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Sample records for beam biomechanical study

  1. Multidimensional characterisation of biomechanical structures by combining Atomic Force Microscopy and Focused Ion Beam: A study of the rat whisker.

    PubMed

    Adineh, Vahid Reza; Liu, Boyin; Rajan, Ramesh; Yan, Wenyi; Fu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of biological structures, particularly at the micro/nano scale can offer insights valuable for multidisciplinary research in tissue engineering and biomimicry designs. Here we propose to combine nanocharacterisation tools, particularly Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for three dimensional mapping of mechanical modulus and chemical signatures. The prototype platform is applied to image and investigate the fundamental mechanics of the rat face whiskers, a high-acuity sensor used to gain detailed information about the world. Grazing angle FIB milling was first applied to expose the interior cross section of the rat whisker sample, followed by a "lift-out" method to retrieve and position the target sample for further analyses. AFM force spectroscopy measurements revealed a non-uniform pattern of elastic modulus across the cross section, with a range from 0.8GPa to 13.5GPa. The highest elastic modulus was found at the outer cuticle region of the whisker, and values gradually decreased towards the interior cortex and medulla regions. Elemental mapping with EDS confirmed that the interior of the rat whisker is dominated by C, O, N, S, Cl and K, with a significant change of elemental distribution close to the exterior cuticle region. Based on these data, a novel comprehensive three dimensional (3D) elastic modulus model was constructed, and stress distributions under realistic conditions were investigated with Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The simulations could well account for the passive whisker deflections, with calculated resonant frequency as well as force-deflection for the whiskers being in good agreement with reported experimental data. Limitations and further applications are discussed for the proposed FIB/AFM approach, which holds good promise as a unique platform to gain insights on various heterogeneous biomaterials and biomechanical systems.

  2. Multidimensional characterisation of biomechanical structures by combining Atomic Force Microscopy and Focused Ion Beam: A study of the rat whisker.

    PubMed

    Adineh, Vahid Reza; Liu, Boyin; Rajan, Ramesh; Yan, Wenyi; Fu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of biological structures, particularly at the micro/nano scale can offer insights valuable for multidisciplinary research in tissue engineering and biomimicry designs. Here we propose to combine nanocharacterisation tools, particularly Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for three dimensional mapping of mechanical modulus and chemical signatures. The prototype platform is applied to image and investigate the fundamental mechanics of the rat face whiskers, a high-acuity sensor used to gain detailed information about the world. Grazing angle FIB milling was first applied to expose the interior cross section of the rat whisker sample, followed by a "lift-out" method to retrieve and position the target sample for further analyses. AFM force spectroscopy measurements revealed a non-uniform pattern of elastic modulus across the cross section, with a range from 0.8GPa to 13.5GPa. The highest elastic modulus was found at the outer cuticle region of the whisker, and values gradually decreased towards the interior cortex and medulla regions. Elemental mapping with EDS confirmed that the interior of the rat whisker is dominated by C, O, N, S, Cl and K, with a significant change of elemental distribution close to the exterior cuticle region. Based on these data, a novel comprehensive three dimensional (3D) elastic modulus model was constructed, and stress distributions under realistic conditions were investigated with Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The simulations could well account for the passive whisker deflections, with calculated resonant frequency as well as force-deflection for the whiskers being in good agreement with reported experimental data. Limitations and further applications are discussed for the proposed FIB/AFM approach, which holds good promise as a unique platform to gain insights on various heterogeneous biomaterials and biomechanical systems. PMID:25839121

  3. Biomechanics or Necromechanics? Or How to Interpret Biomechanical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    The field of biomechanics is inextricably linked with orthopaedic surgery: loads and load distribution play a major role in the problems we treat and in the success and failure of many of our treatments. Nonetheless, despite powerful investigational tools, I would argue biomechanics has made a relatively minor impact in clinical practice primarily because most studies fail to account for the major distinction between living and nonliving systems: adaptability. While any study requires a clear question or hypothesis or goal, without accounting for adaptability and tissue tolerance, these studies might well be termed "necromechanical." These studies will always have limited clinical relevance unless they contain several key features: 1.) A choice of a mechanical parameter which is arguably a surrogate for relevant biological behavior; 2.) A set of loading regimens which arguably represent the entire range of loadings experienced in vivo; 3.) An explicit discussion of tissue tolerance to the mechanical perturbations of the study; 4.) When appropriate (i.e., the question relates to longer-term effects), an explicit exploration of tissue adaptation over time. Without meeting these requirements, any biomechanical study is suspect and requires interpretation with great caution. When meeting these requirements, biomechanics can provide powerful tools to explain the function of the body and to predict the success or failure of treatments prior to using them on patients. PMID:12180603

  4. A biomechanical approach for in vivo lung tumor motion prediction during external beam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Elham; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2015-03-01

    Lung Cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. Among various treatment methods currently being used in the clinic, External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) is used widely not only as the primary treatment method, but also in combination with chemotherapy and surgery. However, this method may lack desirable dosimetric accuracy because of respiration induced tumor motion. Recently, biomechanical modeling of the respiratory system has become a popular approach for tumor motion prediction and compensation. This approach requires reasonably accurate data pertaining to thoracic pressure variation, diaphragm position and biomechanical properties of the lung tissue in order to predict the lung tissue deformation and tumor motion. In this paper, we present preliminary results of an in vivo study obtained from a Finite Element Model (FEM) of the lung developed to predict tumor motion during respiration.

  5. Biomechanics of Distance Running: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.; Gregor, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Training for distance running over a long period produces meaningful changes in the running mechanics of experienced runners, as revealed in this longitudinal study of the biomechanical components of stride length, stride rate, stride time, and support and nonsupport time. (MB)

  6. Biomechanical and Histological Evaluation of Roughened Surface Titanium Screws Fabricated by Electron Beam Melting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Cai, Hong; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Ke; Leng, Huijie; Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, Zhongjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Various fabrication methods are used to improve the stability and osseointegration of screws within the host bone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting can provide better stability and osseointegration as compared with smooth titanium screws in sheep cervical vertebrae. Methods Roughened surface titanium screws, fabricated by electron beam melting, and conventional smooth surface titanium screws were implanted into sheep for 6 or 12 weeks (groups A and B, respectively). Bone ingrowth and implant stability were assessed with three-dimensional imaging and reconstruction, as well as histological and biomechanical tests. Results No screws in either group showed signs of loosening. Fibrous tissue formation could be seen around the screws at 6 weeks, which was replaced with bone at 12 weeks. Bone volume/total volume, bone surface area/bone volume, and the trabecular number were significantly higher for a define region of interest surrounding the roughened screws than that surrounding the smooth screws at 12 weeks. Indeed, for roughened screws, trabecular number was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks. On mechanical testing, the maximum pullout strength was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks, as expected; however, no significant differences were found between smooth and roughened screws at either time point. The maximum torque to extract the roughened screws was higher than that required for the smooth screws. Conclusions Electron beam melting is a simple and effective method for producing a roughened surface on titanium screws. After 12 weeks, roughened titanium screws demonstrated a high degree of osseointegration and increased torsional resistance to extraction over smooth titanium screws. PMID:24788866

  7. Humeral fractures by arm wrestling in adult: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzini, Alessio; Pedrazzoni, Mario; De Filippo, Massimo; Nicoletto, Gianni; Govoni, Riccardo; Ceccarelli, Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Humeral shaft fractures may occur as a result of arm wrestling. We discuss the biomechanics of this rare injury mechanism. Using Strength of materials concepts, Computerized Tomography and Bone Density Scans we studied the biomechanical and anatomical conditions that predispose to this particular fracture. An unfavorable ratio between inner-outer diameter and a low bone mineral concentration in the distal third of humerus compared to other sections of bone were seen as critical aspects. The biomechanical study observed the primary importance of these factors to explain the typical shape and location of this fracture. These results indicate that each arm wrestler should be conscious of the risks of practicing this activity. (www.actabiomedica.it).

  8. Using Clinical Gait Case Studies to Enhance Learning in Biomechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Clinical case studies facilitate the development of clinical reasoning strategies through knowledge and integration of the basic sciences. Case studies have been shown to be more effective in developing problem-solving abilities than the traditional lecture format. To enhance the learning experiences of students in biomechanics, clinical case…

  9. A biomechanical study on fracture risks in ulnohumeral arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Degreef, I; Van Audekercke, R; Boogmans, T; De Smet, L

    2011-06-01

    In the Outerbridge-Kashiwagi ulnohumeral arthroplasty, bone strength may be weakened significantly as a result of the humeral fenestration. Therefore, fracture risks may be increased, particularly in the immediate postoperative period. The objective of this biomechanical cadaver study is to study the humeral bone strength after ulnohumeral arthroplasty. A biomechanical cadaveric study was done in which differences in force needed to fracture the humerus with and without fenestration was measured. First, the diaphysis of 12 distal humeri was embedded and a posterior force was applied until a fracture occurred. Second, a similar study was done with fixed humeral columns, to specifically compare the column strength. In the first part, the force needed to fracture was reduced by 17% after ulnohumeral arthroplasty, which was not statistically significant. However, a shift in the fracture pattern occurred: from diaphyseal fracture towards column fractures after the arthroplasty. In the second part, the force needed to fracture the columns proved to be significantly reduced by 41% after humeral perforation. Alterations in the biomechanical properties of the distal humerus after ulnohumeral arthroplasty may lead to a shift in fracture patterns from diaphyseal to column fractures. The strength of the columns is strongly reduced by 41%. PMID:21592841

  10. Segmentation algorithms for ear image data towards biomechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana; Gentil, Fernanda; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the segmentation, i.e. the identification, of ear structures in video-otoscopy, computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) image data, has gained significant importance in the medical imaging area, particularly those in CT and MR imaging. Segmentation is the fundamental step of any automated technique for supporting the medical diagnosis and, in particular, in biomechanics studies, for building realistic geometric models of ear structures. In this paper, a review of the algorithms used in ear segmentation is presented. The review includes an introduction to the usually biomechanical modelling approaches and also to the common imaging modalities. Afterwards, several segmentation algorithms for ear image data are described, and their specificities and difficulties as well as their advantages and disadvantages are identified and analysed using experimental examples. Finally, the conclusions are presented as well as a discussion about possible trends for future research concerning the ear segmentation.

  11. Musculoskeletal demands on flamenco dancers: a clinical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bejjani, F J; Halpern, N; Pio, A; Dominguez, R; Voloshin, A; Frankel, V H

    1988-04-01

    The flamenco dancer acts on the floor like a drummer. The percussive footwork and vibration patterns created during dancing impose unusual demands on the musculoskeletal system. This study investigated the clinical and biomechanical aspects of this task. Using the electrodynogram and skin-mounted accelerometers, foot pressures as well as hip and knee vibrations were recorded in 10 female dancers after a thorough clinical evaluation. A health questionnaire was also distributed to 29 dancers. Foot pressures and acceleration data reveal the percussive nature of the dance. Some clinical findings, like calluses, are related to pressure distribution. Urogenital disorders, as well as back and neck pain, may be related to the vibrations generated by the flamenco dance form. The hip joint seems to absorb most of the impacts. "Vibration-pressure" diagrams are suggested as a useful tool for evaluating a dancer's biomechanical behavior, as well as the effect of floors and footwear on this behavior. PMID:3366430

  12. Valgus torque in youth baseball pitchers: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Sabick, Michelle B; Torry, Michael R; Lawton, Richard L; Hawkins, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical and anthropometric factors contributing to elbow valgus torque during pitching. Video data of 14 youth pitchers throwing fastballs were used to calculate shoulder and elbow kinematics and kinetics. Peak elbow valgus torque averaged 18 Nm and occurred just before maximal shoulder external rotation. The magnitude of valgus torque was most closely correlated with the thrower's weight. When subject weight and height were controlled for, maximum shoulder abduction torque and maximum shoulder internal rotation torque were most strongly associated with elbow valgus torque, accounting for 85% of its variance (P <.001). When only kinematic variables were considered, maximum shoulder external rotation accounted for 33% of the variance in valgus torque. Given that the biomechanical variables correlated with peak valgus torque are not easily modifiable, limiting the number of innings pitched is likely the best way to reduce elbow injury in youth pitchers.

  13. Single-beam, dual-view digital holographic interferometry for biomechanical strain measurements of biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelić, Dejan V.; Grujić, Dušan Ž.; Vasiljević, Darko M.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a method for dual-view biomechanical strain measurements of highly asymmetrical biological objects, like teeth or bones. By using a spherical mirror, we were able to simultaneously record a digital hologram of the object itself and the mirror image of its (otherwise invisible) rear side. A single laser beam was sufficient to illuminate both sides of the object, and to provide a reference beam. As a result, the system was mechanically very stable, enabling long exposure times (up to 2 min) without the need for vibration isolation. The setup is simple to construct and adjust, and can be used to interferometrically observe any object that is smaller than the mirror diameter. Parallel data processing on a CUDA-enabled (compute unified device architecture) graphics card was used to reconstruct digital holograms and to further correct image distortion. We used the setup to measure the deformation of a tooth due to mastication forces. The finite-element method was used to compare experimental results and theoretical predictions.

  14. Biomechanical study of patellofemoral joint instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavongse, Wongwit

    2005-04-01

    Patellofemoral joint instability is a complex clinical problem. It may be a consequence of pre-existing anatomical abnormality or trauma. The objectives of this study were to use experimental mechanics to measure patellar stability and to quantify the effects of pathological abnormalities on patellar stability in vitro. Eight fresh-frozen cadaver knees were studies. The patellar stability was measured using an Instron material testing machine. A total load of 175N was applied to the quadriceps muscles. Patellar force-displacement was tested at different knee flexion angles as the patella was cyclically displaced 10mm laterally and medially. Three pathological abnormalities were applied; VMO malfunction, flat lateral trochlea, and medial retinacular structure rupturing. For the first time, this study has shown comparative and quantitative influence of pathological abnormalities on patellar stability. It was found that a flat lateral trochlea has greater effect than the medial retinacular rupturing whereas the medial retinacular rupturing has greater effect than VMO malfunction on patellar lateral stability. These results are important for future investigations on the treatment of patellofemoral instability.

  15. Biomechanical study of the pitching elbow.

    PubMed

    Hang, Y S; Lippert, F G; Spolek, G A; Frankel, V H; Harrington, R M

    1979-01-01

    Medial-tension injuries of the pitching elbow are well recognized. One contributing factor is the extreme valgus which has been noted to occur during the acceleration phase of throwing. It is hypothesized that breaking pitches generate higher medial loading because of the pronation and supination required to impart spin to the ball. The pitching motion is a complex action of all body segments to produce maximum linear and angular acceleration of the ball. The purpose of this study was to correlate elbow loading with pitching style. We measured the forearm segment for axial and tangential (varus-valgus plane) acceleration using accelerometers attached to the forearm and hand. Muscle activity was measured by EMG. Forearm rotation was assessed by stroboscopic photography. Despite different delivery styles when throwing breaking pitches, each pitcher demonstrated patterns of muscle activity and acceleration which were similar. Deceleration forces were lower than acceleration forces. Pronation and supination were documented and contribute to the direction of ball spin. Accelerometers can be used to evaluate pitching mechanics. We suggest that the main factors causing an elbow injury are the amount of throwing and the force with which the ball is thrown.

  16. Absorbable scaphoid screw development: a comparative study on biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Song, Muguo; Xu, Yongqing; He, Xiaoqing; Zhu, YueLiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The scaphoid is critical for maintaining the stability and movement of the wrist joints. This study aimed to develop a new internal fixator absorbable scaphoid screw (ASS) for fixation of the scaphoid waist after fracture and to test the biomechanical characteristics of ASS. Materials and methods An ASS was prepared using polylactic acids and designed based on scaphoid measurements and anatomic features. Twenty fractured scaphoid waist specimens were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n=10/group). Reduction and internal fixation of the scaphoid were achieved with either Kirschner wires (K-wires) or ASS. A moving target simulator was used to test palmar flexion and dorsal extension, with the range of testing (waist movement) set from 5° of palmar flexion to 25° of dorsal extension. Flexion and extension were repeated 2,000 times for each specimen. Fracture gap displacements were measured with a computerized tomography scanning. Scaphoid tensile and bending strengths were measured by using a hydraulic pressure biomechanical system. Results Prior to biomechanical fatigue testing, fracture gap displacements were 0.16±0.02 mm and 0.22±0.02 mm in the ASS and K-wire groups, respectively. After fatigue testing, fracture gap displacements in the ASS and the K-wire groups were 0.21±0.03 mm and 1.52±0.07 mm, respectively. The tensile strengths for the ASS and K-wire groups were 0.95±0.02 MPa and 0.63±0.02 MPa, respectively. Conclusion Fixation using an ASS provided sufficient mechanical support for the scaphoid after fracture. PMID:27217756

  17. Fractionation of 50kGy electron beam irradiation: effects on biomechanics of human flexor digitorum superficialis tendons treated with ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Yang, Xu; Tian, Shaoqi; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Zhaoning; Hu, Baiqiang; Tian, Zhen; Sun, Kang

    2013-02-22

    The electron beam (Ebeam) irradiation has begun to be considered as an efficient alternative to gamma irradiation in the sterilization of allografts in the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of human tendons after exposure to electron beam and free radical scavenger ascorbate. Forty human flexor digitorum superficialis tendons were prepared from five fresh cadavers and divided randomly into four groups: A, fresh (0kGy); B, 50kGy Ebeam irradiation; C, fractionated 50kGy Ebeam irradiation; D, fractionated 50kGy Ebeam on ascorbate-treated tendons. The fractionation of 50kGy was achieved by repeated irradiation of 2.5kGy for 20 repetitions. Biomechanical properties were analyzed during load-to-failure testing. The fresh tendons were found to be significant different in ultimate load, ultimate elongation relative to tendons in group B. Statistical differences were found between group B and C in ultimate load. No differences were detected between group A and C in all the parameters. Compare tendons in group C and D, significant differences were found in ultimate load and ultimate stress. It is recommended that fractionated 50kGy electron beam irradiation and free radical scavenger ascorbate should be applied in the sterilization of allografts tendons.

  18. Clinical, biomechanical and histological study on oophorectomy induced menopause

    PubMed Central

    Bordinhon, Maristela; Müller, Sérgio Swain; Silva, Maeli Dal Pai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical implications as well as biomechanical and histological changes and in bone tissue induced by ovariectomy in 64 rats. Methods: The rats were divided into two groups: bilateral oophorectomy or placebo, and subdivided into four subgroups, according to time postoperatively: three, six, nine and 12 months. The weight of the animals at the time of sacrifice was taken into consideration. The biomechanical study was performed on the right tibia, to the maximum load and stiffness coefficient. For the histological study we calculated the trabecular bone of the left tibia. Statistical analysis of body weight and mechanical properties was performed by variance analysis, complemented with Tukey's multiple comparison tests; and trabecular area, the non-parametric variance analysis. Results: Ovariectomy-induced menopause caused an increase in body weight, reduction of diaphyseal bone resistance at six months of hormone deprivation, but this effect is equalized over time by aging; bone stiffness was smaller in the ovariectomized group and reduction of bone mass occurred. Conclusion: The removal of the ovaries produced systemic alterations, characterized by metabolic changes that caused weight gain and changes in bone tissue, associated with alteration of the mechanical profile and reduced bone mass. Level of Evidence I, Clinical Study. PMID:25328434

  19. [Recent Advances of Biomechanical Studies on Cervical Fusion and Non-fusion Surgery].

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhenhua; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-02-01

    This article reviews the progress of biomechanical studies on anterior cervical fusion and non-fusion surgery in recent years. The similarities and differences between animal and human cervical spines as well as the major three biomechanical test methods are introduced. Major progresses of biomechanical evaluation in anterior cervical fusion and non-fusion devices, hybrid surgery, coupled motion and biomechanical parameters, such as the instant center of rotation, are classified and summarized. Future development of loading method, multilevel hybrid surgery and coupling character are also discussed. PMID:27382760

  20. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation.

  1. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation. PMID:25801423

  2. [Biomechanical studies on two thoracolumbar implants in cadaveric spine].

    PubMed

    Lun, B; Zhou, Y; Zhou, J

    2001-03-01

    The aim of these studies was to evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of two devices and provide information for clinical choice. In vitro cadaveric spine testing which consisted of the stability test and the yield strength test was performed. In hemicorpectomy model, the AF was stiffer than the Kaneda in flexion, extension and left lateral bending (P < 0.01). In total corpectomy model, the AF was stiffer than the Kaneda in flexion, left lateral bending and axial rotation (P < 0.01). The average values of yield strength(M) for the Kaneda, the AF and the intact were 477.3 kg, 544.4 kg and 493.6 kg resectively. The stability of the AF is superior to that of the Kaneda. In total corpectomy, the Kaneda is significantly unstable in axial rotation. Both devices restore effectively load carrying capacity of the spine. PMID:11332106

  3. Sterilization with electron beam irradiation influences the biomechanical properties and the early remodeling of tendon allografts for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tanja; Hoburg, Arnd; Broziat, Christine; Smith, Mark D; Gohs, Uwe; Pruss, Axel; Scheffler, Sven

    2012-08-01

    Although allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement have shown advantages compared to autografts, their use is limited due to the risk of disease transmission and the limitations of available sterilization methods. Gamma sterilization has shown detrimental effects on graft properties at the high doses required for sufficient pathogen inactivation. In our previous in vitro study on human patellar tendon allografts, Electron beam (Ebeam) irradiation showed less detrimental effects compared to gamma sterilization (Hoburg et al. in Am J Sports Med 38(6):1134-1140, 2010). To investigate the biological healing and restoration of the mechanical properties of a 34 kGy Ebeam treated tendon allograft twenty-four sheep underwent ACL replacement with either a 34 kGy Ebeam treated allograft or a non-sterilized fresh frozen allograft. Biomechanical testing of stiffness, ultimate failure load and AP-laxity as well as histological analysis to investigate cell, vessel and myofibroblast-density were performed after 6 and 12 weeks. Native sheep ACL and hamstring tendons (HAT, each n = 9) served as controls. The results of a previous study analyzing the remodeling of fresh frozen allografts (n = 12) and autografts (Auto, n = 18) with the same study design were also included in the analysis. Statistics were performed using Mann-Whitney U test followed by Bonferroni-Holm correction. Results showed significantly decreased biomechanical properties during the early remodeling period in Ebeam treated grafts and this was accompanied with an increased remodeling activity. There was no recovery of biomechanical function from 6 to 12 weeks in this group in contrast to the results observed in fresh frozen allografts and autografts. Therefore, high dose Ebeam irradiation investigated in this paper cannot be recommended for soft tissue allograft sterilization.

  4. Study of beam-beam effects in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2010-05-23

    Beam-beam effects in eRHIC have a number of unique features, which distinguish them from both hadron and lepton colliders. Due to beam-beam interaction, both electron and hadron beams would suffer quality degradation or beam loss from without proper treatments. Those features need novel study and dedicate countermeasures. We study the beam dynamics and resulting luminosity of the characteristics, including mismatch, disruption and pinch effects on electron beam, in additional to their consequences on the opposing beam as a wake field and other incoherent effects of hadron beam. We also carry out countermeasures to prevent beam quality degrade and coherent instability.

  5. A comparative study on complete and implant retained denture treatments: a biomechanics perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Suenaga, Hanako; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Although implant-retained overdenture allows edentulous patients to take higher occlusal forces than the conventional complete dentures, the biomechanical influences have not been explored yet. Clinically, there is limited knowledge and means for predicting localized bone remodelling after denture treatment with and without implant support. By using finite element (FE) analysis, this article provides an in-silico approach to exploring the treatment effects on the oral mucosa and potential resorption of residual ridge under three different denture configurations in a patient-specific manner. Based on cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scans, a 3D heterogeneous FE model was created; and the supportive tissue, mucosa, was characterized as a hyperelastic material. A measured occlusal load (63N) was applied onto three virtual models, namely complete denture, two and four implant-retained overdentures. Clinically, the bone resorption was measured after one year in the two implant-retained overdenture treatment. Despite the improved stability and enhanced masticatory function, the implant-retained overdentures demonstrated higher hydrostatic stress in mucosa (43.6kPa and 39.9kPa for two and four implants) at the posterior ends of the mandible due to the cantilever effect, than the complete denture (33.4kPa). Hydrostatic pressure in the mucosa signifies a critical indicator and can be correlated with clinically measured bone resorption, pointing to severer mandibular ridge resorption posteriorly with implant-retained overdentures. This study provides a biomechanical basis for denture treatment planning to improve long-term outcomes with minimal residual ridge resorption.

  6. Aggrecan: approaches to study biophysical and biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Aggrecan, the most abundant extracellular proteoglycan in cartilage (~35 % by dry weight), plays a key role in the biophysical and biomechanical properties of cartilage. Here, we review several approaches based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the physical, mechanical, and structural properties of aggrecan at the molecular level. These approaches probe the response of aggrecan over a wide time (frequency) scale, ranging from equilibrium to impact dynamic loading. Experimental and theoretical methods are described for the investigation of electrostatic and fluid-solid interactions that are key mechanisms underlying the biomechanical and physicochemical functions of aggrecan. Using AFM-based imaging and nanoindentation, ultrastructural features of aggrecan are related to its mechanical properties, based on aggrecans harvested from human vs. bovine, immature vs. mature, and healthy vs. osteoarthritic cartilage. PMID:25325957

  7. A Novel Fixation System for Acetabular Quadrilateral Plate Fracture: A Comparative Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Guo-Chun; Sun, Jun-Ying; Dong, Sheng-Jie; Zhang, Wen; Luo, Zong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the biomechanical properties of a novel fixation system (named AFRIF) and to compare it with other five different fixation techniques for quadrilateral plate fractures. This in vitro biomechanical experiment has shown that the multidirectional titanium fixation (MTF) and pelvic brim long screws fixation (PBSF) provided the strongest fixation for quadrilateral plate fracture; the better biomechanical performance of the AFRIF compared with the T-shaped plate fixation (TPF), L-shaped plate fixation (LPF), and H-shaped plate fixation (HPF); AFRIF gives reasonable stability of treatment for quadrilateral plate fracture and may offer a better solution for comminuted quadrilateral plate fractures or free floating medial wall fracture and be reliable in preventing protrusion of femoral head. PMID:25802849

  8. Quantitative methods for reconstructing tissue biomechanical properties in optical coherence elastography: a comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Sudheendran, Narendran; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the accuracy of five different methods for extracting the biomechanical properties of soft samples using optical coherence elastography (OCE). OCE is an emerging noninvasive technique, which allows assessing biomechanical properties of tissues with a micrometer spatial resolution. However, in order to accurately extract biomechanical properties from OCE measurements, application of proper mechanical model is required. In this study, we utilize tissue-mimicking phantoms with controlled elastic properties and investigate the feasibilities of four available methods for reconstructing elasticity (Young’s modulus) based on OCE measurements of an air-pulse induced elastic wave. The approaches are based on the shear wave equation (SWE), the surface wave equation (SuWE), Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation (RLFE), and finite element method (FEM), Elasticity values were compared with uniaxial mechanical testing. The results show that the RLFE and the FEM are more robust in quantitatively assessing elasticity than the other simplified models. This study provides a foundation and reference for reconstructing the biomechanical properties of tissues from OCE data, which is important for the further development of noninvasive elastography methods. PMID:25860076

  9. Merged beams studies for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Miller, Kenneth A.; O'Connor, Aodh P.; de Ruette, Nathalie; Stuetzel, Julia; Urbain, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    The chain of chemical reactions leading towards life is thought to begin in molecular clouds when atomic carbon and oxygen react with H3+,leading to the formation of complex organic molecules and of water. Uncertainties in the rate coefficients for these reactions hinder our ability to understand the first links in the chemical chain leading towards life. Theory and experiment have yet to converge in either the magnitude or temperature dependence. We have developed a novel merged beam apparatus to study these reactions at the low collision energies relevant for molecular cloud studies. Photodetachment of atomic anion beams is used to produce beams of neutral C and O, each in their ground term as occurs in molecular clouds. The neutral beam is then merged with a velocity matched, co-propagating H3+beam. The merged beams method allows us to use fast beams (keV in the lab frame), which are easy to handle and monitor, while being able to achieve relative collision energies down to ~ 10 meV. Using the measured merged-beams rate coefficient, we are able to extract cross sections that we can then convolve with a Maxwellian energy spread to generate a thermal rate coefficient for molecular cloud temperatures. Here we report recent results. This work was funded, in part, by the NSF Division of Astronomical Sciences.

  10. Experimental Studies of beam-beam effects in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaji Sen et al.

    2003-06-09

    The long-range beam-beam interactions limit the achievable luminosity in the Tevatron. During the past year several studies ere performed on ways of removing the limitations at all stages of the operational cycle. The authors report here on some of these studies, including the effects of changing the helical orbits at injection and collision, tune and chromaticity scans and coupling due to the beam-beam interactions.

  11. Evaluation of tendon healing using fibroblast like synoviocytes in rabbits: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Azad-Tirgan, Mahboobeh; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid; Malekinejad, Hassan; Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Heshmatian, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Several techniques are available for tissue-engineered biological augmentation for tendon healing like stem cells. Recently, synovium has been investigated as a source of cells for tissue engineering. In the present study, we investigated potentials of fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLSs) in tendon healing. Sixteen rabbits were divided randomly into control and treatment groups. One rabbit was used as a donor of synovial membrane (synovium). The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT). Subsequently, the tendon stumps were sutured with 3/0 nylon. In treatment group, 0.1 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing 1 × 10(6) nucleated cells of FLSs was injected intratendinously at both tendon stumps just next to incision line. In control group, 0.1 mL PBS without FLSs was used for intratendinous injection. Model animals were euthanized at eight weeks, DDFTs were harvested and prepared for biomechanical study. Results of study showed that, there was no significant differences in biomechanical parameters values between FLSs treated and control groups. In conclusion, intratendinous injection of FLSs did not improve biomechanical properties during eight weeks in rabbit. PMID:27226883

  12. Evaluation of tendon healing using fibroblast like synoviocytes in rabbits: A biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Azad-Tirgan, Mahboobeh; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid; Malekinejad, Hassan; Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Heshmatian, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Several techniques are available for tissue-engineered biological augmentation for tendon healing like stem cells. Recently, synovium has been investigated as a source of cells for tissue engineering. In the present study, we investigated potentials of fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLSs) in tendon healing. Sixteen rabbits were divided randomly into control and treatment groups. One rabbit was used as a donor of synovial membrane (synovium). The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT). Subsequently, the tendon stumps were sutured with 3/0 nylon. In treatment group, 0.1 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing 1 × 106 nucleated cells of FLSs was injected intratendinously at both tendon stumps just next to incision line. In control group, 0.1 mL PBS without FLSs was used for intratendinous injection. Model animals were euthanized at eight weeks, DDFTs were harvested and prepared for biomechanical study. Results of study showed that, there was no significant differences in biomechanical parameters values between FLSs treated and control groups. In conclusion, intratendinous injection of FLSs did not improve biomechanical properties during eight weeks in rabbit. PMID:27226883

  13. Biomechanical and lifestyle risk factors for medial tibia stress syndrome in army recruits: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jagannath; Golby, Jim; Greeves, Julie; Spears, Iain R

    2011-03-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common injury in active populations and has been suggested to be a result of both biomechanical and lifestyle factors. The main aim of this study was to determine prospectively whether gait biomechanics and lifestyle factors can be used as a predictor of MTSS development. British infantry male recruits (n=468) were selected for the study. Plantar pressure variables, lifestyle factors comprising smoking habit and aerobic fitness as measured by a 1.5 mile timed-run were collected on the first day of training. Injury data were collected during the 26 week training period and incidence rate was 7.9% (n=37). A logistic regression model for membership of the MTSS and non-MTSS groups was developed. An imbalance in foot pressure with greater pressure on the medial side than on the lateral side was the primary risk factor. Low aerobic fitness, as deduced from a 1.5 mile timed-run and smoking habit were also important, but were additive risk factors for MTSS. In conclusion, "poor" biomechanics were the strongest predictors of MTSS development but lifestyle factors were also important. The logistic regression model combining all three risk factors was capable of predicting 96.9% of the non-injured group and 67.5% of the MTSS group with an overall accuracy of 87.7%. While the model has yet to be validated against an external sample and limitations exist with regards to the quality of the data collected, it is nonetheless suggested that the combined analysis of biomechanical and lifestyle factors has the potential to improve the prediction of MTSS. PMID:21247766

  14. Merged Beams Studies for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; O'Connor, Aodh P.; de Ruette, Nathalie; Miller, Kenneth; Stuetzel, Julia; Urbain, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    The chain of chemical reactions leading towards life is thought to begin in molecular clouds when atomic C and O are fixed into molecules. Reactions of neutral C with H3+ is one of the first steps in the gas-phase chemistry leading to the formation of complex organic molecules. Water, believed to be vital for life, can form via a chain of gas-phase reactions that begin with neutral O reacting with H3+. Uncertainties in the rate coefficient for these reactions hinder our ability to understand the first links in the chemical chain leading towards life. Theory provides little insight as fully quantum mechanical calculations for reactions involving four or more atoms are beyond current capabilities. Experimental data are sparse due to the challenge of producing sufficiently intense and well-characterized beams of neutral atoms.We have developed a novel merged-beam apparatus to study reactions of neutral atoms with molecular ions at the low collision energies relevant for molecular clouds. Photo-detachment of keV-energy atomic anion beams is used to produce beams of neutral C and O. A velocity-matched H3+ beam is then merged with the neutrals. The merged-beams method allows us to achieve kinetic temperatures below 30 K. Using our results, we are able to generate thermal rate coefficients for use in chemical models of molecular clouds.

  15. Merged beam studies for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ruette, Nathalie; Miller, Kenneth A.; O'Connor, Aodh; Stuetzel, Julia; Urbain, Xavier; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2014-06-01

    The chain of chemical reactions leading towards life is thought to begin in molecular clouds when atomic carbon and oxygen are fixed into molecules. Reactions of neutral atomic C with H3+ is one of the first steps in the gas phase chemistry leading to the formation of complex organic molecules within such clouds. Water, believed to be vital for life, can form via a chain of gas-phase astrochemical reactions that begin with neutral atomic O reacting with H3+. Uncertainties in the thermal rate coefficient for these reactions hinder our ability to understand the first links in the chemical chain leading towards life. Theory and experiment have yet to converge in either the magnitude or temperature dependence. Theory provides little insight as fully quantum mechanical calculations for reactions involving four or more atoms are too complex for current capabilities. On the other hand, measurements of cross sections and rate coefficients for reactions of atoms with molecular ions are extremely challenging. This is due to the difficulty in producing sufficiently intense and well characterized beams of neutral atoms. We have developed a novel merged beam apparatus to study reactions of neutral atoms with molecular ions at the low collision energies relevant for molecular cloud studies. Photodetachment of atomic anion beams, with an 808-nm (1.53-eV) laser beam, is used to produce beams of neutral C and O, each in their ground term as occurs in molecular clouds. The neutral beam is then merged with a velocity matched, co-propagating H3+ beam, in order to study reactions of C and O on H3+. The merged beams method allows us to use fast beams (keV in the lab frame), which are easy to handle and monitor, while being able to achieve relative collision energies down to ≈10 meV. Using the measured merged beams rate coefficient, we are able to extract cross sections which we can then convolve with a Maxwellian energy spread to generate a thermal rate coefficient for molecular cloud

  16. Morphological and biomechanical studies on the common calcaneal tendon in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jopp, I; Reese, S

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture at the distal part of the gastrocnemius tendon (GT) is the second most common non-traumatic tendon injury in dogs, whereas the other strands of the common calcaneal tendon do not seem to have a predisposition to rupture. In order to discover why we investigated the common calcaneal tendons of 63 dogs microscopically and biomechanically. Both the gastrocnemius and superficial digital flexor tendon (SFT) had multiple low vascularized fibrocartilaginous areas within their distal course as opposed to regular parallel fibered areas in the proximal tendon areas. Biomechanical testing revealed that the distal sections in both tendons show a 50% and 70% lower tensile strength (F(max)/kg BW) than the proximal sections (p<0.01), respectively. On the contrary, tensile load (F(max)/mm(2)) only differed minimally between proximal and distal sections in both tendons (8% and 9%, respectively), whereas the tensile load of the distal gastrocnemius tendon is 35% lower than of the distal superficial flexor tendon (p<0.01). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to experimentally show that there are different biomechanical properties within the same tendon. The maximum load to failure is lower in the GT compared to the SFT within the same dog which explains its higher incidence of rupture in the field. The avascular fibrocartilaginous structure in the distal gastrocnemius tendon seems to play a further role in the pathogenesis of spontaneous rupture.

  17. Longitudinal Study in Male Swimmers: A Hierachical Modeling of Energetics and Biomechanical Contributions for Performance

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Mário J.; Bragada, José A.; Marinho, Daniel A.; Lopes, Vitor P.; Silva, António J.; Barbosa, Tiago M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pooled and individual response of male swimmers over two consecutive years of training and identify the energetic and biomechanical factors that most contributed for the final performance. Nine competitive swimmers (20.0 ± 3.54 years old; 10.1 ± 3.41 years of training experience; 1.79 ± 0.07 m of height; 71.34 ± 8.78 kg of body mass; 22.35 ± 2.02 kg·m-2 of body mass index; 1.86 ± 0.07 m of arm span; 116.22 ± 4.99 s of personal record in the 200 m long course freestyle event) performed an incremental test in six occasions to obtain the velocity at 4 mmol of blood lactate (V4) and the peak blood lactate concentrations (Lapeak) as energetics, and the stroke frequency (SF), stroke length (SL), stroke index and swim efficiency as biomechanical variables. Performance was determined based on official time’s lists of 200 m freestyle event. Slight non-significant improvements in performance were determined throughout the two season period. All energetic and biomechanical factors also presented slight non-significant variations with training. Swimmers demonstrat-ed high inter-individual differences in the annual adaptations. The best performance predictors were the V4, SF and SL. Each unit of change V4, SF and SL represented an enhancement of 0.11 s, 1.21 s and 0.36 s in performance, respectively. The results show that: (i) competitive male swimmers need at least two consecutive seasons to have slight improvements in performance, energetics and biomechanical profiles; (ii) major improvements in competition performance can be accomplished by improving the V4, SF and SL based on the individual background. Key Points Elite swimmers are able to demonstrate slight changes in performance, energetic and biomechanical characteristics at least during two seasons of training; Additional improvements in competition performance can be accomplished by manipulating the V4, SF and SL based on the individual background. Each unit of change V

  18. Development of a Distance Learning Study Guide in Biomechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Brett D.

    The study guide presented here was created primarily from required course texts and recommended readings. A formative committee identified criteria for the content and format of the study guide, provided input on the philosophical and practical requirements, reviewed study guide questions, and provided feedback during the developmental stage. The…

  19. Craniofacial biomechanics: an overview of recent multibody modelling studies

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Multibody modelling is underutilised in craniofacial analyses, particularly when compared to other computational methods such as finite element analysis. However, there are many potential applications within this area, where bony movements, muscle forces, joint kinematics and bite forces can all be studied. This paper provides an overview of recent, three-dimensional, multibody modelling studies related to the analysis of skulls. The goal of this paper is not to offer a critical review of past studies, but instead intends to inform the reader of what has been achieved with multibody modelling. PMID:21062283

  20. Biomechanics of interspinous devices.

    PubMed

    Parchi, Paolo D; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Vertuccio, Antonella; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Cervi, Valentina; Giannetti, Christian; Calvosa, Giuseppe; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A number of interspinous devices (ISD) have been introduced in the lumbar spine implant market. Unfortunately, the use of these devices often is not associated with real comprehension of their biomechanical role. The aim of this paper is to review the biomechanical studies about interspinous devices available in the literature to allow the reader a better comprehension of the effects of these devices on the treated segment and on the adjacent segments of the spine. For this reason, our analysis will be limited to the interspinous devices that have biomechanical studies published in the literature. PMID:25114923

  1. Biomechanics of Interspinous Devices

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo D.; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Vertuccio, Antonella; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Cervi, Valentina; Giannetti, Christian; Calvosa, Giuseppe; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A number of interspinous devices (ISD) have been introduced in the lumbar spine implant market. Unfortunately, the use of these devices often is not associated with real comprehension of their biomechanical role. The aim of this paper is to review the biomechanical studies about interspinous devices available in the literature to allow the reader a better comprehension of the effects of these devices on the treated segment and on the adjacent segments of the spine. For this reason, our analysis will be limited to the interspinous devices that have biomechanical studies published in the literature. PMID:25114923

  2. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace; Marques de Almeida, Adriano; Serbino, José Wilson; da Mota Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Tukey’s tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study). PMID:20454502

  3. Biomechanical study of the tibia in knee replacement revision.

    PubMed

    Quílez, M P; Pérez, M A; Seral-García, B

    2015-01-01

    The best management of severe bone defects following total knee replacement is still controversial. Metal augments, tantalum cones and porous tibial sleeves could help the surgeon to manage any type of bone loss, providing a stable and durable knee joint reconstruction. Five different types of prostheses have been analysed: one prosthesis with straight stem; two prostheses with offset stem, with and without supplement, and two prostheses with sleeves, with and without stem. The purpose of this study is to report a finite element study of revision knee tibial implants. The main objective was to analyse the tibial bone density changes and Von Misses tension changes following different tibial implant designs. In all cases, the bone density decreases in the proximal epiphysis and medullary channels, with a bone density increase also being predicted in the diaphysis and at the bone around the stems tips. The highest value of Von Misses stress has been obtained for the straight tibial stem, and the lowest for the stemless metaphyseal sleeves prosthesis. PMID:25650079

  4. Biomechanical study of the tibia in knee replacement revision.

    PubMed

    Quílez, M P; Pérez, M A; Seral-García, B

    2015-01-01

    The best management of severe bone defects following total knee replacement is still controversial. Metal augments, tantalum cones and porous tibial sleeves could help the surgeon to manage any type of bone loss, providing a stable and durable knee joint reconstruction. Five different types of prostheses have been analysed: one prosthesis with straight stem; two prostheses with offset stem, with and without supplement, and two prostheses with sleeves, with and without stem. The purpose of this study is to report a finite element study of revision knee tibial implants. The main objective was to analyse the tibial bone density changes and Von Misses tension changes following different tibial implant designs. In all cases, the bone density decreases in the proximal epiphysis and medullary channels, with a bone density increase also being predicted in the diaphysis and at the bone around the stems tips. The highest value of Von Misses stress has been obtained for the straight tibial stem, and the lowest for the stemless metaphyseal sleeves prosthesis.

  5. [Biomechanical study of lumbar spine under different vibration conditions].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Pin; Du, Chengfei; Mo, Zhongjun; Gong, He; Wang, Lizhen; Fan, Yubo

    2015-02-01

    We observed the effect of vibration parameters on lumbar spine under different vibration conditions using finite element analysis method in our laboratory. In this study, the CT-images of L1-L5 segments were obtained. All images were used to develop 3D geometrical model using the Mimics10. 01 (Materialise, Belgium). Then it was modified using Geomagic Studio12. 0 (Raindrop Geomagic Inc. USA). Finite element (FE) mesh model was generated by Hypermesh11. 0 (Altair Engineering, Inc. USA) and Abaqus. Abaqus was used to calculate the stress distribution of L1-L5 under different vibration conditions. It was found that in a vibration cycle, tensile stress was occurred on lumbar vertebra mainly. Stress distributed evenly and stress concentration occurred on the left rear side of the upper endplate. The stress had no obvious changes under different frequencies, but the stress was higher when amplitude was greater. In conclusion, frequency and amplitude parameters have little effect on the stress distribution in vertebra. The stress magnitude is positively correlated with the amplitude. PMID:25997265

  6. Studying neuronal biomechanics and its role in CNS development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franze, Kristian; Svoboda, Hanno; da F. Costa, Luciano; Guck, Jochen; Holt, Christine

    2013-03-01

    During the development of the nervous system, neurons migrate and grow over great distances. Currently, our understanding of nervous tissue development is, in large part, based on studies of biochemical signaling. Despite the fact that forces are involved in any kind of cell motion, mechanical aspects have so far rarely been considered. Here we used deformable cell culture substrates, traction force microscopy and calcium imaging to investigate how neurons probe and respond to their mechanical environment. While the growth rate of retinal ganglion cell axons was increased on stiffer substrates, their tendency to grow in bundles, which they show in vivo, was significantly enhanced on more compliant substrates. Moreover, if grown on substrates incorporating linear stiffness gradients, neuronal axons were repelled by stiff substrates. Mechanosensing involved the application of forces driven by the interaction of actin and myosin II, and the activation of stretch-activated ion channels leading to calcium influxes into the cells. Applying a modified atomic force microscopy techniquein vivo, we found mechanical gradients in developing brain tissue along which neurons grow. The application of chondroitin sulfate, which is a major extracellular matrix component in the developing brain, changed tissue mechanics and disrupted axonal pathfinding. Hence, our data suggest that neuronal growth is not only guided by chemical signals - as it is currently assumed - but also by the nervous tissue's mechanical properties.

  7. A biomechanical study of pediatric flexor profundus tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thunayan, Turki A.; Al-Zahrani, Mohammed T.; Hakeem, Ahmad A.; Al-Zahrani, Fahad M.; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the tensile strength of repaired flexor profundus tendons in young lambs, which would be equivalent to repairs in children older than 2 years of age. Methods: A comparative in-vitro experimental study conducted at King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from October 2014 to December 2015. We utilized 30 flexor profundus tendons of young lambs with a width of 4 mm. All tendons were repaired with a 4-strand repair technique using 4/0 polypropylene core sutures. In group I (n=10 tendons), 2 separate figure-of-eight sutures were applied. In group II (n=10 tendons), simple locking sutures were added to the corners of 2 separate figure-of-eight sutures. In group III (n=10 tendons), the locked cruciate repair was used. All tendon repairs were tested to single-cycle tensile failure. Results: There was no significant difference between groups II and III with regards to gap and breaking forces; and all forces of these 2 groups were significantly higher than the forces in group I. Conclusion: It was concluded that 4 mm-wide pediatric flexor tendons allow a 4-strand repair and the use of 4/0 sutures. The use of locking sutures increases the tensile strength to values that may allow protective mobilization in children. PMID:27570850

  8. [Biomechanical study of lumbar spine under different vibration conditions].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Pin; Du, Chengfei; Mo, Zhongjun; Gong, He; Wang, Lizhen; Fan, Yubo

    2015-02-01

    We observed the effect of vibration parameters on lumbar spine under different vibration conditions using finite element analysis method in our laboratory. In this study, the CT-images of L1-L5 segments were obtained. All images were used to develop 3D geometrical model using the Mimics10. 01 (Materialise, Belgium). Then it was modified using Geomagic Studio12. 0 (Raindrop Geomagic Inc. USA). Finite element (FE) mesh model was generated by Hypermesh11. 0 (Altair Engineering, Inc. USA) and Abaqus. Abaqus was used to calculate the stress distribution of L1-L5 under different vibration conditions. It was found that in a vibration cycle, tensile stress was occurred on lumbar vertebra mainly. Stress distributed evenly and stress concentration occurred on the left rear side of the upper endplate. The stress had no obvious changes under different frequencies, but the stress was higher when amplitude was greater. In conclusion, frequency and amplitude parameters have little effect on the stress distribution in vertebra. The stress magnitude is positively correlated with the amplitude.

  9. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  10. Suture anchor versus suture through tunnel fixation for quadriceps tendon rupture: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lighthart, William A; Cohen, David A; Levine, Richard G; Parks, Brent G; Boucher, Henry R

    2008-05-01

    This biomechanical study compared suture anchors versus transosseous sutures for repair of quadriceps tendon ruptures using a force of 150 N at a frequency of 0.5 Hz. No significant difference in displacement was found between the 2 techniques with initial loading or with load or no load after 1000 cycles. Displacement after 1000 cycles for suture anchors and bone tunnels was 4.65 and 4.50 mm, respectively. These findings suggest a possible role for suture anchors in repairing quadriceps tendon ruptures. Suture anchors are relatively expensive but require less dissection over the patella and do not involve suture placement about the patella tendon.

  11. INTRASYNOVIAL FLEXOR TENDON REPAIR: A BIOMECHANICAL STUDY OF VARIATIONS IN SUTURE APPLICATION IN HUMAN CADAVERA

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, GN; Potter, R; Ntouvali, E; Silva, MJ; Boyer, MI; Gelberman, RH; Thomopoulos, S

    2013-01-01

    To improve the functional outcomes of intrasynovial tendon suture, prior experiments evaluated individual technical modifications used in the repair process. Few studies, however, have assessed the combinatorial effects of those suture modifications in an integrated biomechanical manner, including a sample size sufficient to make definitive observations on repair technique. 256 flexor tendon repairs were performed in cadavera, and biomechanical properties were determined. The effects of five factors for flexor tendon repair were tested: core suture caliber (4-0 or 3-0), number of sutures crossing the repair site (4- or 8-strand), core suture purchase (0.75 cm or 1.2 cm), peripheral suture caliber (6-0 or 5-0), and peripheral suture purchase (superficial or 2 mm). Significant factors affecting the properties of the repair were the number of core suture strands and the peripheral suture purchase. The least significant factors were core suture purchase and peripheral suture caliber. The choice of core suture caliber affected the properties of repair marginally. Based on these results, we recommend that surgeons continue to focus on multi-strand repair methods, as the properties of 8-strand repairs were far better than those of 4-strand repairs. To resist gap formation and enhance repair strength, a peripheral suture with 2mm purchase is also recommended. Finally, since core suture caliber affected some biomechanical properties, including the failure mode, a 3-0 suture could be considered, provided that future in vivo studies can confirm that gliding properties are not adversely influenced. PMID:22457145

  12. Single-Level Rigid Fixation Combined with Coflex: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Che, Wu; Chen, Qian; Ma, Yi-Qun; Jiang, Yun-Qi; Yuan, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Gang; Li, Xi-Lei; Dong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this biomechanical in vitro study was to compare the kinematics and intradiscal pressure achieved with 2 methods: L4–L5 pedicle screw-rod fixation (PSRF) with an upper L3–L4 Coflex device and L4–L5 PSRF alone. The results were used to characterize the biomechanics of the topping-off operation with a Coflex device for the lumbar motion segment adjacent to single-level rigid fixation. Material/Methods Six human cadaveric spine specimens were biomechanically tested in vitro (6 males, 0 females). The 3-dimensional specimen motion in response to applied loads during flexibility tests was determined. Loads were applied along anatomic axes to induce flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. All specimens were first studied with intact lumbar motion segments, then with L4–L5 PSRF alone, and finally with L4–L5 PSRF with an upper L3–L4 Coflex device. A non-paired comparison of the 3 configurations under 3 different conditions was made. Results PSRF, with or without a Coflex device, significantly increased the range of motion (ROM) in the upper adjacent motion segments in all directions of loading. The intradiscal pressure (IDP) changed slightly. A correlation analysis showed that the ROM and IDP are significantly positively correlated. The application of the upper motion segment of the Coflex device provided greater stability in all directions of motion than did PSRF alone, particularly for extension (p<0.05), while use of a Coflex device did not significantly decrease the IDP compared with PSRF alone (p>0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that L4–L5 PSRF with an L3–L4 Coflex device is more stable than L4–L5 PSRF alone. PSRF with an upper Coflex device is a promising alternative to PSRF alone. Based on these biomechanical tests, it might be considered a protective method to prevent adjacent segment degeneration (ASD), although some limitations with this in vitro study must be addressed in the future. PMID

  13. Study on diagnosis of micro-biomechanical structure using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, Souichi; Hashimoto, Youhei; Saito, Takashi; Hiro, Takafumi; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2007-02-01

    Acute coronary syndromes, e.g. myocardial infarctions, are caused by the rupture of unstable plaques on coronary arteries. The stability of plaque, which depends on biomechanical properties of fibrous cap, should be diagnosed crucially. Recently, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has been developed as a cross-sectional imaging method of microstructural biological tissue with high resolution 1~10 μm. Multi-functional OCT system has been promising, e.g. an estimator of biomechanical characteristics. It has been, however, difficult to estimate biomechanical characteristics, because OCT images have just speckle patterns by back-scattering light from tissue. In this study, presented is Optical Coherence Straingraphy (OCS) on the basis of OCT system, which can diagnose tissue strain distribution. This is basically composed of Recursive Cross-correlation technique (RC), which can provide a displacement vector distribution with high resolution. Furthermore, Adjacent Cross-correlation Multiplication (ACM) is introduced as a speckle noise reduction method. Multiplying adjacent correlation maps can eliminate anomalies from speckle noise, and then can enhance S/N in the determination of maximum correlation coefficient. Error propagation also can be further prevented by introducing to the recursive algorithm (RC). In addition, the spatial vector interpolation by local least square method is introduced to remove erroneous vectors and smooth the vector distribution. This was numerically applied to compressed elastic heterogeneous tissue samples to carry out the accuracy verifications. Consequently, it was quantitatively confirmed that its accuracy of displacement vectors and strain matrix components could be enhanced, comparing with the conventional method. Therefore, the proposed method was validated by the identification of different elastic objects with having nearly high resolution for that defined by optical system.

  14. Microrobotized blasting improves the bone-to-textured implant response. A preclinical in vivo biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo G; Gil, Luiz F; Neiva, Rodrigo; Jimbo, Ryo; Tovar, Nick; Lilin, Thomas; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of microrobotized blasting of titanium endosteal implants relative to their manually blasted counterparts. Two different implant systems were utilized presenting two different implant surfaces. Control surfaces (Manual) were fabricated by manually grit blasting the implant surfaces while experimental surfaces (Microblasted) were fabricated through a microrobotized system that provided a one pass grit blasting routine. Both surfaces were created with the same ~50µm average particle size alumina powder at ~310KPa. Surfaces were then etched with 37% HCl for 20min, washed, and packaged through standard industry procedures. The surfaces were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical interferometry, and were then placed in a beagle dog radius model remaining in vivo for 3 and 6 weeks. The implant removal torque was recorded and statistical analysis evaluated implant system and surface type torque levels as a function of time in vivo. Histologic sections were qualitatively evaluated for tissue response. Electron microscopy depicted textured surfaces for both manual and microblasted surfaces. Optical interferometry showed significantly higher Sa, Sq, values for the microblasted surface and no significant difference for Sds and Sdr values between surfaces. In vivo results depicted that statistically significant gains in biomechanical fixation were obtained for both implant systems tested at 6 weeks in vivo, while only one system presented significant biomechanical gain at 3 weeks. Histologic sections showed qualitative higher amounts of new bone forming around microblasted implants relative to the manually blasted group. Microrobotized blasting resulted in higher biomechanical fixation of endosteal dental implants and should be considered as an alternative for impant surface manufacturing.

  15. Managing Vancouver B1 fractures by cerclage system compared to locking plate fixation - a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Katharina; Winkler, Martin; Hofstädter, Thomas; Dorn, Ulrich; Augat, Peter

    2016-06-01

    With increasing life expectancy and number of total hip arthroplasties (THA), the need for revision surgery is increasing too. The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal fracture treatment for a clinically characteristic Vancouver B1 fracture. We hypothesized that locking plate fixation has biomechanical advantages over fixation with a simple cerclage system. Additionally, we hypothesized that removal of the primary short stem and revision with a long stem would show biomechanical benefit. The biomechanical testing was performed with a static and a dynamic loading protocol on twenty 4th Generation sawbones. These were divided into four different groups (n = 5 each). In group 1, the primary uncemented short stem remained and the fracture was stabilized with a locking plate. In group 2, the primary stem remained and the fracture was stabilized with a cerclage stabilization system containing two stabilizers and four cerclages. In group 3, the primary stem was replaced by an uncemented long revision stem and the fracture was fixed with a locking plate. In group 4, the short stem was replaced by a long revision stem and the fracture was fixed with the cerclage system. Static testing revealed that the revision of the short stem with the long stem caused a 2-fold (p < 0.001, ANOVA) increase of axial stiffness. In dynamic testing, the number of cycles to failure was 4 times (p < 0.001, ANOVA) higher with the long revision stem. Compared to locked plating cerclage wiring demonstrated a 26% more cycles to failure (p = 0.031, ANOVA). The load to failure was 91% larger (p < 0.001, ANOVA) with the long revision stem and 11% smaller with locked plating (p < 0.001, ANOVA). In conclusion, the present biomechanical study indicates that periprosthetic Vancouver B1 fractures can be sufficiently fixed by simple cerclage systems. Revision with a long replacement stem provides a superior mechanical stability regardless of type of osteosynthesis fixation and is therefore a viable

  16. Experimental biomechanical study of head injuries in lateral falls with skateboard helmet.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sri; Herbst, Brian; Strickland, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are common in sports accidents. Helmets are generally known to provide protection to the head. However, the effectiveness of helmets in mitigating a TBI may be compromised due to the impact location and impact speed. Although it is known that the helmet decreases the linear head accelerations and the resulting head injury potential, to the best of our knowledge, limited research effort has been devoted to the study of the biomechanics of TBI in side impact conditions. The present work is designed to delineate the biomechanics of TBI in a fall impacting the parietal/temporal regions. A standing Hybrid III male dummy with pedestrian pelvis was used. The dummy was placed on a swinging platform for the fall simulation. The drop was achieved by stopping the platform with a block. The platform was swung from a predetermined height and stopped to allow the free fall of the dummy. The test was conducted with and without a skate board helmet. The impact on the dummy’s head was in the parietal and temporal regions. The head impact speed with the floor was approximately 24 kph (6.7 m/sec) The dummy was instrumented with tri-axial linear and tri-axial angular head accelerometers to measure the biomechanical injury responses. Results from three tests were compared. The linear head CG acceleration, Head Injury Criteria (HIC) and angular head accelerations were compared. Results suggest that the helmet reduced the linear head acceleration, HIC and angular head acceleration compared to the impact without a helmet. Although the linear head accelerations and HIC were reduced, the angular head accelerations even with the helmet were above nearly all proposed rotational head injury threshold in the literature. The higher angular head accelerations indicate a higher probability of concussion, acute subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injuries. The present study is an additional step to better understand the biomechanics of TBI and the role of protective

  17. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  18. Disc nucleus fortification for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Brad Bellotte, J; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal stability is attributed in part to osteoligamentous structures, including the vertebral body, facets, intervertebral discs, and posterior elements. The materials in this study provide an opportunity to augment the degenerated nucleus without removing native disc material, a procedure introduced here as "fortification." The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nucleus fortification on lumbar disc biomechanics. METHODS The authors performed in vitro analysis of human cadaveric functional spinal units (FSUs), along with characterization and quantification of movement of the units using biomechanical data in intact, disc-only, and fortified specimens. The units underwent removal of all posterior elements and annulus and were fortified by injecting a biogel into the nucleus pulposus. Each specimen was subjected to load testing, range of motion (ROM) quantification, and disc bulge measurements. Optoelectric tracking was used to quantify disc bulge. These criteria were assessed in the intact, disc-only, and fortified treatments. RESULTS Disc-only FSUs resulted in increased ROM when compared with intact and fortified conditions. Fortification of the FSU resulted in partial restoration of normal ROM in the treatment groups. Analysis of hysteresis loops showed more linear response in the fortified groups when compared with the intact and disc-only groups. CONCLUSIONS Disc nucleus fortification increases linearity and decreases ROM.

  19. Disc nucleus fortification for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Brad Bellotte, J; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal stability is attributed in part to osteoligamentous structures, including the vertebral body, facets, intervertebral discs, and posterior elements. The materials in this study provide an opportunity to augment the degenerated nucleus without removing native disc material, a procedure introduced here as "fortification." The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nucleus fortification on lumbar disc biomechanics. METHODS The authors performed in vitro analysis of human cadaveric functional spinal units (FSUs), along with characterization and quantification of movement of the units using biomechanical data in intact, disc-only, and fortified specimens. The units underwent removal of all posterior elements and annulus and were fortified by injecting a biogel into the nucleus pulposus. Each specimen was subjected to load testing, range of motion (ROM) quantification, and disc bulge measurements. Optoelectric tracking was used to quantify disc bulge. These criteria were assessed in the intact, disc-only, and fortified treatments. RESULTS Disc-only FSUs resulted in increased ROM when compared with intact and fortified conditions. Fortification of the FSU resulted in partial restoration of normal ROM in the treatment groups. Analysis of hysteresis loops showed more linear response in the fortified groups when compared with the intact and disc-only groups. CONCLUSIONS Disc nucleus fortification increases linearity and decreases ROM. PMID:26771371

  20. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  1. Biomechanical study of the sacroiliac fracture fixation with titanium rods and pedicle screws

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Fabrício Hidetoshi; Pisani, Marina Justi; Machado, André Nunes; Rodrigues, Fábio Lucas; Fujiki, Edison Noburo; Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess biomechanically different fixations means of the sacroiliac joint with pedicle screws and to compare the traditional head height with reduced ones. METHODS: We used a polyethylene model representing the pelvic ring and simulated a unilateral sacroiliac dislocation. We set up three different constructions: 1) two screws attached to a rod; 2) two rods connected to two small head screws each; and 3) two rods connected to two average headed screws each. We conducted tests in a biomechanical testing and a mechanized processing laboratory. RESULTS: Group 1 supported an average maximum load of 99.70 N. Group 2 supported an average maximum load of 362.46 N. Group 3 endured an average maximum load of 404.15 N. In the assembly with one rod, the resistance decreased as compared with the one with two bars: 72.5 % compared to small-headed screws and 75.3 % to the traditional screw. CONCLUSION: The assembly with a single bar presented inferior results when compared to the double bar assembly. There was no statistical difference in the results between the screws used. Experimental Study. PMID:26207094

  2. Low-cost microcontroller platform for studying lymphatic biomechanics in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Nipper, Matthew E.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-01-01

    The pumping innate to collecting lymphatic vessels routinely exposes the endothelium to oscillatory wall shear stress and other dynamic forces. However, studying the mechanical sensitivity of the lymphatic endothelium remains a difficult task due to limitations of commercial or custom systems to apply a variety of time-varying stresses in vitro. Current biomechanical in vitro testing devices are very expensive, limited in capability, or highly complex; rendering them largely inaccessible to the endothelial cell biology community. To address these short-comings, the authors propose a reliable, low-cost platform for augmenting the capabilities of commercially available pumps to produce a wide variety of flow rate waveforms. In particular, the Arduino Uno, a microcontroller development board, is used to provide open-loop control of a digital peristaltic pump using precisely-timed serial commands. In addition, the flexibility of this platform is further demonstrated through its support of a custom-built cell-straining device capable of producing oscillatory strains with varying amplitudes and frequencies. Hence, this microcontroller development board is shown to be an inexpensive, precise, and easy-to-use tool for supplementing in vitro assays to quantify the effects of biomechanical forces on lymphatic endothelial cells. PMID:23178036

  3. Low-cost microcontroller platform for studying lymphatic biomechanics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nipper, Matthew E; Dixon, J Brandon

    2013-01-01

    The pumping innate to collecting lymphatic vessels routinely exposes the endothelium to oscillatory wall shear stress and other dynamic forces. However, studying the mechanical sensitivity of the lymphatic endothelium remains a difficult task due to limitations of commercial or custom systems to apply a variety of time-varying stresses in vitro. Current biomechanical in vitro testing devices are very expensive, limited in capability, or highly complex; rendering them largely inaccessible to the endothelial cell biology community. To address these shortcomings, the authors propose a reliable, low-cost platform for augmenting the capabilities of commercially available pumps to produce a wide variety of flow rate waveforms. In particular, the Arduino Uno, a microcontroller development board, is used to provide open-loop control of a digital peristaltic pump using precisely timed serial commands. In addition, the flexibility of this platform is further demonstrated through its support of a custom-built cell-straining device capable of producing oscillatory strains with varying amplitudes and frequencies. Hence, this microcontroller development board is shown to be an inexpensive, precise, and easy-to-use tool for supplementing in vitro assays to quantify the effects of biomechanical forces on lymphatic endothelial cells.

  4. Effect of flexor sheath integrity on tendon gliding: a biomechanical and histologic study.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W W; Manske, P R; Kain, C C; Lesker, P A

    1986-01-01

    The effect on tendon gliding of flexor sheath excision versus incision/closure following primary flexor tendon repair was examined biomechanically and histologically in forty-one chickens. There was no significant difference in either the tendon excursion required to fully flex the digit or in the work of flexion (the integration of the forces that resist tendon gliding during excursion) between the sheath excised and sheath closed groups. The results were unaffected by postoperative immobilization or intermittent passive motion. Histologically, it was noted that at 3 weeks the healing tendon was surrounded by a layer of granulation tissue that was nearly identical in both the sheath excised and the sheath closed digits. Of note was the finding that a synovial lining could not be identified in those digits that had previously undergone sheath closure. However, at 6 weeks postoperatively, a new gliding surface could be identified surrounding the tendon in both the sheath excised and the sheath closed digits. This study indicates that closure of the flexor sheath after primary tendon repair does not improve tendon gliding as measured biomechanically. Despite its repair, the flexor sheath does not maintain its synovial characteristics as demonstrated histologically, and a new sheath must subsequently be formed.

  5. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  6. The Use of Wearable Inertial Motion Sensors in Human Lower Limb Biomechanics Studies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan

    2010-01-01

    Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed. PMID:22163542

  7. The use of wearable inertial motion sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan

    2010-01-01

    Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed.

  8. Loss of glenohumeral internal rotation in little league pitchers: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Nakamizo, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yasuo; Nobuhara, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2008-01-01

    Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) is a significant shoulder problem for throwing athletes. GIRD, however, has not been reported in little league pitchers. The purpose of this study was to investigate GIRD in little leaguers. The range of motion of both shoulders was measured in 25 male little league pitchers. All pitchers underwent motion analyses of their pitching to evaluate shoulder kinematics. GIRD was found in 10 of the 25 pitchers. External rotation in the dominant arm in the GIRD group was not significantly different compared to the contralateral or dominant arm in the non-GIRD group. This biomechanical study showed that the GIRD group had increased external rotation while throwing compared to the non-GIRD group. These findings indicate that GIRD can occur prior to development of the increased external rotation in the dominant arm seen in adult throwers.

  9. Beam halo studies in LEHIPA DTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Pande, R.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) project at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) consists of a 20 MeV, 30 mA proton linac. The accelerator comprises of a 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a 20 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL). In such high intensity accelerators, beam halos are of concern as they not only cause an increase in emittance, but also lead to beam loss and radio activation. We have studied the effect of beam mismatch at the DTL input on halo formation and propagation. The particle core model is used to excite the three envelope eigen modes; the quadrupole mode, the fast mode and the slow mode by giving input beam mismatch. These modes get damped as the beam progresses through the DTL. The damping mechanism is clearly Landau damping and leads to increase in rms emittance of the beam. The evolution of these modes and the corresponding increase in beam emittance and maximum beam extent, as the beam propagates through the DTL, has been studied for different space charge tunes. The halo parameter based on the definition of Allen and Wangler has been calculated. It is seen that beam halos are very important for LEHIPA DTL, even at 20 MeV and leads to emittance and beam size increase and also to beam loss in some cases. The longitudinal halo is present even without mismatch and transverse halos arise in the presence of beam mismatch.

  10. Experimental observation, theoretical models, and biomechanical inference in the study of mandibular form.

    PubMed

    Daegling, D J; Hylander, W L

    2000-08-01

    Experimental studies and mathematical models are disparate approaches for inferring the stress and strain environment in mammalian jaws. Experimental designs offer accurate, although limited, characterization of biomechanical behavior, while mathematical approaches (finite element modeling in particular) offer unparalleled precision in depiction of strain magnitudes, directions, and gradients throughout the mandible. Because the empirical (experimental) and theoretical (mathematical) perspectives differ in their initial assumptions and their proximate goals, the two methods can yield divergent conclusions about how masticatory stresses are distributed in the dentary. These different sources of inference may, therefore, tangibly influence subsequent biological interpretation. In vitro observation of bone strain in primate mandibles under controlled loading conditions offers a test of finite element model predictions. Two issues which have been addressed by both finite element models and experimental approaches are: (1) the distribution of torsional shear strains in anthropoid jaws and (2) the dissipation of bite forces in the human alveolar process. Not surprisingly, the experimental data and mathematical models agree on some issues, but on others exhibit discordance. Achieving congruence between these methods is critical if the nature of the relationship of masticatory stress to mandibular form is to be intelligently assessed. A case study of functional/mechanical significance of gnathic morphology in the hominid genus Paranthropus offers insight into the potential benefit of combining theoretical and experimental approaches. Certain finite element analyses claim to have identified a biomechanical problem unrecognized in previous comparative work, which, in essence, is that the enlarged transverse dimensions of the postcanine corpus may have a less important role in resisting torsional stresses than previously thought. Experimental data have identified

  11. Experimental observation, theoretical models, and biomechanical inference in the study of mandibular form.

    PubMed

    Daegling, D J; Hylander, W L

    2000-08-01

    Experimental studies and mathematical models are disparate approaches for inferring the stress and strain environment in mammalian jaws. Experimental designs offer accurate, although limited, characterization of biomechanical behavior, while mathematical approaches (finite element modeling in particular) offer unparalleled precision in depiction of strain magnitudes, directions, and gradients throughout the mandible. Because the empirical (experimental) and theoretical (mathematical) perspectives differ in their initial assumptions and their proximate goals, the two methods can yield divergent conclusions about how masticatory stresses are distributed in the dentary. These different sources of inference may, therefore, tangibly influence subsequent biological interpretation. In vitro observation of bone strain in primate mandibles under controlled loading conditions offers a test of finite element model predictions. Two issues which have been addressed by both finite element models and experimental approaches are: (1) the distribution of torsional shear strains in anthropoid jaws and (2) the dissipation of bite forces in the human alveolar process. Not surprisingly, the experimental data and mathematical models agree on some issues, but on others exhibit discordance. Achieving congruence between these methods is critical if the nature of the relationship of masticatory stress to mandibular form is to be intelligently assessed. A case study of functional/mechanical significance of gnathic morphology in the hominid genus Paranthropus offers insight into the potential benefit of combining theoretical and experimental approaches. Certain finite element analyses claim to have identified a biomechanical problem unrecognized in previous comparative work, which, in essence, is that the enlarged transverse dimensions of the postcanine corpus may have a less important role in resisting torsional stresses than previously thought. Experimental data have identified

  12. [Biomechanical test study of rat femurs growing under different stress environment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxi; Zhao, Wenzhi; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shouju; Li, Jingnian; Sun, Xiaojiang

    2005-06-01

    By creating two kinds of stress environment in the same animal model, we performed a three-point bending test and a compressing test on the rat femurs growing under different stress conditions to characterize the effect of stress on bone mechanical properties. The right hindlimbs were subjected to sciatic nerve resection to become cripple and were used as unloading group; the left hindlimbs bore excess load and made up the overloading group; the normal rats were used as control group. The animals were encouraged to exercise for half an hour everyday in the morning, noon and evening. The experiment observation finished in four weeks. The biomechanical parameters of femur diaphyses were measured. The experiment results showed that stress environment may change several mechanical parameters of rat femurs. This study indicated that bone tissues can adapt to its stress environment by changing its mechanical properties. The experimental model in this article is practical and reliable.

  13. Biomechanical Study on Distal Filling Effects in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Soo-Won; Lee, Jun-Hyoung; Choi, Hyung-Yun

    In cementless total hip replacement, initial stability of the femoral component is important in the long term fixation of the femoral stem. Initial stability is closely related to the relative displacement between the prosthesis and the cancellous bone of the proximal femur. After implantation of the prosthesis, the surrounding bone is partially shielded from load carrying and starts to resorb. Stress shielding causes the loss of the proximal bone. The stress distribution of femur must be assessed to predict stress shielding. The initial stability and the stress shielding were investigated for two loading conditions approximating a single leg stance and stair climbing. Two types of stems involving a distal filling and a distal short stem were studied by the finite element method to investigate the biomechanical distal filling effects. The distal short stem produced less stress shielding at the proximal bone than the distal filling stem, while both types of stems seemed to satisfy the initial stability requirement.

  14. The biomechanical effect of vertebroplasty on the adjacent vertebral body: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, R K

    2006-05-01

    The increased use of vertebroplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures has led to concerns that the technique may increase the risk of fracture in the adjacent vertebrae. The aim of this study was to simulate the biomechanical effects of vertebroplasty using an osteoporotic two-vertebrae finite element model. Following a simulated compression fracture, the model was augmented with one of three volumes of PMMA-based cement or left untreated. Upon reloading, an increase in segment stiffness was found with increasing volumes of cement. However, in all the treated models there was an increase in endplate deflection into the adjacent vertebra causing plastic failure of the surrounding trabecular bone. More damage was caused in the adjacent vertebra of the treated models than in the untreated model. The model results suggest that clinicians should be wary of using standard vertebroplasty cements to treat compression fractures in patients with highly osteoporotic bone.

  15. Study on Brain Injury Biomechanics Based on the Real Pedestrian Traffic Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chengjian; Yin, Zhiyong

    This paper aimed to research the dynamic response and injury mechanisms of head based on real pedestrian traffic accidents with video. The kinematics of head contact with the vehicle was reconstructed by using multi-body dynamics models. These calculated parameters such as head impact velocity and impact location and head orientation were applied to the THUMS-4 FE head model as initial conditions. The intracranial pressure and stress of brain were calculated from simulations of head contact with the vehicle. These results were consistent with that of others. It was proved that real traffic accidents combined with simulation analysis can be used to study head injury biomechanics. Increasing in the number of cases, a tolerance limit of brain injury will be put forward.

  16. [Double approach to the study of high jumping: attention demands and biomechanics].

    PubMed

    Girouard, Y; Dessureault, J; Ferland, P; Lafortune, M

    1981-09-01

    A double approach was used to study high jumping: attention demands and biomechanic. The main goal was to determine if the methodology used to measure the attention demands did interfere with high jumping performance. Two sub-goals were also aimed: (a) to find the main characteristics of the attention demands of high jumping; (b) to find the main kinetic characteristics of high jumping. Two members of the canadian olympic team were tested. Results showed that the methodology using to measure the attention demands did not seem to interfere with subject's performance, the later being evaluated by means of force time variations during the take-off. Results also showed that: a) high jumping seems to require considerable amount of attention even for international caliber high jumpers, and b) there were differences between Straddle and Fosbury Flop techniques as far as kinetic date were concerned. PMID:7296747

  17. Collimation Studies with Hollow Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Saewert, G.W.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Recent experimental studies at the Fermilab Tevatron collider have shown that magnetically confined hollow electron beams can act as a new kind of collimator for high-intensity beams in storage rings. In a hollow electron beam collimator, electrons enclose the circulating beam. Their electric charge kicks halo particles transversely. If their distribution is axially symmetric, the beam core is unaffected. This device is complementary to conventional two-stage collimation systems: the electron beam can be placed arbitrarily close to the circulating beam; and particle removal is smooth, so that the device is a diffusion enhancer rather than a hard aperture limitation. The concept was tested in the Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the existing electron lenses. We describe some of the technical aspects of hollow-beam scraping and the results of recent measurements.

  18. Controlled Study of Correlation of Biomechanical Profile of Hemiparetic Patients with Distance Travelled in Six Minutes

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Laís Moreira; Quintão, Mônica Maria Pena; de Carvalho, Karen Santos R.; Carrapatoso, Beatriz Cantanhede; Malfacini, Sabrina Lindenberg L.; da Silva, André Custódio; Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Chermont, Sergio S.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    The six-minute walking test (6MWT) is used to assess exercise tolerance that is associated with motor function of the lower limbs in hemiparetic patients. It is suggested that, for post-stroke subjects, performance in the 6MWT may be limited by biomechanical and cardiovascular factors. Our aim is to determine the correlation between the six-minute walk distance (6MWD) and the biomechanical profile of hemiparetic patients. During this cross-sectional controlled study, 10 hemiparetic patients with heart failure underwent 6MWT (ATS protocol). Tonus (Ashworth Scale) and goniometry of the lower limbs were measured. The average of 6MWD in two tests was 279±8 m. There was a negative correlation between the degree of spasticity for both the sural triceps (r=–0.57, P<0.05), quadriceps (r=–0.58, P<0.05) and the limitation in ankle dorsiflexion and the 6MWD (r=–0.76, P<0.05). Also, there was correlation between hip extension and ankle dorsiflexion limitations with 6MWD (r=0.66, P<0.05), (r=0.77, P<0.05). The negative correlation between the highest spasticity in paretic limb and the 6MWD and the correlation between the lower movement range of paretic hip and ankle suggest association with these factors and gait velocity in 6MWT. Loss percentage represents the percentage calculation between distance traveled and the distance predicted achieved by patients. In this study, the negative correlation between the percentage of loss of 6MWD and the limitation in the ankle dorsiflexion movement suggests that for a minor motion arch of the ankle, there is a higher percentage of walking distance loss foretold. PMID:26487924

  19. Silicon nitride films for the protective functional coating: blood compatibility and biomechanical property study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhifeng; Wang, Yingjun; Du, Chang; Huang, Nan; Wang, Lin; Ning, Chengyun

    2012-12-01

    Behaviors of silicon nitride films and their relation to blood compatibility and biomechanical have been interesting subjects to researchers. A systematic blood compatibility and biomechanical property investigation on the deposition of silicon-nitride films under varying N₂ and CF₄ flows was carried out by direct current unbalanced magnetron sputtering techniques. Significant role of surface property, chemical bonding state of silicon nitride film and blood compatibility, mechanical properties for the films were observed. The chemical bonding configurations, surface topography, contact angle and mechanical properties were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano-indentation technique and CSEM pin-on-disk tribometer. Blood compatibility of the films was evaluated by platelet adhesion investigation. The results of the platelet adhesion tests shown that the effect of fluorine and nitrogen-doped revealed an intimate relationship between the ratio of polar component and dispersion component of the surface energy and its hemocompatibility. Si-N-O coating can be a great candidate for developing antithrombogenic surfaces in blood contacting materials. The chemical bonding state made an adjustment in microstructured surfaces, once in the totally wettable configuration, may improve the initial contact between platelet and biomedical materials, due to the appropriate ratio of dispersion component and polar component. To resist wear, biomedical components require coatings that are tough and hard, have low friction, and are bio-inert. The study suggests that by Si-N coating the metal surfaces could be a choice to prolong the life of the sliding pair Co-Cr-Mo alloy/UHMWPE implants.

  20. Quantum dots as mineral- and matrix-specific strain gages for bone biomechanical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peizhi; Xu, Jiadi; Morris, Michael; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Sahar, Nadder; Kohn, David

    2009-02-01

    We report the use of quantum dots (Qdots) as strain gages in the study of bone biomechanics using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have developed solid state NMR sample cells for investigation of deformations of bone tissue components at loads up to several Mega Pascal. The size constraints of the NMR instrumentation limit the bone specimen diameter and length to be no greater than 2-3 mm and 30 mm respectively. Further, magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR experiments require the use of non-metallic apparatus that can be rotated at kilohertz rates. These experimental constraints preclude the use of standard biomechanical measurement systems. In this paper we explore the use of quantum dot center of gravity measurement as a strain gage technology consistent with the constraints of solid state NMR. We use Qdots that bind calcium (625 nm emission) and collagen (705 nm emission) for measurement of strain in these components. Compressive loads are applied to a specimen in a cell through a fine pitch screw turned with a mini-torque wrench. Displacement is measured as changes in the positions of arrays of quantum dots on the surface of a specimen. Arrays are created by spotting the specimen with dilute suspensions of Qdots. Mineral labeling is achieved with 705 nm carboxylated dots and matrix labeling with 565 nm quantum dots conjugated to collagen I antibodies. After each load increment the new positions of the quantum dots are measured by fluorescence microscopy. Changes in Qdot center of gravity as a function of applied load can be measured with submicron accuracy.

  1. Multicenter trial of motion analysis for injury risk prediction: lessons learned from prospective longitudinal large cohort combined biomechanical - epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Roewer, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Myer, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Our biodynamics laboratory group has conducted large cohort biomechanical-epidemiological studies targeted at identifying the complex interactions among biomechanical, biological, hormonal, and psychosocial factors that lead to increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The findings from our studies have revealed highly sensitive and specific predictors for ACL injury. Despite the high incidence of ACL injuries among young athletes, larger cohorts are needed to reveal the underlying mechanistic causes of increased risk for ACL injury. In the current study, we have outlined key factors that contribute to the overall success of multicenter, biomechanical-epidemiological investigations designed to test a larger number of athletes who otherwise could not be recruited, screened, or tested at a single institution. Twenty-five female volleyball players were recruited from a single high school team and tested at three biodynamics laboratories. All athletes underwent three-dimensional motion capture analysis of a drop vertical jump task. Kinematic and kinetic variables were compared within and among laboratories. Reliability of peak kinematic variables was consistently rated good-to-excellent. Reliability of peak kinetic variables was consistently rated goodto-excellent within sites, but greater variability was observed between sites. Variables measured in the sagittal plane were typically more reliable than variables measured in the coronal and transverse planes. This study documents the reliability of biomechanical variables that are key to identification of ACL injury mechanisms and of athletes at high risk. These findings indicate the feasibility of executing multicenter, biomechanical investigations that can yield more robust, reliable, and generalizable findings across larger cohorts of athletes. PMID:26537810

  2. Multicenter trial of motion analysis for injury risk prediction: lessons learned from prospective longitudinal large cohort combined biomechanical - epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Roewer, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Myer, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Our biodynamics laboratory group has conducted large cohort biomechanical-epidemiological studies targeted at identifying the complex interactions among biomechanical, biological, hormonal, and psychosocial factors that lead to increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The findings from our studies have revealed highly sensitive and specific predictors for ACL injury. Despite the high incidence of ACL injuries among young athletes, larger cohorts are needed to reveal the underlying mechanistic causes of increased risk for ACL injury. In the current study, we have outlined key factors that contribute to the overall success of multicenter, biomechanical-epidemiological investigations designed to test a larger number of athletes who otherwise could not be recruited, screened, or tested at a single institution. Twenty-five female volleyball players were recruited from a single high school team and tested at three biodynamics laboratories. All athletes underwent three-dimensional motion capture analysis of a drop vertical jump task. Kinematic and kinetic variables were compared within and among laboratories. Reliability of peak kinematic variables was consistently rated good-to-excellent. Reliability of peak kinetic variables was consistently rated goodto-excellent within sites, but greater variability was observed between sites. Variables measured in the sagittal plane were typically more reliable than variables measured in the coronal and transverse planes. This study documents the reliability of biomechanical variables that are key to identification of ACL injury mechanisms and of athletes at high risk. These findings indicate the feasibility of executing multicenter, biomechanical investigations that can yield more robust, reliable, and generalizable findings across larger cohorts of athletes. PMID:26537810

  3. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two- beam accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven Michael

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka-band (~30-35 GHz) frequency regions. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. A mapping algorithm is used so that tens or hundreds of thousands of macroparticles can be pushed from the solution of a few hundreds of differential equations. This is a great cost-savings device from the standpoint of CPU cycles. It can increase by several orders of magnitude the number of macroparticles that take place in the simulation, enabling more accurate modeling of the evolution of the beam distribution and enhanced sensitivity to effects due to the beam's halo. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split- operator algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The beam-cavity interaction is analyzed and divided naturally into two distinct times scales. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 TW of power from 40 input, gain

  4. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper. PMID:26932091

  5. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  6. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  7. SU-E-J-163: A Biomechanical Lung Model for Respiratory Motion Study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X; Belcher, AH; Grelewicz, Z; Wiersma, RD

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This work presents a biomechanical model to investigate the complex respiratory motion for the lung tumor tracking in radiosurgery by computer simulation. Methods: The models include networked massspring-dampers to describe the tumor motion, different types of surrogate signals, and the force generated by the diaphragm. Each mass-springdamper has the same mechanical structure and each model can have different numbers of mass-spring-dampers. Both linear and nonlinear stiffness parameters were considered, and the damping ratio was tuned in a range so that the tumor motion was over-damped (no natural tumor oscillation occurs without force from the diaphragm). The simulation was run by using ODE45 (ordinary differential equations by Runge-Kutta method) in MATLAB, and all time courses of motions and inputs (force) were generated and compared. Results: The curvature of the motion time courses around their peaks was sensitive to the damping ratio. Therefore, the damping ratio can be determined based on the clinical data of a high sampling rate. The peak values of different signals and the time the peaks occurred were compared, and it was found that the diaphragm force had a time lead over the tumor motion, and the lead time (0.1–0.4 seconds) depended on the distance between the tumor and the diaphragm. Conclusion: We reported a model based analysis approach for the spatial and temporal relation between the motion of the lung tumor and the surrogate signals. Due to the phase lead of the diaphragm in comparing with the lung tumor motion, the measurement of diaphragm motion (or its electromyography signal) can be used as a beam gating signal in radiosurgery, and it can also be an additional surrogate signal for better tumor motion tracking. The research is funded by the American Cancer Society (ACS) grant. The grant name is: Frameless SRS Based on Robotic Head Motion Cancellation. The grant number is: RSG-13-313-01-CCE.

  8. Radiation combined injury models to study the effects of interventions and wound biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zawaski, Janice A; Yates, Charles R; Miller, Duane D; Kaffes, Caterina C; Sabek, Omaima M; Afshar, Solmaz F; Young, Daniel A; Yang, Yunzhi; Gaber, M Waleed

    2014-12-01

    In the event of a nuclear detonation, a considerable number of projected casualties will suffer from combined radiation exposure and burn and/or wound injury. Countermeasure assessment in the setting of radiation exposure combined with dermal injury is hampered by a lack of animal models in which the effects of interventions have been characterized. To address this need, we used two separate models to characterize wound closure. The first was an open wound model in mice to study the effect of wound size in combination with whole-body 6 Gy irradiation on the rate of wound closure, animal weight and survival (morbidity). In this model the addition of interventions, wound closure, subcutaneous vehicle injection, topical antiseptic and topical antibiotics were studied to measure their effect on healing and survival. The second was a rat closed wound model to study the biomechanical properties of a healed wound at 10 days postirradiation (irradiated with 6 or 7.5 Gy). In addition, complete blood counts were performed and wound pathology by staining with hematoxylin and eosin, trichrome, CD68 and Ki67. In the mouse open wound model, we found that wound size and morbidity were positively correlated, while wound size and survival were negatively correlated. Regardless of the wound size, the addition of radiation exposure delayed the healing of the wound by approximately 5-6 days. The addition of interventions caused, at a minimum, a 30% increase in survival and improved mean survival by ∼9 days. In the rat closed wound model we found that radiation exposure significantly decreased all wound biomechanical measurements as well as white blood cell, platelet and red blood cell counts at 10 days post wounding. Also, pathological changes showed a loss of dermal structure, thickening of dermis, loss of collagen/epithelial hyperplasia and an increased density of macrophages. In conclusion, we have characterized the effect of a changing wound size in combination with radiation

  9. Adjacent vertebral failure after vertebroplasty: a biomechanical study of low-modulus PMMA cement

    PubMed Central

    Heini, Paul; Windolf, Markus; Schneider, Erich

    2007-01-01

    PMMA is the most common bone substitute used for vertebroplasty. An increased fracture rate of the adjacent vertebrae has been observed after vertebroplasty. Decreased failure strength has been noted in a laboratory study of augmented functional spine units (FSUs), where the adjacent, non-augmented vertebral body always failed. This may provide evidence that rigid cement augmentation may facilitate the subsequent collapse of the adjacent vertebrae. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the decrease in failure strength of augmented FSUs can be avoided using low-modulus PMMA bone cement. In cadaveric FSUs, overall stiffness, failure strength and stiffness of the two vertebral bodies were determined under compression for both the treated and untreated specimens. Augmentation was performed on the caudal vertebrae with either regular or low-modulus PMMA. Endplate and wedge-shaped fractures occurred in the cranial and caudal vertebrae in the ratios endplate:wedge (cranial:caudal): 3:8 (5:6), 4:7 (7:4) and 10:1 (10:1) for control, low-modulus and regular cement group, respectively. The mean failure strength was 3.3 ± 1 MPa with low-modulus cement, 2.9 ± 1.2 MPa with regular cement and 3.6 ± 1.3 MPa for the control group. Differences between the groups were not significant (p = 0.754 and p = 0.375, respectively, for low-modulus cement vs. control and regular cement vs. control). Overall FSU stiffness was not significantly affected by augmentation. Significant differences were observed for the stiffness differences of the cranial to the caudal vertebral body for the regular PMMA group to the other groups (p < 0.003). The individual vertebral stiffness values clearly showed the stiffening effect of the regular cement and the lesser alteration of the stiffness of the augmented vertebrae using the low-modulus PMMA compared to the control group (p = 0.999). In vitro biomechanical study and biomechanical evaluation of the hypothesis state that the

  10. Driving Position Field Study, Differences with the Whiplash Protocol and Biomechanics Experimental Responses

    PubMed Central

    Arregui-Dalmases, Carlos; Pozo, Eduardo Del; Lessley, David; Barrios, Jose Manuel; Nombela, Mario; Cisneros, Oscar; de Miguel, Juan Luis; Seguí-Gómez, María

    2011-01-01

    Rear-impact collisions at low speed are a leading cause of economic costs among motor vehicle accidents. Recently, EuroNCAP has incorporated in its protocol the whiplash test, to reproduce a low-speed rear impact. This paper presents a field driving study to assess the potential differences between the EuroNCAP dummy tests and actual drivers in the field, focusing on occupant position and biomechanics experimental results. A total of 182 drivers were randomly selected in two geographical areas in Spain. The driving position of each driver was recorded with a focus on the most relevant measurements for rear impact. Statistical analysis was performed to obtain means, standard deviations and density functions to compare observational seating position with that of the EuroNCAP testing protocol. The observational data showed a similar seatback angle to that used in the EuroNCAP protocol (24° in front of 25° for the protocol), a greater distance between the head vertex and the top of the head restraint (53mm compared to 39.5mm), and less distance between the occipital bone of the head and the headrest (67.9 compared to 89.3mm). Based on these data, 4 dummy tests were conducted using the dummy BioRID IIg. The baseline test was designed to reproduce the dummy position according to EuroNCAP 3.0 whiplash protocol. Three different additional tests were defined to reproduce the actual observed driving position as well as to assess a “worst case” scenario in terms of reduced seatback angle. These variations in initial driver position, comparing the EuroNCAP protocol to the observational study results, were not observed to cause significant differences in the biomechanical values measured in the BioRID IIg, The T1 acceleration was reduced less than 8%, the NIC was increased about 8%, and the NKm presented a reduction of 20%. Reducing the seat angle was observed to be more harmful in terms of NIC. PMID:22105385

  11. A numerical study of the left ventricle using structure-based bio-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunfei; Luo, Xiaoyu; Feng, Yaoqi

    A numerical study of the left ventricle using structure-based bio-mechanical model In space environment, microgravity and radiation can have deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system of the astronauts. The work in this paper is part of an ongoing effort to use mathematical models to provide a better understanding of the impact of long-duration spaceflight on the heart and blood vessels. In this study, we develop a computational left ventricle model before and after myocardium infarction based on cardiovascular mechanical theory. The anatomically realistic model has a rule-based fibre structure and a orthotropic structure-based constitutive model. The differences of deformations in the left ventricle before and after infarction are compared in details. In particular, the effects of fiber direction and fiber dispersion are examined. The disarray of both the fiber and sheet orientation is characterized by a dispersion parameter. The left ventricle volume is calculated from the MRI images and used for the optimization of the parameters of the myocardium. We provide the numerical framework for further study on effects of spaceflight on the cardiovascular system.

  12. Prospective Study of the Relation between Landing Biomechanics and Jumper's Knee.

    PubMed

    der Worp, H van; van der Does, H T D; Brink, M S; Zwerver, J; Hijmans, J M

    2016-03-01

    The literature on the relation between jump biomechanics and jumper's knee indicates that a jump with horizontal displacement poses a threat for developing jumper's knee. Subjects with jumper's knee have been shown to display a stiff landing pattern characterized by a small range of motion. However, up to now only cross-sectional studies have been conducted. 6 teams from sports involving repetitive landing were followed prospectively for 2 years. At baseline athletes performed the Landing Error Scoring System jump and 3D kinematics and kinetics were obtained. A comparison was made between subjects who developed jumper's knee and those who did not develop it. 3 subjects developed jumper's knee during the study. Leg stiffness during landing was high compared to the mean of the healthy controls. No common kinematic patterns could be identified in these 3 subjects. The results suggest that athletes with high leg stiffness during landing might have an increased risk for developing jumper's knee, yet this conclusion is based on a very small sample. Subjects who develop jumper's knee do not show a common landing technique. Further research is needed to investigate whether leg stiffness can be used to identify athletes at risk and as a target variable to be used in prevention. PMID:26701825

  13. Biomechanical response of the pubic symphysis in lateral pelvic impacts: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoping; Kim, Jong-Eun; Davidson, James S; Etheridge, Brandon S; Alonso, Jorge E; Eberhardt, Alan W

    2007-01-01

    Automotive side impacts are a leading cause of injuries to the pubic symphysis, yet the mechanisms of those injuries have not been clearly established. Previous mechanical testing of isolated symphyses revealed increased joint laxity following drop tower lateral impacts to isolated pelvic bone structures, which suggested that the joints were damaged by excessive stresses and/or deformations during the impact tests. In the present study, a finite element (FE) model of a female pelvis including a previously validated symphysis sub-model was developed from computed tomography data. The full pelvis model was validated against measured force-time impact responses from drop tower experiments and then used to study the biomechanical response of the symphysis during the experimental impacts. The FE models predicted that the joint underwent a combination of lateral compression, posterior bending, anterior/posterior and superior/inferior shear that exceeded normal physiological levels prior to the onset of bony fractures. Large strains occurred concurrently within the pubic ligaments. Removal of the contralateral constraints to better approximate the boundary conditions of a seated motor vehicle occupant reduced cortical stresses and deformations of the pubic symphysis; however, ligament strains, compressive and shear stresses in the interpubic disc, as well as posterior bending of the joint structure remained as potential sources of joint damage during automotive side impacts. PMID:17399721

  14. Biomechanical analysis of the impact of fibular osteotomies at tibiotalar joint: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Xu, Hong-Zhang; Liang, Dong-Zhu; Lu, Wei; Zhong, Shi-Zheng; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osteotomy of the fibula is a common orthopedic procedure performed for various indications, including harvesting fibula for grafting purposes. The effect of fibular osteotomy and need for tibiofibular syndesmotic fixation fusion at different levels on tibiotalar joint is matter of debate. We performed a biomechanical analysis of the impact of fibular osteotomies at different levels and whether the fixation of distal tibiofibular joint mitigates instability caused by the osteotomy. Materials and Methods: Six lower limb specimens from fresh adult cadavers were used to prepare leg-foot models. The specimens were assigned to six status according to the level of osteotomy and whether fixation of distal tibiofibular joint was performed or not. Each specimen was then loaded axially to 700 N by the material testing machine, and the tibiotalar joint contact area and peak pressure were measured using an electronic pressure sensor. Results: The contact area and the pressure of tibiotalar joint showed significant changes when compared to the normal specimen. All osteotomy specimens had a decreased tibiotalar contact area and an increased peak pressure. This positively correlated with proximity of level of osteotomy to the lateral malleolus. Conclusions: Through this study, we found that fibular osteotomy had an adverse effect in terms of decreasing the contact surface of tibiotalar joint that led to increased peak pressure in the joint. However, bone fusion and screw fixation of the distal tibiofibular joint reduced these adverse effects. PMID:23162143

  15. [3-dimensional biomechanical study of a new flexible lumbar intervertebral disk implant].

    PubMed

    Zöllner, J; Heine, J; Eysel, P

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the significance of a new artificial nucleus implant for lumbar discs (polymethyl siloxane polymer, DR-PMSO) with special regard to the biomechanical properties of the spinal motion segment. The lumbar segments L1/L2 and L4/L5 were harvested from six calf cadavers. The segments were fixed on a special device mounted on a three-dimensional testing machine. Physiological load with a maximum of 7 Nm was applied in flexion/extension, right and left lateral bending, and right and left torsion. The movement of the measuring point (center of L1 and L4) was registered along three axes (sagittal, frontal, and vertical). Three cycles of measurements were performed on all specimens: (1) intact segment, (2) segment after nucleotomy, and (3) segment with PMSO. There was a statistically significant (p = 0.0313) increase in segmental mobility in all directions after nucleotomy with an increased mobility of the segment up to 30% for rotation and 50% for translation. After introduction of the PMSO implant, segmental mobility for all movement directions was restored with no statistically significant difference from the intact situation before nucleotomy. The disc material was found to be noncytotoxic according to current ISO 10993 standards. PMID:11417241

  16. [Angle-fixed plate fixation or double-plate osteosynthesis in fractures of the proximal humerus: a biomechanical study].

    PubMed

    Hessmann, Martin H; Korner, Jan; Hofmann, Alexander; Sternstein, Werner; Rommens, Pol M

    2008-06-01

    Internal fixation of fractures of the proximal humerus needs a high stability of fixation to avoid secondary loss of fixation. This is especially important in osteoporotic bone. In an experimental study, the biomechanical properties of the angle-fixed Philos plate (internal fixator) and a double-plate osteosynthesis using two one-third tubular plates were assessed. The fracture model was an unstable three-part fracture (AO type B2). Eight pairs of human cadaveric humeri were submitted to axial load and torque. In the first part of the study, it was assessed to which degree the original stiffness of the humeri could be restored after the osteotomy by the osteosynthesis procedure. Subsequently, subsidence during 200 cycles of axial loading and torque was analysed. During axial loading, the Philos plate was significantly stiffer and showed less irreversible deformation. Two double-plate fixations, but none of the Philos plate osteosynthesis, failed. During torsion, there were no significant differences between the two implants. From the biomechanical point of view, the angle-fixed Philos plate represents the implant of choice for the surgical fixation of highly unstable three-part fractures of the proximal humerus, as the internal fixator system is characterised by superior biomechanical properties.

  17. Putative proprioceptive function of the pelvic ligaments: biomechanical and histological studies.

    PubMed

    Varga, Endre; Dudas, Bertalan; Tile, Marvin

    2008-08-01

    The sacrospinous (SS) and sacrotuberous (ST) ligaments of the pelvic ring are known as mechanical stabilisers of the pelvic girdle, primarily against rotational forces in the sagittal and horizontal planes. Earlier studies, however, raised the possibility that ST/SS ligaments possess significant proprioceptive function, while the mechanical role of these ligaments in maintaining the structural integrity of the pelvis is of less importance. The aim of this study is to determine whether the function of these ligaments is strictly to provide mechanical stability or if they have any additional functional properties, i.e., proprioception. In order to reveal the function of the SS/ST ligaments, biomechanical studies of cadaver pelvis were used along with the histological analysis of the ligaments. Following measurements to determine the accurate mechanical role of the pelvic ligaments, the strength of these ligaments was significantly less than we earlier expected. For this reason other functions of the SS/ST ligaments were considered, including the proprioceptive role. Indeed, histological studies revealed ramifying nerve terminals in the SS/ST ligaments. These terminals may represent the morphological substrate of the proprioceptive function associated with the ligaments. Our studies revealed that SS/ST ligaments might have a significant proprioceptive function providing information of the position of the pelvis. Consequently, the mechanical role of the ligaments in maintaining the structural integrity of the pelvis may be significantly less than previously assumed. Understanding the function of the SS/ST ligaments is crucial for providing more precise guidelines for patient management with injuries to the posterior pelvic region.

  18. The Relationship between MR Parameters and Biomechanical Quantities of Loaded Human Articular Cartilage in Osteoarthritis: An In-Vitro Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juráš, V.; Szomolányi, P.; Gäbler, S.; Frollo, I.; Trattnig, S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in MRI parameters during applied load directly in MR scanner and correlate these changes with biomechanical parameters of human articular cartilage. Cartilage explants from patients who underwent total knee replacement were examined in the micro-imaging system in 3T scanner. Respective MRI parameters (T1 without- and T1 with contrast agent as a marker of proteoglycan content, T2 as a marker of collagen network anisotropy and ADC as a measure of diffusivity) were calculated in pre- and during compression state. Subsequently, these parameters were compared to the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage, instantaneous modulus (I), equilibrium modulus (Eq) and time of tissue relaxation (τ). Significant load-induced changes of T2 and ADC were recorded. High correlation between T1Gd and I (r = 0.6324), and between ADC and Eq (r = -0.4884) was found. Multi-parametric MRI may have great potential in analyzing static and dynamic biomechanical behavior of articular cartilage in early stages of osteoarthritis (OA).

  19. Experimental and simulation studies of beam-beam compensation with Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2007-06-01

    Initially the Tevatron Electron Lenses (TELs) were intended for compensation of the beam-beam effect on the antiproton beam [1]. Owing to recent increase in the number of antiprotons and reduction in their emittance, it is the proton beam now that suffers most from the beam-beam effect [2]. We present results of beam studies, compare them with the results of computer simulations using LIFETRAC code and discuss possibilities of further improvements of the Beam-Beam Compensation efficiency in the Tevatron.

  20. Studies on Beam Formation in an Atomic Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nass, A.; Steffens, E.; Stancari, M.

    2009-08-04

    Atomic beam sources (ABS) are widely used workhorses producing polarized atomic beams for polarized gas targets and polarized ion sources. Although they have been used for decades the understanding of the beam formation processes is crude. Models were used more or less successfully to describe the measured intensity and beam parameters. ABS's are also foreseen for future experiments, such as PAX [1]. An increase of intensity at a high polarization would be beneficial. A direct simulation Monte-Carlo method (DSMC)[2] was used to describe the beam formation of a hydrogen or deuterium beam in an ABS. For the first time a simulation of a supersonic gas expansion on a molecular level for this application was performed. Beam profile and Time-of-Flight measurements confirmed the simulation results. Furthermore a new method of beam formation was tested, the Carrier Jet method [3], based on an expanded beam surrounded by an over-expanded carrier jet.

  1. Biomechanical and morphological study of a new elastic mesh (Ciberlastic) to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Calvo, B; Pascual, G; Peña, E; Pérez-Khöler, B; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a preclinical evaluation of the behaviour of a new type of abdominal LW prosthesis (Ciberlastic), which was designed with a non-absorbable elastic polyurethane monofilament (Assuplus, Assut Europe, Italy) to allow greater adaptability to mechanical area requirements and higher bio-mimicking with the newly formed surrounding tissues. Our hypothesis was that an increase in the elasticity of the mesh filament could improve the benefits of LW prostheses. To verify our hypothesis, we compared the short- and long-term behaviour of Ciberlastic and Optilene(®) elastic commercial meshes by repairing the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits. The implanted meshes were mechanically and histologically assessed at 14 and 180 days post-implant. We mechanically characterized the partially herniated repaired muscle tissue and also determined mesh shrinkage at different post-implant times. This was followed by a histological study in which the tissue incorporation process was analysed over time. The new prosthesis designed by our group achieved good behaviour that was similar to that of Optilene(®), one of the most popular LW prostheses on the market, with the added advantage of its elastic property. The mechanical properties are significantly lower than those of the polypropylene Optilene(®) mesh, and the new elastic mesh meets the basic mechanical requirements for positioning in the abdominal wall, which was also demonstrated by the absence of recurrences after implantation in the experimental model. We found that the growth of a connective tissue rich in collagen over the hernial defect and the proper deposit of the collagen fibres in the regenerated tissue substantially modified the original properties of the mesh, thereby increasing its biomechanical strength and making the whole tissue/mesh stiffer. PMID:26905037

  2. [A complex study of the movement biomechanics in patients with post-stroke hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    Skvortsov, D V; Bulatova, M A; Kovrazhkina, E A; Suvorov, A Iu; Ivanova, G E; Skvortsova, V I

    2012-01-01

    The authors present results of a pilot study on biomechanics of non-cyclic movements of the human consequent verticalization in the ontogenesis of patients with post-stroke hemiparesis (10 patients in the acute stage of cerebral stroke) and 10 healthy volunteers without neurologic and orthopedic pathology. Some movements of therapeutic exercises Balance (a model of ontogenetic kinesitherapy) have been selected for the study. Cinematic parameters have been recorded using a system of motion 3D video analysis, a kinematic model was build in accordance to standard protocols. The skin (native and straightened) electromyogram (EMG) was recorded synchronously with kinematic data using 16-channel electromyography from the following pairs of muscles: mm. sternocleido-mastoideus, trapezius (горизонтальная порция), biceps brachii, triceps brachii, rectus femoris, adductor magnus. Major differences in the EMG picture between patients and controls were: 1) the EMG "monotony" with the involvement of multiple additional muscles in locomotions with the prevalence of the peculiar "tonic" muscle activity (low amplitudes without distinct peaks), stretching along the whole cycle of movement. In controls, EMG demonstrated variability and had mostly "phasic" character with distinct 1 or 2 peaks; 2) the asymmetry of EMG profile in symmetric movements. i.e. when performed simultaneously from the right and from the left sides. The latter feature may be considered as predictive because it was never found in healthy people. It allows to identify objectively weak muscles even in the absence of visible parethis during the routine neurological examination.

  3. Biomechanical and morphological study of a new elastic mesh (Ciberlastic) to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Calvo, B; Pascual, G; Peña, E; Pérez-Khöler, B; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a preclinical evaluation of the behaviour of a new type of abdominal LW prosthesis (Ciberlastic), which was designed with a non-absorbable elastic polyurethane monofilament (Assuplus, Assut Europe, Italy) to allow greater adaptability to mechanical area requirements and higher bio-mimicking with the newly formed surrounding tissues. Our hypothesis was that an increase in the elasticity of the mesh filament could improve the benefits of LW prostheses. To verify our hypothesis, we compared the short- and long-term behaviour of Ciberlastic and Optilene(®) elastic commercial meshes by repairing the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits. The implanted meshes were mechanically and histologically assessed at 14 and 180 days post-implant. We mechanically characterized the partially herniated repaired muscle tissue and also determined mesh shrinkage at different post-implant times. This was followed by a histological study in which the tissue incorporation process was analysed over time. The new prosthesis designed by our group achieved good behaviour that was similar to that of Optilene(®), one of the most popular LW prostheses on the market, with the added advantage of its elastic property. The mechanical properties are significantly lower than those of the polypropylene Optilene(®) mesh, and the new elastic mesh meets the basic mechanical requirements for positioning in the abdominal wall, which was also demonstrated by the absence of recurrences after implantation in the experimental model. We found that the growth of a connective tissue rich in collagen over the hernial defect and the proper deposit of the collagen fibres in the regenerated tissue substantially modified the original properties of the mesh, thereby increasing its biomechanical strength and making the whole tissue/mesh stiffer.

  4. [A novel knee endoprosthesis with a physiological joint shape. Part 1: Biomechanical basics and tribological studies].

    PubMed

    Frosch, K-H; Floerkemeier, T; Abicht, C; Adam, P; Dathe, H; Fanghänel, J; Stürmer, K M; Kubein-Meesenburg, D; Nägerl, H

    2009-02-01

    The natural tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) functions according to a roll-glide mechanism. In the stance phase (0-20 degrees flexion), the femur rolls backwards over the tibia plateau, while further flexion causes increased gliding. This kinematics is based on the principle of a quadruple joint. The four morphological axes of rotation are the midpoints of the curvatures of the medial and lateral femoral condyles and the medial and lateral tibia plateau. In addition, the medial and lateral compartments are shifted a few millimetres in a sagittal direction, the medial tibia plateau being concave and the lateral plateau convex. In most knee arthroplasties, these factors are not taken into account; instead they are equipped with symmetrical medial and lateral joint surfaces. Thereby, the midpoints of the curvatures of the sagittal contours of the lateral and medial joint surfaces, on the femoral as well as on the tibial sides, create a common axis of rotation which does not allow a physiological roll-glide mechanism. The goal of this study was therefore to report on the biomechanical basis of the natural knee and to describe the development of a novel knee endoprosthesis based on a mathematical model. The design of the structurally new knee joint endoprosthesis has, on the lateral side, a convex shape of the tibial joint surface in a sagittal cross section. Furthermore, from a mathematical point of view, this knee endoprosthesis possesses essential kinematic and static properties similar to those of a physiological TFJ. Within the framework of the authorization tests, the endoprosthesis was examined according to ISO/WC 14243 in a knee simulator. The abrasion rates were, thereby, lower than or at least as good as those for conventional endoprostheses. The presented data demonstrate a novel concept in knee arthroplasty, which still has to be clinically confirmed by long term results.

  5. Improved wire stiffness with modified connection bolts in Ilizarov external frames: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Jan; Jettkant, Birger; Königshausen, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Seybold, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Frame stability in Ilizarov external fixators is mainly dependent on the tension of the transosseous wires, which are clamped to the ring by connection bolts. It was the purpose of this biomechanical study to investigate the holding capacity of a modified bolt design featuring a ruffled wire-bolt interface (TrueLok™) and its influence on wire stiffness in comparison with that of classic bolts featuring a smooth, unruffled wire-bolt interface. Six different ring and bolt configurations were tested using a simplified model consisting of a single ring and wire. The holding capacity at two different tightening torques (10 and 14 Nm) of classic cannulated bolts (CB) and slotted bolts (SB) was determined on Ilizarov and Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF™) rings, whereas the modified TrueLok™ CBs and SBs were used with the TrueLok™ rings. The wire stiffness was calculated via a regression analysis of the load-displacement graphs. The modified TrueLok™ bolts demonstrated significantly better slippage resistance than the classic bolts in all configurations and wire stiffness was significantly higher in the TrueLok™ frame set-ups. After maximum loading, all of the wires showed plastic deformation, including constant wire deflection and dent marks at the clamped wire ends. In conclusion, the decrease in wire stiffness can be explained mainly as a result of wire slippage, but plastic deformation and material yielding also contribute. The relatively simple modification made by roughening the wire-bolt interface results in improved holding capacity and wire stiffness. A frame that contains these modified TrueLok™ bolts should provide improved mechanical stiffness.

  6. Improved wire stiffness with modified connection bolts in Ilizarov external frames: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Jan; Jettkant, Birger; Königshausen, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Seybold, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Frame stability in Ilizarov external fixators is mainly dependent on the tension of the transosseous wires, which are clamped to the ring by connection bolts. It was the purpose of this biomechanical study to investigate the holding capacity of a modified bolt design featuring a ruffled wire-bolt interface (TrueLok™) and its influence on wire stiffness in comparison with that of classic bolts featuring a smooth, unruffled wire-bolt interface. Six different ring and bolt configurations were tested using a simplified model consisting of a single ring and wire. The holding capacity at two different tightening torques (10 and 14 Nm) of classic cannulated bolts (CB) and slotted bolts (SB) was determined on Ilizarov and Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF™) rings, whereas the modified TrueLok™ CBs and SBs were used with the TrueLok™ rings. The wire stiffness was calculated via a regression analysis of the load-displacement graphs. The modified TrueLok™ bolts demonstrated significantly better slippage resistance than the classic bolts in all configurations and wire stiffness was significantly higher in the TrueLok™ frame set-ups. After maximum loading, all of the wires showed plastic deformation, including constant wire deflection and dent marks at the clamped wire ends. In conclusion, the decrease in wire stiffness can be explained mainly as a result of wire slippage, but plastic deformation and material yielding also contribute. The relatively simple modification made by roughening the wire-bolt interface results in improved holding capacity and wire stiffness. A frame that contains these modified TrueLok™ bolts should provide improved mechanical stiffness. PMID:23394181

  7. Effects of a contoured articular prosthetic device on tibiofemoral peak contact pressure: a biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Roland; Thermann, Hajo; Paessler, Hans H.; Skrbensky, Gobert

    2007-01-01

    Many middle-aged patients are affected by localized cartilage defects that are neither appropriate for primary, nor repeat biological repair methods, nor for conventional arthroplasty. This in vitro study aims to determine the peak contact pressure in the tibiofemoral joint with a partial femoral resurfacing device (HemiCAP®, Arthrosurface Inc., Franklin, MA, USA). Peak contact pressure was determined in eight fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens using a Tekscan sensor placed in the medial compartment above the menisci. A closed loop robotic knee simulator was used to test each knee in static stance positions (5°/15°/30°/45°) with body weight ground reaction force (GRF), 30° flexion with twice the body weight (2tBW) GRF and dynamic knee-bending cycles with body weight GRF. The ground reaction force was adjusted to the living body weight of the cadaver donor and maintained throughout all cycles. Each specimen was tested under four different conditions: Untreated, flush HemiCAP® implantation, 1-mm proud implantation and 20-mm defect. A paired sampled t test to compare means (significance, P ≤ 0.05) was used for statistical analysis. On average, no statistically significant differences were found in any testing condition comparing the normal knee with flush device implantation. With the 1-mm proud implant, statistically significant increase of peak contact pressures of 217% (5° stance), 99% (dynamic knee bending) and 90% (30° stance with 2tBW) compared to the untreated condition was seen. No significant increase of peak contact pressure was evaluated with the 20-mm defect. The data suggests that resurfacing with the HemiCAP® does not lead to increased peak contact pressure with flush implantation. However, elevated implantation results in increased peak contact pressure and might be biomechanically disadvantageous in an in vivo application. PMID:17934718

  8. The Protective Effect of Kevlar ® Socks Against Hockey Skate Blade Injuries: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nauth, Aaron; Aziz, Mina; Tsuji, Matthew; Whelan, Daniel B.; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Zdero, Rad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Several recent high profile injuries to elite players in the National Hockey League (NHL) secondary to skate blade lacerations have generated significant interest in these injuries and possible methods to protect against them. These injuries are typically due to direct contact of the skate blade of another player with posterior aspect of the calf resulting in a range of potential injuries to tendons or neurovascular structures. The Achilles tendon is most commonly involved. Kevlar® reinforced socks have recently become available for hockey players to wear and are cited as providing possible protection against such injuries. However, there has been no investigation of the possible protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against skate blade injuries, and it is currently unknown what protective effects, if any, that these socks provide against these injuries. The proposed study sought to address this by conducting a biomechanical investigation of the protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against Achilles tendon injuries in a simulated model of skate blade injury using human cadaver limbs. This novel investigation is the first to address the possible benefits to hockey players of wearing Kevlar® reinforced socks. Methods: Seven matched pairs of human cadaver lower limbs were fitted with a Kevlar ® reinforced sock comprised of 60% Kevlar®/20% Coolmax® polyester/18 % Nylon/12% Spandex (Bauer Elite Performance Skate Sock) on one limb and a standard synthetic sock comprised of 51% polyester/47% nylon/2% spandex (Bauer Premium Performance Skate Sock) on the contralateral limb as a control. Each limb was then mounted on a Materials Testing System (MTS) with the ankle dorsiflexed to 90° and the knee held in full extension using a custom designed jig. Specimens were then impacted with a hockey skate blade directed at the posterior calf, 12 cm above the heel, at an angle of 45° and a speed of 31m/s, to a penetration depth of 4.3 cm, to

  9. Photon beam studies of magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovesey, S. W.

    1994-06-01

    The past decade has seen a surge of activity in the use of photon beam techniques to study magnetic properties of materials. By and large, in this period the experimental work has been accomplished with beams produced by electron synchrotron facilities. To date, it is fair to say that the surge of activity is underpinned by improvements in instrument performance, enjoyed at synchrotron sources, rather than outstanding intellectual advances. In consequence, improvements in the intensity at the sample, and the provision of good beams of polarized photons, which enable polarization induced discrimination effects to be exploited as a means of increasing the signal-to-noise, are particularly significant in the use for magnetic studies of photon beam techniques.

  10. Biomechanical Approaches for Studying Integration of Tissue Structure and Function in Mammary Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2010-01-01

    The structure and function of each individual mammary epithelial cell (MEC) is largely controlled by a bidirectional interchange of chemical and mechanical signals with the microenvironment. Most of these signals are tissue-specific, since they arise from the three-dimensional (3D) tissue organization and are modulated during mammary gland development, maturation, pregnancy, lactation, and involution. Although the important role played by structural and mechanical signals in mammary cell and tissue function is being increasingly recognized, quantitative biomechanical approaches are still scarce. Here we review currently available biomechanical tools that allow quantitative examination of individual cells, groups of cells or full monolayers in two-dimensional cultures, and cells in 3D cultures. Current technological limitations and challenges are discussed, with special emphasis on their potential applications in MEC biology. We argue that the combination of biomechanical tools with current efforts in mathematical modeling and in cell and molecular biology applied to 3D cultures provides a powerful approach to unravel the complexity of tissue-specific structure-function relationships. PMID:15838605

  11. Biomechanical approaches for studying integration of tissue structure and function in mammary epithelia.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Nelson, Celeste M; Bissell, Mina J

    2004-10-01

    The structure and function of each individual mammary epithelial cell (MEC) is largely controlled by a bidirectional interchange of chemical and mechanical signals with the microenvironment. Most of these signals are tissue-specific, since they arise from the three-dimensional (3D) tissue organization and are modulated during mammary gland development, maturation, pregnancy, lactation, and involution. Although the important role played by structural and mechanical signals in mammary cell and tissue function is being increasingly recognized, quantitative biomechanical approaches are still scarce. Here we review currently available biomechanical tools that allow quantitative examination of individual cells, groups of cells or full monolayers in two-dimensional cultures, and cells in 3D cultures. Current technological limitations and challenges are discussed, with special emphasis on their potential applications in MEC biology. We argue that the combination of biomechanical tools with current efforts in mathematical modeling and in cell and molecular biology applied to 3D cultures provides a powerful approach to unravel the complexity of tissue-specific structure-function relationships.

  12. A biomechanical evaluation of proximal femoral nail antirotation with respect to helical blade position in femoral head: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Ho; Garg, Anant Kumar; Oh, Jong-Keon; Oh, Chang-Wug; Lee, Sung-Jae; Myung-Rae, Cho; Kim, Min-Keun; Kim, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Despite new developments in the management of osteoporotic fractures, complications like screw cutout are still found in the fixation of proximal femur fractures even with biomechanically proven better implants like proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA). The purpose of this cadaveric study was to investigate the biomechanical stability of this device in relation to two common positions (center-center and inferior-center) of the helical blade in the femoral head in unstable trochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Eight pairs of human cadaveric femurs were used; in one group [center-center (C-C) group], the helical blade of PFNA was fixed randomly in central position both in anteroposterior and lateral view, whereas in the other group it was fixed in inferior one-third position in anteroposterior and in central position in lateral view [inferior-center (I-C) group]. Unstable intertrochanteric fracture was created and each specimen was loaded cyclically till load to failure Results: Angular and rotational displacements were significantly higher within the C-C group compared to the I-C group in both unloaded and loaded condition. Loading to failure was higher in the I-C group compared to the C-C group. No statistical significance was found for this parameter. Correlations between tip apex distance, cyclic loading which lead to femoral head displacement, and ultimate load to failure showed a significant positive relationship. Conclusion: The I-C group was superior to the C-C group and provided better biomechanical stability for angular and rotational displacement. This study would be a stimulus for further experimental studies with larger number specimens and complex loading protocols at multicentres. PMID:23325963

  13. Minimally invasive reconstruction of lateral tibial plateau fractures using the jail technique: a biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study described a novel, minimally invasive reconstruction technique of lateral tibial plateau fractures using a three-screw jail technique and compared it to a conventional two-screw osteosynthesis technique. The benefit of an additional screw implanted in the proximal tibia from the anterior at an angle of 90° below the conventional two-screw reconstruction after lateral tibial plateau fracture was evaluated. This new method was called the jail technique. Methods The two reconstruction techniques were tested using a porcine model (n = 40). Fracture was simulated using a defined osteotomy of the lateral tibial plateau. Load-to-failure and multiple cyclic loading tests were conducted using a material testing machine. Twenty tibias were used for each reconstruction technique, ten of which were loaded in a load-to-failure protocol and ten cyclically loaded (5000 times) between 200 and 1000 N using a ramp protocol. Displacement, stiffness and yield load were determined from the resulting load displacement curve. Failure was macroscopically documented. Results In the load-to-failure testing, the jail technique showed a significantly higher mean maximum load (2275.9 N) in comparison to the conventional reconstruction (1796.5 N, p < 0.001). The trend for better outcomes for the novel technique in terms of stiffness and yield load did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). In cyclic testing, the jail technique also showed better trends in displacement that were not statistically significant. Failure modes showed a tendency of screws cutting through the bone (cut-out) in the conventional reconstruction. No cut-out but a bending of the lag screws at the site of the additional third screw was observed in the jail technique. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that the jail and the conventional technique have seemingly similar biomechanical properties. This suggests that the jail technique may be a feasible alternative to

  14. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  15. Experimental studies of compensation of beam beam effects with Tevatron electron lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Bishofberger, K.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-04-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this paper, we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980 GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron electron lenses.

  16. Biomechanics of fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix studied by Brillouin scattering

    PubMed Central

    Palombo, Francesca; Winlove, C. Peter; Edginton, Ryan S.; Green, Ellen; Stone, Nick; Caponi, Silvia; Madami, Marco; Fioretto, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) spectroscopy is a technique that is able to detect thermally excited phonons within a material. The speed of propagation of these phonons can be determined from the magnitude of the Brillouin frequency shift between incident and scattered light, thereby providing a measure of the mechanical properties of the material in the gigahertz range. The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices of biological tissues and their constituent biopolymers are important for normal tissue function and disturbances in these properties are widely implicated in disease. BLS offers the prospect of measuring mechanical properties on a microscopic scale in living tissues, thereby providing insights into structure–function relationships under normal and pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated BLS in collagen and elastin—the fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Measurements were made on type I collagen in rat tail tendon, type II collagen in articular cartilage and nuchal ligament elastin. The dependence of the BLS spectrum on fibre orientation was investigated in a backscattering geometry using a reflective substrate. Two peaks, a bulk mode arising from phonon propagation along a quasi-radial direction to the fibre axis and a mode parallel to the surface, depending on sample orientation relative to the fibre axis, could be distinguished. The latter peak was fitted to a model of wave propagation through a hexagonally symmetric elastic solid, and the five components of the elasticity tensor were combined to give axial and transverse Young's, shear and bulk moduli of the fibres. These were 10.2, 8.3, 3.2 and 10.9 GPa, and 6.1, 5.3, 1.9 and 8 GPa for dehydrated type I collagen and elastin, respectively. The former values are close to those previously reported. A microfocused BLS approach was also applied providing selection of single fibres. The moduli of collagen and elastin are much higher than those measured at

  17. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Kaya, Motoshi; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    Compared with the other exercise, such as walking and cycling, rowing was expected to have some fitness advantage, while there were some misgivings about the risk of injury. The objectives of this study were to quantify biomechanical characteristics of rowing for fitness and rehabilitation and to offer normative data for the prevention of injury and for determining effective exercise. An experiment was performed to collect the kinematic and kinetic data during rowing by experienced and non-experienced subjects. A three-dimensional whole-body musculo-skeletal model was used to calculate the biomechanical loads, such as the joint moments, the muscular tensions, the joint contact forces and the energy consumption. The results of this study indicate that rowing is an effective exercise for rehabilitation and fitness. However, the non-experienced rower should acquire considerable skill to obtain sufficient exercise. The rowing cadence should be decided according to the purpose of the exercise.

  18. 6-D weak-strong beam-beam simulation study of proton lifetime in presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the calculated particle loss of a proton bunch in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in the RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run, we are introducing a DC electron beam with the same transverse profile as the proton beam to collide with the proton beam. Such a device is called an electron lens (e-lens). In this note we first present the optics and beam parameters and the tracking setup. Then we calculate and compare the particle loss of a proton bunch with head-on beam-beam compensation, phase advance of k{pi} between IP8 and the center of the e-lens and second order chromaticity correction. We scanned the proton beam's linear chromaticity, working point and bunch intensity. We also scanned the electron beam's intensity, transverse beam size. The effect of the electron-proton transverse offset in the e-lens was studied. In the study 6-D weak-strong beam-beam interaction model a la Hirata is used for proton collisions at IP6 and IP8. The e-lens is modeled as 8 slices. Each slice is modeled with as drift - (4D beam-beam kick) - drift.

  19. Biomechanical characteristics of bone in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: An in-vivo randomized controlled experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Korres, Nektarios; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Pavlou, George; Mitsoudis, Athanasios; Perrea, Despina N; Zoumbos, Aristedes B

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vivo effects of type I diabetes on the mechanical strength of tibial bone in a rodent model. METHODS: The biomechanical effect of diabetes on the structural integrity of the tibia in streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats was analysed. Induction of diabetes was achieved by an intra-peritoneal injection and confirmed by measuring serial blood glucose levels (> 150 mg/dL). After 8 wk the tibiae were harvested and compared to a control group. Biomechanical analysis of harvested tibiae was performed using a three-point bending technique on a servo hydraulic MTS 858 MiniBionix frame. Maximum force applied to failure (N), stiffness (N × mm) and energy absorbed (N/mm) were recorded and plotted on load displacement curves. A displacement control loading mode of 1 mm/min was selected to simulate quasi-static loading conditions. Measurements from load-displacement curves were directly compared between groups. RESULTS: Fourteen streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats were compared against nineteen non-diabetic controls. An average increase of 155.2 g in body weight was observed in the control group compared with only 5 g in the diabetic group during the experimental study period. Levels of blood glucose increased to 440.25 mg/dL in the diabetic group compared to 116.62 mg/dL in the control group.The biomechanical results demonstrate a highly significant reduction in the maximum load to failure from 69.5 N to 58 N in diabetic group compared to control (P = 0.011). Energy absorption to fracture was reduced from 28.2 N in the control group to 23.5 N in the diabetic group (P = 0.082). No significant differences were observed between the groups for bending stiffness. CONCLUSION: Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rodents reduces the maximum force and energy absorption to failure of bone, suggesting a predisposition for fracture risk. PMID:23878780

  20. Physical modelling in biomechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, M A R

    2003-01-01

    Physical models, like mathematical models, are useful tools in biomechanical research. Physical models enable investigators to explore parameter space in a way that is not possible using a comparative approach with living organisms: parameters can be varied one at a time to measure the performance consequences of each, while values and combinations not found in nature can be tested. Experiments using physical models in the laboratory or field can circumvent problems posed by uncooperative or endangered organisms. Physical models also permit some aspects of the biomechanical performance of extinct organisms to be measured. Use of properly scaled physical models allows detailed physical measurements to be made for organisms that are too small or fast to be easily studied directly. The process of physical modelling and the advantages and limitations of this approach are illustrated using examples from our research on hydrodynamic forces on sessile organisms, mechanics of hydraulic skeletons, food capture by zooplankton and odour interception by olfactory antennules. PMID:14561350

  1. [A biomechanical study on the morphological changing process of human bitemarks].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinmin; Sun, Dahong; Wu, Yan

    2004-08-01

    This is a biomechanical research in the morphological changing process of human bitemarks on the skin of dogs. The human bitemarks were made on the live and dead dogs by different tooth and occlusal force. The changing process of the bitemarks were recorded for a long time and its related morphological parameters were measured. Then multiple stepwise regression analysis was made to disclose the relationship of the shape of the bitemarks to occlusal force, time, and tooth area, tooth width and thickness. The mathematic relationship of the morphological changing process of the bitemark with occlusal force, time and tooth shape was established. PMID:15357446

  2. Application Of Biomechanics Cinematography To The Study Of Sports And Industrial Injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagenhoef, Stanley

    1982-02-01

    A personal history of biomechanical analyses from motion pictures is presented. The areas of work are of total body motions of athletes in many sports, analysis of work-related injuries in industry, measurements of synthetic turfs, diagnosis of muscular imbalance, and animal motion. A film presentation illustrates each of these areas.The filming and analysing of any motion should produce data that has practical applications. This means taking measured data, interpreting it properly, and then using the information to actually obtain useful results. The practical application of data obtained from the high speed filming of humans and animals is presented here.

  3. Biomechanical Factors Affecting Dave Dravecky's Return to Competitive Pitching: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Schachter, C L; Canham, P B; Mottola, M F

    1992-01-01

    Dave Dravecky, pitcher for the San Francisco Giants, returned to competition 10 months after surgical removal of a desmoid tumor in the deltoid muscle and cryosurgery of the humerus of his pitching arm. While delivering a pitch, Dravecky sustained a spiral fracture of his humerus. Abnormal loading and muscle balance, changes in bone geometry, stress concentration, and fatigue failure may have contributed to the fracture that halted Dave Dravecky's comeback. Exploration of these biomechanical factors may help the reader contemplate a baseball pitcher's return to high performance after musculoskeletal injury, trauma, and surgery. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1992;16(1):2-5.

  4. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Andrew P.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  5. Simulation study of beam-beam effects in ion beams with large space charge tuneshift

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.

    2012-05-20

    During low-energy operations with gold-gold collisions at 3.85 GeV beam energy, significant beam lifetime reductions have been observed due to the beam-beam interaction in the presence of large space charge tuneshifts. These beam-beam tuneshift parameters were about an order of magnitude smaller than during regular high energy operations. To get a better understanding of this effect, simulations have been performed. Recent results are presented.

  6. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam.

    PubMed

    Gloi, Aime M

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12-20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6-9 MeV). PMID:27651563

  7. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Gloi, Aime M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12–20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6–9 MeV).

  8. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Gloi, Aime M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12–20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6–9 MeV). PMID:27651563

  9. Biomechanical behaviour of cerebral aneurysm and its relation with the formation of intraluminal thrombus: a patient-specific modelling study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Xiaoyang

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is an irreversible dilatation causing intracranial haemorrhage with severe complications. It is assumed that the biomechanical factor plays a significant role in the development of cerebral aneurysm. However, reports on the correlations between the formation of intraluminal thrombus and the flow pattern, wall shear stress (WSS) distribution of the cerebral aneurysm as well as wall compliance are still limited. In this research, patient-specific numerical simulation was carried out for three cerebral aneurysms based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data-sets. The interaction between pulsatile blood and aneurysm wall was taken into account. The biomechanical behaviour of cerebral aneurysm and its relation with the formation of intraluminal thrombus was studied systematically. The results of the numerical simulation indicated that the region of low blood flow velocity and the region of swirling recirculation were nearly coincident with each other. Besides, there was a significant correlation between the slow swirling flow and the location of thrombus deposition. Excessively low WSS was also found to have strong association with the regions of thrombus formation. Moreover, the relationship between cerebral aneurysm compliance and thrombus deposition was discovered. The patient-specific modelling study based on fluid-structure interaction) may provide a basis for future investigation on the prediction of thrombus formation in cerebral aneurysm. PMID:22292428

  10. Dinosaur biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R. McNeill

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result. PMID:16822743

  11. Dinosaur biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R McNeill

    2006-08-01

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result.

  12. Electron beam, laser beam and plasma arc welding studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    This program was undertaken as an initial step in establishing an evaluation framework which would permit a priori selection of advanced welding processes for specific applications. To this end, a direct comparison of laser beam, electron beam and arc welding of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was undertaken. Ti-6Al-4V was selected for use in view of its established welding characteristics and its importance in aerospace applications.

  13. Biomechanical studies on aliphatic physically crosslinked poly(urethane urea) for blood contact applications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vinoy; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2008-07-01

    Hydrophobic and physically crosslinked (virtually crosslinked through hydrogen bonding) aliphatic poly(urethane urea)s were developed and characterized for its biomechanical properties. The aging under induced-stress (bend samples) condition reveals resistance of poly(urethane urea) to environmental stress corrosion cracking (ESC) in hydrolytic media, Ringer's solution and phosphate buffered saline at 50 degrees C. The strain-induced (20% tensile strain) and aged polymer in hydrolytic enzyme medium, papain and in buffer reveals increase of elastic modulus in papain enzyme and papain buffer. The increase of elastic modulus is attributed to unidirectional reorganisation of chains under continually strained conditions. The polymer exposed in boiling alcoholic potassium hydroxide solution (accelerated hydrolytic chemical degradation) reveals no degradation. A comparative evaluation of poly(ether urethane urea)s reveals inferior properties. Poly(ether urethane urea)s polymer undergo hydrolytic degradation in boiling alcoholic potassium hydroxide solution. The candidate poly(urethane urea) HFL 18-PUU is more promising elastomer for long-term biomechanically sensitive blood contact applications such as heart valve and blood pump diaphragm of left ventricular assist device.

  14. Biomechanical studies on aliphatic physically crosslinked poly(urethane urea) for blood contact applications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vinoy; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2008-07-01

    Hydrophobic and physically crosslinked (virtually crosslinked through hydrogen bonding) aliphatic poly(urethane urea)s were developed and characterized for its biomechanical properties. The aging under induced-stress (bend samples) condition reveals resistance of poly(urethane urea) to environmental stress corrosion cracking (ESC) in hydrolytic media, Ringer's solution and phosphate buffered saline at 50 degrees C. The strain-induced (20% tensile strain) and aged polymer in hydrolytic enzyme medium, papain and in buffer reveals increase of elastic modulus in papain enzyme and papain buffer. The increase of elastic modulus is attributed to unidirectional reorganisation of chains under continually strained conditions. The polymer exposed in boiling alcoholic potassium hydroxide solution (accelerated hydrolytic chemical degradation) reveals no degradation. A comparative evaluation of poly(ether urethane urea)s reveals inferior properties. Poly(ether urethane urea)s polymer undergo hydrolytic degradation in boiling alcoholic potassium hydroxide solution. The candidate poly(urethane urea) HFL 18-PUU is more promising elastomer for long-term biomechanically sensitive blood contact applications such as heart valve and blood pump diaphragm of left ventricular assist device. PMID:18305906

  15. Marking-dots digital image correlation and application to studies of spinal biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinlong; Sun, Cuiru; Qin, Yuwen; Ji, Xinhua

    2005-04-01

    A method of marking-dots digital image correlation is developed to measure the biomechanics behavior of cattle spine. In the system, a video camera and personal computer are used to acquire digitized images of a random speckle pattern on the surface of a marking-dot before and after deformation. The method of making-dots digital image correlation can immediately measure the transformation by tracking the gray value pattern in small local neighborhoods commonly referred to as subsets. In the experiment, a specimen was selected from the cattle's spine that was covered with some muscles and tissues. It is apparent that the covering muscles and tissues cannot be treated as the information carrier, for they must be kept active and moist curing by the physiological brine in the course of the experiment. In order to solve the problem, the marking-dots were fixed into the vertebrae, and the front surface of a marking-dot was coated with a thin layer of white paint and splattered with black spot so as to create a random black-on-white speckle pattern. Experimental results have shown that the marking-dots digital image correlation method can be applied to the measurement of the biomechanical behavior of cattle spine, and offer an effective measurement tool to research the range of motion of the adjacent segment in spine under intervertebral fusion.

  16. Competing influences on morphological modularity in biomechanical systems: a case study in mantis shrimp.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Philip S L; Smith, Danielle C; Patek, S N

    2016-05-01

    Related species that share similar biomechanical systems and segmentation patterns may exhibit different patterns of morphological covariation. We examined morphological covariation of the potent prey capture appendage of two mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) species-a spearer (Squilla empusa) and smasher (Gonodactylaceus falcatus). We assessed three frameworks for modularity, two based on the biomechanics of the appendage and one based on its segmentation as a proxy for shared developmental pathways. We collected morphometric data from S. empusa, and compared morphological covariation patterns across the raptorial appendage with patterns from a new analysis of previously published morphometric data from G. falcatus. The relative importance of the different hypothetical influences differed between the two species, and was dependent on whether specimens were analyzed all together or subdivided based on sex or sub-populations, including one particularly distinct population in the Gulf of Mexico. We also found an intriguing handedness pattern in which right-hand appendages had a variable number of spines, whereas the left had a constant number of spines. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of testing multiple, alternative frameworks for morphological covariation and suggest that mantis shrimp experience contrasting influences on covariation depending on their feeding mechanisms. PMID:27161948

  17. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Patrick; Beach, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this study was to (1) review and analyze the state-of-art in beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) by identifying potential game-changing applications, (2) formulate a roadmap of technology development, and (3) identify key near-term technology demonstrations to rapidly advance elements of BEP technology to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. The two major areas of interest were launching payloads and space propulsion. More generally, the study was requested and structured to address basic mission feasibility. The attraction of beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) is the potential for high specific impulse while removing the power-generation mass. The rapid advancements in high-energy beamed-power systems and optics over the past 20 years warranted a fresh look at the technology. For launching payloads, the study concluded that using BEP to propel vehicles into space is technically feasible if a commitment to develop new technologies and large investments can be made over long periods of time. From a commercial competitive standpoint, if an advantage of beamed energy for Earth-to-orbit (ETO) is to be found, it will rest with smaller, frequently launched payloads. For space propulsion, the study concluded that using beamed energy to propel vehicles from low Earth orbit to geosynchronous Earth orbit (LEO-GEO) and into deep space is definitely feasible and showed distinct advantages and greater potential over current propulsion technologies. However, this conclusion also assumes that upfront infrastructure investments and commitments to critical technologies will be made over long periods of time. The chief issue, similar to that for payloads, is high infrastructure costs.

  18. Biomechanics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  19. Research Techniques in Biomechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Terry

    Biomechanics involves the biological human beings interacting with his/her mechanical environment. Biomechanics research is being done in connection with sport, physical education, and general motor behavior, and concerns mechanics independent of implements. Biomechanics research falls in the following two general categories: (1) that specific…

  20. Amputee walking training: a preliminary study of biomechanical measurements of stance and balance.

    PubMed

    Summers, G D; Morrison, J D; Cochrane, G M

    1988-01-01

    Biomechanical parameters of stance and balance were recorded in ten unilateral lower limb amputees at the beginning and end of walking training. Measurements were carried out using a Double Video Forceplate (DVF), a machine developed at University College, London, Bioengineering Centre, Roehampton. During free standing on the DVF there was a mean increase in weight-bearing under the prosthetic foot from 32% body weight (1st session) to 41% body weight (final session), p less than 0.01. Maximum weight-bearing during leaning as far as possible onto the prosthesis increased from a mean of 54% body weight to 63% body weight, p less than 0.01. These simple measurements of weight distribution between the feet can be of value during walking training to monitor progress and can accurately record improvement for research purposes. PMID:3391935

  1. Bone-on-Bone versus Hardware Impingement in Total Hips: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jacob M.; Pedersen, Douglas R.; Callaghan, John J.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Dislocation remains a serious concern for total hip arthroplasty (THA). Impingement, typically between the implant femoral neck and the acetabular cup, remains the most common dislocation impetus. Wear reductions from recent bearing technology advancements have encouraged introduction of substantially increased femoral head diameters. However, there is some evidence that range of motion with larger head sizes is limited by bone-on-bone, rather than hardware, impingement. While all impingement events are of course undesirable, currently little is known biomechanically if these two impingement modes differ in terms of generation of potentially deleterious stress concentrations or with regard to dislocation resistance. Finite element (FE) analysis was therefore used to parametrically investigate the role of head diameter on the local biomechanics of bone-on-bone versus component-on-component impingement events. Of several dislocation-prone patient motion challenges considered, only squatting consistently resulted in bone-on-bone (as opposed to hardware) impingement. Implant stress concentrations arising from hardware impingement during squatting were greater than those from bony impingement, for all head sizes considered. Additionally, dislocation resistance was substantially greater for instances of bony impingement versus hardware-only impingement. These findings suggest that hardware impingement may still be a/the the predominant mode of impingement even with the use of larger femoral heads, for sub-optimally positioned cups. Additionally, the data indicate that, should impingement occur, impingements between the implant neck and cup are (1) more likely to dislocate, and (2) have a greater propensity for causing damage to the implant compared to impingement events involving bony members. PMID:23576916

  2. Hydroxyapatite coating on PEEK implants: Biomechanical and histological study in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Durham, John W; Montelongo, Sergio A; Ong, Joo L; Guda, Teja; Allen, Matthew J; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2016-11-01

    A bioactive two-layer coating consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated on cylindrical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Post-deposition heat treatments via variable frequency microwave annealing with and without subsequent autoclaving were used to crystallize the as-deposited amorphous HA layer. Microstructural analysis, performed by TEM and EDS, showed that these methods were capable of crystallizing HA coating on PEEK. The in vivo response to cylindrical PEEK samples with and without coating was studied by implanting uncoated PEEK and coated PEEK implants in the lateral femoral condyle of 18 rabbits. Animals were studied in two groups of 9 for observation at 6 or 18weeks post surgery. Micro-CT analysis, histology, and mechanical pull-out tests were performed to determine the effect of the coating on osseointegration. The heat-treated HA/YSZ coatings showed improved implant fixation as well as higher bone regeneration and bone-implant contact area compared to uncoated PEEK. The study offers a novel method to coat PEEK implants with improved osseointegration. PMID:27524073

  3. Biomechanics finds practical applications in aerospace research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanghe, X.

    1984-10-01

    Biomechanics is a branch of science which studies the mechanical properties of biological parts using the basic principles of mechanics and engineering. Formulas and quantitative calculations are used to analyze and understand physiological phenomena. Problems caused by weightlessness, coronary heart disease, blood circulation, use of medication, and application of biomechanics in aviation rescue are discussed.

  4. Prevention of stress fractures using custom biomechanical shoe orthoses.

    PubMed

    Finestone, A; Giladi, M; Elad, H; Salmon, A; Mendelson, S; Eldad, A; Milgrom, C

    1999-03-01

    In a prospective study of stress fractures the hypothesis that training with custom made biomechanical shoe orthoses could lessen the incidence of stress fractures in infantry recruits was tested. Recruits were assigned randomly to groups and given soft biomechanical orthoses or semirigid biomechanical orthoses and compared with a control group that did not train in biomechanical orthoses. All recruits wore infantry boots with soles designed like those of basketball shoes. Recruits were examined biweekly during 14 weeks of basic training. The incidence of stress fractures was 15.7% for the recruits with the semirigid biomechanical orthoses, 10.7% for the recruits with the soft biomechanical orthoses, and 27% for the control group. The soft biomechanical orthoses were tolerated better by the recruits than were the semirigid devices. Among trainees at high risk for stress fractures, prophylactic use of custom made biomechanical orthoses may be warranted.

  5. Biomechanical and histologic investigation of cemented total hip arthroplasties. A study of autopsy-retrieved femurs after in vivo cycling.

    PubMed

    Maloney, W J; Jasty, M; Burke, D W; O'Connor, D O; Zalenski, E B; Bragdon, C; Harris, W H

    1989-12-01

    Eleven whole anatomic specimens of the femur were retrieved at autopsy from patients who previously had cemented total hip arthroplasty. Implant duration ranged from 0.5 to 210 months. Clinically and roentgenographically the implants were stable. A detailed biomechanical analysis evaluated bone strains and implant stability in both the single-limb stance and stair-climbing positions using a 100-pound spinal load. The stability offered by cement in these well-fixed prostheses was remarkable, with the maximum axial micromotion being 40 mu. This is a reflection of intimate osseointegration at the bone-cement interface with only rare intervening fibrous tissue. The strain gauge and photoelastic strain-coating studies revealed that marked stress shielding in the proximal medial femoral cortex persists long after a cemented femoral component is inserted. Even 17 years after surgery, the strain in the calcar region did not normalize. PMID:2582664

  6. A split-crank bicycle ergometer uses servomotors to provide programmable pedal forces for studies in human biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Worthen-Chaudhari, Lise; Schwandt, Douglas; Bevly, David M; Kautz, Steven A

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a novel computer-controlled bicycle ergometer, the TiltCycle, for use in human biomechanics studies of locomotion. The TiltCycle has a tilting (reclining) seat and backboard, a split pedal crankshaft to isolate the left and right loads to the feet of the pedaler, and two belt-driven, computer-controlled motors to provide assistance or resistance loads independently to each crank. Sensors measure the kinematics and force production of the legs to calculate work performed, and the system allows for goniometric and electromyography signals to be recorded. The technical description presented includes the mechanical design, low-level software and control algorithms, system identification and validation test results. PMID:20378483

  7. New method for detection of complex 3D fracture motion - Verification of an optical motion analysis system for biomechanical studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fracture-healing depends on interfragmentary motion. For improved osteosynthesis and fracture-healing, the micromotion between fracture fragments is undergoing intensive research. The detection of 3D micromotions at the fracture gap still presents a challenge for conventional tactile measurement systems. Optical measurement systems may be easier to use than conventional systems, but, as yet, cannot guarantee accuracy. The purpose of this study was to validate the optical measurement system PONTOS 5M for use in biomechanical research, including measurement of micromotion. Methods A standardized transverse fracture model was created to detect interfragmentary motions under axial loadings of up to 200 N. Measurements were performed using the optical measurement system and compared with a conventional high-accuracy tactile system consisting of 3 standard digital dial indicators (1 μm resolution; 5 μm error limit). Results We found that the deviation in the mean average motion detection between the systems was at most 5.3 μm, indicating that detection of micromotion was possible with the optical measurement system. Furthermore, we could show two considerable advantages while using the optical measurement system. Only with the optical system interfragmentary motion could be analyzed directly at the fracture gap. Furthermore, the calibration of the optical system could be performed faster, safer and easier than that of the tactile system. Conclusion The PONTOS 5 M optical measurement system appears to be a favorable alternative to previously used tactile measurement systems for biomechanical applications. Easy handling, combined with a high accuracy for 3D detection of micromotions (≤ 5 μm), suggests the likelihood of high user acceptance. This study was performed in the context of the deployment of a new implant (dynamic locking screw; Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland). PMID:22405047

  8. Further studies of shoulder and neck pain and exposures in customer service work with low biomechanical demands.

    PubMed

    Holte, Kari Anne; Westgaard, Rolf H

    2002-10-20

    The aim of the study was to establish insight into work exposures that cause shoulder and neck pain among occupational groups that have low biomechanical exposure and experience work stress from client/customer contact, among other exposures. Four occupational groups were studied, in health care (n = 20), retail (n = 22), banking (n = 26), and university secretaries (n = 26), a total of 94 volunteers. Thirty-nine were classified as pain-afflicted in the shoulder and neck, while 55 were pain-free. The subjects' perceptions of biomechanical and psychosocial exposures were established by use of quantitative questionnaires and by explorative interviews with open-ended questions, covering the same themes. Heart rate and trapezius EMG were recorded over a full workday and the following leisure period. Trapezius median and static activity during work were 3.3% and 0.3% EMG(max), only marginally higher than trapezius activity in the leisure period (2.7% and 0.2% EMG(max)). The quantitative questionnaire did not identify any variable that correlated with shoulder and neck pain except perceived general tension. The interviews established that the interaction with clients or customers was an important source of work stress. Such stress appeared to be a complex entity not easily characterized by established psychosocial questionnaires. The physiological variables were at most weakly elevated in periods with high stress as compared to periods with low stress. The authors caution against relying on standardized quantitative questionnaires and/or physiological recordings to characterize work stress in occupations with emotional stress through client/customer service work. PMID:12519522

  9. Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is a local event in the aneurysm wall that naturally demands tools to assess the risk for local wall rupture. Consequently, global parameters like the maximum diameter and its expansion over time can only give very rough risk indications; therefore, they frequently fail to predict individual risk for AAA rupture. In contrast, the Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment (BRRA) method investigates the wall’s risk for local rupture by quantitatively integrating many known AAA rupture risk factors like female sex, large relative expansion, intraluminal thrombus-related wall weakening, and high blood pressure. The BRRA method is almost 20 years old and has progressed considerably in recent years, it can now potentially enrich the diameter indication for AAA repair. The present paper reviews the current state of the BRRA method by summarizing its key underlying concepts (i.e., geometry modeling, biomechanical simulation, and result interpretation). Specifically, the validity of the underlying model assumptions is critically disused in relation to the intended simulation objective (i.e., a clinical AAA rupture risk assessment). Next, reported clinical BRRA validation studies are summarized, and their clinical relevance is reviewed. The BRRA method is a generic, biomechanics-based approach that provides several interfaces to incorporate information from different research disciplines. As an example, the final section of this review suggests integrating growth aspects to (potentially) further improve BRRA sensitivity and specificity. Despite the fact that no prospective validation studies are reported, a significant and still growing body of validation evidence suggests integrating the BRRA method into the clinical decision-making process (i.e., enriching diameter-based decision-making in AAA patient treatment).

  10. Effect of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone on Osseointegration of Titanium Implants: A Histologic and Biomechanical Study in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Marcelo Emir Requia; Valiati, Renato; Hubler, Roberto; Moraes, Aury Nunes; Antonini, Fernando; de Oliveira, Henrique do Couto; Pagnoncelli, Rogério Miranda

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the action of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on osseointegration of titanium implants in rabbits. Fourteen adult New Zealand rabbits, aged 30 weeks, were used in the study, and randomly divided into 2 groups. In each animal, 2 (2.2 mm × 6 mm) pure titanium implants were placed in the left tibia. In one group (test group), 1 IU (0.3 mg) of rhGH as a lyophilized powder was applied to each osteotomy site prior to implant placement. Only titanium implants were placed in osteotomy sites of the other group (control). Animals were humanely killed at 14 and 42 days after surgery, and samples were then prepared for histologic analysis and biomechanical test. The biomechanical test showed tensile pull-out stress values of 33.88 N/cm(2) for controls and 59.26 N/cm(2) for the rhGH group at 14 days and 25.99 N/cm(2) and 29.69 N/cm(2) for the control and the test group, respectively, at 42 days. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed more uniform and abundant bone tissue in contact with the implants for the test group at 14 days, and no differences between groups at 42 days. Furthermore, histologic analysis also showed accelerated bone repair in 14 days and a more advanced stage of bone remodeling for the rhGH-treated group when compared to controls after 42 days of repair. Such results show that the topical use of rhGH induces new bone formation in the early stages of bone repair and hence accelerates osseointegration of titanium dental implants.

  11. Biomechanical studies in an ovine model of non-accidental head injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R W G; Sandoz, B; Dutschke, J K; Finnie, J W; Turner, R J; Blumbergs, P C; Manavis, J; Vink, R

    2014-08-22

    This paper presents the head kinematics of a novel ovine model of non-accidental head injury (NAHI) that consists only of a naturalistic oscillating insult. Nine, 7-to-10-day-old anesthetized and ventilated lambs were subjected to manual shaking. Two six-axis motion sensors tracked the position of the head and torso, and a triaxial accelerometer measured head acceleration. Animals experienced 10 episodes of shaking over 30 min, and then remained under anesthesia for 6h until killed by perfusion fixation of the brain. Each shaking episode lasted for 20s resulting in about 40 cycles per episode. Each cycle typically consisted of three impulsive events that corresponded to specific phases of the head's motion; the most substantial of these were interactions typically with the lamb's own torso, and these generated accelerations of 30-70 g. Impulsive loading was not considered severe. Other kinematic parameters recorded included estimates of head power transfer, head-torso flexion, and rate of flexion. Several styles of shaking were also identified across episodes and subjects. Axonal injury, neuronal reaction and albumin extravasation were widely distributed in the hemispheric white matter, brainstem and at the craniocervical junction and to a much greater magnitude in lower body weight lambs that died. This is the first biomechanical description of a large animal model of NAHI in which repetitive naturalistic insults were applied, and that reproduced a spectrum of injury associated with NAHI. PMID:24974335

  12. Classroom Journal Club: Collaborative Study of Contemporary Primary Literature in the Biomechanics Classroom.

    PubMed

    Kuxhaus, Laurel; Corbiere, Nicole C

    2016-07-01

    Current engineering pedagogy primarily focuses on developing technical proficiency and problem solving skills; the peer-review process for sharing new research results is often overlooked. The use of a collaborative classroom journal club can engage students with the excitement of scientific discovery and the process of dissemination of research results, which are also important lifelong learning skills. In this work, a classroom journal club was implemented and a survey of student perceptions spanning three student cohorts was collected. In this collaborative learning activity, students regularly chose and discussed a recent biomechanics journal article, and were assessed based on specific, individual preparation tasks. Most student-chosen journal articles were relevant to topics discussed in the regular class lecture. Surveys assessed student perceptions of the activity. The survey responses show that, across all cohorts, students both enjoyed the classroom journal club and recognized it as an important learning experience. Many reported discussing their journal articles with others outside of the classroom, indicating good engagement. The results demonstrate that student engagement with primary literature can foster both technical knowledge and lifelong learning skills.

  13. Biomechanical behavior of valgus foot in children with cerebral palsy: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junchao; Wang, Lizhen; Mo, Zhongjun; Chen, Wei; Fan, Yubo

    2015-09-18

    Valgus foot (VF) is the most common foot deformity in children with cerebral palsy (CP), which seriously affects the foot balance in standing and posture control in walking. Little information about the locus and stress of internal bones was available. To accurately describe the biomechanical behavior of the internal bones of VF in CP, we compared the locus and stress of internal bones between the normal foot (NF) and VF by finite element models. Compared with the NF, displacement of the talus and navicular drop in VF increased by 109% and 171% in vertical direction respectively, and the locus of talus had a tendency to clockwise rotation and downward movement in coronal plane. In addition, the abduction angle of forefoot in VF increased up to 10.3°, which was twice more than that in the NF. Moreover, the lateral metatarsophalangeal joints were upward tilted 6.3° comparing with touchdown posture of NF, and peak von Mises stress of the internal bones in VF model concentrated on the fourth metatarsal. The simulation showed that locus of the forefoot, downward rotation of talus head and navicular drop were meaningful to quantify the collapse of medial longitudinal arch. It would provide some suggestions to the rehabilitation treatments of the CP children's VF.

  14. Dynamic biomechanics correlate with histopathology in human tibial cartilage: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Young, Allan A; Appleyard, Richard C; Smith, Margaret M; Melrose, James; Little, Christopher B

    2007-09-01

    Improved staging of cartilage degeneration is required, particularly during early stages when minimal surface damage is visible arthroscopically. Degradation of articular cartilage extracellular matrix, resulting from degenerative changes associated with osteoarthritis, can influence its functional properties. Cartilage mechanical properties therefore may provide a quantitative method for monitoring degenerative change in this tissue. We determined whether dynamic mechanical properties of cartilage (effective shear modulus and phase lag) measured with a handheld indenter correlated with histopathology scores, proteoglycan, and collagen content or expression of chondrocyte-specific (aggrecan, collagen II) or dedifferentiation (collagen I and III) genes in human osteoarthritic cartilage with International Cartilage Repair Society scores of 0 to 1. We observed an association between the histopathologic stage of cartilage disease and dynamic shear modulus and phase lag. In contrast, there generally was a poor relationship between cartilage biomechanical properties and biochemistry with the only noteworthy correlation being between shear modulus and collagen. Phase lag but not shear modulus correlated with gene expression. These data support the potential of dynamic indentation for assessing the stage of cartilage degeneration in tissue with minimal gross surface damage.

  15. Effects of the fibers distribution in the human eardrum: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gentil, Fernanda; Parente, Marco; Martins, Pedro; Garbe, Carolina; Santos, Carla; Areias, Bruno; Branco, Carla; Paço, João; Jorge, Renato Natal

    2016-06-14

    The eardrum separates the external ear from the middle ear and it is responsible to convert the acoustical energy into mechanical energy. It is divided by pars tensa and pars flaccida. The aim of this work is to analyze the susceptibility of the four quadrants of the pars tensa under negative pressure, to different lamina propria fibers distribution. The development of associated ear pathology, in particular the formation of retraction pockets, is also evaluated. To analyze these effects, a computational biomechanical model of the tympano-ossicular chain was constructed using computerized tomography images and based on the finite element method. Three fibers distributions in the eardrum middle layer were compared: case 1 (eardrum with a circular band of fibers surrounding all quadrants equally), case 2 (eardrum with a circular band of fibers that decreases in thickness in posterior quadrants), case 3 (eardrum without circular fibers in the posterior/superior quadrant). A static analysis was performed by applying approximately 3000Pa in the eardrum. The pars tensa of the eardrum was divided in four quadrants and the displacement of a central point of each quadrant analyzed. The largest displacements of the eardrum were obtained for the eardrum without circular fibers in the posterior/superior quadrant.

  16. Classroom Journal Club: Collaborative Study of Contemporary Primary Literature in the Biomechanics Classroom.

    PubMed

    Kuxhaus, Laurel; Corbiere, Nicole C

    2016-07-01

    Current engineering pedagogy primarily focuses on developing technical proficiency and problem solving skills; the peer-review process for sharing new research results is often overlooked. The use of a collaborative classroom journal club can engage students with the excitement of scientific discovery and the process of dissemination of research results, which are also important lifelong learning skills. In this work, a classroom journal club was implemented and a survey of student perceptions spanning three student cohorts was collected. In this collaborative learning activity, students regularly chose and discussed a recent biomechanics journal article, and were assessed based on specific, individual preparation tasks. Most student-chosen journal articles were relevant to topics discussed in the regular class lecture. Surveys assessed student perceptions of the activity. The survey responses show that, across all cohorts, students both enjoyed the classroom journal club and recognized it as an important learning experience. Many reported discussing their journal articles with others outside of the classroom, indicating good engagement. The results demonstrate that student engagement with primary literature can foster both technical knowledge and lifelong learning skills. PMID:26902674

  17. Beam dynamics studies for the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven M.

    2001-04-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band \\(~8-12 GHz\\) through Ka-band \\(~30-35 GHz\\) frequency regions. The relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator project, whose aim is to study TBAs based upon extended relativistic klystrons, is described, and a new simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed, self-consistent calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed together with a beam line design that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 rf cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficiently capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beam line.

  18. Biomechanical strain of goldsmiths.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Paula Emanuela Fernandes; Teixeira, Juliana Vieira Schmidt; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira; Gontijo, Leila Amaral

    2012-01-01

    The work of the goldsmiths consists in the manufacture of jewelry. The piece, be it an earring, bracelet or necklace, is hand-assembled. This task requires precision, skill, kindness and patience. In this work, we make use of tools such as cuticle clippers and rounded tip, beads or precious stones and also pieces of metal. This type of activity requires a biomechanical stress of hands and wrists. In order to quantify the biomechanical stress, we performed a case study to measure the movements performed by an assembly of pieces of jewelry. As method for research, filming was done during assembly of parts to a paste, using a Nikon digital camera, for 1 (one) hour. The film was edited by Kinovea software, and the task was divided into cycles, each cycle corresponds to a complete object. In one cycle, there are four two movements of supination and pronation movements of the forearm. The cycle lasts approximately sixteen seconds, totaling 1800 cycles in eight hours. Despite the effort required of the wrists, the activity shows no complaints from the employees, but this fact does not mischaracterizes the ability of employees to acquire repetitive strain injuries and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:22317096

  19. [Biomechanics of the shoulder].

    PubMed

    Gohlke, F

    2000-10-01

    The shoulder joint takes a special position among all the other joints of the human body because of its special requirements of stability and mobility. Knowledge of the biomechanics of the shoulder joint forms the basis for the development of modern concepts of reconstructive surgery and arthroplasty. Most of the biomechanical findings are the result of research performed on cadaver shoulders using increasingly sophisticated methods of measurement. These studies elucidate the interaction of the static and dynamic factors which contribute to the delicate balance of the glenohumeral joint. Recently performed research is increasingly being focussed on more detailed analyses of muscle forces and stress distribution in the subchondral bone and periarticular soft tissues. The efficiency of the computer systems now available has enabled the development of complex, virtual shoulder models and three-dimensional finite element analyses. In the future a pure mechanical understanding has to be modified to extend to a concept which includes more data obtained from living subjects, especially with regard to muscle activity under varying loads and neuromuscular feedback systems which currently are difficult to assess.

  20. Biomechanical strain of goldsmiths.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Paula Emanuela Fernandes; Teixeira, Juliana Vieira Schmidt; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira; Gontijo, Leila Amaral

    2012-01-01

    The work of the goldsmiths consists in the manufacture of jewelry. The piece, be it an earring, bracelet or necklace, is hand-assembled. This task requires precision, skill, kindness and patience. In this work, we make use of tools such as cuticle clippers and rounded tip, beads or precious stones and also pieces of metal. This type of activity requires a biomechanical stress of hands and wrists. In order to quantify the biomechanical stress, we performed a case study to measure the movements performed by an assembly of pieces of jewelry. As method for research, filming was done during assembly of parts to a paste, using a Nikon digital camera, for 1 (one) hour. The film was edited by Kinovea software, and the task was divided into cycles, each cycle corresponds to a complete object. In one cycle, there are four two movements of supination and pronation movements of the forearm. The cycle lasts approximately sixteen seconds, totaling 1800 cycles in eight hours. Despite the effort required of the wrists, the activity shows no complaints from the employees, but this fact does not mischaracterizes the ability of employees to acquire repetitive strain injuries and work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  1. Technology integration box beam failure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Ambur, D. R.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Davis, Randall C.; Farley, G. L.; Lotts, C. G.; Wang, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    Composite structures have the potential to be cost effective, structurally efficient primary aircraft structures. As part of the Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program to exploit this potential for heavily loaded aircraft structures, the design and fabrication of the technology integration box beam (TIBB) was completed. The TIBB is an advanced composite prototype structure for the center wing section of the Lockheed C-130 aircraft. The TIBB was tested for downbending, upbending, torsion, and combined upbending and torsion load conditions to verify the design. The TIBB failed at 83 percent of design ultimate load for the combined upbending and torsion load condition. Current analytical and experimental results are described for a study of the mechanisms that led to the failure of the TIBB. Experimental results include load, strain, and deflection data. An analytical study was conducted of the TIBB structural response. Analytical results include strain and deflection results from a global analysis of the TIBB.

  2. Studies of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Space-charge forces limit the possible transverse compression of high perveance ion beams that are used in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics applications; the minimum radius to which a beam can be focused is an increasing function of perveance. The limit can be overcome if a plasma is introduced in the beam path between the focusing element and the target in order to neutralize the space charge of the beam. This concept has been implemented on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL using Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPS). In our experiment at PPPL, we propagate a perveance-dominated ion beam through a FEPS to study the effect of the neutralizing plasma on the beam envelope and its evolution in time. A 30-60 keV space-charge-dominated Argon beam is focused with an Einzel lens into a FEPS located at the beam waist. The beam is intercepted downstream from the FEPS by a movable Faraday cup that provides time-resolved 2D current density profiles of the beam spot on target. We report results on: (a) dependence of charge neutralization on FEPS plasma density; (b) effects on beam emittance, and (c) time evolution of the beam envelope after the FEPS pulse. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Influences of tongue biomechanics on speech movements during the production of velar stop consonants: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan; Zandipour, Majid; Perkell, Joseph

    2003-09-01

    This study explores the following hypothesis: forward looping movements of the tongue that are observed in VCV sequences are due partly to the anatomical arrangement of the tongue muscles, how they are used to produce a velar closure, and how the tongue interacts with the palate during consonantal closure. The study uses an anatomically based two-dimensional biomechanical tongue model. Tissue elastic properties are accounted for in finite-element modeling, and movement is controlled by constant-rate control parameter shifts. Tongue raising and lowering movements are produced by the model mainly with the combined actions of the genioglossus, styloglossus, and hyoglossus. Simulations of V1CV2 movements were made, where C is a velar consonant and V is [a], [i], or [u]. Both vowels and consonants are specified in terms of targets, but for the consonant the target is virtual, and cannot be reached because it is beyond the surface of the palate. If V1 is the vowel [a] or [u], the resulting trajectory describes a movement that begins to loop forward before consonant closure and continues to slide along the palate during the closure. This pattern is very stable when moderate changes are made to the specification of the target consonant location and agrees with data published in the literature. If V1 is the vowel [i], looping patterns are also observed, but their orientation was quite sensitive to small changes in the location of the consonant target. These findings also agree with patterns of variability observed in measurements from human speakers, but they contradict data published by Houde [Ph.D. dissertation (1967)]. These observations support the idea that the biomechanical properties of the tongue could be the main factor responsible for the forward loops when V1 is a back vowel, regardless of whether V2 is a back vowel or a front vowel. In the [i] context it seems that additional factors have to be taken into consideration in order to explain the observations made

  4. Study of sex differences in the association between hip fracture risk and body parameters by DXA-based biomechanical modeling.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Masoud; Luo, Yunhua

    2016-09-01

    There is controversy about whether or not body parameters affect hip fracture in men and women in the same way. In addition, although bone mineral density (BMD) is currently the most important single discriminator of hip fracture, it is unclear if BMD alone is equally effective for men and women. The objective of this study was to quantify and compare the associations of hip fracture risk with BMD and body parameters in men and women using our recently developed two-level biomechanical model that combines a whole-body dynamics model with a proximal-femur finite element model. Sideways fall induced impact force of 130 Chinese clinical cases, including 50 males and 80 females, were determined by subject-specific dynamics modeling. Then, a DXA-based finite element model was used to simulate the femur bone under the fall-induced loading conditions and calculate the hip fracture risk. Body weight, body height, body mass index, trochanteric soft tissue thickness, and hip bone mineral density were determined for each subject and their associations with impact force and hip fracture risk were quantified. Results showed that the association between impact force and hip fracture risk was not strong enough in both men (r=-0.31,p<0.05) and women (r=0.42,p<0.001) to consider the force as a sole indicator of hip fracture risk. The correlation between hip BMD and hip fracture risk in men (r=-0.83,p<0.001) was notably stronger than that in women (r=-0.68,p<0.001). Increased body mass index was not a protective factor against hip fracture in men (r=-0.13,p>0.05), but it can be considered as a protective factor among women (r=-0.28,p<0.05). In contrast to men, trochanteric soft tissue thickness can be considered as a protective factor against hip fracture in women (r=-0.50,p<0.001). This study suggested that the biomechanical risk/protective factors for hip fracture are sex-specific. Therefore, the effect of body parameters should be considered differently for men and women in hip

  5. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Baertling, Y.; Hoppe, D.; Kuksanov, N.; Fadeev, S.; Salimov, R.

    2012-09-15

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  6. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography.

    PubMed

    Hampel, U; Bärtling, Y; Hoppe, D; Kuksanov, N; Fadeev, S; Salimov, R

    2012-09-01

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Two Types of Immediately Loaded Implants Using Biomechanical and Histomorphometric Tests: An Animal Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Movahedian, Bijan; Khalighinejad, Navid; Badrian, Hamid; Mohammad Razavi, Sayed; Nekouie, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In order to minimize the required time to regain esthetic and function, immediately loaded implants were suggested. The aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the Nisastan and XIve implants using biomechanical and histomorphometric tests. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, 6 Nisastan one-piece immediately loaded screw type implant (OPILS) and 6 Xive implants with 3.4 mm diameter and 11 mm long were used. The implants were immediately loaded with temporary coating. After three months, the torque required to break bone-implant contact was measured and was recorded. All implants were extracted with surrounding bone and histologically were evaluated. The data were inputted into the SPSS 11.5 to run student T-test statistical analyses (α = 0.05). Results. The success rates of both types of implants was 100%, and none of them failed due to mobility or bone loss. The mean removal torque value (RTV) was 142.08 and 40 N/Cm for Xive and Nisastan implants, respectively, and their RTVs showed a significant difference between two mentioned implants (P = 0.004). None of the histomorphometric values showed significant differences between the two implants (P > 0.05). Discussion. both systems have the capability to induce osseointegration under immediate loads but that Xive implants showed higher capability for bone contact. PMID:22852091

  8. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark, D.M.

    1993-12-01

    The authors have developed a novel technique for studying the photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals. In these experiments, radicals are generated by laser photodetachment of a fast (6-8 keV) mass-selected negative ion beam. The resulting radicals are photodissociated with a second laser, and the photofragments are collected and detected with high efficiency using a microchannel plate detector. The overall process is: ABC{sup -} {yields} ABC + e{sup -} {yields} A + BC, AB + C. Two types of fragment detection schemes are used. To map out the photodissociation cross-section of the radical, the photodissociation laser is scanned and the total photofragment yield is measured as a function of wavelength. In other experiments, the photodissociation frequency is fixed and the photofragment masses, kinetic energy release, and scattering angle is determined for each photodissociation event.

  9. Multiple beam antenna/switch system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    In the study of the Multiple Beam Antenna/Switch for the space to ground link (SGL) uplink and downlink services, several issues related to system engineering, antenna, transmit/receive, and switch systems were addressed and the results are provided. Bandwidth allocation at Ku band is inadequate to serve the data rate requirements for the forward and return services. Rain and depolarization effects at EHF, especially at Ka band, pose a significant threat to the link availabilities at heavy rain areas. Hardware induced effects such as the nonlinear characteristics of the power amplifier may necessitate the use of linearizers and limiters. It is also important to identify the components that are susceptible to the space radiation effects and shield or redesign them with rad-hard technologies for meeting the requirements of the space environment.

  10. Molecular beam studies of stratospheric photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Teresa Anne

    1998-12-01

    Photochemistry of chlorine oxide containing species plays a major role in stratospheric ozone depletion. This thesis discusses two photodissociation studies of the key molecules ClONO2 and ClOOCl which were previously thought to only produce Cl-atom (ozone depleting) products at wavelengths relevant to the stratosphere. The development of a molecular beam source of ClOOCl and the photodissociation dynamics of the model system Cl2O are also discussed. In the first chapter, the photochemistry of ClONO2 is examined at 308 nm using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy. Two primary decomposition pathways, leading to Cl + NO3 and ClO + NO2, were observed, with a lower limit of 0.33 for the relative yield of ClO. The angular distributions for both channels were anisotropic, indicating that the dissociation occurs within a rotational period. Chapter two revisits the photodissociation dynamics of Cl2O at 248 and 308 nm, on which we had previously reported preliminary findings. At 248 nm, three distinct dissociation pathways leading to Cl + ClO products were resolved. At 308 nm, the angular distribution was slightly more isotropic that previously reported, leaving open the possibility that Cl2O excited at 308 nm lives longer than a rotational period. Chapter three describes the development and optimization of a molecular beam source of ClOOCl. We utilized pulsed laser photolysis of ClA2O to generate ClO radicals, and cooled the cell to promote three body recombination to form ClOOCl. The principal components in the beam were Cl2, Cl2O, and ClOOCl. In the fourth chapter, the photodissociation dynamics of ClOOCl are investigated at 248 and 308 nm. We observed multiple dissociation pathways which produced ClO + ClO and 2Cl + O2 products. The relative Cl:ClO product yields are 1.0:0.13 and 1.0:0.20 for ClOOCl photolysis at 248 and 308 nm, respectively. The upper limit for the relative yield of the ClO + ClO channel was 0.19 at 248 nm and 0.31 at 308 nm

  11. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:26932087

  12. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  13. Beam Dynamics Simulation Platform and Studies of Beam Breakup in Dielectric Wakefield Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Gai, W.

    2010-11-04

    A particle-Green's function beam dynamics code (BBU-3000) to study beam breakup effects is incorporated into a parallel computing framework based on the Boinc software environment, and supports both task farming on a heterogeneous cluster and local grid computing. User access to the platform is through a web browser.

  14. A three-dimensional finite element study on the biomechanical behavior of an FGBM dental implant in surrounding bone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Xiang, Hong-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Dental implants made of functionally graded biomaterials (FGBM) have been receiving increasing attention due to their unique advantage of being able to simultaneously satisfy biocompatibility, strength, corrosion resistance, etc., which a single composition with a uniform structure cannot satisfy. This paper investigates the biomechanical behavior of a threaded FGBM dental implant/surrounding bone system under static and harmonic occlusal forces by using a three-dimensional finite element method. The implant is a mixture of a bioceramic and a biometal with a smooth gradient in both the material composition and properties in the longitudinal direction. The interaction of the implant and the supporting bone tissues is considered. Three contact conditions at the implant-bone interface are used to model different osseointegration stages. A comprehensive parametric study is conducted to highlight the influence of the material properties, the volume fraction index, the occlusal force orientation, and the osseointegration quality on the maximum von-Mises stress, deformation distribution, natural frequencies, and harmonic response.

  15. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics.

  16. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics. PMID:25162173

  17. An MRI-based leg model used to simulate biomechanical phenomena during cuff algometry: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Manafi-Khanian, Bahram; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cuff pressure stimulation is applicable for assessing deep-tissue pain sensitivity by exciting a variety of deep-tissue nociceptors. In this study, the relative transfer of biomechanical stresses and strains from the cuff via the skin to the muscle and the somatic tissue layers around bones were investigated. Cuff pressure was applied on the lower leg at three different stimulation intensities (mild pressure to pain). Three-dimensional finite element models including bones and three different layers of deep tissues were developed based on magnetic resonance images (MRI). The skin indentation maps at mild pressure, pain threshold, and intense painful stimulations were extracted from MRI and applied to the model. The mean stress under the cuff position around tibia was 4.6, 4.9 and around fibula 14.8, 16.4 times greater than mean stress of muscle surface in the same section at pain threshold and intense painful stimulations, respectively. At the same stimulation intensities, the mean strains around tibia were 36.4, 42.3 % and around fibula 32.9, 35.0 %, respectively, of mean strain on the muscle surface. Assuming strain as the ideal stimulus for nociceptors the results suggest that cuff algometry is less capable to challenge the nociceptors of tissues around bones as compared to more superficially located muscles.

  18. Study of a non-intrusive electron beam radius diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; DeVolder, B.G.; Goldstein, J.C.; Snell, C.M.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have evaluated the usefulness and limitation of a non-intrusive beam radius diagnostic which is based on the measurement of the magnetic moment of a high-current electron beam in an axisymmetric focusing magnetic field, and relates the beam root-mean-square (RMS) radius to the change in magnetic flux through a diamagnetic loop encircling the beam. An analytic formula that gives the RMS radius of the electron beam at a given axial position and a given time is derived and compared with results from a 2-D particle-in-cell code. The study has established criteria for its validity and optimal applications.

  19. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    PubMed

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  20. Biomechanical patterns of text-message distraction.

    PubMed

    Le, Peter; Hwang, Jaejin; Grawe, Sarah; Li, Jing; Snyder, Alison; Lee, Christina; Marras, William S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify biomechanical measures that can distinguish texting distraction in a laboratory-simulated driving environment. The goal would be to use this information to provide an intervention for risky driving behaviour. Sixteen subjects participated in this study. Three independent variables were tested: task (texting, visual targeting, weighted and non-weighted movements), task direction (front and side) and task distance (close and far). Dependent variables consisted of biomechanical moments, head displacement and the length of time to complete each task. Results revealed that the time to complete each task was higher for texting compared to other tasks. Peak moments during texting were only distinguishable from visual targeting. Peak head displacement and cumulative biomechanical exposure measures indicated that texting can be distinguished from other tasks. Therefore, it may be useful to take into account both temporal and biomechanical measures when considering warning systems to detect texting distraction. PMID:25867196

  1. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  2. Technology integration box beam failure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Davis, R. C.; Farley, G. L.; Lotts, C. G.; Wang, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe current results from an on-going study of the mechanisms that led to the failure of the TIBB. Experimental and analytical results are presented. Experimental results include load, strain, and deflection data for the TIBB (Technology Integration Box Beam). An analytical investigation was conducted to compliment the experimental investigation and to gain additional insight into the TIBB structural response. Analytical results include strain and deflection results from a global analysis of the TIBB. A local analysis of the failure region is being completed. These analytical results are validated through comparisons with the experimental results from the TIBB tests. The experimental and analytical results from the TIBB tests are used to determine a sequence of events that may have resulted in failure of the TIBB. A potential cause of failure is high stresses in a stiffener runout region. Typical analytical results are presented for a stiffener runout specimen that is being defined to simulate the TIBB failure mechanisms. The results of this study are anticipated to provide better understanding of potential failure mechanisms in composite aircraft structures, to lead to future design improvements, and to identify needed analytical tools for design and analysis.

  3. A Biomechanical Modeling Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis Oris Muscle and Jaw Posture on Lip Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavness, Ian; Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Demolin, Didier; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors' general aim is to use biomechanical models of speech articulators to explore how possible variations in anatomical structure contribute to differences in articulatory strategies and phone systems across human populations. Specifically, they investigated 2 issues: (a) the link between lip muscle anatomy and variability in…

  4. Beam dynamics studies for the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    2001-06-22

    Two-beam accelerators based upon relativistic klystron s (RK s) have been proposed as power sources for future generation linear electron-positron colliders. These drivers are known to suffer from several transverse beam break-up (BBU) instabilities. A program to study a particular technique (the betatron node scheme ) for ameliorating the high frequency BBU is under way at LBNL. Central to this study are the pillbox RF cavities and RF beam position monitors (BPM s) employed. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the RF components. Performance details during operation are also discussed.

  5. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  6. Technology integration box beam failure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Davis, R. C.; Farley, G. L.; Lotts, C. G.; Wang, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Composite structures have the potential to be cost-effective, structurally efficient primary aircraft structures. The Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program has the goal to develop the technology to exploit this potential for heavily loaded aircraft structures. As part of the ACT Program, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company completed the design and fabrication of the Technology Integration Box Beam (TIBB). The TIBB is an advanced composite prototype structure for the center wing section of the C-130 aircraft. Lockheed subjected the TIBB to downbending, upbending, torsion and combined upbending and torsion load conditions to verify the design. The TIBB failed at 83 percent of design ultimate load for the combined upbending and torsion load condition. The objective of this paper is to describe the mechanisms that led to the failure of the TIBB. The results of a comprehensive analytical and experimental study are presented. Analytical results include strain and deflection results from both a global analysis of the TIBB and a local analysis of the failure region. These analytical results are validated by experimental results from the TIBB tests. The analytical and experimental results from the TIBB tests are used to determine a sequence of events that resulted in failure of the TIBB. A potential cause of failure is high stresses in a stiffener runout region. Analytical and experimental results are also presented for a stiffener runout specimen that was used to simulate the TIBB failure mechanisms.

  7. The neural mechanism of biomechanical constraints in the hand laterality judgment task: A near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shuang; Oi, Misato; Sekiyama, Kaoru; Saito, Hirofumi

    2016-08-01

    The mental rotation (MR) task is defined as a discrimination task between mirror-reversed images involving discrepancy in angular orientation. Various studies have shown that the MR task likely causes mental imagery, that is, visual and/or motor imagery, depending on stimulus types. When figures of rotated hands are presented to be identified as a left or right hand, reaction times (RTs) usually show an effect of biomechanical constraints (BC): a hand in a position difficult to reach with a real movement results in longer RTs. The BC effect as a marker of motor imagery has been investigated by brain function measures (fMRI, PET, EEG and MEG) as well as by RTs. Unlike other neuroimaging techniques, NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy) imposes few physical constraints on participants and is relatively unaffected by motion artifact, which permits serial assessments of tasks in relaxed and natural environment. Focusing on these advantages, a NIRS study on motor imagery in HLJ was carried out in which we measured the brain activation during the HLJ task and a single character judgment task. In the HLJ task, both the RTs and the activity of the left superior parietal lobe (SPL) showed an interaction between Hand (left, right) and Orientation (135°, 225°) i.e., the BC effect, but not in the character judgment task. More specifically, in the analysis of BC-related activity of SPL, although the Hand×Orientation interaction was significant, the left SPL for the left hand significantly increased from 135° to 225°, but the reversed increase (from 225° to 135°) was not found for the right hand. These results suggest that left SPL is involved in the BC effect and NIRS differentiates left hand awkwardness of right-hander in the HLJ task.

  8. Propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bley, Andre Serra; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF) joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT), which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM), gluteus medius (GMed), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress. PMID:24830289

  9. Propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bley, Andre Serra; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF) joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT), which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM), gluteus medius (GMed), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress.

  10. Effect of adipose-derived stromal cells and BMP12 on intrasynovial tendon repair: A biomechanical, biochemical, and proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Gelberman, Richard H; Shen, Hua; Kormpakis, Ioannis; Rothrauff, Benjamin; Yang, Guang; Tuan, Rocky S; Xia, Younan; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly; Silva, Matthew J; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2016-04-01

    The outcomes of flexor tendon repair are highly variable. As recent efforts to improve healing have demonstrated promise for growth factor- and cell-based therapies, the objective of the current study was to enhance repair via application of autologous adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) and the tenogenic growth factor bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 12. Controlled delivery of cells and growth factor was achieved in a clinically relevant canine model using a nanofiber/fibrin-based scaffold. Control groups consisted of repair-only (no scaffold) and acellular scaffold. Repairs were evaluated after 28 days of healing using biomechanical, biochemical, and proteomics analyses. Range of motion was reduced in the groups that received scaffolds compared to normal. There was no effect of ASC + BMP12 treatment for range of motion or tensile properties outcomes versus repair-only. Biochemical assays demonstrated increased DNA, glycosaminoglycans, and crosslink concentration in all repair groups compared to normal, but no effect of ASC + BMP12. Total collagen was significantly decreased in the acellular scaffold group compared to normal and significantly increased in the ASC + BMP12 group compared to the acellular scaffold group. Proteomics analysis comparing healing tendons to uninjured tendons revealed significant increases in proteins associated with inflammation, stress response, and matrix degradation. Treatment with ASC + BMP12 amplified these unfavorable changes. In summary, the treatment approach used in this study induced a negative inflammatory reaction at the repair site leading to poor healing. Future approaches should consider cell and growth factor delivery methods that do not incite negative local reactions.

  11. Comparative biomechanical study of using decellularized human adipose tissues for post-mastectomy and post-lumpectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Seyyed M H; Omidi, Ehsan; Flynn, Lauren E; Samani, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Developing suitable biomaterials for post-mastectomy or post-lumpectomy breast reconstruction is highly important. This study is aimed at evaluating biomechanical suitability of decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) for this purpose. The study involves computational experiments for evaluating deformation of the breast reconstructed using DAT under loading conditions pertaining to two common body position changes of prone-to-supine and prone-to-upright. This was conducted using nonlinear finite element models where the breast geometry was obtained from MRI image of a female breast. The experiments were performed using DAT sourced from various adipose tissue depots in comparison to natural adipose tissue. Data obtained from the conducted experiments showed no contour defects with various DAT materials for simulated post-mastectomy or post-lumpectomy breast reconstruction under the loading conditions. They also demonstrated that a breast reconstructed using DAT derived from the breast or subcutaneous abdominal depots exhibit significantly closer deformation, both qualitatively and quantitatively, to that of a normal breast under the same loading conditions. Similarity of DAT deformation to that of natural breast tissue in post-surgery breast reconstruction was assessed using nonlinear finite element analysis. Our results provide evidence that DAT derived from subcutaneous abdominal and breast depots yield more analogous deformation pattern to the natural tissue in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction applications. This is quite encouraging, as breast and subcutaneous adipose tissue can be readily obtained in large quantities from breast or abdominal lipo-reduction surgery procedures. Furthermore, in post-lumpectomy cases all DAT samples used in this research showed similar deformation, and thus are suitable as breast tissue substituents. PMID:26735182

  12. Recent study of beam stability in the PSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. S. F.; Cooper, R.; Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Hardek, T.; Hutson, R.; Macek, R.; Ohmori, C.; Plum, M.; Thiessen, H.

    1993-05-01

    A fast transverse instability with beam loss has been observed in the 800 MeV Los Alamos Pro Ring (PSR) when the injected beam intensity reaches 2 - 4(10)(exp 13) protons per pulse. Previous observations indicate that the instability is most likely driven by electrons trapped within the proton beam. Theoretical study shown that beam leakage into the inter-bunch gap leads to electron trapping. Recent experiments were carried out by using the newly implemented 'pinger' and by varying the machine transition gamma to explore further the 'e-p' instability and the nature of the instability. This paper summarizes some of these recent experimental results and theoretical studies.

  13. Recent study of beam stability in the PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Cooper, R.; Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Hardek, T.; Hutson, R.; Macek, R.; Ohmori, C.; Plum, M.; Thiessen, H.; Wilkinson, C.; Colton, E.; Neuffer, D.; Rees, G.

    1993-06-01

    A fast transverse instability with beam loss has been observed in the 800 MeV Los Alamos Pro Ring (PSR) when the injected beam intensity reaches 2 - 4 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. Previous observations in that the instability is most likely driven by electrons trapped within the proton beam. Theoretical study shown that beam leakage into the inter-bunch gap leads to electron trapping. Recent experiments were carried out by using the newly implemented ``pinger`` and by varying the machine transition gamma to explore further the ``e-p`` instability and the nature of the instability. This paper summarizes some of these recent experimental results and theoretical studies.

  14. Recent study of beam stability in the PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Cooper, R.; Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Hardek, T.; Hutson, R.; Macek, R.; Ohmori, C.; Plum, M.; Thiessen, H.; Wilkinson, C. ); Colton, E. ); Neuffer, D. ); Rees, G. )

    1993-01-01

    A fast transverse instability with beam loss has been observed in the 800 MeV Los Alamos Pro Ring (PSR) when the injected beam intensity reaches 2 - 4 [times] 10[sup 13] protons per pulse. Previous observations in that the instability is most likely driven by electrons trapped within the proton beam. Theoretical study shown that beam leakage into the inter-bunch gap leads to electron trapping. Recent experiments were carried out by using the newly implemented pinger'' and by varying the machine transition gamma to explore further the e-p'' instability and the nature of the instability. This paper summarizes some of these recent experimental results and theoretical studies.

  15. Molecular beam studies of oxygen atom reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoltner, A.-M.

    1989-10-01

    The dynamics of several elementary reactions relevant to combustion was investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state oxygen atoms with small unsaturated hydrocarbons was studied using a crossed molecular beam apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The infrared and ultraviolet photodissociation of anisole was studied using a rotating beam source/fixed detector apparatus. 253 refs., 64 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. High-precision satellite positioning system as a new tool to study the biomechanics of human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Terrier, P; Ladetto, Q; Merminod, B; Schutz, Y

    2000-12-01

    New Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers allow now to measure a location on earth at high frequency (5Hz) with a centimetric precision using phase differential positioning method. We studied whether such technique was accurate enough to retrieve basic parameters of human locomotion. Eight subjects walked on an athletics track at four different imposed step frequencies (70-130steps/min) plus a run at free pace. Differential carrier phase localization between a fixed base station and the mobile antenna mounted on the walking person was calculated. In parallel, a triaxial accelerometer, attached to the low back, recorded body accelerations. The different parameters were averaged for 150 consecutive steps of each run for each subject (total of 6000 steps analyzed). We observed a perfect correlation between average step duration measured by accelerometer and by GPS (r=0.9998, N=40). Two important parameters for the calculation of the external work of walking were also analyzed, namely the vertical lift of the trunk and the velocity variation per step. For an average walking speed of 4.0km/h, average vertical lift and velocity variation were, respectively, 4.8cm and 0.60km/h. The average intra-individual step-to-step variability at a constant speed, which includes GPS errors and the biological gait style variation, were found to be 24. 5% (coefficient of variation) for vertical lift and 44.5% for velocity variation. It is concluded that GPS technique can provide useful biomechanical parameters for the analysis of an unlimited number of strides in an unconstrained free-living environment. PMID:11006399

  17. Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Tekla S.

    1991-01-01

    The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

  18. Biomechanics and tennis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, B

    2006-01-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause. PMID:16632567

  19. Inclusion of the periodontal ligament in studies on the biomechanical behavior of fiber post-retained restorations: An in vitro study and three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Lluch, Carmen; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Pablo-Jesús; Forner, Leopoldo; Barjau, Amaya

    2016-03-01

    Endodontically treated teeth are known to have reduced structural strength. Periodontal ligament may influence fracture resistance. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of including the periodontal ligament in biomechanical studies about endodontically treated and restored teeth. Forty human maxillary central incisors were treated endodontically and randomly divided into four groups: non-crowned (with and without an artificial ligament) and crowned (with and without an artificial ligament) with glass-ceramic crowns. All groups received prefabricated glass-fiber posts and a composite resin core. Specimens were tested, under a flexural-compressive load, until failure occurred. The failure mode was registered for all specimens. The failure loads were recorded and analyzed using an analysis of variance test (p < 0.05). These results were compared with those predicted by a finite element model. The analysis of variance did not show significant differences between the use of crown on the failure load (p = 0.331) and the use of periodontal ligament (p = 0.185). A cohesive mode in crown appeared in crowned teeth and in core in non-crowned groups. For non-crowned teeth, adhesive failure occurred along the cement-enamel junction with a slight tendency in specimens without periodontal ligament. Furthermore, an unfavorable failure mode affects partially the root with no differences regarding non-crown specimens. In crowned teeth, the tendency was an adhesive failure along the cement-enamel junction. The model predicted a distribution of the safety factor consistent with these results. This study showed that inclusion of periodontal ligament is not particularly important on biomechanical behavior of post-retained restorations. However, we recommend its inclusion in fatigue studies. PMID:26893228

  20. Inclusion of the periodontal ligament in studies on the biomechanical behavior of fiber post-retained restorations: An in vitro study and three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Lluch, Carmen; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Pablo-Jesús; Forner, Leopoldo; Barjau, Amaya

    2016-03-01

    Endodontically treated teeth are known to have reduced structural strength. Periodontal ligament may influence fracture resistance. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of including the periodontal ligament in biomechanical studies about endodontically treated and restored teeth. Forty human maxillary central incisors were treated endodontically and randomly divided into four groups: non-crowned (with and without an artificial ligament) and crowned (with and without an artificial ligament) with glass-ceramic crowns. All groups received prefabricated glass-fiber posts and a composite resin core. Specimens were tested, under a flexural-compressive load, until failure occurred. The failure mode was registered for all specimens. The failure loads were recorded and analyzed using an analysis of variance test (p < 0.05). These results were compared with those predicted by a finite element model. The analysis of variance did not show significant differences between the use of crown on the failure load (p = 0.331) and the use of periodontal ligament (p = 0.185). A cohesive mode in crown appeared in crowned teeth and in core in non-crowned groups. For non-crowned teeth, adhesive failure occurred along the cement-enamel junction with a slight tendency in specimens without periodontal ligament. Furthermore, an unfavorable failure mode affects partially the root with no differences regarding non-crown specimens. In crowned teeth, the tendency was an adhesive failure along the cement-enamel junction. The model predicted a distribution of the safety factor consistent with these results. This study showed that inclusion of periodontal ligament is not particularly important on biomechanical behavior of post-retained restorations. However, we recommend its inclusion in fatigue studies.

  1. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  2. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  3. ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

  4. Experimental Studies of Ion Beam Neutralization: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, N.; Polansky, J.; Downey, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    A testing platform is designed to study ion beam neutralization in the mesothermal, collisionless region. In the experimental setup, argon neutrals were ionized in a microwave cavity and accelerated by a plasma lens system which was biased to 2500 V above the system ground. Electrons were boiled off from two hot tungsten filaments to neutralize the ion beam. The plasma is diagnosed using Langmuir probe and Faraday probe. A 3-D traversing system and a complete data acquisition loop were developed to efficiently measure 3-D beam profile. Preliminary measurements of beam profiles are presented for different operating conditions.

  5. A Study to Determine the Biomechanics of Running in Skilled Trackmen. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the manner in which selected mechanical elements of the running stride are altered with accompanying variations in the speed of running and the slope upon which running occurs. Subjects, 16 intercollegiate runners, were marked at reference points of the body pertinent to this study and filmed twice…

  6. Combining Multiple Data Acquisition Systems to Study Corticospinal Output and Multi-segment Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, Michael J; Bailey, Aaron Z; Keir, Peter J; Potvin, Jim; Bergel, Tim; Nelson, Aimee J

    2016-01-09

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques allow for an in-depth investigation into the neural mechanisms that underpin human behavior. To date, the use of TMS to study human movement, has been limited by the challenges related to precisely timing the delivery of TMS to features of the unfolding movement and, also, by accurately characterizing kinematics and kinetics. To overcome these technical challenges, TMS delivery and acquisition systems should be integrated with an online motion tracking system. The present manuscript details technical innovations that integrate multiple acquisition systems to facilitate and advance the use of TMS to study human movement. Using commercially available software and hardware systems, a step-by-step approach to both the hardware assembly and the software scripts necessary to perform TMS studies triggered by specific features of a movement is provided. The approach is focused on the study of upper limb, planar, multi-joint reaching movements. However, the same integrative system is amenable to a multitude of sophisticated studies of human motor control.

  7. Experimental study of the longitudinal instability for beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, M.; Wang, J.G.; Guo, W.M.; Wang, D.X.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical model for beam longitudinal instability in a transport pipe with general wall impedance is considered. The result shows that a capacitive wall tends to stabilize the beam. The experimental study of the instability for a pure resistive-wall is presented, including the design parameters, setup and components for the experiment. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  8. IMMEDIATE AND LATE EFFECT OF SUTURES IN EXTRASYNOVIAL TENDONS: BIOMECHANICAL STUDY IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Sardenberg, Trajano; Muller, Sérgio Swain; Garms, Luciana Zauhy; Miduati, Francini Belluci

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on the mechanical properties of rats’ calcaneus tendons, of repair arrangements using suture material in the absence of any healing process. Method: Twelve male Wistar rats were used. They were subjected to placement of a modified Kessler suture stitch in the calcaneus tendon. The sacrifices were performed immediately after and six weeks after the operation. The mechanical properties studied were maximum load, tension in the maximum load and module of elasticity. The contralateral tendon was used as a control. Results: The statistical analysis showed that for the times studied, the values for mechanical properties did not present any significant differences. In relation to the control, i.e. the contralateral tendon without a suture, the results demonstrated that, six weeks after the operation, the values for the modulus of elasticity were lower, whereas there were no significant variations in maximum load or tension at maximum load. Conclusion: Placement of suture material on an extrasynovial tendon without lesions decreased the modulus of elasticity, but it did not interfere with the maximum load or tension at maximum load, six weeks after the operation. PMID:27047823

  9. The effect of a cadence retraining protocol on running biomechanics and efficiency: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hafer, Jocelyn F; Brown, Allison M; deMille, Polly; Hillstrom, Howard J; Garber, Carol Ewing

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented the association between mechanical deviations from normal and the presence or risk of injury. Some runners attempt to change mechanics by increasing running cadence. Previous work documented that increasing running cadence reduces deviations in mechanics tied to injury. The long-term effect of a cadence retraining intervention on running mechanics and energy expenditure is unknown. This study aimed to determine if increasing running cadence by 10% decreases running efficiency and changes kinematics and kinetics to make them less similar to those associated with injury. Additionally, this study aimed to determine if, after 6 weeks of cadence retraining, there would be carryover in kinematic and kinetic changes from an increased cadence state to a runner's preferred running cadence without decreased running efficiency. We measured oxygen uptake, kinematic and kinetic data on six uninjured participants before and after a 6-week intervention. Increasing cadence did not result in decreased running efficiency but did result in decreases in stride length, hip adduction angle and hip abductor moment. Carryover was observed in runners' post-intervention preferred running form as decreased hip adduction angle and vertical loading rate.

  10. The effect of a cadence retraining protocol on running biomechanics and efficiency: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hafer, Jocelyn F; Brown, Allison M; deMille, Polly; Hillstrom, Howard J; Garber, Carol Ewing

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented the association between mechanical deviations from normal and the presence or risk of injury. Some runners attempt to change mechanics by increasing running cadence. Previous work documented that increasing running cadence reduces deviations in mechanics tied to injury. The long-term effect of a cadence retraining intervention on running mechanics and energy expenditure is unknown. This study aimed to determine if increasing running cadence by 10% decreases running efficiency and changes kinematics and kinetics to make them less similar to those associated with injury. Additionally, this study aimed to determine if, after 6 weeks of cadence retraining, there would be carryover in kinematic and kinetic changes from an increased cadence state to a runner's preferred running cadence without decreased running efficiency. We measured oxygen uptake, kinematic and kinetic data on six uninjured participants before and after a 6-week intervention. Increasing cadence did not result in decreased running efficiency but did result in decreases in stride length, hip adduction angle and hip abductor moment. Carryover was observed in runners' post-intervention preferred running form as decreased hip adduction angle and vertical loading rate. PMID:25369525

  11. Nano-Biomechanical Study of Spatio-Temporal Cytoskeleton Rearrangements that Determine Subcellular Mechanical Properties and Endothelial Permeability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Bleher, Reiner; Brown, Mary E; Garcia, Joe G N; Dudek, Steven M; Shekhawat, Gajendra S; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial cell (EC) lining of the pulmonary vascular system forms a semipermeable barrier between blood and the interstitium and regulates various critical biochemical functions. Collectively, it represents a prototypical biomechanical system, where the complex hierarchical architecture, from the molecular scale to the cellular and tissue level, has an intimate and intricate relationship with its biological functions. We investigated the mechanical properties of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (ECs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Concurrently, the wider distribution and finer details of the cytoskeletal nano-structure were examined using fluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), respectively. These correlative measurements were conducted in response to the EC barrier-disrupting agent, thrombin, and barrier-enhancing agent, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Our new findings and analysis directly link the spatio-temporal complexities of cell re-modeling and cytoskeletal mechanical properties alteration. This work provides novel insights into the biomechanical function of the endothelial barrier and suggests similar opportunities for understanding the form-function relationship in other biomechanical subsystems. PMID:26086333

  12. Nano-Biomechanical Study of Spatio-Temporal Cytoskeleton Rearrangements that Determine Subcellular Mechanical Properties and Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Bleher, Reiner; Brown, Mary E.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Dudek, Steven M.; Shekhawat, Gajendra S.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial cell (EC) lining of the pulmonary vascular system forms a semipermeable barrier between blood and the interstitium and regulates various critical biochemical functions. Collectively, it represents a prototypical biomechanical system, where the complex hierarchical architecture, from the molecular scale to the cellular and tissue level, has an intimate and intricate relationship with its biological functions. We investigated the mechanical properties of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (ECs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Concurrently, the wider distribution and finer details of the cytoskeletal nano-structure were examined using fluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), respectively. These correlative measurements were conducted in response to the EC barrier-disrupting agent, thrombin, and barrier-enhancing agent, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Our new findings and analysis directly link the spatio-temporal complexities of cell re-modeling and cytoskeletal mechanical properties alteration. This work provides novel insights into the biomechanical function of the endothelial barrier and suggests similar opportunities for understanding the form-function relationship in other biomechanical subsystems. PMID:26086333

  13. Effect of an artificial disc on lumbar spine biomechanics: a probabilistic finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Anke; Zander, Thomas; Bergmann, Georg

    2008-01-01

    The effects of different parameters on the mechanical behaviour of the lumbar spine were in most cases determined deterministically with only one uncertain parameter varied at a time while the others were kept fixed. Thus most parameter combinations were disregarded. The aim of the study was to determine in a probabilistic finite element study how intervertebral rotation, intradiscal pressure, and contact force in the facet joints are affected by the input parameters implant position, implant ball radius, presence of scar tissue, and gap size in the facet joints. An osseoligamentous finite element model of the lumbar spine ranging from L3 vertebra to L5/S1 intervertebral disc was used. An artificial disc with a fixed center of rotation was inserted at level L4/L5. The model was loaded with pure moments of 7.5 Nm to simulate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. In a probabilistic study the implant position in anterior–posterior (ap) and in lateral direction, the radius of the implant ball, and the gap size of the facet joint were varied. After implanting an artificial disc, scar tissue may develop, replacing the anterior longitudinal ligament. Thus presence and absence of scar tissue were also simulated. For each loading case studied, intervertebral rotations, intradiscal pressures and contact forces in the facet joints were calculated for 1,000 randomized input parameter combinations in order to determine the probable range of these output parameters. Intervertebral rotation at implant level varies strongly for different combinations of the input parameters. It is mainly affected by gap size, ap-position and implant ball radius for flexion, by scar tissue and implant ball radius for extension and lateral bending, and by gap size and implant ball radius for axial torsion. For extension, intervertebral rotation at implant level varied between 1.4° and 7.5°. Intradiscal pressure in the adjacent discs is only slightly affected by all input

  14. Coupled Biomechanical Response of the Cornea Assessed by Non-Contact Tonometry. A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical response of the cornea subjected to a non-contact air-jet tonometry diagnostic test represents an interplay between its geometry, the corneal material behavior and the loading. The objective is to study this interplay to better understand and interpret the results obtained with a non-contact tonometry test. A patient-specific finite element model of a healthy eye, accounting for the load free configuration, was used. The corneal tissue was modeled as an anisotropic hyperelastic material with two preferential directions. Three different sets of parameters within the human experimental range obtained from inflation tests were considered. The influence of the IOP was studied by considering four pressure levels (10–28 mmHg) whereas the influence of corneal thickness was studied by inducing a uniform variation (300–600 microns). A Computer Fluid Dynamics (CFD) air-jet simulation determined pressure loading exerted on the anterior corneal surface. The maximum apex displacement showed a linear variation with IOP for all materials examined. On the contrary, the maximum apex displacement followed a cubic relation with corneal thickness. In addition, a significant sensitivity of the apical displacement to the corneal stiffness was also obtained. Explanation to this behavior was found in the fact that the cornea experiences bending when subjected to an air-puff loading, causing the anterior surface to work in compression whereas the posterior surface works in tension. Hence, collagen fibers located at the anterior surface do not contribute to load bearing. Non-contact tonometry devices give useful information that could be misleading since the corneal deformation is the result of the interaction between the mechanical properties, IOP, and geometry. Therefore, a non-contact tonometry test is not sufficient to evaluate their individual contribution and a complete in-vivo characterization would require more than one test to independently determine the membrane

  15. Evaluation of the ShapeTape for studying biomechanics in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Harley, Linda R; Grullon, Sergio A; Harbert, Simeon D; Holmes, Jonathan; Britton, Douglas F

    2012-01-01

    Motion capture systems may be difficult to use in harsh environments such as a poultry plant, and therefore should be self-contained, portable, unobtrusive, and not interfere with or be degraded by plant machinery or processes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity, reliability and accuracy of the ShapeTape system as a potential solution. This was accomplished by comparing kinematic data from the ShapeTape against the Vicon system. Subjects performed cyclical movements along a plane angled 45° up from the horizontal using their right arms. Results revealed that the ShapeTape kinematic data was significantly larger than the Vicon data, yet statistically reliable.

  16. Biomechanics and Biotensegrity: Study Method and Frequency Response of the Simplex and 3-bar-SVD Tensegrity Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Arenas, C.; Ghersi, I.; Miralles, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the frequency response of 3D tensegrity structures. These are structures that have been used, since the 80’s, to model biological systems of different scales. This fact led to the origin of the field of biotensegrity, which includes biomechanics as a natural field of application. In this work: a) A simple method for the analysis of frequency response of different nodes in 3D tensegrity structures was set up and tuned. This method is based on a video-analysis algorithm, which was applied to the structures, as they were vibrated along their axis of symmetry, at frequencies from 1 Hz to 60 Hz. b) Frequency-response analyses were performed, for the simplest 3D structure, the Simplex module, as well as for two towers, formed by stacking two and three Simplex modules, respectively. Resonant frequencies were detected for the Simplex module at (19.2±0.1) Hz and (50.2±0.1) Hz (the latter being an average of frequencies between homologous nodes). For the towers with two and three modules, each selected node presented a characteristic frequency response, modulated by their spatial placement in each model. Resonances for the two-stage tower were found at: (12±0.1) Hz; (16.2±0.1) Hz; (29.4±0.1) Hz and (37.2±0.1) Hz. For the tower with three Simplex modules, the main resonant frequencies were found at (12.0±0.1) Hz and (21.0±0.1) Hz. Results show that the proposed method is adequate for the study (2D) of any 3D tensegrity structure, with the potential of being generalized to the study of oscillations in three dimensions. A growing complexity and variability in the frequency response of the nodes was observed, as modules were added to the structures. These findings were compared to those found in the available literature.

  17. Biomechanical effects of intraspecimen variations in trabecular architecture: a three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, O C; Keaveny, T M

    1999-08-01

    Trabecular architecture is considered important in osteoporosis and has been quantified by a variety of mean parameters characteristic of a whole specimen. Variations within a specimen, however, have been mostly ignored. In this study, the theoretical effects of these intraspecimen variations in architecture on predicted mechanical properties were investigated through a three-dimensional finite element parameter study that simulated variations in trabecular thickness in a controlled manner. An irregularly spaced lattice of different sized rods was used to simulate trabecular bone in three distinct volume fraction ranges, representing young, middle-aged, and elderly vertebral bone. Beta distributions (a type of non-normal distribution) of trabecular thickness with coefficients of variation of either 25%, 40%, or 55% were applied to the rods in each model, and 225 simulations of uniaxial compression tests were performed to obtain modulus values. Percent modulus reductions of 22% and 43% were predicted when the intraspecimen coefficient of variation in trabecular thickness was increased from 25% to 40% and from 25% to 55%, respectively, for models of equal volume fraction. Furthermore, this trend was predicted to be independent of volume fraction. We conclude, therefore, that consideration of the intraspecimen trabecular thickness variation in conjunction with volume fraction may improve the ability to predict trabecular modulus compared with use of volume fraction alone. Further, the model suggests that if age, disease, or drug treatments increase trabecular thickness variation, this may be detrimental to mechanical properties.

  18. Biomechanical effects of intraspecimen variations in trabecular architecture: a three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, O C; Keaveny, T M

    1999-08-01

    Trabecular architecture is considered important in osteoporosis and has been quantified by a variety of mean parameters characteristic of a whole specimen. Variations within a specimen, however, have been mostly ignored. In this study, the theoretical effects of these intraspecimen variations in architecture on predicted mechanical properties were investigated through a three-dimensional finite element parameter study that simulated variations in trabecular thickness in a controlled manner. An irregularly spaced lattice of different sized rods was used to simulate trabecular bone in three distinct volume fraction ranges, representing young, middle-aged, and elderly vertebral bone. Beta distributions (a type of non-normal distribution) of trabecular thickness with coefficients of variation of either 25%, 40%, or 55% were applied to the rods in each model, and 225 simulations of uniaxial compression tests were performed to obtain modulus values. Percent modulus reductions of 22% and 43% were predicted when the intraspecimen coefficient of variation in trabecular thickness was increased from 25% to 40% and from 25% to 55%, respectively, for models of equal volume fraction. Furthermore, this trend was predicted to be independent of volume fraction. We conclude, therefore, that consideration of the intraspecimen trabecular thickness variation in conjunction with volume fraction may improve the ability to predict trabecular modulus compared with use of volume fraction alone. Further, the model suggests that if age, disease, or drug treatments increase trabecular thickness variation, this may be detrimental to mechanical properties. PMID:10456389

  19. Gliding resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions: (1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; (2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; (3) 30 mmHg; (4) 60 mmHg; (5) 90 mmHg; (6) 120 mmHg. The gliding resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in gliding resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon gliding resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients.

  20. Enhancement of pedicle screw stability using calcium phosphate cement in osteoporotic vertebrae: in vivo biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Yoshimichi; Takemasa, Ryuichi; Tani, Toshikazu; Mizobuchi, Hiroo; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    We conducted an experimental study using female beagles with and without ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis to determine the effect of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) on the mechanical stability of inserted pedicle screws. A drill hole was created from the base of the transverse process to the vertebral body; CPC was injected into the hole, and then a screw was inserted into the same hole. In the presence of osteoporosis evidenced by dual X-ray absorptiometry, the stability of the inserted screw augmented by CPC against pull-out and cephalocaudal forces were significantly greater by 28% and 54% at 1 week after operation, 48% and 71% at 2 weeks, and 56% and 68% at 4 weeks compared with those without CPC. The pull-out strength increased progressively with time after surgery, probably reflecting new-bone growth from the surrounding cancellous bone, which was in direct contact with the CPC, as shown in the histologic study. At each time point the cephalocaudal rigidity was similar and the pull-out strength greater than that for the screws inserted without CPC in nonporotic dogs. These findings suggest that CPC augments the stability of the inserted pedicle screws and increases the stiffness of fixed osteoporotic motion segments using instrumentation. PMID:12768486

  1. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  2. Unlocked and locked elastic stable intramedullary nailing in an ovine tibia fracture model: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Berger, Leopold; Fischerauer, Stefan; Weiß, Barbara; Celarek, Anna; Castellani, Christoph; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina; Tschegg, Elmar

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, four different systems of elastic stable intramedullary nails (unlocked, Ender stainless steel nails locked with 3-mm screws, titanium nails locked with end caps, titanium nails locked with plugs and 3-mm screws) were implanted in cadaveric ovine tibiae. Fractures were simulated by a transverse diaphyseal osteotomy. The specimens were subjected to simultaneous axial and torsional fatigue loading of 5000 and 1000 cycles, respectively. The unlocked systems failed at an axial load of 200 N peak amplitude. End caps systems withstood axial loads up to 800 N for 1000 cycles, and ender nails and plugs lasted up to 1000 N for 1000 cycles. All systems showed a decrease of axial stiffness with higher loads and endured cycles. Ender nails and nails locked with plugs failed by penetration of the distal epiphysis rather than by loosening of the interlocking system. Overall, the titanium nails locked with plugs and 3-mm screws exhibited superior test results.

  3. Radioactive beam studies of cosmological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sale, K. E.; Boyd, R. N.; Mathews, G. J.; Corn, P. B.; Islam, M. S.

    1989-04-01

    Experimental efforts by the LLNL/Ohio State radioactive ion beam collaboration are described. We are presently focusing on some reactions which are of great importance in the newly proposed inhomogeneous big bang cosmological models [G.M. Fuller, G.J. Mathews and C.R. Alcock, in: Origin and Distribution of the Elements, ed. G.J. Mathews (World Scientific, Singapore, 1987)]. Specifically we are using our system to make beams of 8Li for measurements of the 8Li(d, n)9Be and 8Li(a, n)11B cross sections. These are the key reactions which determine the production of heavy (A > 12) elements during the era of big bang nucleosynthesis, and thus the initial composition of stars and subsequent stellar isotope production. Plans for future experiments, including the measurement of the 7Be(p, γ)8B cross section will be discussed.

  4. Neutral beam source commercialization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.J.

    1980-06-01

    The basic tasks of this Phase II project were to: generate a set of design drawings suitable for quantity production of sources of this design; fabricate a functional neutral beam source incorporating as many of the proposed design changes as proved feasible; and document the procedures and findings developed during the contract. These tasks have been accomplished and represent a demonstrated milestone in the industrialization of this complete device.

  5. Canine tendon studies. II. Biomechanical evaluation of normal and regrown canine tendons.

    PubMed

    Walker, P; Amstutz, H C; Rubinfeld, M

    1976-01-01

    Some of the mechanical properties of regrown canine tendons are compared to those of normal tendons of young and mature animals. Patellar and Achilles tendons from 12 beagle dogs were removed and studied with their bone origin and insertions. Mechanical tests were performed within 24 hr and test conditions simulated the physiological function of the tendon in vivo at room temperature. Specimens were soaked in Ringers solution and mounted in an Instron testing machine with load deflection curves plotted automatically. The parameters used for analysis were load extension, stress relaxation, elastic limit, and strain rate dependence. The regrown tendons in young animals appeared to quickly adjust in dimension and structure so that their properties were not significantly different from those of normal tendons on a load extension basis. The normal tendons were stiffer than regrown ones but the modulus of elasticity increased with age. The Achilles were stiffer than patellar tendons. Cyclic loading with 25 kg did not affect reconstructed tendon models, although some increase in stiffness was noted. The elastic modulus decreased with an increase in ambient temperature and increasing strain rate.

  6. Biomechanical evaluation of exercises for performing a forward handspring - case study.

    PubMed

    Zivčić-Marković, Kamenka; Sporiš, Goran; Cavar, Ines; Aleksić-Veljković, Aleksandra; Milanović, Zoran

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was based on the kinematic parameters, extracted at different stages of performing a forward handspring to determine the interconnection of methodological procedures of learning with the final structure of the movement. The respondent is an active competitor with years of experience, elite athlete, many times Croatian champion, and competitor at European, World Championships and the Olympics. The team composed of six gymnastic experts, chose one of the best performances by twelve methodological procedures and the best performance (of six) two-leg forward handsprings basing their choice on a detailed review of recorded material. Assessment of quality of performance was done according to the defined rules prescribed by the regulations (Code of Points). The forward handspring technique consists of four phases based on which 45 space and time kinematic parameters were selected (30 parameters in the phase of hand contact and push-off, 7 in the flight phase, and 8 parameters in the landing phase). By extraction of space and time parameters, there was a differentiation of certain methodological procedures that are the best for learning forward handspring in each phase of its performance. This research indicates that these methodological procedures mostly coincide in space kinematic parameters by which the technique of a forward handspring is described.

  7. The importance of accurate muscle modelling for biomechanical analyses: a case study with a lizard skull

    PubMed Central

    Gröning, Flora; Jones, Marc E. H.; Curtis, Neil; Herrel, Anthony; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E.; Fagan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-based simulation techniques such as multi-body dynamics analysis are becoming increasingly popular in the field of skull mechanics. Multi-body models can be used for studying the relationships between skull architecture, muscle morphology and feeding performance. However, to be confident in the modelling results, models need to be validated against experimental data, and the effects of uncertainties or inaccuracies in the chosen model attributes need to be assessed with sensitivity analyses. Here, we compare the bite forces predicted by a multi-body model of a lizard (Tupinambis merianae) with in vivo measurements, using anatomical data collected from the same specimen. This subject-specific model predicts bite forces that are very close to the in vivo measurements and also shows a consistent increase in bite force as the bite position is moved posteriorly on the jaw. However, the model is very sensitive to changes in muscle attributes such as fibre length, intrinsic muscle strength and force orientation, with bite force predictions varying considerably when these three variables are altered. We conclude that accurate muscle measurements are crucial to building realistic multi-body models and that subject-specific data should be used whenever possible. PMID:23614944

  8. Statistical study of biomechanics of living brain cells during growth and maturation on artificial substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, La; Li, Wenfang; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that mechanical issues play a vital role in neuron growth and brain development. The importance of this grows as novel devices, whose material properties differ from cells, are increasingly implanted in the body. In this work, we studied the mechanical properties of rat brain cells over time and on different materials by using a high throughput magnetic tweezers system. It was found that the elastic moduli of both neurite and soma in networked neurons increased with growth. However, neurites at DIV4 exhibited a relatively high stiffness, which could be ascribed to the high outgrowth tension. The power-law exponents (viscoelasticity) of both neurites and somas of neurons decreased with culture time. On the other hand, the stiffness of glial cells also increased with maturity. Furthermore, both neurites and glia become softer when cultured on compliant substrates. Especially, the glial cells cultured on a soft substrate obviously showed a less dense and more porous actin and GFAP mesh. In addition, the viscoelasticity of both neurites and glia did not show a significant dependence on the substrates' stiffness. PMID:27573132

  9. The importance of accurate muscle modelling for biomechanical analyses: a case study with a lizard skull.

    PubMed

    Gröning, Flora; Jones, Marc E H; Curtis, Neil; Herrel, Anthony; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E; Fagan, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Computer-based simulation techniques such as multi-body dynamics analysis are becoming increasingly popular in the field of skull mechanics. Multi-body models can be used for studying the relationships between skull architecture, muscle morphology and feeding performance. However, to be confident in the modelling results, models need to be validated against experimental data, and the effects of uncertainties or inaccuracies in the chosen model attributes need to be assessed with sensitivity analyses. Here, we compare the bite forces predicted by a multi-body model of a lizard (Tupinambis merianae) with in vivo measurements, using anatomical data collected from the same specimen. This subject-specific model predicts bite forces that are very close to the in vivo measurements and also shows a consistent increase in bite force as the bite position is moved posteriorly on the jaw. However, the model is very sensitive to changes in muscle attributes such as fibre length, intrinsic muscle strength and force orientation, with bite force predictions varying considerably when these three variables are altered. We conclude that accurate muscle measurements are crucial to building realistic multi-body models and that subject-specific data should be used whenever possible. PMID:23614944

  10. Design of human surrogates for the study of biomechanical injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Payne, Thomas; Mitchell, Séan; Bibb, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Human surrogates are representations of living human structures employed to replicate "real-life" injurious scenarios in artificial environments. They are used primarily to evaluate personal protective equipment (PPE) or integrated safety systems (e.g., seat belts) in a wide range of industry sectors (e.g., automotive, military, security service, and sports equipment). Surrogates are commonly considered in five major categories relative to their form and functionality: human volunteers, postmortem human surrogates, animal surrogates, anthropomorphic test devices, and computational models. Each surrogate has its relative merits. Surrogates have been extensively employed in scenarios concerning "life-threatening" impacts (e.g., penetrating bullets or automotive accidents). However, more frequently occurring nonlethal injuries (e.g., fractures, tears, lacerations, contusions) often result in full or partial debilitation in contexts where optimal human performance is crucial (e.g., military, sports). Detailed study of these injuries requires human surrogates with superior biofidelity to those currently available if PPE designs are to improve. The opportunities afforded by new technologies, materials, instrumentation, and processing capabilities should be exploited to develop a new generation of more sophisticated human surrogates. This paper presents a review of the current state of the art in human surrogate construction, highlighting weaknesses and opportunities, to promote research into improved surrogates for PPE development. PMID:23510009

  11. Study of extracellular matrix in vocal fold biomechanics using a two-phase model.

    PubMed

    Miri, Amir K; Li, Nicole Y K; Avazmohammadi, Reza; Thibeault, Susan L; Mongrain, Rosaire; Mongeau, Luc

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the vocal fold tissue consists primarily of fibrous and interstitial proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of selective enzymatic digestion of two ECM proteins, namely elastin and versican, on the elasticity of rabbit vocal fold tissue. Quasi-static, sinusoidal, uniaxial tensile tests were performed. The data were analyzed within the framework of a model of the ECM as a two-phase composite material consisting of collagen fibrils as the reinforcing fibers and noncollagenous ECM proteins as the matrix. To validate the two-phase model, the regression parameters for the fibers' volume fraction and shear modulus in a different animal model were compared with corresponding published data. The proposed model was then used to analyze rabbit vocal fold tissues. The mean value and the standard deviation of the fiber volume fraction were found to be 8.49 ± 3.75 % for the control samples (n = 4), 0.59 ± 1.13 % after elastin removal (n = 4), and 8.22 ± 1.06 % after versican removal (n = 4). The results suggest that elastin removal may lead to a reduction in tissue stiffness, through counteracting the reinforcement of collagen fibrils. PMID:24792897

  12. Study of extracellular matrix in vocal fold biomechanics using a two-phase model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nicole Y. K.; Avazmohammadi, Reza; Thibeault, Susan L.; Mongrain, Rosaire; Mongeau, Luc

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the vocal fold tissue consists primarily of fibrous and interstitial proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of selective enzymatic digestion of two ECM proteins, namely elastin and versican, on the elasticity of rabbit vocal fold tissue. Quasi-static, sinusoidal, uniaxial tensile tests were performed. The data were analyzed within the framework of a model of the ECM as a two-phase composite material consisting of collagen fibrils as the reinforcing fibers and noncollagenous ECM proteins as the matrix. To validate the two-phase model, the regression parameters for the fibers’ volume fraction and shear modulus in a different animal model were compared with corresponding published data. The proposed model was then used to analyze rabbit vocal fold tissues. The mean value and the standard deviation of the fiber volume fraction were found to be 8.49 ±3.75% for the control samples (n =4), 0.59 ±1.13 % after elastin removal (n =4), and 8.22 ±1.06% after versican removal (n =4). The results suggest that elastin removal may lead to a reduction in tissue stiffness, through counteracting the reinforcement of collagen fibrils. PMID:24792897

  13. Gliding characteristics between flexor tendons and surrounding tissues in the carpal tunnel: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Osamura, Naoki; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel with varied wrist positions and tendon motion styles, which may help us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and repetitive hand motion. Eight fresh human cadaveric wrists and hands were used. The peak (PGR) and mean (MGR) gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon were measured with the wrist in 0, 30, and 60 degrees of flexion and extension. While moving all three fingers together, the PGR at 60 degrees flexion was significantly higher than that at 0, 30, or 60 degrees extension. While moving the middle finger alone, the PGR at 60 and 30 degrees flexion was significantly higher than the PGR at 60 degrees extension. The PGR moving the middle finger FDS alone was significantly greater than that for all three digits moving together in 0, 30, and 60 degrees flexion. Differential finger motion with wrist flexion elevated the tendon gliding resistance in the carpal tunnel, which may be relevant in considering the possible role of wrist position and activity in the etiology of CTS.

  14. Biomechanical characterization of osseointegration during healing: an experimental in vivo study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Brånemark, R; Ohrnell, L O; Nilsson, P; Thomsen, P

    1997-07-01

    This study reports torsion tests and pull-out tests on osseointegrated commercially pure titanium fixtures. The tests were performed in vivo on a total of 26 rats. Three fixtures with a diameter of 2.0 mm were installed bilaterally in the proximal tibia in each animal. The mechanical testing was performed immediately after installation, after 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of unloaded healing. The torsional strength started to increase after 4 weeks of unloaded healing and there was a significant increase with time during the initial 16 weeks. The pull-out load increased rapidly during the first 4 weeks; thereafter, a moderate increase occurred during the following 12 weeks. A histological evaluation was performed after 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks. There were significant (P < 0.01) correlations between torque and percentage of bone in contact with the fixture, and between pull-out load and the bone thickness around the fixture (P < 0.001). Estimations of shear stresses and shear moduli in the bone tissue (pull-out test) and at the interface (torque test) indicated that the increase in bone volume around the implant substantially improved the mechanical capacity.

  15. Design of human surrogates for the study of biomechanical injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Payne, Thomas; Mitchell, Séan; Bibb, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Human surrogates are representations of living human structures employed to replicate "real-life" injurious scenarios in artificial environments. They are used primarily to evaluate personal protective equipment (PPE) or integrated safety systems (e.g., seat belts) in a wide range of industry sectors (e.g., automotive, military, security service, and sports equipment). Surrogates are commonly considered in five major categories relative to their form and functionality: human volunteers, postmortem human surrogates, animal surrogates, anthropomorphic test devices, and computational models. Each surrogate has its relative merits. Surrogates have been extensively employed in scenarios concerning "life-threatening" impacts (e.g., penetrating bullets or automotive accidents). However, more frequently occurring nonlethal injuries (e.g., fractures, tears, lacerations, contusions) often result in full or partial debilitation in contexts where optimal human performance is crucial (e.g., military, sports). Detailed study of these injuries requires human surrogates with superior biofidelity to those currently available if PPE designs are to improve. The opportunities afforded by new technologies, materials, instrumentation, and processing capabilities should be exploited to develop a new generation of more sophisticated human surrogates. This paper presents a review of the current state of the art in human surrogate construction, highlighting weaknesses and opportunities, to promote research into improved surrogates for PPE development.

  16. Knotless single-row rotator cuff repair: a comparative biomechanical study of 2 knotless suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Efird, Chad; Traub, Shaun; Baldini, Todd; Rioux-Forker, Dana; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana; Hawkins, Monica; McCarty, Eric

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the gap formation during cyclic loading, maximum repair strength, and failure mode of single-row full-thickness supraspinatus repairs performed using 2 knotless suture anchors with differing internal suture-retention mechanisms in a human cadaver model. Nine matched pairs of cadaver shoulders were used. Full-thickness tears were induced by detaching the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tuberosity. Single-row repairs were performed with either type I (Opus Magnum PI; ArthroCare, Austin, Texas) or type II (ReelX STT; Stryker, Mahwah, New Jersey) knotless suture anchors. The repaired tendon was cycled from 10 to 90 N for 500 cycles, followed by load to failure. Gap formation was measured at 5, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 cycles with a video digitizing system. Anchor type or location (anterior or posterior) had no effect on gap formation during cyclic loading regardless of position (anterior, P=.385; posterior, P=.389). Maximum load to failure was significantly greater (P=.018) for repairs performed with type II anchors (288±62 N) compared with type I anchors (179±39 N). Primary failure modes were anchor pullout and tendon tearing for type II anchors and suture slippage through the anchor for type I anchors. The internal ratcheting suture-retention mechanism of type II anchors may have helped this anchor outperform the suture-cinching mechanism of type I anchors by supporting significantly higher loads before failure and minimizing suture slippage, potentially leading to stronger repairs clinically. PMID:23937749

  17. The influence of novel compliant floors on balance control in elderly women--A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alexander D; Laing, Andrew C

    2011-07-01

    Novel compliant floors aim to decrease the risk for fall-related injury by providing substantial force attenuation during the impact phase of falls. Certain models of compliant flooring have been shown to have limited influence on postural sway and successful completion of dynamic balance tasks. However, the effects of these products on balance recovery mechanisms following an externally induced perturbation have yet to be quantified. We used a floor translation paradigm to induce a balance perturbation to thirteen elderly community-dwelling women. Outcome measures included the displacement rates and margins of safety for both the underfoot centre-of-pressure and whole-body centre-of-mass across two novel compliant floors (SmartCell, SofTile), two basic foam surfaces (Firm-Foam, Soft-Foam) and a standard 'Rigid' floor as a control condition. The centre-of-mass and centre-of-pressure margins of safety, and all centre-of-mass displacement rates, were not significantly lower for the two novel compliant flooring systems compared to the control floor. The centre-of-pressure displacement rates were similar to the control floor for the SmartCell floor condition. The majority of the margin of safety and displacement rate variables for the foam floors were significantly lower than the control condition. This study illustrates that the SmartCell and SofTile novel compliant floors have minimal influences on balance and balance control responses following externally induced perturbations in older community-dwelling women, and supports pilot installations of these floors to inform decisions regarding the development of clinical trials.

  18. The use of biomechanics in the study of movement in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregor, R. J.; Broker, J. P.; Ryan, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    As biomechanists interested in the adaptability of the human body to microgravity conditions, it appears that our job is not only to make sure that the astronauts can function adequately in space but also that they can function upon their return to Earth. This is especially significant since many of the projects now being designed at NASA concern themselves with humans performing for up to 3 years in microgravity. While the Extended Duration Orbiter flights may last 30 to 60 days, future flights to Mars using current propulsion technology may last from 2 to 3 years. It is for this range of time that the adaptation process must be studied. Specifically, biomechanists interested in space travel realize that human performance capabilities will change as a result of exposure to microgravity. The role of the biomechanist then is to first understand the nature of the changes realized by the body. These changes include adaptation by the musculoskeletal system, the nervous system, cardiorespiratory system, and the cardiovascular system. As biomechanists, it is also our role to take part in the development of countermeasure programs that involve some form of regular exercise. Exercise countermeasure programs should include a variety of modalities with full knowledge of the loads imposed on the body by these modalities. Any exercise programs that are to be conducted by the astronauts during space travel must consider the fact that the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems degrade as a function of flight duration. Additionally, it must be understood that the central nervous system modifies its output in the control of the human body during space flight and most importantly, we must prepare the astronauts for their return to one g.

  19. Upward squatting in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Valdeci C; Marconi, Nádia F; dos Santos, Irlei; Almeida, Gil L

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis on whether individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) try to avoid knee position during upward squatting so as not to aggravate this syndrome. Also, we tested whether PFPS would generate changes in the kinetic and electromyographic (EMG) strategies used to perform this task. Eight healthy subjects and 8 subjects with PFPS, but without a history of pain for at least 30 days, took part in the experiment. They were asked to perform upward squatting with knees initially flexed at 60° (very flexed) until reaching an upright position. Angle, velocity, and acceleration (kinematic) were reconstructed for knee and ankle joints. The torques at these joints were calculated using inverse dynamics, taking into account anthropometric and inertial characteristics of each subject, including records from force data. Only activities of major muscles were recorded. The kinetic and EMG profiles were quantified during acceleration and deceleration phases of the upward squatting. Both healthy and PFPS subjects used the same kinetic and EMG strategies to perform the upward squatting, even though the magnitude of the muscle activities were decreased for the latter group. Compared to the control group, the PFPS subjects presented larger joint ankle torques and smaller knee joint torques. However, the subjects avoided keeping their knees very flexed at the initial position. Group differences in the kinetic and EMG strategies can be explained by differences in the initial position, suggesting a protective strategy used by subjects with PFPS. Therefore, for these subjects, coaches and therapists should avoid using this exercise when the knee is required to move above 40° flexion.

  20. The contributions of dietary protein and mineral to the healing of experimental fractures. A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Einhorn, T A; Bonnarens, F; Burstein, A H

    1986-12-01

    We examined the contributions of dietary protein and mineral to fracture-healing by assessing the mechanical properties of fracture callus in rats that were fed a diet that was deficient in or enriched by these nutrients. In order to isolate the effects of diet on fracture-healing, we developed a method for producing a standard closed femoral fracture with minimum-soft-tissue injury. Three groups of animals were studied. Group I was a control group, in which the rats did not undergo an operation. The rats in Group II underwent intramedullary pinning of the right femur, but no fracture was created. The rats in Group III underwent pinning identical to that used for Group II, after which a closed, transverse femoral fracture was produced. Immediately after surgery, the animals in each group were subdivided into five diet-treatment subgroups. Subgroup A received a regular diet; Subgroup B received a protein-free diet; and Subgroup C received a mineral-free diet that was lacking in calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Subgroup D received a protein-supplemented diet that was composed of three times the calculated requirement of protein, and Subgroup E received a mineral-supplemented diet that was composed of three times the calculated requirements of calcium and phosphorus as well as a therapeutic dose of vitamin D, equivalent to that used in the treatment of osteomalacia. At the end of five weeks, the animals were killed and the right femur of each one was subjected to torsion-testing to failure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  2. Biomechanics, Exercise Physiology, and the 75th Anniversary of RQES

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamill, Joseph; Haymes, Emily M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the biomechanics and exercise physiology studies published in the Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) over the past 75 years. Studies in biomechanics, a relatively new subdiscipline that evolved from kinesiology, first appeared in the journal about 40 years ago. Exercise physiology studies have…

  3. The biomechanics of concussion in unhelmeted football players in Australia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Andrew S; Patton, Declan A; Fréchède, Bertrand; Pierré, Paul-André; Ferry, Edouard; Barthels, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Objective Concussion is a prevalent brain injury in sport and the wider community. Despite this, little research has been conducted investigating the dynamics of impacts to the unprotected human head and injury causation in vivo, in particular the roles of linear and angular head acceleration. Setting Professional contact football in Australia. Participants Adult male professional Australian rules football players participating in 30 games randomly selected from 103 games. Cases selected based on an observable head impact, no observable symptoms (eg, loss-of-consciousness and convulsions), no on-field medical management and no injury recorded at the time. Primary and secondary outcome measures A data set for no-injury head impact cases comprising head impact locations and head impact dynamic parameters estimated through rigid body simulations using the MAthematical DYnamic MOdels (MADYMO) human facet model. This data set was compared to previously reported concussion case data. Results Qualitative analysis showed that the head was more vulnerable to lateral impacts. Logistic regression analyses of head acceleration and velocity components revealed that angular acceleration of the head in the coronal plane had the strongest association with concussion; tentative tolerance levels of 1747 rad/s2 and 2296 rad/s2 were reported for a 50% and 75% likelihood of concussion, respectively. The mean maximum resultant angular accelerations for the concussion and no-injury cases were 7951 rad/s2 (SD 3562 rad/s2) and 4300 rad/s2 (SD 3657 rad/s2), respectively. Linear acceleration is currently used in the assessment of helmets and padded headgear. The 50% and 75% likelihood of concussion values for resultant linear head acceleration in this study were 65.1 and 88.5 g, respectively. Conclusions As hypothesised by Holbourn over 70 years ago, angular acceleration plays an important role in the pathomechanics of concussion, which has major ramifications in terms of

  4. Biomechanical Study of the Fixation Strength of Anteromedial Plating for Humeral Shaft Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yin-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Shan, Lei; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Open reduction and internal fixation with plate and screws are the gold standard for the surgical treatment of humeral shaft fractures, this study was to compare the mechanical properties of anteromedial, anterolateral, and posterior plating for humeral shaft fractures. Methods: A distal third humeral shaft fracture model was constructed using fourth-generation sawbones (#3404, composite bone). A total of 24 sawbones with a distal third humeral shaft fracture was randomly divided into three Groups: A, B, and C (n = 8 in each group) for anteromedial, anterolateral, and posterior plating, respectively. All sawbones were subjected to horizontal torsional fatigue tests, horizontal torsional and axial compressive fatigue tests, four-point bending fatigue tests in anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) directions and horizontal torsional destructive tests. Results: In the horizontal torsional fatigue tests, the mean torsional angle amplitude in Groups A, B, and C were 6.12°, 6.53°, and 6.81°. In horizontal torsional and axial compressive fatigue tests, the mean torsional angle amplitude in Groups A, B, and C were 5.66°, 5.67°, and 6.36°. The mean plate displacement amplitude was 0.05 mm, 0.08 mm, and 0.10 mm. Group A was smaller than Group C (P < 0.05). In AP four-point bending fatigue tests, the mean plate displacement amplitude was 0.16 mm, 0.13 mm, and 0.20 mm. Group B was smaller than Group C (P < 0.05). In ML four-point bending fatigue tests, the mean plate displacement amplitude were 0.16 mm, 0.19 mm, and 0.17 mm. In horizontal torsional destructive tests, the mean torsional rigidity in Groups A, B, and C was 0.82, 0.75, and 0.76 N·m/deg. The yielding torsional angle was 24.50°, 25.70°, and 23.86°. The mean yielding torque was 18.46, 18.05, and 16.83 N·m, respectively. Conclusions: Anteromedial plating was superior to anterolateral or posterior plating in all mechanical tests except in AP four-point bending fatigue tests compared to the

  5. Compression and contact area of anterior strut grafts in spinal instrumentation: a biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anterior bone grafts are used as struts to reconstruct the anterior column of the spine in kyphosis or following injury. An incomplete fusion can lead to later correction losses and compromise further healing. Despite the different stabilizing techniques that have evolved, from posterior or anterior fixating implants to combined anterior/posterior instrumentation, graft pseudarthrosis rates remain an important concern. Furthermore, the need for additional anterior implant fixation is still controversial. In this bench-top study, we focused on the graft-bone interface under various conditions, using two simulated spinal injury models and common surgical fixation techniques to investigate the effect of implant-mediated compression and contact on the anterior graft. Methods Calf spines were stabilised with posterior internal fixators. The wooden blocks as substitutes for strut grafts were impacted using a “pressfit” technique and pressure-sensitive films placed at the interface between the vertebral bone and the graft to record the compression force and the contact area with various stabilization techniques. Compression was achieved either with posterior internal fixator alone or with an additional anterior implant. The importance of concomitant ligament damage was also considered using two simulated injury models: pure compression Magerl/AO fracture type A or rotation/translation fracture type C models. Results In type A injury models, 1 mm-oversized grafts for impaction grafting provided good compression and fair contact areas that were both markedly increased by the use of additional compressing anterior rods or by shortening the posterior fixator construct. Anterior instrumentation by itself had similar effects. For type C injuries, dramatic differences were observed between the techniques, as there was a net decrease in compression and an inadequate contact on the graft occurred in this model. Under these circumstances, both compression and the

  6. Long-Range And Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation Studies in RHIC With Lessons for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-28

    Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. Electron lenses were proposed for both RHIC and the LHC to reduce the head-on beam-beam effect. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

  7. Long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation studies in RHIC with lessons for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H.-J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.

    2009-01-12

    Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. Electron lenses were proposed for both RHIC and the LHC to reduce the head-on beam-beam effect. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

  8. Long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation studies in RHIC with lessons for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer,W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J. -P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H. -J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.

    2008-11-24

    Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both RIDC and the LHC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

  9. Challenge of biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2013-06-01

    The application of mechanics to biology--biomechanics--bears great challenges due to the intricacy of living things. Their dynamism, along with the complexity of their mechanical response (which in itself involves complex chemical, electrical, and thermal phenomena) makes it very difficult to correlate empirical data with theoretical models. This difficulty elevates the importance of useful biomechanical theories compared to other fields of engineering. Despite inherent imperfections of all theories, a well formulated theory is crucial in any field of science because it is the basis for interpreting observations. This is all-the-more vital, for instance, when diagnosing symptoms, or planning treatment to a disease. The notion of interpreting empirical data without theory is unscientific and unsound. This paper attempts to fortify the importance of biomechanics and invigorate research efforts for those engineers and mechanicians who are not yet involved in the field. It is not aimed here, however, to give an overview of biomechanics. Instead, three unsolved problems are formulated to challenge the readers. At the micro-scale, the problem of the structural organization and integrity of the living cell is presented. At the meso-scale, the enigma of fingerprint formation is discussed. At the macro-scale, the problem of predicting aneurysm ruptures is reviewed. It is aimed here to attract the attention of engineers and mechanicians to problems in biomechanics which, in the author's opinion, will dominate the development of engineering and mechanics in forthcoming years. PMID:24015479

  10. Challenge of biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2013-06-01

    The application of mechanics to biology--biomechanics--bears great challenges due to the intricacy of living things. Their dynamism, along with the complexity of their mechanical response (which in itself involves complex chemical, electrical, and thermal phenomena) makes it very difficult to correlate empirical data with theoretical models. This difficulty elevates the importance of useful biomechanical theories compared to other fields of engineering. Despite inherent imperfections of all theories, a well formulated theory is crucial in any field of science because it is the basis for interpreting observations. This is all-the-more vital, for instance, when diagnosing symptoms, or planning treatment to a disease. The notion of interpreting empirical data without theory is unscientific and unsound. This paper attempts to fortify the importance of biomechanics and invigorate research efforts for those engineers and mechanicians who are not yet involved in the field. It is not aimed here, however, to give an overview of biomechanics. Instead, three unsolved problems are formulated to challenge the readers. At the micro-scale, the problem of the structural organization and integrity of the living cell is presented. At the meso-scale, the enigma of fingerprint formation is discussed. At the macro-scale, the problem of predicting aneurysm ruptures is reviewed. It is aimed here to attract the attention of engineers and mechanicians to problems in biomechanics which, in the author's opinion, will dominate the development of engineering and mechanics in forthcoming years.

  11. Corneal biomechanics: a review.

    PubMed

    Piñero, David P; Alcón, Natividad

    2015-03-01

    Biomechanics is often defined as 'mechanics applied to biology'. Due to the variety and complexity of the behaviour of biological structures and materials, biomechanics is better defined as the development, extension and application of mechanics for a better understanding of physiology and physiopathology and consequently for a better diagnosis and treatment of disease and injury. Different methods for the characterisation of corneal biomechanics are reviewed in detail, including those that are currently commercially available (Ocular Response Analyzer and CorVis ST). The clinical applicability of the parameters provided by these devices are discussed, especially in the fields of glaucoma, detection of ectatic disorders and orthokeratology. Likewise, other methods are also reviewed, such as Brillouin microscopy or dynamic optical coherence tomography and others with potential application to clinical practice but not validated for in vivo measurements, such as ultrasonic elastography. Advantages and disadvantages of all these techniques are described. Finally, the concept of biomechanical modelling is revised as well as the requirements for developing biomechanical models, with special emphasis on finite element modelling. PMID:25470213

  12. In vitro biomechanical study of pedicle screw pull-out strength based on different screw path preparation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moldavsky, Mark; Salloum, Kanaan; Bucklen, Brandon; Khalil, Saif; Mehta, Jwalant S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor screw-to-bone fixation is a clinical problem that can lead to screw loosening. Under-tapping (UT) the pedicle screw has been evaluated biomechanically in the past. The objective of the study was to determine if pedicle preparation with a sequential tapping technique will alter the screw-to-bone fixation strength using a stress relaxation testing loading protocol. Materials and Methods: Three thoracolumbar calf spines were instrumented with pedicle screws that were either probed, UT, standard-tapped (ST), or sequential tapped to prepare the pedicle screw track and a stress relaxation protocol was used to determine pull-out strength. The maximum torque required for pedicle screw insertion and pull-out strength was reported. A one-way ANOVA and Tukeys post-hoc test were used to determine statistical significance. Results: The pedicle screw insertion torques for the probed, UT, ST and sequentially tapped (SQT) techniques were 5.09 (±1.08) Nm, 5.39 (±1.61) Nm, 2.93 (±0.43) Nm, and 3.54 (±0.67) Nm, respectively. There is a significant difference between probed compared to ST (P ≤ 0.05), as well as UT compared to both ST and SQT (P ≤ 0.05). The pull-out strength for pedicle screws for the probed, UT, ST and SQT techniques was 2443 (±782) N, 2353(±918) N, 2474 (±521) N, and 2146 (±582) N, respectively, with no significant difference (P ≥ 0.05) between techniques. Conclusions: The ST technique resulted in the highest pull-out strength while the SQT technique resulted in the lowest. However, there was no significant difference in the pull-out strength for the various preparation techniques and there was no correlation between insertion torque and pull-out strength. This suggests that other factors such as bone density may have a greater influence on pull-out strength. PMID:27053808

  13. Macroparticle simulation studies of a proton beam haloexperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Colestock, P.L.; Gilpatrick, D.; Smith, H.V.; Wangler,T.P.; Schulze, M.E.

    2002-09-12

    We report macroparticle simulations for comparison withmeasured results from a proton beam-halo experiment in a 52-quadrupoleperiodic-focusing channel. An important issue is that the inputphase-space distribution is not experimentally known. Three differentinitial distributions with different shapes predict different beamprofiles in the transport system. Simulations have been fairly successfulin reproducing the core of the measured matched-beam profiles and thetrend of emittance growth as a function of mismatch factor, butunderestimate the growth rate of halo and emittance for mismatched beams.In this study, we find that knowledge of the Courant-Snyder parametersand emittances of the input beam is not sufficient for reliableprediction of the halo. Input distributions iwth greater population inthe tails produce larger rates of emittance growth, a result that isqualitatively consistent with the particle-core model of halo formationin mismatched beams.

  14. A biomechanical study of the recovery in spinal stability of flexion/extension and torsion after the resection of different posterior lumbar structures in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haobo; Zhu, Shaowen; Ma, Jianxiong; Wang, Jie; Feng, Rui; Xing, Dan; Yang, Yang; Ma, Baoyi; Chen, Yang; Yu, Jingtao; Ma, Xinlong

    2013-08-01

    Posterior lumbar structures are vital for spinal stability, and many researchers thought that laminectomy and facetectomy would lead to severe spinal instability. However, because living organisms have compensatory repair capacities, their long-term condition after injuries may change over time. To study the changes in the lumbar biomechanical stability of flexion/extension and torsion at different time points after the resection of various posterior structures, as well as to assess the capacity for self-healing, sheep that had undergone laminectomy or facetectomy were used as an experimental animal model. The injured sheep models included three groups: laminectomy only, laminectomy plus left total facetectomy, and laminectomy plus bilateral facetectomy. Eight nonoperative sheep were used as the control group. At 0, 6, 12, 24, and 36 weeks after injury, the lumbar specimens were harvested for biomechanical testing using the Instron 8874 servohydraulic biomechanical testing system. The changes in the injured lumbar spine were also analyzed through radiological examination. The lumbar stability in flexion/extension and torsion was severely decreased after the three types of surgery. After 6 weeks, the flexion/extension mechanical parameters recovered substantially; each parameter had returned to normal levels by 12 weeks and exceeded the intact group by 24 and 36 weeks. Torsional stiffness also recovered gradually over time. All injury groups demonstrated decreased intervertebral space and degeneration or even fusion in the small joints of the surgical segment or in adjacent segments. These results indicate that the body has the ability to repair the mechanical instability to a certain extent.

  15. Cement augmentation of implants--no general cure in osteoporotic fracture treatment. A biomechanical study on non-displaced femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Nicolino, Tomas I; Barla, Jorge; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Richards, R Geoff; Blauth, Michael; Windolf, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Femoral neck fractures in the elderly are a common problem in orthopedics. Augmentation of screw fixation with bone cement can provide better stability of implants and lower the risk of secondary displacement. This study aimed to investigate whether cement augmentation of three cannulated screws in non-displaced femoral neck fractures could increase implant fixation. A femoral neck fracture was simulated in six paired human cadaveric femora and stabilized with three 7.3 mm cannulated screws. Pairs were divided into two groups: conventional instrumentation versus additional cement augmentation of screw tips with 2 ml TraumacemV+ each. Biomechanical testing was performed by applying cyclic axial load until failure. Failure cycles, axial head displacement, screw angle changes, telescoping and screw cut-out were evaluated. Failure (15 mm actuator displacement) occurred in the augmented group at 12,500 cycles (± 2,480) compared to 15,625 cycles (± 4,215) in the non-augmented group (p = 0.041). When comparing 3 mm vertical displacement of the head no significant difference (p = 0.72) was detected between the survival curves of the two groups. At 8,500 load-cycles (early onset failure) the augmented group demonstrated a change in screw angle of 2.85° (± 0.84) compared to 1.15° (± 0.93) in the non-augmented group (p = 0.013). The results showed no biomechanical advantage with respect to secondary displacement following augmentation of three cannulated screws in a non-displaced femoral neck fracture. Consequently, the indication for cement augmentation to enhance implant anchorage in osteoporotic bone has to be considered carefully taking into account fracture type, implant selection and biomechanical surrounding. PMID:26177609

  16. Polarization Studies in Fast-Ion Beam Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2001-12-20

    In a historical review, the observations and the insight gained from polarization studies of fast ions interacting with solid targets are presented. These began with J. Macek's recognition of zero-field quantum beats in beam-foil spectroscopy as indicating alignment, and D.G. Ellis' density operator analysis that suggested the observability of orientation when using tilted foils. Lastly H. Winter's studies of the ion-beam surface interaction at grazing incidence yielded the means to produce a high degree of nuclear orientation in ion beams.

  17. Cellular track model for study of heavy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1993-01-01

    Track theory is combined with a realistic model of a heavy ion beam to study the effects of nuclear fragmentation on cell survival and biological effectiveness. The effects of secondary reaction products are studied as a function of depth in a water column. Good agreement is found with experimental results for the survival of human T-l cells exposed to monoenergetic carbon, neon, and argon beams under aerobic and hypoxia conditions. The present calculation, which includes the effect of target fragmentation, is a significant improvement over an earlier calculation because of the use of a vastly improved beam model with no change in the track theory or cellular response parameters.

  18. Factors Related to Students' Learning of Biomechanics Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, ChengTu; Smith, Jeremy D.; Bohne, Michael; Knudson, Duane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate and expand a previous study to identify the factors that affect students' learning of biomechanical concepts. Students were recruited from three universities (N = 149) located in the central and western regions of the United States. Data from 142 students completing the Biomechanics Concept Inventory…

  19. Modelling approaches in biomechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R McN

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual, physical and mathematical models have all proved useful in biomechanics. Conceptual models, which have been used only occasionally, clarify a point without having to be constructed physically or analysed mathematically. Some physical models are designed to demonstrate a proposed mechanism, for example the folding mechanisms of insect wings. Others have been used to check the conclusions of mathematical modelling. However, others facilitate observations that would be difficult to make on real organisms, for example on the flow of air around the wings of small insects. Mathematical models have been used more often than physical ones. Some of them are predictive, designed for example to calculate the effects of anatomical changes on jumping performance, or the pattern of flow in a 3D assembly of semicircular canals. Others seek an optimum, for example the best possible technique for a high jump. A few have been used in inverse optimization studies, which search for variables that are optimized by observed patterns of behaviour. Mathematical models range from the extreme simplicity of some models of walking and running, to the complexity of models that represent numerous body segments and muscles, or elaborate bone shapes. The simpler the model, the clearer it is which of its features is essential to the calculated effect. PMID:14561333

  20. Spes: Exotic Beams for Nuclear Physics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Corradetti, Stefano; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesu; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-02-01

    The SPES project at Laboratori di Legnaro of INFN (Italy) is concentrating on the production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei for nuclear physics experiments using uranium fission at a rate of 1013 fission/s. The emphasis on neutron-rich isotopes is justified by the fact that this vast territory has been little explored. The Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) will be produced by the ISOL technique using proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx. The most critical element of the SPES project is the Multi-Foil Direct Target. Up to the present time, the proposed target represents an innovation in terms of its capability to sustain the primary beam power. This talk will present the status of the project financed by INFN, which is actually in the construction phase at Legnaro. In particular, developments related to the target and the ion-source activities using the surface ion source, plasma ion source, and laser ion source techniques will be reported.

  1. Molecular beam facility for studying mass spectrometer performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballenthin, J. O.; Nier, A. O.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus which produces neutral gas beams in the velocity range from thermal to 6 km/s makes possible studies simulating the motion of instruments through tenuous atmospheres. Use of the apparatus in studying the response of an open-source mass spectrometer is examined. Experiments performed include responses when the instrument is in a normal mode of operation, when the ion source potentials are adjusted to reject striking gas particles, when the beam is restricted so that portions of the ion source are struck, and when the beam strikes at angles other than normal incidence. Results indicate specular radiation of particles out of the source and stagnation ratios close to unity for normal operation. Retarding potential studies dropped the sensitivity by a factor of about 10, and as angles of attack are varied, the effect was found to depend upon beam velocity and the way the ions are initially accelerated.

  2. A Biomechanical Comparison of Intralaminar C7 Screw Constructs with and without Offset Connector Used for C6-7 Cervical Spine Immobilization : A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N.; An, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The offset connector can allow medial and lateral variability and facilitate intralaminar screw incorporation into the construct. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of C7 intralaminar screw constructs with and without offset connector using a three dimensional finite element model of a C6-7 cervical spine segment. Methods Finite element models representing C7 intralaminar screw constructs with and without the offset connector were developed. Range of motion (ROM) and maximum von Mises stresses in the vertebra for the two techniques were compared under pure moments in flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. Results ROM for intralaminar screw construct with offset connector was less than the construct without the offset connector in the three principal directions. The maximum von Misses stress was observed in the C7 vertebra around the pedicle in both constructs. Maximum von Mises stress in the construct without offset connector was found to be 12-30% higher than the corresponding stresses in the construct with offset connector in the three principal directions. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the intralaminar screw fixation with offset connector is better than the construct without offset connector in terms of biomechanical stability. Construct with the offset connector reduces the ROM of C6-7 segment more significantly compared to the construct without the offset connector and causes lower stresses around the C7 pedicle-vertebral body complex. PMID:24003366

  3. Advantages and Disadvantages of Double Threaded Dental Implant Screws As Opposed to Single-Threaded: A Study from a Biomechanical Perspective by the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Arenal, A.; de Cos Juez, F. J.; Lasheras, F. Sánchez; Quevedo, M. Mauvezin

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the present article is to study the advantages from a biomechanical point of view of the use of a double-threaded dental implant over the more common single-threaded one. For this purpose a 3D model of a portion of the jaw was generated. In this model four different bone areas were distinguished (transition cortical, transition trabecular, bulk cortical and bulk trabecular). Not only was the portion of the jaw created with CAD software but also two different implants geometries, one with only one thread (single-threaded) and the other with two threads (double-threaded). The loading condition was defined as 150 N intrusive forces and 15 N lingual-labial forces acting on the implant. The results of the present study shown that from a macroscopic point of view, the choice of one or other of the dental implants does not make a significant difference in the general behaviour of the jaw. In spite of this and notwithstanding the effects of the transition bone-implant, the stress distribution achieved by the single-threaded dental implant is more uniform. This effect is better for the biomechanics of the jaw. The advantage presented by the double threaded implant is that due to its larger surface the osseointegration is better than in the single-threaded version.

  4. Ionosphere/microwave beam interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. E.; Duncan, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave beam of the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) is predicted to interact with the ionosphere producing thermal runaway up to an altitude of about 100 kilometers at a power density threshold of 12 mW/cm sq (within a factor of two). The operation of the SPS at two frequencies, 2450 and 5800 MHz, is compared. The ionosphere interaction is less at the higher frequency, but the tropospheric problem scattering from heavy rain and hail is worse at the higher frequency. Microwave signals from communication satellites were observed to scintillate, but there is some concern that the uplink pilot signal may be distorted by the SPS heated ionosphere. The microwave scintillations are only observed in the tropics in the early evenings near the equinoxes. Results indicate that large phase errors in the uplink pilot signal can be reduced.

  5. A preliminary case study of the effect of shoe-wearing on the biomechanics of a horse’s foot

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Jeffery W.; Gatesy, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Horse racing is a multi-billion-dollar industry that has raised welfare concerns due to injured and euthanized animals. Whilst the cause of musculoskeletal injuries that lead to horse morbidity and mortality is multifactorial, pre-existing pathologies, increased speeds and substrate of the racecourse are likely contributors to foot disease. Horse hooves have the ability to naturally deform during locomotion and dissipate locomotor stresses, yet farriery approaches are utilised to increase performance and protect hooves from wear. Previous studies have assessed the effect of different shoe designs on locomotor performance; however, no biomechanical study has hitherto measured the effect of horseshoes on the stresses of the foot skeleton in vivo. This preliminary study introduces a novel methodology combining three-dimensional data from biplanar radiography with inverse dynamics methods and finite element analysis (FEA) to evaluate the effect of a stainless steel shoe on the function of a Thoroughbred horse’s forefoot during walking. Our preliminary results suggest that the stainless steel shoe shifts craniocaudal, mediolateral and vertical GRFs at mid-stance. We document a similar pattern of flexion-extension in the PIP (pastern) and DIP (coffin) joints between the unshod and shod conditions, with slight variation in rotation angles throughout the stance phase. For both conditions, the PIP and DIP joints begin in a flexed posture and extend over the entire stance phase. At mid-stance, small differences in joint angle are observed in the PIP joint, with the shod condition being more extended than the unshod horse, whereas the DIP joint is extended more in the unshod than the shod condition. We also document that the DIP joint extends more than the PIP after mid-stance and until the end of the stance in both conditions. Our FEA analysis, conducted solely on the bones, shows increased von Mises and Maximum principal stresses on the forefoot phalanges in the shod

  6. A preliminary case study of the effect of shoe-wearing on the biomechanics of a horse's foot.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Rankin, Jeffery W; Gatesy, Stephen M; Hutchinson, John R

    2016-01-01

    Horse racing is a multi-billion-dollar industry that has raised welfare concerns due to injured and euthanized animals. Whilst the cause of musculoskeletal injuries that lead to horse morbidity and mortality is multifactorial, pre-existing pathologies, increased speeds and substrate of the racecourse are likely contributors to foot disease. Horse hooves have the ability to naturally deform during locomotion and dissipate locomotor stresses, yet farriery approaches are utilised to increase performance and protect hooves from wear. Previous studies have assessed the effect of different shoe designs on locomotor performance; however, no biomechanical study has hitherto measured the effect of horseshoes on the stresses of the foot skeleton in vivo. This preliminary study introduces a novel methodology combining three-dimensional data from biplanar radiography with inverse dynamics methods and finite element analysis (FEA) to evaluate the effect of a stainless steel shoe on the function of a Thoroughbred horse's forefoot during walking. Our preliminary results suggest that the stainless steel shoe shifts craniocaudal, mediolateral and vertical GRFs at mid-stance. We document a similar pattern of flexion-extension in the PIP (pastern) and DIP (coffin) joints between the unshod and shod conditions, with slight variation in rotation angles throughout the stance phase. For both conditions, the PIP and DIP joints begin in a flexed posture and extend over the entire stance phase. At mid-stance, small differences in joint angle are observed in the PIP joint, with the shod condition being more extended than the unshod horse, whereas the DIP joint is extended more in the unshod than the shod condition. We also document that the DIP joint extends more than the PIP after mid-stance and until the end of the stance in both conditions. Our FEA analysis, conducted solely on the bones, shows increased von Mises and Maximum principal stresses on the forefoot phalanges in the shod

  7. An analytical study on the bending of prismatic SMA beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Arghavani, Jamal; Poorasadion, Saeid

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an analytical solution is presented for pure bending of shape memory alloy (SMA) beams with symmetric cross section as well as symmetric behavior in tension and compression. To this end, a three-dimensional constitutive equation is reduced to one-dimensional form and employed to study the bending response of SMA beams at high (pseudo-elasticity) and low (shape memory effect) temperatures. An analytical expression for bending stress as well as polynomial approximation for shear stress and deflection are obtained. Derived equations for bending are employed to analyze an SMA beam with rectangular cross section and results are compared with those of the finite element method. The results of this work show good agreement when compared with experimental data and finite element results. Furthermore, the existence of several zero-stress fibers during unloading of SMA beams at low temperature is demonstrated.

  8. Prevention of Peritendinous Adhesions Using an Electrospun DegraPol Polymer Tube: A Histological, Ultrasonographic, and Biomechanical Study in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Müller, Angela; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G.; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. One of the great challenges in surgical tendon rupture repair is to minimize peritendinous adhesions. In order to reduce adhesion formation, a physical barrier was applied to a sutured rabbit Achilles tendon, with two different immobilization protocols used postoperatively. Methods. Thirty New Zealand white rabbits received a laceration on the Achilles tendon, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture, and half of the rabbits got a DegraPol tube at the repair site. While fifteen rabbits had their treated hind leg in a 180° stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), the other fifteen rabbits were recasted with a 150° position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization). Adhesion extent was analysed macroscopically, via ultrasound and histology. Inflammation was determined histologically. Biomechanical properties were analysed. Results. Application of a DegraPol tube reduced adhesion formation by approximately 20%—independently of the immobilization protocol. Biomechanical properties of extracted specimen were not affected by the tube application. There was no serious inflammatory reaction towards the implant material. Conclusions. Implantation of a DegraPol tube tightly set around a sutured tendon acts as a beneficial physical barrier and prevents adhesion formation significantly—without affecting the tendon healing process. PMID:25101292

  9. Influence of drop-landing exercises on bone geometry and biomechanical properties in prepubertal girls: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Greene, David A; Wiebe, Peter N; Naughton, Geraldine A

    2009-08-01

    We conducted a 28-week school-based exercise trial of single-leg drop-landing exercise with 42 girls (Tanner stage 1, 6-10 years old) randomly assigned to control (C), low-drop (LD), or high-drop (HD) exercise groups. The LD and HD groups performed single-leg drop-landings (three sessions/week and 50 landings/session) from 14 and 28 cm, respectively, using the nondominant leg. Single-leg peak ground-reaction impact forces in a subsample ranged between 2.5 and 4.4 times body weight. Dependent variables were bone geometry and biomechanical properties using magnetic resonance imaging. No differences (P > 0.05) were found among groups at baseline for age, stature, lean tissue mass (DXA--Lunar 3.6-DPX), leisure-time physical activity, average daily calcium intake, or measures of knee extensor or flexor torque. A series of ANOVA and ANCOVA tests showed no within- or between-group differences from baseline to posttraining. Group comparisons assessing magnitude of change in side-to-side differences in geometry (area cm(2)) and cross-sectional moment of inertia (cm(4)) at proximal, mid, and distal sites revealed negligible effect sizes. Our findings suggest that strictly controlled unimodal, unidirectional single-leg drop-landing exercises involving low to moderate peak ground-reaction impact forces do not influence geometrical or biomechanical measures in the developing prepubertal female skeleton. PMID:19458887

  10. Biomechanical jumping differences among elite female handball players with and without previous anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a novel inertial sensor unit study.

    PubMed

    Setuain, Igor; Millor, Nora; González-Izal, Miriam; Gorostiaga, Esteban M; Gómez, Marisol; Alfaro-Adrián, Jesús; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-09-01

    Persistent biomechanical and jumping capacity alterations have been observed among female athletes who have sustained anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine if biomechanical jumping differences persist among a cohort of elite female handball players with previous ACL reconstruction several years after return to top-level competition. In order to achieve this goal, a direct mechanics simplified analysis by using a single Inertial Sensor Unit (IU) was used. Twenty-one elite female (6 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed and 15 uninjured control players) handball players were recruited and evaluated 6.0 ± 3.5 years after surgical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Bilateral and unilateral vertical jumps were performed to evaluate the functional performance and a single inertial sensor unit was employed in order to collect 3D acceleration and 3D orientation data. Previously ACL-reconstructed analysed athletes demonstrated significant (p < 0.05) alterations in relation to the three-dimensional axis (X-Y-Z) supported accelerations and differing jump phase durations, including jumping performance values, in both bilateral and unilateral jumping manoeuvres several years after ACL reconstruction. Identification of the encountered deficits through the use of an IU devise could provide clinicians with a new reliable tool for movement analysis in a clinical setting.

  11. Mathematical foundations of biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of biomechanics is the analysis of the structure and function of humans, animals, and plants by means of the methods of mechanics. Its foundations are in particular embedded in mathematics, physics, and informatics. Due to the inherent multidisciplinary character deriving from its aim, biomechanics has numerous connections and overlapping areas with biology, biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology, along with clinical medicine, so its range is enormously wide. This treatise is mainly meant to serve as an introduction and overview for readers and students who intend to acquire a basic understanding of the mathematical principles and mechanics that constitute the foundation of biomechanics; accordingly, its contents are limited to basic theoretical principles of general validity and long-range significance. Selected examples are included that are representative for the problems treated in biomechanics. Although ultimate mathematical generality is not in the foreground, an attempt is made to derive the theory from basic principles. A concise and systematic formulation is thereby intended with the aim that the reader is provided with a working knowledge. It is assumed that he or she is familiar with the principles of calculus, vector analysis, and linear algebra. PMID:21303323

  12. Biomechanical regulation of mesenchymal cell function

    PubMed Central

    Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Liu, Fei; Tager, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Cells of mesenchymal origin are strongly influenced by their biomechanical environment. They also help to shape tissue architecture and reciprocally influence tissue mechanical environments through their capacity to deposit, remodel, and resorb extracellular matrix and to promote tissue vascularization. Although mechanical regulation of cell function and tissue remodeling has long been appreciated in other contexts, the purpose of this review is to highlight the increasing appreciation of its importance in fibrosis and hypertrophic scarring. Recent findings Experiments in both animal and cellular model systems have demonstrated pivotal roles for the biomechanical environment in regulating myofibroblast differentiation and contraction, endothelial barrier function and angiogenesis, and mesenchymal stem cell fate decisions. Through these studies, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms transducing the biomechanical environment is emerging, with prominent and interacting roles recently identified for key network components including transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, focal adhesion kinase, MRTFs, Wnt/β-catenin and YAP/TAZ signaling pathways. Summary Progress in understanding biomechanical regulation of mesenchymal cell function is leading to novel approaches for improving clinical outcomes in fibrotic diseases and wound healing. These approaches include interventions aimed at modifying the tissue biomechanical environment, and efforts to target mesenchymal cell activation by, and reciprocal interactions with, the mechanical environment. PMID:23114589

  13. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Guilak, Farshid; Butler, David L; Goldstein, Steven A; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2014-06-27

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical function. Furthermore, it is now clear that mechanobiological interactions between cells and scaffolds can critically influence cell behavior, even in tissues and organs that do not serve an overt biomechanical role. Over the past decade, the field of "functional tissue engineering" has grown as a subfield of tissue engineering to address the challenges and questions on the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue engineering. Originally posed as a set of principles and guidelines for engineering of load-bearing tissues, functional tissue engineering has grown to encompass several related areas that have proven to have important implications for tissue repair and regeneration. These topics include measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment; quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of native tissues, scaffolds, and repair tissues; development of rationale criteria for the design and assessment of engineered tissues; investigation of the effects biomechanical factors on native and repair tissues, in vivo and in vitro; and development and application of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. Here we further expand this paradigm and provide examples of the numerous advances in the field over the past decade. Consideration of these principles in the design process will hopefully improve the safety, efficacy, and overall success of engineered tissue replacements.

  14. Biomechanics of bird flight.

    PubMed

    Tobalske, Bret W

    2007-09-01

    Power output is a unifying theme for bird flight and considerable progress has been accomplished recently in measuring muscular, metabolic and aerodynamic power in birds. The primary flight muscles of birds, the pectoralis and supracoracoideus, are designed for work and power output, with large stress (force per unit cross-sectional area) and strain (relative length change) per contraction. U-shaped curves describe how mechanical power output varies with flight speed, but the specific shapes and characteristic speeds of these curves differ according to morphology and flight style. New measures of induced, profile and parasite power should help to update existing mathematical models of flight. In turn, these improved models may serve to test behavioral and ecological processes. Unlike terrestrial locomotion that is generally characterized by discrete gaits, changes in wing kinematics and aerodynamics across flight speeds are gradual. Take-off flight performance scales with body size, but fully revealing the mechanisms responsible for this pattern awaits new study. Intermittent flight appears to reduce the power cost for flight, as some species flap-glide at slow speeds and flap-bound at fast speeds. It is vital to test the metabolic costs of intermittent flight to understand why some birds use intermittent bounds during slow flight. Maneuvering and stability are critical for flying birds, and design for maneuvering may impinge upon other aspects of flight performance. The tail contributes to lift and drag; it is also integral to maneuvering and stability. Recent studies have revealed that maneuvers are typically initiated during downstroke and involve bilateral asymmetry of force production in the pectoralis. Future study of maneuvering and stability should measure inertial and aerodynamic forces. It is critical for continued progress into the biomechanics of bird flight that experimental designs are developed in an ecological and evolutionary context.

  15. Molecular beam studies of elementary chemical processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y T

    1987-05-15

    The experimental investigation of elementary chemical reactions is presently in a very exciting period. The advance in modern microscopic experimental methods, especially crossed molecular beams and laser technology, has made it possible to explore the dynamics and mechanisms of important elementary chemical reactions in great detail. Through the continued accumulation of detailed and reliable knowledge about elementary reactions, we will be in a better position to understand, predict, and control many time-dependent macroscopic chemical processes that are important in nature or to human society. In addition, because of recent improvements in the accuracy of theoretical predictions based on large-scale ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, meaningful comparisons between theoretical and experimental findings have become possible. In the remaining years of the 20th century, there is no doubt that the experimental investigation of the dynamics and mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions will play a very important role in bridging the gap between the basic laws of mechanics and the real world of chemistry.

  16. Beam-foil-gas spectroscopy - A technique for studying steady-state non-equilibrium processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickel, W. S.; Veje, E.; Carriveau, G.; Anderson, N.

    1971-01-01

    When a thin foil is inserted in the beam of a beam-gas experiment, the beam particle state populations are driven far from their beam-gas equilibrium values. Downstream from the foil, the 'new beam' and gas species interact to produce a new equilibrium, usually different from the beam-gas equilibrium. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate this effect and to show how relative cross-section measurements can be used to study the beam-foil interaction.

  17. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  18. A Computer Study of Beam Transport by Solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chun Fai; Lee, Edward P.

    1997-11-01

    Beam transport by solenoids provides an alternative to the use of electrostatic quadrupole arrays that has been less studied for applications to heavy ion fusion drivers. A 1-d code (named SALT, for Solenoid Applications to Linac Transport) has been developed to simulate the axisymmetric beam dynamics through a sequence of solenoids. The beam is modeled as a set of ringlets, with radius and momentum traced in the axial coordinate. Solenoid fringe field aberrations, envelope matching, phase space evolution and emittance growth are studied using relativistically correct equations that include the electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Initial application is to the transport of a 2 MeV, 31.10 Ampere of K^+ beam through a channel of strength 6 Tesla. This implies a line charge density of 10 μC/m, a factor of 40 above the realistic limit for electrostatic quadrupoles. A second application is to the focusing of a 20 MeV, 4 kA electron beam down to its emittance limit.

  19. Study of Long Range Beam-Beam Interaction Limit at CESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnykh, Alexander; Sagan, David

    1997-05-01

    At CESR the counter rotating bunches share the same beam pipe and there is thus a long range beam-beam interaction (LRBBI) between the beams. It is well known that the strength of LRBBI depends on the beam intensity and on the separation between beams. We show with a simple numerical simulation that, in addition, the threshold of instability of a particle of one beam depends on the vertical size of the opposite beam. An increase of beam vertical size leads to an increase of the allowed beam intensity for a given separation. The recent experiments made at CESR and reported here confirmed this dependence as well as the early noticed fact that the LRBBI limit is due to vertical beam tail growth ( A. B. Temnykh, J. J. Welch and D. H. Rice, ``The Long Range Beam-Beam Interaction at CESR'', Proceedings of the 1993 IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference, p.2007).

  20. Biomechanics and the wheelchair.

    PubMed

    McLaurin, C A; Brubaker, C E

    1991-04-01

    Wheelchair biomechanics involves the study of how a wheelchair user imparts power to the wheels to achieve mobility. Because a wheelchair can coast, power input need not be continuous, but each power strike can be followed by a period of recovery, with the stroking frequency depending on user preferences and the coasting characteristics of the wheelchair. The latter is described in terms of rolling resistance, wind resistance and the slope of the surface. From these three factors the power required to propel the wheelchair is determined, and must be matched by the power output of the user. The efficiency of propulsion is the ratio of this power output to the metabolic cost and is typically in the order of 5% in normal use. The features required in a wheelchair depend upon user characteristics and intended activities. The ideal wheelchair for an individual will have the features that closely match these characteristics and activities. Thus prescription is not just choosing a wheelchair, but choosing the components of the wheelchair that best serve the intended purpose. In this paper, each component is examined for available options and how these options effect the performance of the wheelchair for the individual. The components include wheels, tyres, castors, frames, bearings, materials, construction details, seats, backrests, armrests, foot and legrests, headrests, wheel locks, running brakes, handrims, levers, accessories, adjustments and detachable parts. Each component is considered in relation to performance characteristics including rolling resistance, versatility, weight, comfort, stability, maneouvrability, transfer, stowage, durability and maintenance. Where they exist, wheelchair standards are referred to as a source of information regarding these characteristics.

  1. Study of a final focus system for high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Shuman, Derek B.; Waldron, William L.

    2004-06-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The final focus scenario in an HIF driver consists of several large aperture quadrupole magnets followed by a drift section in which the beam space charge is neutralized by a plasma. This beam is required to hit a millimeter-sized target spot at the end of the drift section. The objective of the NTX experiments and associated theory and simulations is to study the various physical mechanisms that determine the final spot size (radius r{sub s}) at a given distance (f) from the end of the last quadrupole. In a fusion driver, f is the standoff distance required to keep the chamber wall and superconducting magnets properly protected. The NTX final quadrupole focusing system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final spot is determined by the conditions of the beam entering the quadrupole section, the beam dynamics in the magnetic lattice, and the plasma neutralization dynamics in the drift section. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. In this paper, we will describe the theoretical and experimental aspects of the beam dynamics in the quadrupole lattice, and how these physical effects influence the final beam size. In particular, we present theoretical and experimental results on the dependence of final spot size on geometric aberrations and perveance.

  2. Nuclear photofission studies with monochromatic {gamma} ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Csige, L.; Gulyas, J.; Habs, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2012-07-09

    Two new research facilities will be ready for operation very soon (MEGa-Ray at Liver-more National Laboratory) or start construction (ELI-Nuclear Physics in Bucharest), both providing highly brilliant {gamma} beams with so far unprecedented properties via Compton backscattering of laser photons from a high-quality, relativistic electron beam. With these intense, monochromatic {gamma} beams, a new era of photonuclear physics will be enabled. A new research campaign is proposed to exploit the unprecedented properties of these highly-brilliant, novel {gamma} beams on highly-selective studies of extremely deformed nuclei in the multiple-humped potential energy landscape of the actinides via photofission. With the unique {gamma} beam bandwidth of {Delta}E/E = 10{sup -3}, we can aim at resolving individual resonances which could never be achieved so far due to the limited {gamma} bandwidth of bremsstrahlung beams. Exploratory, non-bremsstrahlung photofission experiments are going to be performed very soon at the HI{gamma}S facility (Duke University, USA) to investigate the fine structure of the sub-barrier transmission resonances of the actinides.

  3. Hip fracture risk estimation based on bone mineral density of a biomechanically guided region of interest: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjun; Kornak, John; Li, Caixia; Koyama, Alain; Saeed, Isra; Lu, Ying; Lang, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    We aim to define a biomechanically-guided region of interest inside the proximal femur for improving fracture risk prediction based on bone density measurements. The central hypothesis is that by identifying and focusing on the proximal femoral tissues strongly associated with hip fracture risk, we can provide a better densitometric evaluation of fracture risk compared to current evaluations based on anatomically defined regions of interest using DXA or CT. To achieve this, we have constructed a hip statistical atlas of quantitative computed tomography (QCT) images by applying rigid and non-rigid inter-subject image registration to transform hip QCT scans of 15 fractured patients and 15 controls into a common reference space, and performed voxel-by-voxel t-tests between the two groups to identify bone tissues that showed the strongest relevance to hip fracture. Based on identification of this fracture-relevant tissue volume, we have generated a biomechanically-guided region of interest (B-ROI). We have applied BMD measured from this new region of interest to discriminate the fractured patients and controls, and compared it to BMD measured in the total proximal femur. For the femur ROI approach, the BMD values of the fractured patients and the controls had an overlap of 60 mg/cm 3, and only 1 out of 15 fractured patients had BMD below the overlap region; for the B-ROI approach, a much narrower BMD overlap region of 28 mg/cm 3 was observed, and 11 out of 15 fractured patients had BMDs below the overlap region.

  4. A Biomechanical Analysis of the Karate Chop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Peter R.; Landa, Jean

    Although the sport of karate has been somewhat neglected by scientists, the following two isolated biomechanical studies exist in literature: (1) tracings of a karate chop in two planes were presented, but no data was given concerning the rates of movement of the limb segments, and (2) pre- and postimpact phenomena of five subjects were studied,…

  5. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band ({approximately}8-12 GHz) through Ka band ({approximately} 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional

  6. Outrun or Outmaneuver: Predator-Prey Interactions as a Model System for Integrating Biomechanical Studies in a Broader Ecological and Evolutionary Context.

    PubMed

    Moore, Talia Y; Biewener, Andrew A

    2015-12-01

    Behavioral studies performed in natural habitats provide a context for the development of hypotheses and the design of experiments relevant both to biomechanics and to evolution. In particular, predator-prey interactions are a model system for integrative study because success or failure of predation has a direct effect on fitness and drives the evolution of specialized performance in both predator and prey. Although all predators share the goal of capturing prey, and all prey share the goal of survival, the behavior of predators and prey are diverse in nature. This article presents studies of some predator-prey interactions sharing common predation strategies that reveal general principles governing the behaviors of predator and prey, even in distantly related taxa. Studies of predator-prey interactions also reveal that maximal performance observed in a laboratory setting is not necessarily the performance that determines fitness. Thus, considering locomotion in the context of predation ecology can aid in evolutionarily relevant experimental design. Classification by strategy reveals that displaying unpredictable trajectories is a relevant anti-predator behavior in response to multiple predation strategies. A predator's perception and pursuit of prey can be affected indirectly by divergent locomotion of similar animals that share an ecosystem. Variation in speed and direction of locomotion that directly increases the unpredictability of a prey's trajectory can be increased through genetic mutation that affects locomotor patterns, musculoskeletal changes that affect maneuverability, and physical interactions between an animal and the environment. By considering the interconnectedness of ecology, physical constraints, and the evolutionary history of behavior, studies in biomechanics can be designed to inform each of these fields.

  7. Comparison of Biomechanical Characteristics and Pelvic Ring Stability Using Different Fixation Methods to Treat Pubic Symphysis Diastasis: A Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Feng; He, Yu; Qian, Hebu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Li, Qinghu

    2015-12-01

    The intention of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics using 5 internal fixation methods used clinically to stabilize a pubic symphysis diastasis (PSD, Tile type B1).A 3-dimensional finite element model of PSD was simulated using 5 implants, including single superior plate (Single-Plate), superior and anterior plate (Dual-Plate), single cannulated screw (Single-Screw), crossed dual cannulated screws (Cross-Screw), and parallel dual cannulated screws (Para-Screw). Three loads were distributed in all models, including dual-leg standing, single-leg stance, and rotation. To evaluate the biomechanical properties, the construct stiffness, the stress distribution, and the von Misses stress were recorded and analyzed. To evaluate pelvic ring stability, the micromotion of the pubic symphysis and iliosacral joint was analyzed.Disruption of pubic symphysis dramatically decreased the pelvic ring stability. Cross-screw and Para-Screw showed higher stiffness than other methods. All implants endured the maximum von Misses stress under single-leg stance. For Plate-Screw system, the maximum stress occurred at a place where it strides over pubic symphysis and adjacent Plate-Screw interface. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. Para-Screw showed the best fixation effect under dual-leg conditions. Cross-screw showed superior antishearing force capacity under single-leg stance. Dual-Plate provided maximum antihorizontal rotation. Para-Screw provided the maximum stabilization for the posterior pelvic ring.This study showed the biomechanical advantages of dual-implant for PSD only from the finite element view. The Para-Screw provided high construct stiffness under 3 load conditions. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. The better anterior and posterior pelvic stabilization were obtained by the dual-implant fixation than other methods. Therefore, the Cross-Screw and Dual-Plate fixation methods should be preferred in the

  8. Biomechanics of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, V.; Kodigudla, M.; Goel, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Disc degeneration and associated disorders are among the most debated topics in the orthopedic literature over the past few decades. These may be attributed to interrelated mechanical, biochemical, and environmental factors. The treatment options vary from conservative approaches to surgery, depending on the severity of degeneration and response to conservative therapies. Spinal fusion is considered to be the “gold standard” in surgical methods till date. However, the association of adjacent level degeneration has led to the evolution of motion preservation technologies like spinal arthroplasty and posterior dynamic stabilization systems. These new technologies are aimed to address pain and preserve motion while maintaining a proper load sharing among various spinal elements. This paper provides an elaborative biomechanical review of the technologies aimed to address the disc degeneration and reiterates the point that biomechanical efficacy followed by long-term clinical success will allow these nonfusion technologies as alternatives to fusion, at least in certain patient population. PMID:22745914

  9. Study of longitudinal dynamics in space-charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai

    from the 6-D phase space measurement has been used as initial conditions in computer simulations in order to explore the cause of discrepancies we have observed earlier between the experimental and theoretical models. After extensive simulation studies, we find that the beam loss inside the perturbation due to mismatch or misalignment is an important factor that needs to be included in the models for better reliability.

  10. SU-E-T-635: Quantitative Study On Beam Flatness Variation with Beam Energy Change

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J S; Eldib, A; Ma, C; Lin, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam flatness check has been proposed for beam energy check for photon beams with flattering filters. In this work, beam flatness change with beam energy was investigated quantitatively using the Monte Carlo method and its significance was compared with depth dose curve change. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations for a linear accelerator with flattering filter were performed with different initial electron energies for photon beams of 6MV and 10MV. Dose calculations in a water phantom were then perform with the phase space files obtained from the simulations. The beam flatness was calculated based on the dose profile at 10 cm depth for all the beams with different initial electron energies. The percentage depth dose (PDD) curves were also analyzed. The dose at 10cm depth (D10) and the ratio of the dose at 10cm and 20cm depth (D10/D20) and their change with the beam energy were calculated and compared with the beam flatness variation. Results: It was found that the beam flatness variation with beam energy change was more significant than the change of D10 and the ratio between D10 and D20 for both 6MV and 10MV beams. Half MeV difference on the initial electron beam energy brought in at least 20% variation on the beam flatness but only half percent change on the ratio of D10 and D20. The change of D10 or D20 alone is even less significant. Conclusion: The beam energy impact on PDD is less significant than that on the beam flatness. If the PDD is used for checking the beam energy, uncertainties of the measurement could possibly disguise its change. Beam flatness changes more significantly with beam energy and therefore it can be used for monitoring the energy change for photon beams with flattering filters. However, other factors which may affect the beam flatness should be watched as well.

  11. Biomechanics of Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Andrew; Tueting, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of tendons in the upper extremity is a powerful technique to restore function to a partially paralyzed hand. The biomechanical principles of muscle tension and tendon excursion dictate motor function both in the native as well as transferred states. Appropriately tensioning transferred tendons to maximize the function of the associated muscle remains an area of focused research. Newer methods of tendon coaptation have proven similar in strength to the standard Pulvertaft weave, affording more options to the surgeon. PMID:27387073

  12. Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, Yaritza

    2016-01-01

    The Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) is equipped with anthropometric and biomechanical instrumentation and regularly performs population analysis based on analytical and modeling capabilities to test and verify if all eligible crew/passengers can be accommodated, and fitted with a protective suit that enables performance of reach and access tasks. The ABF's unique expertise can aid in identifying potential ergonomic and occupational biomechanical problems with recommended solutions to improve a suited passenger's safety, comfort, and injury protection. My involvement was in the following projects: The ABF is currently trying to define human performance capabilities in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit. Subjects are tested in an effort to further understand shoulder and elbow strength performance deficits when suited compared to unsuited. Another ongoing project is to develop a protocol to reliably characterize human health and performance metrics for individuals working inside various extravehicular activity (EVA) suits under realistic spaceflight conditions. This project will provide benchmarking data and protocols to be used in the making of future EVA suit configurations.

  13. Beam-beam interaction study of medium energy eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao,Y.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2009-07-15

    Medium Energy eRHIC (MeRHIC), the first stage design of eRHIC, includes a multi-pass ERL that provides 4GeV high quality electron beam to collide with the ion beam of RHIC. It delivers a minimum luminosity of 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Beam-beam effects present one of major factors limiting the luminosity of colliders. In this paper, both beam-beam effects on the electron beam and the proton beam in MeRHIC are investigated. The beam-beam interaction can induce a head-tail type instability of the proton beam referred to as the kink instability. Thus, beam stability conditions should be established to avoid proton beam loss. Also, the electron beam transverse disruption by collisions has to be evaluated to ensure that the beam quality is good enough for the energy recovery pass. The relation of proton beam stability, electron disruption and consequential luminosity are carried out after thorough discussion.

  14. Comparative Study on Functional Effects of Allotransplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Adipose Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction on Tendon Repair: A Biomechanical Study in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Behfar, Mehdi; Javanmardi, Sara; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Objective Tendon never returns to its complete biological and mechanical properties after repair. Bone marrow and, recently, adipose tissue have been used as sources of mesenchymal stem cells which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. In the present study, we compared the effects of allotransplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and adipose derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) on tendon mechanical properties after experimentally induced flexor tendon transection. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we used 48 adult male New Zealand white rabbits. Twelve of rabbits were used as donors of bone marrow and adipose tissue, the rest were divided into control and treatment groups. The injury model was a unilateral complete transection of the deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, 4×106cells of either fresh SVF from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or cultured BMSCs were intratendinously injected into tendon stumps in the treatment groups. Controls received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Immobilization with a cast was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed three and eight weeks after surgery and tendons underwent mechanical evaluations. The differences among the groups were analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey’s multiple comparisons test. Results Stromal cell transplantation resulted in a significant increase in ultimate and yield loads, energy absorption, and stress of repairs compared to the controls. However, there were no statistically significant changes detected in terms of stiffness. In comparison, we observed no significant differences at the third week between SVF and BMSCs treated tendons in terms of all load related properties. However, at the eighth week SVF transplantation resulted in significantly increased energy absorption, stress and stiffness compared to BMSCs. Conclusion The enhanced biomechanical properties of

  15. A Patient Specific Biomechanical Analysis of Custom Root Analogue Implant Designs on Alveolar Bone Stress: A Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Anssari Moin, David; Hassan, Bassam; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyse by means of FEA the influence of 5 custom RAI designs on stress distribution of peri-implant bone and to evaluate the impact on microdisplacement for a specific patient case. Materials and Methods. A 3D surface model of a RAI for the upper right canine was constructed from the cone beam computed tomography data of one patient. Subsequently, five (targeted) press-fit design modification FE models with five congruent bone models were designed: "Standard," "Prism," "Fins," "Plug," and "Bulbs," respectively. Preprocessor software was applied to mesh the models. Two loads were applied: an oblique force (300 N) and a vertical force (150 N). Analysis was performed to evaluate stress distributions and deformed contact separation at the peri-implant region. Results. The lowest von Mises stress levels were numerically observed for the Plug design. The lowest levels of contact separation were measured in the Fins model followed by the Bulbs design. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the applied methodology, adding targeted press-fit geometry to the RAI standard design will have a positive effect on stress distribution, lower concentration of bone stress, and will provide a better primary stability for this patient specific case. PMID:27274727

  16. A Patient Specific Biomechanical Analysis of Custom Root Analogue Implant Designs on Alveolar Bone Stress: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyse by means of FEA the influence of 5 custom RAI designs on stress distribution of peri-implant bone and to evaluate the impact on microdisplacement for a specific patient case. Materials and Methods. A 3D surface model of a RAI for the upper right canine was constructed from the cone beam computed tomography data of one patient. Subsequently, five (targeted) press-fit design modification FE models with five congruent bone models were designed: “Standard,” “Prism,” “Fins,” “Plug,” and “Bulbs,” respectively. Preprocessor software was applied to mesh the models. Two loads were applied: an oblique force (300 N) and a vertical force (150 N). Analysis was performed to evaluate stress distributions and deformed contact separation at the peri-implant region. Results. The lowest von Mises stress levels were numerically observed for the Plug design. The lowest levels of contact separation were measured in the Fins model followed by the Bulbs design. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the applied methodology, adding targeted press-fit geometry to the RAI standard design will have a positive effect on stress distribution, lower concentration of bone stress, and will provide a better primary stability for this patient specific case. PMID:27274727

  17. A Case Study in Proton Pencil-Beam Scanning Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Kooy, Hanne M.; Clasie, Benjamin M.; Lu, H.-M.; Madden, Thomas M.; Bentefour, Hassan; Depauw, Nicolas M.S.; Adams, Judy A.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Demaret, Denis; Delaney, Thomas F.; Flanz, Jacob B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: We completed an implementation of pencil-beam scanning (PBS), a technology whereby a focused beam of protons, of variable intensity and energy, is scanned over a plane perpendicular to the beam axis and in depth. The aim of radiotherapy is to improve the target to healthy tissue dose differential. We illustrate how PBS achieves this aim in a patient with a bulky tumor. Methods and Materials: Our first deployment of PBS uses 'broad' pencil-beams ranging from 20 to 35 mm (full-width-half-maximum) over the range interval from 32 to 7 g/cm{sup 2}. Such beam-brushes offer a unique opportunity for treating bulky tumors. We present a case study of a large (4,295 cc clinical target volume) retroperitoneal sarcoma treated to 50.4 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) (presurgery) using a course of photons and protons to the clinical target volume and a course of protons to the gross target volume. Results: We describe our system and present the dosimetry for all courses and provide an interdosimetric comparison. Discussion: The use of PBS for bulky targets reduces the complexity of treatment planning and delivery compared with collimated proton fields. In addition, PBS obviates, especially for cases as presented here, the significant cost incurred in the construction of field-specific hardware. PBS offers improved dose distributions, reduced treatment time, and reduced cost of treatment.

  18. Biomechanical Stability of Dental Implants in Augmented Maxillary Sites: Results of a Randomized Clinical Study with Four Different Biomaterials and PRF and a Biological View on Guided Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Troedhan; Marcel, Wainwright; Andreas, Kurrek; Izabela, Schlichting

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bone regenerates mainly by periosteal and endosteal humoral and cellular activity, which is given only little concern in surgical techniques and choice of bone grafts for guided bone regeneration. This study investigates on a clinical level the biomechanical stability of augmented sites in maxillary bone when a new class of moldable, self-hardening calcium-phosphate biomaterials (SHB) is used with and without the addition of Platelet Rich Fibrin (aPRF) in the Piezotome-enhanced subperiosteal tunnel-technique (PeSPTT). Material and Methods. 82 patients with horizontal atrophy of anterior maxillary crest were treated with PeSPTT and randomly assigned biphasic (60% HA/40% bTCP) or monophasic (100% bTCP) SHB without or with addition of aPRF. 109 implants were inserted into the augmented sites after 8.3 months and the insertion-torque-value (ITV) measured as clinical expression of the (bio)mechanical stability of the augmented bone and compared to ITVs of a prior study in sinus lifting. Results. Significant better results of (bio)mechanical stability almost by two-fold, expressed by higher ITVs compared to native bone, were achieved with the used biomaterials and more constant results with the addition of aPRF. Conclusion. The use of SHB alone or combined with aPRF seems to be favourable to achieve a superior (bio)mechanical stable restored alveolar bone. PMID:25954758

  19. Theoretical study of longitudinal beam splitting and related phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Shih, H.J.; Kummer, M.

    1993-10-01

    A recent experiment at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) with electron cooling showed that rf phase modulation near 1:1 resonance leads to longitudinal beam splitting. Here we explain this by applying the method of averaging, a powerful tool from the study of dynamical systems, to the underlying equation of motion -- a pendulum equation with small damping and periodic forcing. The beam splitting is explained by showing that the associated Poincare map has two attracting fixed points, each with a well-defined basin of attraction. Our approach can be immediately applied to other accelerator physics problems governed by a similar equation.

  20. Beam Breakup Studies for New Cryo-Unit

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, I. Shin, R. Kazimi, F. Marhauser ,F. Hannon ,G. Krafft ,B. Yunn ,A. Hofler

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we report the numerical simulations of cumulative beam breakup studies for a new cryo-unit for booster design at Jefferson lab. The system consists of two 1-cell and one 7-cell superconducting RF cavities. Combining two 1-cell into a 2-cell together with a 7-cell is also an option. Simulations have been performed using the 2-dimensional time-domain code. The 1-cell+1-cell+7-cell combination confirms beam stability, however, the arrangement 2-cell+7-cell shows instability.

  1. Fermilab Booster Transition Crossing Simulations and Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C. M.; Tan, C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Fermilab Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV at 15 Hz. In the PIP (Proton Improvement Plan) era, it is required that Booster deliver 4.2 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse to extraction. One of the obstacles for providing quality beam to the users is the longitudinal quadrupole oscillation that the beam suffers from right after transition. Although this oscillation is well taken care of with quadrupole dampers, it is important to understand the source of these oscillations in light of the PIP II requirements that require 6.5 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse at extraction. This paper explores the results from machine studies, computer simulations and solutions to prevent the quadrupole oscillations after transition.

  2. Spheromak Energy Transport Studies via Neutral Beam Injection

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, H S; Hill, D N; Wood, R D; Jayakumar, J; Pearlstein, L D

    2008-02-11

    Results from the SSPX spheromak experiment provide strong motivation to add neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Such auxiliary heating would significantly advance the capability to study the physics of energy transport and pressure limits for the spheromak. This LDRD project develops the physics basis for using NBI to heat spheromak plasmas in SSPX. The work encompasses three activities: (1) numerical simulation to make quantitative predictions of the effect of adding beams to SSPX, (2) using the SSPX spheromak and theory/modeling to develop potential target plasmas suitable for future application of neutral beam heating, and (3) developing diagnostics to provide the measurements needed for transport calculations. These activities are reported in several publications.

  3. Determination of the biomechanical effect of an interspinous process device on implanted and adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a hybrid testing protocol: a finite-element study.

    PubMed

    Erbulut, Deniz U; Zafarparandeh, Iman; Hassan, Chaudhry R; Lazoglu, Ismail; Ozer, Ali F

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT The authors evaluated the biomechanical effects of an interspinous process (ISP) device on kinematics and load sharing at the implanted and adjacent segments. METHODS A 3D finite-element (FE) model of the lumbar spine (L1-5) was developed and validated through comparison with published in vitro study data. Specifically, validation was achieved by a flexible (load-control) approach in 3 main planes under a pure moment of 10 Nm and a compressive follower load of 400 N. The ISP device was inserted between the L-3 and L-4 processes. Intact and implanted cases were simulated using the hybrid protocol in all motion directions. The resultant motion, facet load, and intradiscal pressure after implantation were investigated at the index and adjacent levels. In addition, stress at the bone-implant interface was predicted. RESULTS The hybrid approach, shown to be appropriate for adjacent-level investigations, predicted that the ISP device would decrease the range of motion, facet load, and intradiscal pressure at the index level relative to the corresponding values for the intact spine in extension. Specifically, the intradiscal pressure induced after implantation at adjacent segments increased by 39.7% and by 6.6% at L2-3 and L4-5, respectively. Similarly, facet loads at adjacent segments after implantation increased up to 60% relative to the loads in the intact case. Further, the stress at the bone-implant interface increased significantly. The influence of the ISP device on load sharing parameters in motion directions other than extension was negligible. CONCLUSIONS Although ISP devices apply a distraction force on the processes and prevent further extension of the index segment, their implantation may cause changes in biomechanical parameters such as facet load, intradiscal pressure, and range of motion at adjacent levels in extension.

  4. Theoretical studies of a molecular beam generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John

    1994-01-01

    At present no adequate computer code exists for predicting the effects of thermal nonequilibrium on the flow quality of a converging-diverging N2 nozzle. It is the purpose of this research to develop such a code and then perform parametric studies to determine the effects of intermolecular forces (high gas pressure) and thermal nonequilibrium (the splitting of temperature into a vibrational and rotational-translational excitation) upon the flow quality. The two models to be compared are given. Appendix A contains nomenclature and additional relationships.

  5. Biomechanical benefits of anterior offsetting of humeral head component in posteriorly unstable total shoulder arthroplasty: A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Min Mike; Chacon, Alexander C; Andrews, Seth H; Roush, Evan P; Cho, Edward; Conaway, William K; Kunselman, Allen R; Lewis, Gregory S

    2016-04-01

    Restoration of joint stability during total shoulder arthroplasty can be challenging in the face of severe glenoid retroversion. A novel technique of humeral head component anterior-offsetting has been proposed to address posterior instability. We evaluated the biomechanical benefits of this technique in cadaveric specimens. Total shoulder arthroplasty was performed in 14 cadaveric shoulders from 7 donors. Complementary shoulders were assigned to either 10° or 20° glenoid retroversion, with retroversion created by eccentric reaming. Two humeral head component offset positions were tested in each specimen: The anatomic (posterior) and anterior (reverse). With loads applied to the rotator cuff and deltoid, joint contact pressures and the force and energy required for posterior humeral head translation were measured. The force and energy required to displace the humeral head posteriorly increased significantly with the anterior offset position compared to the anatomic offset position. The joint contact pressures were significantly shifted anteriorly, and the joint contact area significantly increased with the anterior offset position. Anterior offsetting of the humeral head component increased the resistance to posterior humeral head translation, shifted joint contact pressures anteriorly, and increased joint contact area, thus, potentially increasing the joint stability in total shoulder arthroplasty with simulated glenoid retroversion. PMID:26356804

  6. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, D R

    1993-11-01

    The photodissociation of free radicals is studied in order to characterize the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a novel method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with a highly complementary form of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopy of transitions to dissociative states is determined by monitoring the total photofragment yield as a function of dissociation photon energy. Branching ratios to various product channels, internal energy distributions of the fragments, bond dissociation energies, and the translational energy-dependent photofragment recoil angular distributions are then determined at selected excitation energies. A detailed picture of the dissociation dynamics can then be formulated, allowing insight concerning the interactions of potential energy surfaces involved in the dissociation. After an introduction to the concepts and techniques mentioned above, the experimental apparatus used in these experiments is described in detail. The basis and methods used in the treatment of data, especially in the dissociation dynamics experiments, are then put forward.

  7. Parametric study of beam refraction problems across laser anemometer windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experimenter is often required to view flows through a window with a different index of refraction than either the medium being observed or the medium that the laser anemometer is immersed in. The refraction that occurs at the window surfaces may lead to undesirable changes in probe volume position or beam crossing angle and can lead to partial or complete beam uncrossing. This report describes the results of a parametric study of this problem using a ray tracing technique to predict these changes. The windows studied were a flat plate and a simple cyclinder. For the flat-plate study: (1) surface thickness, (2) beam crossing angle, (3) bisecting line - surface normal angle, and (4) incoming beam plane surface orientation were varied. For the cylindrical window additional parameters were also varied: (1) probe volume immersion, (2) probe volume off-radial position, and (3) probe volume position out of the R-theta plane of the lens. A number of empirical correlations were deduced to aid the interested reader in determining the movement, uncrossing, and change in crossing angle for a particular situation.

  8. Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Aronson, A.

    2011-03-01

    The primary advantages that accelerator driven systems have over critical reactors are: (1) Greater flexibility regarding the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the blanket surrounding the target, and (2) Potentially enhanced safety brought about by operating at a sufficiently low value of the multiplication factor to preclude reactivity induced events. The control of the power production can be achieved by vary the accelerator beam current. Furthermore, once the beam is shut off the system shuts down. The primary difference between the operation of an accelerator driven system and a critical system is the issue of beam interruptions of the accelerator. These beam interruptions impose thermo-mechanical loads on the fuel and mechanical components not found in critical systems. Studies have been performed to estimate an acceptable number of trips, and the value is significantly less stringent than had been previously estimated. The number of acceptable beam interruptions is a function of the length of the interruption and the mission of the system. Thus, for demonstration type systems and interruption durations of 1sec < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins 2500/yr and 50/yr are deemed acceptable. However, for industrial scale power generation without energy storage type systems and interruption durations of t < 1sec., 1sec < t < 10secs., 10secs < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins, the acceptable number of interruptions are 25000, 2500, 250, and 3 respectively. However, it has also been concluded that further development is required to reduce the number of trips. It is with this in mind that the following study was undertaken. The primary focus of this study will be the merit of a multi-beam target system, which allows for multiple spallation sources within the target/blanket assembly. In this manner it is possible to ameliorate the effects of sudden accelerator beam interruption on the surrounding reactor, since the remaining beams will still

  9. Teaching undergraduate biomechanics with Just-in-Time Teaching.

    PubMed

    Riskowski, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    Biomechanics education is a vital component of kinesiology, sports medicine, and physical education, as well as for many biomedical engineering and bioengineering undergraduate programmes. Little research exists regarding effective teaching strategies for biomechanics. However, prior work suggests that student learning in undergraduate physics courses has been aided by using the Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT). As physics understanding plays a role in biomechanics understanding, the purpose of study was to evaluate the use of a JiTT framework in an undergraduate biomechanics course. This two-year action-based research study evaluated three JiTT frameworks: (1) no JiTT; (2) mathematics-based JiTT; and (3) concept-based JiTT. A pre- and post-course assessment of student learning used the biomechanics concept inventory and a biomechanics concept map. A general linear model assessed differences between the course assessments by JiTT framework in order to evaluate learning and teaching effectiveness. The results indicated significantly higher learning gains and better conceptual understanding in a concept-based JiTT course, relative to a mathematics-based JiTT or no JiTT course structure. These results suggest that a course structure involving concept-based questions using a JiTT strategy may be an effective method for engaging undergraduate students and promoting learning in biomechanics courses.

  10. The biomechanics of solids and fluids: the physics of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David E.

    2016-09-01

    Biomechanics borrows and extends engineering techniques to study the mechanical properties of organisms and their environments. Like physicists and engineers, biomechanics researchers tend to specialize on either fluids or solids (but some do both). For solid materials, the stress-strain curve reveals such useful information as various moduli, ultimate strength, extensibility, and work of fracture. Few biological materials are linearly elastic so modified elastic moduli are defined. Although biological materials tend to be less stiff than engineered materials, biomaterials tend to be tougher due to their anisotropy and high extensibility. Biological beams are usually hollow cylinders; particularly in plants, beams and columns tend to have high twist-to-bend ratios. Air and water are the dominant biological fluids. Fluids generate both viscous and pressure drag (normalized as drag coefficients) and the Reynolds number (Re) gives their relative importance. The no-slip conditions leads to velocity gradients (‘boundary layers’) on surfaces and parabolic flow profiles in tubes. Rather than rigidly resisting drag in external flows, many plants and sessile animals reconfigure to reduce drag as speed increases. Living in velocity gradients can be beneficial for attachment but challenging for capturing particulate food. Lift produced by airfoils and hydrofoils is used to produce thrust by all flying animals and many swimming ones, and is usually optimal at higher Re. At low Re, most swimmers use drag-based mechanisms. A few swimmers use jetting for rapid escape despite its energetic inefficiency. At low Re, suspension feeding depends on mechanisms other than direct sieving because thick boundary layers reduce effective porosity. Most biomaterials exhibit a combination of solid and fluid properties, i.e., viscoelasticity. Even rigid biomaterials exhibit creep over many days, whereas pliant biomaterials may exhibit creep over hours or minutes. Instead of rigid materials

  11. The biomechanics of solids and fluids: the physics of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David E.

    2016-09-01

    Biomechanics borrows and extends engineering techniques to study the mechanical properties of organisms and their environments. Like physicists and engineers, biomechanics researchers tend to specialize on either fluids or solids (but some do both). For solid materials, the stress–strain curve reveals such useful information as various moduli, ultimate strength, extensibility, and work of fracture. Few biological materials are linearly elastic so modified elastic moduli are defined. Although biological materials tend to be less stiff than engineered materials, biomaterials tend to be tougher due to their anisotropy and high extensibility. Biological beams are usually hollow cylinders; particularly in plants, beams and columns tend to have high twist-to-bend ratios. Air and water are the dominant biological fluids. Fluids generate both viscous and pressure drag (normalized as drag coefficients) and the Reynolds number (Re) gives their relative importance. The no-slip conditions leads to velocity gradients (‘boundary layers’) on surfaces and parabolic flow profiles in tubes. Rather than rigidly resisting drag in external flows, many plants and sessile animals reconfigure to reduce drag as speed increases. Living in velocity gradients can be beneficial for attachment but challenging for capturing particulate food. Lift produced by airfoils and hydrofoils is used to produce thrust by all flying animals and many swimming ones, and is usually optimal at higher Re. At low Re, most swimmers use drag-based mechanisms. A few swimmers use jetting for rapid escape despite its energetic inefficiency. At low Re, suspension feeding depends on mechanisms other than direct sieving because thick boundary layers reduce effective porosity. Most biomaterials exhibit a combination of solid and fluid properties, i.e., viscoelasticity. Even rigid biomaterials exhibit creep over many days, whereas pliant biomaterials may exhibit creep over hours or minutes. Instead of rigid materials

  12. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  13. Commisioning of the second Tevatron electron lens and beam study results

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Fellenz, B.; Hively, R.; Kuznetsov, G.; Olson, M.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    In the framework of Fermilab's Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project, the 2nd Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL2) was installed in the Tevatron during Spring 2006 shutdown. It was successfully commissioned and a series of beam studies has been carried out in single bunch and all-bunch modes. The paper describes TEL2 commissioning and beam studies results.

  14. Identifying nonlinear biomechanical models by multicriteria analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srdjevic, Zorica; Cveticanin, Livija

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the methodology developed by Srdjevic and Cveticanin (International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 34 (2004) 307-318) for the nonbiased (objective) parameter identification of the linear biomechanical model exposed to vertical vibrations is extended to the identification of n-degree of freedom (DOF) nonlinear biomechanical models. The dynamic performance of the n-DOF nonlinear model is described in terms of response functions in the frequency domain, such as the driving-point mechanical impedance and seat-to-head transmissibility function. For randomly generated parameters of the model, nonlinear equations of motion are solved using the Runge-Kutta method. The appropriate data transformation from the time-to-frequency domain is performed by a discrete Fourier transformation. Squared deviations of the response functions from the target values are used as the model performance evaluation criteria, thus shifting the problem into the multicriteria framework. The objective weights of criteria are obtained by applying the Shannon entropy concept. The suggested methodology is programmed in Pascal and tested on a 4-DOF nonlinear lumped parameter biomechanical model. The identification process over the 2000 generated sets of parameters lasts less than 20 s. The model response obtained with the imbedded identified parameters correlates well with the target values, therefore, justifying the use of the underlying concept and the mathematical instruments and numerical tools applied. It should be noted that the identified nonlinear model has an improved accuracy of the biomechanical response compared to the accuracy of a linear model.

  15. Effect of Device Rigidity and Physiological Loading on Spinal Kinematics after Dynamic Stabilization : An In-Vitro Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kwonsoo; Yang, Inchul; Kim, Namhoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of posterior implant rigidity on spinal kinematics at adjacent levels by utilizing a cadaveric spine model with simulated physiological loading. Methods Five human lumbar spinal specimens (L3 to S1) were obtained and checked for abnormalities. The fresh specimens were stripped of muscle tissue, with care taken to preserve the spinal ligaments and facet joints. Pedicle screws were implanted in the L4 and L5 vertebrae of each specimen. Specimens were tested under 0 N and 400 N axial loading. Five different posterior rods of various elastic moduli (intact, rubber, low-density polyethylene, aluminum, and titanium) were tested. Segmental range of motion (ROM), center of rotation (COR) and intervertebral disc pressure were investigated. Results As the rigidity of the posterior rods increased, both the segmental ROM and disc pressure at L4-5 decreased, while those values increased at adjacent levels. Implant stiffness saturation was evident, as the ROM and disc pressure were only marginally increased beyond an implant stiffness of aluminum. Since the disc pressures of adjacent levels were increased by the axial loading, it was shown that the rigidity of the implants influenced the load sharing between the implant and the spinal column. The segmental CORs at the adjacent disc levels translated anteriorly and inferiorly as rigidity of the device increased. Conclusion These biomechanical findings indicate that the rigidity of the dynamic stabilization implant and physiological loading play significant roles on spinal kinematics at adjacent disc levels, and will aid in further device development. PMID:26713140

  16. Suspension biomechanics of swimming microbes

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organisms play a vital role in many biological, medical and engineering phenomena. Some recent research efforts have demonstrated the importance of biomechanics in understanding certain aspects of micro-organism behaviours such as locomotion and collective motions of cells. In particular, spatio-temporal coherent structures found in a bacterial suspension have been the focus of many research studies over the last few years. Recent studies have shown that macroscopic properties of a suspension, such as rheology and diffusion, are strongly affected by meso-scale flow structures generated by swimming microbes. Since the meso-scale flow structures are strongly affected by the interactions between microbes, a bottom-up strategy, i.e. from a cellular level to a continuum suspension level, represents the natural approach to the study of a suspension of swimming microbes. In this paper, we first provide a summary of existing biomechanical research on interactions between a pair of swimming micro-organisms, as a two-body interaction is the simplest many-body interaction. We show that interactions between two nearby swimming micro-organisms are described well by existing mathematical models. Then, collective motions formed by a group of swimming micro-organisms are discussed. We show that some collective motions of micro-organisms, such as coherent structures of bacterial suspensions, are satisfactorily explained by fluid dynamics. Lastly, we discuss how macroscopic suspension properties are changed by the microscopic characteristics of the cell suspension. The fundamental knowledge we present will be useful in obtaining a better understanding of the behaviour of micro-organisms. PMID:19674997

  17. Study on astrophysical reactions using low-energy RI beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, low-energy RI beams can be produced in a good intensity and they have been used for studying many astrophysical reactions. One of the facilities producing low-energy RI beams is CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) [1,2], an RI-beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Taking CRIB as an example, recent improvements on the RI-beam production and experimental results on astrophysical studies are presented. Several experimental approaches have been taken for the studies on astrophysical reactions.The feature of each method are discussed based on real measurements performed at CRIB. One is the direct method, applied for measurements of reactions such as (α,p) [3]. Another is the measurement of proton/alpha resonance scattering using the thick target method in inverse kinematics, by which we can obtain information on the resonances relevant in astrophysical reactions [4,5]. A recent fruitful result was from a measurement of proton resonance scattering using a ^7Be beam [5]. The energy level structure of ^8B, revealed by the experiment, is especially of interest as it is related with the ^7Be(p,γ) ^8B reaction, responsible for the production of ^8B neutrinos in the sun. We successfully determined parameters of resonances in ^8B below 6.7 MeV, which may affect the ^7Be(p,γ)^8B reaction rate at the solar temparature. Indirect methods, such as ANC and the Trojan Horse Method, were also used in some of the measurements.[4pt] [1] S. Kubono et al., Eur. Phys. J. A13 (2002) 217.[0pt] [2] Y. Yanagisawa et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res., Sect. A 539 (2005) 74.[0pt] [3] M. Notani et al., Nucl. Phys. A 764 (2004) 113c.[0pt] [4] T. Teranishi et al., Phys. Lett. B 650 (2007) 129.[0pt] [5] H. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Lett. B 672 (2009) 230.

  18. A beam optics study of the biomedical beam line at a proton therapy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Chong Cheoul; Kim, Jong-Won

    2007-10-01

    A biomedical beam line has been designed for the experimental area of a proton therapy facility to deliver mm to sub-mm size beams in the energy range of 20-50 MeV using the TRANSPORT/TURTLE beam optics codes and a newly-written program. The proton therapy facility is equipped with a 230 MeV fixed-energy cyclotron and an energy selection system based on a degrader and slits, so that beam currents available for therapy decrease at lower energies in the therapeutic beam energy range of 70-230 MeV. The new beam line system is composed of an energy-degrader, two slits, and three quadrupole magnets. The minimum beam sizes achievable at the focal point are estimated for the two energies of 50 and 20 MeV. The focused FWHM beam size is approximately 0.3 mm with an expected beam current of 20 pA when the beam energy is reduced to 50 MeV from 100 MeV, and roughly 0.8 mm with a current of 10 pA for a 20 MeV beam.

  19. Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

  20. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  1. Study of high field superconducting solenoids for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, Michael J.; Sadovskiy, Y.; Zlobin, Alexander V; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    The final beam cooling stages of a possible Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 40-50 T in an aperture of 40-50 mm. In this paper we study possible solutions towards creating DC fields of that order using available superconductors. Several magnetic and mechanical designs, optimized for the maximum performance are presented and compared in terms of cost and size.

  2. Recent Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Radioactive Tin Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Chae, K. Y.; Cizewski, J. A.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garcia-Ruiz, R. F.; Grzywacz, R.; Howard, M. E.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P. D.; Padgett, S.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Pain, S. D.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, D. C.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Shore, A.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Stroberg, S. R.; Tostevin, J.; Varner, R. L.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.; Winkler, R.

    2015-01-01

    Direct reaction techniques are powerful tools to study the single-particle nature of nuclei. Performing direct reactions on short-lived nuclei requires radioactive ion beams produced either via fragmentation or the Isotope Separation OnLine (ISOL) method. Some of the most interesting regions to study with direct reactions are close to the magic numbers where changes in shell structure can be tracked. These changes can impact the final abundances of explosive nucleosynthesis. The structure of the chain of tin isotopes is strongly influenced by the Z = 50 proton shell closure, as well as the neutron shell closures lying in the neutron-rich, N = 82, and neutron-deficient, N = 50, regions. Here, we present two examples of direct reactions on exotic tin isotopes. The first uses a one-neutron transfer reaction and a low-energy reaccelerated ISOL beam to study states in Sn-131 from across the N = 82 shell closure. The second example utilizes a one-neutron knockout reaction on fragmentation beams of neutron-deficient Sn-106,108Sn. In conclusion, In both cases, measurements of γ rays in coincidence with charged particles proved to be invaluable.

  3. Recent Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Radioactive Tin Beams

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Direct reaction techniques are powerful tools to study the single-particle nature of nuclei. Performing direct reactions on short-lived nuclei requires radioactive ion beams produced either via fragmentation or the Isotope Separation OnLine (ISOL) method. Some of the most interesting regions to study with direct reactions are close to the magic numbers where changes in shell structure can be tracked. These changes can impact the final abundances of explosive nucleosynthesis. The structure of the chain of tin isotopes is strongly influenced by the Z = 50 proton shell closure, as well as the neutron shell closures lying in the neutron-rich, Nmore » = 82, and neutron-deficient, N = 50, regions. Here, we present two examples of direct reactions on exotic tin isotopes. The first uses a one-neutron transfer reaction and a low-energy reaccelerated ISOL beam to study states in Sn-131 from across the N = 82 shell closure. The second example utilizes a one-neutron knockout reaction on fragmentation beams of neutron-deficient Sn-106,108Sn. In conclusion, In both cases, measurements of γ rays in coincidence with charged particles proved to be invaluable.« less

  4. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha; Shiels, Alan; FitzGerald, Paul G.; Menon, Anil G.; Mathias, Richard T.; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5{sup −/−}), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0{sup +/−}; homozygous KO: AQP0{sup −/−}; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0{sup +/−} lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and

  5. Beam-transport study of an isocentric rotating ion gantry with minimum number of quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Márius; Griesmayer, Erich; Seemann, Rolf

    2005-06-01

    A beam-transport study of an isocentric gantry for ion therapy is presented. The gantry is designed with the number of quadrupoles down to the theoretical minimum, which is the feature published for the first time in this paper. This feature has been achieved without compromising the ion-optical functions of the beam-transport system that is capable of handling non-symmetric beams (beams with different emittances in vertical and horizontal plane), pencil-beam scanning, double-achromatic optics and beam-size control. Ion-optical properties of the beam-transport system are described, discussed and illustrated by computer simulations performed by the TRANSPORT-code.

  6. Biomechanics teachers can be animals.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ross; Sanders, Lesley

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a constructivist approach, in particular a visit to a zoo, could be effective in consolidating mechanical concepts and applying those concepts to coaching and teaching. Ten students in their final year of their Bachelor of Physical Education at the University of Edinburgh participated in a visit to Edinburgh Zoo. During the visit students completed a worksheet of questions and engaged interactively in discussing how various animals are adapted mechanically to survive in their environments. Immediately after the visit they completed a questionnaire with four sections. The first section assessed whether they could apply the mechanical concepts discussed during the visit to human sports performance. The second canvassed their opinions on whether the visit was effective in reinforcing mechanical concepts, in developing 'lateral thinking' about mechanical concepts, and in improving their ability to apply mechanical concepts to coaching and teaching. The third canvassed their opinions on whether the visit would be effective for senior high school Physical Education and Sports Science students for developing mechanical concepts and applying them to coaching. The fourth section canvassed their opinions on when the visit should be conducted for Physical Education and Sports Science students in universities and in senior high schools. The results indicated that the visit was effective in reinforcing mechanical concepts and in applying them laterally to improve understanding of human sports performance. Participants believed that the visit would also be effective for senior high school students. All participants believed that the visit would be most beneficial after at least one course in biomechanics that covers the basic biomechanical principles.

  7. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  8. A Study of Effects of Tissue Inhomogeneity on HIFU Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Viren; Roberts, Ron; Long, Tao; Thompson, R. B.; Ryken, Timothy

    2006-05-01

    The potential of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) will not be realized unless the effects of overlaying tissues are understood in such a way that allows for estimation of HIFU dose distribution at a target tissue. We employ computational models to examine the impact of phase aberration on tissue ablation. Thompson and Roberts have recently studied the effects of phase aberration on ultrasound focusing in aerospace engine materials such as titanium alloy, and have developed a computational model to examine these effects. The ultrasound beam observed after transmission through the fused quartz (homogeneous) and that observed after transmission through the titanium (inhomogeneous) demonstrate the severe beam wavefield amplitude distortion introduced by the velocity inhomogeneity-induced phase aberration. We study applicability of this approach to model phase aberration in inhomogeneous tissues and its effect on HIFU dose distribution around the focus. It is hypothesized that the ill-effects of phase aberration accumulate during propagation through intervening tissue in which field intensities are substantially lower than that in the focal zone, and it is therefore appropriate to use a linear acoustic model to describe the transport of energy from the transducer to the volume targeted for ablation. We present initial results of the simulation and experiments of beam measurements under water without and with different tissue layers.

  9. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  10. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R

    2012-01-01

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  11. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2012-02-01

    The H(-) injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ∼38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ∼1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  12. Feasibility study of beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron with wires

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; Erdelyi, Bela; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-05-01

    We explore the possibility of compensating long-range beam-beam interactions in the Tevatron by current carrying wires. Compensation strategies depend on whether the compensation is done close to the interaction or nonlocally, on the aspect ratio of the strong beam and on other details. Strategies for each case have been developed and applied to the Tevatron. We discuss the results of these strategies at injection and collision energy.

  13. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guimei

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam

  14. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  15. The role of inter-prosthetic distance, cortical thickness and bone mineral density in the development of inter-prosthetic fractures of the femur: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Weiser, L; Korecki, M A; Sellenschloh, K; Fensky, F; Püschel, K; Morlock, M M; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2014-10-01

    It is becoming increasingly common for a patient to have ipsilateral hip and knee replacements. The inter-prosthetic (IP) distance, the distance between the tips of hip and knee prostheses, has been thought to be associated with an increased risk of IP fracture. Small gap distances are generally assumed to act as stress risers, although there is no real biomechanical evidence to support this. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of IP distance, cortical thickness and bone mineral density on the likelihood of an IP femoral fracture. A total of 18 human femur specimens were randomised into three groups by bone density and cortical thickness. For each group, a defined IP distance of 35 mm, 80 mm or 160 mm was created by choosing the appropriate lengths of component. The maximum fracture strength was determined using a four-point bending test. The fracture force of all three groups was similar (p = 0.498). There was a highly significant correlation between the cortical area and the fracture strength (r = 0.804, p < 0.001), whereas bone density showed no influence. This study suggests that the IP distance has little influence on fracture strength in IP femoral fractures: the thickness of the cortex seems to be the decisive factor.

  16. The role of inter-prosthetic distance, cortical thickness and bone mineral density in the development of inter-prosthetic fractures of the femur: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Weiser, L; Korecki, M A; Sellenschloh, K; Fensky, F; Püschel, K; Morlock, M M; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2014-10-01

    It is becoming increasingly common for a patient to have ipsilateral hip and knee replacements. The inter-prosthetic (IP) distance, the distance between the tips of hip and knee prostheses, has been thought to be associated with an increased risk of IP fracture. Small gap distances are generally assumed to act as stress risers, although there is no real biomechanical evidence to support this. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of IP distance, cortical thickness and bone mineral density on the likelihood of an IP femoral fracture. A total of 18 human femur specimens were randomised into three groups by bone density and cortical thickness. For each group, a defined IP distance of 35 mm, 80 mm or 160 mm was created by choosing the appropriate lengths of component. The maximum fracture strength was determined using a four-point bending test. The fracture force of all three groups was similar (p = 0.498). There was a highly significant correlation between the cortical area and the fracture strength (r = 0.804, p < 0.001), whereas bone density showed no influence. This study suggests that the IP distance has little influence on fracture strength in IP femoral fractures: the thickness of the cortex seems to be the decisive factor. PMID:25274925

  17. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  18. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Kawachi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-07-01

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  19. Design study of longitudinal dynamics of the drive beam in 1 TeV relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Yu, S.S.; Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    In this paper the authors present a design study on the longitudinal dynamics of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) scheme which has been proposed as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV next linear collider (NLC). They address the issue of maintaining stable power output at desired level for a 300-m long TBA with 150 extraction cavities and present their simulation results to demonstrate that it can be achieved by inductively detuning the extraction cavities to counter the space charge debunching effect on the drive beam. They then carry out simulation study to show that the beam bunches desired by the RK-TBA can be efficiently obtained by first chopping an initially uniform beam of low energy into a train of beam bunches with modest longitudinal dimension and then using the {open_quotes}adiabatic capture{close_quotes} scheme to bunch and accelerate these beam bunches into tight bunches at the operating energy of the drive beam. The authors have also examined the {open_quotes}after burner{close_quotes} scheme which is implemented in their RK-TBA design for efficiency enhancement.

  20. Study of beam optics and beam halo by integrated modeling of negative ion beams from plasma meniscus formation to beam acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Hatayama, A.; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.

    2013-01-14

    To understand the physical mechanism of the beam halo formation in negative ion beams, a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code for simulating the trajectories of negative ions created via surface production has been developed. The simulation code reproduces a beam halo observed in an actual negative ion beam. The negative ions extracted from the periphery of the plasma meniscus (an electro-static lens in a source plasma) are over-focused in the extractor due to large curvature of the meniscus.

  1. Peri-implant biomechanical responses to standard, short-wide, and mini implants supporting single crowns under axial and off-axial loading (an in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Kheiralla, Lamia Sayed; Younis, Jihan Farouk

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the biomechanical responses of 3 single crowns supported by 3 different implants under axial and off-axial loading. A standard implant (3.75 mm diameter, 13 mm length), a mini implant (3 mm diameter, 13 mm length), and a short-wide implant (5.7 mm diameter, 8 mm length) were embedded in epoxy resin by the aid of a surveyor to ensure their parallelism. Each implant supported a full metal crown made of Ni-Cr alloy with standardized dimensions. Strain gauges and finite element analysis (FEA) were used to measure the strain induced under axial and off-axial functional loads of 300 N. Results showed that mini implants recorded the highest microstrains, under both axial and off-axial loading. All implants showed a considerable increase in strain values under off-axial loading. Standard and short-wide implants proved to be preferable in supporting crowns, as the standard implant showed the lowest strains under axial and off-axial loading using FEA simulation, while the short-wide implant showed the lowest strains under nonaxial loading using strain gauge analysis.

  2. Implant augmentation: adding bone cement to improve the treatment of osteoporotic distal femur fractures: a biomechanical study using human cadaver bones.

    PubMed

    Wähnert, Dirk; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Richards, R Geoff; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Raschke, Michael J; Windolf, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The increasing problems in the field of osteoporotic fracture fixation results in specialized implants as well as new operation methods, for example, implant augmentation with bone cement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical impact of augmentation in the treatment of osteoporotic distal femur fractures.Seven pairs of osteoporotic fresh frozen distal femora were randomly assigned to either an augmented or nonaugmented group. In both groups, an Orthopaedic Trauma Association 33 A3 fractures was fixed using the locking compression plate distal femur and cannulated and perforated screws. In the augmented group, additionally, 1 mL of polymethylmethacrylate cement was injected through the screw. Prior to mechanical testing, bone mineral density (BMD) and local bone strength were determined. Mechanical testing was performed by cyclic axial loading (100 N to 750 N + 0.05N/cycle) using a servo-hydraulic testing machine.As a result, the BMD as well as the axial stiffness did not significantly differ between the groups. The number of cycles to failure was significantly higher in the augmented group with the BMD as a significant covariate.In conclusion, cement augmentation can significantly improve implant anchorage in plating of osteoporotic distal femur fractures. PMID:25415673

  3. Implant augmentation: adding bone cement to improve the treatment of osteoporotic distal femur fractures: a biomechanical study using human cadaver bones.

    PubMed

    Wähnert, Dirk; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Richards, R Geoff; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Raschke, Michael J; Windolf, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The increasing problems in the field of osteoporotic fracture fixation results in specialized implants as well as new operation methods, for example, implant augmentation with bone cement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical impact of augmentation in the treatment of osteoporotic distal femur fractures.Seven pairs of osteoporotic fresh frozen distal femora were randomly assigned to either an augmented or nonaugmented group. In both groups, an Orthopaedic Trauma Association 33 A3 fractures was fixed using the locking compression plate distal femur and cannulated and perforated screws. In the augmented group, additionally, 1 mL of polymethylmethacrylate cement was injected through the screw. Prior to mechanical testing, bone mineral density (BMD) and local bone strength were determined. Mechanical testing was performed by cyclic axial loading (100 N to 750 N + 0.05N/cycle) using a servo-hydraulic testing machine.As a result, the BMD as well as the axial stiffness did not significantly differ between the groups. The number of cycles to failure was significantly higher in the augmented group with the BMD as a significant covariate.In conclusion, cement augmentation can significantly improve implant anchorage in plating of osteoporotic distal femur fractures.

  4. Shock Absorbing Function Study on Denucleated Intervertebral Disc with or without Hydrogel Injection through Static and Dynamic Biomechanical Tests In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiyu; Wei, Fuxin; Liang, Jiabi; Deng, Wenbin; Dai, Xuejun; Zhou, Guangqian

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogel injection has been recently proposed as a novel therapy for disc degenerative diseases, with the potential to restore the spine motion and the intervertebral disc height. However, it remains unknown whether the new technique could also maintain the shock absorbing property of the treated intervertebral disc. In this study, 18 porcine lumbar bone-disc-bone specimens were collected and randomly divided into three groups: the normal with intact intervertebral discs, the mimic for the injection of disulfide cross-linked hyaluronan hydrogels following discectomy, and the control disc with discectomy only. In the static compression test, specimens in the mimic group exhibited displacements similar to those in the normal discs, whereas the control group showed a significantly larger displacement range in the first two steps (P < 0.05). With the frequency increasing, all specimens generally displayed an increasing storage modulus, decreasing loss modulus, and tanδ. At any frequency point, the control group exhibited the largest value in all the three parameters among three groups while the normal group was the lowest, with the mimic group being mostly close to the normal group. Therefore, the hydrogel injection into the intervertebral discs greatly restored their shock absorbing function, suggesting that the technique could serve as an effective approach to maintaining biomechanical properties of the degenerative intervertebral disc. PMID:25045680

  5. Comparison of modified Kessler tendon suture at different levels in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon and porcine flexors and porcine extensors: an experimental biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, J; Leppänen, O V; Järvinen, T L N; Göransson, H

    2011-10-01

    This study compared the biomechanical behaviour of repairs in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zones I, II and III with repairs of different segments of the porcine flexor tendon of the second digit and the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon, in order to assess the validity of porcine tendons as models for human flexor tendon repairs. These porcine tendons were selected after comparing their size with the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon. The tendon repairs were done in three segments of each porcine tendon and repairs in the human tendons were done in zones I,II and III. Ten tendons in each group yielded a total of 90 specimens. A modified Kessler repair was done with 3-0 coated braided polyester suture and subjected to uniaxial tensile testing. In human flexor tendons, the ultimate force was higher in zones I and II than in zone III. The porcine flexor digitorum profundus tendon from the second digit and the proximal segment of the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon behaved similarly to the human flexor tendon in zone III and can be considered as surrogates for the human flexor tendon. PMID:21816887

  6. Recent progress on beam stability study in the PSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Channell, Paul J.; Cooper, Richard K.; Fitzgerald, Daniel H.; Hardek, Tom; Hutson, Richard; Jason, Andrew J.; Macek, Robert J.; Plum, Michael A.; Wilkinson, Carol

    A fast transverse instability has been observed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) when the injected beam intensity reaches more than 2 (times) 10(exp 13) protons per pulse. Understanding the cause and control of this instability has taken on new importance as the neutron-scattering community considers the next generation of accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources, which call for peak-proton intensities of 10(exp 14) per pulse or higher. Previous observations and theoretical studies indicate that the instability in the PSR is most likely driven by electrons trapped within the proton beam. Recent studies using an experimental electron-clearing system and voltage-biased pinger-electrodes for electron clearing and collection support this hypothesis. Experiments have also been performed to study the instability threshold when varying the electron production rate. Theoretical studies include a computer simulation of a simplified model for the e -- p instability and the investigation of possible electron confinement in the ring-element magnetic fields. This paper reports some recent results from these studies.

  7. Recent progress on beam stability study in the PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Channell, P.; Cooper, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast transverse instability has been observed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) when the injected beam intensity reaches more than 2 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. Understanding the cause and control of this instability has taken on new importance as the neutron-scattering community considers the next generation of accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources, which call for peak-proton intensities of 10{sup 14} per pulse or higher. Previous observations and theoretical studies indicate that the instability in the PSR is most likely driven by electrons trapped within the proton beam. Recent studies using an experimental electron-clearing system and voltage-biased pinger-electrodes for electron clearing and collection support this hypothesis. Experiments have also been performed to study the instability threshold when varying the electron production rate. Theoretical studies include a computer simulation of a simplified model for the e -- p instability and the investigation of possible electron confinement in the ring-element magnetic fields. This paper reports some recent results from these studies.

  8. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  9. Nuclear structure studies with gamma-ray beams

    DOE PAGES

    Tonchev, Anton; Bhatia, Chitra; Kelley, John; Raut, Rajarshi; Rusev, Gencho; Tornow, Werner; Tsoneva, Nadia

    2015-05-28

    In stable and weakly bound neutron-rich nuclei, a resonance-like concentration of dipole states has been observed for excitation energies below the neutron-separation energy. This clustering of strong dipole states has been named the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) in contrast to the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) that dominates the E1 response. Understanding the PDR is presently of great interest in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. High-sensitivity studies of E1 and M1 transitions in closed-shell nuclei using monoenergetic and 100% linearly-polarized photon beams are presented.

  10. Morphology and biomechanics of human heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Polienko, Asel V.; Ivanov, Dmitry V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: A study of the biomechanical characteristics of the human heart ventricles was performed. 80 hearts were extracted during autopsy of 80 corpses of adults (40 women and 40 men) aged 31-70 years. The samples were investigated in compliance with the recommendations of the ethics committee. Methods: Tension and compression tests were performed with help of the uniaxial testing machine Instron 5944. Cardiometry was also performed. Results: In this work, techniques for human heart ventricle wall biomechanical properties estimation were developed. Regularities of age and gender variability in deformative and strength properties of the right and left ventricle walls were found. These properties were characterized by a smooth growth of myocardial tissue stiffness and resistivity at a relatively low strain against reduction in their strength and elasticity from 31-40 to 61-70 years. It was found that tissue of the left ventricle at 61-70 years had a lower stretchability and strength compared with tissues of the right ventricle and septum. These data expands understanding of the morphological organization of the heart ventricles, which is very important for the development of personalized medicine. Taking into account individual, age and gender differences of the heart ventricle tissue biomechanical characteristics allows to rationally choosing the type of patching materials during reconstructive operations on heart.

  11. Beam storage studies in the Fermilab main ring

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1982-05-06

    Bunched beams of 100 and 150 GeV have been stored in the Fermilab Main Ring for periods of up to one hour. The observations of beam current and beam profiles are analyzed for the effects of gas scattering, chromaticity and non-linear magnetic field.

  12. Beam-storage studies in the Fermilab main ring

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1982-05-06

    Bunched beams of 100 and 150 GeV have been stored in the Fermilab Main Ring for periods of up to one hour. The observations of beam current and beam profiles are analyzed for the effects of gas scattering, chromaticity and non-linear magnetic field.

  13. Using a gel/plastic surrogate to study the biomechanical response of the head under air shock loading: a combined experimental and numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Wagner, Christina; Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Jin, Xin; Vandevord, Pamela; Chou, Clifford; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2012-03-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study was conducted to determine a method to elucidate the biomechanical response of a head surrogate physical model under air shock loading. In the physical experiments, a gel-filled egg-shaped skull/brain surrogate was exposed to blast overpressure in a shock tube environment, and static pressures within the shock tube and the surrogate were recorded throughout the event. A numerical model of the shock tube was developed using the Eulerian approach and validated against experimental data. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fluid-structure coupling algorithm was then utilized to simulate the interaction of the shock wave and the head surrogate. After model validation, a comprehensive series of parametric studies was carried out on the egg-shaped surrogate FE model to assess the effect of several key factors, such as the elastic modulus of the shell, bulk modulus of the core, head orientation, and internal sensor location, on pressure and strain responses. Results indicate that increasing the elastic modulus of the shell within the range simulated in this study led to considerable rise of the overpressures. Varying the bulk modulus of the core from 0.5 to 2.0 GPa, the overpressure had an increase of 7.2%. The curvature of the surface facing the shock wave significantly affected both the peak positive and negative pressures. Simulations of the head surrogate with the blunt end facing the advancing shock front had a higher pressure compared to the simulations with the pointed end facing the shock front. The influence of an opening (possibly mimicking anatomical apertures) on the peak pressures was evaluated using a surrogate head with a hole on the shell of the blunt end. It was revealed that the presence of the opening had little influence on the positive pressures but could affect the negative pressure evidently.

  14. Corneal Biomechanics Determination in Healthy Myopic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kunliang; Lu, Xuehui; Zhang, Riping; Wang, Geng; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the corneal biomechanical properties by using the Ocular Response Analyzer™ and to investigate potential factors associated with the corneal biomechanics in healthy myopic subjects. Methods. 135 eyes from 135 healthy myopic subjects were included in this cross-sectional observational study. Cornea hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), cornea-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc), and Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg) were determined with the Reichert Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA). Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to investigate factors associated with corneal biomechanics. Results. The mean CH and CRF were 9.82 ± 1.34 mmHg and 9.64 ± 1.57 mmHg, respectively. In univariate regression analysis, CH was significantly correlated with axial length, refraction, central corneal thickness (CCT), and IOPg (r = -0.27, 0.23, 0.45, and 0.21, resp.; all with p ≤ 0.015), but not with corneal curvature or age; CRF was significantly correlated with CCT and IOPg (r = 0.52 and 0.70, resp.; all with p < 0.001), but not with axial length/refraction, corneal curvature, or age. In multivariate regression analysis, axial length, IOPcc, and CCT were found to be independently associated with CH, while CCT and IOPg were associated with CRF. Conclusions. Both CH and CRF were positively correlated with CCT. Lower CH but not CRF was associated with increasing degree of myopia. Evaluation of corneal biomechanical properties should take CCT and myopic status into consideration. PMID:27525109

  15. Biomechanical response to hamstring muscle strain injury.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Wrigley, Tim V; Baker, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring strains are common injuries, the majority of which occur whilst sprinting. An understanding of the biomechanical circumstances that cause the hamstrings to fail during sprinting is required to improve rehabilitation specificity. The aim of this study was to therefore investigate the biomechanics of an acute hamstring strain. Bilateral kinematic and ground reaction force data were captured from a sprinting athlete prior to and immediately following a right hamstring strain. Ten sprinting trials were collected: nine normal (pre-injury) trials and one injury trial. Joint angles, torques and powers as well as hamstring muscle-tendon unit lengths were computed using a three-dimensional biomechanical model. For the pre-injury trials, the right leg compared to the left displayed greater knee extension and hamstring muscle-tendon unit length during terminal swing, an increased vertical ground reaction force peak and loading rate, and an increased peak hip extensor torque and peak hip power generation during initial stance. For the injury trial, significant biomechanical reactions were evident in response to the right hamstring strain, most notably for the right leg during the proceeding swing phase after the onset of the injury. The earliest kinematic deviations in response to the injury were displayed by the trunk and pelvis during right mid-stance. Taking into account neuromuscular latencies and electromechanical delays, the stimulus for the injury must have occurred prior to right foot-strike during the swing phase of the sprinting cycle. It is concluded that hamstring strains during sprinting most likely occur during terminal swing as a consequence of an eccentric contraction.

  16. Corneal Biomechanics Determination in Healthy Myopic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Kunliang; Lu, Xuehui; Zhang, Riping; Wang, Geng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the corneal biomechanical properties by using the Ocular Response Analyzer™ and to investigate potential factors associated with the corneal biomechanics in healthy myopic subjects. Methods. 135 eyes from 135 healthy myopic subjects were included in this cross-sectional observational study. Cornea hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), cornea-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc), and Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg) were determined with the Reichert Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA). Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to investigate factors associated with corneal biomechanics. Results. The mean CH and CRF were 9.82 ± 1.34 mmHg and 9.64 ± 1.57 mmHg, respectively. In univariate regression analysis, CH was significantly correlated with axial length, refraction, central corneal thickness (CCT), and IOPg (r = −0.27, 0.23, 0.45, and 0.21, resp.; all with p ≤ 0.015), but not with corneal curvature or age; CRF was significantly correlated with CCT and IOPg (r = 0.52 and 0.70, resp.; all with p < 0.001), but not with axial length/refraction, corneal curvature, or age. In multivariate regression analysis, axial length, IOPcc, and CCT were found to be independently associated with CH, while CCT and IOPg were associated with CRF. Conclusions. Both CH and CRF were positively correlated with CCT. Lower CH but not CRF was associated with increasing degree of myopia. Evaluation of corneal biomechanical properties should take CCT and myopic status into consideration. PMID:27525109

  17. Nuclear Structure Studies with Stable and Radioactive Beams: The SPES radioactive ion beam project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; SPES Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-04-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  18. Dynamic modelling and experimental study of cantilever beam with clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Jin, W.; Han, L.; He, Z.

    2012-05-01

    Clearances occur in almost all mechanical systems, typically such as the clearance between slide plate of gun barrel and guide. Therefore, to study the clearances of mechanisms can be very important to increase the working performance and lifetime of mechanisms. In this paper, rigid dynamic modelling of cantilever with clearance was done according to the subject investigated. In the rigid dynamic modelling, clearance is equivalent to the spring-dashpot model, the impact of beam and boundary face was also taken into consideration. In ADAMS software, the dynamic simulation was carried out according to the model above. The software simulated the movement of cantilever with clearance under external excitation. Research found: When the clearance is larger, the force of impact will become larger. In order to study how the stiffness of the cantilever's supporting part influences natural frequency of the system, A Euler beam which is restricted by a draught spring and a torsion spring at its end was raised. Through numerical calculation, the relationship between natural frequency and stiffness was found. When the value of the stiffness is close to the limit value, the corresponding boundary condition is illustrated. An ADAMS experiment was carried out to check the theory and the simulation.

  19. Biomechanics of the mandible.

    PubMed

    van Eijden, T M

    2000-01-01

    In this review the biomechanical behavior of the mandibular bone tissue, and of the mandibular bone as a whole, in response to external loading is discussed. A survey is given of the determinants of mandibular stiffness and strength, including the mechanical properties and distribution of bone tissue and the size and shape of the mandible. Mandibular deformations, stresses, and strains that occur during static biting and chewing are reviewed. During biting and the powerstroke of mastication, a combination of sagittal bending, corpus rotation, and transverse bending occurs. The result is a complex pattern of stresses and strains (compressive, tensile, shear, torsional) in the mandible. To be able to resist forces and bending and torsional moments, not only the material properties of the mandible but also its geometrical design is of importance. This is reflected by variables like polar and maximum and minimum moments of inertia and the relative amount and distribution of bone tissue. In the longitudinal direction, the mandible is stiffer than in transverse directions, and the vertical cross-sectional dimension of the mandible is larger than its transverse dimension. These features enhance the resistance of the mandible to the relatively large vertical shear forces and bending moments that come into play in the sagittal plane.

  20. Basic biomechanic principles of knee instability.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Ferrer, Gerald A; Debski, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Motion at the knee joint is a complex mechanical phenomenon. Stability is provided by a combination of static and dynamic structures that work in concert to prevent excessive movement or instability that is inherent in various knee injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer of the knee, providing both translational and rotatory constraint. Despite the high volume of research directed at native ACL function, pathogenesis and surgical reconstruction of this structure, a gold standard for objective quantification of injury and subsequent repair, has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that novel anatomic structures may play a significant role in knee stability. The use of biomechanical principles and testing techniques provides essential objective/quantitative information on the function of bone, ligaments, joint capsule, and other contributing soft tissues in response to various loading conditions. This review discusses the principles of biomechanics in relation to knee stability, with a focus on the objective quantification of knee stability, the individual contributions of specific knee structures to stability, and the most recent technological advances in the biomechanical evaluation of the knee joint. PMID:27007474

  1. Biomechanical analysis of sprinting: decathletes versus champions.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, H.; Kaufmann, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare some biomechanical variables of decathletes and world class sprinters while running the 100 metre race. Sixteen Swiss national decathletes and three world class American sprinters were filmed by a 16 mm Locam (100 fps) camera at the 70 m mark of the race. The co-ordinates for a 26-point stick figure were digitised and then submitted to analysis by a computer programme which produced quantitative data for 12 biomechanical variables. The data indicated that world-class sprinters differed from decathletes in running the 100 m dash by having (1) an optimal combination of a larger stride length and higher stride frequency (2) a smaller thigh angle at contact which shortens the contact time (3) a larger stride landing angle (4) a greater average acceleration of the thigh angle was (5) a larger trunk angle which contributes to a larger trunk/thigh angle. Although other factors such as culture, training, physique and racial differences may influence differences in performance between American world-class sprinters and Swiss decathletes, these data do indicate that biomechanical variables may contribute to differences in 100 m dash performance. Images p177-a p177-b PMID:7272662

  2. Study and design of beam expander with wide aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming; Jin, Guangyong; Cai, Jixing; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    In order to improve the capacity of beam collimation for laser beam expander, it is necessary to design a more reasonable and feasible structure of beam expander system. Laser beam expander is used to compress the laser divergence angle, in order to reduce the energy losing in long distance scanning acquisition system. This paper introduces the working principle and design idea of the laser beam expander, the collimating multiplying power focal length and the collimated magnification formula of expander main, secondary mirror. According to the third-order aberration theory, Considering the spherical aberration, sine difference and divergence angle, the reasonable analysis of optical path, ZEMAX optical design software was used to design large-diameter laser beam expander and analysis and optimize, And given the actual design data and results. Display the maximum optical path difference is +/-0.01λ of the main light ray and each light ray. To combination the rear- group objective lens of Galileo and Kepler beam expander, a large-diameter(1.475m) laser beam expander was designed with 0.2m in the diameter, 1/2m in the relative caliber. In the objective lens System, a high-order aspherical was used to the aberration of extra-axial point. we can see that the image quality is close to the diffraction limit from the curves of wavefront. In addition to improve image quality effectively, the system has the characteristics of simple structure, less costly and less design difficulty to compare with the other beam expanding system. And make the output beam's divergence angle smaller, energy density higher, and the beam quality has been greatly improved. The results show that the beam expander is fully meet the design requirements, the use effect is good. Design and research of laser beam expanding system not only improves the quality of the laser beam in the laser system, but also enlarge the application field of laser technology in photoelectric system.

  3. Combination of finite element modeling and optimization for the study of lumbar spine biomechanics considering the 3D thorax-pelvis orientation.

    PubMed

    Ezquerro, Francisco; Simón, Antonio; Prado, María; Pérez, Ana

    2004-01-01

    A model of the lumbar spine capable of taking into account realistic loads derived from human activity would be of great benefit in studying its normal biomechanical functioning as well as its in vivo behavior in injured and surgically altered states. This paper proposes a method to analyze the mechanical response of the lumbar spine subjected to loads derived from human activity, combining a non-linear finite element model (FEM) and an optimization-based force predicting algorithm. Loads borne by the lumbar spine at the T12-L1 level (joint loads) are first predicted with the optimization algorithm and then applied to the FEM, while a boundary condition prescribing the relative L1-sacrum rotation is imposed onto the FEM to account for three-dimensional physiological thorax-pelvis orientation. The prescribed rotation is achieved through the application of moments on L1. To account for the effect of these moments on lumbar joint loads, an iteration between the optimization technique and the FEM computation has been carried out. This method provides two main benefits over previous studies: first, it allows for the application of any 3D loading condition while considering the real 3D rotation measured between the thorax and the pelvis, and second, it makes it possible to estimate the moments that must be applied on L1 in order to maintain this rotation, taking them into account when predicting joint loads. As an example application of the method, results are presented for the lumbar spine mechanical response at the time of peak T12-L1 joint force during walking.

  4. A quantitative study of MC3T3-E1 cell adhesion, morphology and biomechanics on chitosan-collagen blend films at single cell level.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuang; Xie, Xu-dong; Huang, Xun; Liang, Zhi-hong; Zhou, Chang-ren

    2015-08-01

    The interaction between cells and biomaterials plays a key role in cell proliferation and differentiation in tissue engineering. However, a quantitative analysis of those interactions has been less well studied. The objective of this study was to quantitative recapitulate the difference of MC3T3-E1 cell adhesion, morphological and biomechanical properties on chitosan-collagen films in terms of chemical composition. Here, the unbinding force between MC3T3-E1 cell and a series of chitosan-collagen films was probed by a real-time and in situ atomic force microscopy-single cell force spectroscopy (AFM-SCFS). Meanwhile, changes in cell morphology and Young's modulus on different chitosan-collagen films were detected by AFM. The cell area and CCK-8 results showed that cell spreading and proliferation increased with increasing collagen content. AFM observations clearly showed cell height decreased and pseudopod fusion with the collagen content increased. Cell adhesive force increased from 0.76±0.17 nN to 1.70±0.19 nN. On the contrary, cells Young's modulus, which reflected biophysical changes of cells decreased from 11.94±3.19 kPa to 1.81±0.52 kPa, respectively. It suggested that stronger cell-substrate interactions benefit cell adhesion, and better cell flexibility improve cell spreading. The findings indicate that cell morphology, adhesive force and Young's modulus are significant affected by various chitosan-collagen substrates. Those methods and quantitative results have guiding significance for investigating the mechanism of chitosan and/or collagen based cell-targeting drug carrier and the preparation of chitosan-collagen composite biomaterials.

  5. Biomechanical in vitro evaluation of three stable internal fixation techniques used in sagittal osteotomy of the mandibular ramus: a study in sheep mandibles

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVERA, Leandro Benetti; SANT'ANA, Eduardo; MANZATO, Antonio José; GUERRA, Fábio Luis Bunemer; ARNETT, G. William

    2012-01-01

    Among the osteotomies performed in orthognathic surgery, the sagittal osteotomy of the mandibular ramus (SOMR) is the most common, allowing a great range of movements and stable internal fixation (SIF), therefore eliminating the need of maxillomandibular block in the postoperative period. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical resistance of three national systems used for SIF in SOMR in sheep mandibles. Material and methods: The study was performed in 30 sheep hemi-mandibles randomly divided into 3 experimental groups, each containing 10 hemi-mandibles. The samples were measured to avoid discrepancies and then subjected to SOMR with 5-mm advancement. In group I, 2.0x12 mm screws were used for fixation, inserted in an inverted "L" pattern (inverted "L" group). In group II, fixation was performed with two 2.0x12 mm screws, positioned in a linear pattern and a 4-hole straight miniplate and four 2.0x6.0 mm monocortical screws (hybrid group). In group III, fixation was performed with two 4-hole straight miniplates and eight 2.0x6.0 mm monocortical screws (mini plate group). All materials used for SIF were supplied by Osteosin - SIN. The hemimandibles were subjected to vertical linear load test by Kratos K2000MP mechanical testing unit for loading registration and displacement. Results: All groups showed similar resistance during mechanical test for loading and displacement, with no statistically significant differences between groups according to analysis of variance. Conclusion: These results indicate that the three techniques of fixation are equally effective for clinical fixation of SOMR. PMID:23032203

  6. Energy-shunting external hip protector attenuates the peak femoral impact force below the theoretical fracture threshold: an in vitro biomechanical study under falling conditions of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Parkkari, J; Kannus, P; Heikkilä, J; Poutala, J; Sievänen, H; Vuori, I

    1995-10-01

    The first objective of this study was to design a hip protector that would effectively attenuate and shunt away from the greater trochanter the impact energies created in typical falls of the elderly. As the shock absorption material, the protector included the 12 mm-thick Plastazote, which was found to be the most efficient energy-absorbing material in our previous in vitro biomechanical tests. With an anatomically designed semiflexible outer shield of the protector (high density polyethylene), the impact surface was increased and the impact energy shunted away from the greater trochanter. In the second phase of the study, we determined the force attenuation capacity of this device in realistic (in vitro) falling conditions of the elderly. With the impact force of 6940 N used (a typical hip impact force measured in in vitro falling tests), the trochanteric soft tissue (25 mm-thick polyethylene foam) attenuated the peak femoral impact force to 5590 N and the tested protector to 1040 N. In the second series of this experiment, the peak femoral impact force was set to be so high (13,130 N) that the protector, if effective, should prevent the hip fracture in almost all cases. The trochanteric soft tissue attenuated this peak impact force to 10,400 N and the tested protector to 1810 N. Thus, the force received by the proximal femur still remained clearly below 4170 N, the average force required to fracture in vitro the proximal femur of the elderly in a fall loading configuration. In conclusion, our test results suggest that an anatomically designed energy-shunting and energy-absorbing hip protector can provide an effective impact force attenuation in typical falling conditions of the elderly. However, the efficacy of the protector in the prevention of hip fractures can only be evaluated in randomized clinical trials.

  7. A novel injectable porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for vertebroplasty: an in vivo biomechanical and osteogenic study in a rabbit osteoporosis model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Yu, Jin; He, Qiang; Zhao, Xiong; Sang, Hongxun; Lei, Wei; Wu, Zixiang; Chen, Jingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of a novel injectable Porous Surface Modified Bioactive Bone Cement (PSMBBC) for vertebroplasty of aiding osteoporotic vertebrae in an osteoporosis model. Methods: 72 osteoporosis rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: the Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) group, the PSMBBC group and the control group. PMMA and PSMBBC were administrated to osteoporotic vertebrae in vertebroplasty, respectively. The animals were sacrificed at 1w, 4w, 12w after the procedure. Micro-CT analysis, biomechanical tests and histological analysis were performed at each time point. Results: From 4 to 12 weeks after the implantation of bone cements, the bone volume fraction (BV/TV) of the PSMBBC group increased from 28.27 ± 1.69% to 38.43 ± 1.34%. However, the BV/TV of the PMMA group showed no significant difference after the implantation. At 4 weeks, direct contact between the bone and the bone cement was observed in the PSMBBC group. At 12 weeks, it was discovered that new intact bone trabecular was formed in PSMBBC group. Furthermore, the maximum compressive strength values of the PSMBBC group were significantly higher than those of the control group at each time point after implantation. Conclusions: In summary, this study was the first investigation to evaluate the potential application of PSMBBC for vertebroplasty. Results demonstrated its beneficial effects on the trabecular ingrowth of new bone and bone mineral density increase. With further validation, PSMBBC can become a valuable biomaterial for aiding osteoporotic vertebrae and usable bone cement applied in vertebroplasty. PMID:26045894

  8. Study of Synchrotron Radiation for the Electron Beam Polarimeter for the MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.

    2015-08-06

    This is a look at the synchrotron radiation coming from the chicane in the electron beam line for the MEIC design. The power density on the beam pipe as well as transmission through the beam pipe is studied. The optics design is version 12.

  9. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  10. Numerical Study of Collective Effects for Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Dazhang; Kaplan, Daniel M.; Roberts, Thomas J.; Ng, King Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The study of Muon beam optics is crucial for future Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider facilities. At present, the GEANT4-based simulation tools for Muon beam tracking such as G4beamline and G4MICE only do single particle tracking without collective effects taken into account. However, it is known that collective interaction such as space charge and wakefields for muons (in matter or vacuum) are not ignorable. As the first step, space charge computation is implemented into muon tracking. The basic algorithm is particle-to-particle interaction through retarded electro-magnetic field. The momentum impulse due to collective effects is applied to every particle at each collective step, and the G4beamline main code is used for tracking. Comparisons to LANL Parmela are illustrated and analyzed. Optimizations of the algorithm are also underway to gain less computing time and more accuracy. Moreover, the idea of enhancing ionization cooling efficiency by utilizing the collective effect due to the polarized charges in matter appears to be possible, and preliminary estimates have been made.

  11. The biomechanics of soccer: a review.

    PubMed

    Lees, A; Nolan, L

    1998-04-01

    This review considers the biomechanical factors that are relevant to success in the game of soccer. Three broad areas are covered: (1) the technical performance of soccer skills; (2) the equipment used in playing the game; and (3) the causative mechanisms of specific soccer injuries. Kicking is the most widely studied soccer skill. Although there are many types of kick, the variant most widely reported in the literature is the maximum velocity instep kick of a stationary ball. In contrast, several other skills, such as throwing-in and goalkeeping, have received little attention; some, for example passing and trapping the ball, tackling, falling behaviour, jumping, running, sprinting, starting, stopping and changing direction, have not been the subject of any detailed biomechanical investigation. The items of equipment reviewed are boots, the ball, artificial and natural turf surfaces and shin guards. Little of the research conducted by equipment manufacturers is in the public domain; this part of the review therefore concentrates on the mechanical responses of equipment, player-equipment interaction, and the effects of equipment on player performance and protection. Although the equipment has mechanical characteristics that can be reasonably well quantified, the player-equipment interaction is more difficult to establish; this makes its efficacy for performance or protection difficult to predict. Some soccer injuries may be attributable to the equipment used. The soccer boot has a poor protective capability, but careful design can have a minor influence on reducing the severity of ankle inversion injuries. Performance requirements limit the scope for reducing these injuries; alternative methods for providing ankle stability are necessary. Artificial surfaces result in injury profiles different from those on natural turf pitches. There is a tendency for fewer serious injuries, but more minor injuries, on artificial turf than on natural turf pitches. Players adapt to

  12. Simulation study of interactions of Space Shuttle-generated electron beams with ambient plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin S.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-1936. The objective of this report is to conduct large scale simulations of electron beams injected into space. The topics covered include the following: (1) simulation of radial expansion of an injected electron beam; (2) simulations of the active injections of electron beams; (3) parameter study of electron beam injection into an ionospheric plasma; and (4) magnetosheath-ionospheric plasma interactions in the cusp.

  13. Laboratory studies of the charge neutralization of a rocket payload during electron beam emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, W.; Whalen, B. A.; Harris, F. R.; Mcnamara, A. G.; Konradi, A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge neutralization of an electrically-isolated rocket payload emitting an energetic electron beam has been studied in experiments in the large vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center. The introduction of an RF-discharge-produced ambient plasma density (10,000 to 50,000 per cu cm) reduces the payload potential to 200 V for low current (1 and 10 ma) beams. The ignition of the beam-plasma discharge provides an efficient neutralization process for higher current beams.

  14. Beam-Beam Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, Christopher

    2003-09-05

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea-Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. Finally, a study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam spotsizes.

  15. Energy deposition studies for the LBNE beam absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor L.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Tropin, Igor S.

    2015-01-29

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition studies performed for the LBNE absorber core and the surrounding shielding with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system – all with corresponding radiation shielding – was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. This option provides substantial flexibility and automation when developing complex geometry models. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Various design options were considered, in particular the following: (i) filling the decay pipe with air or helium; (ii) the absorber mask material and shape; (iii) the beam spoiler material and size. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable absorber design options.

  16. Inherent Strength of the osteo-WEDGE(™) Bone Plate Locking System for Arthrodesis of the First Metatarsocuneiform Joint: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michael E; Chikka, Avanthi; Goel, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    First metatarsocuneiform joint arthrodesis with a locking bone plate and screw system has been effectively used to correct metatarsus primus varus and instability of the first ray. The goal of the present cadaveric biomechanical study was to quantify and compare the inherent strength of the first metatarsocuneiform joint and surrounding bones fixated with the osteo-WEDGE(™) bone plate locking system (OW) with that of intact specimens. Fourteen fresh-frozen adult human cadaveric foot specimens consisting of the first metatarsal and medial cuneiform bones with intact joint capsules and ligaments were used. The OW was implanted in 7 of these specimens at the first metatarsal cuneiform joint (MCJ), and the remaining 7 specimens were left intact. Each of the specimens was then subjected to axial force to simulate dorsiflexion of the first metatarsal using a cantilever bending test setup. Load was applied on the plantar aspect of the first metatarsal head until failure of the construct. The mean load and bending moment on the first MCJ at failure for the implanted specimens were 119.98 ± 56.76 N and 5.57 ± 2.71 Nm, respectively. For the intact specimens, the mean load and bending moment on the first MCJ at failure were 107.93 ± 60.90 N and 6.07 ± 3.18 Nm, respectively. None of the specimens showed catastrophic failure within the physiologic loading limits. These results imply that the mechanical strength of the OW is comparable to that of intact specimens. Thus, the first MCJ and surrounding bones fixated with an OW should be able to effectively withstand the vertical ground reaction forces the same as intact specimens. PMID:26884262

  17. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using a tendon graft: a biomechanical study comparing a novel “sutured throughout” tendon graft to a standard tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Qais; Williams, Nadine; Hayes, Westley; Kapadia, Bhaveen H.; Chatterjee, Dipal; Urban, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: With a recurrence rate of over 30%, techniques that offer stronger acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction through increased graft strength may provide longevity. The purpose of our study was to determine the biomechanical strength of a novel tendon graft sutured throughout compared to a native tendon graft in Grade 3 anatomical AC joint reconstruction. Methods: For this in vitro experiment, nine paired (n = 18) embalmed cadaveric AC joints of three males and six females (age 86 years, range 51–94 years) were harvested. Anatomic repair with fresh bovine Achilles tendon grafts without bone block was simulated. Specimens were divided into two groups; with group 1 using grafts with ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture ran throughout the entire length. In group 2, reconstruction with only native allografts was performed. The distal scapula and humerus were casted in epoxy compound and mounted on the mechanical testing machine. Tensile tests were performed using a mechanical testing machine at the rate of 50 mm/min. Maximum load and displacement to failure were collected. Results: The average load to failure was significantly higher for group 1 compared to group 2, with mean values of 437.5 N ± 160.7 N and 94.4 N ± 43.6 N, (p = 0.001). The average displacement to failure was not significantly different, with 29.7 mm ± 10.6 mm in group 1 and 25 mm ± 9.1 mm in group 2 (p = 0.25). Conclusion: We conclude that a UHMWPE suture reinforced graft can provide a 3.6 times stronger AC joint reconstruction compared to a native graft. PMID:27163106

  18. Clinical and biomechanical evaluation of three bioscaffold augmentation devices used for superficial digital flexor tenorrhaphy in donkeys (Equus asinus): An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    El-Shafaey, El-Sayed A.; Karrouf, Gamal I.; Zaghloul, Adel E.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to carry out an in vivo and in vitro comparative evaluation of three bio-scaffold augmentation devices used for superficial digital flexor tenorrhaphy in donkeys. Twenty-four clinically healthy donkeys were assigned for three treatment trials (n = 8) using one of three bioscaffold materials (glycerolized bovine pericardium xenograft, tendon allograft and allograft with glycerolized by bovine pericardium). In addition, eight clinically healthy donkeys were selected to serve as control. Clinical signs of each animal were scored and the sum of all clinical indexes was calculated at each time point of the experiment. Four donkeys from each group were euthanized at 45 and 90 days postoperatively, respectively, for biomechanical and histopathological evaluation of treated superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT). The failure stress in allograft shielding group significantly increased compared to the corresponding values of the other groups at 45 (62.7 ± 6.5 N mm−2) and 90 (88.8 ± 3.5 N mm−2) days postoperatively. The fetlock angle in the allograft shielding group at both 45 (112.8° ± 4.4) and 90 (123.8° ± 1.1) days postoperatively showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) relative to the values of the other groups and a significant decrease (p < 0.05) when compared to normal angle (125° ± 0). However, the histomorphological findings revealed no remarkable changes between the treatment groups. In conclusion, the failure stress, fetlock angle and histomorphological findings may provide useful information about the healing characteristics of SDFT tenorrhaphy. The bio-scaffold augmentation devices, either xenogenic or allogenic, provide good alternative techniques accelerating SDFT healing with minimal adhesions in donkeys. PMID:25685407

  19. Beam feasibility study of a collimator with in-jaw beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollmann, Daniel; Nosych, Andriy A.; Valentino, Gianluca; Aberle, Oliver; Aßmann, Ralph W.; Bertarelli, Alessandro; Boccard, Christian; Bruce, Roderik; Burkart, Florian; Calvo, Eva; Cauchi, Marija; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Deboy, Daniel; Gasior, Marek; Jones, Rhodri; Kain, Verena; Lari, Luisella; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana

    2014-12-01

    At present, the beam-based alignment of the LHC collimators is performed by touching the beam halo with both jaws of each collimator. This method requires dedicated fills at low intensities that are done infrequently and makes this procedure time consuming. This limits the operational flexibility, in particular in the case of changes of optics and orbit configuration in the experimental regions. The performance of the LHC collimation system relies on the machine reproducibility and regular loss maps to validate the settings of the collimator jaws. To overcome these limitations and to allow a continuous monitoring of the beam position at the collimators, a design with jaw-integrated Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) was proposed and successfully tested with a prototype (mock-up) collimator in the CERN SPS. Extensive beam experiments allowed to determine the achievable accuracy of the jaw alignment for single and multi-turn operation. In this paper, the results of these experiments are discussed. The non-linear response of the BPMs is compared to the predictions from electromagnetic simulations. Finally, the measured alignment accuracy is compared to the one achieved with the present collimators in the LHC.

  20. Kinesiology/Biomechanics: Perspectives and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwater, Anne E.

    1980-01-01

    Past and recent developments and future directions in kinesiology and biomechanics are reviewed. Similarities and differences between these two areas are clarified. The areas of kinesiology and biomechanics have distinct unique qualities and should be treated as separate disciplines. (CJ)

  1. Speciation through the lens of biomechanics: locomotion, prey capture and reproductive isolation

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Sean M.; Langerhans, R. Brian; Jamniczky, Heather A.; Lauder, George V.; Stewart, William J.; Martin, Christopher H.; Reznick, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Speciation is a multifaceted process that involves numerous aspects of the biological sciences and occurs for multiple reasons. Ecology plays a major role, including both abiotic and biotic factors. Whether populations experience similar or divergent ecological environments, they often adapt to local conditions through divergence in biomechanical traits. We investigate the role of biomechanics in speciation using fish predator–prey interactions, a primary driver of fitness for both predators and prey. We highlight specific groups of fishes, or specific species, that have been particularly valuable for understanding these dynamic interactions and offer the best opportunities for future studies that link genetic architecture to biomechanics and reproductive isolation (RI). In addition to emphasizing the key biomechanical techniques that will be instrumental, we also propose that the movement towards linking biomechanics and speciation will include (i) establishing the genetic basis of biomechanical traits, (ii) testing whether similar and divergent selection lead to biomechanical divergence, and (iii) testing whether/how biomechanical traits affect RI. Future investigations that examine speciation through the lens of biomechanics will propel our understanding of this key process. PMID:27629033

  2. Speciation through the lens of biomechanics: locomotion, prey capture and reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Higham, Timothy E; Rogers, Sean M; Langerhans, R Brian; Jamniczky, Heather A; Lauder, George V; Stewart, William J; Martin, Christopher H; Reznick, David N

    2016-09-14

    Speciation is a multifaceted process that involves numerous aspects of the biological sciences and occurs for multiple reasons. Ecology plays a major role, including both abiotic and biotic factors. Whether populations experience similar or divergent ecological environments, they often adapt to local conditions through divergence in biomechanical traits. We investigate the role of biomechanics in speciation using fish predator-prey interactions, a primary driver of fitness for both predators and prey. We highlight specific groups of fishes, or specific species, that have been particularly valuable for understanding these dynamic interactions and offer the best opportunities for future studies that link genetic architecture to biomechanics and reproductive isolation (RI). In addition to emphasizing the key biomechanical techniques that will be instrumental, we also propose that the movement towards linking biomechanics and speciation will include (i) establishing the genetic basis of biomechanical traits, (ii) testing whether similar and divergent selection lead to biomechanical divergence, and (iii) testing whether/how biomechanical traits affect RI. Future investigations that examine speciation through the lens of biomechanics will propel our understanding of this key process. PMID:27629033

  3. The radiation measurement applied to beam lifetime study on the synchrotron radiation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuxiong; Li, Juexin; Liu, Zuping; Cui, Yonggang; Gong, Guanghua; Shao, Beibei

    2003-06-01

    To collect beam loss information from an accelerator radiation field is helpful to machine study and operation. For a synchrotron radiation storage ring, shower electrons give a distinct clue to loss location and a BLM-XS model detector is suitable to detect them. Recently, we set up a new beam loss monitoring system by this method for National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) storage ring. It does not interfere with the vacuum chamber and machine operation. Different from other systems, the detectors are used in pairs, fixed on opposite sides of the chamber separately. Some interesting phenomena about beam lifetime were observed. We located exactly where an excessive beam loss took place during ramping process and solved the problem. It was proved that gas accumulated at the front ends of photo-beam lines strongly impacted the electron beam and led to beam lifetime decreases. The cause of beam lifetime decrease because of superconducting wiggler is discussed.

  4. Experimental studies of SPECT scintimammography with combined cone-beam and parallel-beam collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Gangal, K. R.; Coman, Ioana L.; Salgado, Roberto B.; Lipson, Edward D.; Karczewski, Deborah A.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2003-05-01

    Conventional SPECT Tc-99m sestamibi scintimammography (STSM) has limited clinical utility due to fairly low radiopharmaceutical uptake in the breast tissue as compared to the heart and the liver. We investigated the use of a cone-beam collimator (CBC) to STSM. Each detector on a multi-headed gamma camera can be equipped with parallel-beam (PBC) or cone-beam collimators (CBC). PBC can provide truncation-free SPECT projection sets, while CBC offers increased sensitivity in a limited field-of-view (FOV). Combined PBC and CBC SPECT ddata acquisition may provide improved lesion contrast and overall better imaging performance within CBC FOV with significantly reduced truncation artifacts in the reconstructed images. In this paper we evaluate the combined CBC&PBC SPECT method using a limited number of confirmed breast cancer patients and female chest phantoms with simulated breast lesions. We envision the combined CBC&PBC SPECT as a useful clinical tool in scintimammography.

  5. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  6. Transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics studies at the Fermilab photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.P.; Barov, N.; Edwards, H.; Fitch, M.; Hartung, W.; Flottmann, K.; Schreiber, S.; Ferrario, M.; /Frascati

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab photoinjector produces electron bunches of 1-12 nC charge with an energy of 16-18 MeV. Detailed measurements and optimization of the transverse emittance have been carried out for a number of beam line optics conditions, and at a number of beam line locations. The length of the bunches has also been measured, first for an uncompressed beam (as a function of the charge) and then for a compressed beam of 8 nC charge (as a function of the 9-cell cavity phase). These measurements are presented and compared with the simulation codes HOMDYN and ASTRA.

  7. Biomechanics of Single Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bernick, Kristin B.; Prevost, Thibault P.; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude – 10, 1, and 0.1 μm/s. Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper-) elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented into a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. PMID:20971217

  8. Radiological Studies for the LCLS Beam Abort System

    SciTech Connect

    Santana Leitner, M.; Vollaire, J.; Mao, X.S.

    2008-03-25

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a pioneer hard x-ray free electron laser is currently under construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is expected that by 2009 LCLS will deliver laser pulses of unprecedented brightness and short length, which will be used in several forefront research applications. This ambitious project encompasses major design challenges to the radiation protection like the numerous sources and the number of surveyed objects. In order to sort those, the showers from various loss sources have been tracked along a detailed model covering 1/2 mile of LCLS accelerator by means of the Monte Carlo intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. This article covers the FLUKA studies of heat load; prompt and residual dose and environmental impact for the LCLS beam abort system.

  9. Direct reaction experimental studies with beams of radioactive tin ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L. Ayres, A.; Bey, A.; Burcher, S.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Beene, J. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Liang, J. F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Radford, D. C.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at {sup 100}Sn, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at {sup 132}Sn out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich {sup 130}Sn. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of γ rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  10. Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Beams of Radioactive Tin Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.H.; Allmond, James M; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Beene, James R; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Cartegni, L.; Chae, K. Y.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Garcia-Ruiz, R.F.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Howard, Meredith E; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Matos, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Padgett, S; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Pain, Steven D; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Smith, Michael Scott; Stracener, Daniel W; Stroberg, S.; Tostevin, Jeffrey A; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-01-01

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at Sn-100, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at Sn-132 out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich Sn-130. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of gamma rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  11. Comments on Injector Proton Beam Study in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    During the entire period of injector proton study in run 2014, it seems that the beam transverse emittance out of Booster is larger than that in run 2013. The emittance measured at the BtA transfer line and also the transmission from Booster late to AGS late are presented for this argument. In addition to this problem, it seems that the multiturn Booster injection, which defines the transverse emittance, needs more attention. Moreover, for high intensity operations, the space charge effect may be already relevant in RHIC polarized proton runs. With the RHIC proton intensity improvement in the next several years, higher Booster input intensity is needed, therefore, the space charge effect at the Booster injection and early ramp may become a new limiting factor.

  12. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  13. Nanoscale characterization of the biomechanical hardening of bovine zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Frassanito, Maria Cristina; Lamberti, Luciano; Brunelli, Roberto; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Monaci, Maurizio; Papi, Massimiliano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Parasassi, Tiziana; Sylla, Lakamy; Ursini, Fulvio; De Spirito, Marco

    2012-11-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) is an extracellular membrane surrounding mammalian oocytes. The so-called zona hardening plays a key role in fertilization process, as it blocks polyspermy, which may also be caused by an increase in the mechanical stiffness of the ZP membrane. However, structural reorganization mechanisms leading to ZP's biomechanical hardening are not fully understood yet. Furthermore, a correct estimate of the elastic properties of the ZP is still lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the biomechanical behaviour of ZP membranes extracted from mature and fertilized bovine oocytes to better understand the mechanisms involved in the structural reorganization of the ZP that may lead to the biomechanical hardening of the ZP. For that purpose, a hybrid procedure is developed by combining atomic force microscopy nanoindentation measurements, nonlinear finite element analysis and nonlinear optimization. The proposed approach allows us to determine the biomechanical properties of the ZP more realistically than the classical analysis based on Hertz's contact theory, as it accounts for the nonlinearity of finite indentation process, hyperelastic behaviour and material heterogeneity. Experimental results show the presence of significant biomechanical hardening induced by the fertilization process. By comparing various hyperelastic constitutive models, it is found that the Arruda-Boyce eight-chain model best describes the biomechanical response of the ZP. Fertilization leads to an increase in the degree of heterogeneity of membrane elastic properties. The Young modulus changes sharply within a superficial layer whose thickness is related to the characteristic distance between cross-links in the ZP filamentous network. These findings support the hypothesis that biomechanical hardening of bovine ZP is caused by an increase in the number of inter-filaments cross-links whose density should be higher in the ZP inner side.

  14. Nanoscale characterization of the biomechanical hardening of bovine zona pellucida

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Frassanito, Maria Cristina; Lamberti, Luciano; Brunelli, Roberto; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Monaci, Maurizio; Papi, Massimiliano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Parasassi, Tiziana; Sylla, Lakamy; Ursini, Fulvio; De Spirito, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) is an extracellular membrane surrounding mammalian oocytes. The so-called zona hardening plays a key role in fertilization process, as it blocks polyspermy, which may also be caused by an increase in the mechanical stiffness of the ZP membrane. However, structural reorganization mechanisms leading to ZP's biomechanical hardening are not fully understood yet. Furthermore, a correct estimate of the elastic properties of the ZP is still lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the biomechanical behaviour of ZP membranes extracted from mature and fertilized bovine oocytes to better understand the mechanisms involved in the structural reorganization of the ZP that may lead to the biomechanical hardening of the ZP. For that purpose, a hybrid procedure is developed by combining atomic force microscopy nanoindentation measurements, nonlinear finite element analysis and nonlinear optimization. The proposed approach allows us to determine the biomechanical properties of the ZP more realistically than the classical analysis based on Hertz's contact theory, as it accounts for the nonlinearity of finite indentation process, hyperelastic behaviour and material heterogeneity. Experimental results show the presence of significant biomechanical hardening induced by the fertilization process. By comparing various hyperelastic constitutive models, it is found that the Arruda–Boyce eight-chain model best describes the biomechanical response of the ZP. Fertilization leads to an increase in the degree of heterogeneity of membrane elastic properties. The Young modulus changes sharply within a superficial layer whose thickness is related to the characteristic distance between cross-links in the ZP filamentous network. These findings support the hypothesis that biomechanical hardening of bovine ZP is caused by an increase in the number of inter-filaments cross-links whose density should be higher in the ZP inner side. PMID:22675161

  15. Nanoscale characterization of the biomechanical hardening of bovine zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Frassanito, Maria Cristina; Lamberti, Luciano; Brunelli, Roberto; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Monaci, Maurizio; Papi, Massimiliano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Parasassi, Tiziana; Sylla, Lakamy; Ursini, Fulvio; De Spirito, Marco

    2012-11-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) is an extracellular membrane surrounding mammalian oocytes. The so-called zona hardening plays a key role in fertilization process, as it blocks polyspermy, which may also be caused by an increase in the mechanical stiffness of the ZP membrane. However, structural reorganization mechanisms leading to ZP's biomechanical hardening are not fully understood yet. Furthermore, a correct estimate of the elastic properties of the ZP is still lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the biomechanical behaviour of ZP membranes extracted from mature and fertilized bovine oocytes to better understand the mechanisms involved in the structural reorganization of the ZP that may lead to the biomechanical hardening of the ZP. For that purpose, a hybrid procedure is developed by combining atomic force microscopy nanoindentation measurements, nonlinear finite element analysis and nonlinear optimization. The proposed approach allows us to determine the biomechanical properties of the ZP more realistically than the classical analysis based on Hertz's contact theory, as it accounts for the nonlinearity of finite indentation process, hyperelastic behaviour and material heterogeneity. Experimental results show the presence of significant biomechanical hardening induced by the fertilization process. By comparing various hyperelastic constitutive models, it is found that the Arruda-Boyce eight-chain model best describes the biomechanical response of the ZP. Fertilization leads to an increase in the degree of heterogeneity of membrane elastic properties. The Young modulus changes sharply within a superficial layer whose thickness is related to the characteristic distance between cross-links in the ZP filamentous network. These findings support the hypothesis that biomechanical hardening of bovine ZP is caused by an increase in the number of inter-filaments cross-links whose density should be higher in the ZP inner side. PMID:22675161

  16. Biomechanics of Early Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Goenezen, Sevan; Rennie, Monique Y.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanics affect early cardiac development, from looping to the development of chambers and valves. Hemodynamic forces are essential for proper cardiac development, and their disruption leads to congenital heart defects. A wealth of information already exists on early cardiac adaptations to hemodynamic loading, and new technologies, including high resolution imaging modalities and computational modeling, are enabling a more thorough understanding of relationships between hemodynamics and cardiac development. Imaging and modeling approaches, used in combination with biological data on cell behavior and adaptation, are paving the road for new discoveries on links between biomechanics and biology and their effect on cardiac development and fetal programming. PMID:22760547

  17. Effect of bone fragment impact velocity on biomechanical parameters related to spinal cord injury: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Khuyagbaatar, Batbayar; Kim, Kyungsoo; Hyuk Kim, Yoon

    2014-08-22

    Several experimental and computational studies have investigated the effect of bone fragment impact on the spinal cord during trauma. However, the effect of the impact velocity of a fragment generated by a burst fracture on the stress and strain inside the spinal cord has not been computationally investigated, even though spinal canal occlusion and peak pressure at various impact velocities were provided in experimental studies. These stresses and strains are known factors related to clinical symptoms or injuries. In this study, a fluid-structure interaction model of the spinal cord, dura mater, and cerebrospinal fluid was developed and validated. The von-Mises stress distribution in the cord, the longitudinal strain, the cord compression and cross-sectional area at the impact center, and the obliteration of the cerebrospinal fluid layer were analyzed for three pellet sizes at impact velocities ranging from 1.5m/s to 7.5m/s. The results indicate that stress in the cord was substantially elevated when the initial impact velocity of the pellet exceeded a threshold of 4.5m/s. Cord compression, reduction in cross-sectional area, and obliteration of the cerebrospinal fluid increased gradually as the velocity of the pellet increased, regardless of the size of the pellet. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms underlying spinal cord injury.

  18. Beam Simulation Studies of the LEBT for RIA Driver Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Q.; Wu, X.; Andreev, V.; Balabin, A.; Doleans, M.; Gorelov, D.; Grimm, T.L.; Hartung, W.; Marti, F.; Schriber, S.O.; York, R.C.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.

    2005-03-15

    The low energy beam transport (LEBT) system in the front-end of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) uses a 70 kV platform to pre-accelerate the ion beam from a 30 kV Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, followed by an achromatic charge selection system. The selected beam is then pre-bunched and matched into the entrance of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) with a multi-harmonic buncher. To meet the beam power requirements for heavy ions, high current (several mA), multi-species beams will be extracted from the ECR. Therefore, it is crucial to control space charge effects in order to obtain the low emittance beam required for RIA. The PARMELA code is used to perform the LEBT simulations for the multi-species beams with 3D space charge calculations. The results of the beam dynamics simulations are presented, and the key issues of emittance growth in the LEBT and its possible compensation are discussed.

  19. Initial beam size study for passive scatter proton therapy. II. Changes in delivered depth dose profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Harvey, Mark C.; Smith, Alfred R.

    2007-11-15

    In passively scattered proton radiotherapy, a clinically useful treatment beam is produced by spreading a small proton 'pencil beam' extracted from the accelerator to create both a uniform dose profile laterally and a uniform spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) in depth. Lateral spreading and range modulation of the beam are accomplished using specially designed components within the treatment delivery nozzle. The purpose of this study was to determine how changes in the size of the initial proton pencil beam affect the delivery of dose with a passive scatter treatment nozzle. Monte Carlo calculations were used to study changes of the beam's in-air energy distribution at the exit of the nozzle and the central axis depth dose profiles in water resulting from changes in the incident beam size. Our results indicate that the width of the delivered SOBP decreases as the size of the initial beam increases.

  20. Experimental study of thin-walled composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Ngo, Hieu; Chopra, Inderjit

    1988-01-01

    Thin-walled rectangular section composite beams are built out of graphite-epoxy prepreg tape using an autoclave molding technique. Cantilevered beams are tested under static loads using a specially-built apparatus and bending slope and elastic twist at a station are measured using a laser system. Measured bending slope and bending-induced twist distributions are correlated with predicted results obtained using a simple beam analysis as well as a refined finite element analysis. Natural vibration characteristics at different rotational speeds are determined experimentally by testing beams in a specially built 10 ft diameter vacuum chamber. The rotor is excited by piezo-electric crystals and response is determined from strain gages mounted on the surface. For composite beams with bending-twisting couplings (symmetric layup), effects of section warping and transverse shear on structural response are found to be substantial. These results were substantiated by the analyses.

  1. Biomechanical Stress Analysis of Mandibular First Permanent Molar; Restored with Amalgam and Composite Resin: A Computerized Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, AR

    2010-01-01

    Normal mastication with its varying magnitude and direction generates considerable reactionary stresses in teeth and their supporting tissues. The structure of the human tooth and its supporting tissues is a complex assemblage of materials of varied mechanical properties. The finite element method (FEM), a modern technique of numerical stress analysis, has the great advantage of being applicable to solids of irregular geometry and heterogeneous material properties and therefore ideally suited to the examination of structural behavior of teeth. The mandibular first permanent molar is one of the earliest permanent teeth to erupt in the oral cavity and hence most prone to caries. The purpose of the present study was to construct a two-dimensional FE model of the mandibular first permanent molar and its supporting structures, using a FE software called NISA II-Display III, EMRC, USA to study the following: • To compare stress distributions patterns when a modeled Class I Cavity was restored with dental amalgam and composite resin. • To compare the stress distributions pattern when the load was applied to different to locations, i.e.: At the mesial cusp tip, and at the center of the occlusal surface. Both amalgam and composite resin showed similar stress distribution pattern, however, the magnitudes of stresses generated in the tooth restored with composite resin were higher. Thus, amalgam is a better restorative material in distributing stresses.

  2. Biomechanical evaluation and surface characterization of a nano-modified surface on PEEK implants: a study in the rabbit tibia.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pär; Jimbo, Ryo; Kjellin, Per; Currie, Fredrik; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Wennerberg, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is today frequently used as a biomaterial in different medical operations due to its excellent mechanical and chemical properties. However, the untreated surface of PEEK is bioinert and hydrophobic, and it does not osseointegrate in its pure form. The aim of this study was to evaluate a unique nano-modified surface of PEEK with respect to osseointegration. Forty-eight threaded, non-cutting PEEK implants were inserted bilaterally in the tibia of 24 rabbits. Half of the implants (n=24) were coated with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (test) and the remaining implants (n=24) were left uncoated (control). Half of the animals (n=12) were euthanized after 3 weeks of healing and the remaining (n=12) after 12 weeks. The implant retention was measured with a removal torque apparatus. Surface analysis was performed with interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photon spectroscopy to relate the removal torque to the applied surface. The test implants revealed a significantly higher retention after 3 weeks (P=0.05) and 12 weeks (P=0.028) compared to controls. The result of the present study proves that the addition of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite coating to PEEK surfaces significantly increases its removal torque and biocompatibility. PMID:25152620

  3. Carpal height and postoperative strength after proximal row carpectomy or four-corner arthrodesis: Clinical, anatomical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Laronde, Pascale; Christiaens, Nicolas; Aumar, Aurélien; Chantelot, Christophe; Fontaine, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) and four-corner arthrodesis (4CA) are the two most commonly performed surgical procedures to treat wrist arthritis. Postoperative strength is one of the criteria for choosing between the two techniques. Some authors believe that strength is correlated with residual carpal height. The goal of this study was to determine if postoperative carpal height was predictive of postoperative strength. This study consisted of two parts: a clinical evaluation of grip strength after 4CA or PRC; anatomical and radiological measurements of carpal height before and after 4CA or PRC. Grip strength was better preserved after PRC (87.5%) than after 4CA (76.1%), when expressed relative to the opposite hand (P=0.053). There was a significant decrease in carpal height for the PRC group with a Youm's index of 0.37 versus 0.50 for the 4CA group (P<0.0001). Our clinical results and analysis of the literature indicate that 4CA is not superior to PRC when it comes to grip strength, whereas carpal height is significantly decreased after PRC. The decreased tendon excursion after PRC is balanced by an increase in joint stresses after 4CA. PMID:27117123

  4. A Comparative Study on the Kinematic Biomechanical Effects of Tibia Vara in the Healthy and Diseased Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmohammadi, Mehrdad; Karami, Hossein; Bani, Milad Salimi; Zadeh, Hossein Bahreini; Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2016-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Malalignment about the knee leads to a pathological-mechanical load that may cause early osteoarthritis of the knee joint and high degree of deformity which may need surgical treatment. Analysis of the leg movements in the experimental cases and comparing acquired results to the normal ones during the gait is used as a practical method to evaluate the effects of the disease. METHOD: In this study, gait differences between the patients with tibia vara and normal people were studied according to the data obtained from a three-dimensional (3D) motion analyzer. Various parameters, including positions, linear and angular velocities, linear and angular accelerations, total velocity, total acceleration, and path length at different angels were extracted and processed via a 3D motion analyzer. Then the results of the patient and control groups were compared to identify the differences. RESULTS: The maximum and average values as well as sample entropy were also calculated for all the mentioned parameters. Among all, only nine remarkable differences between these two groups were observed. The results revealed that the great difference between the patients with tibia vara compared to the normal ones in gait cycle lies on the abnormal movement of fibula bone and less irregularities along the z-axis. CONCLUSIONS: These findings may have implications not only for understanding the differences between the tibia vara in the healthy and diseased individuals, but also for providing a practical understanding for the medical and orthopedic experts to propose a better treatment method.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation and surface characterization of a nano-modified surface on PEEK implants: a study in the rabbit tibia

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Pär; Jimbo, Ryo; Kjellin, Per; Currie, Fredrik; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Wennerberg, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is today frequently used as a biomaterial in different medical operations due to its excellent mechanical and chemical properties. However, the untreated surface of PEEK is bioinert and hydrophobic, and it does not osseointegrate in its pure form. The aim of this study was to evaluate a unique nano-modified surface of PEEK with respect to osseointegration. Forty-eight threaded, non-cutting PEEK implants were inserted bilaterally in the tibia of 24 rabbits. Half of the implants (n=24) were coated with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (test) and the remaining implants (n=24) were left uncoated (control). Half of the animals (n=12) were euthanized after 3 weeks of healing and the remaining (n=12) after 12 weeks. The implant retention was measured with a removal torque apparatus. Surface analysis was performed with interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photon spectroscopy to relate the removal torque to the applied surface. The test implants revealed a significantly higher retention after 3 weeks (P=0.05) and 12 weeks (P=0.028) compared to controls. The result of the present study proves that the addition of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite coating to PEEK surfaces significantly increases its removal torque and biocompatibility. PMID:25152620

  6. Carpal height and postoperative strength after proximal row carpectomy or four-corner arthrodesis: Clinical, anatomical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Laronde, Pascale; Christiaens, Nicolas; Aumar, Aurélien; Chantelot, Christophe; Fontaine, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) and four-corner arthrodesis (4CA) are the two most commonly performed surgical procedures to treat wrist arthritis. Postoperative strength is one of the criteria for choosing between the two techniques. Some authors believe that strength is correlated with residual carpal height. The goal of this study was to determine if postoperative carpal height was predictive of postoperative strength. This study consisted of two parts: a clinical evaluation of grip strength after 4CA or PRC; anatomical and radiological measurements of carpal height before and after 4CA or PRC. Grip strength was better preserved after PRC (87.5%) than after 4CA (76.1%), when expressed relative to the opposite hand (P=0.053). There was a significant decrease in carpal height for the PRC group with a Youm's index of 0.37 versus 0.50 for the 4CA group (P<0.0001). Our clinical results and analysis of the literature indicate that 4CA is not superior to PRC when it comes to grip strength, whereas carpal height is significantly decreased after PRC. The decreased tendon excursion after PRC is balanced by an increase in joint stresses after 4CA.

  7. A comparative biomechanical analysis of term fetal membranes in human and domestic species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to biomechanically characterize and compare human, porcine, equine, and ovine fetal membranes. Noncontact metrology was used for topographic analyses. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to resolve specific biomechanical values. Puncture force and radial stresses we...

  8. Diagnostic Assessment of Preparedness of Level One Sports Science Students for Biomechanics Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Sharon J.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the use of a diagnostic test to assess the preparedness of level one students for a sports biomechanics module. During their first week at university, a cohort of 108 students completed a diagnostic test at the end of their first lecture in sports biomechanics, with no prior notice. Upon…

  9. Anatomy, pathophysiology, and biomechanics of shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Doukas, W C; Speer, K P

    2001-07-01

    Instability in the athlete presents a unique challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. A spectrum of both static and dynamic pathophysiology, as well as gross and microscopic histopathology, contribute to this complex clinical continuum. Biomechanical studies of the shoulder and ligament cutting studies in recent years have generated a more precise understanding of the individual contributions of the various ligaments and capsular regions to shoulder instability. An understanding of the underlying pathology and accurate assessment of degree and direction of the instability by clinical examination and history are essential to developing appropriate treatment algorithms.

  10. Biomechanical tactics of chiral growth in emergent aquatic macrophytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Long; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Li, Bing-Wei; Nie, Ben-Dian; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    Through natural selection, many plant organs have evolved optimal morphologies at different length scales. However, the biomechanical strategies for different plant species to optimize their organ structures remain unclear. Here, we investigate several species of aquatic macrophytes living in the same natural environment but adopting distinctly different twisting chiral morphologies. To reveal the principle of chiral growth in these plants, we performed systematic observations and measurements of morphologies, multiscale structures, and mechanical properties of their slender emergent stalks or leaves. Theoretical modeling of pre-twisted beams in bending and buckling indicates that the different growth tactics of the plants can be strongly correlated with their biomechanical functions. It is shown that the twisting chirality of aquatic macrophytes can significantly improve their survivability against failure under both internal and external loads. The theoretical predictions for different chiral configurations are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:26219724

  11. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Sonato, P.

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  12. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Veltri, P.

    2014-02-01

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  13. The effect of multi-level laminoplasty and laminectomy on the biomechanics of the cervical spine: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Kode, Swathi; Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Smucker, Joseph D; Fredericks, Douglas C; Grosland, Nicole M

    2014-01-01

    Laminectomy has been regarded as a standard treatment for multi-level cervical stenosis. Concern for complications such as kyphosis has limited the indication of multi-level laminectomy; hence it is often augmented with an instrumented fusion. Laminoplasty has emerged as a motion preserving alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the multidirectional flexibility of the cervical spine in response to a plate-only open door laminoplasty, double door laminoplasty, and laminectomy using a computational model. A validated three-dimensional finite element model of a specimen-specific intact cervical spine (C2-T1) was modified to simulate each surgical procedure at levels C3-C6. An additional goal of this work was to compare the instrumented computational model to our multi-specimen experimental findings to ensure similar trends in response to the surgical procedures. Model predictions indicate that mobility was retained following open and double door laminoplasty with a 5.4% and 20% increase in flexion, respectively, compared to the intact state. Laminectomy resulted in 57% increase in flexion as compared to the intact state, creating a concern for eventual kyphosis--a known risk/complication of multi-level laminectomy in the absence of fusion. Increased disc stresses were observed at the altered and adjacent segments post-laminectomy in flexion. PMID:25328475

  14. Biomechanical study in polyurethane mandibles of different metal plates and internal fixation techniques, employed in mandibular angle fractures.

    PubMed

    Semeghini Guastaldi, Fernando Pozzi; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo; Guastaldi, Antonio Carlos

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a physicochemical and morphological characterization and compare the mechanical behavior of an experimental Ti-Mo alloy to the analogous metallic Ti-based fixation system, for mandibular angle fractures. Twenty-eight polyurethane mandibles were uniformly sectioned on the left angle. These were divided into 4 groups: group Eng 1P, one 2.0-mm plate and 4 screws 6 mm long; group Eng 2P, two 2.0-mm plates, the first fixed with 4 screws 6 mm long and the second with 4 screws 12 mm long. The same groups were created for the Ti-15Mo alloy. Each group was subjected to linear vertical loading at the first molar on the plated side in a mechanical testing unit. Means and standard deviations were compared with respect to statistical significance using ANOVA. The chemical composition of the Ti-15Mo alloy was close to the nominal value. The mapping of Mo and Ti showed a homogeneous distribution. SEM of the screw revealed machining debris. For the plates, only the cpTi plate undergoes a surface treatment. The metallographic analysis reveals granular microstructure, from the thermomechanical trials. A statistically significant difference was found (P < 0.05) when the comparison between both internal fixation techniques was performed. The 2P technique showed better mechanical behavior than 1P. PMID:25340696

  15. Restriction in Hip Internal Rotation is Associated with an Increased Risk of ACL Injury in NFL Combine Athletes: A Clinical and Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Asheesh; Warren, Russell F.; Oh, Youkeun K.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Oltean, Hanna N.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A deficiency in hip internal rotation secondary to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) may result in compensatory increases in rotational stresses applied to the ACL with cutting and pivoting activities, thereby increasing the risk of ACL failure in athletes. The purpose of this study was to correlate ACL injury with hip range of motion in a consecutive series of elite, contact athletes and to test the hypothesis that a restriction in the available hip axial rotation in a dynamic in silico model of a simulated pivot landing would increase ACL strain and the risk of ACL rupture. Methods: We examined 324 football athletes attending the 2012 NFL National Invitational Camp. Hip range of internal rotation was measured by three orthopaedic surgeons and correlated with a history of ACL injury and surgical repair using generalized estimating equation logistic regression analysis. An in silico biomechanical model was used to study the effect of FAI on the peak relative ACL strain developed during a simulated pivot landing. Results: The in vivo results demonstrated that a reduction in internal rotation of the left hip was associated with a statistically significant increased odds of ACL injury in the ipsilateral or contralateral knee (OR = 0.95, P =.0001 and P < .0001, respectively). A post-estimation calculation of odds ratio for ACL injury based on deficiency in hip internal rotation demonstrated that a 30-degree reduction in left hip internal rotation was associated with 4.06 and 5.29 times greater odds of ACL injury in the ipsilateral and contralateral limbs, respectively (Figure 1A). The in silico model demonstrated that FAI systematically increased the peak ACL strain predicted during the pivot landing (Figure 1B). The peak AM-ACL strain for 5-degrees of internal rotation was 22.5% greater than the corresponding value for 10-degrees of internal rotation (i.e., a peak AM-ACL strain of 5.77% vs. 4.71%, respectively). Conclusion: FAI may significantly increase

  16. Effect of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures on Achilles tendon healing in a rat model: A histological and biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Stephen H; Grande, Daniel A; Hee, Christopher K; Kestler, Hans K; Roden, Colleen M; Shah, Neil V; Razzano, Pasquale; Dines, David M; Chahine, Nadeen O

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Repairing tendon injuries with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB has potential for improving surgical outcomes. Augmentation of sutures, a critical component of surgical tendon repair, by coating with growth factors may provide a clinically useful therapeutic device for improving tendon repair. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to (a) coat Vicryl sutures with a defined dose of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB without additional coating excipients (e.g. gelatin), (b) quantify the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB released from the suture, and (c) use the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures to enhance tendon repair in a rat Achilles tendon transection model. Methods: Vicryl sutures were coated with 0, 0.3, 1.0, and 10.0 mg/mL concentrations of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB using a dip-coating process. In vitro release was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Acutely transected rat Achilles tendons were repaired using one of the four suture groups (n = 12 per group). Four weeks following repair, the tensile biomechanical and histological (i.e. collagen organization and angiogenesis) properties were determined. Results: A dose-dependent bolus release of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB occurred within the first hour in vitro, followed by a gradual release over 48 h. There was a significant increase in ultimate tensile strength (p < 0.01) in the two highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose groups (1.9 ± 0.5 and 2.1 ± 0.5 MPa) relative to controls (1.0 ± 0.2 MPa). The modulus significantly increased (p = 0.031) with the highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose group (7.2 ± 3.8 MPa) relative to all other groups (control: 3.5 ± 0.9 MPa). No significant differences were identified for the maximum load or stiffness. The histological collagen and angiogenesis scores

  17. Biomechanical and histologic basis of osseodensification drilling for endosteal implant placement in low density bone. An experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lahens, Bradley; Neiva, Rodrigo; Tovar, Nick; Alifarag, Adham M; Jimbo, Ryo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Bowers, Michelle M; Cuppini, Marla; Freitas, Helora; Witek, Lukasz; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-10-01

    A bone drilling concept, namely osseodensification, has been introduced for the placement of endosteal implants to increase primary stability through densification of the osteotomy walls. This study investigated the effect of osseodensification on the initial stability and early osseointegration of conical and parallel walled endosteal implants in low density bone. Five male sheep were used. Three implants were inserted in the ilium, bilaterally, totaling 30 implants (n=15 conical, and n=15 parallel). Each animal received 3 implants of each type, inserted into bone sites prepared as follows: (i) regular-drilling (R: 2mm pilot, 3.2mm, and 3.8mm twist drills), (ii) clockwise osseodensification (CW), and (iii) counterclockwise (CCW) osseodensification drilling with Densah Bur (Versah, Jackson, MI, USA): 2.0mm pilot, 2.8mm, and 3.8mm multi-fluted burs. Insertion torque as a function of implant type and drilling technique, revealed higher values for osseodensification relative to R-drilling, regardless of implant macrogeometry. A significantly higher bone-to-implant contact (BIC) for both osseodensification techniques (p<0.05) was observed compared to R-drilling. There was no statistical difference in BIC as a function of implant type (p=0.58), nor in bone-area-fraction occupancy (BAFO) as a function of drilling technique (p=0.22), but there were higher levels of BAFO for parallel than conic implants (p=0.001). Six weeks after surgery, new bone formation along with remodeling sites was observed for all groups. Bone chips in proximity with the implants were seldom observed in the R-drilling group, but commonly observed in the CW, and more frequently under the CCW osseodensification technique. In low-density bone, endosteal implants present higher insertion torque levels when placed in osseodensification drilling sites, with no osseointegration impairment compared to standard subtractive drilling methods.

  18. Biomechanical analysis of different types of pedicle screw augmentation: a cadaveric and synthetic bone sample study of instrumented vertebral specimens.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kuo-Hua; Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Ming; McClean, Colin J; Fan, Chang-Yuan; Chang, Chia-Hao; Lin, Leou-Chyr; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to determine the pull-out strength, stiffness and failure pull-out energy of cement-augmented, cannulated-fenestrated pedicle screws in an osteoporotic cadaveric thoracolumbar model, and to determine, using synthetic bone samples, the extraction torques of screws pre-filled with cement and those with cement injected through perforations. Radiographs and bone mineral density measurements from 32 fresh thoracolumbar vertebrae were used to define specimen quality. Axial pull-out strength of screws was determined through mechanical testing. Mechanical pull-out strength, stiffness and energy-to-failure ratio were recorded for cement-augmented and non-cement-augmented screws. Synthetic bone simulating a human spinal bone with severe osteoporosis was used to measure the maximum extraction torque. The pull-out strength and stiffness-to-failure ratio of cement pre-filled and cement-injected screws were significantly higher than the non-cement-augmented control group. However, the cement pre-filled and cement-injected groups did not differ significantly across these values (p=0.07). The cement pre-filled group had the highest failure pull-out energy, approximately 2.8 times greater than that of the cement-injected (p<0.001), and approximately 11.5 times greater than that of the control groups (p<0.001). In the axial pull-out test, the cement-injected group had a greater maximum extraction torque than the cement pre-filled group, but was statistically insignificant (p=0.17). The initial fixation strength of cannulated screws pre-filled with cement is similar to that of cannulated screws injected with cement through perforations. This comparable strength, along with the heightened pull-out energy and reduced extraction torque, indicates that pedicle screws pre-filled with cement are superior for bone fixation over pedicle screws injected with cement. PMID:23669371

  19. Biomechanical and histologic basis of osseodensification drilling for endosteal implant placement in low density bone. An experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lahens, Bradley; Neiva, Rodrigo; Tovar, Nick; Alifarag, Adham M; Jimbo, Ryo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Bowers, Michelle M; Cuppini, Marla; Freitas, Helora; Witek, Lukasz; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-10-01

    A bone drilling concept, namely osseodensification, has been introduced for the placement of endosteal implants to increase primary stability through densification of the osteotomy walls. This study investigated the effect of osseodensification on the initial stability and early osseointegration of conical and parallel walled endosteal implants in low density bone. Five male sheep were used. Three implants were inserted in the ilium, bilaterally, totaling 30 implants (n=15 conical, and n=15 parallel). Each animal received 3 implants of each type, inserted into bone sites prepared as follows: (i) regular-drilling (R: 2mm pilot, 3.2mm, and 3.8mm twist drills), (ii) clockwise osseodensification (CW), and (iii) counterclockwise (CCW) osseodensification drilling with Densah Bur (Versah, Jackson, MI, USA): 2.0mm pilot, 2.8mm, and 3.8mm multi-fluted burs. Insertion torque as a function of implant type and drilling technique, revealed higher values for osseodensification relative to R-drilling, regardless of implant macrogeometry. A significantly higher bone-to-implant contact (BIC) for both osseodensification techniques (p<0.05) was observed compared to R-drilling. There was no statistical difference in BIC as a function of implant type (p=0.58), nor in bone-area-fraction occupancy (BAFO) as a function of drilling technique (p=0.22), but there were higher levels of BAFO for parallel than conic implants (p=0.001). Six weeks after surgery, new bone formation along with remodeling sites was observed for all groups. Bone chips in proximity with the implants were seldom observed in the R-drilling group, but commonly observed in the CW, and more frequently under the CCW osseodensification technique. In low-density bone, endosteal implants present higher insertion torque levels when placed in osseodensification drilling sites, with no osseointegration impairment compared to standard subtractive drilling methods. PMID:27341291

  20. Comparison between different methods for biomechanical assessment of ex vivo fracture callus stiffness in small animal bone healing studies.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Malte; Volkheimer, David; Meyers, Nicholaus; Wehner, Tim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    For ex vivo measurements of fracture callus stiffness in small animals, different test methods, such as torsion or bending tests, are established. Each method provides advantages and disadvantages, and it is still debated which of those is most sensitive to experimental conditions (i.e. specimen alignment, directional dependency, asymmetric behavior). The aim of this study was to experimentally compare six different testing methods regarding their robustness against experimental errors. Therefore, standardized specimens were created by selective laser sintering (SLS), mimicking size, directional behavior, and embedding variations of respective rat long bone specimens. For the latter, five different geometries were created which show shifted or tilted specimen alignments. The mechanical tests included three-point bending, four-point bending, cantilever bending, axial compression, constrained torsion, and unconstrained torsion. All three different bending tests showed the same principal behavior. They were highly dependent on the rotational direction of the maximum fracture callus expansion relative to the loading direction (creating experimental errors of more than 60%), however small angular deviations (<15°) were negligible. Differences in the experimental results between the bending tests originate in their respective location of maximal bending moment induction. Compared to four-point bending, three-point bending is easier to apply on small rat and mouse bones under realistic testing conditions and yields robust measurements, provided low variation of the callus shape among the tested specimens. Axial compressive testing was highly sensitive to embedding variations, and therefore cannot be recommended. Although it is experimentally difficult to realize, unconstrained torsion testing was found to be the most robust method, since it was independent of both rotational alignment and embedding uncertainties. Constrained torsional testing showed small errors (up to

  1. Clinical applications of biomechanics cinematography.

    PubMed

    Woodle, A S

    1986-10-01

    Biomechanics cinematography is the analysis of movement of living organisms through the use of cameras, image projection systems, electronic digitizers, and computers. This article is a comparison of cinematographic systems and details practical uses of the modality in research and education. PMID:2946390

  2. A selection of biomechanical research problems: From modeling to experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Cyrus Omid

    The research undertakings within this manuscript illustrate the importance of biomechanics in today's science. Without doubt, biomechanics can be utilized to obtain a better understanding of many unsolved mysteries involved in the field of medicine. Moreover, biomechanics can be used to develop better prosthetic or surgical devices as well. Chapter 2 represents a medical problem, which has not been solved for more than a century. With the use of fundamental principles of biomechanics', a better insight of this problem and its possible causes were obtained. Chapter 3 investigates the mechanical interaction between the human teeth and some processed food products during mastication, which is a routine but crucial daily activity of a human being. Chapter 4 looks at a problem within the field of surgery. In this chapter the stability and reliability of two different Suturing-Techniques are explored. Chapters 5 and 6 represent new patent designs as a result of the investigations made in Chapter 4. Chapter 7 studies the impact and load transfer patterns during the collision between a child's head and the ground. All of the above mentioned chapters show the significance of biomechanics in solving a range of different medical problems that involve physical and or mechanical characters.

  3. Experimental Studies on Behaviour of Reinforced Geopolymer Concrete Beams Subjected to Monotonic Static Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madheswaran, C. K.; Ambily, P. S.; Dattatreya, J. K.; Ramesh, G.

    2015-06-01

    This work describes the experimental investigation on behaviour of reinforced GPC beams subjected to monotonic static loading. The overall dimensions of the GPC beams are 250 mm × 300 mm × 2200 mm. The effective span of beam is 1600 mm. The beams have been designed to be critical in shear as per IS:456 provisions. The specimens were produced from a mix incorporating fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag, which was designed for a compressive strength of 40 MPa at 28 days. The reinforced concrete specimens are subjected to curing at ambient temperature under wet burlap. The parameters being investigated include shear span to depth ratio (a/d = 1.5 and 2.0). Experiments are conducted on 12 GPC beams and four OPCC control beams. All the beams are tested using 2000 kN servo-controlled hydraulic actuator. This paper presents the results of experimental studies.

  4. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S. E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  5. Performance Studies of the Vibration Wire Monitor on the Test Stand with Low Energy Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Kota; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Kinsho, Michikazu

    In the high intensity proton accelerator as the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) accelerators, serious radiation and residual dose is induced by a small beam loss such a beam halo. Therefore, diagnostics of the beam halo formation is one of the most important issues to control the beam loss. For the beam halo monitor, the vibration wire monitor (VWM) has a potential for investigating the beam halo and weak beam scanning. The VWM has a wide dynamic range, high resolution and the VWM is not susceptible to secondary electrons and electric noises. We have studied the VWM features as a new beam-halo monitor on the test stand with low energy electron gun. The frequency shift of the irradiated vibration wire was confirmed about wire material and the electron beam profile measured by using the VWM was consistent with the results of the Faraday cup measurement. Also we calculated a temperature distribution on the vibration wire which is irradiated by the electron beam with the numerical simulation. The simulations have been fairly successful in reproducing the transient of the irradiated vibration wire frequency measured by test stand experiments. In this paper, we will report a result of performance evaluation for the VWM on the test stands and discuss the VWM for beam halo diagnostic

  6. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A; Sing Babu, P; Srivastava, S; Pandit, V S

    2015-11-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results. PMID:26628123

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Three Different Obturating Techniques Lateral Compaction, Thermafil and Calamus for Filling Area and Voids Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography: An Invitro study

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Anil; Panwar, Nidhi R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The success of root canal treatment depends upon the proper sealing of root canal system. Improper apical seal leads to the microleakage which can be prevented by proper obturation technique. Aim To compare the quality of three different root canal obturation techniques: lateral compaction, Thermafil and Calamus by using cone beam computed tomography. Materials and Methods A total of 30 central incisors were selected. Biomechanical preparation was done by Reciproc file no 25. Teeth were divided into 3 groups of 10 teeth each according to the obturation technique i.e. Calamus, Thermafil and lateral compaction. Cone beam computed tomography was used to measure filling area and voids at coronal, middle and apical third of the root canal after obturation by different techniques. Data was statistically analysed by One-Way Anova and multiple comparison of Tukey HSD tests. Result The maximum amount of obturating material was observed in Calamus group followed by Thermafil and lateral compaction. Minimum voids were seen in obturation by Calamus technique. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that Calamus may be a good obturation technique. PMID:26436038

  8. Rebuilding the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Brynda, W.J.; Passell, L.; Rorer, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    After nearly thirty years of operation, Brookhaven`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is still one of the world`s premier steady-state neutron sources. A major center for condensed matter studies, it currently supports fifteen separate beamlines conducting research in fields as diverse as crystallography, solid-state, nuclear and surface physics, polymer physics and structural biology and will very likely be able to do so for perhaps another decade. But beyond that point the HFBR will be running on borrowed time. Unless appropriate remedial action is taken, progressive radiation-induced embrittlement problems will eventually shut it down. Recognizing the HFBR`s value as a national scientific resource, members of the Laboratory`s scientific and reactor operations staffs began earlier this year to consider what could be done both to extend its useful life and to assure that it continues to provide state-of-the-art research facilities for the scientific community. This report summarizes the findings of that study. It addresses two basic issues: (i) identification and replacement of lifetime-limiting components and (ii) modifications and additions that could expand and enhance the reactor`s research capabilities.

  9. Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure Studies Using Low-energy RI Beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-05-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, Many measurements on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, (alpha,p) reactions, and others were peformed in recent years, mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the {sup 7}Be+p and {sup 7}Li+alpha resonance scatterings are presented.

  10. Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure Studies Using Low-energy RI Beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-05-01

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, Many measurements on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, (α,p) reactions, and others were peformed in recent years, mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the 7Be+p and 7Li+α resonance scatterings are presented.

  11. Nuclear clusters studied with alpha resonant scatterings using RI beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.; Kubono, S.; Suhara, T.; Kanada-En'yo, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kim, A.; Iwasa, N.; Lee, P. S.; Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Gwak, M. S.; Kim, D. H.; Milman, E.

    2014-12-01

    Alpha resonant scattering is a simple and promising method to study α-cluster structure in nuclei. It has several good features which enable us to perform measurements with short-lived and relatively low-intense RI beams. Several measurements on alpha resonant scattering have been carried out at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Recent α resonant scattering studies at CRIB, using 7Li, 7Be and 10Be beams with a helium gas target, are discussed.

  12. Molecular-beam Studies of Primary Photochemical Processes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, Y. T.

    1982-12-01

    Application of the method of molecular-beam photofragmentation translational spectroscopy to the investigation of primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules is described. Examples will be given to illustrate how information concerning the energetics, dynamics, and mechanism of dissociation processes can be obtained from the precise measurements of angular and velocity distributions of products in an experiment in which a well-defined beam of molecules is crossed with a laser.

  13. Status of LHC crab activity simulations and beam studies

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Assman, R.; Barranco, J.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Caspers, F.; Ciapala, E.; De-Maria, R.; Koutchouk, J. P.; Linnecar, T.; Metral, E.; Morita, A.; Solyak, N.; Sun, Y.; Tomas, R.; Tuckmantel, J.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.

    2009-05-04

    The LHC crab cavity program is advancing rapidly towards a first prototype which is anticipated to be tested during the early stages of the LHC phase I upgrade and commissioning. The general project status and some aspects related to crab optics, collimation, aperture constraints, impedances, noise effects. beam transparency and machine protection critical for a safe and robust operation of LHC beams with crab cavities are addressed here.

  14. Distributed Data Acquisition For Biomechanics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myklebust, J.; Geisler, M.; Prieto, T.; Weiss, R.

    1987-01-01

    Biomechanics research at the Medical College of Wisconsin is directed to the determination of the mechanisms of head and spine injury and the evaluation of surgical treatments for these injuries. This work involves mechanical testing of components of the spine (disks, vertebral bodies, and ligaments) as well as testing of composite spines and in situ evaluation of intact human cadavers (1,3). Other studies utilize experimental animals to measure neurologic and physiologic effects due to injury producing loads and accelerations (2). An integrated system has been developed to facilitate the acquisition and analysis of the diverse types of data from these experiments.

  15. Studies on Neutral Beam Injection into the SSPX Spheromak Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, R; Pearlstein, L D; Casper, T A; Fowler, T K; Hill, D N; Hudson, B; McLean, H; Moller, J

    2007-10-19

    In the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, (SSPX) ['Improved operation of the SSPX spheromak', R.D. Wood, D.N. Hill, E.B. Hooper, S. Woodruff1, H.S. McLean and B.W. Stallard, Nucl. Fusion 45 1582-1588 (2005)], plasmas with core electron temperatures reaching up to 500 eV at densities of 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} have been sustained for several milliseconds, making them suitable as targets for neutral beam injection. High performance and further progress in understanding Spheromak plasma physics are expected if neutral beams are injected into the plasma. This paper presents the results of numerical 1.5 D modeling of the plasma to calculate neutral beam current drive and ion and electron heating. The results are presented for varying initial conditions of density, temperatures and profiles and beam energy, injection angle and power. Current drive efficiency (Ampere/Watt of absorbed power) of up to 0.08 can be achieved with best performance SSPX shots as target. Analyses of neutral beam heating indicate that ion temperatures of up to 1.5 keV and electron temperatures of up to 750 eV can be obtained with injection of about 1 MW of neutral beam for 5-10 ms and with diffusivities typically observed in SSPX. Injection targeting near the magnetic axis appears to be the best for heating and current drive. Effect of the current drive and evolution of SSPX equilibrium are discussed.

  16. Feasibility study of optical/e-beam complementary lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohle, Christoph; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Freitag, Martin; Gutsch, Manuela; Jaschinsky, Philipp; Kahlenberg, Frank; Klein, Christof; Klikovits, Jan; Paul, Jan; Rudolph, Matthias; Thrun, Xaver

    2012-03-01

    Using electron beam direct write (EBDW) as a complementary approach together with standard optical lithography at 193nm or EUV wavelength has been proposed only lately and might be a reasonable solution for low volume CMOS manufacturing and special applications as well as design rule restrictions. Here, the high throughput of the optical litho can be combined with the high resolution and the high flexibility of the e-beam by using a mix & match approach (Litho- Etch-Litho-Etch, LELE). Complementary Lithography is mainly driven by special design requirements for unidirectional (1-D gridded) Manhattan type design layouts that enable scaling of advanced logic chips. This requires significant data prep efforts such as layout splitting. In this paper we will show recent results of Complementary Lithography using 193nm immersion generated 50nm lines/space pattern addressing the 32nm logic technology node that were cut with electron beam direct write. Regular lines and space arrays were patterned at GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden and have been cut in predefined areas using a VISTEC SB3050DW e-beam direct writer (50KV Variable Shaped Beam) at Fraunhofer Center Nanoelectronic Technologies (CNT), Dresden, as well as on the PML2 tool at IMS Nanofabrication, Vienna. Two types of e-beam resists were used for the cut exposure. Integration issues as well as overlay requirements and performance improvements necessary for this mix & match approach will be discussed.

  17. Biomechanics of Wheat/Barley Straw and Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher T. Wright; Peter A. Pryfogle; Nathan A. Stevens; Eric D. Steffler; J. Richard Hess; Thomas H. Ulrich

    2005-03-01

    The lack of understanding of the mechanical characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks is a limiting factor in economically collecting and processing crop residues, primarily wheat and barley stems and corn stover. Several testing methods, including compression, tension, and bend have been investigated to increase our understanding of the biomechanical behavior of cellulosic feedstocks. Biomechanical data from these tests can provide required input to numerical models and help advance harvesting, handling, and processing techniques. In addition, integrating the models with the complete data set from this study can identify potential tools for manipulating the biomechanical properties of plant varieties in such a manner as to optimize their physical characteristics to produce higher value biomass and more energy efficient harvesting practices.

  18. [Air transport biomechanical risk: reduced mobility passengers' handling].

    PubMed

    Draicchio, F; Campoli, G; Silvetti, A; Badellino, E; Forzano, F; Ranavolo, A; Iavicoli, S; Campagna, G; Raffaele, G; Gismondi, M

    2012-01-01

    As the airport traffic increases there is a continuous increase of passengers with different motor disabilities. Disabled passenger's assistance causes a biomechanical overload in airport workers. Some disabled passengers are classified by IATA as WCHC (wheel chair in cabin or Charlie). Our study, was performed in one of the most important Italian airport on Charlie passengers (about 10% of all assistances). We identified four critical points: 1) wheelchair and baggage moving (unstable load), 2) inclined ramps with worker's backwards steps and braked wheelchair to prevent passenger tipping or falling, 3) transfer from standard wheelchair to bicycle wheelchair, specifically designed for the aisle; 4.) transfer from bicycle wheelchair to aircraft seat. The last two points required sometimes to lift passengers over the armrest and positioning them on a window side seat, causing a serious increase of biomechanical load. For each critical point we have proposed technical and organizational measures to reduce airport worker's biomechanical risk.

  19. [Air transport biomechanical risk: reduced mobility passengers' handling].

    PubMed

    Draicchio, F; Campoli, G; Silvetti, A; Badellino, E; Forzano, F; Ranavolo, A; Iavicoli, S; Campagna, G; Raffaele, G; Gismondi, M

    2012-01-01

    As the airport traffic increases there is a continuous increase of passengers with different motor disabilities. Disabled passenger's assistance causes a biomechanical overload in airport workers. Some disabled passengers are classified by IATA as WCHC (wheel chair in cabin or Charlie). Our study, was performed in one of the most important Italian airport on Charlie passengers (about 10% of all assistances). We identified four critical points: 1) wheelchair and baggage moving (unstable load), 2) inclined ramps with worker's backwards steps and braked wheelchair to prevent passenger tipping or falling, 3) transfer from standard wheelchair to bicycle wheelchair, specifically designed for the aisle; 4.) transfer from bicycle wheelchair to aircraft seat. The last two points required sometimes to lift passengers over the armrest and positioning them on a window side seat, causing a serious increase of biomechanical load. For each critical point we have proposed technical and organizational measures to reduce airport worker's biomechanical risk. PMID:23405594

  20. Biomechanics of frontal skull fracture.

    PubMed

    Delye, Hans; Verschueren, Peter; Depreitere, Bart; Verpoest, Ignaas; Berckmans, Daniel; Vander Sloten, Jos; Van Der Perre, Georges; Goffin, Jan

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether an energy failure level applies to the skull fracture mechanics in unembalmed post-mortem human heads under dynamic frontal loading conditions. A double-pendulum model was used to conduct frontal impact tests on specimens from 18 unembalmed post-mortem human subjects. The specimens were isolated at the occipital condyle level, and pre-test computed tomography images were obtained. The specimens were rigidly attached to an aluminum pendulum in an upside down position and obtained a single degree of freedom, allowing motion in the plane of impact. A steel pendulum delivered the impact and was fitted with a flat-surfaced, cylindrical aluminum impactor, which distributed the load to a force sensor. The relative displacement between the two pendulums was used as a measure for the deformation of the specimen in the plane of impact. Three impact velocity conditions were created: low (3.60+/-0.23 m/sec), intermediate (5.21+/-0.04 m/sec), and high (6.95+/-0.04 m/sec) velocity. Computed tomography and dissection techniques were used to detect pathology. If no fracture was detected, repeated tests on the same specimen were performed with higher impact energy until fracture occurred. Peak force, displacement and energy variables were used to describe the biomechanics. Our data suggests the existence of an energy failure level in the range of 22-24 J for dynamic frontal loading of an intact unembalmed head, allowed to move with one degree of freedom. Further experiments, however, are necessary to confirm that this is a definitive energy criterion for skull fracture following impact. PMID:17970621

  1. Beam dynamics studies in the driver LINAC pre-Stripper section of the RIA facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E. S.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2003-07-10

    The RIA facility driver linac consists of about 400 superconducting (SC) independently phased rf cavities. The linac is designed to accelerate simultaneously several-charge-state beams to generate as much as 400 kW of uranium beam power. The linac beam dynamics is most sensitive to the focusing and accelerating-structure parameters of the prestripper section, where the uranium beam is accelerated from 0.17 keV/u to 9.4 MeV/u. This section is designed to accept and accelerate 2 charge states (28 and 29) of uranium beam from an ECR ion source. The prestripper section must be designed to minimize the beam emittance distortion of this two-charge-state beam. In particular, the inter-cryostat spaces must be minimized and beam parameters near transitions of the accelerating and focusing lattices must be matched carefully. Several sources of possible effective emittance growth are considered in the design of the prestripper section and a tolerance budget is established. Numerical beam dynamics studies include realistic electric and magnetic 3-dimensional field distributions in the SC rf cavities and SC solenoids. Error effects in the longitudinal beam parameters are studied.

  2. Correlation study of a beam-position monitor and a photon-beam-position monitor in the PLS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changbum; Shin, Seunghwan; Hwang, Ilmoon; Lee, Byung-Joon; Joo, Young-Do; Ha, Taekyun; Yoon, Jong Chel; Kim, Ghyung Hwa; Kim, Mungyung; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Ilyou; Huang, Jung-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The beam stability is one of the most important issues for the user service of the synchrotron radiation facility. After the upgrade of the Pohang Light Source (PLS-II), the electron-beam orbit is maintained within a root-mean-squred (rms) 1- μm range by using an orbit feedback system. However, that does not guarantee the radiation stability at the end of the beamline because unknown factors, such as focusing mirrors and double-crystal monocrometers, are present in the beamline. As a first step to solve this problem, photon-beam-position monitors (PBPMs) are installed in the front ends of the beamline to monitor the radiation stability. If the radiation is stable at the starting point of the beamline, we can move to the other components downstream that make the radiation unstable. In this paper, a correlation study will be presented between the beam-position monitor (BPM) and the PBPM. In addition, the effect of the orbit feedback system on the correlation will be described.

  3. Treatment of industrial effluents using electron beam accelerator and adsorption with activated carbon: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Sampa, Maria Helena; Rela, Paulo Roberto; Casas, Alexandre Las; Mori, Manoel Nunes; Duarte, Celina Lopes

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of a study that compares the use of electron beam processing and activated carbon adsorption to clean up a standardized organic aqueous solution and a real industrial effluent. The electron beam treatment was performed in a batch system using the IPEN's Electron Beam Accelerators from Radiation Dynamics Inc., Dynamitron 37.5 kW. The granular activated carbon removal treatment was performed using charcoal made from wood "pinus". If the adequate irradiation dose is delivered to the organic pollutant, it is possible to conclude for the studied compounds that the Electron Beam Process is similar to the activated carbon process in organic removal efficiency.

  4. Corneal biomechanical properties in thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Gamze Ozturk; Kaynak, Pelin; Altan, Cıgdem; Ozturker, Can; Aksoy, Ebru Funda; Demirok, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Omer Faruk

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of thyroid eye disease (TED) on the measurement of corneal biomechanical properties and the relationship between these parameters and disease manifestations. A total of 54 eyes of 27 individuals with TED and 52 eyes of 30 healthy control participants were enrolled. Thyroid ophthalmopathy activity was defined using the VISA (vision, inflammation, strabismus, and appearance/exposure) classification for TED. The intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement with Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), axial length (AL), keratometry, and central corneal thickness (CCT) measurements were taken from each patient. Corneal biomechanical properties, including corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) and noncontact IOP measurements, Goldmann-correlated IOP (IOPg) and corneal-compensated IOP (IOPcc) were measured with the Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) using the standard technique. Parameters such as best corrected visual acuity, axial length, central corneal thickness, and corneal curvature were not statistically significant between the two groups (p > 0.05). IOP measured with GAT was higher in participants with TED (p < 0.001). The CH of TED patients was significantly lower than that of the control group. There was no significant difference in the corneal resistance factor between groups. However, IOPg and IOPcc were significantly higher in TED patients. CH and VISA grading of TED patients showed a negative correlation (p = 0.007). In conclusion, TED affects the corneal biomechanical properties by decreasing CH. IOP with GAT and IOPg is found to be increased in these patients. As the severity of TED increases, CH decreases in these patients.

  5. Biomechanics and biophysics of cancer cells ☆

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Subra

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen substantial growth in research into how changes in the biomechanical and biophysical properties of cells and subcellular structures influence, and are influenced by, the onset and progression of human diseases. This paper presents an overview of the rapidly expanding, nascent field of research that deals with the biomechanics and biophysics of cancer cells. The review begins with some key observations on the biology of cancer cells and on the role of actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments and microtubule biopolymer cytoskeletal components in influencing cell mechanics, locomotion, differentiation and neoplastic transformation. In order to set the scene for mechanistic discussions of the connections among alterations to subcellular structures, attendant changes in cell deformability, cytoadherence, migration, invasion and tumor metastasis, a survey is presented of the various quantitative mechanical and physical assays to extract the elastic and viscoelastic deformability of cancer cells. Results available in the literature on cell mechanics for different types of cancer are then reviewed. Representative case studies are presented next to illustrate how chemically induced cytoskeletal changes, biomechanical responses and signals from the intracellular regions act in concert with the chemomechanical environment of the extracellular matrix and the molecular tumorigenic signaling pathways to effect malignant transformations. Results are presented to illustrate how changes to cytoskeletal architecture induced by cancer drugs and chemotherapy regimens can significantly influence cell mechanics and disease state. It is reasoned through experimental evidence that greater understanding of the mechanics of cancer cell deformability and its interactions with the extracellular physical, chemical and biological environments offers enormous potential for significant new developments in disease diagnostics, prophylactics, therapeutics and drug

  6. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  7. Design study of beam dynamics issues for 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Yu, S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.

    1994-11-01

    A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. The author present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. They have achieved in their design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA.

  8. Design study of beam dynamics issues for a one TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Houck, T.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.

    1995-06-01

    A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. We present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. We have achieved in our design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA. {copyright} 1995 {ital American Institute of Physics}.

  9. A study of electron beam-induced conductivity in resists.

    PubMed

    Hwu, J J; Joy, D C

    1999-01-01

    The charging of polymeric resist materials during electron beam irradiation leads to significant problems during imaging and lithography processes. Charging occurs because of charge deposition in the polymer and charge generation/trapping due to formation of electron-hole pairs in the dielectric. The presence of such charge also results in the phenomena of electron beam-induced conductivity (EBIC). Electron beam-induced conductivity data have been obtained for three commercial e-beam resists under a variety of dose rate and temperature conditions. From the observed values of induced conductivity under varying conditions significant information about the generation of electron-hole pair and the transport of charge in the resist can be obtained. Three electron beam resists, EBR900, ZEP7000, and PBS are examined by an external bias method. The difference in resist chemistry is considered to play the role in the initial state EBIC behaviors among three resists even though the way that it affects the behaviors is not clear. A comparison of the power consumption comparison is proposed as a measure to give a preliminary estimate of the carrier concentration and carrier drift velocity differences among the resists. A simple single trap model with constant activation energy is proposed and provides good agreement with experiment.

  10. Fiber-Matrix Interface Studies on Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drazel, L.T.; Janke, C.J.; Yarborough, K.D.

    1999-05-23

    The recently completed Department of Energy (DOE) and industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) entitled, ''Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites,'' determined that the interlaminar shear strength properties of the best electron beam cured IM7/epoxy composites were 19-28% lower than autoclave cured IM7/epoxy composites (i.e. IM7/977-2 and IM7/977-3). Low interlaminar shear strength is widely acknowledged as the key barrier to the successful acceptance and implementation of electron beam cured composites in the aircraft/aerospace industry. The objective of this work was to improve the interlaminar shear strength properties of electron beam cured composites by formulating and evaluating several different fiber sizings or coating materials. The researchers have recently achieved some promising results by having discovered that the application of epoxy-based, electron beam compatible sizings or coatings onto surface-treated, unsized IM7 carbon fibers improved the composite interlaminar shear strength properties by as much as 55% versus composites fabricated from surface-treated, unsized IM7 fibers. In addition, by applying these same epoxy-based sizings or coatings onto surface-treated, unsized IM7 fibers it was possible to achieve an 11% increase in the composite interlaminar shear strength compared to composites made from surface-treated, GP-sized IM7 fibers. Work is continuing in this area of research to further improve these properties.

  11. Study on shear strengthening of RC continuous T-beams using different layers of CFRP strips

    SciTech Connect

    Alferjani, M. B. S.; Samad, A. A. Abdul; Mohamad, Noridah; Elrawaff, Blkasem S.; Elzaroug, Omer

    2015-05-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates are externally bonded to reinforced concrete (RC) members to provide additional strength such as flexural, shear, etc. However, this paper presents the results of an experimental investigation for enhancing the shear capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) continuous T- beams using different layers of CFRP wrapping schemes. A total of three concrete beams were tested and various sheet configurations and layouts were studied to determine their effects on ultimate shear strength and shear capacity of the beams. One beam was kept as control beams, while other beams were strengthened with externally bonded CFRP strips with three side bonding and one or two layers of CFRP strips. From the test results, it was found that all schemes were found to be effective in enhancing the shear strength of RC beams. It was observed that the strength increases with the number of sheet layers provided the most effective strengthening for RC continuous T- beam. Beam strengthened using this scheme showed 23.21% increase in shear capacity as compared to the control beam. Two prediction models available in literature were used for computing the contribution of CFRP strips and compared with the experimental results.

  12. Study on shear strengthening of RC continuous T-beams using different layers of CFRP strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alferjani, M. B. S.; Samad, A. A. Abdul; Elrawaff, Blkasem S.; Elzaroug, Omer; Mohamad, Noridah

    2015-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates are externally bonded to reinforced concrete (RC) members to provide additional strength such as flexural, shear, etc. However, this paper presents the results of an experimental investigation for enhancing the shear capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) continuous T- beams using different layers of CFRP wrapping schemes. A total of three concrete beams were tested and various sheet configurations and layouts were studied to determine their effects on ultimate shear strength and shear capacity of the beams. One beam was kept as control beams, while other beams were strengthened with externally bonded CFRP strips with three side bonding and one or two layers of CFRP strips. From the test results, it was found that all schemes were found to be effective in enhancing the shear strength of RC beams. It was observed that the strength increases with the number of sheet layers provided the most effective strengthening for RC continuous T- beam. Beam strengthened using this scheme showed 23.21% increase in shear capacity as compared to the control beam. Two prediction models available in literature were used for computing the contribution of CFRP strips and compared with the experimental results.

  13. Electromagnetic and beam dynamics studies of a high current drift tube linac for LEHIPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, R.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2014-06-01

    We have performed detailed electromagnetic and beam dynamics studies of a 352.21 MHz drift-tube linac (DTL) that will accelerate a 30 mA CW proton beam from 3 to 20 MeV. At such high currents space charge effects are important, and therefore the effect of linear as well as non-linear space charge has been studied (corresponding to uniform and Gaussian initial beam distributions), in order to avoid space charge instabilities. To validate the electromagnetic simulations, a 1.2 m long prototype of the DTL was fabricated. RF measurements performed on the prototype were in good agreement with the simulations. A detailed simulation study of beam halos was also performed, which showed that beyond a current of 10 mA, significant longitudinal beam halos are excited even for a perfectly matched beam, whereas for a mis-matched beam transverse beam halos are also excited. However, these do not lead to any beam loss within the DTL.

  14. Effects of cord pretension and stiffness of the Dynesys system spacer on the biomechanics of spinal decompression- a finite element study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Dynesys system provides stability for destabilized spines while preserving segmental motion. However, clinical studies have demonstrated that the Dynesys system does not prevent adjacent segment disease. Moreover, biomechanical studies have revealed that the stiffness of the Dynesys system is comparable to rigid fixation. Our previous studies showed that adjusting the cord pretension of the Dynesys system alleviates stress on the adjacent level during flexion. We also demonstrated that altering the stiffness of Dynesys system spacers can alleviate stress on the adjacent level during extension of the intact spine. In the present study, we hypothesized that omitting the cord preload and changing the stiffness of the Dynesys system spacers would abate stress shielding on adjacent spinal segments. Methods Finite element models were developed for - intact spine (INT), facetectomy and laminectomy at L3-4 (DEC), intact spine with Dynesys system (IntDyWL), decompressed spine with Dynesys system (DecDyWL), decompressed spine with Dynesys system without cord preload (DecDyNL), and decompressed spine with Dynesys system assembled using spacers that were 0.8 times the standard diameter without cord pretension (DecDyNL0.8). These models were subjected to hybrid control for flexion, extension, axial rotation; and lateral bending. Results The greatest decreases in range of motion (ROM) at the L3-4 level occurred for axial rotation and lateral bending in the IntDyWL model and for flexion and extension in the DecDyWL model. The greatest decreases in disc stress occurred for extension and lateral bending in the IntDyWL model and for flexion in the DecDyWL model. The greatest decreases in facet contact force occurred for extension and lateral bending in the DecDyNL model and for axial rotation in the DecDyWL model. The greatest increases in ROMs at L2-3 level occurred for flexion, axial rotation and lateral bending in IntDyWL model and for extension in the Dec

  15. Beam Dynamics Studies of Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, G. Krafft, K. Detrick, S. Silva, J. Delayen, M. Spata ,M. Tiefenback, A. Hofler ,K. Beard

    2011-03-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for parallel-bar transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF separators: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to conventional TM$_{110}$ type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a one- or two-cell superconducting structure are enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the Lambertson magnet. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  16. Recent advances in crossed-beam studies of bimolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kopin

    2006-10-01

    A critical overview of the recent progress in crossed-beam reactive scattering is presented. This review is not intended to be an exhaustive nor a comprehensive one, but rather a critical assessment of what we have been learning about bimolecular reaction dynamics using crossed molecular beams since year 2000. Particular emphasis is placed on the information content encoded in the product angular distribution-the trait of a typical molecular beam scattering experiment-and how the information can help in answering fundamental questions about chemical reactivity. We will start with simple reactions by highlighting a few benchmark three-atom reactions, and then move on progressively to the more complex chemical systems and with more sophisticated types of measurements. Understanding what cause the experimental observations is more than computationally simulating the results. The give and take between experiment and theory in unraveling the physical picture of the underlying dynamics is illustrated throughout this review.

  17. Beam dynamics studies for transverse electromagnetic mode type rf deflectors

    DOE PAGES

    Ahmed, Shahid; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Deitrick, Kirsten; De Silva, Subashini U.; Delayen, Jean R.; Spata, Mike; Tiefenback, Michael; Hofler, Alicia; Beard, Kevin

    2012-02-14

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type rf deflectors: normal and superconducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to the conventional TM110 type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a single cell superconducting structure is enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the target point. Both the normal and superconducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the verticalmore » kick of the beam.« less

  18. Studies of beam halo formation in the 12GeV CEBAF design

    SciTech Connect

    Yves Roblin; Arne Freyberger

    2007-06-01

    Beam halo formation in the beam transport design for the Jefferson Lab 12GeV upgrade was investigated using 12GeV beam transport models as well as data from 6GeV CEBAF operations. Various halo sources were considered; these covered both nuclear interactions with beam gas as well as optics-related effects such as non linearities in the magnetic fields of the transport elements. Halo due to beam gas scattering was found to be less of a problem at 12GeV compared to the 6GeV machine. Halo due to non linear effects of magnetic elements was characterized as a function of beam orbit and functional forms of the distribution were derived. These functional forms were used as inputs in subsequent detector optimizations studies.

  19. Simulation Studies of Temperature Anisotropy Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams for IBX Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, E. A.; Davidson, R. C.; Qin, H.

    2003-10-01

    The Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) is a proof-of-principal experiment for heavy ion fusion designed to test source-to-target beam physics using a single beam of K^+ ions of duration 0.2 - 1.5 μ s, accelerated to energies 5-10 MeV, and driver-scale normalized perviance in the range 10-5 -10-3. An important physics issue to be addressed by IBX is the effect of longitudinal-transverse coupling on the beam transport and focusibility of the driver. Our previous numerical and theoretical studies of intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138, 2002] demonstrated that a fast, electrostatic, Harris-like instability may develop. This paper reports the results of recent simulations of the temperature anisotropy instability using the Beam Equilibrium Stability Transport (BEST) code for IBX parameters.

  20. Analysis of bending and buckling of pre-twisted beams: A bioinspired study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zi-Long; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Chang, Zheng; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-08-01

    Twisting chirality is widely observed in artificial and natural materials and structures at different length scales. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the effect of twisting chiral morphology on the mechanical properties of elastic beams by using the Timoshenko beam model. Particular attention is paid to the transverse bending and axial buckling of a pre-twisted rectangular beam. The analytical solution is first derived for the deflection of a clamped-free beam under a uniformly or periodically distributed transverse force. The critical buckling condition of the beam subjected to its self-weight and an axial compressive force is further solved. The results show that the twisting morphology can significantly improve the resistance of beams to both transverse bending and axial buckling. This study helps understand some phenomena associated with twisting chirality in nature and provides inspirations for the design of novel devices and structures.

  1. Analytic and numerical studies of the modified betatron. [Kiloamp beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.P.; Campbell, M.M.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1983-08-01

    The modified betatron concept has been proposed as a means of accelerating high current (kiloamp) electron beams to high energy. This device employs a toroidal magnetic field to overcome the space-charge limit on the current in a conventional betatron at low energy. In this paper, the authors look at the injection, equilibrium and stability of the modified betatron. The main emphasis is on stability. An analytic dispersion relation is derived using a cold-fluid model of the beam. The results are compared to three-dimensional simulations performed with the electromagnetic PIC code IVORY. The nonlinear development of the negative mass instability is followed in the simulations.

  2. High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W.

    2012-12-21

    For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

  3. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  4. The biomechanics of cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  5. Simulation study of accelerator based quasi-mono-energetic epithermal neutron beams for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Adib, M; Habib, N; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Mansy, M S

    2016-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-7.5 keV at the accelerator port using the generated neutron spectrum from a Li (p, n) Be reaction. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The feature of the filtered beams is detailed in terms of optimal thickness of the primary and additive components. A computer code named "QMNB-AS" was developed to carry out the required calculations. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity with low contamination from the accompanying thermal, fast neutrons and γ-rays.

  6. An exploratory study of the relationship between biomechanical factors and right-arm musculoskeletal discomfort and fatigue in a VDT data-entry task.

    PubMed

    Pan, C S; Schleifer, L M

    1996-06-01

    The relationship of key force and keystroke rate with right-arm musculoskeletal discomfort and fatigue was explored in a video-display-terminal (VDT) data-entry task. Forty-three data transcribers entered bogus data from tax forms at a VDT for one workday with their right hand. Peak key force and keystroke rate were monitored on a continuous basis. Self-ratings of right-arm discomfort and fatigue were assessed at periodic intervals. Stepwise regression analyses indicated that both lower key forces and lower keystroke rates were associated with higher ratings of right-elbow discomfort. In addition, lower key forces were associated with higher ratings of right-hand discomfort and lower keystroke rates were associated with higher ratings of right-shoulder discomfort and fatigue. The amount of variance accounted for by these models ranged from 7 to 24%. These results appear to be contrary to conventional biomechanical models that postulate a positive association between key force, keystroke rate and musculoskeletal discomfort in VDT work. Further laboratory and field research under controlled conditions is needed to clarify the direction and extent of the cause-and-effect relationship between biomechanical factors and musculoskeletal discomfort in VDT data-entry work. PMID:15677060

  7. An exploratory study of the relationship between biomechanical factors and right-arm musculoskeletal discomfort and fatigue in a VDT data-entry task.

    PubMed

    Pan, C S; Schleifer, L M

    1996-06-01

    The relationship of key force and keystroke rate with right-arm musculoskeletal discomfort and fatigue was explored in a video-display-terminal (VDT) data-entry task. Forty-three data transcribers entered bogus data from tax forms at a VDT for one workday with their right hand. Peak key force and keystroke rate were monitored on a continuous basis. Self-ratings of right-arm discomfort and fatigue were assessed at periodic intervals. Stepwise regression analyses indicated that both lower key forces and lower keystroke rates were associated with higher ratings of right-elbow discomfort. In addition, lower key forces were associated with higher ratings of right-hand discomfort and lower keystroke rates were associated with higher ratings of right-shoulder discomfort and fatigue. The amount of variance accounted for by these models ranged from 7 to 24%. These results appear to be contrary to conventional biomechanical models that postulate a positive association between key force, keystroke rate and musculoskeletal discomfort in VDT work. Further laboratory and field research under controlled conditions is needed to clarify the direction and extent of the cause-and-effect relationship between biomechanical factors and musculoskeletal discomfort in VDT data-entry work.

  8. Modeling the biomechanics of fetal movements.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Stefaan W; Loo, Jessica H W; Hayat, Tayyib T A; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rutherford, Mary A; Phillips, Andrew T M; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2016-08-01

    Fetal movements in the uterus are a natural part of development and are known to play an important role in normal musculoskeletal development. However, very little is known about the biomechanical stimuli that arise during movements in utero, despite these stimuli being crucial to normal bone and joint formation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to create a series of computational steps by which the forces generated during a kick in utero could be predicted from clinically observed fetal movements using novel cine-MRI data of three fetuses, aged 20-22 weeks. A custom tracking software was designed to characterize the movements of joints in utero, and average uterus deflection of [Formula: see text] mm due to kicking was calculated. These observed displacements provided boundary conditions for a finite element model of the uterine environment, predicting an average reaction force of [Formula: see text] N generated by a kick against the uterine wall. Finally, these data were applied as inputs for a musculoskeletal model of a fetal kick, resulting in predicted maximum forces in the muscles surrounding the hip joint of approximately 8 N, while higher maximum forces of approximately 21 N were predicted for the muscles surrounding the knee joint. This study provides a novel insight into the closed mechanical environment of the uterus, with an innovative method allowing elucidation of the biomechanical interaction of the developing fetus with its surroundings. PMID:26534772

  9. The biomechanical structure of swim start performance.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sebastian; Kibele, Armin

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the significance of various biomechanical parameters in swim start performance for the grab and track start techniques. To do so, structural equation models were analysed, incorporating measurements for the take-off phase, flight phase and entry phase. Forty-six elite German swimmers (18 female and 28 male; age: 20.1 ± 4.2 yrs; PB (100 m Freestyle): 53.6 ± 2.9 s) participated in the study. Their swim start performance was examined within a 25-m sprint test. Structural equation modelling was conducted in separate models for the block time, flight time and water time and in a combined model for swim start time. Our main finding was that swim start time is predominantly related to water time and determined to a lesser extent by block time and flight time. We conclude that more emphasis should be given to the water immersion behaviour and the gliding phase when analysing swim start performance. Furthermore, significant differences were found between the grab start and track techniques as regards the biomechanical parameters representing the take-off phase and water phase. PMID:27239685

  10. Crossed molecular beam studies of atmospheric chemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingsong

    1993-04-01

    The dynamics of several elementary chemical reactions that are important in atmospheric chemistry are investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state chlorine or bromine atoms with ozone molecules and ground state chlorine atoms with nitrogen dioxide molecules is studied using a crossed molecular beams apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The Cl + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at four collision energies ranging from 6 kcal/mole to 32 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions show that the reaction has a direct reaction mechanism and that there is a strong repulsion on the exit channel. The ClO product is sideways and forward scattered with respect to the Cl atom, and the translational energy release is large. The Cl atom is most likely to attack the terminal oxygen atom of the ozone molecule. The Br + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at five collision energies ranging from 5 kcal/mole to 26 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions are quite similar to those in the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The Br + O{sub 3} reaction has a direct reaction mechanism similar to that of the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The electronic structure of the ozone molecule seems to play the central role in determining the reaction mechanism in atomic radical reactions with the ozone molecule. The Cl + NO{sub 2} {yields} ClO + NO reaction has been studied at three collision energies ranging from 10.6 kcal/mole to 22.4 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass angular distribution has some forward-backward symmetry, and the product translational energy release is quite large. The reaction proceeds through a short-lived complex whose lifetime is less than one rotational period. The experimental results seem to show that the Cl atom mainly attacks the oxygen atom instead of the nitrogen atom of the NO{sub 2} molecule.

  11. Energetics, Biomechanics, and Performance in Masters' Swimmers: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria I; Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário J; Neiva, Henrique P; Marinho, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Ferreira, MI, Barbosa, TM, Costa, MJ, Neiva, HP, and Marinho, DA. Energetics, biomechanics, and performance in masters' swimmers: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2069-2081, 2016-This study aimed to summarize evidence on masters' swimmers energetics, biomechanics, and performance gathered in selected studies. An expanded search was conducted on 6 databases, conference proceedings, and department files. Fifteen studies were selected for further analysis. A qualitative evaluation of the studies based on the Quality Index (QI) was performed by 2 independent reviewers. The studies were thereafter classified into 3 domains according to the reported data: performance (10 studies), energetics (4 studies), and biomechanics (6 studies). The selected 15 articles included in this review presented low QI scores (mean score, 10.47 points). The biomechanics domain obtained higher QI (11.5 points), followed by energetics and performance (10.6 and 9.9 points, respectively). Stroke frequency (SF) and stroke length (SL) were both influenced by aging, although SF is more affected than SL. Propelling efficiency (ηp) decreased with age. Swimming performance declined with age. The performance declines with age having male swimmers deliver better performances than female counterparts, although this difference tends to be narrow in long-distance events. One single longitudinal study is found in the literature reporting the changes in performance over time. The remaining studies are cross-sectional designs focusing on the energetics and biomechanics. Overall, biomechanics parameters, such as SF, SL, and ηp, tend to decrease with age. This review shows the lack of a solid body of knowledge (reflected in the amount and quality of the articles published) on the changes in biomechanics, energetics, and performance of master swimmers over time. The training programs for this age-group should aim to preserve the energetics as much as possible and, concurrently, improve the

  12. Energetics, Biomechanics, and Performance in Masters' Swimmers: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria I; Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário J; Neiva, Henrique P; Marinho, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Ferreira, MI, Barbosa, TM, Costa, MJ, Neiva, HP, and Marinho, DA. Energetics, biomechanics, and performance in masters' swimmers: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2069-2081, 2016-This study aimed to summarize evidence on masters' swimmers energetics, biomechanics, and performance gathered in selected studies. An expanded search was conducted on 6 databases, conference proceedings, and department files. Fifteen studies were selected for further analysis. A qualitative evaluation of the studies based on the Quality Index (QI) was performed by 2 independent reviewers. The studies were thereafter classified into 3 domains according to the reported data: performance (10 studies), energetics (4 studies), and biomechanics (6 studies). The selected 15 articles included in this review presented low QI scores (mean score, 10.47 points). The biomechanics domain obtained higher QI (11.5 points), followed by energetics and performance (10.6 and 9.9 points, respectively). Stroke frequency (SF) and stroke length (SL) were both influenced by aging, although SF is more affected than SL. Propelling efficiency (ηp) decreased with age. Swimming performance declined with age. The performance declines with age having male swimmers deliver better performances than female counterparts, although this difference tends to be narrow in long-distance events. One single longitudinal study is found in the literature reporting the changes in performance over time. The remaining studies are cross-sectional designs focusing on the energetics and biomechanics. Overall, biomechanics parameters, such as SF, SL, and ηp, tend to decrease with age. This review shows the lack of a solid body of knowledge (reflected in the amount and quality of the articles published) on the changes in biomechanics, energetics, and performance of master swimmers over time. The training programs for this age-group should aim to preserve the energetics as much as possible and, concurrently, improve the

  13. An irradiation facility with a horizontal beam for radiobiological studies.

    PubMed

    Czub, J; Banas, D; Braziewicz, J; Choinski, J; Jaskóla, M; Korman, A; Szeflinski, Z; Wójcik, A

    2006-01-01

    A facility with a horizontal beam for radiobiological experiments with heavy ions has been designed and constructed at the Heavy Ion Laboratory in Warsaw University. The facility is optimal to investigate the radiobiological effects of charged heavy particles on a cellular or molecular level as in the region of the Bragg peak.

  14. Experimental and numerical study of high intensity argon cluster beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korobeishchikov, N. G.; Kalyada, V. V.; Shmakov, A. A.; Zarvin, A. E.; Skovorodko, P. A.

    2014-12-09

    Experimental and numerical investigations of expansion of argon with homogeneous condensation in supersonic conical nozzle and in free jet behind it were carried out. Optimal parameters (stagnation pressure, nozzle-skimmer distance) for the formation of cluster beam with maximum intensity were determined. Two available models for nonequilibrium nucleation were tested. The numerical results are in satisfactory agreement with the measured data.

  15. The Biomechanical Implications of Obesity in K-12 Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmeyer, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Few biomechanical studies have examined obese individuals as primary subjects. However, some mechanical differences have been identified between overweight or obese individuals and nonoverweight movers. It is not clear how obesity affects the onset of osteoarthritis, for example, but it is evident that obesity does place significant limitations on…

  16. Comparing handrim biomechanics for treadmill and overground wheelchair propulsion

    PubMed Central

    Kwarciak, Andrew M.; Turner, Jeffrey T.; Guo, Liyun; Richter, W. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Study design Cross-sectional study. Objectives To compare handrim biomechanics recorded during overground propulsion to those recorded during propulsion on a motor-driven treadmill. Setting Biomechanics laboratory. Methods Twenty-eight manual wheelchair users propelled their own wheelchairs, at a self-selected speed, on a low-pile carpet and on a wheelchair accessible treadmill. Handrim biomechanics were recorded with an OptiPush instrumented wheelchair wheel. Results Across the two conditions, all handrim biomechanics were found to be similar and highly correlated (r > 0.85). Contact angle, peak force, average force, and peak axle moment differed by 1.6% or less across the two conditions. While not significant, power output and cadence tended to be slightly higher for the treadmill condition (3.5% and 3.6%, respectively), due to limitations in adjusting the treadmill grade. Conclusion Based on the results of this study, a motor-driven treadmill can serve as a valid surrogate for overground studies of wheelchair propulsion. PMID:21042332

  17. Qualitative biomechanical principles for application in coaching.

    PubMed

    Knudson, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aspects of human movements in sport can be readily understood by Newtonian rigid-body mechanics. Many of these laws and biomechanical principles, however, are counterintuitive to a lot of people. There are also several problems in the application of biomechanics to sports, so the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport skills by many coaches has been limited. Biomechanics scholars have long been interested in developing principles that facilitate the qualitative application of biomechanics to improve movement performance and reduce the risk of injury. This paper summarizes the major North American efforts to establish a set of general biomechanical principles of movement, and illustrates how principles can be used to improve the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport technique. A coach helping a player with a tennis serve is presented as an example. The standardization of terminology for biomechanical principles is proposed as an important first step in improving the application ofbiomechanics in sport. There is also a need for international cooperation and research on the effectiveness of applying biomechanical principles in the coaching of sport techniques. PMID:17542182

  18. Integrative Structural Biomechanical Concepts of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Nair, Kalyani; Andonian, Brian J.; Prus, Kristina M.; Kelly, Joseph; Sanchez, Jose R.; Henderson, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is not fully explained by inflammatory processes. Clinical, epidemiological, genetic, and course of disease features indicate additional host-related risk processes and predispositions. Collectively, the pattern of predisposition to onset in adolescent and young adult ages, male preponderance, and widely varied severity of AS is unique among rheumatic diseases. However, this pattern could reflect biomechanical and structural differences between the sexes, naturally occurring musculoskeletal changes over life cycles, and a population polymorphism. During juvenile development, the body is more flexible and weaker than during adolescent maturation and young adulthood, when strengthening and stiffening considerably increase. During middle and later ages, the musculoskeletal system again weakens. The novel concept of an innate axial myofascial hypertonicity reflects basic mechanobiological principles in human function, tissue reactivity, and pathology. However, these processes have been little studied and require critical testing. The proposed physical mechanisms likely interact with recognized immunobiological pathways. The structural biomechanical processes and tissue reactions might possibly precede initiation of other AS-related pathways. Research in the combined structural mechanobiology and immunobiology processes promises to improve understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of AS than prevailing concepts. The combined processes might better explain characteristic enthesopathic and inflammatory processes in AS. PMID:22216409

  19. Integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löberg, Johanna; Mattisson, Ingela; Ahlberg, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce the need for animal studies in dental implant applications, a new model has been developed which combines well-known surface characterization methods with theoretical biomechanical calculations. The model has been named integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC), and gives a comprehensive description of the surface topography and the ability of the surface to induce retention strength with bone. IBTSC comprises determination of 3D-surface roughness parameters by using 3D-scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and calculation of the ability of different surface topographies to induce retention strength in bone by using the local model. Inherent in this integrated approach is the use of a length scale analysis, which makes it possible to separate different size levels of surface features. The IBTSC concept is tested on surfaces with different level of hierarchy, induced by mechanical as well as chemical treatment. Sequential treatment with oxalic and hydrofluoric acid results in precipitated nano-sized features that increase the surface roughness and the surface slope on the sub-micro and nano levels. This surface shows the highest calculated shear strength using the local model. The validity, robustness and applicability of the IBTSC concept are demonstrated and discussed.

  20. Beam studies at the SPEAR3 synchrotron using a digital optical mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. D.; Fiorito, R. B.; Corbett, J.; Shkvarunets, A. G.; Tian, K.; Fisher, A.

    2016-05-01

    The 3GeV SPEAR3 synchrotron light source operates in top-up injection mode with up to 500 mA circulating in the storage ring (equivalently 392 nC). Each injection pulse contains 40-80 pC producing a contrast ratio between total stored charge and injected charge of about 6500:1. In order to study transient injected beam dynamics during user operations, it is desirable to optically image the injected pulse in the presence of the bright stored beam. In the present work this is done by imaging the visible component of the synchrotron radiation onto a digital micro-mirror-array device (DMD), which is then used as an optical mask to block out light from the bright central core of the stored beam. The physical masking, together with an asynchronously-gated, ICCD imaging camera, makes it possible to observe the weak injected beam component on a turn-by-turn basis. The DMD optical masking system works similar to a classical solar coronagraph but has some distinct practical advantages: i.e. rapid adaption to changes in the shape of the stored beam, a high extinction ratio for unwanted light and minimum scattering from the primary beam into the secondary optics. In this paper we describe the DMD masking method, features of the high dynamic range point spread function for the SPEAR3 optical beam line and measurements of the injected beam in the presence of the stored beam.

  1. COMPUTATIONAL BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR IMPROVING THE RING INJECTION AND EXTRACTION SYSTEMS IN SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Plum, Michael A; Wang, Jian-Guang

    2008-01-01

    The ring injection and extraction systems must function as designed in order for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to achieve its specified performance. In commissioning and early operations we have encountered problems that have been traced to these systems. We experienced high beam losses in and around the injection dump, the rectification of which has necessitated ongoing study and development by a multidisciplinary team. Results already include a number of enhancements of existing features and the addition of new elements and diagnostics. The problem in the extraction region stems from tilted beam distributions observed in the ring-to-target beam transport line (RTBT) and on the target, thus complicating the control of the beam-on-target distribution. This indicates the inadvertent introduction of x-y beam coupling somewhere upstream of the RTBT. The present paper describes computational studies, using the ORBIT Code, addressed at the detailed understanding and solution of these problems.

  2. Metric for the measurement of the quality of complex beams: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Kaim, Sergiy; Lumeau, Julien; Smirnov, Vadim; Zeldovich, Boris; Glebov, Leonid

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of various definitions of laser beam width in a given cross section. Quality of the beam is characterized by dimensionless beam propagation products (BPPs) Δx·Δθ(x)/λ, which are different for the 21 definitions presented, but are close to 1. Six particular beams are studied in detail. In the process, we had to review the properties for the Fourier transform of various modifications and the relationships between them: physical Fourier transform (PFT), mathematical Fourier transform (MFT), and discrete Fourier transform (DFT). We found an axially symmetric self-MFT function, which may be useful for descriptions of diffraction-quality beams. In the appendices, we illustrate the thesis "the Fourier transform lives on the singularities of the original." PMID:26366763

  3. Electron-beam studies of Schottky-barrier detector surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckerar, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the surface anomalies occurring in Schottky-barrier particle detectors identifiable by means of an electron beam technique employed by Czaja (1965) for analyzing defects in diode structures. The technique is shown to make possible the detection and identification of the following anomalies: (1) chemical contamination of the detector surface; (2) mechanical damage of the wafer substrates; (3) damage introduced in semiconductor surface preparation; (4) radiation damage; and (5) defective surface metallization.

  4. A review of studies on ion thruster beam and charge-exchange plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Various experimental and analytical studies of the primary beam and charge-exchange plasmas of ion thrusters are reviewed. The history of plasma beam research is recounted, emphasizing experiments on beam neutralization, expansion of the beam, and determination of beam parameters such as electron temperature, plasma density, and plasma potential. The development of modern electron bombardment ion thrusters is treated, detailing experimental results. Studies on charge-exchange plasma are discussed, showing results such as the relationship between neutralizer emission current and plasma beam potential, ion energies as a function of neutralizer bias, charge-exchange ion current collected by an axially moving Faraday cup-RPA for 8-cm and 30-cm ion thrusters, beam density and potential data from a 15-cm ion thruster, and charge-exchange ion flow around a 30-cm thruster. A 20-cm thruster electrical configuration is depicted and facility effects are discussed. Finally, plasma modeling is covered in detail for plasma beam and charge-exchange plasma.

  5. Biomechanical properties of the atlantoaxial joint with naturally-occurring instability in a toy breed dog. A comparative descriptive cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Forterre, F; Precht, C; Riedinger, B; Bürki, A

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of the atlanto-axial joint in a young Yorkshire Terrier dog with spontaneous atlantoaxial instability were compared to those of another young toy breed dog with a healthy atlantoaxial joint. The range-of-motion was increased in flexion and lateral bending in the unstable joint. In addition, lateral bending led to torsion and dorsal dislocation of the axis within the atlas. On gross examination, the dens ligaments were absent and a longitudinal tear of the tectorial membrane was observed. These findings suggest that both ventral and lateral flexion may lead to severe spinal cord compression, and that the tectorial membrane may play a protective role in some cases of atlantoaxial instability.

  6. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-01

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, (α, p) reactions, and other types of measurements (β-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7Li+α/7Be+α resonant scatterings are presented.

  7. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha}, p) reactions, and other types of measurements ({beta}-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Li+{alpha}/{sup 7}Be+{alpha} resonant scatterings are presented.

  8. Studies on Nuclear Astrophysics and Exotic Structure at the Low-Energy RI Beam Facility CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kubono, S.; Cherubini, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Gulino, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Torresi, D.; Lee, P. S.; Lee, C. S.; Komatsubara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Okoda, Y.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; La Commara, M.; Strano, E.; Boiano, C.; Boiano, A.; Manea, C.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Miyatake, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Yan, L.; Yang, Y. Y.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, resonant structure, and nuclear reaction are going on at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), a low-energy RI beam separator operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Two major methods used at CRIB to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical relevance are the resonant scattering, and direct measurements of (α,p) reactions using a thick-gas target. Several experiments for decay measurements and reaction mechanism are also performed using low-energy RI beams at CRIB. Some of the results from recent experiments at CRIB are discussed.

  9. Theoretical and experimental study on the transverse vibration properties of an axially moving nested cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ying-Chang; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jing-Quan; Liu, Ya-Wen; Shao, Fei

    2014-06-01

    An axially moving nested cantilever beam is a type of time-varying nonlinear system that can be regarded as a cantilever stepped beam. The transverse vibration equation for the axially moving nested cantilever beam with a tip mass is derived by D'Alembert's principle, and the modified Galerkin's method is used to solve the partial differential equation. The theoretical model is modified by adjusting the theoretical beam length with the measured results of its first-order vibration frequencies under various beam lengths. It is determined that the length correction value of the second segment of the nested beam increases as the structural length increases, but the corresponding increase in the amplitude becomes smaller. The first-order decay coefficients are identified by the logarithmic decrement method, and the decay coefficient of the beam decreases with an increase in the cantilever length. The calculated responses of the modified model agree well with the experimental results, which verifies the correctness of the proposed calculation model and indicates the effectiveness of the methods of length correction and damping determination. Further studies on non-damping free vibration properties of the axially moving nested cantilever beam during extension and retraction are investigated in the present paper. Furthermore, the extension movement of the beam leads the vibration displacement to increase gradually, and the instantaneous vibration frequency and the vibration speed decrease constantly. Moreover, as the total mechanical energy becomes smaller, the extension movement of the nested beam remains stable. The characteristics for the retraction movement of the beam are the reverse.

  10. Nonlinear beam dynamics studies at Indiana University. Final report, August 1, 1993--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1998-03-31

    During the three-year funding period the author`s achievements can be summarized as follows: (1) The author has systematically studied the effect of phase modulation on bunch distribution. (2) The author has found that a frequently observed proton beam instability when the velocity of cooling electrons differs from that of protons is due to Hopf bifurcation. The equilibrium proton beam distribution becomes a limiting cycle attractor. This technique can be used to measure the temperature of cooling electrons. (3) The author has studied mechanisms of controlled bunch dilution. Evolution of beam bunch profile is measured while the beam is perturbed by the modulation of a secondary rf system. The experimental data reveal that mean square bunch length {sigma}{sup 2}(t) exhibits two characteristic time scales. He finds that overlapping parametric resonances plays an important role in beam diffusion. (4) He has studied the effects of global chaos on the halo formation of space charge dominated beams. He has analyzed the halo produced by a modulating mismatched space charge dominated beam in a uniform focusing channel. He found that the halo formation is determined by a single scaling parameter, the space charge perveance parameter divided by the phase advance per unit length. The condition of global chaos can thus be predicted. In June 1994, Indiana University has served as the host of the USPAS (United States Particle Accelerator School). In July 1994, IUCF has also served as the host site of the workshop on the future direction of hadron facilities. In October 1994, the author organized a successful workshop on space charge dominated beams and application of high brightness beams. During this period of this funding, he has had many visitors from SSC, SLAC, Fermilab, and Brookhaven National Laboratory. He has carried out many nonlinear beam dynamics experiments at the IUCF Cooler Ring. He has published about 30 refereed journal papers related to this project. These

  11. Beam tracking strategies for studies of kinetic scales in the solar wind with THOR-CSW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keyser, Johan; Lavraud, Benoit; Neefs, Eddy; Berkenbosch, Sophie; Anciaux, Michel; Maggiolo, Romain

    2016-04-01

    Modern plasma spectrometers for monitoring the solar wind attempt to intelligently track the energy and direction of the solar wind beam in order to obtain solar wind velocity distributions more efficiently. Such beam tracking strategies offer some benefits, but also have their limitations and drawbacks. Benefits include an improved resolution and/or a faster velocity distribution function acquisition time. Limitations are due to instrument characteristics that tend to be optimized for a particular range of particle energies and arrival directions. A drawback is the risk to miss an important part of the velocity distribution or to lose track of the beam altogether. A comparison is presented of different beam tracking strategies under consideration for the THOR-CSW instrument in order to highlight a number of design decisions and their impact on the acquired velocity distributions. The gain offered by beam tracking in terms of increased time resolution turns out to be essential for studies of solar wind physics at kinetic scales.

  12. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  13. How to Assess the Biomechanical Risk Levels in Beekeeping.

    PubMed

    Maina, G; Rossi, F; Baracco, A

    2016-01-01

    Beekeepers are at particular risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders, but many of the studies lack detailed exposure assessment. To evaluate the biomechanical overload exposure in a specific farming activity, a multitasking model has been developed through the characterization of 37 basic operational tasks typical of the beekeeping activity. The Occupational Repetitive Actions (OCRA) Checklist and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Lifting Index methodologies have been applied to these elementary tasks to evaluate the exposure, and the resulting risk indices have been time-weighted averaged. Finally, an easy access, computer-assisted toolkit has been developed to help the beekeepers in the biomechanical risk assessment process. The risk of biomechanical overload for the upper limbs ranges from acceptable (maintenance and recovery of woody material and honey packaging with dosing machine tasks) to high (distribution of the top supers) risk level. The risk for back injury is always borderline in women and increases with exposure time, whereas it ranges from acceptable to borderline in men. The definition of the biomechanical risk levels allows for planning of corrective actions aimed at preventing and reducing the risk of musculoskeletal disorders through engineering, administrative, and behavioral interventions. The methodology can be used for risk assessment in other mainly manual agricultural activities. PMID:26765780

  14. How to Assess the Biomechanical Risk Levels in Beekeeping.

    PubMed

    Maina, G; Rossi, F; Baracco, A

    2016-01-01

    Beekeepers are at particular risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders, but many of the studies lack detailed exposure assessment. To evaluate the biomechanical overload exposure in a specific farming activity, a multitasking model has been developed through the characterization of 37 basic operational tasks typical of the beekeeping activity. The Occupational Repetitive Actions (OCRA) Checklist and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Lifting Index methodologies have been applied to these elementary tasks to evaluate the exposure, and the resulting risk indices have been time-weighted averaged. Finally, an easy access, computer-assisted toolkit has been developed to help the beekeepers in the biomechanical risk assessment process. The risk of biomechanical overload for the upper limbs ranges from acceptable (maintenance and recovery of woody material and honey packaging with dosing machine tasks) to high (distribution of the top supers) risk level. The risk for back injury is always borderline in women and increases with exposure time, whereas it ranges from acceptable to borderline in men. The definition of the biomechanical risk levels allows for planning of corrective actions aimed at preventing and reducing the risk of musculoskeletal disorders through engineering, administrative, and behavioral interventions. The methodology can be used for risk assessment in other mainly manual agricultural activities.

  15. Unified Approach to the Biomechanics of Dental Implantology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenoble, D. E.; Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    The human need for safe and effective dental implants is well-recognized. Although many implant designs have been tested and are in use today, a large number have resulted in clinical failure. These failures appear to be due to biomechanical effects, as well as biocompatibility and surgical factors. A unified approach is proposed using multidisciplinary systems technology, for the study of the biomechanical interactions between dental implants and host tissues. The approach progresses from biomechanical modeling and analysis, supported by experimental investigations, through implant design development, clinical verification, and education of the dental practitioner. The result of the biomechanical modeling, analysis, and experimental phases would be the development of scientific design criteria for implants. Implant designs meeting these criteria would be generated, fabricated, and tested in animals. After design acceptance, these implants would be tested in humans, using efficient and safe surgical and restorative procedures. Finally, educational media and instructional courses would be developed for training dental practitioners in the use of the resulting implants.

  16. Suitability of Thiel embalmed tendons for biomechanical investigation.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Frey, Kevin; Schweizer, Andreas; Calcagni, Maurizio; Ullrich, Oliver; Snedeker, Jess G

    2011-05-01

    The standard post-mortem storage method for biomechanical testing is freezing. Freezing minimally alters the biomechanical characteristics of tendons but only suspends the process of decay. Chemical fixation arrests decay and overcomes risk of infection, but alters the biomechanical properties of tendons. On the other hand, Thiel preservation has been reported to maintain soft tissue consistency similar to that of living tissue. The current study investigates the effects of Thiel embalming on human digitorum profundus tendons (FDP) from fresh-frozen and Thiel embalmed cadavers. Cross-sectional area was measured at pre-load, samples were preconditioned and then ramped at a constant strain-rate to failure. Thiel preserved tendons had statistically lower failure stress with median of 38MPa compared to fresh frozen samples with median of 60MPa (p-value=0.048) and trended to a decreased tangential modulus. To overcome limited donor number and masking factors of age, gender, and time embalmed, we also performed experiments in rat tail tendon fascicle. Similar quasi-static ramp to failure tests were performed with control and Thiel treated sample pairs. Similar differences were observed to those found as in human FDP, however these trends were statistically significant. In both tendons, Thiel preserved samples demonstrated altered failure characteristics, indicating a different collagen fiber/collagen network failure mechanism most likely due to partial denaturing by boric acid in Thiel solution. In conclusion, Thiel embalmed tendons did not faithfully represent the biomechanical characteristics of fresh frozen tendons.

  17. Biomechanical design considerations for transradial prosthetic interface: A review.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yuanjun; Li, Xiang; Luo, Yun

    2016-03-01

    Traditional function and comfort assessment of transradial prostheses pay scant attention to prosthetic interface. With better understanding of the biomechanics of prosthetic interface comes better efficiency and safety for interface design; in this way, amputees are more likely to accept prosthetic usage. This review attempts to provide design and selection criteria of transradial interface for prosthetists and clinicians. Various transradial socket types in the literature were chronologically reviewed. Biomechanical discussion of transradial prosthetic interface design from an engineering point of view was also done. Suspension control, range of motion, stability, as well as comfort and safety of socket designs have been considered in varying degrees in the literature. The human-machine interface design should change from traditional "socket design" to new "interface design." From anatomy and physiology to biomechanics of the transradial residual limb, the force and motion transfer, together with comfort and safety, are the two main aspects in prosthetic interface design. Load distribution and transmission should mainly rely on achieving additional skeletal control through targeted soft tissue relief. Biomechanics of the residual limb soft tissues should be studied to find the relationship between mechanical properties and the comfort and safety of soft tissues.

  18. Study of nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and intermediate cavities in a relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Li, Z. H.; Tang, C. X.

    2012-07-15

    In intermediate cavities of a relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) driven by intense relativistic electron beam, the equivalent circuit model, which is widely adopted to investigate the interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a conventional klystron design, is invalid due to the high gap voltage and the nonlinear beam loading in a RKA. According to Maxwell equations and Lorentz equation, the self-consistent equations for beam-wave interaction in the intermediate cavity are introduced to study the nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a RKA. Based on the equations, the effects of modulation depth and modulation frequency of the beam on the gap voltage amplitude and its phase are obtained. It is shown that the gap voltage is significantly lower than that estimated by the equivalent circuit model when the beam modulation is high. And the bandwidth becomes wider as the beam modulation depth increases. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier is designed based on the result. And the corresponding experiment is carried out on the linear transformer driver accelerator. The peak output power has achieved 1.2 GW with an efficiency of 28.6% and a gain of 46 dB in the corresponding experiment.

  19. Exploring the biomechanics of taurodontism.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Stefano; Nguyen, Huynh N; Kullmer, Ottmar; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Taurodontism (i.e. enlarged pulp chamber with concomitant apical displacement of the root bi/trifurcation) is considered a dental anomaly with relatively low incidence in contemporary societies, but it represents a typical trait frequently found in Neandertal teeth. Four hypotheses can be envisioned to explain the high frequency in Neandertals: adaptation to a specific occlusal loading regime (biomechanical advantage), adaptation to a high attrition diet, pleiotropic or genetic drift effects. In this contribution we used finite element analysis (FEA) and advanced loading concepts based on macrowear information to evaluate whether taurodontism supplies some dental biomechanical advantages. Loads were applied to the digital model of the lower right first molar (RM1 ) of the Neandertal specimen Le Moustier 1, as well as to the digital models of both a shortened and a hyper-taurodontic version of Le Moustier RM1 . Moreover, we simulated a scenario where an object is held between teeth and pulled in different directions to investigate whether taurodontism might be useful for para-masticatory activities. Our results do not show any meaningful difference among all the simulations, pointing out that taurodontism does not improve the functional biomechanics of the tooth and does not favour para-masticatory pulling activities. Therefore, taurodontism should be considered either an adaptation to a high attrition diet or most likely the result of pleiotropic or genetic drift effects. Finally, our results have important implications for modern dentistry during endodontic treatments, as we observed that filling the pulp chamber with dentine-like material increases tooth stiffness, and ultimately tensile stresses in the crown, thus favouring tooth failure.

  20. Applied Biomechanics in an Instructional Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics is the science of how people move better, meaning more skillfully and more safely. This article places more emphasis on skill rather than safety, though there are many parallels between them. It shares a few features of the author's paradigm of applied biomechanics and discusses an integrated approach toward a middle school football…