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Sample records for beam biomechanical study

  1. Biomechanics or Necromechanics? Or How to Interpret Biomechanical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    The field of biomechanics is inextricably linked with orthopaedic surgery: loads and load distribution play a major role in the problems we treat and in the success and failure of many of our treatments. Nonetheless, despite powerful investigational tools, I would argue biomechanics has made a relatively minor impact in clinical practice primarily because most studies fail to account for the major distinction between living and nonliving systems: adaptability. While any study requires a clear question or hypothesis or goal, without accounting for adaptability and tissue tolerance, these studies might well be termed "necromechanical." These studies will always have limited clinical relevance unless they contain several key features: 1.) A choice of a mechanical parameter which is arguably a surrogate for relevant biological behavior; 2.) A set of loading regimens which arguably represent the entire range of loadings experienced in vivo; 3.) An explicit discussion of tissue tolerance to the mechanical perturbations of the study; 4.) When appropriate (i.e., the question relates to longer-term effects), an explicit exploration of tissue adaptation over time. Without meeting these requirements, any biomechanical study is suspect and requires interpretation with great caution. When meeting these requirements, biomechanics can provide powerful tools to explain the function of the body and to predict the success or failure of treatments prior to using them on patients. PMID:12180603

  2. A biomechanical approach for in vivo lung tumor motion prediction during external beam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Elham; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2015-03-01

    Lung Cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. Among various treatment methods currently being used in the clinic, External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) is used widely not only as the primary treatment method, but also in combination with chemotherapy and surgery. However, this method may lack desirable dosimetric accuracy because of respiration induced tumor motion. Recently, biomechanical modeling of the respiratory system has become a popular approach for tumor motion prediction and compensation. This approach requires reasonably accurate data pertaining to thoracic pressure variation, diaphragm position and biomechanical properties of the lung tissue in order to predict the lung tissue deformation and tumor motion. In this paper, we present preliminary results of an in vivo study obtained from a Finite Element Model (FEM) of the lung developed to predict tumor motion during respiration.

  3. Biomechanics of Distance Running: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.; Gregor, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Training for distance running over a long period produces meaningful changes in the running mechanics of experienced runners, as revealed in this longitudinal study of the biomechanical components of stride length, stride rate, stride time, and support and nonsupport time. (MB)

  4. Biomechanics of Distance Running: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.; Gregor, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Training for distance running over a long period produces meaningful changes in the running mechanics of experienced runners, as revealed in this longitudinal study of the biomechanical components of stride length, stride rate, stride time, and support and nonsupport time. (MB)

  5. Biomechanical and Histological Evaluation of Roughened Surface Titanium Screws Fabricated by Electron Beam Melting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Cai, Hong; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Ke; Leng, Huijie; Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, Zhongjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Various fabrication methods are used to improve the stability and osseointegration of screws within the host bone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting can provide better stability and osseointegration as compared with smooth titanium screws in sheep cervical vertebrae. Methods Roughened surface titanium screws, fabricated by electron beam melting, and conventional smooth surface titanium screws were implanted into sheep for 6 or 12 weeks (groups A and B, respectively). Bone ingrowth and implant stability were assessed with three-dimensional imaging and reconstruction, as well as histological and biomechanical tests. Results No screws in either group showed signs of loosening. Fibrous tissue formation could be seen around the screws at 6 weeks, which was replaced with bone at 12 weeks. Bone volume/total volume, bone surface area/bone volume, and the trabecular number were significantly higher for a define region of interest surrounding the roughened screws than that surrounding the smooth screws at 12 weeks. Indeed, for roughened screws, trabecular number was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks. On mechanical testing, the maximum pullout strength was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks, as expected; however, no significant differences were found between smooth and roughened screws at either time point. The maximum torque to extract the roughened screws was higher than that required for the smooth screws. Conclusions Electron beam melting is a simple and effective method for producing a roughened surface on titanium screws. After 12 weeks, roughened titanium screws demonstrated a high degree of osseointegration and increased torsional resistance to extraction over smooth titanium screws. PMID:24788866

  6. Biomechanical and histological evaluation of roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Cai, Hong; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Ke; Leng, Huijie; Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, Zhongjun

    2014-01-01

    Various fabrication methods are used to improve the stability and osseointegration of screws within the host bone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting can provide better stability and osseointegration as compared with smooth titanium screws in sheep cervical vertebrae. Roughened surface titanium screws, fabricated by electron beam melting, and conventional smooth surface titanium screws were implanted into sheep for 6 or 12 weeks (groups A and B, respectively). Bone ingrowth and implant stability were assessed with three-dimensional imaging and reconstruction, as well as histological and biomechanical tests. No screws in either group showed signs of loosening. Fibrous tissue formation could be seen around the screws at 6 weeks, which was replaced with bone at 12 weeks. Bone volume/total volume, bone surface area/bone volume, and the trabecular number were significantly higher for a define region of interest surrounding the roughened screws than that surrounding the smooth screws at 12 weeks. Indeed, for roughened screws, trabecular number was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks. On mechanical testing, the maximum pullout strength was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks, as expected; however, no significant differences were found between smooth and roughened screws at either time point. The maximum torque to extract the roughened screws was higher than that required for the smooth screws. Electron beam melting is a simple and effective method for producing a roughened surface on titanium screws. After 12 weeks, roughened titanium screws demonstrated a high degree of osseointegration and increased torsional resistance to extraction over smooth titanium screws.

  7. Braided cerclage wires: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Ely L; Shavit, Ronen

    2011-04-01

    One of the drawbacks that makes many surgeons reluctant to use cerclage wires is the risk of periosteal vascular compromise. A new, easily applied braided wire configuration has been developed to improve mechanical wire gripping and to decrease the contact area between the hardware and the bony surface. Braided wires with two diameters (1 mm and 1.5 mm) were compared to single strand and double-strand wire configurations. The biomechanical properties, peak and elongation loads,and wire pressure imprint points of this new configuration were evaluated in the current study. The braided wire was found to have the same peak load as the double-strand wire (P = 0.315) and more than twice the peak load than the single-strand wire (P = 0.0001), but a much shorter elongation peak than the other two. The imprint test showed that the braided wire has an interrupted dotted pattern compared to the continuous circular one that characterises the single-strand and double strand wires, indicating less potential damage to the bone. The braided cerclage wire may decrease the extent of insult to the bone by decreasing the contact area between the hardware and the bony surface and by enhancing stability by reducing the elongation peak, affording increased fracture fixation stability. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Restoring Segmental Biomechanics Through Nucleus Augmentation: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Matthew H; Cohen, Charles S; Ducheyne, Paul; Walsh, William R

    2016-12-01

    In vitro biomechanical laboratory study. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a mechanical treatment to create a degenerative motion segment and the ability of nucleus augmentation to restore biomechanics. In cases with an intact annulus fibrosus, the replacement or augmentation of the nucleus pulposus alone may provide a less invasive option to restore normal biomechanics and disk height when compared with spinal fusion or total disk replacement. Laboratory testing allows these changes to be fully characterized. However, without preexisting pathology, nucleus augmentation therapies are difficult to evaluate in vitro. The present study evaluated pure moment bending and compressive biomechanics in 3 states (n=6): (1) intact, (2) after creep loading and nucleus disruption to induce degenerative biomechanical changes, and (3) after nucleus augmentation through an injectable polymer (DiscCell). Neutral zone and ROM were increased in all modes of bending after the degenerative treatment. The most sensitive mode of bending was lateral bending, with intact ROM (20.0±2.9 degrees) increased to 22.3±2.6 degrees after degenerative treatment and reduced to 18.4±1.6 degrees after injection of the polymer. All bending ROM and NZ changes induced by the degenerative treatment were reversed by nucleus augmentation. This material was shown to be effective at altering motion segment biomechanics and restoring disk height during time zero tests. This technique may provide a model to examine the time zero performance of a nucleus augmentation device/material.

  9. Verification, validation and sensitivity studies in computational biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Andrew E; Ellis, Benjamin J; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2007-06-01

    Computational techniques and software for the analysis of problems in mechanics have naturally moved from their origins in the traditional engineering disciplines to the study of cell, tissue and organ biomechanics. Increasingly complex models have been developed to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of such biological systems. While the availability of advanced computational tools has led to exciting research advances in the field, the utility of these models is often the subject of criticism due to inadequate model verification and validation (V&V). The objective of this review is to present the concepts of verification, validation and sensitivity studies with regard to the construction, analysis and interpretation of models in computational biomechanics. Specific examples from the field are discussed. It is hoped that this review will serve as a guide to the use of V&V principles in the field of computational biomechanics, thereby improving the peer acceptance of studies that use computational modeling techniques.

  10. Verification, Validation and Sensitivity Studies in Computational Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational techniques and software for the analysis of problems in mechanics have naturally moved from their origins in the traditional engineering disciplines to the study of cell, tissue and organ biomechanics. Increasingly complex models have been developed to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of such biological systems. While the availability of advanced computational tools has led to exciting research advances in the field, the utility of these models is often the subject of criticism due to inadequate model verification and validation. The objective of this review is to present the concepts of verification, validation and sensitivity studies with regard to the construction, analysis and interpretation of models in computational biomechanics. Specific examples from the field are discussed. It is hoped that this review will serve as a guide to the use of verification and validation principles in the field of computational biomechanics, thereby improving the peer acceptance of studies that use computational modeling techniques. PMID:17558646

  11. Biomechanical research on bowed string musicians: a scoping study.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Leila K; Campbell, Kody R; Dickey, James P

    2013-12-01

    Performing arts biomechanics is concerned with quantifying the musculoskeletal demands of artistic tasks. The growing body of related research has prompted this scoping study, solely focused on quantitative research, to summarize the state of the science, identify knowledge gaps, and identify opportunities for future research. To identify, summarize, and categorize quantitative research on the biomechanics of violin, viola, cello, and double bass players, using scoping study methodology. Established scoping study methodology was used to identify and categorize existing research. We identified 74 articles for review. Of these, 34 met our scoping study criteria and were included in this study. Twenty-one of the 34 articles that met the scoping criteria were published since 2000. Investigations using electromyography (16 studies) and kinematics (15 studies) comprise the bulk of the research. Two studies employed force transducers for data collection. Violinists were the most frequently studied musicians (22 studies) and double bass players were the least (1 study). Fewer than half of the studies used solely professional musicians as their subjects (13 studies). This scoping study confirmed that quantitative biomechanical research into bowed string musicians has been performed with increasing frequency and that there are voids in the research, particularly in investigating mechanisms of injury and protective strategies. Currently, arts biomechanics research is largely descriptive in nature. There are few studies that investigate protective strategies, although it is expected that the field will progress to incorporate this type of research.

  12. Use of electronic speckle pattern interferometry to study the biomechanics of human bone and prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heras-Palov, Carlos; Tyrer, John R.; Petzing, Jon N.; Stoyle, Tom F.; Gregg, P. J.

    1995-02-01

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) is a laser based technique developed for the study of stresses and strains in complex structures. This method consists of the projection of two laser beams onto the object of study. This produces a visible pattern that is recorded by a video camera. When the structure is stressed in a jig, the pattern changes depending on the in- plane and out-of-plane deformation and movement of the surface observed. This allows us to qualify and quantify strain in the whole area under study, in real time. We describe the method of application of ESPI to the study of the biomechanics of the proximal femur, before and after the implantation of the femoral component of a total hip replacement in cadaveric femora, under physiological loads and tensions, and report our preliminary results. The information obtained with this technique should provide a better understanding of the biomechanics of bone after joint replacement.

  13. Using Clinical Gait Case Studies to Enhance Learning in Biomechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Clinical case studies facilitate the development of clinical reasoning strategies through knowledge and integration of the basic sciences. Case studies have been shown to be more effective in developing problem-solving abilities than the traditional lecture format. To enhance the learning experiences of students in biomechanics, clinical case…

  14. Using Clinical Gait Case Studies to Enhance Learning in Biomechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Clinical case studies facilitate the development of clinical reasoning strategies through knowledge and integration of the basic sciences. Case studies have been shown to be more effective in developing problem-solving abilities than the traditional lecture format. To enhance the learning experiences of students in biomechanics, clinical case…

  15. Ion Beam Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Ion Beam Propulsion Study was a joint high-level study between the Applied Physics Laboratory operated by NASA and ASRC Aerospace at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Berkeley Scientific, Berkeley, California. The results were promising and suggested that work should continue if future funding becomes available. The application of ion thrusters for spacecraft propulsion is limited to quite modest ion sources with similarly modest ion beam parameters because of the mass penalty associated with the ion source and its power supply system. Also, the ion source technology has not been able to provide very high-power ion beams. Small ion beam propulsion systems were used with considerable success. Ion propulsion systems brought into practice use an onboard ion source to form an energetic ion beam, typically Xe+ ions, as the propellant. Such systems were used for steering and correction of telecommunication satellites and as the main thruster for the Deep Space 1 demonstration mission. In recent years, "giant" ion sources were developed for the controlled-fusion research effort worldwide, with beam parameters many orders of magnitude greater than the tiny ones of conventional space thruster application. The advent of such huge ion beam sources and the need for advanced propulsion systems for exploration of the solar system suggest a fresh look at ion beam propulsion, now with the giant fusion sources in mind.

  16. Poor relation between biomechanical and clinical studies for the proximal femoral locking compression plate.

    PubMed

    Viberg, Bjarke; Rasmussen, Katrine M V; Overgaard, Søren; Rogmark, Cecilia

    2017-08-01

    Background and purpose - The proximal femur locking compression plate (PF-LCP) is a new concept in the treatment of hip fractures. When releasing new implants onto the market, biomechanical studies are conducted to evaluate performance of the implant. We investigated the relation between biomechanical and clinical studies on PF-LCP. Methods - A systematic literature search of relevant biomechanical and clinical studies was conducted in PubMed on December 1, 2015. 7 biomechanical studies and 15 clinical studies were included. Results - Even though the biomechanical studies showed equivalent or higher failure loads for femoral neck fracture, the clinical results were far worse, with a 37% complication rate. There were no biomechanical studies on pertrochanteric fractures. Biomechanical studies on subtrochanteric fractures showed that PF-LCP had a lower failure load than with proximal femoral nail, but higher than with angled blade plate. 4 clinical studies had complication rates less than 8% and 9 studies had complication rates between 15% and 53%. Interpretation - There was no clear relation between biomechanical and clinical studies. Biomechanical studies are generally inherently different from clinical studies, as they examine the best possible theoretical use of the implant without considering the long-term outcome in a clinical setting. Properly designed clinical studies are mandatory when introducing new implants, and they cannot be replaced by biomechanical studies.

  17. Musculoskeletal demands on flamenco dancers: a clinical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bejjani, F J; Halpern, N; Pio, A; Dominguez, R; Voloshin, A; Frankel, V H

    1988-04-01

    The flamenco dancer acts on the floor like a drummer. The percussive footwork and vibration patterns created during dancing impose unusual demands on the musculoskeletal system. This study investigated the clinical and biomechanical aspects of this task. Using the electrodynogram and skin-mounted accelerometers, foot pressures as well as hip and knee vibrations were recorded in 10 female dancers after a thorough clinical evaluation. A health questionnaire was also distributed to 29 dancers. Foot pressures and acceleration data reveal the percussive nature of the dance. Some clinical findings, like calluses, are related to pressure distribution. Urogenital disorders, as well as back and neck pain, may be related to the vibrations generated by the flamenco dance form. The hip joint seems to absorb most of the impacts. "Vibration-pressure" diagrams are suggested as a useful tool for evaluating a dancer's biomechanical behavior, as well as the effect of floors and footwear on this behavior.

  18. Segmentation algorithms for ear image data towards biomechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana; Gentil, Fernanda; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the segmentation, i.e. the identification, of ear structures in video-otoscopy, computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) image data, has gained significant importance in the medical imaging area, particularly those in CT and MR imaging. Segmentation is the fundamental step of any automated technique for supporting the medical diagnosis and, in particular, in biomechanics studies, for building realistic geometric models of ear structures. In this paper, a review of the algorithms used in ear segmentation is presented. The review includes an introduction to the usually biomechanical modelling approaches and also to the common imaging modalities. Afterwards, several segmentation algorithms for ear image data are described, and their specificities and difficulties as well as their advantages and disadvantages are identified and analysed using experimental examples. Finally, the conclusions are presented as well as a discussion about possible trends for future research concerning the ear segmentation.

  19. Biomechanical study of tarsometatarsal joint fusion using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Zengyong; Zhang, Ming

    2014-11-01

    Complications of surgeries in foot and ankle bring patients with severe sufferings. Sufficient understanding of the internal biomechanical information such as stress distribution, contact pressure, and deformation is critical to estimate the effectiveness of surgical treatments and avoid complications. Foot and ankle is an intricate and synergetic system, and localized intervention may alter the functions to the adjacent components. The aim of this study was to estimate biomechanical effects of the TMT joint fusion using comprehensive finite element (FE) analysis. A foot and ankle model consists of 28 bones, 72 ligaments, and plantar fascia with soft tissues embracing all the segments. Kinematic information and ground reaction force during gait were obtained from motion analysis. Three gait instants namely the first peak, second peak and mid-stance were simulated in a normal foot and a foot with TMT joint fusion. It was found that contact pressure on plantar foot increased by 0.42%, 19% and 37%, respectively after TMT fusion compared with normal foot walking. Navico-cuneiform and fifth meta-cuboid joints sustained 27% and 40% increase in contact pressure at second peak, implying potential risk of joint problems such as arthritis. Von Mises stress in the second metatarsal bone increased by 22% at midstance, making it susceptible to stress fracture. This study provides biomechanical information for understanding the possible consequences of TMT joint fusion.

  20. The anisotropic hyperelastic biomechanical response of the vocal ligament and implications for frequency regulation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Jordan E; Siegmund, Thomas; Du, Mindy; Naseri, Elhum; Chan, Roger W

    2013-03-01

    One of the primary mechanisms to vary one's vocal frequency is through vocal fold length changes. As stress and deformation are linked to each other, it is hypothesized that the anisotropy in the biomechanical properties of the vocal fold tissue would affect the phonation characteristics. A biomechanical model of vibrational frequency rise during vocal fold elongation is developed which combines an advanced biomechanical characterization protocol of the vocal fold tissue with continuum beam models. Biomechanical response of the tissue is related to a microstructurally informed, anisotropic, nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive model. A microstructural characteristic (the dispersion of collagen) was represented through a statistical orientation function acquired from a second harmonic generation image of the vocal ligament. Continuum models of vibration were constructed based upon Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories, and applied to the study of the vibration of a vocal ligament specimen. From the natural frequency predictions in dependence of elongation, two competing processes in frequency control emerged, i.e., the applied tension raises the frequency while simultaneously shear deformation lowers the frequency. Shear becomes much more substantial at higher modes of vibration and for highly anisotropic tissues. The analysis was developed as a case study based on a human vocal ligament specimen.

  1. The anisotropic hyperelastic biomechanical response of the vocal ligament and implications for frequency regulation: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Jordan E.; Siegmund, Thomas; Du, Mindy; Naseri, Elhum; Chan, Roger W.

    2013-01-01

    One of the primary mechanisms to vary one's vocal frequency is through vocal fold length changes. As stress and deformation are linked to each other, it is hypothesized that the anisotropy in the biomechanical properties of the vocal fold tissue would affect the phonation characteristics. A biomechanical model of vibrational frequency rise during vocal fold elongation is developed which combines an advanced biomechanical characterization protocol of the vocal fold tissue with continuum beam models. Biomechanical response of the tissue is related to a microstructurally informed, anisotropic, nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive model. A microstructural characteristic (the dispersion of collagen) was represented through a statistical orientation function acquired from a second harmonic generation image of the vocal ligament. Continuum models of vibration were constructed based upon Euler–Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories, and applied to the study of the vibration of a vocal ligament specimen. From the natural frequency predictions in dependence of elongation, two competing processes in frequency control emerged, i.e., the applied tension raises the frequency while simultaneously shear deformation lowers the frequency. Shear becomes much more substantial at higher modes of vibration and for highly anisotropic tissues. The analysis was developed as a case study based on a human vocal ligament specimen. PMID:23464032

  2. Biomechanical study of patellofemoral joint instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavongse, Wongwit

    2005-04-01

    Patellofemoral joint instability is a complex clinical problem. It may be a consequence of pre-existing anatomical abnormality or trauma. The objectives of this study were to use experimental mechanics to measure patellar stability and to quantify the effects of pathological abnormalities on patellar stability in vitro. Eight fresh-frozen cadaver knees were studies. The patellar stability was measured using an Instron material testing machine. A total load of 175N was applied to the quadriceps muscles. Patellar force-displacement was tested at different knee flexion angles as the patella was cyclically displaced 10mm laterally and medially. Three pathological abnormalities were applied; VMO malfunction, flat lateral trochlea, and medial retinacular structure rupturing. For the first time, this study has shown comparative and quantitative influence of pathological abnormalities on patellar stability. It was found that a flat lateral trochlea has greater effect than the medial retinacular rupturing whereas the medial retinacular rupturing has greater effect than VMO malfunction on patellar lateral stability. These results are important for future investigations on the treatment of patellofemoral instability.

  3. Considerations for Reporting Finite Element Analysis Studies in Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Erdemir, Ahmet; Guess, Trent M.; Halloran, Jason; Tadepalli, Srinivas C.; Morrison, Tina M.

    2012-01-01

    Simulation-based medicine and the development of complex computer models of biological structures is becoming ubiquitous for advancing biomedical engineering and clinical research. Finite element analysis (FEA) has been widely used in the last few decades to understand and predict biomechanical phenomena. Modeling and simulation approaches in biomechanics are highly interdisciplinary, involving novice and skilled developers in all areas of biomedical engineering and biology. While recent advances in model development and simulation platforms offer a wide range of tools to investigators, the decision making process during modeling and simulation has become more opaque. Hence, reliability of such models used for medical decision making and for driving multiscale analysis comes into question. Establishing guidelines for model development and dissemination is a daunting task, particularly with the complex and convoluted models used in FEA. Nonetheless, if better reporting can be established, researchers will have a better understanding of a model’s value and the potential for reusability through sharing will be bolstered. Thus, the goal of this document is to identify resources and considerate reporting parameters for FEA studies in biomechanics. These entail various levels of reporting parameters for model identification, model structure, simulation structure, verification, validation, and availability. While we recognize that it may not be possible to provide and detail all of the reporting considerations presented, it is possible to establish a level of confidence with selective use of these parameters. More detailed reporting, however, can establish an explicit outline of the decision-making process in simulation-based analysis for enhanced reproducibility, reusability, and sharing. PMID:22236526

  4. Absorbable scaphoid screw development: a comparative study on biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Song, Muguo; Xu, Yongqing; He, Xiaoqing; Zhu, YueLiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The scaphoid is critical for maintaining the stability and movement of the wrist joints. This study aimed to develop a new internal fixator absorbable scaphoid screw (ASS) for fixation of the scaphoid waist after fracture and to test the biomechanical characteristics of ASS. Materials and methods An ASS was prepared using polylactic acids and designed based on scaphoid measurements and anatomic features. Twenty fractured scaphoid waist specimens were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n=10/group). Reduction and internal fixation of the scaphoid were achieved with either Kirschner wires (K-wires) or ASS. A moving target simulator was used to test palmar flexion and dorsal extension, with the range of testing (waist movement) set from 5° of palmar flexion to 25° of dorsal extension. Flexion and extension were repeated 2,000 times for each specimen. Fracture gap displacements were measured with a computerized tomography scanning. Scaphoid tensile and bending strengths were measured by using a hydraulic pressure biomechanical system. Results Prior to biomechanical fatigue testing, fracture gap displacements were 0.16±0.02 mm and 0.22±0.02 mm in the ASS and K-wire groups, respectively. After fatigue testing, fracture gap displacements in the ASS and the K-wire groups were 0.21±0.03 mm and 1.52±0.07 mm, respectively. The tensile strengths for the ASS and K-wire groups were 0.95±0.02 MPa and 0.63±0.02 MPa, respectively. Conclusion Fixation using an ASS provided sufficient mechanical support for the scaphoid after fracture. PMID:27217756

  5. Clinical, biomechanical and histological study on oophorectomy induced menopause

    PubMed Central

    Bordinhon, Maristela; Müller, Sérgio Swain; Silva, Maeli Dal Pai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical implications as well as biomechanical and histological changes and in bone tissue induced by ovariectomy in 64 rats. Methods: The rats were divided into two groups: bilateral oophorectomy or placebo, and subdivided into four subgroups, according to time postoperatively: three, six, nine and 12 months. The weight of the animals at the time of sacrifice was taken into consideration. The biomechanical study was performed on the right tibia, to the maximum load and stiffness coefficient. For the histological study we calculated the trabecular bone of the left tibia. Statistical analysis of body weight and mechanical properties was performed by variance analysis, complemented with Tukey's multiple comparison tests; and trabecular area, the non-parametric variance analysis. Results: Ovariectomy-induced menopause caused an increase in body weight, reduction of diaphyseal bone resistance at six months of hormone deprivation, but this effect is equalized over time by aging; bone stiffness was smaller in the ovariectomized group and reduction of bone mass occurred. Conclusion: The removal of the ovaries produced systemic alterations, characterized by metabolic changes that caused weight gain and changes in bone tissue, associated with alteration of the mechanical profile and reduced bone mass. Level of Evidence I, Clinical Study. PMID:25328434

  6. Biomechanical study of a hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu-Tong; Jia, Lian-Shun; Chen, Tong-Yi

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical effect of a hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage (HCIFC). In this in vitro biomechanical study, 48 goat cervical spines (C2-5) were tested in flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending with a nondestructive stiffness method using a nonconstrained testing apparatus, and three-dimensional displacement was measured. Autologous iliac bone and cervical spine intervertebral fusion cage were implanted according to manufacturers' information after complete discectomy (C3-4). Eight spines in each of the following groups were tested: intact, autologous iliac bone graft, Harms cage, SynCage C, carbon cage, and HCIFC. The mean apparent stiffness values were calculated from the corresponding load-displacement curves. Additionally, cage volume and volume-related stiffness were determined. The stiffness of the SynCage C was statistically greatest in all directions. After implantation of the HCIFC, flexion stiffness increased compared with that of the intact motion segment. There was no significant difference in stiffness between the HCIFC and carbon cage. The stiffness of the HCIFC was statistically higher than that of the Harms cage in axial rotation and significantly lower in flexion, extension, and lateral bending. Volume-related stiffness of all cages was higher than that of iliac bone graft. The Harms cage was highest in volume-related stiffness in all directions. The HCIFC can provide enough primary stability for cervical intervertebral fusion.

  7. Biomechanical Study of Two Peripheral Suture Methods on Repaired Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Flexor digitorum tendon injuries are challenging conditions to manage to ensure optimal patient outcomes. While several surgical approaches with high success rates have been developed, there remains no gold standard for suture technique for the repair of flexor tendon injuries. In this study, we compared two distinct peripheral suture methods on the strength of repaired tendons. Pig flexor digitorum profundus tendons were used in biomechanical studies and the biomechanical influence on tendon repair of continuous running peripheral suture (CRPS) and continuous locking peripheral suture (CLPS), were compared, using stitch length ranging from 1mm to 5mm. In CRPS, the 1mm stitch length group displayed the highest maximum load and breaking power, which was 1.57 fold higher than the 2mm stitch length group. Pairwise comparison revealed that the 1 and 2mm groups were statistically different from the 3, 4, and 5mm stitch length groups while comparison among the latter groups was not statistically significant. For CLPS, the 1mm group exhibited consistently the highest maximum load strength and breaking power, which was twice the strength displayed by the 2mm group. Pairwise comparisons between groups showed statistical significance. For future repairs of flexor tendon injuries, 1mm stitch length is highly recommended for simple peripheral suture.

  8. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation.

  9. Vertical shear fractures of the femoral neck. A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Baitner, A C; Maurer, S G; Hickey, D G; Jazrawi, L M; Kummer, F J; Jamal, J; Goldman, S; Koval, K J

    1999-10-01

    A biomechanical cadaver study was performed to compare the strength and stability of three cannulated cancellous lag screws with a sliding hip screw for fixation of a vertically oriented fracture of the femoral neck (Pauwels Type III). Using eight matched pairs of human cadaveric femurs, vertically oriented femoral neck osteotomies were created, reduced, and randomized to one of the two fixation methods. The constructs were tested with incremental axial loading from 100 N to 1200 N and cyclical loading at 1000 N for 10,000 cycles; fracture displacements and ultimate load to failure were determined. The specimens stabilized using a sliding hip screw showed less inferior femoral head displacement, less shearing displacement at the osteotomy site, and a much greater load to failure than did those stabilized with multiple cancellous lag screws. These results support the use of a sliding hip screw for treatment of vertically oriented fractures of the femoral neck.

  10. Enhancement of stability following anterior cervical corpectomy: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kern; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Kim, Jesse; Lorenz, Eric P; Lim, Tae-Hong; An, Howard S

    2004-04-15

    An in vitro biomechanical study of various reconstructive techniques following decompression of the spondylotic cervical spine. OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate the biomechanical stability of anterior cervical plate fixation following three strategies of decompression for multilevel cervical spondylosis (three levels) of the cervical spine: three level discectomy, single corpectomy and discectomy, and a two-level corpectomy. The main goals of surgical treatment for cervical myelopathy include adequate decompression and stabilization while maintaining or restoring cervical lordosis. Cervical decompression is often performed through a corpectomy followed by strut-graft reconstruction. An anterior cervical plate with end-fixation (two points of fixation) is then used to span the construct. The authors propose an alternative to multilevel corpectomy and long-segment end construct plate fixation. Often times, the cervical stenosis is confined to the area of the degenerative discs. As a result, the authors feel that either multilevel discectomy or a corpectomy combined with discectomy followed by segmental plate fixation may provide adequate decompression with increased biomechanical rigidity as compared to cervical plate-constructs with end-fixation only. Seven human cadaveric fresh-frozen cervical spines from C1-T1 were utilized. Three-dimensional motion analysis with an optical tracking device was used to determine motion following various reconstruction methods. All seven cervical spines underwent testing in a randomized order. The end construct model consisted of a corpectomy at C4 and C5 with a polymethyl methacrylate strut graft and an anterior cervical PEAK (DePuy-AcroMed) plate. The two segmental constructs also utilized the PEAK plate with one construct undergoing discectomies at C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6 with polymethyl methacrylate interbody grafts and the other segmental construct undergoing a discectomy at C3-C4 and a corpectomy of C5. All specimens underwent a pure

  11. High-dose electron beam sterilization of soft-tissue grafts maintains significantly improved biomechanical properties compared to standard gamma treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoburg, A; Keshlaf, S; Schmidt, T; Smith, M; Gohs, U; Perka, C; Pruss, A; Scheffler, S

    2015-06-01

    Allografts have gained increasing popularity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, one of the major concerns regarding allografts is the possibility of disease transmission. Electron beam (Ebeam) and Gamma radiation have been proven to be successful in sterilization of medical products. In soft tissue sterilization high dosages of gamma irradiation have been shown to be detrimental to biomechanical properties of grafts. Therefore, it was the objective of this study to compare the biomechanical properties of human bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts after ebeam with standard gamma irradiation at medium (25 kGy) and high doses (34 kGy). We hypothesized that the biomechanical properties of Ebeam irradiated grafts would be superior to gamma irradiated grafts. Paired 10 mm-wide human BPTB grafts were harvested from 20 donors split into four groups following irradiation with either gamma or Ebeam (each n = 10): (A) Ebeam 25 kGy, (B) Gamma 25 kGy, (C) Ebeam 34 kGy (D) Gamma 34 kGy and ten non-irradiated BPTB grafts were used as controls. All grafts underwent biomechanical testing which included preconditioning (ten cycles, 0-20 N); cyclic loading (200 cycles, 20-200 N) and a load-to-failure (LTF) test. Stiffness of non-irradiated controls (199.6 ± 59.1 N/mm) and Ebeam sterilized grafts did not significantly differ (152.0 ± 37.0 N/mm; 192.8 ± 58.0 N/mm), while Gamma-irradiated grafts had significantly lower stiffness than controls at both irradiation dosages (25 kGy: 126.1 ± 45.4 N/mm; 34 kGy: 170.6 ± 58.2 N/mm) (p < 0.05). Failure loads at 25 kGy were significantly lower in the gamma group (1,009 ± 400 N), while the failure load was significantly lower in both study groups at high dose irradiation with 34 kGy (Ebeam: 1,139 ± 445 N, Gamma: 1,073 ± 617 N) compared to controls (1,741 ± 304 N) (p < 0.05). Creep was significantly larger in the gamma irradiated groups (25 kGy: 0.96 ± 1.34 mm; 34 kGy: 1.06 ± 0.58 mm) than in the Ebeam (25 k

  12. LHC beam-beam compensation studies at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer,W.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    Long-range and head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both the LHC and RHIC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program and report on head-on compensations studies at RHIC, which are based on simulations.

  13. Cyclical loading of coracoclavicular ligament reconstructions: a comparative biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven J; Keefer, Eric P; McHugh, Malachy P; Kremenic, Ian J; Orishimo, Karl F; Ben-Avi, Simon; Nicholas, Stephen J

    2008-10-01

    Reconstruction for injuries to the acromioclavicular joint remains controversial. A coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon would have superior performance to the classic coracoacromial ligament transfer with or without augmentation. Controlled laboratory study. Five cadaveric shoulders were used to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligaments with 3 methods: coracoacromial ligament transfer without augmentation, coracoacromial ligament transfer augmented with No. 5 Ethibond suture, and a semitendinosus tendon. Each reconstruction was cyclically loaded at 40 N to 80 N for 2500 cycles, then from 40 N to 210 N for 2500 cycles, followed by loading to failure. The number of cycles to 50% and 100% loss of acromioclavicular joint reduction were recorded. During the 40 N to 80 N-loading cycle, the coracoacromial transfer without augmentation failed (15 +/- 16 cycles). The augmented coracoacromial ligament transfer and the semitendinosus reconstruction did not fail (P = .008). During the 40 N to 210 N-loading cycle, the augmented coracoacromial ligament transfer failed (207 +/- 399 cycles). The semitendinosus reconstruction survived through both loading cycles (P < .01). Coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus graft is a biomechanically superior construct in a cyclically loaded setting to a coracoacromial ligament transfer augmented with a No. 5 Ethibond suture. The semitendinosus graft is a strong, biologic option for reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments.

  14. Beam Propagation Experimental Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    and locating the camera next to the FX-100 output switch . The camera trigger was derived directly from the light emitted by the FX-100 output switch ...Instability 20 ASSTRPACT eContinue an reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) )A program of extensively diagnosed experiments to investigate ...primary objectives of this research were to measure the rate of erosion of the headIof the beam, and to investigate resistive instabilities, such as

  15. Effect of patellar thickness on knee flexion in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemian, Mansour; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Sternheim, Amir; Bougherara, Habiba; Barnes, C Lowry; Backstein, David J

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical computer-based model was developed to simulate the influence of patellar thickness on passive knee flexion after arthroplasty. Using the computer model of a single-radius, PCL-sacrificing knee prosthesis, a range of patella-implant composite thicknesses was simulated. The biomechanical model was then replicated using two cadaveric knees. A patellar-thickness range of 15 mm was applied to each of the knees. Knee flexion was found to decrease exponentially with increased patellar thickness in both the biomechanical and experimental studies. Importantly, this flexion loss followed an exponential pattern with higher patellar thicknesses in both studies. In order to avoid adverse biomechanical and functional consequences, it is recommended to restore patellar thickness to that of the native knee during total knee arthroplasty.

  16. Physiologic strains in the lumbar spinal ligaments. An in vitro biomechanical study 1981 Volvo Award in Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Panjabi, M M; Goel, V K; Takata, K

    1982-01-01

    For understanding of the mechanical causes of low-back pain, knowledge of the biomechanics of the various spinal elements is essential. In this in vitro biomechanical study, in situ behavior of spinal ligaments of the L3-4 and L4-5 functional spinal units during physiologic activities was studied in a three-stage procedure. First, 72 load-displacement curves were obtained to determine the three-dimensional flexibility characteristics of the spinal units. Second, three-dimensional morphometric measurements were made of all the spinal ligament attachment points. Finally, a mathematical model was constructed to combine the flexibility and morphometric data and compute the ligament length changes and strains as functions of various spinal movements. In flexion movement, the interspinous and supra-spinous ligaments were found to be subjected to the highest strains, followed by the capsular ligaments and the ligamentum flavum. During extension, it is the anterior longitudinal ligament that has the maximum strain. In lateral bending, the contralateral transverse ligaments carried the highest strains, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were relatively unstrained. In rotation, the capsular ligaments were by far the most strained ligaments.

  17. Beam Propagation Experimental Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    30- -40- -50 I 0 100 200 300 Time (ns) Figure 2. FX-100 diode voltage and current. The gas- insulated coax was charged to 4.2 MV in order to produce...limit the usable gradient. The voltage standoff capability will be further limited by electron bombardment of the insulators , which may lead to flashover ...the low-pressure window for stable propagation has been inferred from measurements of the time delay for the beam arrival at a given axial position. 8

  18. Sensitivity studies of crystalline beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1996-07-01

    The equations of motion are presented, appropriate to interacting charged particles of diverse charge and mass, subject to the external forces produced by various kinds of magnetic fields and rf electric fields in storage rings. These equations have been employed in the molecular dynamics simulations for sensitivity studies of crystalline beams. The two necessary conditions for the formation and maintenance of crystalline beams are summarized. Effects of lattice shear and AG focusing, magnetic field imperfection, and ion neutralization on crystalline beam heating is presented.

  19. A biomechanical study of periacetabular defects and cement filling.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoping; Butala, Neha B; Etheridge, Brandon S; Siegel, Herrick J; Lemons, Jack E; Eberhardt, Alan W

    2007-04-01

    Periacetabular bone metastases cause severe pain and functional disability in cancer patients. Percutaneous acetabuloplasty (PCA) is a minimally invasive, image-guided procedure whereby cement is injected into lesion sites. Pain relief and functional restoration have been observed clinically; however, neither the biomechanical consequences of the lesions nor the effectiveness of the PCA technique are well understood. The objective of this study was to investigate how periacetabular lesion size, cortex involvement, and cement modulus affect pelvic bone stresses and strains under single-legged stance loading. Experiments were performed on a male cadaver pelvis under conditions of intact, periacetabular defect, and cement-filling with surface strains recorded at three strain gage locations. The experimental data were then employed to validate three-dimensional finite element models of the same pelvis, developed using computed tomography data. The models demonstrated that increases in cortical stresses were highest along the posterior column of the acetabulum, adjacent to the defect. Cortical stresses were more profoundly affected in the presence of transcortical defects, as compared to those involving only trabecular bone. Cement filling with a modulus of 2.2 GPa was shown to restore cortical stresses to near intact values, while a decrease in cement modulus due to inclusion of BaSO(4) reduced the restorative effect. Peak acetabular contact pressures increased less than 15% for all simulated defect conditions; however, the contact stresses were reduced to levels below intact in the presence of either cement filling. These results suggest that periacetabular defects may increase the vulnerability of the pelvis to fracture depending on size and cortical involvement and that PCA filling may lower the risk of periacetabular fractures.

  20. Aggrecan: approaches to study biophysical and biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Aggrecan, the most abundant extracellular proteoglycan in cartilage (~35 % by dry weight), plays a key role in the biophysical and biomechanical properties of cartilage. Here, we review several approaches based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the physical, mechanical, and structural properties of aggrecan at the molecular level. These approaches probe the response of aggrecan over a wide time (frequency) scale, ranging from equilibrium to impact dynamic loading. Experimental and theoretical methods are described for the investigation of electrostatic and fluid-solid interactions that are key mechanisms underlying the biomechanical and physicochemical functions of aggrecan. Using AFM-based imaging and nanoindentation, ultrastructural features of aggrecan are related to its mechanical properties, based on aggrecans harvested from human vs. bovine, immature vs. mature, and healthy vs. osteoarthritic cartilage.

  1. A numerical framework for studying the biomechanical behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalahmadi, Golnaz; Linte, Cristian; Helguera, María.

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is known as a leading cause of death in the United States. AAA is an abnormal dilation of the aorta, which usually occurs below the renal arteries and causes an expansion at least 1.5 times its normal diameter. It has been shown that biomechanical parameters of the aortic tissue coupled with a set of specific geometric parameters characterizing the vessel expansion, affect the risk of aneurysm rupture. Here, we developed a numerical framework that incorporates both biomechanical and geometrical factors to study the behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our workflow enables the extraction of the aneurysm geometry from both clinical quality, as well as low-resolution MR images. We used a two-parameter, hyper-elastic, isotropic, incompressible material to model the vessel tissue. Our numerical model was tested using both synthetic and mouse data and we evaluated the effects of the geometrical and biomechanical properties on the developed peak wall stress. In addition, we performed several parameter sensitivity studies to investigate the effect of different factors affecting the AAA and its behavior and rupture. Lastly, relationships between different geometrical and biomechanical parameters and peak wall stress were determined. These studies help us better understand vessel tissue response to various loading, geometry and biomechanics conditions, and we plan to further correlate these findings with the pathophysiological conditions from a patient population diagnosed with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  2. Conceptual framework on the application of biomechanical measurement methods in driving behavior study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjaya, Kadek Heri; Sya'bana, Yukhi Mustaqim Kusuma

    2017-01-01

    Research on eco-friendly vehicle development in Indonesia has largely neglected ergonomic study, despite the fact that traffic accidents have resulted in greater economic cost than fuel subsidy. We have performed a biomechanical experiment on human locomotion earlier. In this article, we describe the importance of implementing the biomechanical measurement methods in transportation ergonomic study. The instruments such as electromyogram (EMG), load cell, pressure sensor, and motion analysis methods as well as cross-correlation function analysis were explained, then the possibility of their application in driving behavior study is described. We describe the potentials and challenges of the biomechanical methods concerning the future vehicle development. The methods provide greater advantages in objective and accurate measurement not only in human task performance but also its correlation with vehicle performance.

  3. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  4. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  5. Quantitative methods for reconstructing tissue biomechanical properties in optical coherence elastography: a comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Sudheendran, Narendran; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the accuracy of five different methods for extracting the biomechanical properties of soft samples using optical coherence elastography (OCE). OCE is an emerging noninvasive technique, which allows assessing biomechanical properties of tissues with a micrometer spatial resolution. However, in order to accurately extract biomechanical properties from OCE measurements, application of proper mechanical model is required. In this study, we utilize tissue-mimicking phantoms with controlled elastic properties and investigate the feasibilities of four available methods for reconstructing elasticity (Young’s modulus) based on OCE measurements of an air-pulse induced elastic wave. The approaches are based on the shear wave equation (SWE), the surface wave equation (SuWE), Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation (RLFE), and finite element method (FEM), Elasticity values were compared with uniaxial mechanical testing. The results show that the RLFE and the FEM are more robust in quantitatively assessing elasticity than the other simplified models. This study provides a foundation and reference for reconstructing the biomechanical properties of tissues from OCE data, which is important for the further development of noninvasive elastography methods. PMID:25860076

  6. Beam Beam Simulation Studies for NLC And SLC2000

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.A.; Chen, P.; Irwin, J.; Zimmermann, F.; /SLAC

    2010-05-27

    We apply and modify the computer codes CAIN(P.Chen, G.Horton-Smith, T.Ohgaki, A.W.Weidemann, K.Yokoya, contributed to Workshop on Gamma-Gamma Colliders, Berkeley, CA, March 28-31, 1994; SLAC-PUB-6583.) and GUINEAPIG(D.Schulte (DESY), unpublished.) to make detailed studies of the beam-beam interaction in the SLAC design for a future linear collider (NLC), as well as to the proposed SLC2000 project. Using realistic beam distributions, we present simulations related to the tuning and optimization of luminosity in SLC2000 and NLC.

  7. Overground vs. treadmill walking on biomechanical energy harvesting: An energetics and EMG study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-Paul; Li, Qingguo

    2017-02-01

    A biomechanical energy harvester is a wearable device that generates electricity from human motion. Walking on a treadmill has been used almost exclusively by researchers for studying the energetic effects of biomechanical energy harvesters and wearable robotics. A treadmill provides the advantage of having long duration trials within a stationary motion capture volume. However, no consensus exists on whether the results from treadmill walking accurately represent overground walking. We aim to investigate how a biomechanical energy harvester performs overground compared to on a treadmill by measuring energy expenditure and muscle activity. Participants (n=15) walked both overground and on a treadmill with and without a lower limb-driven biomechanical energy harvester. Energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry and muscle activity was collected with surface electromyograms on seven superficial lower limb muscles. We observed a similar increase in metabolic cost of transport (Δoverground: 0.28±0.24J/kgm, Δtreadmill: 0.30±0.24J/kgm) from normal walking (overground: 2.56±0.33J/kgm, treadmill: 3.39±0.31J/kgm) to harvester walking (overground: 2.83±0.35J/kgm, treadmill: 3.69±0.32J/kgm) in both walking modes (p>0.05). This was accompanied a significant increase in muscle activity of select muscle groups (p<0.05). There was also a significant increase observed during walking on a treadmill compared to overground walking (p<0.05). In conclusion, our results suggest that although the metabolic cost of transport and muscle activation for treadmill walking is higher than that of overground, when studying the effects of a biomechanical energy harvester, treadmill will give similar net increases when compared to a controlled walking condition, such as normal walking, on the same walking surface.

  8. ASB clinical biomechanics award winner 2006 prospective study of the biomechanical factors associated with iliotibial band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noehren, Brian; Davis, Irene; Hamill, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    Iliotibial band syndrome is the leading cause of lateral knee pain in runners. Despite its high prevalence, little is known about the biomechanics that lead to this syndrome. The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare lower extremity kinematics and kinetics between a group of female runners who develop iliotibial band syndrome compared to healthy controls. It was hypothesized that runners who develop iliotibial band syndrome will exhibit greater peak hip adduction, knee internal rotation, rearfoot eversion and no difference in knee flexion at heel strike. Additionally, the iliotibial band syndrome group were expected to have greater hip abduction, knee external rotation, and rearfoot inversion moments. A group of healthy female recreational runners underwent an instrumented gait analysis and were then followed for two years. Eighteen runners developed iliotibial band syndrome. Their initial running mechanics were compared to a group of age and mileage matched controls with no history of knee or hip pain. Comparisons of peak hip, knee, rearfoot angles and moments were made during the stance phase of running. Variables of interest were averaged over the five running trials, and then averaged across groups. The iliotibial band syndrome group exhibited significantly greater hip adduction and knee internal rotation. However, rearfoot eversion and knee flexion were similar between groups. There were no differences in moments between groups. The development of iliotibial band syndrome appears to be related to increased peak hip adduction and knee internal rotation. These combined motions may increase iliotibial band strain causing it to compress against the lateral femoral condyle. These data suggest that treatment interventions should focus on controlling these secondary plane movements through strengthening, stretching and neuromuscular re-education.

  9. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  10. Biomechanical Study of the Digital Flexor Tendon Sliding Lengthening Technique.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ken; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Takane; Hiwatari, Ryo; Matsuura, Yusuke; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-10-01

    To compare the mechanical properties of sliding lengthening (SL) and Z-lengthening (ZL) for flexor tendon elongation used for conditions such as Volkmann contracture, cerebral palsy, and poststroke spasticity. We harvested 56 flexor tendons, including flexor pollicis longus tendons, flexor digitorum superficialis tendons (zones II to IV), and flexor digitorum profundus tendons (zones II to V) from 24 upper limbs of 12 fresh cadavers. Each tendon was harvested together with its homonymous tendon from the opposite side of the cadaver and paired. We used 28 pairs of tendons and divided them randomly into 4 groups depending on the lengthening distance (20 or 30 mm) and type of stitching (single or double mattress sutures). Then we divided each pair into either the SL or ZL group. Each group was composed of 7 specimens. The same surgeon lengthened all tendons and stitched them with 2-0 polyester sutures. We tested biomechanical tensile strength immediately after completing lengthening and suturing in each group. Ultimate tensile strengths were: 23 N for the SL 20-mm lengthening and single mattress suture and 7 N for the ZL; 25 N for the SL 20-mm lengthening and double mattress suture and 10 N for the ZL; 15 N for the SL 30-mm lengthening and single mattress suture and 8 N for the ZL; and 18 N for the SL 30-mm lengthening and double mattress suture and 10 N for the ZL. The SL technique may be a good alternative to the ZL technique because it provides higher ultimate tensile strength. Because of its higher ultimate tensile strength, the SL technique may allow for earlier rehabilitation and reduced risk of postoperative complications. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of trochlear dysplasia on patellofemoral biomechanics: a cadaveric study with simulated trochlear deformities.

    PubMed

    Van Haver, Annemieke; De Roo, Karel; De Beule, Matthieu; Labey, Luc; De Baets, Patrick; Dejour, David; Claessens, Tom; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Trochlear dysplasia appears in different geometrical variations. The Dejour classification is widely used to grade the severity of trochlear dysplasia and to decide on treatment. To investigate the effect of trochlear dysplasia on patellofemoral biomechanics and to determine if different types of trochlear dysplasia have different effects on patellofemoral biomechanics. Controlled laboratory study. Trochlear dysplasia was simulated in 4 cadaveric knees by replacing the native cadaveric trochlea with different types of custom-made trochlear implants, manufactured with 3-dimensional printing. For each knee, 5 trochlear implants were designed: 1 implant simulated the native trochlea (control condition), and 4 implants simulated 4 types of trochlear dysplasia. The knees were subjected to 3 biomechanical tests: a squat simulation, an open chain extension simulation, and a patellar stability test. The patellofemoral kinematics, contact area, contact pressure, and stability were compared between the control condition (replica implants) and the trochlear dysplastic condition and among the subgroups of trochlear dysplasia. The patellofemoral joint in the trochlear dysplastic group showed increased internal rotation, lateral tilt, and lateral translation; increased contact pressures; decreased contact areas; and decreased stability when compared with the control group. Within the trochlear dysplastic group, the implants graded as Dejour type D showed the largest deviations for the kinematical parameters, and the implants graded as Dejour types B and D showed the largest deviations for the patellofemoral contact areas and pressures. Patellofemoral kinematics, contact area, contact pressure, and stability are significantly affected by trochlear dysplasia. Of all types of trochlear dysplasia, the models characterized with a pronounced trochlear bump showed the largest deviations in patellofemoral biomechanics. Investigating the relationship between the shape of the trochlea and

  12. Beam instability studies for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.

    1994-09-01

    Beam instability studies of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) during the period 1989--1993 are briefly reviewed in this paper. Various topics are covered: single bunch and multi-bunch, single beam and beam-beam, parasitic heating and active feedback, etc. Although the SSC will not be built, many of the results obtained from these studies remain as useful references to the accelerator community.

  13. [Mystery of alar ligament rupture: value of MRI in whiplash injuries--biomechanical, anatomical and clinical studies].

    PubMed

    Bitterling, H; Stäbler, A; Brückmann, H

    2007-11-01

    Whiplash injury of the cervical spine is a frequent issue in medical expertise and causes enormous consequential costs for motor insurance companies. Some authors accuse posttraumatic changes of alar ligaments to be causative for consequential disturbances. Review of recent studies on biomechanics, anatomical and clinical MR imaging. Biomechanical experiments can not induce according injuries of alar ligaments. Although MRI provides excellent visualization of alar ligaments, the range of normal variants is high. Biomechanical studies give no evidence of alar ligament involvement in whiplash disease. Using MRI, signal alterations of alar ligaments can hardly be differentiated from common normal variants. Functional MRI provides no diagnostic yield.

  14. Collimation Studies with Hollow Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Saewert, G.W.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Recent experimental studies at the Fermilab Tevatron collider have shown that magnetically confined hollow electron beams can act as a new kind of collimator for high-intensity beams in storage rings. In a hollow electron beam collimator, electrons enclose the circulating beam. Their electric charge kicks halo particles transversely. If their distribution is axially symmetric, the beam core is unaffected. This device is complementary to conventional two-stage collimation systems: the electron beam can be placed arbitrarily close to the circulating beam; and particle removal is smooth, so that the device is a diffusion enhancer rather than a hard aperture limitation. The concept was tested in the Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the existing electron lenses. We describe some of the technical aspects of hollow-beam scraping and the results of recent measurements.

  15. Stiffness of various pin configurations for pediatric supracondylar humeral fracture: a systematic review on biomechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tony Lin-wei; He, Chang-qiang; Zheng, Ting-qu; Gan, Yan-qun; Huang, Ming-xiang; Zheng, Yan-dong; Zhao, Jing-tao

    2015-09-01

    To compare the biomechanical stability of various pin configurations for pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures under varus, internal rotation, and extension conditions. After electronic retrieval, 11 biomechanical studies were included. Stiffness values of pin configurations under different loading conditions were extracted and pooled. There were no statistically significant differences between two cross pins and two divergent lateral pins on the basis of the 'Hamdi method' (P=0.249-0.737). An additional pin did not strengthen two-pin construct (P=0.124-0.367), but better stabilized fractures with medial comminution (P<0.01). Isolated lateral pins are preferable because of a better balance of a lower risk of nerve injury and comparable fixation strength. Limitations such as differences in experimental setup among recruited studies and small sample size may compromise the methodologic power of this study.

  16. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haitao Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-15

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  17. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  18. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two- beam accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven Michael

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka-band (~30-35 GHz) frequency regions. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. A mapping algorithm is used so that tens or hundreds of thousands of macroparticles can be pushed from the solution of a few hundreds of differential equations. This is a great cost-savings device from the standpoint of CPU cycles. It can increase by several orders of magnitude the number of macroparticles that take place in the simulation, enabling more accurate modeling of the evolution of the beam distribution and enhanced sensitivity to effects due to the beam's halo. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split- operator algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The beam-cavity interaction is analyzed and divided naturally into two distinct times scales. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 TW of power from 40 input, gain

  19. [Longitudinal study of a population exposed to risk of biomechanical overload of the upper limb].

    PubMed

    Martmelli, R; Tobia, L; Lupi, A; Monaco, M; Capitano, T; Ponzi, I; Paoletti, A

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important factors of the work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremities (WMSDs) is the biomechanical overload. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possibility of the worker fitting to the job, to decrease the upper limb repetitive stress. In order to this aim, we have collected and compared, in different controls at the distance of two years, the clinical-anamnestic and instrumental data of a cohort of workers in a car industry.

  20. MRI-based biomechanical imaging: initial study on early plaque progression and vessel remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Abendschein, Dana R.; Okamoto, Ruth J.; Yang, Deshan; McCommis, Kyle S.; Misselwitz, Bernd; Gropler, Robert J.; Tang, Dalin

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to develop a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based biomechanical imaging technique to address biomechanical pathways of atherosclerotic progression and regression in vivo using a 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Initial in vivo study was carried out in an early plaque model in pigs that underwent balloon-overstretch injury to the left carotid arteries. Consecutive MRI scans were performed while the pigs were maintained on high cholesterol (progression) or normal chow (regression), with an injection of a plaque-targeted contrast agent, Gadofluorine M. At the end of study, the specimens of carotid arterial segments were dissected and underwent dedicated mechanical testing to determine their material properties. 3D FSI computational model was applied to calculate structure stress and strain distribution. The plaque structure resembles early plaque with thickened intima. Lower maximal flow shear stress correlates with the growth of plaque volume during progression, but not during regression. In contrast, maximal principle structure stress/stain (stress-P1 and strain-P1) were shown to correlate strongly with the change in the plaque dimension during regression, but moderately during progression. This MRI-based biomechanical imaging method may allow for noninvasive dynamic assessment of local hemodynamic forces on the development of atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. PMID:19559552

  1. Biomechanical study comparing biceps wedge tenodesis with other proximal long head of the biceps tenodesis techniques.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Ren; Budoff, Jeffrey E; Chiang, Chen-Hao; Lee, Chi-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Li

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this biomechanical study was to compare the ultimate failure strength, stiffness, cyclic displacement, and failure displacement of 5 different proximal biceps tenodesis fixation techniques, specifically comparing wedge tenodesis with the other 4 techniques. Forty cadaveric shoulders underwent 1 of 5 long head of the biceps tenodesis techniques and were cyclically tested to failure by use of tensile forces applied parallel to the longitudinal axis of the humerus. A preload at 5 N was applied for 2 minutes, followed by cyclical loading for 500 cycles from 5 to 70 N at 1 Hz and a pull-to-failure test at 1 mm/s. The techniques studied were wedge tenodesis, suture anchor fixation, suprapectoral interference screw fixation, T-wedge tenodesis, and the percutaneous intra-articular transtendon (PITT) technique. Cyclic displacement, failure displacement, and stiffness were calculated. The wedge tenodesis technique had an ultimate failure load similar to interference screw fixation and a greater ultimate failure load and stiffness than the suture anchor, PITT, and T-wedge techniques (P < .05). In this biomechanical study, wedge tenodesis was found to have an ultimate failure load similar to interference screw fixation and a greater ultimate failure load and stiffness than the suture anchor, PITT, and T-wedge techniques. On biomechanical testing, wedge tenodesis compares favorably with other techniques and may be a useful clinical option for proximal biceps tenodesis. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A biomechanical study of bankart lesion fixation - biodegradable ArthroRivet tack vs. suture repair.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kevin J; Mukherjee, Debi P; Ogden, Alan L; Sadasivan, Kalia K; Albright, James A; Pietrzak, William S

    2007-01-01

    Bioabsorbable fixation is commonly used in soft tissue procedures performed in the shoulder. ArthroRivettrade mark tacks (referred to as rivets here), made from a copolymer of 82% poly-L-lactic acid and 18% polyglycolic acid, were developed for the Bankart procedure. Although a previous in vivo study demonstrated favorable comparison of the fixation strength and absorption characteristics of this device with that of polyglyconate bioabsorbable tacks, there have been no published biomechanical studies of this rivet in the shoulder. Fourteen shoulders were harvested from fresh-frozen cadavers of average age 74 years (46-89). Biomechanical testing was performed by measuring the energy, or work, required to anteriorly displace the humeral head 6 mm from the glenoid. Each shoulder was tested intact, vented, and before and after repair of a simulated Bankart lesion at 0, 45, and 90 degrees of abduction with and without maximal external rotation. Overall, the average work required ranged from 54.7 N-mm to 178.27 N-mm. Although the biomechanical performance of the rivet, based on resistance to anterior displacement of the humeral head, was indistinguishable from that of the suture repair, the statistical power of the test was low due to the large variance in the cadaver specimens. The results, in general, correlated well with those of previously published studies, suggesting the suitability of the bioabsorbable rivet for use in Bankart repair.

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament injury alters preinjury lower extremity biomechanics in the injured and uninjured leg: the JUMP-ACL study.

    PubMed

    Goerger, Benjamin M; Marshall, Stephen W; Beutler, Anthony I; Blackburn, J Troy; Wilckens, John H; Padua, Darin A

    2015-02-01

    Information as to how anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstructive surgery (ACLR) alter lower extremity biomechanics may improve rehabilitation and return to play guidelines, reducing the risk for repeat ACL injury. To compare lower extremity biomechanics before ACL injury and after subsequent ACLR for the injured and uninjured leg. Baseline unilateral lower extremity biomechanics were collected on the dominant leg of participants without ACL injury when they entered the Joint Undertaking to Monitor and Prevent ACL (JUMP-ACL) study. Thirty-one participants with subsequent ACL injury, reconstructive surgery and full return to physical activity completed repeat, follow-up biomechanical testing, as did 39 uninjured, matched controls. Not all injured participants suffered injury to the dominant leg, requiring separation of those with ACL injury into two groups: ACLR-injured leg group (n=12) and ACLR-uninjured leg group (n=19). We compared the landing biomechanics of these three groups (ACLR-injured leg, ACLR-uninjured leg, control) before ACL injury (baseline) with biomechanics after ACL injury, surgery and return to physical activity (follow-up). ACL injury and ACLR altered lower extremity biomechanics, as both ACLR groups demonstrated increases in frontal plane movement (increased hip adduction and knee valgus). The ACLR-injured leg group also exhibited decreased sagittal plane loading (decreased anterior tibial shear force, knee extension moment and hip flexion moment). No high-risk biomechanical changes were observed in control group participants. ACL injury and ACLR caused movement pattern alterations of the injured and uninjured leg that have previously shown to increase the risk for future non-contact ACL injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Longitudinal study in male swimmers: a hierachical modeling of energetics and biomechanical contributions for performance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Mário J; Bragada, José A; Marinho, Daniel A; Lopes, Vitor P; Silva, António J; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pooled and individual response of male swimmers over two consecutive years of training and identify the energetic and biomechanical factors that most contributed for the final performance. Nine competitive swimmers (20.0 ± 3.54 years old; 10.1 ± 3.41 years of training experience; 1.79 ± 0.07 m of height; 71.34 ± 8.78 kg of body mass; 22.35 ± 2.02 kg·m(-2) of body mass index; 1.86 ± 0.07 m of arm span; 116.22 ± 4.99 s of personal record in the 200 m long course freestyle event) performed an incremental test in six occasions to obtain the velocity at 4 mmol of blood lactate (V4) and the peak blood lactate concentrations (Lapeak) as energetics, and the stroke frequency (SF), stroke length (SL), stroke index and swim efficiency as biomechanical variables. Performance was determined based on official time's lists of 200 m freestyle event. Slight non-significant improvements in performance were determined throughout the two season period. All energetic and biomechanical factors also presented slight non-significant variations with training. Swimmers demonstrat-ed high inter-individual differences in the annual adaptations. The best performance predictors were the V4, SF and SL. Each unit of change V4, SF and SL represented an enhancement of 0.11 s, 1.21 s and 0.36 s in performance, respectively. The results show that: (i) competitive male swimmers need at least two consecutive seasons to have slight improvements in performance, energetics and biomechanical profiles; (ii) major improvements in competition performance can be accomplished by improving the V4, SF and SL based on the individual background. Key PointsElite swimmers are able to demonstrate slight changes in performance, energetic and biomechanical characteristics at least during two seasons of training;Additional improvements in competition performance can be accomplished by manipulating the V4, SF and SL based on the individual background.Each unit of change V4

  5. Development of a Distance Learning Study Guide in Biomechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Brett D.

    The study guide presented here was created primarily from required course texts and recommended readings. A formative committee identified criteria for the content and format of the study guide, provided input on the philosophical and practical requirements, reviewed study guide questions, and provided feedback during the developmental stage. The…

  6. The effect of tranexamic acid on artificial joint materials: a biomechanical study (the bioTRANX study).

    PubMed

    Alshryda, Sattar; Mason, James M; Sarda, Praveen; Lou, T; Stanley, Martin; Wu, Junjie; Unsworth, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been successfully used to reduce bleeding in joint replacement. Recently local TXA has been advocated to reduce blood loss in total knee or hip replacement; however, this raised concerns about potential adverse effects of TXA upon the artificial joint replacement. In this biomechanical study we compared the effects of TXA and saline upon the following biomechanical properties of artificial joint materials-(1) tensile properties (ultimate strength, stiffness and Young's modulus), (2) the wear rate using a multi-directional pin-on-plate machine, and (3) the surface topography of pins and plates before and after wear rate testing. There were no significant differences in tensile strength, wear rates or surface topography of either ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene pins or cobalt chromium molybdenum metal plates between specimens soaked in TXA and specimens soaked in saline. Biomechanical testing shows that there are no biomechanical adverse affects on the properties of common artificial joint materials from using topical TXA. V.

  7. Human Genome-Wide Expression Analysis Reorients the Study of Inflammatory Mediators and Biomechanics in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sandy, John D.; Chan, Deva D.; Trevino, Robert L.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Plaas, Anna

    2015-01-01

    A major objective of this article is to examine the research implications of recently available genome-wide expression profiles of cartilage from human osteoarthritis (OA) joints. We propose that when viewed in the light of extensive earlier work this novel data provides a unique opportunity to reorient the design of experimental systems toward clinical relevance. Specifically, in the area of cartilage explant biology this will require a fresh evaluation of existing paradigms, so as to optimize the choices of tissue source, cytokine/growth factor/nutrient addition, and biomechanical environment for discovery. Within this context, we firstly discuss the literature on the nature and role of potential catabolic mediators in OA pathology, including data from human OA cartilage, animal models of OA and ex vivo studies. Secondly, due to the number and breadth of studies on IL-1β in this area, a major focus of the article is a critical analysis of the design and interpretation of cartilage studies where IL-1β has been used as a model cytokine. Thirdly, the article provides a data-driven perspective (including genome-wide analysis of clinical samples, studies on mutant mice, and clinical trials), which concludes that IL-1β should be replaced by soluble mediators such as IL-17 or TGF-β1, which are much more likely to mimic the disease in OA model systems. We also discuss the evidence that changes in early OA can be attributed to the activity of such soluble mediators, whereas late-stage disease results more from a chronic biomechanical effect on the matrix and cells of the remaining cartilage and on other local mediator-secreting cells. Lastly, an updated protocol for in vitro studies with cartilage explants and chondrocytes (including the use of specific gene expression arrays) is provided to motivate more disease-relevant studies on the interplay of cytokines/growth factors and biomechanics on cellular behavior. PMID:26521740

  8. [Biomechanical study on dento-alveolar arch forces].

    PubMed

    Onu, Brînduşa; Burlui, V

    2009-01-01

    This study has two major objectives. The first one is to draw attention in an original device especially conceived and designed to measure bite force; the second purpose of the study is represented by proper measurements of individual bite force during bilateral clenching for two lots of patients using this device and comparing the outcomes to those of other similar studies, in order to prove its practical utility. 62 young (20-35 years of age) healthy patients were tested: 35 fully dentured subjects in control group and 27 subjects with various single unit treated edentation, in test group. The two potentiometers from the lateral side of the device are connected to a computer which would measure, register and interpret the outcomes during three different sessions of clenching for each patient. Measured values showed that the mean maximum bilateral bite force in patients with no edentation was, in all cases, higher than in patients with single unit treated edentation for all three sessions. Because the device allows simultaneous bilateral registration of the bite force, during the same session, it is obvious that it can measure also the asymmetry between left and right dental hemi-arches. Therefore, in control group, mean values found in left side were higher (369.36N - 399.75N) than right side (352.18N - 392.15N); an opposite situation was found in test group: higher values were found in right side (313.75N - 329.43N) comparing to left side (310.54N -321.53N). The device proved to be usefull not only for measuring bite force in one region of dental arches, but it is designed to simultaneous register parameters from various regions; the values obtained in this study are similar to those reported by others authors who used more sophisticated devices, so that this simple device proves its usefulness.

  9. Biomechanics of Interspinous Devices

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo D.; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Vertuccio, Antonella; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Cervi, Valentina; Giannetti, Christian; Calvosa, Giuseppe; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A number of interspinous devices (ISD) have been introduced in the lumbar spine implant market. Unfortunately, the use of these devices often is not associated with real comprehension of their biomechanical role. The aim of this paper is to review the biomechanical studies about interspinous devices available in the literature to allow the reader a better comprehension of the effects of these devices on the treated segment and on the adjacent segments of the spine. For this reason, our analysis will be limited to the interspinous devices that have biomechanical studies published in the literature. PMID:25114923

  10. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace; Marques de Almeida, Adriano; Serbino, José Wilson; da Mota Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Tukey’s tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study). PMID:20454502

  11. Tissue-Engineering for the Study of Cardiac Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Stephen P.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The notion that both adaptive and maladaptive cardiac remodeling occurs in response to mechanical loading has informed recent progress in cardiac tissue engineering. Today, human cardiac tissues engineered in vitro offer complementary knowledge to that currently provided by animal models, with profound implications to personalized medicine. We review here recent advances in the understanding of the roles of mechanical signals in normal and pathological cardiac function, and their application in clinical translation of tissue engineering strategies to regenerative medicine and in vitro study of disease. PMID:26720588

  12. Biomechanical study of the final push-pull in archery.

    PubMed

    Leroyer, P; Van Hoecke, J; Helal, J N

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse archery performance among eight archers of different abilities by means of displacement pull-hand measurements during the final push-pull phase of the shoot. The archers showed an irregular displacement negatively related to their technical level. Displacement signal analysis showed high power levels in both the 0-5 Hz and 8-12 Hz ranges. The latter peak corresponds to electromyographic tremor observed during a prolonged push-pull effort. The results are discussed in relation to some potentially helpful training procedures such as biofeedback and strength conditioning.

  13. Biomechanical study of the tibia in knee replacement revision.

    PubMed

    Quílez, M P; Pérez, M A; Seral-García, B

    2015-01-01

    The best management of severe bone defects following total knee replacement is still controversial. Metal augments, tantalum cones and porous tibial sleeves could help the surgeon to manage any type of bone loss, providing a stable and durable knee joint reconstruction. Five different types of prostheses have been analysed: one prosthesis with straight stem; two prostheses with offset stem, with and without supplement, and two prostheses with sleeves, with and without stem. The purpose of this study is to report a finite element study of revision knee tibial implants. The main objective was to analyse the tibial bone density changes and Von Misses tension changes following different tibial implant designs. In all cases, the bone density decreases in the proximal epiphysis and medullary channels, with a bone density increase also being predicted in the diaphysis and at the bone around the stems tips. The highest value of Von Misses stress has been obtained for the straight tibial stem, and the lowest for the stemless metaphyseal sleeves prosthesis. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Compression capability of cerclage fixation systems. A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J A; Daubert, H B

    1988-08-01

    Cerclage wire or tension band techniques are frequently complicated by broken wires or inadequate bony stabilization. The fixation capabilities of various cerclage systems were defined in this study by measuring the maximum compression forces generated by the different methods as well as their ultimate strengths. Parham bands and swage-lock titanium cables were found to exhibit the greatest fixation potential and highest ultimate strengths. Cerclage fixation using stainless steel wire was found to be enhanced by using a modified square knot. Mersilene tape was found to have fixation capabilities of similar magnitude to 20 guage stainless wire secured with a twist knot. The polypropylene and nylon cable ties tested showed no advantage when compared to the other systems.

  15. [Fixateur interne: a comparative biomechanical study of various systems].

    PubMed

    Nolte, L P; Steffen, R; Krämer, J; Jergas, M

    1993-02-01

    The three-dimensional stability provided by three spinal fixation devices of the type "fixateur interne" have been studied in an in vitro model using L2-L4 sections of the lumbar spine. Three-dimensional rotations and translations for the intact and instrumented spine under physiological loads in flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were determined. To objectify the results, a dimensionless related stability parameter was introduced. The tested devices were: Dick (AO-Synthes), Kluger (Endotec), and SOCON (Aesculap). In addition a vertebrectomy L3 was performed to simulate a severe fracture model. Different screw diameters allowed for a direct comparison of two internal fixateur systems on identical specimens. In contrast to the intact spine, the instrumented spine reflects purely linear structural behaviour with a stabilization significant in flexion/extension and lateral bending and only moderate in axial rotation. Differences for various systems tested were found to be small. The results for the fracture model confirmed the efficiency of these internal fixation devices.

  16. Biomechanical study of different plate configurations for distal humerus osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bogataj, M; Kosel, F; Norris, R; Krkovic, M; Brojan, M

    2015-05-01

    Fractures of the distal humerus are most commonly fixed by open reduction and internal fixation, using plates and screws, either in a locking or in a non-locking construct. Three different plating systems are commonly used in practice. The most important differences between them are in plate orientation, which affects both the rigidity of the osteosynthesis and invasiveness of the surgical procedure. Unfortunately, there is no common agreement between surgeons about which plate configuration brings the best clinical outcome. In this study, we investigate the theoretical rigidity of plate osteosyntheses considering two types of AO/ASIF configurations (90° angle between plates), Mayo clinic (Acumed) configuration (180° between plates) and dorsal fixation of both plates. We also compared the results for cases with and without contact between the bone fragments. In the case of no bone contact, the Mayo clinic plate configuration is found to be the most rigid, followed by both AO/ASIF plate configurations, and the least rigid system is the Korosec plate configuration. On the other hand, no significant differences between all types of fixation configurations are found in cases with contact in-between the bone fragments. Our findings show that this contact is very important and can compensate for the lack of load carrying capacity of the implants. This could therefore incite other implant fixation solutions, leading to less invasive surgical procedures and consequently improved clinical outcome.

  17. A biomechanical study of the finger pulley system during repair.

    PubMed

    Amirouche, F; Gonzalez, M; Koldoff, J; Tioco, J; Ham, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the mechanics of the finger/pulley system when subjected to various excisions and repairs. Several cadaver hands were used to study the finger/pulley's function, finger joint dynamics, and the relationship between tendon excursion and finger joint angles of rotation. By using a method of continuous and simultaneous data acquisition of the entire finger joint's motion, a more detailed analysis was achieved. Our experimental investigation is based on the use of four micro-potentiometers inserted at the finger's joints and a pulley system to simulate tendon excursion. Using this procedure, a detailed kinematic analysis of the entire finger was performed. This included analysis of the intact hand, various pulley excisions, and reconstruction. In addition to introducing a new method of acquisition, a mathematical model was developed for the inverse dynamic analysis of the finger pulley system. From this model, the torques required at the joints for the motion were computed. The results provided new insight into possible ways of characterizing kinematic changes resulting from pulley damage and repair.

  18. Studying neuronal biomechanics and its role in CNS development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franze, Kristian; Svoboda, Hanno; da F. Costa, Luciano; Guck, Jochen; Holt, Christine

    2013-03-01

    During the development of the nervous system, neurons migrate and grow over great distances. Currently, our understanding of nervous tissue development is, in large part, based on studies of biochemical signaling. Despite the fact that forces are involved in any kind of cell motion, mechanical aspects have so far rarely been considered. Here we used deformable cell culture substrates, traction force microscopy and calcium imaging to investigate how neurons probe and respond to their mechanical environment. While the growth rate of retinal ganglion cell axons was increased on stiffer substrates, their tendency to grow in bundles, which they show in vivo, was significantly enhanced on more compliant substrates. Moreover, if grown on substrates incorporating linear stiffness gradients, neuronal axons were repelled by stiff substrates. Mechanosensing involved the application of forces driven by the interaction of actin and myosin II, and the activation of stretch-activated ion channels leading to calcium influxes into the cells. Applying a modified atomic force microscopy techniquein vivo, we found mechanical gradients in developing brain tissue along which neurons grow. The application of chondroitin sulfate, which is a major extracellular matrix component in the developing brain, changed tissue mechanics and disrupted axonal pathfinding. Hence, our data suggest that neuronal growth is not only guided by chemical signals - as it is currently assumed - but also by the nervous tissue's mechanical properties.

  19. [Biomechanical study of lumbar spine under different vibration conditions].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Pin; Du, Chengfei; Mo, Zhongjun; Gong, He; Wang, Lizhen; Fan, Yubo

    2015-02-01

    We observed the effect of vibration parameters on lumbar spine under different vibration conditions using finite element analysis method in our laboratory. In this study, the CT-images of L1-L5 segments were obtained. All images were used to develop 3D geometrical model using the Mimics10. 01 (Materialise, Belgium). Then it was modified using Geomagic Studio12. 0 (Raindrop Geomagic Inc. USA). Finite element (FE) mesh model was generated by Hypermesh11. 0 (Altair Engineering, Inc. USA) and Abaqus. Abaqus was used to calculate the stress distribution of L1-L5 under different vibration conditions. It was found that in a vibration cycle, tensile stress was occurred on lumbar vertebra mainly. Stress distributed evenly and stress concentration occurred on the left rear side of the upper endplate. The stress had no obvious changes under different frequencies, but the stress was higher when amplitude was greater. In conclusion, frequency and amplitude parameters have little effect on the stress distribution in vertebra. The stress magnitude is positively correlated with the amplitude.

  20. Coronoid reconstruction using osteochondral grafts: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bellato, Enrico; Kim, Youngbok; Fitzsimmons, James S; Berglund, Lawrence J; Hooke, Alexander W; Bachman, Daniel R; O'Driscoll, Shawn W

    2017-07-19

    The purposes of this study were to test the hypothesis that coronoid deficiency in the setting of posteromedial rotatory instability (PMRI) must be reconstructed to restore articular contact pressures to normal and to compare 3 different osteochondral grafts for this purpose. After creation of a anteromedial fracture, six cadaveric elbows were tested under gravity varus stress using a custom-made machine designed to simulate muscle loads and to passively flex the elbow. Mean articular surface contact pressure data were collected and processed using TekScan sensors and software. After testing of the intact specimen (intact condition), a PMRI injury was created (PMRI condition). Testing was repeated after reconstruction of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) (LCL-only condition), followed by reconstruction of the coronoid with 3 different osteochondral graft techniques (reconstructed conditions). Contact pressure was consistently significantly higher in the PMRI elbow compared with the intact, LCL-only, and reconstructed conditions (P < .006). The LCL-only elbow contact pressure was significantly higher than that of the intact and reconstructed conditions from 5° to 55° of flexion (P = .018). The contact pressure of the intact elbow was never significantly different from that of the reconstructed elbow, except at 5° of flexion (P ≤ .008). No significant difference was detected between each of the reconstructed techniques (P ≥ .15). However, the annular surface of the radial head was the only graft that yielded contact pressures not significantly different from normal at any flexion angle. Isolated reconstruction of the LCL did not restore native articular surface contact pressure, and reconstruction of the coronoid using osteochondral graft was necessary. There was no difference in contact pressures among the 3 coronoid reconstruction techniques. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier

  1. Patellofemoral Contact Pressures After Patellar Distalization: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Justin S; Fulkerson, John P; Obopilwe, Elifho; Voss, Andreas; Divenere, Jessica; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Edgar, Cory M

    2017-08-22

    To measure the patellofemoral contact pressure in early flexion after a tibial tubercle distalization osteotomy. Ten matched-pair fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were studied. The average Blackburne-Peel ratio of the native knees was 0.91. The knees were placed on a testing rig, with a fixed femur and tibia mobile through 90° of flexion. Individual quadriceps heads and the iliotibial band were separated and loaded with 205 N in anatomic directions using a weighted pulley system. A straight tubercle distalization osteotomy of 1 cm was performed and fixed with screws, with and without a lateral release. Patellofemoral contact pressures were measured at 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° of flexion using pressure-sensitive films on the medial trochlea and lateral trochlea. Contact force, area, and pressure were measured in the following states: (1) in the native knee, (2) after distalization, and (3) after distalization with lateral release. The average Blackburne-Peel ratio after distalization was 0.64. Tibial tubercle distalization resulted in a 6-fold increase in mean contact pressure at 0° (0.15 MPa vs 0.90 MPa, P < .001) and a 55% increase at 10° of flexion (0.70 MPa vs 1.09 MPa, P = .02). Mean contact pressure was similar from 20° to 90° of flexion (P > .1). After distalization, the total contact area was significantly higher at 0° of flexion (17.7 mm(2) vs 58.4 mm(2), P = .02). Lateral release after distalization did not significantly change contact pressure (P > .21). Our results suggest that patella baja, as a result of excessive patellar distalization, can cause increased patellofemoral contact pressures during early flexion at 0° and 10°. No changes were seen in contact pressure from 20° to 90°. Care should be taken to prevent excessive distalization of the patella to avoid patella baja and increased patellofemoral contact pressures during early flexion. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by

  2. Tarsal autografts for reconstruction of the scapholunate interosseous ligament: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hofstede, D J; Ritt, M J; Bos, K E

    1999-09-01

    A biomechanical cadaver study was performed to identify a potential bone-ligament-bone autograft from the foot for reconstruction of the scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL). In this study the biomechanical properties of 9 dorsal tarsal ligaments and the anterior tibiofibular ligament were investigated and compared with those of the dorsal part of the SLIL. Fifteen fresh-frozen human cadaver feet and 14 fresh-frozen human cadaver wrists were used. In a Monsanto Tensometer testing apparatus (Monsanto Limited Instruments, Dorean Swindon, England) the complexes were uniaxially elongated at a constant velocity of 6.35 mm/min until rupture occurred. The stiffness and strength values for each tarsal ligament were calculated and compared with those of the dorsal part of the SL ligament. Analysis indicated that the third dorsal tarsometatarsal ligament (143 +/- 42 N) and the dorsal calcaneocuboid ligament (149 +/- 41 N) were comparable to the dorsal part of the SL ligament (141 +/- 20 N) while all other ligaments were stronger. The stiffness values of the third dorsal tarsometatarsal ligament (67 +/- 17 N/mm) and the dorsal calcaneocuboid ligament (55 +/- 14 N/mm) were comparable to the dorsal part of the SL ligament (61 +/- 6 N/mm). All the other ligaments had values that were higher than the dorsal part of the SL ligament. The strongest ligament appeared to be the medial dorsal cuneonavicular ligament (479 +/- 65 N), which had a stiffness value of 127 +/- 19 N/mm. Although the third dorsal tarsometatarsal ligament and the dorsal calcaneocuboid ligament are biomechanically most similar to the dorsal part of the SLIL, at present it is unclear how strength and stiffness values of ligaments are sustained following transplantation. From this selection of tarsal ligaments, the medial dorsal cuneonavicular ligament is the strongest ligament and it is therefore concluded that this ligament is the most suitable ligament to be used as an autograft for reconstruction of the

  3. Tangential Bicortical Locked Fixation Improves Stability in Vancouver B1 Periprosthetic Femur Fractures: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gregory S; Caroom, Cyrus T; Wee, Hwabok; Jurgensmeier, Darin; Rothermel, Shane D; Bramer, Michelle A; Reid, John Spence

    2015-10-01

    The biomechanical difficulty in fixation of a Vancouver B1 periprosthetic fracture is purchase of the proximal femoral segment in the presence of the hip stem. Several newer technologies provide the ability to place bicortical locking screws tangential to the hip stem with much longer lengths of screw purchase compared with unicortical screws. This biomechanical study compares the stability of 2 of these newer constructs to previous methods. Thirty composite synthetic femurs were prepared with cemented hip stems. The distal femur segment was osteotomized, and plates were fixed proximally with either (1) cerclage cables, (2) locked unicortical screws, (3) a composite of locked screws and cables, or tangentially directed bicortical locking screws using either (4) a stainless steel locking compression plate system with a Locking Attachment Plate (Synthes) or (5) a titanium alloy Non-Contact Bridging system (Zimmer). Specimens were tested to failure in either axial or torsional quasistatic loading modes (n = 3) after 20 moderate load preconditioning cycles. Stiffness, maximum force, and failure mechanism were determined. Bicortical constructs resisted higher (by an average of at least 27%) maximum forces than the other 3 constructs in torsional loading (P < 0.05). Cables constructs exhibited lower maximum force than all other constructs, in both axial and torsional loading. The bicortical titanium construct was stiffer than the bicortical stainless steel construct in axial loading. Proximal fixation stability is likely improved with the use of bicortical locking screws as compared with traditional unicortical screws and cable techniques. In this study with a limited sample size, we found the addition of cerclage cables to unicortical screws may not offer much improvement in biomechanical stability of unstable B1 fractures.

  4. Ulnar impaction syndrome with different operative methods: a comparative biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ya-Dong; Wu, Tao; Tian, Fang-Tao; Shang, Yun-Tao; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Bai, Yan-Bin; Han, Chang-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar impaction syndrome seriously impairs wrist and hand function. Three main treatment procedures are available; however, little systematic research on the post-operation changes in wrist biomechanics currently exists. This study aimed to determine the long-term effects of these procedures and the optimal treatment methods for ulnar impaction syndrome. Twenty-four cases of fresh upper limb specimens were randomized into four groups: (1) the control group, (2) the ulnar-shortening operation group, (3) the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group (distal radioulnar arthrodesis and intentional distal ulnar pseudoarthrosis), and (4) the Darrach procedure group (distal ulna resection). After keeping the wrist in a neutral position, a pressure sensitive film was applied. Starting at 0 N, the load was increased gradually at a speed of 0.1 N/s until reaching 200 N and then maintained for 60 s by the CSS-44020 series biomechanical machine. Then, the pressure sensitive films from each group were measured, and the results were analyzed with SPSS software. The mean pressure and force on the ulna in the groups followed a decreasing trend from the control group, Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group and ulnar-shortening operation group. The mean pressure of the scaphoid fossa and the force on distal aspect of the radius in the groups followed an increasing trend from the control group, Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group, ulnar-shortening operation group and Darrach procedure group. This study found no significant differences in the mean pressure of the scaphoid fossa and the force on distal aspect of the radius between the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group and the ulnar-shortening operation group. The Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group showed the greatest mean pressure on lunate fossa. In this comprehensive analysis of wrist biomechanics, the ulnar-shortening operation was superior to the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure and Darrach procedure, which adequately maintained the anatomical relationships of the

  5. Biomechanical wall properties of the human rectum. A study with impedance planimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Dall, F H; Jørgensen, C S; Houe, D; Gregersen, H; Djurhuus, J C

    1993-01-01

    Biomechanical properties of the rectal wall were studied in 17 healthy adult volunteers (nine men and eight women). With impedance planimetry it is possible to obtain simultaneous measurements of pressure and rectal cross sectional area (CSA) during balloon inflations. Rectal distensions were done with an intraluminal balloon using specified pressures up to 40 cmH2O above baseline rectal pressure. Balloon inflation elicited a phase of rapid increase in rectal CSA followed by a phase of slow increase until a steady state was reached. Steady state occurred within 67 to 140 seconds with the shortest period at the highest distension pressures. Steady state rectal CSA values had a non-linear relation to increasing distension pressure. Rectal CSA values in women showed a tendency of being slightly higher than male values at all pressure steps with a significant difference at 3 and 5 cm H2O. Biomechanical parameters were calculated from rectal CSA pressure relations. Circumferential wall tension increased in a linear way. Rectal compliance decreased in a non-linear way with no further decline between 30 and 40 cmH2O. The pressure elastic modulus increased steeply until a distension pressure of 35 cmH2O with no further increase to 40 cmH2O. This suggests that rectal tone is reduced as the muscle fails to resist further distension at 35 cmH2O and higher pressures. Impedance planimetry offers new possibilities for investigation of anorectal physiology through the study of segmental biomechanical wall properties of the human rectum. PMID:8244148

  6. A biomechanical study on the effects of rib head release on thoracic spinal motion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xianfeng; Blount, Thomas J; Suzuki, Nobumasa; Brown, Laura K; van der Walt, Christiaan J; Baldini, Todd; Lindley, Emily M; Patel, Vikas V; Burger, Evalina L

    2012-04-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis is generally treated by surgical derotation of the spine. A secondary goal of surgery is minimization of the "rib hump" deformity. Previous studies have evaluated the effects of surgical releases such as diskectomy, costo-vertebral joint release, facetectomy, and costoplasty on spine mobilization and overall contribution to thoracic stability. The present study was designed to evaluate the biomechanical effects of the rib head joints alone on axial rotation, lateral bending, and segmental rotation, without diskectomy or disruption of anterior or posterior elements. Four female cadaver thoracic spines with intact sternums and rib cages were mounted in an Instron servo-hydraulic bi-axial MTS. In a 12-step sequence, the costo-vertebral and costo-transverse ligaments were released, first unilaterally from T10-T7, then bilaterally until complete disarticulation between the rib heads and the vertebral bodies. After each release, biomechanical testing, including axial rotation and lateral bending, was performed. Vertebral body displacement was also measured using electromagnetic trackers. We found that rib displacement during axial rotation was significantly increased by unilateral rib head release, and torque was decreased with each successive cut. We also found increased vertebral displacement with sequential rib head release. Our results show that sequential costo-vertebral joint releases result in a decrease in the force required for axial rotation and lateral bending, coupled with an increase in the displacement of vertebral bodies. These findings suggest that surgical release of the costo-transverse and costo-vertebral ligaments can facilitate segmental correction in scoliosis by decreasing the torso's natural biomechanical resistance to this correction.

  7. Studies on Beam Formation in an Atomic Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nass, A.; Stancari, M.; Steffens, E.

    2009-08-01

    Atomic beam sources (ABS) are widely used workhorses producing polarized atomic beams for polarized gas targets and polarized ion sources. Although they have been used for decades the understanding of the beam formation processes is crude. Models were used more or less successfully to describe the measured intensity and beam parameters. ABS's are also foreseen for future experiments, such as PAX [1]. An increase of intensity at a high polarization would be beneficial. A direct simulation Monte-Carlo method (DSMC) [2] was used to describe the beam formation of a hydrogen or deuterium beam in an ABS. For the first time a simulation of a supersonic gas expansion on a molecular level for this application was performed. Beam profile and Time-of-Flight measurements confirmed the simulation results. Furthermore a new method of beam formation was tested, the Carrier Jet method [3], based on an expanded beam surrounded by an over-expanded carrier jet.

  8. Rise of the Pigs: Utilization of the Porcine Model to Study Musculoskeletal Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering During Skeletal Growth.

    PubMed

    Cone, Stephanie G; Warren, Paul B; Fisher, Matthew B

    2017-09-01

    Large animal models play an essential role in the study of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM), as well as biomechanics. The porcine model has been increasingly used to study the musculoskeletal system, including specific joints, such as the knee and temporomandibular joints, and tissues, such as bone, cartilage, and ligaments. In particular, pigs have been utilized to evaluate the role of skeletal growth on the biomechanics and engineered replacements of these joints and tissues. In this review, we explore the publication history of the use of pig models in biomechanics and TERM discuss interspecies comparative studies, highlight studies on the effect of skeletal growth and other biological considerations in the porcine model, and present challenges and emerging opportunities for using this model to study functional TERM.

  9. Fixation performance of an ultrasonically fused, bioresorbable osteosynthesis implant: A biomechanical and biocompatibility study.

    PubMed

    Augat, P; Robioneck, P B; Abdulazim, A; Wipf, F; Lips, K S; Alt, V; Schnettler, R; Heiss, C

    2016-01-01

    Bioresorbable implants may serve as an alternative option for the fixation of bone fractures. Because of their minor inherent mechanical properties and insufficient anchorage within bone bioresorbable implants have so far been limited to mechanically nondemanding fracture types. By briefly liquefying the surface of the biomaterial during insertion, bioresorbable implants can be ultrasonically fused with bone to improve their mechanical fixation. The objective of this study was to investigate the biomechanical fixation performance and in vivo biocompatibility of an ultrasonically fused bioresorbable polymeric pin (SonicPin). First, we biomechanically compared the fused pin with press fitted metallic and bioresorbable polymeric implants for quasi-static and fatigue strength under shear and tensile loading in a polyurethane foam model. Second, fused implants were inserted into cancellous bovine bone and tested biomechanically to verify the reproducibility of their fusion behavior. Finally, the fused pins were tested in a lapine model of femoral condyle osteotomies and were histologically examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. While comparable under static shear loads, fixation performance of ultrasonically fused pins was significantly (p = 0.001) stronger under tensile loading than press fit implants and showed no pull-out. Both bioresorbable implants withstood comparable fatigue shear strength, but less than the K-wire. In bovine bone the ultrasonic fusion process worked highly reproducible and provided consistent mechanical fixation. In vivo, the polymeric pin produced no notable foreign body reactions or resorption layers. Ultrasonic fusion of polymeric pins achieved adequate and consistent mechanical fixation with high reproducibility and exhibits good short-term resorption and biocompatibility. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A novel adjustable dynamic plate for treatment of long bone fractures: An in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Acar, Nihat; Karaarslan, Ahmet; Ertem, Fatih; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Locking compression plate (LCP) system was designed to provide bone stability and to enhance bone healing. However, implant failure, nonunion and instability are still frequently encountered complications. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the biomechanical characteristics of a novel adjustable dynamic plate (ADP) with the commonly used LCP. Twelve 4th generation composite artificial femoral bones were used. Transverse fracture was created in all bones, 6 femurs were fixated using the novel ADP, whereas the other 6 femurs were fixated using the traditional LCP. All samples had undergone a non-destructive repetitive different forces (axial compression, bending and torsion), to evaluate the biomechanical differences between the two plating systems. Under axial load the mean stiffness value was 439.0 N/mm for the ADP and 158.9 N/mm for the LCP, ADP showed a statistically significant stiffness value than LCP with a P value of 0.004. There was no significant difference in flexion/extension bending strain values between ADP and LCP. However LCP provided significantly stiffer fixation in medial and lateral bending tests than ADP (P = 0.037) and (P = 0.016) respectively. But no significant difference was detected between the two plating system in the applied torsional stress. These results do not show any significant biomechanical difference in the applied torsional and bending stresses between LCP and ADP. However the remarkably increased persistent compression effect of the ADP created a considerable stress on fracture edges which may accelerate bone healing.

  11. Microrobotized blasting improves the bone-to-textured implant response. A preclinical in vivo biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo G; Gil, Luiz F; Neiva, Rodrigo; Jimbo, Ryo; Tovar, Nick; Lilin, Thomas; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of microrobotized blasting of titanium endosteal implants relative to their manually blasted counterparts. Two different implant systems were utilized presenting two different implant surfaces. Control surfaces (Manual) were fabricated by manually grit blasting the implant surfaces while experimental surfaces (Microblasted) were fabricated through a microrobotized system that provided a one pass grit blasting routine. Both surfaces were created with the same ~50µm average particle size alumina powder at ~310KPa. Surfaces were then etched with 37% HCl for 20min, washed, and packaged through standard industry procedures. The surfaces were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical interferometry, and were then placed in a beagle dog radius model remaining in vivo for 3 and 6 weeks. The implant removal torque was recorded and statistical analysis evaluated implant system and surface type torque levels as a function of time in vivo. Histologic sections were qualitatively evaluated for tissue response. Electron microscopy depicted textured surfaces for both manual and microblasted surfaces. Optical interferometry showed significantly higher Sa, Sq, values for the microblasted surface and no significant difference for Sds and Sdr values between surfaces. In vivo results depicted that statistically significant gains in biomechanical fixation were obtained for both implant systems tested at 6 weeks in vivo, while only one system presented significant biomechanical gain at 3 weeks. Histologic sections showed qualitative higher amounts of new bone forming around microblasted implants relative to the manually blasted group. Microrobotized blasting resulted in higher biomechanical fixation of endosteal dental implants and should be considered as an alternative for impant surface manufacturing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical effect of rotator cuff augmentation with an acellular dermal matrix graft: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Omae, Hiromichi; Steinmann, Scott P; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E; Wongtriratanachai, Prasit; Sperling, John W; An, Kai-Nan

    2012-10-01

    Acellular human dermal matrix grafts (Graftjacket; Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN, USA) are used clinically for rotator cuff augmentation without a detailed understanding of their biomechanical effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of augmentation with dermal grafts on the biomechanical effects of rotator cuff repairs. Nine matched pairs of human cadaveric shoulders were used. A single-row rotator cuff repair combined with an augmentation graft was performed on one shoulder, and a single-row repair was performed on the contralateral shoulder as a control. An acellular dermal matrix graft was sutured to the tendon medially and fixed to the humerus laterally. The constructs were preloaded at 10 N and then cyclically loaded between 10 and 180 N for 1000 cycles, followed by tensile testing to failure at 1.0 mm/s. The maximum load of the augmentation group (560.2 N, SD 95.5) was greater than that of the control group (345.7 N, SD 60.8), while the linear stiffness of the augmentation group (65.2 N/mm, SD 15.6) was less than that of the control group (77.2 N/mm, SD 15.7). Reliable gap distance data were not obtained during cyclic loading in 5 of 9 augmented repairs due to the elasticity of the dermal matrix graft. The dermal matrix graft augmentation increased the maximum load but did not increase the linear stiffness. The elasticity of the dermal matrix graft affected the biomechanical effects of the augmented rotator cuff repairs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acousto-Optic Beam Steering Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    8217111 INK $ 1 1 illl iII Ill i, R L-TR-94-121 !1!1Il t 11I1!I!11! ilI, / Final Technical Report August 1994 ACOUSTO - OPTIC BEAM STEERING STUDY Harris...contractual obligations or notices on a specific document require that it be returned. For i ..........I ,, ACOUSTO - OPTIC BEAM STEERING STUDY H. W...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS ACOUSTO - OPTIC BEAM STEERING STUDY C - F30602-91-C-0131 PE - 63215C 6. AUTHOR(S) PR - 1405 TA - 02 H. W

  14. Experimental biomechanical study of head injuries in lateral falls with skateboard helmet.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sri; Herbst, Brian; Strickland, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are common in sports accidents. Helmets are generally known to provide protection to the head. However, the effectiveness of helmets in mitigating a TBI may be compromised due to the impact location and impact speed. Although it is known that the helmet decreases the linear head accelerations and the resulting head injury potential, to the best of our knowledge, limited research effort has been devoted to the study of the biomechanics of TBI in side impact conditions. The present work is designed to delineate the biomechanics of TBI in a fall impacting the parietal/temporal regions. A standing Hybrid III male dummy with pedestrian pelvis was used. The dummy was placed on a swinging platform for the fall simulation. The drop was achieved by stopping the platform with a block. The platform was swung from a predetermined height and stopped to allow the free fall of the dummy. The test was conducted with and without a skate board helmet. The impact on the dummy’s head was in the parietal and temporal regions. The head impact speed with the floor was approximately 24 kph (6.7 m/sec) The dummy was instrumented with tri-axial linear and tri-axial angular head accelerometers to measure the biomechanical injury responses. Results from three tests were compared. The linear head CG acceleration, Head Injury Criteria (HIC) and angular head accelerations were compared. Results suggest that the helmet reduced the linear head acceleration, HIC and angular head acceleration compared to the impact without a helmet. Although the linear head accelerations and HIC were reduced, the angular head accelerations even with the helmet were above nearly all proposed rotational head injury threshold in the literature. The higher angular head accelerations indicate a higher probability of concussion, acute subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injuries. The present study is an additional step to better understand the biomechanics of TBI and the role of protective

  15. Knee Biomechanics During Jogging After Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Lloyd, David G; Bennell, Kim L

    2017-07-01

    Altered knee joint biomechanics is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis and has been reported in patients after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) while performing various activities. Longitudinally, understanding knee joint biomechanics during jogging may assist future studies to assess the implications of jogging on knee joint health in this population. To investigate knee joint biomechanics during jogging in patients 3 months after APM and a healthy control group at baseline and 2 years later at follow-up. Controlled laboratory study. Seventy-eight patients who underwent medial APM and 38 healthy controls underwent a 3-dimensional motion analysis during barefoot overground jogging at baseline. Sixty-four patients who underwent APM and 23 controls returned at follow-up. External peak moments (flexion and adduction) and the peak knee flexion angle during stance were evaluated for the APM leg, non-APM leg (nonoperated leg), and control leg. At baseline, the peak knee flexion angle was 1.4° lower in the APM leg compared with the non-APM leg ( P = .03). No differences were found between the moments in the APM leg compared with the control leg (all P > .05). However, the normalized peak knee adduction moment was 35% higher in the non-APM leg compared with the control leg ( P = .008). In the non-APM leg, the normalized peak knee adduction and flexion moments were higher compared with the APM leg by 16% and 10%, respectively, at baseline ( P ≤ .004). Despite the increase in the peak knee flexion moment in the APM leg compared with the non-APM leg ( P < .001), there were no differences in the peak knee flexion moment or any other parameter assessed at 2-year follow-up between the legs ( P > .05). Comparing the APM leg and control leg, no differences in knee joint biomechanics during jogging for the variables assessed were observed. Higher knee moments in the non-APM leg may have clinical implications for the noninvolved leg. Kinematic

  16. Managing Vancouver B1 fractures by cerclage system compared to locking plate fixation - a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Katharina; Winkler, Martin; Hofstädter, Thomas; Dorn, Ulrich; Augat, Peter

    2016-06-01

    With increasing life expectancy and number of total hip arthroplasties (THA), the need for revision surgery is increasing too. The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal fracture treatment for a clinically characteristic Vancouver B1 fracture. We hypothesized that locking plate fixation has biomechanical advantages over fixation with a simple cerclage system. Additionally, we hypothesized that removal of the primary short stem and revision with a long stem would show biomechanical benefit. The biomechanical testing was performed with a static and a dynamic loading protocol on twenty 4th Generation sawbones. These were divided into four different groups (n = 5 each). In group 1, the primary uncemented short stem remained and the fracture was stabilized with a locking plate. In group 2, the primary stem remained and the fracture was stabilized with a cerclage stabilization system containing two stabilizers and four cerclages. In group 3, the primary stem was replaced by an uncemented long revision stem and the fracture was fixed with a locking plate. In group 4, the short stem was replaced by a long revision stem and the fracture was fixed with the cerclage system. Static testing revealed that the revision of the short stem with the long stem caused a 2-fold (p < 0.001, ANOVA) increase of axial stiffness. In dynamic testing, the number of cycles to failure was 4 times (p < 0.001, ANOVA) higher with the long revision stem. Compared to locked plating cerclage wiring demonstrated a 26% more cycles to failure (p = 0.031, ANOVA). The load to failure was 91% larger (p < 0.001, ANOVA) with the long revision stem and 11% smaller with locked plating (p < 0.001, ANOVA). In conclusion, the present biomechanical study indicates that periprosthetic Vancouver B1 fractures can be sufficiently fixed by simple cerclage systems. Revision with a long replacement stem provides a superior mechanical stability regardless of type of osteosynthesis fixation and is therefore a viable

  17. Biomechanical model of the thorax under blast loading: a three dimensional numerical study.

    PubMed

    Goumtcha, Aristide Awoukeng; Thoral-Pierre, Karine; Roth, Sébastien

    2014-12-01

    Injury mechanisms due to high speed dynamic loads, such as blasts, are not well understood. These research fields are widely investigated in the literature, both at the experimental and numerical levels, and try to answer questions about the safety and efficiency of protection devices or biomechanical traumas. At a numerical level, the development of powerful mathematical models tends to study tolerance limits and injury mechanisms in order to avoid experimental tests which cannot be easily conducted. In a military framework, developing a fighter/soldier numerical model can help to the understanding of many traumas which are specific to soldier injuries, like mines, ballistic impacts or blast traumas. The aim of this study is to investigate the consequences of violent loads in terms of human body response, submitting a developed and validated three-dimensional thorax finite element (FE) model to blast loadings. Specific formulations of FE methods are used to simulate this loading, and its consequence on the biomechanical model. Mechanical parameters such as pressure in the air field and also in internal organs are observed, and these values are compared to the experimental data in the literature. This study gives encouraging results and allows going further in soldier trauma investigations. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Physical-Performance Outcomes and Biomechanical Correlates from the 32-Week Yoga Empowers Seniors Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Man-Ying; Yu, Sean S.-Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Yoga Empowers Seniors Study (YESS) quantified physical demands associated with yoga performance using biomechanical methods. This study evaluated the efficacy of the program on physical function outcomes. Methods. Twenty community-dwelling older adults aged 70.7 ± 3.8 years attended biweekly 60-minute Hatha yoga classes for 32 weeks. Four domains of the physical measurements including (1) functional performance, (2) flexibility, (3) muscle strength, and (4) balance were taken at the baseline, 16-week and 32-week time points. Repeated-measures ANOVA omnibus tests and Tukey's post hoc tests were employed to examine the differences in each outcome variable across the 3 time points. Results. Improved timed chair stands (p < 0.01), 8-foot up and go (p < 0.05), 2-min step test (p < 0.05), and vertical reach (p = 0.05) performance were evident. Isometric knee flexor strength (p < 0.05) and repetitions of the heel rise test (p < 0.001) also increased following the 32-week intervention. Both flexibility and balance performance remained unchanged. Conclusions. Significant improvements in physical function and muscle-specific lower-extremity strength occur with the regular practice of a modified Hatha yoga program designed for seniors. These adaptations corresponded with the previously reported biomechanical demands of the poses. PMID:27885329

  19. Sitting movement in elderly subjects with and without Parkinson's disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Valdeci Carlos; de Biagi Curtarelli, Mônica; Sande de Souza, Luciane Aparecida Pascucci

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare kinetic, kinematic, and electromyographic variables during the sitting movement between healthy elderly and in those with Parkinson's disease (PD) with moderate involvement. We hypothesized that subjects with PD would show difficulty in selecting the muscles for the task and that this could be related to the co-activation pattern and would be reflected in the behavior of some biomechanical variables. Fifteen subjects participated in this study, seven healthy subjects (NN group) and eight with Parkinson's disease. Electromyography (EMG) activity of the tibialis anterior (TA), soleus (SO), vastus medialis oblique (VMO), biceps femoris (BF), and erector spinae (ES) were recorded, and biomechanical variables were calculated, during four phases of the sitting movement. Compared to healthy subjects, the subjects with PD showed more flexion at the ankle, knee, and hip joints in the initial position and lower joint velocity. However, the EMG activity and hip, knee, and ankle joint torques were not different during all phases of movement. The sitting movement in PD subjects with moderate involvement generates EMG activity and joint torques similar to healthy elderly subjects. Only a reduced movement velocity was found in PD patients during the sitting task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Biomechanics study during march with different military equipment of equal carrying load].

    PubMed

    Lang, Y Y

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to select the best military equipment of equal carrying load by the index of biomechanics. Six healthy young men whose age varied between 19 and 25 years were volunteered, in the experiment. They were required to march 1.5 h, carried with different military equipment of equal weight, 25 kg, at a speed of 5 km/h. The centre of gravity of the body and its kinesic parameters were measured before and after the march. The frequency and length of pace were measured during the march. The results of the study indicated that the displacement of the body's centre of gravity carrying equipment I was the most evident, whereas the least displacement of centre of gravity of the body was that carrying equipment II. The frequency of pace during the march was reduced in all three carrying different kinds of equipment, the most evident being that carrying equipment I; the length of pace became bigger with those carrying equipment II and III; the speed of pace was decelerated using equipment I, but it was quickened with equipment II. The change of kinesic parameters have no significant difference among the three. In summary; equipment II conforms best to biomechanical principles, whereas equipment I is the worst.

  1. Locking-plate osteosynthesis versus intramedullary nailing for fixation of olecranon fractures: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Tobias E; Burkhart, Klaus J; Andres, Torsten; Dietz, Sven O; Klitscher, Daniela; Mueller, Lars P; Rommens, Pol M

    2013-05-01

    Intramedullary nailing and locked plating for fixation of olecranon fractures has recently gained popularity. However, these two new technologies have not been compared for their biomechanical efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of two newly designed fracture fixation devices for treating olecranon fractures during dynamic continuous loading: the ION intramedullary locking nail and the LCP precontoured locking compression plate. Simulated oblique olecranon fractures were created in eight pairs of fresh-frozen cadaver ulnae and stabilised using either the LCP or ION. Specimens were then subjected to continuous dynamic loading (from 25 to 200 N), with a continuous angle alteration between 0° and 90° of flexion, to perform a matched-pairs comparison. Significant differences in the distance between markers surrounding the fracture gap was determined using the Wilcoxon test after four and 300 loading cycles. The ION resulted in significantly less displacement in the fracture gap at 0° extension (P = 0.036), 45° flexion (P = 0.035) and 90° flexion (P = 0.017) after 300 cycles of continuous loading. The measured displacements were small and were probably not of clinical significance. No mechanical failure or hardware migration was seen with either fixation technique. This study shows significantly less micromotion for the ION than for the LCP in treating oblique olecranon fractures after 300 cycles of dynamic loading. Both implant types could be appropriate surgical techniques for fixation of selected olecranon fractures and osteotomies.

  2. Bicondylar tibial plateau fractures managed with the Sheffield Hybrid Fixator. Biomechanical study and operative technique.

    PubMed

    Ali, A M; Yang, L; Hashmi, M; Saleh, M

    2001-12-01

    The two main challenges in the management of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures are: Firstly, the compromised skin and soft tissue envelope which invite a high rate of complications following attempted open reduction and dual plating. Secondly, poor bone quality and comminuted fracture patterns, which create difficulty in achieving stable fixation. Although dual plating is considered to be the best mechanical method of stabilizing these complex fractures, there remains concern regarding the high rate of complications associated with extensive soft tissue dissection, required for the insertion of these plates in an already compromised knee. The Sheffield Hybrid fixator (SHF) technique offers a solution to the two main problems of these difficult fractures by minimizing soft tissue dissection, since bone fragments are reduced and fixed percutaneously, and providing superior cancellous bone purchase with beam loading stabilization for comminuted fractures. Our biomechanical testing showed the SHF with four tensioned wires to be as strong as dual plating and able to provide adequate mechanical stability in the fixation of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures. This was confirmed clinically by a prospective review of the use of the SHF at our centre, for managing complex and high-energy tibial plateau fractures with a good final outcome and no cases of deep infection or septic arthritis.

  3. Low-cost microcontroller platform for studying lymphatic biomechanics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nipper, Matthew E; Dixon, J Brandon

    2013-01-04

    The pumping innate to collecting lymphatic vessels routinely exposes the endothelium to oscillatory wall shear stress and other dynamic forces. However, studying the mechanical sensitivity of the lymphatic endothelium remains a difficult task due to limitations of commercial or custom systems to apply a variety of time-varying stresses in vitro. Current biomechanical in vitro testing devices are very expensive, limited in capability, or highly complex; rendering them largely inaccessible to the endothelial cell biology community. To address these shortcomings, the authors propose a reliable, low-cost platform for augmenting the capabilities of commercially available pumps to produce a wide variety of flow rate waveforms. In particular, the Arduino Uno, a microcontroller development board, is used to provide open-loop control of a digital peristaltic pump using precisely timed serial commands. In addition, the flexibility of this platform is further demonstrated through its support of a custom-built cell-straining device capable of producing oscillatory strains with varying amplitudes and frequencies. Hence, this microcontroller development board is shown to be an inexpensive, precise, and easy-to-use tool for supplementing in vitro assays to quantify the effects of biomechanical forces on lymphatic endothelial cells.

  4. Biomechanical study of the sacroiliac fracture fixation with titanium rods and pedicle screws

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Fabrício Hidetoshi; Pisani, Marina Justi; Machado, André Nunes; Rodrigues, Fábio Lucas; Fujiki, Edison Noburo; Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess biomechanically different fixations means of the sacroiliac joint with pedicle screws and to compare the traditional head height with reduced ones. METHODS: We used a polyethylene model representing the pelvic ring and simulated a unilateral sacroiliac dislocation. We set up three different constructions: 1) two screws attached to a rod; 2) two rods connected to two small head screws each; and 3) two rods connected to two average headed screws each. We conducted tests in a biomechanical testing and a mechanized processing laboratory. RESULTS: Group 1 supported an average maximum load of 99.70 N. Group 2 supported an average maximum load of 362.46 N. Group 3 endured an average maximum load of 404.15 N. In the assembly with one rod, the resistance decreased as compared with the one with two bars: 72.5 % compared to small-headed screws and 75.3 % to the traditional screw. CONCLUSION: The assembly with a single bar presented inferior results when compared to the double bar assembly. There was no statistical difference in the results between the screws used. Experimental Study. PMID:26207094

  5. Anabolic androgenic steroids reverse the beneficial effect of exercise on tendon biomechanics: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Tsitsilonis, Serafim; Chatzistergos, Panayiotis E; Panayiotis, Chatzistergos E; Mitousoudis, Athanasios S; Athanasios, Mitousoudis S; Kourkoulis, Stavros K; Stavros, Kourkoulis K; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Ioannis, Vlachos S; Agrogiannis, George; George, Agrogiannis; Fasseas, Konstantinos; Konstantinos, Fasseas; Perrea, Despina N; Despina, Perrea N; Zoubos, Aristides B; Aristides, Zoubos B

    2014-06-01

    The effect of anabolic androgenic steroids on tendons has not yet been fully elucidated. Aim of the present study was the evaluation of the impact of anabolic androgenic steroids on the biomechanical and histological characteristics of Achilles tendons. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with exercise and anabolic steroids (nandrolone decanoate) serving as variables. Protocol duration was 12 weeks. Following euthanasia, tendons' biomechanical properties were tested with the use of a modified clamping configuration. Histological examination with light and electron microscopy were also performed. In the group of anabolic steroids and exercise the lowest fracture stress values were observed, while in the exercise group the highest ones. Histological examination by light and electron microscopy revealed areas of collagen dysplasia and an increased epitendon in the groups receiving anabolic steroids and exercise. These findings suggest that anabolic androgenic steroids reverse the beneficial effect of exercise, thus resulting in inferior maximal stress values. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Low-cost microcontroller platform for studying lymphatic biomechanics in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Nipper, Matthew E.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-01-01

    The pumping innate to collecting lymphatic vessels routinely exposes the endothelium to oscillatory wall shear stress and other dynamic forces. However, studying the mechanical sensitivity of the lymphatic endothelium remains a difficult task due to limitations of commercial or custom systems to apply a variety of time-varying stresses in vitro. Current biomechanical in vitro testing devices are very expensive, limited in capability, or highly complex; rendering them largely inaccessible to the endothelial cell biology community. To address these short-comings, the authors propose a reliable, low-cost platform for augmenting the capabilities of commercially available pumps to produce a wide variety of flow rate waveforms. In particular, the Arduino Uno, a microcontroller development board, is used to provide open-loop control of a digital peristaltic pump using precisely-timed serial commands. In addition, the flexibility of this platform is further demonstrated through its support of a custom-built cell-straining device capable of producing oscillatory strains with varying amplitudes and frequencies. Hence, this microcontroller development board is shown to be an inexpensive, precise, and easy-to-use tool for supplementing in vitro assays to quantify the effects of biomechanical forces on lymphatic endothelial cells. PMID:23178036

  7. Anterior tibia spine fracture in children: follow-up evaluation by biomechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Chin, L S; Wang, N H; Hou, C H; Lo, W H

    1996-09-01

    The treatment of anterior tibial spine (ATS) fracture in children is in controversy. Previous studies have shown that most of the children who sustained ATS fractures have objective evidence of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) laxity at follow-up, but detailed biomechanical analysis of the knee joint has seldom been performed. Eight ATS fractures in children at a mean age of 12 years were treated from 1989 to 1994. Two were of Meyer's classification type I, 3 were of type II, and 3 were of type III. The treatment varied from casting to open reduction & internal fixation (ORIF) by pulling through suture or biofix absorbable screw. Patients were followed with radiological, clinical and biomechanical analysis. KT 1000 knee arthrometer was used to evaluate the laxity of ACL. Cybex isokinetic machine was used to evaluate knee extensor and flexor strength. During an average follow-up period of 47 months, all fractures showed to unite well on X-ray except 1 untreated type I fracture who had malunion. Only one had subjective complaint of instability, but 3 had clinical signs of instability. Objective evidence of laxity, determined by KT-1000 arthrometer, was noted in 4 patients. Decreased muscle strength, determined by Cybex isokinetic machine, was more prominent in hamstrings than in quadriceps. Patients with milder ATS fracture (type I & II), if treated inappropriately, may still result in ACL laxity and knee muscle strength deficiency. Type III ATS fractures, if treated well by ORIF, tend to recover nearly normal ACL function and muscle strength.

  8. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  9. A pilot study of biomechanical assessment before and after an integrative training program for adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Tran, Susan T; Thomas, Staci; DiCesare, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Megan; Sil, Soumitri; Ting, Tracy V; Williams, Sara E; Myer, Gregory D; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2016-07-22

    Adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) tend to be very sedentary and avoid participation in physical activity. A prior study suggested that JFM patients show altered biomechanics compared to healthy adolescents which may make them more prone to pain/injury during exercise. A new intervention combining well established cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques with specialized neuromuscular exercise -Fibromyalgia Integrative Training for Teens (FIT Teens) was developed and shown to be promising in improving functioning in adolescents with JFM. In contrast to traditional exercise programs such as aerobic or resistance training, neuromuscular training is a tailored approach which targets gait, posture, balance and movement mechanics which form the foundation for safe exercise participation with reduced risk for injury or pain (and hence more tolerable by JFM patients). The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to establish whether objective biomechanical assessment including sophisticated 3-D motion analysis would be useful in measuring improvements in strength, balance, gait, and functional performance after participation in the 8-week FIT Teens program. Eleven female participants with JFM (ages 12-18 years) completed pre- and post-treatment assessments of biomechanics, including walking gait analysis, lower extremity strength assessment, functional performance, and dynamic postural stability. Descriptive data indicated that mechanics of walking gait and functional performance appeared to improve after treatment. Hip abduction strength and dynamic postural control also demonstrated improvements bilaterally. Overall, the results of this pilot study offer initial evidence for the utility of biomechanical assessment to objectively demonstrate observable changes in biomechanical performance after an integrated training intervention for youth with JFM. If replicated in larger controlled studies, findings would suggest that through the FIT Teens intervention

  10. Biomechanical and clinical study of single posterior oblique cage POLIF in the treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Zagra, Antonino; Scaramuzzo, Laura; Galbusera, Fabio; Minoia, Leone; Archetti, Marino; Giudici, Fabrizio

    2015-11-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability and the clinical efficacy of a lumbar interbody fusion obtained by single oblique cage implanted by a posterior approach. Through the realization of three finite element models (FEMs), the biomechanics of POLIF was compared to PLIF and TLIF. Ninety-four patients underwent interbody fusion by POLIF with instrumented posterolateral fusion. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated at regular intervals for at least 6 months. The FEMs showed no statistically significant differences in stability in compression and flexion-extension. Mean preoperative VAS score was 7.1, decreased to 2.1 at follow-up. Mean preoperative SF-12 value was 34.5 %, increased to 75.4 % at follow-up. All patients showed a good fusion rate and no hardware failure. POLIF associated to instrumented posterolateral fusion is a viable and safe surgical technique, which ensures a biomechanical stability similar to other surgical techniques.

  11. Invertebrate biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Patek, S N; Summers, A P

    2017-05-22

    Invertebrate biomechanics focuses on mechanical analyses of non-vertebrate animals, which at root is no different in aim and technique from vertebrate biomechanics, or for that matter the biomechanics of plants and fungi. But invertebrates are special - they are fabulously diverse in form, habitat, and ecology and manage this without the use of hard, internal skeletons. They are also numerous and, in many cases, tractable in an experimental and field setting. In this Primer, we will probe three axes of invertebrate diversity: worms (Phylum Annelida), spiders (Class Arachnida) and insects (Class Insecta); three habitats: subterranean, terrestrial and airborne; and three integrations with other fields: ecology, engineering and evolution. Our goal is to capture the field of invertebrate biomechanics, which has blossomed from having a primary focus on discoveries at the interface of physics and biology to being inextricably linked with integrative challenges that span biology, physics, mathematics and engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Head kinematics and shoulder biomechanics in shoulder impacts similar to pedestrian crashes--a THUMS study.

    PubMed

    Paas, Ruth; Davidsson, Johan; Brolin, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Head injuries account for the largest percentage of fatalities among pedestrians in car crashes. To prevent or mitigate such injuries, safety systems that reduce head linear and rotational acceleration should be introduced. Human body models (HBMs) are valuable safety system evaluation tools for assessing both head injury risk and head kinematics prior to head contact. This article aims to evaluate the suitability of the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) version 4.0 for studying shoulder impacts, similar to pedestrian crashes, investigating head, spine, and shoulder kinematics as well as shoulder biomechanics. Shoulder impact experiments including volunteers and postmortem human subjects (PMHSs) were simulated with THUMS. Head linear and angular and vertebral linear displacements of THUMS were compared with volunteers and shoulder deflections with both volunteers and PMHSs. A parameter variation study was conducted to assess head response to shoulder impacts, by varying shoulder posture and impact directions mimicking shoulder-to-vehicle contacts. Functional biomechanics literature was compared with THUMS responses in view of pedestrian-like shoulder impacts. THUMS head linear displacement compared better with tensed than with relaxed volunteers. Head lateral rotation was comparable with volunteer responses up to 120 ms; head twist was greater in THUMS than in the volunteers. The THUMS spine appeared to be stiffer than in the volunteers. Shoulder deflections were smaller than in the relaxed volunteers but matched the PMHSs. Raised shoulder postures decreased the THUMS shoulder deflections and increased head lateral displacements. When the impactor surface orientation or the impact velocity angle was changed from lateral to superolateral, THUMS head lateral displacement decreased. THUMS scapula and clavicle kinematics compared well with previous experimental studies. The shoulder impact conditions influenced the scapula motion over the thorax, which had

  13. Studies of Beam Dynamics in Cooler Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, J.; Stein, J.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-03-20

    This report describes the numerical simulation of the crystalline proton beam formation in COSY using BETACOOL code. The study includes the description of experimental results at NAP-M storage ring where the large reduction of the momentum spread was observed for first time. The present simulation shows that this behavior of proton beam can not be explained as ordered state of protons. The numerical simulation of crystalline proton beams was done for COSY parameters. The number of protons when the ordering state can be observed is limited by value 106 particles and momentum spread less then 10-6. Experimental results for the attempt to achieve of ordered state of proton beam for COSY is presented. This work is supported by RFBR grant no. 05-02-16320 and INTAS grant no. 03-54-5584.

  14. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  15. 6-D weak-strong beam-beam simulation study of proton lifetime in presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the calculated particle loss of a proton bunch in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in the RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run, we are introducing a DC electron beam with the same transverse profile as the proton beam to collide with the proton beam. Such a device is called an electron lens (e-lens). In this note we first present the optics and beam parameters and the tracking setup. Then we calculate and compare the particle loss of a proton bunch with head-on beam-beam compensation, phase advance of k{pi} between IP8 and the center of the e-lens and second order chromaticity correction. We scanned the proton beam's linear chromaticity, working point and bunch intensity. We also scanned the electron beam's intensity, transverse beam size. The effect of the electron-proton transverse offset in the e-lens was studied. In the study 6-D weak-strong beam-beam interaction model a la Hirata is used for proton collisions at IP6 and IP8. The e-lens is modeled as 8 slices. Each slice is modeled with as drift - (4D beam-beam kick) - drift.

  16. Knotted versus knotless suture bridge repair of the achilles tendon insertion: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Cox, Joseph T; Shorten, Peter L; Gould, Gregory C; Markert, Ronald J; Barnett, Michael D; Laughlin, Richard T

    2014-11-01

    Surgical treatment of insertional Achilles tendinopathy often involves detachment and debridement of the Achilles tendon insertion. A recent study has shown that knotted suture bridge fixation of the Achilles to the calcaneus is biomechanically superior to single-row fixation, but there is an absence of literature on the use of different suture bridge constructs to repair the Achilles tendon. There will be no significant difference in the load to failure, mode of failure, tendon strain, tendon stiffness, repair site gapping, or footprint size when comparing knotted suture bridge repair to knotless suture bridge repair of the Achilles tendon after detachment for insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Controlled laboratory study. A single specimen from each pair of 10 cadaveric Achilles tendons was randomized to 1 of 2 Achilles insertion repair groups: knotted (n = 10) or knotless (n = 10) suture bridge repair. Repaired footprint size was measured, and then cyclic testing from 10 to 100 N for 2000 cycles was performed. This was followed by measurement of tendon strain, repair site displacement, load to failure, and tendon stiffness. The knotted suture bridge repair had a significantly higher load to failure compared with the knotless suture bridge (mean ± SD, 317.8 ± 93.6 N vs 196.1 ± 12.1 N, respectively; P = .001). All constructs failed at the tendon-suture interface. Tendon strain after cyclic testing was significantly greater in the knotless (1.20 ± 1.05) compared with the knotted (0.39 ± 0.4) suture repair groups (P = .011). There was no significant difference in footprint size between the knotted (230.3 ± 63.3 mm(2)) and knotless (248.5 ± 48.8 mm(2)) groups (P = .40). There was also no significant difference in stiffness (knotted = 76.4 ± 8.0 N/mm; knotless = 69.6 ± 10.9 N/mm; P = .17) and repair site displacement after cyclic testing (knotted = 2.8 ± 1.2 mm; knotless = 3.6 ± 1.1 mm; P = .17). During suture bridge repair of the Achilles tendon after

  17. The Use of Wearable Inertial Motion Sensors in Human Lower Limb Biomechanics Studies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan

    2010-01-01

    Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed. PMID:22163542

  18. The use of wearable inertial motion sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan

    2010-01-01

    Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed.

  19. Experimental observation, theoretical models, and biomechanical inference in the study of mandibular form.

    PubMed

    Daegling, D J; Hylander, W L

    2000-08-01

    Experimental studies and mathematical models are disparate approaches for inferring the stress and strain environment in mammalian jaws. Experimental designs offer accurate, although limited, characterization of biomechanical behavior, while mathematical approaches (finite element modeling in particular) offer unparalleled precision in depiction of strain magnitudes, directions, and gradients throughout the mandible. Because the empirical (experimental) and theoretical (mathematical) perspectives differ in their initial assumptions and their proximate goals, the two methods can yield divergent conclusions about how masticatory stresses are distributed in the dentary. These different sources of inference may, therefore, tangibly influence subsequent biological interpretation. In vitro observation of bone strain in primate mandibles under controlled loading conditions offers a test of finite element model predictions. Two issues which have been addressed by both finite element models and experimental approaches are: (1) the distribution of torsional shear strains in anthropoid jaws and (2) the dissipation of bite forces in the human alveolar process. Not surprisingly, the experimental data and mathematical models agree on some issues, but on others exhibit discordance. Achieving congruence between these methods is critical if the nature of the relationship of masticatory stress to mandibular form is to be intelligently assessed. A case study of functional/mechanical significance of gnathic morphology in the hominid genus Paranthropus offers insight into the potential benefit of combining theoretical and experimental approaches. Certain finite element analyses claim to have identified a biomechanical problem unrecognized in previous comparative work, which, in essence, is that the enlarged transverse dimensions of the postcanine corpus may have a less important role in resisting torsional stresses than previously thought. Experimental data have identified

  20. Ulnar impaction syndrome with different operative methods: a comparative biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ya-Dong; Wu, Tao; Tian, Fang-Tao; Shang, Yun-Tao; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Bai, Yan-Bin; Han, Chang-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ulnar impaction syndrome seriously impairs wrist and hand function. Three main treatment procedures are available; however, little systematic research on the post-operation changes in wrist biomechanics currently exists. This study aimed to determine the long-term effects of these procedures and the optimal treatment methods for ulnar impaction syndrome. Methods: Twenty-four cases of fresh upper limb specimens were randomized into four groups: (1) the control group, (2) the ulnar-shortening operation group, (3) the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group (distal radioulnar arthrodesis and intentional distal ulnar pseudoarthrosis), and (4) the Darrach procedure group (distal ulna resection). After keeping the wrist in a neutral position, a pressure sensitive film was applied. Starting at 0 N, the load was increased gradually at a speed of 0.1 N/s until reaching 200 N and then maintained for 60 s by the CSS-44020 series biomechanical machine. Then, the pressure sensitive films from each group were measured, and the results were analyzed with SPSS software. Results: The mean pressure and force on the ulna in the groups followed a decreasing trend from the control group, Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group and ulnar-shortening operation group. The mean pressure of the scaphoid fossa and the force on distal aspect of the radius in the groups followed an increasing trend from the control group, Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group, ulnar-shortening operation group and Darrach procedure group. This study found no significant differences in the mean pressure of the scaphoid fossa and the force on distal aspect of the radius between the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group and the ulnar-shortening operation group. The Sauvé-Kapandji procedure group showed the greatest mean pressure on lunate fossa. Conclusions: In this comprehensive analysis of wrist biomechanics, the ulnar-shortening operation was superior to the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure and Darrach procedure, which adequately

  1. A novel physiological testing device to study knee biomechanics in vitro.

    PubMed

    van de Bunt, Fabian; Emanuel, Kaj S; Wijffels, Thomas; Kooren, Peter N; Kingma, Idsart; Smit, Theodoor H

    2017-08-01

    To properly study knee kinetics, kinematics and the effects of injury and surgical treatment in vitro, the knee should be constrained as little as possible, while imposing physiological loads. A novel dynamic biomechanical knee system (BKS) is presented here. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility and reproducibility of the system and demonstrate its features with an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) lesion model. Six goat knees were used in the current study. Flexion and extension simulating gait was imposed by a servo-motor, while normal joint load was applied by two artificial muscles. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were assessed for inter-test measures, while paired t-tests were performed for comparison between intact knees and knees with ACL-lesion. The ICC's for inter-test measures based on all six goat knees were excellent: varus/valgus: ICC=0.93; rotation: ICC=0.94 (all p<0.01), and translation in frontal (x)-, side (y)- and upward (z)-direction (ICC=0.90, 0.88 & 0.94) (all p<0.01). A significant increase in joint center movement was found in knees after creating an ACL-lesion (p=0.018): translation increased more than two-fold in frontal (p=0.016), side (p=0.004) and upward (p=0.018) direction. Five degrees of motion were reproducibly assessed in the intact joint, suggesting that the goat knee may find its natural pathway when loaded in the BKS. The novel five-degrees-of-freedom knee system allows a detailed study of the effect of a diversity of defects and surgical treatments on knee biomechanics under physiological loading conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High-Tensile Strength Tape Versus High-Tensile Strength Suture: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Gnandt, Ryan J; Smith, Jennifer L; Nguyen-Ta, Kim; McDonald, Lucas; LeClere, Lance E

    2016-02-01

    To determine which suture design, high-tensile strength tape or high-tensile strength suture, performed better at securing human tissue across 4 selected suture techniques commonly used in tendinous repair, by comparing the total load at failure measured during a fixed-rate longitudinal single load to failure using a biomechanical testing machine. Matched sets of tendon specimens with bony attachments were dissected from 15 human cadaveric lower extremities in a manner allowing for direct comparison testing. With the use of selected techniques (simple Mason-Allen in the patellar tendon specimens, whip stitch in the quadriceps tendon specimens, and Krackow stitch in the Achilles tendon specimens), 1 sample of each set was sutured with a 2-mm braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength tape and the other with a No. 2 braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength suture. A total of 120 specimens were tested. Each model was loaded to failure at a fixed longitudinal traction rate of 100 mm/min. The maximum load and failure method were recorded. In the whip stitch and the Krackow-stitch models, the high-tensile strength tape had a significantly greater mean load at failure with a difference of 181 N (P = .001) and 94 N (P = .015) respectively. No significant difference was found in the Mason-Allen and simple stitch models. Pull-through remained the most common method of failure at an overall rate of 56.7% (suture = 55%; tape = 58.3%). In biomechanical testing during a single load to failure, high-tensile strength tape performs more favorably than high-tensile strength suture, with a greater mean load to failure, in both the whip- and Krackow-stitch models. Although suture pull-through remains the most common method of failure, high-tensile strength tape requires a significantly greater load to pull-through in a whip-stitch and Krakow-stitch model. The biomechanical data obtained in the current study indicates that high-tensile strength tape may provide better repair

  3. Robots in human biomechanics--a study on ankle push-off in walking.

    PubMed

    Renjewski, Daniel; Seyfarth, André

    2012-09-01

    In biomechanics, explanatory template models are used to identify the basic mechanisms of human locomotion. However, model predictions often lack verification in a realistic environment. We present a method that uses template model mechanics as a blueprint for a bipedal robot and a corresponding computer simulation. The hypotheses derived from template model studies concerning the function of heel-off in walking are analysed and discrepancies between the template model and its real-world anchor are pointed out. Neither extending the ground clearance of the swinging leg nor an impact reduction at touch-down as an effect of heel lifting was supported by the experiments. To confirm the relevance of the experimental findings, a comparison of robot data to human walking data is discussed and we speculate on an alternative explanation of heel-off in human walking, i.e. that the push-off powers the following leg swing.

  4. Fixed-angle screws vs standard screws in acetabular prosthesis fixation: a cadaveric biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hugate, Ronald R; Dickey, Ian D; Chen, Qingshan; Wood, Christina M; Sim, Franklin H; Rock, Michael G

    2009-08-01

    Secure fixation of acetabular components in total hip arthroplasty can be challenging. The purpose of this study was to perform biomechanical analysis of cup fixation strength using fixed-angle vs standard screw fixation. Multihole, porous-backed acetabular prostheses were implanted in both acetabuli of 8 cadaveric pelves using standard press-fit techniques. Fixed-angle screws were used on the left side, and standard cancellous screws were used in the right. The use of fixed-angle screws enhanced acetabular fixation substantially under subfailure cyclic loading conditions and load-to-failure. The triradiate screw configuration increases the bending moment required to fail the specimens as well. Fixed-angle screws may be useful for achieving rigid fixation of acetabular prostheses in challenging clinical scenarios.

  5. Study on Brain Injury Biomechanics Based on the Real Pedestrian Traffic Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chengjian; Yin, Zhiyong

    This paper aimed to research the dynamic response and injury mechanisms of head based on real pedestrian traffic accidents with video. The kinematics of head contact with the vehicle was reconstructed by using multi-body dynamics models. These calculated parameters such as head impact velocity and impact location and head orientation were applied to the THUMS-4 FE head model as initial conditions. The intracranial pressure and stress of brain were calculated from simulations of head contact with the vehicle. These results were consistent with that of others. It was proved that real traffic accidents combined with simulation analysis can be used to study head injury biomechanics. Increasing in the number of cases, a tolerance limit of brain injury will be put forward.

  6. Biomechanical effect of isolated capitate shortening in Kienbock's disease: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Werber, K-D; Schmelz, R; Peimer, C A; Wagenpfeil, S; Machens, H-G; Lohmeyer, J A

    2013-06-01

    Multiple operations have been proposed to slow the progression of osteonecrosis and secondary carpal damage in Kienböck's disease. To assess the biomechanical changes after capitate shorting, we inserted pressure-testing devices into the carpal and radiocarpal joints in an anatomical study. Pressure sensors were placed into eight thawed non-fixated human cadaver arms to measure the forces transmitted in physiological loading. Longitudinal 9.8 N and 19.6 N forces were applied before and after capitate shortening. After capitate shortening, significant load reduction on the lunate was evident in all specimens. An average decrease of 49% was seen under a 9.8 N load and 56% under a 19.6 N load. The load was transferred to the radial and ulnar intercarpal joints. More relief of pressure on the lunate after isolated capitate shortening is achieved with a shallow angle between the scaphoid and capitate in the posteroanterior radiograph.

  7. Open-cellular metal implant design and fabrication for biomechanical compatibility with bone using electron beam melting.

    PubMed

    Murr, L E

    2017-02-27

    Implant history extends more than 4000 years in antiquity, with biocompatible alloy implants extending over only 70 years. Over the past several decades, total hip and knee replacements of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloys have exhibited post implantation life spans extending over 15 years; limited by infection, loosening, stress-shielding-related bone resorption and other mechanical failures. With the advent of additive manufacturing technologies, such as electron beam melting (EBM) over the past decade, personalized, patient-specific; porous (open-cellular) implant components can be manufactured, and the integration of chemical, biological and mechanical methods is able to optimize strategies for improving long-term clinical outcomes. This review outlines these strategies, which include enhanced osseointegration and vascularization prospects, and provides some evidence for, and examples of, clinical trials representative of millions of implant surgeries world-wide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Controlled Study of Correlation of Biomechanical Profile of Hemiparetic Patients with Distance Travelled in Six Minutes.

    PubMed

    Moura, Laís Moreira; Quintão, Mônica Maria Pena; de Carvalho, Karen Santos R; Carrapatoso, Beatriz Cantanhede; Malfacini, Sabrina Lindenberg L; da Silva, André Custódio; Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Chermont, Sergio S M C

    2015-09-24

    The six-minute walking test (6MWT) is used to assess exercise tolerance that is associated with motor function of the lower limbs in hemiparetic patients. It is suggested that, for post-stroke subjects, performance in the 6MWT may be limited by biomechanical and cardiovascular factors. Our aim is to determine the correlation between the six-minute walk distance (6MWD) and the biomechanical profile of hemiparetic patients. During this cross-sectional controlled study, 10 hemiparetic patients with heart failure underwent 6MWT (ATS protocol). Tonus (Ashworth Scale) and goniometry of the lower limbs were measured. The average of 6MWD in two tests was 279±8 m. There was a negative correlation between the degree of spasticity for both the sural triceps (r=-0.57, P<0.05), quadriceps (r=-0.58, P<0.05) and the limitation in ankle dorsiflexion and the 6MWD (r=-0.76, P<0.05). Also, there was correlation between hip extension and ankle dorsiflexion limitations with 6MWD (r=0.66, P<0.05), (r=0.77, P<0.05). The negative correlation between the highest spasticity in paretic limb and the 6MWD and the correlation between the lower movement range of paretic hip and ankle suggest association with these factors and gait velocity in 6MWT. Loss percentage represents the percentage calculation between distance traveled and the distance predicted achieved by patients. In this study, the negative correlation between the percentage of loss of 6MWD and the limitation in the ankle dorsiflexion movement suggests that for a minor motion arch of the ankle, there is a higher percentage of walking distance loss foretold.

  9. A markerless motion capture system to study musculoskeletal biomechanics: visual hull and simulated annealing approach.

    PubMed

    Corazza, S; Mündermann, L; Chaudhari, A M; Demattio, T; Cobelli, C; Andriacchi, T P

    2006-06-01

    Human motion capture is frequently used to study musculoskeletal biomechanics and clinical problems, as well as to provide realistic animation for the entertainment industry. The most popular technique for human motion capture uses markers placed on the skin, despite some important drawbacks including the impediment to the motion by the presence of skin markers and relative movement between the skin where the markers are placed and the underlying bone. The latter makes it difficult to estimate the motion of the underlying bone, which is the variable of interest for biomechanical and clinical applications. A model-based markerless motion capture system is presented in this study, which does not require the placement of any markers on the subject's body. The described method is based on visual hull reconstruction and an a priori model of the subject. A custom version of adapted fast simulated annealing has been developed to match the model to the visual hull. The tracking capability and a quantitative validation of the method were evaluated in a virtual environment for a complete gait cycle. The obtained mean errors, for an entire gait cycle, for knee and hip flexion are respectively 1.5 degrees (+/-3.9 degrees ) and 2.0 degrees (+/-3.0 degrees ), while for knee and hip adduction they are respectively 2.0 degrees (+/-2.3 degrees ) and 1.1 degrees (+/-1.7 degrees ). Results for the ankle and shoulder joints are also presented. Experimental results captured in a gait laboratory with a real subject are also shown to demonstrate the effectiveness and potential of the presented method in a clinical environment.

  10. Biomechanical Assessment of Stabilization of Simulated Type II Odontoid Fracture with Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Roy T.; Klocke, Noelle; Yandamuri, Soumya S.; Bobinski, Lukas; Duff, John M.; Bucklen, Brandon S.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Researchers created a proper type II dens fracture (DF) and quantified a novel current posterior fixation technique with spacers at C1–C2. A clinical case study supplements this biomechanical analysis. Purpose Researchers explored their hypothesis that spacers combined with posterior instrumentation (PI) reduce range of motion significantly, possibly leading to better fusion outcomes. Overview of Literature Literature shows that the atlantoaxial joint is unique in allowing segmental rotary motion, enabling head turning. With no intervertebral discs at these joints, multiple ligaments bind the axis to the skull base and to the atlas; an intact odontoid (dens) enhances stability. The most common traumatic injury at these strong ligaments is a type II odontoid fracture. Methods Each of seven specimens (C0–C3) was tested on a custom-built six-degrees-of-freedom spine simulator with constructs of intact state, type II DF, C1–C2 PI, PI with joint capsulotomy (PIJC), PI with spacers (PIS) at C1–C2, and spacers alone (SA). A bending moment of 2.0 Nm (1.5°/sec) was applied in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR). One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was performed. Results DF increased motion to 320%, 429%, and 120% versus intact (FE, LB, and AR, respectively). PI significantly reduced motion to 41%, 21%, and 8%. PIJC showed negligible changes from PI. PIS reduced motion to 16%, 14%, and 3%. SA decreased motion to 64%, 24%, and 54%. Reduced motion facilitated solid fusion in an 89-year-old female patient within 1 year. Conclusions Type II odontoid fractures can lead to acute or chronic instability. Current fixation techniques use C1–C2 PI or an anterior dens screw. Addition of spacers alongside PI led to increased biomechanical rigidity over intact motion and may offer an alternative to established surgical fixation techniques. PMID:28243364

  11. Contribution of the Pubofemoral Ligament to Hip Stability: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Hal D; Khoury, Anthony N; Schröder, Ricardo; Johnson, Eric; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan; Campos, Salvador; Palmer, Ian J

    2017-02-01

    To determine the isolated function of the pubofemoral ligament of the hip capsule and its contribution to hip stability in external/internal rotational motion during flexion greater than 30° and abduction. Thirteen hips from 7 fresh-frozen pelvis-to-toe cadavers were skeletonized from the lumbar spine to the distal femur with the capsular ligaments intact. Computed tomographic imaging was performed to ensure no occult pathological state existed, and assess bony anatomy. Specimens were placed on a surgical table in supine position with lower extremities resting on a custom-designed polyvinylchloride frame. Hip internal and external rotation was measured with the hip placed into a combination of the following motions: 30°, 60°, 110° hip flexion and 0°, 20°, 40° abduction. Testing positions were randomized. The pubofemoral ligament was released and measurements were repeated, followed by releasing the ligamentum teres. Analysis of the 2,106 measurements recorded demonstrates the pubofemoral ligament as a main controller of hip internal rotation during hip flexion beyond 30° and abduction. Hip internal rotation was increased up to 438.9% (P < .001) when the pubofemoral ligament was released and 412.9% (P < .001) when both the pubofemoral and teres ligament were released, compared with the native state. The hypothesis of the pubofemoral ligament as one of the contributing factors of anterior inferior hip stability by controlling external rotation of the hip in flexion beyond 30° and abduction was disproved. The pubofemoral ligament maintains a key function in limiting internal rotation in the position of increasing hip flexion beyond 30° and abduction. This cadaveric study concludes previous attempts at understanding the anatomical and biomechanical function of the capsular ligaments and their role in hip stability. The present study contributes to the understanding of hip stability and biomechanical function of the pubofemoral ligament. Copyright © 2016

  12. Controlled Study of Correlation of Biomechanical Profile of Hemiparetic Patients with Distance Travelled in Six Minutes

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Laís Moreira; Quintão, Mônica Maria Pena; de Carvalho, Karen Santos R.; Carrapatoso, Beatriz Cantanhede; Malfacini, Sabrina Lindenberg L.; da Silva, André Custódio; Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Chermont, Sergio S.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    The six-minute walking test (6MWT) is used to assess exercise tolerance that is associated with motor function of the lower limbs in hemiparetic patients. It is suggested that, for post-stroke subjects, performance in the 6MWT may be limited by biomechanical and cardiovascular factors. Our aim is to determine the correlation between the six-minute walk distance (6MWD) and the biomechanical profile of hemiparetic patients. During this cross-sectional controlled study, 10 hemiparetic patients with heart failure underwent 6MWT (ATS protocol). Tonus (Ashworth Scale) and goniometry of the lower limbs were measured. The average of 6MWD in two tests was 279±8 m. There was a negative correlation between the degree of spasticity for both the sural triceps (r=–0.57, P<0.05), quadriceps (r=–0.58, P<0.05) and the limitation in ankle dorsiflexion and the 6MWD (r=–0.76, P<0.05). Also, there was correlation between hip extension and ankle dorsiflexion limitations with 6MWD (r=0.66, P<0.05), (r=0.77, P<0.05). The negative correlation between the highest spasticity in paretic limb and the 6MWD and the correlation between the lower movement range of paretic hip and ankle suggest association with these factors and gait velocity in 6MWT. Loss percentage represents the percentage calculation between distance traveled and the distance predicted achieved by patients. In this study, the negative correlation between the percentage of loss of 6MWD and the limitation in the ankle dorsiflexion movement suggests that for a minor motion arch of the ankle, there is a higher percentage of walking distance loss foretold. PMID:26487924

  13. SU-E-J-163: A Biomechanical Lung Model for Respiratory Motion Study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X; Belcher, AH; Grelewicz, Z; Wiersma, RD

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This work presents a biomechanical model to investigate the complex respiratory motion for the lung tumor tracking in radiosurgery by computer simulation. Methods: The models include networked massspring-dampers to describe the tumor motion, different types of surrogate signals, and the force generated by the diaphragm. Each mass-springdamper has the same mechanical structure and each model can have different numbers of mass-spring-dampers. Both linear and nonlinear stiffness parameters were considered, and the damping ratio was tuned in a range so that the tumor motion was over-damped (no natural tumor oscillation occurs without force from the diaphragm). The simulation was run by using ODE45 (ordinary differential equations by Runge-Kutta method) in MATLAB, and all time courses of motions and inputs (force) were generated and compared. Results: The curvature of the motion time courses around their peaks was sensitive to the damping ratio. Therefore, the damping ratio can be determined based on the clinical data of a high sampling rate. The peak values of different signals and the time the peaks occurred were compared, and it was found that the diaphragm force had a time lead over the tumor motion, and the lead time (0.1–0.4 seconds) depended on the distance between the tumor and the diaphragm. Conclusion: We reported a model based analysis approach for the spatial and temporal relation between the motion of the lung tumor and the surrogate signals. Due to the phase lead of the diaphragm in comparing with the lung tumor motion, the measurement of diaphragm motion (or its electromyography signal) can be used as a beam gating signal in radiosurgery, and it can also be an additional surrogate signal for better tumor motion tracking. The research is funded by the American Cancer Society (ACS) grant. The grant name is: Frameless SRS Based on Robotic Head Motion Cancellation. The grant number is: RSG-13-313-01-CCE.

  14. A biomechanical study of human lateral ankle ligaments and autogenous reconstructive grafts.

    PubMed

    Attarian, D E; McCrackin, H J; Devito, D P; McElhaney, J H; Garrett, W E

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical behavior of human anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments, as well as peroneus brevis, split peroneus brevis, and toe extensor tendon grafts. This article represents the first published data comparing the most frequently injured ankle ligaments to the most commonly used autogenous reconstructive grafts. Twenty fresh human ankles provided the bone-ligament-bone and tendon graft specimens for biomechanical testing on a Minneapolis Testing System. Protocol consisted of cyclic loading at physiologic deflections, followed by several load-deflection tests at varying velocities, followed by a final extremely rapid load to failure test. The load-deflection data for all ligaments and tendons demonstrated nonlinearity and strain rate dependence. The maximum load to failure for the anterior talofibular ligament was the lowest of all specimens tested, while its strain to failure was the highest. The loads to failure of the peroneus brevis and split peroneus tendons were significantly greater than the anterior talofibular ligament and approximately equal to the calcaneofibular ligament. Strains to failure for all tendons were significantly less than ligament strains. The high strain to failure of the anterior talofibular ligament demonstrates its physiologic function of allowing increased ankle plantar flexion-internal rotation, while its low load to failure shows its propensity for injury. The greater strength of the tendon grafts explains the success of most reconstructive procedures in reestablishing stability in chronic ankle sprains; at the same time, the data presented suggest that those surgical procedures sacrificing the entire peroneus brevis tendon are unnecessary.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Silicon nitride films for the protective functional coating: blood compatibility and biomechanical property study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhifeng; Wang, Yingjun; Du, Chang; Huang, Nan; Wang, Lin; Ning, Chengyun

    2012-12-01

    Behaviors of silicon nitride films and their relation to blood compatibility and biomechanical have been interesting subjects to researchers. A systematic blood compatibility and biomechanical property investigation on the deposition of silicon-nitride films under varying N₂ and CF₄ flows was carried out by direct current unbalanced magnetron sputtering techniques. Significant role of surface property, chemical bonding state of silicon nitride film and blood compatibility, mechanical properties for the films were observed. The chemical bonding configurations, surface topography, contact angle and mechanical properties were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano-indentation technique and CSEM pin-on-disk tribometer. Blood compatibility of the films was evaluated by platelet adhesion investigation. The results of the platelet adhesion tests shown that the effect of fluorine and nitrogen-doped revealed an intimate relationship between the ratio of polar component and dispersion component of the surface energy and its hemocompatibility. Si-N-O coating can be a great candidate for developing antithrombogenic surfaces in blood contacting materials. The chemical bonding state made an adjustment in microstructured surfaces, once in the totally wettable configuration, may improve the initial contact between platelet and biomedical materials, due to the appropriate ratio of dispersion component and polar component. To resist wear, biomedical components require coatings that are tough and hard, have low friction, and are bio-inert. The study suggests that by Si-N coating the metal surfaces could be a choice to prolong the life of the sliding pair Co-Cr-Mo alloy/UHMWPE implants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of pathological myopia on biomechanical properties: a study by ocular response analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Öner, Veysi; Taş, Mehmet; Özkaya, Erdal; Oruç, Yavuz

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the ocular response analyzer (ORA) measurements of patients with pathological myopia in comparison with those of emmetropic control subjects, and to investigate the correlation between these ORA measurements and spherical equivalent (SE). METHODS Measurements of 53 eyes of 53 subjects with pathological myopia (SE>-6.00 D) were compared with those of 60 eyes of 60 emmetropic controls. Corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), noncontact tonometer intraocular pressure (IOPg), and corneal-compensated IOP (IOPcc) were obtained for each subject. The refractive error value was determined as SE via a cycloplegic refraction test. RESULTS The mean age was 54.1±18.9y (ranging from 5 to 88) in the pathological myopic group and 56.2±19.0y (ranging from 6 to 89) in the control group. There were no significant differences between the groups concerning age and sex. CH and CRF were significantly lower in the pathological myopic group than in the control group (P<0.001, P=0.005, respectively). IOPcc and IOPg were significantly higher in the pathological myopic group than in the control group (P<0.001, P=0.009, respectively). There were significantly positive correlations between CH and SE (r=0.565, P<0.001) and between CRF and SE (r=0.364, P=0.007). There were significantly negative correlations between IOPcc and SE (r=-0.432, P=0.001) and between IOPg and SE (r=-0.401, P=0.003). CONCLUSION The present study displayed that pathological myopia affected biomechanical properties measured by ORA. The results of corneal biomechanical properties measured by ORA may need to be appreciated by taking refraction into account. Further, pathological myopia might be related with the increased IOP. PMID:25938057

  17. Quantum dots as mineral- and matrix-specific strain gages for bone biomechanical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peizhi; Xu, Jiadi; Morris, Michael; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Sahar, Nadder; Kohn, David

    2009-02-01

    We report the use of quantum dots (Qdots) as strain gages in the study of bone biomechanics using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have developed solid state NMR sample cells for investigation of deformations of bone tissue components at loads up to several Mega Pascal. The size constraints of the NMR instrumentation limit the bone specimen diameter and length to be no greater than 2-3 mm and 30 mm respectively. Further, magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR experiments require the use of non-metallic apparatus that can be rotated at kilohertz rates. These experimental constraints preclude the use of standard biomechanical measurement systems. In this paper we explore the use of quantum dot center of gravity measurement as a strain gage technology consistent with the constraints of solid state NMR. We use Qdots that bind calcium (625 nm emission) and collagen (705 nm emission) for measurement of strain in these components. Compressive loads are applied to a specimen in a cell through a fine pitch screw turned with a mini-torque wrench. Displacement is measured as changes in the positions of arrays of quantum dots on the surface of a specimen. Arrays are created by spotting the specimen with dilute suspensions of Qdots. Mineral labeling is achieved with 705 nm carboxylated dots and matrix labeling with 565 nm quantum dots conjugated to collagen I antibodies. After each load increment the new positions of the quantum dots are measured by fluorescence microscopy. Changes in Qdot center of gravity as a function of applied load can be measured with submicron accuracy.

  18. Histological and biomechanical study of dura mater applied to the technique of dura splitting decompression in Chiari type I malformation.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Dorian; Carpentier, Alexandre; Allain, Jean-Marc; Polivka, Marc; Crépin, Jérôme; George, Bernard

    2010-07-01

    Many techniques are described to treat Chiari type I malformation. One of them is a splitting of the dura, removing its outer layer only to reduce the risks of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. We try to show the effectiveness of this technique from histological and biomechanical observations of dura mater. Study was performed on 25 posterior fossa dura mater specimens from fresh human cadavers. Dural composition and architecture was assessed on 47 transversal and sagittal sections. Uniaxial mechanical tests were performed on 22 dural samples (15 entire, 7 split) to focus on the dural macroscopic mechanical behavior comparing entire and split samples and also to understand deformation mechanisms. We finally created a model of volume expansion after splitting. Dura mater was composed of predominant collagen fibers with a few elastin fibers, cranio-caudally orientated. The classical description of two distinct layers remained inconstant. Biomechanical tests showed a significant difference between entire dura, which presents an elastic fragile behavior, with a small domain where deformation is reversible with stress, and split dura, which presents an elasto-plastic behavior with a large domain of permanent strain and a lower stress level. From these experimental results, the model showed a volume increase of approximately 50% below the split area. We demonstrated the capability of the split dura mater to enlarge for suitable stress conditions and we quantified it by biomechanical tests and experimental model. Thus, dural splitting decompression seems to have a real biomechanical substrate to envision the efficacy of this Chiari type I malformation surgical technique.

  19. Foot orthoses in the treatment of symptomatic midfoot osteoarthritis using clinical and biomechanical outcomes: a randomised feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Jill; Chapman, Graham J; Gray, Janine C; Grainger, Andrew J; Brown, Sarah; Wilkins, Richard A; Roddy, Edward; Helliwell, Philip S; Keenan, Anne-Maree; Redmond, Anthony C

    2016-04-01

    This randomised feasibility study aimed to examine the clinical and biomechanical effects of functional foot orthoses (FFOs) in the treatment of midfoot osteoarthritis (OA) and the feasibility of conducting a full randomised controlled trial. Participants with painful, radiographically confirmed midfoot OA were recruited and randomised to receive either FFOs or a sham control orthosis. Feasibility measures included recruitment and attrition rates, practicality of blinding and adherence rates. Clinical outcome measures were: change from baseline to 12 weeks for severity of pain (numerical rating scale), foot function (Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index) and patient global impression of change scale. To investigate the biomechanical effect of foot orthoses, in-shoe foot kinematics and plantar pressures were evaluated at 12 weeks. Of the 119 participants screened, 37 were randomised and 33 completed the study (FFO = 18, sham = 15). Compliance with foot orthoses and blinding of the intervention was achieved in three quarters of the group. Both groups reported improvements in pain, function and global impression of change; the FFO group reporting greater improvements compared to the sham group. The biomechanical outcomes indicated the FFO group inverted the hindfoot and increased midfoot maximum plantar force compared to the sham group. The present findings suggest FFOs worn over 12 weeks may provide detectable clinical and biomechanical benefits compared to sham orthoses. This feasibility study provides useful clinical, biomechanical and statistical information for the design and implementation of a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of FFOs in treating painful midfoot OA.

  20. Electron beam, laser beam and plasma arc welding studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    This program was undertaken as an initial step in establishing an evaluation framework which would permit a priori selection of advanced welding processes for specific applications. To this end, a direct comparison of laser beam, electron beam and arc welding of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was undertaken. Ti-6Al-4V was selected for use in view of its established welding characteristics and its importance in aerospace applications.

  1. Biomechanics of slips.

    PubMed

    Redfern, M S; Cham, R; Gielo-Perczak, K; Grönqvist, R; Hirvonen, M; Lanshammar, H; Marpet, M; Pai, C Y; Powers, C

    2001-10-20

    The biomechanics of slips are an important component in the prevention of fall-related injuries. The purpose of this paper is to review the available literature on the biomechanics of gait relevant to slips. This knowledge can be used to develop slip resistance testing methodologies and to determine critical differences in human behaviour between slips leading to recovery and those resulting in falls. Ground reaction forces at the shoe-floor interface have been extensively studied and are probably the most critical biomechanical factor in slips. The ratio of the shear to normal foot forces generated during gait, known as the required coefficient of friction (RCOF) during normal locomotion on dry surfaces or 'friction used/achievable' during slips, has been one biomechanical variable most closely associated with the measured frictional properties of the shoe/floor interface (usually the coefficient of friction or COF). Other biomechanical factors that also play an important role are the kinematics of the foot at heel contact and human responses to slipping perturbations, often evident in the moments generated at the lower extremity joints and postural adaptations. In addition, it must be realized that the biomechanics are dependent upon the capabilities of the postural control system, the mental set of the individual, and the perception of the environment, particularly, the danger of slipping. The focus of this paper is to review what is known regarding the kinematics and kinetics of walking on surfaces under a variety of environmental conditions. Finally, we discuss future biomechanical research needs to help to improve walkway-friction measurements and safety.

  2. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Gloi, Aime M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12–20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6–9 MeV). PMID:27651563

  3. The relationship between corneal biomechanics and anterior segment parameters in the early stage of orthokeratology: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renai; Mao, Xinjie; Jiang, Jun; Shen, Meixiao; Lian, Yan; Zhang, Bin; Lu, Fan

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between corneal biomechanics and anterior segment parameters in the early stage of overnight orthokeratology.Twenty-three eyes from 23 subjects were involved in the study. Corneal biomechanics, including corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF), and parameters of the anterior segment, including corneal curvature, central corneal thickness (CCT), and corneal sublayers' thickness, were measured at baseline and day 1 and 7 after wearing orthokeratology lens. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to compare the longitudinal changes and partial least squares linear regression was used to explore the relationship between corneal biomechanics and anterior segment parameters.At baseline, CH and CRF were positively correlated with CCT (r = 0.244, P = .008 for CH; r = 0.249, P < .001 for CRF), central stroma thickness (CST) (r = 0.241, P = .008 for CH; r = 0.244, P = .002 for CRF) and central Bowman layer thickness (CBT) (r = 0.138, P = .039 for CH; r = 0.171, P = .006 for CRF). Both CH and CRF significantly decreased from day 1 after orthokeratology. The corneal curvature and the epithelium thickness also significantly decreased, while the stromal layer thickened significantly from day 1 after orthokeratology. There was no correlation between the changes of corneal biomechanics and anterior segment parameters at day 1 and 7 after orthokeratology.While corneal biomechanics were positively correlated with CCT, CST, and CBT, the changes of CH and CRF were not correlated with the changes of corneal curvature, CCT, and corneal sublayers' thickness in the early stage of orthokeratology in our study.

  4. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Patrick; Beach, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this study was to (1) review and analyze the state-of-art in beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) by identifying potential game-changing applications, (2) formulate a roadmap of technology development, and (3) identify key near-term technology demonstrations to rapidly advance elements of BEP technology to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. The two major areas of interest were launching payloads and space propulsion. More generally, the study was requested and structured to address basic mission feasibility. The attraction of beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) is the potential for high specific impulse while removing the power-generation mass. The rapid advancements in high-energy beamed-power systems and optics over the past 20 years warranted a fresh look at the technology. For launching payloads, the study concluded that using BEP to propel vehicles into space is technically feasible if a commitment to develop new technologies and large investments can be made over long periods of time. From a commercial competitive standpoint, if an advantage of beamed energy for Earth-to-orbit (ETO) is to be found, it will rest with smaller, frequently launched payloads. For space propulsion, the study concluded that using beamed energy to propel vehicles from low Earth orbit to geosynchronous Earth orbit (LEO-GEO) and into deep space is definitely feasible and showed distinct advantages and greater potential over current propulsion technologies. However, this conclusion also assumes that upfront infrastructure investments and commitments to critical technologies will be made over long periods of time. The chief issue, similar to that for payloads, is high infrastructure costs.

  5. Topographic, tomographic and biomechanical corneal changes during pregnancy in patients with keratoconus: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Naderan, Mohammad; Jahanrad, Ali

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of pregnancy on topographic, tomographic and biomechanical parameters of patients with keratoconus (KC) in comparison with non-pregnant patients with KC. In a cohort study, patients with KC, whose disease was stable for at least 2 years, were evaluated before pregnancy, at their third trimester of pregnancy (34th week of pregnancy) and 6 months after pregnancy. As the control group, an equivalent number of age- and severity-matched non-pregnant female patients with KC were evaluated at the corresponding times. All subjects were evaluated with respect to central and thinnest corneal thickness (CCT and TCT), keratometry values, and maximum anterior and posterior elevation measurements (AE and PE) by Pentacam. Furthermore, corneal biomechanical properties including corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) were measured using the ocular response analyser. Twenty-two eyes of 11 patients were equally enrolled in each group. The results revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between the means of all measurements during the course of study (p < 0.001, repeated measures analysis of variance). The values of CCT, TCT, CH, CRF, IOPg and IOPcc were significantly decreased; however, keratometry values, AE, PE and refraction measurements were significantly increased during the study period (p < 0.001). In contrast, no significant differences were observed regarding the study variables in the control group (p > 0.05). According to the Amsler-Krumeich classification, severity of KC increased during the pregnancy and postpregnancy periods (p = 0.038). The obtained results revealed that KC progressed during the pregnancy period and continued to the post-partum period, indicating that pregnancy may be a risk factor for KC progression. Patients with KC, who intend to become pregnant, may consider corneal cross-linking treatment in an attempt to stop KC progression. © 2016 Acta

  6. Biomechanical comparison of pedicle screws versus spinous process screws in C2 vertebra: A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guan-Yi; Mao, Lu; Xu, Rong-Ming; Ma, Wei-Hu

    2014-11-01

    Biomechanical studies have shown C2 pedicle screw to be the most robust in insertional torque and pullout strength. However, C2 pedicle screw placement is still technically challenging. Smaller C2 pedicles or medial localization of the vertebral artery may preclude safe C2 pedicle screw placement in some patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the pullout strength of spinous process screws with pedicle screws in the C2. Eight fresh human cadaveric cervical spine specimens (C2) were harvested and subsequently frozen to -20°C. After being thawed to room temperature, each specimen was debrided of remaining soft tissue and labeled. A customs jig as used to clamp each specimen for screw insertion firmly. Screws were inserted into the vertebral body pairs on each side using one of two methods. The pedicle screws were inserted in usual manner as in previous biomechanical studies. The starting point for spinous process screw insertion was located at the junction of the lamina and the spinous process and the direction of the screw was about 0° caudally in the sagittal plane and about 0° medially in the axial plane. Each vertebrae was held in a customs jig, which was attached to material testing machine (Material Testing System Inc., Changchun, China). A coupling device that fit around the head of the screw was used to pull out each screw at a loading rate of 2 mm/min. The uniaxial load to failure was recorded in Newton'st dependent test (for paired samples) was used to test for significance. The mean load to failure was 387 N for the special protection scheme and 465 N for the protection scheme without significant difference (t = -0.862, P = 0.403). In all but three instances (38%), the spinous process pullout values exceeded the values for the pedicle screws. The working distances for the spinous process screws was little shorter than pedicle screws in each C2 specimen. Spinous process screws provide comparable pullout strength to pedicle screws of the C2

  7. Scaphoid tuberosity excursion is minimized during a dart-throwing motion: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Werner, Frederick W; Sutton, Levi G; Basu, Niladri; Short, Walter H; Moritomo, Hisao; St-Amand, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excursion of the scaphoid tuberosity and therefore scaphoid motion is minimized during a dart-throwing motion. Scaphoid tuberosity excursion was studied as an indicator of scaphoid motion in 29 cadaver wrists as they were moved through wrist flexion-extension, radioulnar deviation, and a dart-throwing motion. Study results demonstrate that excursion was significantly less during the dart-throwing motion than during either wrist flexion-extension or radioulnar deviation. If the goal of early wrist motion after carpal ligament or distal radius injury and reconstruction is to minimize loading of the healing structures, a wrist motion in which scaphoid motion is minimal should reduce length changes in associated ligamentous structures. Therefore, during rehabilitation, if a patient uses a dart-throwing motion that minimizes his or her scaphoid tuberosity excursion, there should be minimal changes in ligament loading while still allowing wrist motion. Bench research, biomechanics, and cross-sectional. Not applicable. The study was laboratory based. Copyright © 2016 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models.

    PubMed

    Chi, Y; Liang, J; Yan, D

    2006-02-01

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  9. Biomechanical podiatric evaluation in an Italian cohort of patients with systemic sclerosis: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Ravenni, Giovanni; Ciampi, Benedetta; Del Rosso, Angela; El Aoufy, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Objective Foot problems are often present in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients, however studies regarding podiatric problems related to SSc are lacking and there are no data evaluating the foot biomechanical changes. The aim of the present pilot study was to evaluate podiatric problems in an Italian cohort of SSc patients by assessing received podiatric services, foot pain and disability and biomechanical foot deformity. Material and Methods 25 consecutive SSc patients were enrolled from the Division of Rheumatology, University of Florence. All SSc patients were assessed by: Standards of Care for People with Foot Musculoskeletal Health problems: Audit Tool, Foot Function Index (FFI), Weight and non-weight bearing foot joint assessment, (Foot Posture Index (FPI) and Gait Cycle), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 (SF-36). Results Audit Tool - Only 7 (28%) out of the 25 patients with SSc had a specific podiatric assessment and treatment: no patient received a foot health assessment within the first 6 months of disease diagnosis and no patient received information about foot involvement. 1 patient (4%) received foot assessment every year; 1 patient (4%) received specific information about the disease and 5 patients (20%) received information about the benefits of using adapted footwear and insoles. FFI - Values of pain, disability and activity limitations, reported in FFI, are 4.7±5.1, 5.1±3.2 and 3.2±3.1 (M±DS), respectively. Non-weight bearing foot joint assessment shows a rearfoot varus deformity in 64% of patients, forefoot varus deformity in 42% and 6% forefoot valgus deformity. Weight bearing foot joint assessment, through FPI shows a pronated foot 20% of patients with and 34% with highly pronated overall foot posture. Gait analysis shows that 64% of patients has a contact of the calcaneus in invertion while 36% in eversion. In the midstance, 78% have the foot in pronation and 22% in supination, while in

  10. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2006-02-15

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  11. Driving Position Field Study, Differences with the Whiplash Protocol and Biomechanics Experimental Responses

    PubMed Central

    Arregui-Dalmases, Carlos; Pozo, Eduardo Del; Lessley, David; Barrios, Jose Manuel; Nombela, Mario; Cisneros, Oscar; de Miguel, Juan Luis; Seguí-Gómez, María

    2011-01-01

    Rear-impact collisions at low speed are a leading cause of economic costs among motor vehicle accidents. Recently, EuroNCAP has incorporated in its protocol the whiplash test, to reproduce a low-speed rear impact. This paper presents a field driving study to assess the potential differences between the EuroNCAP dummy tests and actual drivers in the field, focusing on occupant position and biomechanics experimental results. A total of 182 drivers were randomly selected in two geographical areas in Spain. The driving position of each driver was recorded with a focus on the most relevant measurements for rear impact. Statistical analysis was performed to obtain means, standard deviations and density functions to compare observational seating position with that of the EuroNCAP testing protocol. The observational data showed a similar seatback angle to that used in the EuroNCAP protocol (24° in front of 25° for the protocol), a greater distance between the head vertex and the top of the head restraint (53mm compared to 39.5mm), and less distance between the occipital bone of the head and the headrest (67.9 compared to 89.3mm). Based on these data, 4 dummy tests were conducted using the dummy BioRID IIg. The baseline test was designed to reproduce the dummy position according to EuroNCAP 3.0 whiplash protocol. Three different additional tests were defined to reproduce the actual observed driving position as well as to assess a “worst case” scenario in terms of reduced seatback angle. These variations in initial driver position, comparing the EuroNCAP protocol to the observational study results, were not observed to cause significant differences in the biomechanical values measured in the BioRID IIg, The T1 acceleration was reduced less than 8%, the NIC was increased about 8%, and the NKm presented a reduction of 20%. Reducing the seat angle was observed to be more harmful in terms of NIC. PMID:22105385

  12. Driving position field study, differences with the whiplash protocol and biomechanics experimental responses.

    PubMed

    Arregui-Dalmases, Carlos; Pozo, Eduardo Del; Lessley, David; Barrios, Jose Manuel; Nombela, Mario; Cisneros, Oscar; De Miguel, Juan Luis; Seguí-Gómez, María

    2011-01-01

    Rear-impact collisions at low speed are a leading cause of economic costs among motor vehicle accidents. Recently, EuroNCAP has incorporated in its protocol the whiplash test, to reproduce a low-speed rear impact. This paper presents a field driving study to assess the potential differences between the EuroNCAP dummy tests and actual drivers in the field, focusing on occupant position and biomechanics experimental results. A total of 182 drivers were randomly selected in two geographical areas in Spain. The driving position of each driver was recorded with a focus on the most relevant measurements for rear impact. Statistical analysis was performed to obtain means, standard deviations and density functions to compare observational seating position with that of the EuroNCAP testing protocol. The observational data showed a similar seatback angle to that used in the EuroNCAP protocol (24° in front of 25° for the protocol), a greater distance between the head vertex and the top of the head restraint (53mm compared to 39.5mm), and less distance between the occipital bone of the head and the headrest (67.9 compared to 89.3mm). Based on these data, 4 dummy tests were conducted using the dummy BioRID IIg. The baseline test was designed to reproduce the dummy position according to EuroNCAP 3.0 whiplash protocol. Three different additional tests were defined to reproduce the actual observed driving position as well as to assess a "worst case" scenario in terms of reduced seatback angle. These variations in initial driver position, comparing the EuroNCAP protocol to the observational study results, were not observed to cause significant differences in the biomechanical values measured in the BioRID IIg, The T1 acceleration was reduced less than 8%, the NIC was increased about 8%, and the NKm presented a reduction of 20%. Reducing the seat angle was observed to be more harmful in terms of NIC.

  13. Biomechanical studies on transverse olecranon and patellar fractures: a systematic review with the development of a new scoring method.

    PubMed

    Traa, Willeke A; Oomen, Pim J A; den Hamer, Anniek; Heusinkveld, Maarten H G; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Several methods of transverse patellar and olecranon fixation have been described. This article compares biomechanical studies of various fixation methods using a newly developed scoring method. The databases PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, Google Scholar and Google were searched for relevant studies. Fixation hardware failure remains a problem. Various materials and fixation techniques have been tested to provide an improved fixation of transverse olecranon and patellar fractures. The difference in biomechanical testing setup between the studies makes it hard to compare different fixation techniques. The newly developed grading method was proved to be unbiased and reliable; however, extra specifications need to be added at some criteria when adopting the scoring method. Non-metallic constructs may provide an improvement to the currently used metallic tension band wiring technique; however, clinical research is required.

  14. Application of Endodontic Files for the Extraction of Root Tips: A Biomechanical Investigation and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junliang; He, Yun; Pan, Qin; Nie, Minhai

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the appropriate endodontic file for the extraction of root tips through a biomechanical study and to evaluate the clinic efficiency of this technique. Nine hundred molar roots were randomly divided into 3 groups (3, 5, and 7 mm) and amputated to the corresponding length. Different files were inserted into the root tips, and a pullout test was conducted using a universal testing machine. The pullout force was recorded and files with greatest pullout force were selected for clinical study. Patients' root tips were extracted using these files. The duration and incidence of postoperative complications were recorded. The greatest pullout force was obtained for the 25(#) Hedström file, regardless of the length of the root tip and the type of file. The pullout force of Hedström files was significantly greater than that of Kerr files in each file group and root length group (P < .05). Clinically, the direct success ratio of this technique was 81.4%. The incidence of postoperative complications was very low. The results of this study suggest that the application of endodontic files for the extraction of root tips is an acceptable technique. The 25(#) Hedström file is the optimum choice for root extraction in most cases when using endodontic files. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A numerical study of the left ventricle using structure-based bio-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunfei; Luo, Xiaoyu; Feng, Yaoqi

    A numerical study of the left ventricle using structure-based bio-mechanical model In space environment, microgravity and radiation can have deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system of the astronauts. The work in this paper is part of an ongoing effort to use mathematical models to provide a better understanding of the impact of long-duration spaceflight on the heart and blood vessels. In this study, we develop a computational left ventricle model before and after myocardium infarction based on cardiovascular mechanical theory. The anatomically realistic model has a rule-based fibre structure and a orthotropic structure-based constitutive model. The differences of deformations in the left ventricle before and after infarction are compared in details. In particular, the effects of fiber direction and fiber dispersion are examined. The disarray of both the fiber and sheet orientation is characterized by a dispersion parameter. The left ventricle volume is calculated from the MRI images and used for the optimization of the parameters of the myocardium. We provide the numerical framework for further study on effects of spaceflight on the cardiovascular system.

  16. Beam-Beam Study on the Upgrade of Beijing Electron Positron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Cai, Y.; /SLAC

    2006-02-10

    It is an important issue to study the beam-beam interaction in the design and performance of such a high luminosity collider as BEPCII, the upgrade of Beijing Electron Positron Collider. The weak-strong simulation is generally used during the design of a collider. For performance a large scale tune scan, the weak-strong simulation studies on beam-beam interaction were done, and the geometry effects were taken into account. The strong-strong simulation studies were done for investigating the luminosity goal and the dependence of the luminosity on the beam parameters.

  17. Beam structure and transverse emittance studies of high-energy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Schneider, J. D.

    1991-05-01

    A visual diagnostic technique was developed to monitor and study ion beam structure shape and size along a transport line. In this technique, a commercially available fluorescent screen is utilized in conjunction with a video camera. This visual representation of the beam structure is digitized and enhanced through use of false color coding and displayed on a TV monitor for on-line viewing. Digitized information is stored for further off-line processing (e.g., extraction of beam profiles). An optional wire grid placed upstream of the fluor screen adds the capability of transverse emittance (or angular spread) measurement to this technique. This diagnostic allows real time observation of the beam response to parameter changes (e.g., evolution of the beam structure, shifts in the beam intensity at various spatial locations within the beam perimeter, and shifts in the beam center and position).

  18. Interlocking Nailing Versus Interlocking Plating in Intra-articular Calcaneal Fractures: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Sophia; Martin, Heiner; Ulmar, Benjamin; Döbele, Stefan; Zwipp, Hans; Rammelt, Stefan; Richter, Martinus; Pompach, Martin; Mittlmeier, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation with a plate is deemed to represent the gold standard of surgical treatment for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. Standard plate fixation is usually placed through an extended lateral approach with high risk for wound complications. Minimally invasive techniques might avoid wound complications but provide limited construct stability. Therefore, 2 different types of locking nails were developed to allow for minimally invasive technique with sufficient stability. The aim of this study was to quantify primary stability of minimally invasive calcaneal interlocking nail systems in comparison to a variable-angle interlocking plate. After quantitative CT analysis, a standardized Sanders type IIB fracture model was created in 21 fresh-frozen cadavers. For osteosynthesis, 2 different interlocking nail systems (C-Nail; Medin, Nov. Město n. Moravě, Czech Republic; Calcanail; FH Orthopedics SAS; Heimsbrunn, France) as well as a polyaxial interlocking plate (Rimbus; Intercus GmbH; Rudolstadt, Germany) were used. Biomechanical testing consisted of a dynamic load sequence (preload 20 N, 1000 N up to 2500 N, stepwise increase of 100 N every 100 cycles, 0.5 mm/s) and a load to failure sequence (max. load 5000 N, 0.5 mm/s). Interfragmentary movement was detected via a 3-D optical measurement system. Boehler angle was measured after osteosynthesis and after failure occurred. No significant difference regarding load to failure, stiffness, Boehler angle, or interfragmentary motion was found between the different fixation systems. A significant difference was found with the dynamic failure testing sequence where 87.5% of the Calcanail implants failed in contrast to 14% of the C-Nail group (P < .01) and 66% of the Rimbus plate. The highest load to failure was observed for the C-Nail. Boehler angle showed physiologic range with all implants before and after the biomechanical tests. Both minimally invasive interlocking nail systems

  19. Prospective Study of the Relation between Landing Biomechanics and Jumper's Knee.

    PubMed

    der Worp, H van; van der Does, H T D; Brink, M S; Zwerver, J; Hijmans, J M

    2016-03-01

    The literature on the relation between jump biomechanics and jumper's knee indicates that a jump with horizontal displacement poses a threat for developing jumper's knee. Subjects with jumper's knee have been shown to display a stiff landing pattern characterized by a small range of motion. However, up to now only cross-sectional studies have been conducted. 6 teams from sports involving repetitive landing were followed prospectively for 2 years. At baseline athletes performed the Landing Error Scoring System jump and 3D kinematics and kinetics were obtained. A comparison was made between subjects who developed jumper's knee and those who did not develop it. 3 subjects developed jumper's knee during the study. Leg stiffness during landing was high compared to the mean of the healthy controls. No common kinematic patterns could be identified in these 3 subjects. The results suggest that athletes with high leg stiffness during landing might have an increased risk for developing jumper's knee, yet this conclusion is based on a very small sample. Subjects who develop jumper's knee do not show a common landing technique. Further research is needed to investigate whether leg stiffness can be used to identify athletes at risk and as a target variable to be used in prevention.

  20. Gastrocsoleus recession techniques: an anatomical and biomechanical study in human cadavers.

    PubMed

    Tinney, A; Khot, A; Eizenberg, N; Wolfe, R; Graham, H K

    2014-06-01

    Lengthening of the conjoined tendon of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis and soleus fascia is frequently used in the treatment of equinus deformities in children and adults. The Vulpius procedure as described in most orthopaedic texts is a division of the conjoined tendon in the shape of an inverted V. However, transverse division was also described by Vulpius and Stoffel, and has been reported in some clinical studies. We studied the anatomy and biomechanics of transverse division of the conjoined tendon in 12 human cadavers (24 legs). Transverse division of the conjoined tendon resulted in predictable, controlled lengthening of the gastrocsoleus muscle-tendon unit. The lengthening achieved was dependent both on the level of the cut in the conjoined tendon and division of the midline raphé. Division at a proximal level resulted in a mean lengthening of 15.2 mm (sd 2.0, (12 to 19), which increased to 17.1 mm (sd 1.8, (14 to 20) after division of the midline raphé. Division at a distal level resulted in a mean lengthening of 21.0 mm (sd 2.0, (18 to 25), which increased to 26.4 mm (sd 1.4, (24 to 29) after division of the raphé. These differences were significant (p < 0.001).

  1. A comparative biomechanical study of bone ingrowth in two porous hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Li-Mei; Todo, Mitsugu; Arahira, Takaaki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Myoui, Akira

    2012-12-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bioceramics have been widely used as artificial bone substitute materials because of their superior biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. In the present study, mechanical properties changes of two hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics induced by bone ingrowth were tested and evaluated in a rabbit model. Both materials (NEOBONE®, Apaceram-AX®) have highly interconnected pores with a porosity of 75-85%. The major structural difference between them lies in that Apaceram-AX® has micropores smaller than 10 micrometers in diameter, whereas NEOBONE® does not contain such micropores. Both materials were implanted into the femoral condyles of rabbits for the specified observation period (1, 5, 12, 24, and 48 weeks) and then evaluated by experimental approach in combination with finite element method (FEM). Results indicate that two porous bioceramics exhibit different degradability in vivo, and remarkably different variation of total stiffness, elastic modulus distribution, as well as strain energy density distribution calculated by FE simulation. These results demonstrate how the internal microstructures affect the progress of bone regeneration and mechanical properties with the duration of implantation, emphasizing the importance of biomaterial design tailored to various clinic applications. Additionally, this study showed a potential for applying the computational method to monitor the time-dependent biomechanical changes of implanted porous bioceramics.

  2. Validation of an experimental polyurethane model for biomechanical studies on implant supported prosthesis - tension tests

    PubMed Central

    MIYASHIRO, Mariane; SUEDAM, Valdey; MORETTI NETO, Rafael Tobias; FERREIRA, Paulo Martins; RUBO, José Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The complexity and heterogeneity of human bone, as well as ethical issues, frequently hinder the development of clinical trials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the modulus of elasticity of a polyurethane isotropic experimental model via tension tests, comparing the results to those reported in the literature for mandibular bone, in order to validate the use of such a model in lieu of mandibular bone in biomechanical studies. Material and Methods Forty-five polyurethane test specimens were divided into 3 groups of 15 specimens each, according to the ratio (A/B) of polyurethane reagents (PU-1: 1/0.5, PU-2: 1/1, PU-3: 1/1.5). Results Tension tests were performed in each experimental group and the modulus of elasticity values found were 192.98 MPa (SD=57.20) for PU-1, 347.90 MPa (SD=109.54) for PU-2 and 304.64 MPa (SD=25.48) for PU-3. Conclusion The concentration of choice for building the experimental model was 1/1. PMID:21625741

  3. Preliminary study of the biomechanical behavior and physical characteristics of tantalum (Ta)-coated prostheses.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yonghong; Liu, Lie; Wang, Ling; Guo, Fei; Li, Haoping; Shi, Lei; Li, Mao; Yin, Dayu; Jiang, Chi; Zhu, Qingsheng

    2012-03-01

    Use of Ta biomaterials in medicine started in the middle of the last century. The good biocompatibility and chemical stability, and the unique physical characteristics of Ta metal have resulted in many possible developments of Ta biomaterials. In this study, histopathological observation, histomorphometric analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis, biomechanical testing, and examination of the coating's mechanical strength have been used to evaluate the value of clinical application of Ta-coated prostheses prepared by a plasma-spraying process. Histopathological observation has demonstrated that the periprosthetic new bone tissues tightly and stably adhere to the Ta coating after the implantation, with no signs of loosening. Early after implantation, there is no significant difference in periprosthetic bone volume and ultimate shear strength between Ta-coated and Ti-coated prostheses (P > 0.05). EDX analysis suggests that the ultimate shear stress does not damage Ta coating. Mechanical strength testing shows that the adhesive strength and Vicker's surface hardness (HV) of the Ta coating are significantly higher than those of the Ti coating (P < 0.01). Ta coating has good stability and bone biocompatibility; the extraordinary physical characteristics of Ta coating have great significance in maintaining prosthetic stability and surface porosity after implantation.

  4. Topography of Acoustical Properties of Long Bones: From Biomechanical Studies to Bone Health Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinov, Alexey; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a retrospective view on the assessment of long bones condition using topographical patterns of the acoustic properties. The application of ultrasonic point-contact transducers with exponential waveguides on a short acoustic base for detailed measurements in human long bones by the surface transmission was initiated during the 1980s in Latvia. The guided wave velocity was mapped on the surface of the long bones and the topographical patterns reflected the biomechanical peculiarities. Axial velocity profiles obtained in vivo by measurements along the medial surface of tibia varied due to aging, hypokinesia, and physical training. The method has been advanced at Artann Laboratories (West Trenton, NJ) by the introduction of multifrequency data acquisition and axial scanning. The model studies carried out on synthetic phantoms and in bone specimens confirmed the potential to evaluate separately changes of the bone material properties and of the cortical thickness by multifrequency acoustic measurements at the 0.1 to 1 MHz band. The bone ultrasonic scanner (BUSS) is an axial mode ultrasonometer developed to depict the acoustic profile of bone that will detect the onset of bone atrophy as a spatial process. Clinical trials demonstrated a high sensitivity of BUSS to osteoporosis and the capability to assess early stage of osteopenia. PMID:18599416

  5. Topography of acoustical properties of long bones: from biomechanical studies to bone health assessment.

    PubMed

    Tatarinov, Alexey; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a retrospective view on the assessment of long bones condition using topographical patterns of the acoustic properties. The application of ultrasonic point-contact transducers with exponential waveguides on a short acoustic base for detailed measurements in human long bones by the surface transmission was initiated during the 1980s in Latvia. The guided wave velocity was mapped on the surface of the long bones and the topographical patterns reflected the biomechanical peculiarities. Axial velocity profiles obtained in vivo by measurements along the medial surface of tibia varied due to aging, hypokinesia, and physical training. The method has been advanced at Artann Laboratories (West Trenton, NJ) by the introduction of multifrequency data acquisition and axial scanning. The model studies carried out on synthetic phantoms and in bone specimens confirmed the potential to evaluate separately changes of the bone material properties and of the cortical thickness by multifrequency acoustic measurements at the 0.1 to 1 MHz band. The bone ultrasonic scanner (BUSS) is an axial mode ultrasonometer developed to depict the acoustic profile of bone that will detect the onset of bone atrophy as a spatial process. Clinical trials demonstrated a high sensitivity of BUSS to osteoporosis and the capability to assess early stage of osteopenia.

  6. Treatment of limited shoulder motion: a case study based on biomechanical considerations.

    PubMed

    McClure, P W; Flowers, K R

    1992-12-01

    This article describes the management of a 57-year-old female patient following a fracture and dislocation of the right humeral head. The treatment of the patient involved the use of thermal agents, manual therapy, continuous passive motion, and splinting of the arm in an elevated position. We describe an approach to treatment of limited shoulder motion that is focused on identifying and applying tension to restricting structures rather than restoration of translatory gliding movements of the humeral head. Our treatment approach is based on recent data from biomechanical studies that challenge the concave-convex theory of arthrokinematic motion first described by MacConaill. We believe that tension in capsular tissues, rather than joint surface geometry, may control the translatory movements of the humeral head. The rationale for treatment involving low-load prolonged stress to tissues in the form of continuous passive motion and splinting is discussed as well as potential limitations of more brief forms of stress such as joint mobilization and manual stretching.

  7. Stability of edentulous, atrophic mandibles after insertion of different dental implants. A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Torsiglieri, T; Raith, S; Rau, A; Deppe, H; Hölzle, F; Steiner, T

    2015-06-01

    Fractures of the atrophic edentulous mandible are a rare complication that can become severe after the insertion of dental implants. This in vitro study investigated the effects of different implant settings varying in number, diameter, and length. and the influence of a fixed bar. In biomechanical experiments on artificial mandibles, an unmodified reference group, four implant settings with two different implants, and the effect of adding a fixed bar to these settings were tested. All specimens were loaded with incisal biting forces until failure due to fracture. Implants weakened all specimens significantly compared with those in the reference group. Without a fixed bar, four short and thick implants showed the best results, with high significance. With a fixed bar, four long and thin implants withstood the highest loads. The addition of fixed bars reduced the differences between the implant settings. Fixed bars did not show increased stability for all groups; however, these groups showed a higher mean strength. Four implants with a short and thick design should be the first choice when implants are placed without a fixed bar in an atrophic mandible. With a fixed bar, four long and thin implants should be used. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Olecranon tension plating or olecranon tension band wiring? A comparative biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gruszka, Dominik; Arand, Charlotte; Nowak, Tobias; Dietz, Sven-Oliver; Wagner, Daniel; Rommens, Pol

    2015-05-01

    The complication rate of a tension band wiring (TBW) used for the internal fixation of olecranon fractures remains high. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of a novel olecranon tension plate (OTP) with TBW in a simulated fracture model. We tested 12 fresh frozen-pairs of cadaver proximal ulnae treated with OTP and TBW under cyclic loading. The elbow motion ranged from full extension to 90° of flexion, and the pulling force of the triceps tendon ranged from 50 to 350 N. The displacement of the fracture fragments was measured continuously. Data were assessed statistically using the Wilcoxon test with significance level of p < 0.05. The cyclic loading tests showed median displacements of the fracture fragments of 0.25 mm using OTP and 1.12 mm for TBW. Statistical analysis showed the difference to be substantial (p = 0.086) but not statistically significant. No plate breakage or screw loosening occurred. The concept of replacing prominent K-wires at the proximal end of the ulna using an low-profile plate with classical lag and multidirectional angle-stable screws demonstrated biomechanical advantages over TBW.

  9. Biomechanical study on surgical fixation methods for minimally invasive treatment of hallux valgus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Rui; Guo, Junchao; Luo, Chenyu; Fan, Yubo; Wen, Jianmin; Wang, Lizhen

    2017-08-01

    Hallux valgus (HV) was one of the most frequent female foot deformities. The aim of this study was to evaluate mechanical responses and stabilities of the Kirschner, bandage and fiberglass fixations after the distal metatarsal osteotomy in HV treatment. Surface traction of different forefoot regions in bandage fixation and the biomechanical behavior of fiberglass bandage material were measured by a pressure sensor device and a mechanical testing, respectively. A three-dimensional foot finite element (FE) model was developed to simulate the three fixation methods (Kirschner, bandage and fiberglass fixations) in weight bearing. The model included 28 bones, sesamoids, ligaments, plantar fascia, cartilages and soft tissue. The peak Von Mises stress (MS) and compression stress (CS) of the distal fragment were predicted from the three fixation methods: Kirschner fixation (MS=6.71MPa, CS=1.232MPa); Bandage fixation (MS=14.90MPa, CS=9.642MPa); Fiberglass fixation (MS=15.83MPa, CS=19.70MPa). Compared with the Kirschner and bandage fixation, the fiberglass fixation reduced the relative movement of osteotomy fragments and obtained the maximum CS. We concluded that fiberglass fixation in HV treatment was helpful to the bone healing of distal fragment. The findings were expected to guide further therapeutic planning of HV patient. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Core decompression of the equine navicular bone: an in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Florien; Kirker-Head, Carl

    2011-02-01

    To determine the effect of core decompression surgery and bone mineral density (BMD) on the mechanical properties of equine navicular bones. Experimental, in vitro study. Fore limb navicular bones (n=36 pairs) from sound 2-5-year-old horses with no radiographic abnormalities of the distal aspect of the forelimbs. Navicular BMD was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. One randomly assigned navicular bone from each pair served as control. The contralateral test specimen was allocated to 1 of 6 treatment groups defined by drill bit size (3.2 versus 2.5 mm diameter) and by the number of drill channels (1, 2, or 3) created in the proximal border of the bone. Bones were then tested until failure in 3-point bending. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and regression analysis. There were significant (P<.001) positive correlations between BMD and biomechanical data. A significant (P<.001) reduction in breaking strength was noted between intact and drilled bone pairs; however, the diameter and number of decompression channels did not significantly (P>.05) influence the extent of the reduction in mechanical strength. In vitro core decompression significantly decreases the breaking strength of the equine navicular bone. © Copyright 2010 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  11. A biomechanical study on fixation stability with twin hook or lag screw in artificial cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Olsson, O; Tanner, K E; Ceder, L; Ryd, L

    2002-01-01

    The twin hook has been developed as an alternative to the conventional lag screw to be combined with a barrelled side-plate in the treatment of trochanteric hip fractures. With two oppositely directed apical hooks introduced into the subchondral bone of the femoral head, the twin hook provides different stabilising properties to the lag screw. The femoral head purchase of the twin hook and the lag screw were compared in a biomechanical study using artificial cancellous bone, and responses to axial and torsional loading was determined. A distinct yield point in load and torque was noted for the lag screw, representing failure of the laminas supporting the threads. For the twin hook, gradual increase of load and torque occurred during impaction of the bone supporting the hooks. The peak loads and torques were higher for the lag screw, but were similar for both devices after 8 mm deformation. The stiffness was higher for the lag screw, but in counter-clockwise rotation the stiffness for the lag screw was negligible. The twin hook appeared to provide fixation stability comparable to that offered by the lag screw, but with conceivable advantages in terms of a deformation response involving bone impaction and gradually increasing stability.

  12. MovExp: A Versatile Visualization Tool for Human-Computer Interaction Studies with 3D Performance and Biomechanical Data.

    PubMed

    Palmas, Gregorio; Bachynskyi, Myroslav; Oulasvirta, Antti; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Weinkauf, Tina

    2014-12-01

    In Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), experts seek to evaluate and compare the performance and ergonomics of user interfaces. Recently, a novel cost-efficient method for estimating physical ergonomics and performance has been introduced to HCI. It is based on optical motion capture and biomechanical simulation. It provides a rich source for analyzing human movements summarized in a multidimensional data set. Existing visualization tools do not sufficiently support the HCI experts in analyzing this data. We identified two shortcomings. First, appropriate visual encodings are missing particularly for the biomechanical aspects of the data. Second, the physical setup of the user interface cannot be incorporated explicitly into existing tools. We present MovExp, a versatile visualization tool that supports the evaluation of user interfaces. In particular, it can be easily adapted by the HCI experts to include the physical setup that is being evaluated, and visualize the data on top of it. Furthermore, it provides a variety of visual encodings to communicate muscular loads, movement directions, and other specifics of HCI studies that employ motion capture and biomechanical simulation. In this design study, we follow a problem-driven research approach. Based on a formalization of the visualization needs and the data structure, we formulate technical requirements for the visualization tool and present novel solutions to the analysis needs of the HCI experts. We show the utility of our tool with four case studies from the daily work of our HCI experts.

  13. Biomechanical Evaluation of the Stabilizing Function of Three Atlantoaxial Implants Under Shear Loading: A Canine Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Riedinger, Benoit; Bürki, Alexander; Stahl, Christina; Howard, Judith; Forterre, Franck

    2015-11-01

    To compare the biomechanical properties of a ventral transarticular lag screw fixation technique, a new dorsal atlantoaxial instability (AAI) clamp, and a new ventral AAI hook plate under sagittal shear loading after transection of the ligaments of the atlantoaxial joint. Cadaveric biomechanical study. Canine cadavers (n = 10). The occipitoatlantoaxial region of Beagles euthanatized for reasons unrelated to the study was prepared leaving only ligamentous structures and the joint capsules between the first 2 cervical vertebrae (C1 and C2). The atlanto-occipital joints were stabilized with 2 transarticular diverging positive threaded K-wires. The occipital bone and the caudal end of C2 were embedded in polymethylmethacrylate and loaded in shear to a force of 50 Newtons. The range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ) of the atlantoaxial joint were determined after 3 loading cycles with atlantoaxial ligaments intact, after ligament transection, and after fixation with each implant. The testing order of implants was randomly assigned. The implants tested last were subjected to failure testing. All stabilization procedures decreased the ROM and NZ of the atlantoaxial joint compared to transected ligament specimens. Only stabilization with transarticular lag screws and ventral plates produced a significant reduction of ROM compare to intact specimens. Fixation with transarticular lag screws and a ventral hook plate was biomechanically similar and provided more rigidity compared to dorsal clamp fixation. Further load cycling to failure tests and clinical studies are required before making clinical recommendations. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Biomechanical pulping of kenaf

    Treesearch

    Aziz Ahmed; Masood Akhtar; Gary C. Myers; Gary M. Scott

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fungal pretreatment of whole kenaf prior to refining on refiner electrical energy consumption, paper strength, and optical properties. We also explored the suitability of whole kenaf biomechanical pulp for making newsprint in terms of ISO brightness and strength properties. Kenaf was sterilized by autoclaving...

  15. Biomechanical effect of increasing or decreasing degrees of freedom for surgery of trapeziometacarpal joint arthritis: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Domalain, Mathieu F; Seitz, William H; Evans, Peter J; Li, Zong-Ming

    2011-11-01

    Osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint can be treated by arthrodesis and arthroplasty, which potentially decreases or increases the degrees of freedom (DoF) of the joint, respectively. The aim of our study was to bring novel biomechanical insights into these joint surgery procedures by investigating the influence of DoF at the TMC joint on muscle and joint forces in the thumb. A musculoskeletal model of the thumb was developed to equilibrate a 1 N external force in various directions while the thumb assumed key and pulp pinch postures. Muscle and joint forces were computed with an optimization method. In comparison to that of the 2-DoF (intact joint) condition, muscle forces slightly decreased in the 0-DoF (arthrodesis) condition, but drastically increased in the 3-DoF (arthroplasty) condition. TMC joint forces in the 3-DoF condition were 12 times larger than the 2-DoF joint. This study contributes to a further understanding of the biomechanics of the intact and surgically repaired TMC joint and addresses the biomechanical consequences of changing a joint's DoF by surgery. 

  16. Beam dynamics studies for the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven M.

    2001-04-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band \\(~8-12 GHz\\) through Ka-band \\(~30-35 GHz\\) frequency regions. The relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator project, whose aim is to study TBAs based upon extended relativistic klystrons, is described, and a new simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed, self-consistent calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed together with a beam line design that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 rf cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficiently capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beam line.

  17. A biomechanical study of 3 different types of sublaminar wire used for constructs in the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hideki; Yamazaki, Ken; Attallah-Wasif, Emad S; Tsai, Kai-Jow; Shimamura, Tadashi; Hutton, William C

    2006-08-01

    A biomechanical study was carried out on 3 different types of sublaminar wire used in constructs to secure the thoracic spine: stainless steel monofilament wire (steel wire), titanium cable (cable), and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene tape (tape). Two experiments were carried out. Experiment 1: Thirty-one fresh human thoracic vertebrae classified as osteoporotic (bone mineral density of <0.8 g/cm2) were used. The steel wire, cable, or tape was placed sublaminarly and a tensile force was applied until the steel wire, cable, or tape cut 5 mm through the lamina, and the force at this point was noted. Experiment 2: Seven fresh human thoracic spines (T7-T10) were biomechanically tested as follows: axial compression (250 N), flexion (7.5 Nm), extension (7.5 Nm), left lateral bending (7.5 Nm), right lateral bending (7.5 Nm), left axial torsion (10 Nm), and right axial torsion (10 Nm). This sequence was applied to the intact spine. The spine was then de-stabilized and then restabilized using one or other of the 3 different types of sublaminar wires. The biomechanical testing was then repeated on the restabilized spine and stiffness curves were generated. In the laminar cut-through test, the cut-through force for tape was higher than that for either steel wire or cable. In the biomechanical stiffness testing, there was no significant difference between the 3 different sublaminar wiring constructs in any of the loading modes tested. The results of both experiments suggest that tape is as good, if not better, than steel wire or cable as a sublaminar wiring construct material.

  18. Understanding how axial loads on the spine influence segmental biomechanics for idiopathic scoliosis patients: A magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Little, J P; Pearcy, M J; Izatt, M T; Boom, K; Labrom, R D; Askin, G N; Adam, C J

    2016-02-01

    Segmental biomechanics of the scoliotic spine are important since the overall spinal deformity is comprised of the cumulative coronal and axial rotations of individual joints. This study investigates the coronal plane segmental biomechanics for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients in response to physiologically relevant axial compression. Individual spinal joint compliance in the coronal plane was measured for a series of 15 idiopathic scoliosis patients using axially loaded magnetic resonance imaging. Each patient was first imaged in the supine position with no axial load, and then again following application of an axial compressive load. Coronal plane disc wedge angles in the unloaded and loaded configurations were measured. Joint moments exerted by the axial compressive load were used to derive estimates of individual joint compliance. The mean standing major Cobb angle for this patient series was 46°. Mean intra-observer measurement error for endplate inclination was 1.6°. Following loading, initially highly wedged discs demonstrated a smaller change in wedge angle, than less wedged discs for certain spinal levels (+2,+1,-2 relative to the apex, (p<0.05)). Highly wedged discs were observed near the apex of the curve, which corresponded to lower joint compliance in the apical region. While individual patients exhibit substantial variability in disc wedge angles and joint compliance, overall there is a pattern of increased disc wedging near the curve apex, and reduced joint compliance in this region. Approaches such as this can provide valuable biomechanical data on in vivo spinal biomechanics of the scoliotic spine, for analysis of deformity progression and surgical planning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Relationship between MR Parameters and Biomechanical Quantities of Loaded Human Articular Cartilage in Osteoarthritis: An In-Vitro Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juráš, V.; Szomolányi, P.; Gäbler, S.; Frollo, I.; Trattnig, S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in MRI parameters during applied load directly in MR scanner and correlate these changes with biomechanical parameters of human articular cartilage. Cartilage explants from patients who underwent total knee replacement were examined in the micro-imaging system in 3T scanner. Respective MRI parameters (T1 without- and T1 with contrast agent as a marker of proteoglycan content, T2 as a marker of collagen network anisotropy and ADC as a measure of diffusivity) were calculated in pre- and during compression state. Subsequently, these parameters were compared to the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage, instantaneous modulus (I), equilibrium modulus (Eq) and time of tissue relaxation (τ). Significant load-induced changes of T2 and ADC were recorded. High correlation between T1Gd and I (r = 0.6324), and between ADC and Eq (r = -0.4884) was found. Multi-parametric MRI may have great potential in analyzing static and dynamic biomechanical behavior of articular cartilage in early stages of osteoarthritis (OA).

  20. Biomechanical study of expandable pedicle screw fixation in severe osteoporotic bone comparing with conventional and cement-augmented pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Long; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chou, Chi-Wei; Chen, Jou-Wen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Lai, Yu-Shu; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Shih-Tien

    2014-11-01

    Pedicle screws are widely utilized to treat the unstable thoracolumbar spine. The superior biomechanical strength of pedicle screws could increase fusion rates and provide accurate corrections of complex deformities. However, osteoporosis and revision cases of pedicle screw substantially reduce screw holding strength and cause loosening. Pedicle screw fixation becomes a challenge for spine surgeons in those scenarios. The purpose of this study was to determine if an expandable pedicle screw design could be used to improve biomechanical fixation in osteoporotic bone. Axial mechanical pull-out test was performed on the expandable, conventional and augmented pedicle screws placed in a commercial synthetic bone block which mimicked a human bone with severe osteoporosis. Results revealed that the pull-out strength and failure energy of expandable pedicle screws were similar with conventional pedicle screws augmented with bone cement by 2 ml. The pull-out strength was 5-fold greater than conventional pedicle screws and the failure energy was about 2-fold greater. Besides, the pull-out strength of expandable screw was reinforced by the expandable mechanism without cement augmentation, indicated that the risks of cement leakage from vertebral body would potentially be avoided. Comparing with the biomechanical performances of conventional screw with or without cement augmentation, the expandable screws are recommended to be applied for the osteoporotic vertebrae. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lower limb biomechanical characteristics of patients with neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers: the diabetes foot ulcer study protocol.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Cunningham, Margaret; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-10-23

    Foot ulceration is the main precursor to lower limb amputation in patients with type 2 diabetes worldwide. Biomechanical factors have been implicated in the development of foot ulceration; however the association of these factors to ulcer healing remains less clear. It may be hypothesised that abnormalities in temporal spatial parameters (stride to stride measurements), kinematics (joint movements), kinetics (forces on the lower limb) and plantar pressures (pressure placed on the foot during walking) contribute to foot ulcer healing. The primary aim of this study is to establish the biomechanical characteristics (temporal spatial parameters, kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressures) of patients with plantar neuropathic foot ulcers compared to controls without a history of foot ulcers. The secondary aim is to assess the same biomechanical characteristics in patients with foot ulcers and controls over-time to assess whether these characteristics remain the same or change throughout ulcer healing. The design is a case-control study nested in a six-month longitudinal study. Cases will be participants with active plantar neuropathic foot ulcers (DFU group). Controls will consist of patients with type 2 diabetes (DMC group) and healthy participants (HC group) with no history of foot ulceration. Standardised gait and plantar pressure protocols will be used to collect biomechanical data at baseline, three and six months. Descriptive variables and primary and secondary outcome variables will be compared between the three groups at baseline and follow-up. It is anticipated that the findings from this longitudinal study will provide important information regarding the biomechanical characteristic of type 2 diabetes patients with neuropathic foot ulcers. We hypothesise that people with foot ulcers will demonstrate a significantly compromised gait pattern (reduced temporal spatial parameters, kinematics and kinetics) at base line and then throughout the follow-up period

  2. Preliminary Biomechanical Study of Different Acetabular Reinforcement Devices for Acetabular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Lee, Po-Yi; Hsieh, Pang-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Background Acetabular reinforcement devices (ARDs) are frequently used as load-sharing devices to allow allograft incorporation in revision hip arthroplasty with massive acetabular bone loss. The key to a successful reconstruction is robust fixation of the device to the host acetabulum. Interlocking fixation is expected to improve the initial stability of the postoperative construct. However, all commercially available ARDs are designed with non-locking fixation. This study investigates the efficacy of standard ARDs modified with locking screw mechanisms for improving stability in acetabular reconstruction. Methods Three types of ARDs were examined to evaluate the postoperative compression and angular stability: i) standard commercial ARDs, ii) standard ARDs modified with monoaxial and iii) standard ARDs modified with polyaxial locking screw mechanisms. All ARDs were implanted into osteomized synthetic pelvis with pelvic discontinuity. Axial compression and torsion tests were then performed using a servohydraulic material testing machine that measured load (angle) versus displacement (torque). Initial stability was compared among the groups. Results Equipping ARDs with interlocking mechanisms effectively improved the initial stability at the device/bone interface compared to standard non-locked ARDs. In both compression and torsion experiments, the monoaxial interlocking construct demonstrated the highest construct stiffness (672.6 ± 84.1 N/mm in compression and 13.3 ± 1.0 N·m/degree in torsion), whereas the non-locked construct had the lowest construct stiffness (381.4 ± 117.2 N/mm in compression and 6.9 ± 2.1 N·m/degree in torsion) (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential benefit of adding a locking mechanism to an ARD. Polyaxial ARDs provide the surgeon with more flexibility in placing the screws at the cost of reduced mechanical performance. This in vitro study provides a preliminary evaluation of biomechanical performance for ARDs

  3. Biomechanics of abdominal injuries.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A; Maltese, M R

    2001-01-01

    Although considerable efforts have been advanced to investigate the biomechanical aspects of abdominal injuries, reviews have been very limited. The purpose of this article is to present a comprehensive review of the topic. Traumatic abdominal injuries occur due to penetrating or blunt loading. However, the present review is focused on blunt trauma. Because of the complexity of the abdomen, biomechanically relevant anatomical characteristics of the various abdominal organs are presented. The proposed mechanism of injury for these organs and methods for abdominal injury quantification are described. This is followed by a detailed analysis of the biomechanical literature with particular emphasis on experiments aimed to duplicate real world injuries and attempt to quantify trauma in terms of parameters such as force, deflection, viscous criteria, pressure criteria, and correlation of these variables with the severity of abdominal injury. Experimental studies include tests using primates, pigs, rats, beagles, and human cadavers. The effects of velocity, compression, padding, and impactor characteristics on tolerance; effects of pressurization and postmortem characteristics on abdominal injury; deduction of abdominal response corridors; and force-deflection responses (of the different abdominal regions and organs) are discussed. Output of initial research is presented on the development of a device to record the biomechanical parameters in an anthropomorphic test dummy during impact. Based on these studies and the current need for abdominal protection, recommendations are given for further research.

  4. Visualisation to enhance biomechanical tuning of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) in stroke: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are a number of gaps in the evidence base for the use of ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Three dimensional motion analysis offers an ideal method for objectively obtaining biomechanical gait data from stroke patients, however there are a number of major barriers to its use in routine clinical practice. One significant problem is the way in which the biomechanical data generated by these systems is presented. Through the careful design of bespoke biomechanical visualisation software it may be possible to present such data in novel ways to improve clinical decision making, track progress and increase patient understanding in the context of ankle-foot orthosis tuning. Methods A single-blind randomised controlled trial will be used to compare the use of biomechanical visualisation software in ankle-foot orthosis tuning against standard care (tuning using observation alone). Participants (n = 70) will have experienced a recent hemiplegia (1-12 months) and will be identified by their care team as being suitable candidates for a rigid ankle-foot orthosis. The primary outcome measure will be walking velocity. Secondary outcome measures include; lower limb joint kinematics (thigh and shank global orientations) & kinetics (knee and hip flexion/extension moments, ground reaction force FZ2 peak magnitude), step length, symmetry ratio based on step length, Modified Ashworth Scale, Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and EuroQol (EQ-5D). Additional qualitative measures will also be taken from participants (patients and clinicians) at the beginning and end of their participation in the study. The main aim of the study is to determine whether or not the visualisation of biomechanical data can be used to improve the outcomes of tuning ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Discussion In addition to answering the primary research question the broad range of measures that will be taken during this study are likely to contribute to a wider understanding of

  5. Study on shear behavior of FRP strengthened concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. K.; Xu, X. S.

    2017-04-01

    There are many researches on concrete bending beams reinforced with FRP, and the beam section of the bending strength is enhanced, it is necessary to carry out an oblique section bearing capacity review, if the bearing capacity is insufficient, it is also necessary to strengthen, so as to ensure the ductility of the beam and meet the needs of Engineering safety. In this paper, four concrete beams strengthened with different fibers (CFRP, HFRP and GFRP) were used to study the stress characteristics, failure forms, reasonable reinforcement methods, beam strain conditions, bearing capacity, stiffness and deformation capacity of shear behavior of concrete beams strengthened with different fibers and different forms of reinforcement. The experimental results showed that the FRP reinforcement can not only improve the shear bearing capacity and ultimate deformation of beam, but also increase the stiffness of the beam, reduce the bending deformation under the same load beam, and delay the extension of diagonal cracks.

  6. Shoulder biomechanics during the push phase of wheelchair propulsion: a multisite study of persons with paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Collinger, Jennifer L; Boninger, Michael L; Koontz, Alicia M; Price, Robert; Sisto, Sue Ann; Tolerico, Michelle L; Cooper, Rory A

    2008-04-01

    To present a descriptive analysis and comparison of shoulder kinetics and kinematics during wheelchair propulsion at multiple speeds (self-selected and steady-state target speeds) for a large group of manual wheelchair users with paraplegia while also investigating the effect of pain and subject demographics on propulsion. Case series. Three biomechanics laboratories at research institutions. Volunteer sample of 61 persons with paraplegia who use a manual wheelchair for mobility. Subjects propelled their own wheelchairs on a dynamometer at 3 speeds (self-selected, 0.9m/s, 1.8m/s) while kinetic and kinematic data were recorded. Differences in demographics between sites, correlations between subject characteristics, comparison of demographics and biomechanics between persons with and without pain, linear regression using subject characteristics to predict shoulder biomechanics, comparison of biomechanics between speed conditions. Significant increases in shoulder joint loading with increased propulsion velocity were observed. Resultant force increased from 54.4+/-13.5N during the 0.9m/s trial to 75.7+/-20.7N at 1.8m/s (P<.001). Body weight was the primary demographic variable that affected shoulder forces, whereas pain did not affect biomechanics. Peak shoulder joint loading occurs when the arm is extended and internally rotated, which may leave the shoulder at risk for injury. Body-weight maintenance, as well as other interventions designed to reduce the force required to propel a wheelchair, should be implemented to reduce the prevalence of shoulder pain and injury among manual wheelchair users.

  7. The influence of extraction on the stability of implanted titanium microscrews: a biomechanical and histomorphometric study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leilei; Tang, Tian; Deng, Feng; Zhao, Zhihe

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of extraction on the stability of implanted titanium microscrews. Six male beagle dogs received 96 microscrews between the mesial and distal roots of the second, third, and fourth premolars and the first molar in both maxillae and mandibles. The third and fourth premolars were extracted from each dog. Test implants were placed near the extraction sites, and control implants were placed at a distance from the extraction sites. The bone remodeling process at the interface was studied through biomechanical pull-out testing, histomorphologic observation, and histomorphometric assessment after different amounts of healing time (1, 3, or 8 weeks). Two microscrews were loose in the test group at week 1. Near the extraction regions, both the peak pullout force at extraction (Fmax) and the bone-implant contact (BIC) of the microscrews were lower than that seen in the control group at week 1, but quickly surpassed the control groups at week 3. After 8 weeks of healing time, Fmax and BIC values between test and control groups exhibited no differences. The lowest BIC value was 10.12%, and the corresponding pull-out force was 100.23 N. At week 1, the inflammatory reaction at the bone-implant interface in the test groups was stronger than in the control groups. At week 3, many active osteoblasts gathered along the interface and a bone matrix excreted by osteoblasts around the microscrew were observed in the test group. A BIC of at least 10% provided resistance to orthodontic forces. For microscrews placed near extraction regions, the risk of loosening was highest in the first week following implant placement. The most active bone remodeling at the implant-bone interface occurred 3 weeks after implantation, especially for screws near extraction regions.

  8. [A complex study of the movement biomechanics in patients with post-stroke hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    Skvortsov, D V; Bulatova, M A; Kovrazhkina, E A; Suvorov, A Iu; Ivanova, G E; Skvortsova, V I

    2012-01-01

    The authors present results of a pilot study on biomechanics of non-cyclic movements of the human consequent verticalization in the ontogenesis of patients with post-stroke hemiparesis (10 patients in the acute stage of cerebral stroke) and 10 healthy volunteers without neurologic and orthopedic pathology. Some movements of therapeutic exercises Balance (a model of ontogenetic kinesitherapy) have been selected for the study. Cinematic parameters have been recorded using a system of motion 3D video analysis, a kinematic model was build in accordance to standard protocols. The skin (native and straightened) electromyogram (EMG) was recorded synchronously with kinematic data using 16-channel electromyography from the following pairs of muscles: mm. sternocleido-mastoideus, trapezius (горизонтальная порция), biceps brachii, triceps brachii, rectus femoris, adductor magnus. Major differences in the EMG picture between patients and controls were: 1) the EMG "monotony" with the involvement of multiple additional muscles in locomotions with the prevalence of the peculiar "tonic" muscle activity (low amplitudes without distinct peaks), stretching along the whole cycle of movement. In controls, EMG demonstrated variability and had mostly "phasic" character with distinct 1 or 2 peaks; 2) the asymmetry of EMG profile in symmetric movements. i.e. when performed simultaneously from the right and from the left sides. The latter feature may be considered as predictive because it was never found in healthy people. It allows to identify objectively weak muscles even in the absence of visible parethis during the routine neurological examination.

  9. Biomechanical risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome: a pooled study of 2474 workers

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Eisen, Ellen A; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Hegmann, Kurt T; Thiese, Matthew S; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley; Burt, Susan; Bao, Stephen; Silverstein, Barbara; Merlino, Linda; Gerr, Fred; Rempel, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Between 2001 and 2010, five research groups conducted coordinated prospective studies of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) incidence among US workers from various industries and collected detailed subject-level exposure information with follow-up of symptoms, electrophysiological measures and job changes. Objective This analysis examined the associations between workplace biomechanical factors and incidence of dominant-hand CTS, adjusting for personal risk factors. Methods 2474 participants, without CTS or possible polyneuropathy at enrolment, were followed up to 6.5 years (5102 person-years). Individual workplace exposure measures of the dominant hand were collected for each task and included force, repetition, duty cycle and posture. Task exposures were combined across the workweek using time-weighted averaging to estimate job-level exposures. CTS case-criteria were based on symptoms and results of electrophysiological testing. HRs were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models. Results After adjustment for covariates, analyst (HR=2.17; 95% CI 1.38 to 3.43) and worker (HR=2.08; 95% CI 1.31 to 3.39) estimated peak hand force, forceful repetition rate (HR=1.84; 95% CI 1.19 to 2.86) and per cent time spent (eg, duty cycle) in forceful hand exertions (HR=2.05; 95% CI 1.34 to 3.15) were associated with increased risk of incident CTS. Associations were not observed between total hand repetition rate, per cent duration of all hand exertions, or wrist posture and incident CTS. Conclusions In this prospective multicentre study of production and service workers, measures of exposure to forceful hand exertion were associated with incident CTS after controlling for important covariates. These findings may influence the design of workplace safety programmes for preventing work-related CTS. PMID:25324489

  10. Reconstruction of the coronoid using an extended prosthesis: an in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Alolabi, Bashar; Gray, Alia; Ferreira, Louis M; Johnson, James A; Athwal, George S; King, Graham J W

    2012-07-01

    When repair of comminuted coronoid fractures is not possible, prosthetic replacement may restore elbow stability. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to determine whether a coronoid implant with an extended tip would improve elbow stability compared with an anatomic prosthesis in the setting of collateral ligament insufficiency. Passive elbow extension was performed in 7 cadaveric arms in the varus and valgus positions and active and passive extension in the horizontal position by use of an elbow motion simulator. Varus-valgus laxity of the ulna relative to the humerus was quantified with a tracking system with a native coronoid, a 40% coronoid deficiency, an anatomic prosthesis, and an extended prosthesis, with the collateral ligaments sectioned and repaired. Laxity significantly increased after a 40% coronoid deficiency with both repaired and sectioned collateral ligaments (P ≤ .01). With the ligaments repaired, there was no significant difference in laxity between the native coronoid, the anatomic implant, or the extended implant. Ligament sectioning alone produced severe instability, with a mean laxity of 42.75° ± 11.54° (P < .01). With insufficient ligaments, the anatomic prosthesis produced no change in laxity compared with the native coronoid, whereas the extended implant significantly reduced laxity by 21.56° ± 17.70° (P = .02). An anatomic coronoid implant with ligament repair restores stability to the coronoid-deficient elbow to intact levels. In the setting of ligament insufficiency, an extended implant improves stability relative to an anatomic implant, but the elbow remains significantly less stable than an intact elbow. Studies are needed to evaluate the feasibility of these designs. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomechanical risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome: a pooled study of 2474 workers.

    PubMed

    Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Eisen, Ellen A; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Hegmann, Kurt T; Thiese, Matthew S; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley; Burt, Susan; Bao, Stephen; Silverstein, Barbara; Merlino, Linda; Gerr, Fred; Rempel, David

    2015-01-01

    Between 2001 and 2010, five research groups conducted coordinated prospective studies of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) incidence among US workers from various industries and collected detailed subject-level exposure information with follow-up of symptoms, electrophysiological measures and job changes. This analysis examined the associations between workplace biomechanical factors and incidence of dominant-hand CTS, adjusting for personal risk factors. 2474 participants, without CTS or possible polyneuropathy at enrolment, were followed up to 6.5 years (5102 person-years). Individual workplace exposure measures of the dominant hand were collected for each task and included force, repetition, duty cycle and posture. Task exposures were combined across the workweek using time-weighted averaging to estimate job-level exposures. CTS case-criteria were based on symptoms and results of electrophysiological testing. HRs were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models. After adjustment for covariates, analyst (HR=2.17; 95% CI 1.38 to 3.43) and worker (HR=2.08; 95% CI 1.31 to 3.39) estimated peak hand force, forceful repetition rate (HR=1.84; 95% CI 1.19 to 2.86) and per cent time spent (eg, duty cycle) in forceful hand exertions (HR=2.05; 95% CI 1.34 to 3.15) were associated with increased risk of incident CTS. Associations were not observed between total hand repetition rate, per cent duration of all hand exertions, or wrist posture and incident CTS. In this prospective multicentre study of production and service workers, measures of exposure to forceful hand exertion were associated with incident CTS after controlling for important covariates. These findings may influence the design of workplace safety programmes for preventing work-related CTS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Biomechanical and morphological study of a new elastic mesh (Ciberlastic) to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Calvo, B; Pascual, G; Peña, E; Pérez-Khöler, B; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a preclinical evaluation of the behaviour of a new type of abdominal LW prosthesis (Ciberlastic), which was designed with a non-absorbable elastic polyurethane monofilament (Assuplus, Assut Europe, Italy) to allow greater adaptability to mechanical area requirements and higher bio-mimicking with the newly formed surrounding tissues. Our hypothesis was that an increase in the elasticity of the mesh filament could improve the benefits of LW prostheses. To verify our hypothesis, we compared the short- and long-term behaviour of Ciberlastic and Optilene(®) elastic commercial meshes by repairing the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits. The implanted meshes were mechanically and histologically assessed at 14 and 180 days post-implant. We mechanically characterized the partially herniated repaired muscle tissue and also determined mesh shrinkage at different post-implant times. This was followed by a histological study in which the tissue incorporation process was analysed over time. The new prosthesis designed by our group achieved good behaviour that was similar to that of Optilene(®), one of the most popular LW prostheses on the market, with the added advantage of its elastic property. The mechanical properties are significantly lower than those of the polypropylene Optilene(®) mesh, and the new elastic mesh meets the basic mechanical requirements for positioning in the abdominal wall, which was also demonstrated by the absence of recurrences after implantation in the experimental model. We found that the growth of a connective tissue rich in collagen over the hernial defect and the proper deposit of the collagen fibres in the regenerated tissue substantially modified the original properties of the mesh, thereby increasing its biomechanical strength and making the whole tissue/mesh stiffer.

  13. Shoulder biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  14. Emittance compensation studies of photoinjector beams with angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven

    2003-05-19

    Beam dynamics studies on the FNPL photo injector that seek to optimize the transport of intense electron beams with large values of canonical angular momentum have been performed. These studies investigate the effect of solenoid emittance compensation on beams that evolve under the combined influence of intense space charge forces and large angular momentum. We present details of experimental measurements and supporting simulations of beam envelope evolution.

  15. MR LLRF VXI upgrade beam study period

    SciTech Connect

    Mesiner, K.; /Fermilab

    1995-01-01

    AD/RFI/LLRF group personnel performed several studies with the MR LLRF VXI upgrade system during the evening of 7/29/95. The study period lasted about 4 hours. The MR operating conditions were a mixture of $29 and $2B cycles, with beam injected only on the $29. The author believes the $2B cycles were present for reasons unrelated to the study. The basic study period goal was to test the initial VXI version of MR LLRF finite state machine (FSM) execution. This goal represents what has been called MR LLRF VXI Upgrade Implementation Stage No.2 throughout presentations and documentation on the upgrade project. The test includes control of MR LLRF NIM hardware, the MR RF cavities, and beam via XVI TTL FSM outputs. Numerous MR LLRF VXI system objects, or components, must work together correctly for a successful test. Very briefly, the required objects include VXI Front End hardware, the ACNET/Front End interface code, and the VXI/NIM Interface chassis (the chassis solves VXI-CAMAC-NIM RF and FSM output connectivity and development problems). Though this initial FSM does not yet fully support Upgrade Implementation Stage 2 functionality, all code and hardware for the following basic functionality is tested.

  16. [Study of the immediate biomechanical stability in a goat cervical spine model].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Zhou, Chunguang; Song, Yueming

    2009-10-01

    A new kind of Cage made of poly-DL-lactic acid was designed and an in-vitro study was conducted to evaluate the biomechanical effect of PDLLA Cage on a goat cervical spine model. 27 goat cervical spines were divided into four groups randomly: intact group, PDLLA Cage group, titanium Cage group, and autologous tricortical iliac crest bone group. Different implants were implanted after complete discectomy (C3-4) was performed, then they were tested in flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending with a nondestructive stiffness method using a nonconstrained testing apparatus, and three-dimensional displacement was measured. The range of motion (ROM) and the mean stiffness values were calculated and compared between groups. The result showed that the ROM values between PDLLA Cage group and the titanium Cage group were not significantly different in extensional and rotational movement (P > 0.05), but they were lower than that of rest groups (P < 0.05). In flexional loading mode, the ROM values showed statistically significant difference between the four groups (P < 0.05). And in lateral bending loading mode, no significant difference was found between PDLLA Cage group and iliac crest bone group (P > 0.05), but significant difference was found among the other groups (P < 0.05). The stiffness of cervical spine was raised after Cage was implanted. In flexional and rotational loading mode, significant difference in stiffness was found between PDLLA Cage group and control group or iliac crest bone group (P < 0.05). So PDLLA Cage can provide enough primary stability for cervical intervertebral fusion.

  17. Effects of a contoured articular prosthetic device on tibiofemoral peak contact pressure: a biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Roland; Thermann, Hajo; Paessler, Hans H.; Skrbensky, Gobert

    2007-01-01

    Many middle-aged patients are affected by localized cartilage defects that are neither appropriate for primary, nor repeat biological repair methods, nor for conventional arthroplasty. This in vitro study aims to determine the peak contact pressure in the tibiofemoral joint with a partial femoral resurfacing device (HemiCAP®, Arthrosurface Inc., Franklin, MA, USA). Peak contact pressure was determined in eight fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens using a Tekscan sensor placed in the medial compartment above the menisci. A closed loop robotic knee simulator was used to test each knee in static stance positions (5°/15°/30°/45°) with body weight ground reaction force (GRF), 30° flexion with twice the body weight (2tBW) GRF and dynamic knee-bending cycles with body weight GRF. The ground reaction force was adjusted to the living body weight of the cadaver donor and maintained throughout all cycles. Each specimen was tested under four different conditions: Untreated, flush HemiCAP® implantation, 1-mm proud implantation and 20-mm defect. A paired sampled t test to compare means (significance, P ≤ 0.05) was used for statistical analysis. On average, no statistically significant differences were found in any testing condition comparing the normal knee with flush device implantation. With the 1-mm proud implant, statistically significant increase of peak contact pressures of 217% (5° stance), 99% (dynamic knee bending) and 90% (30° stance with 2tBW) compared to the untreated condition was seen. No significant increase of peak contact pressure was evaluated with the 20-mm defect. The data suggests that resurfacing with the HemiCAP® does not lead to increased peak contact pressure with flush implantation. However, elevated implantation results in increased peak contact pressure and might be biomechanically disadvantageous in an in vivo application. PMID:17934718

  18. Stability of acute dorsal fracture dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Tyser, Andrew R; Tsai, Michael A; Parks, Brent G; Means, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    We performed a cadaveric biomechanical study to characterize proximal interphalangeal joint stability after an injury to different amounts of the volar articular base of the middle phalanx (intact, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% volar defects). Eighteen digits on 6 hands were tested through full proximal interphalangeal joint range of motion using computer-controlled flexion and extension via the digital tendons. We collected proximal interphalangeal joint kinematic cine data in a true lateral projection with mini-fluoroscopy. We measured the amount of dorsal middle phalanx translation in full proximal interphalangeal joint extension. As we cycled the joint from full flexion into extension, we recorded the angle at which subluxation occurred. No specimens with 20% volar bony defect subluxated. All specimens in the 60% and 80% groups subluxated at an average flexion angle of 67° (range, 10° to 90°) in the 60% group and at all degrees of flexion in the 80% group. In the 40% group, 28% of specimens demonstrated subluxation at an average flexion angle of 14° (range, 4° to 40°). Mean dorsal translation of the middle phalanx in relation to the proximal phalanx at full digital extension was 0.2 mm in the 20% group, 0.8 mm in the 40% group, 3.2 mm in the 60% group, and 3.1 mm in the 80% group. Simulated volar articular bony defects of 20% were stable, whereas those with 60% and 80% defects were unstable during digital motion. Stability in the 40% group was variable and appeared to be the threshold for stability. Knowledge of the typical amount of middle phalanx defect and degree of proximal interphalangeal joint extension that can lead to joint instability may improve management of mechanically important proximal interphalangeal joint fracture dislocations. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Improved wire stiffness with modified connection bolts in Ilizarov external frames: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Jan; Jettkant, Birger; Königshausen, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Seybold, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Frame stability in Ilizarov external fixators is mainly dependent on the tension of the transosseous wires, which are clamped to the ring by connection bolts. It was the purpose of this biomechanical study to investigate the holding capacity of a modified bolt design featuring a ruffled wire-bolt interface (TrueLok™) and its influence on wire stiffness in comparison with that of classic bolts featuring a smooth, unruffled wire-bolt interface. Six different ring and bolt configurations were tested using a simplified model consisting of a single ring and wire. The holding capacity at two different tightening torques (10 and 14 Nm) of classic cannulated bolts (CB) and slotted bolts (SB) was determined on Ilizarov and Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF™) rings, whereas the modified TrueLok™ CBs and SBs were used with the TrueLok™ rings. The wire stiffness was calculated via a regression analysis of the load-displacement graphs. The modified TrueLok™ bolts demonstrated significantly better slippage resistance than the classic bolts in all configurations and wire stiffness was significantly higher in the TrueLok™ frame set-ups. After maximum loading, all of the wires showed plastic deformation, including constant wire deflection and dent marks at the clamped wire ends. In conclusion, the decrease in wire stiffness can be explained mainly as a result of wire slippage, but plastic deformation and material yielding also contribute. The relatively simple modification made by roughening the wire-bolt interface results in improved holding capacity and wire stiffness. A frame that contains these modified TrueLok™ bolts should provide improved mechanical stiffness.

  20. Double plating in Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic proximal femur fractures: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Wähnert, Dirk; Grüneweller, Niklas; Gehweiler, Dominic; Brunn, Benjamin; Raschke, Michael J; Stange, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Periprosthetic hip fractures are an increasing problem in modern orthopedic and trauma surgery. Many options for the operative treatment are available to the surgeon ranging from modern variable angular systems to standard plates, screws, and cerclages. However, there is no gold standard and therefore, the aim of this study, was to investigate the biomechanical characteristics of double plating versus a lateral standard plate in a Vancouver B1 fracture model. Ten 4th generation composite femora were used to implant cementless total hip prosthesis and create Vancouver B1 periprosthetic fractures. Afterwards, the osteotomies were fixed using the locking compression plate in combination with the locking attachment plate (LCP, LAP, DePuy Synthes, Solothurn, Switzerland)-group I. Group II additionally achieved a 5-hole 4.5/5.0 mm LCP anteriorly. Each construct was cyclically loaded to failure in axial compression. Axial construct stiffness was 50.87 N/mm (SD 1.61) for group I compared to 738.68 N/mm (SD 94.8) for group II, this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.016). The number of cycles to failure was also significant higher for group II (2,375 vs. 13,000 cycles; p = 0.016). Double plating can significantly increase construct stiffness and stability, and thus, is an option in the treatment of complex periprosthetic fractures, in revision surgery and for patients with the inability to partial weight bear. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:234-239, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Pectoralis major tendon repair: a biomechanical study of suture button versus transosseous suture techniques.

    PubMed

    Thomas, William; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Packham, Iain

    2015-09-01

    Pectoralis major tendon avulsion injury benefits from surgical repair. The technique used and speed of rehabilitation in this demanding population remains subject to debate. We performed a biomechanical study comparing suture button (Pec Button™, Arthrex, Naples, FL) with a transosseous suture technique (FibreWire, Arthrex, Naples, FL). Freshly slaughtered porcine humeri were prepared to model a single transosseous suture or suture button repair. A static, tensile load to failure experiment and a cyclic, tensile load experiment to model standard (10,000 cycles) and accelerated rehabilitation (20,000 cycles) philosophies were tested. The mode of failure, yield and ultimate failure load, extension (clinical failure >10 mm) and the resistance to cyclic loading was measured. The mode of failure was suture fracture in all the static load experiments with 10/11 occurring as the suture passed through the button and 7/11 as the suture passed through the bone tunnels. There was a significant difference in yield load, favouring transosseous suture [p = 0.009, suture button (SB) 673.0 N (647.2-691.7 N), transosseous suture (TOS) 855.0 N (750.0-891.4 N)] and median extension, favouring suture button [p = 0.009, SB 8.8 mm (5.0-12.4 mm), TOS 15.2 mm (13.2-17.1 mm)]. 2/3 transosseous suture and 0/3 suture buttons failed before completing 20,000 cycles. The difference in mean number of cycles completed was non-significant. The difference in mean extension was 5.1 mm (SB 6.7 mm, TOS 11.7 mm). Both techniques show advantages. The difference in extension is likely to be more clinically relevant than load tolerated at failure, which is well above physiological levels. The findings do not support an accelerated rehabilitation model.

  2. The Protective Effect of Kevlar ® Socks Against Hockey Skate Blade Injuries: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nauth, Aaron; Aziz, Mina; Tsuji, Matthew; Whelan, Daniel B.; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Zdero, Rad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Several recent high profile injuries to elite players in the National Hockey League (NHL) secondary to skate blade lacerations have generated significant interest in these injuries and possible methods to protect against them. These injuries are typically due to direct contact of the skate blade of another player with posterior aspect of the calf resulting in a range of potential injuries to tendons or neurovascular structures. The Achilles tendon is most commonly involved. Kevlar® reinforced socks have recently become available for hockey players to wear and are cited as providing possible protection against such injuries. However, there has been no investigation of the possible protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against skate blade injuries, and it is currently unknown what protective effects, if any, that these socks provide against these injuries. The proposed study sought to address this by conducting a biomechanical investigation of the protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against Achilles tendon injuries in a simulated model of skate blade injury using human cadaver limbs. This novel investigation is the first to address the possible benefits to hockey players of wearing Kevlar® reinforced socks. Methods: Seven matched pairs of human cadaver lower limbs were fitted with a Kevlar ® reinforced sock comprised of 60% Kevlar®/20% Coolmax® polyester/18 % Nylon/12% Spandex (Bauer Elite Performance Skate Sock) on one limb and a standard synthetic sock comprised of 51% polyester/47% nylon/2% spandex (Bauer Premium Performance Skate Sock) on the contralateral limb as a control. Each limb was then mounted on a Materials Testing System (MTS) with the ankle dorsiflexed to 90° and the knee held in full extension using a custom designed jig. Specimens were then impacted with a hockey skate blade directed at the posterior calf, 12 cm above the heel, at an angle of 45° and a speed of 31m/s, to a penetration depth of 4.3 cm, to

  3. Results of head-on beam-beam compensation studies at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; Stancari, G.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At the Tevatron collider, we studied the feasibility of suppressing the antiproton head-on beam-beamtune spread using a magnetically confined 5-keV electron beam with Gaussian transverse profile overlapping with the circulating beam. When electron cooling of antiprotons is applied in regular Tevatron operations, the head-on beam-beam effect on antiprotons is small. Therefore, we first focused on the operational aspects, such as beam alignment and stability, and on fundamental observations of tune shifts, tune spreads, lifetimes, and emittances. We also attempted two special collider stores with only 3 proton bunches colliding with 3 antiproton bunches, to suppress long-range forces and enhance head-on effects. We present here the results of this study and a comparison between numerical simulations and observations, in view of the planned application of this compensation concept to RHIC.

  4. Beam-beam studies for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    We present a summary of beam-beam dynamics studies that have been carried out to date for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B Factory. Most of the material presented here is contained in the proposal's Conceptual Design Report, although post-CDR studies are also presented. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Studies of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Space-charge forces limit the possible transverse compression of high perveance ion beams that are used in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics applications; the minimum radius to which a beam can be focused is an increasing function of perveance. The limit can be overcome if a plasma is introduced in the beam path between the focusing element and the target in order to neutralize the space charge of the beam. This concept has been implemented on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL using Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPS). In our experiment at PPPL, we propagate a perveance-dominated ion beam through a FEPS to study the effect of the neutralizing plasma on the beam envelope and its evolution in time. A 30-60 keV space-charge-dominated Argon beam is focused with an Einzel lens into a FEPS located at the beam waist. The beam is intercepted downstream from the FEPS by a movable Faraday cup that provides time-resolved 2D current density profiles of the beam spot on target. We report results on: (a) dependence of charge neutralization on FEPS plasma density; (b) effects on beam emittance, and (c) time evolution of the beam envelope after the FEPS pulse. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. [Researches in forensic biomechanics].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Fan, Yubo; Yu, Xiaojun

    2004-02-01

    Forensic biomechanics is the science of proof, which applies the biomechanical theory and technology to resolve problems related to mechanics in the process of expert witness. It belongs to the realm of a new subject combining biomechanics and forensics. Forensic biomechanics is a new branch of modern biomechanics and at the same time a new important branch of forensics, and it is one of the most potential research areas in forensics of injury. In this paper, the task of forensic biomechanics expert witness, the procedure of expert witness, and the forensic biomechanics research methods and cases are reviewed.

  7. Alcoholism and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage: an experimental study on vascular morphology and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haipeng; Yu, Xiaojun; Xu, Guohui; Xu, Guangtao; Gao, Guishan; Xu, Xiaohu

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (TSAH) related to alcohol abuse is a notable risk factor. Here, we investigated the vascular morphology and biomechanics of TSAH in rat models of acute alcoholic intoxication and chronic alcoholism rats to explore the possible mechanisms of TSAH. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into acute alcoholic intoxication and chronic alcoholism groups. Edible spirituous liquor (56% vol/vol) was intragastrically given (15 mL/kg) once to the rats in the acute group, and given twice daily (8 mL/kg for 2 weeks and 12 mL/kg for another 2 weeks) to rats in the chronic group. A self-made instrument was used to inflict head injury. Whole brain, arterial blood, and thoracic aorta of rats were sampled for morphologic and biomechanical examination. Compared with the acute alcoholic rats, the chronic alcoholic rats showed significant morphologic and biomechanical changes: (1) decreased body weight (p<0.05), (2) higher morbidity and mortality from TSAH (p<0.01), (3) greater mean thickness of vascular wall of subarachnoid small arteries and each layer thickness of thoracic aorta (p<0.05), (4) decreased failure load and corresponding extensibility (60 kPa and limit load) of thoracic aorta, and (5) increased elastic modulus (30 kPa, range in physiologic stress) (p<0.05). Chronic alcoholism can induce the morphologic and biomechanical changes in cerebral vessels and thoracic aorta. The synergistic effect of alcohol abuse and minor blow may be one of the mechanisms of TSAH. High blood pressure from long-term alcohol abuse is also a notable factor.

  8. Beam-Beam Simulation Studies for PEP-II and KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Tawada, M.

    2004-01-09

    The study issues for this project are: (1) Comparison of 3D PIC beam-beam simulation code; (2) Comparison of 2D PIC beam-beam simulation code; (3) Comparison between 2D PIC solver and exact Gauss solution in Weak-Strong simulation; (4) Comparison between head-on collision and xangle+crab cavity by KEK code; (5) Crossing angle dependence of luminosity for PEP-II and KEKB parameter; and (6) Tune scan for PEP-II by using weak-strong code at the crossing angle of 0, 3, 5 mrad.

  9. Histologic and biomechanical studies of tendon-to-bone healing after autologous and allogeneic bone transplants.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Wei; Zhou, Xin-She

    2013-04-01

    Compare histologic and biomechanical differences of tendon-to-bone healing between autologous and allogeneic bone transplants. Adult, healthy, New Zealand white rabbits were used to establish the extra-articular tendon-to-bone healing model with the left hind limb transplanted with allogeneic bone and the right hind limb transplanted with autologous bone. After 3, 6, and 12 weeks after the transplant, the rabbits were killed to collect tendon-to-bone specimens, and then the healing processes in tendon-to-bone interfaces were examined. All rabbits grew well after incision without infection and can freely move. Histologic observations 3 and 6 weeks after surgery and biomechanical test results 6 weeks after surgery were statistically different between the autologous and the allogeneic transplants (P < .05). After 12 weeks, histologic observations and biomechanical test results showed no difference between the 2 transplants (P > .05). Allogeneic bone transplant has a relatively slower tendon-to-bone healing than does autologous bone transplant, but finally allogeneic and autologous bone transplants have the same extent of tendon-to-bone healing.

  10. Biomechanical behaviour of native and sutured bronchi: An in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Gian Luca; Vannucci, Jacopo; Tiribuzi, Roberto; Freddolini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical behaviour evaluation of a suture is an important information for the surgeon to choose the best technique to perform. To assess the biomechanical behavior of the native and mechanically sutured bronchi. Ten bronchi were harvested from slaughtered pigs and then randomly separated in two groups, a control intact group and a sutured group where specimens were cut in half and sutured, to evaluate mechanical properties during a tensile test using a loading frame machine. In addition optoelectric motion tracking system was used to evaluate suture profile motion during the test. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between the two groups for the parameters investigated. The control group showed a higher maximal stress resistance and stiffness than the suture group, while elongation at rupture was increased in the sutured group. All the sutures broke in symmetric manner, as the mean of the side difference of the sutured specimens was 0.93 ± 0.80 mm at rupture. Biomechanical behaviour of native and sutured bronchi was evaluated, giving highly reproducible parameters regarding mechanical properties that may help clinicians and bioengineers to rationalize the choice for a particular suture material or suture technique, increasing surgical outcomes.

  11. Evaluation of Stability of Rotating Hinge Knee Prostheses: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Friesenbichler, Joerg; Leithner, Andreas; Glehr, Mathias; Sadoghi, Patrick; Maurer-Ertl, Werner; Avian, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Rotating hinge knee prostheses should provide a stable situation following reconstruction. We performed a biomechanical analysis to establish the association between design of the central rotational stem (peg) and implant's stability, in a theoretical setting. Methods. Six different rotating hinge designs were tested, and three observers performed two different measurements with a custom made biomechanical apparatus and laterally directed pressure. The aim was to assign the degree of tilting of the peg within the vertical post-in channel by extending the distraction as well as the maximum amount of distraction before the peg's dislocation. An intraclass-correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to determine the observer's reliability. Results. Implant designs with cylindrical pegs of different lengths were superior to implant designs with conical or other shaped pegs concerning stability and maximum amount of distraction before dislocation, showing steep rising distraction-angular displacement curves. The ICC at 15 mm and 25 mm of distraction revealed high interobserver reliability (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The biomechanical analysis showed that rotating hinge prostheses with long and cylindrical pegs have the highest stability at any given amount of distraction. Designs with shorter and markedly tapered pegs may become unstable under conditions of mild joint distraction which has to be proven in future in vivo investigations. PMID:24967114

  12. Torsional stability of interference screws derived from bovine bone - a biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the present biomechanical study, the torsional stability of different interference screws, made of bovine bone, was tested. Interference screws derived from bovine bone are a possible biological alternative to conventional metallic or bioabsorbable polymer interference screws. Methods In the first part of the study we compared the torsional stability of self-made 8 mm Interference screws (BC) and a commercial 8 mm interference screw (Tutofix®). Furthermore, we compared the torsional strength of BC screws with different diameters. For screwing in, a hexagon head and an octagon head were tested. Maximum breaking torques in polymethyl methacrylate resin were recorded by means of an electronic torque screw driver. In the second part of the study the tibial part of a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was fixed in porcine test specimens using an 8 mm BC screw and the maximum insertion torques were recorded. Each interference screw type was tested 5 times. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the different 8 mm interference screws (p = 0.121). Pairwise comparisons did not reveal statistically significant differences, either. It was demonstrated for the BC screws, that a larger screw diameter significantly leads to higher torsional stability (p = 9.779 × 10-5). Pairwise comparisons showed a significantly lower torsional stability for the 7 mm BC screw than for the 8 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079) and the 9 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079). Statistically significant differences between the 8 mm and the 9 mm BC screw could not be found (p = 0.15). During screwing into the tibial graft channel of the porcine specimens, insertion torques between 0.5 Nm and 3.2 Nm were recorded. In one case the hexagon head of a BC screw broke off during the last turn. Conclusions The BC screws show comparable torsional stability to Tutofix® interference screws. As expected the torsional strength of the screws increases significantly with the diameter. The safety

  13. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Baertling, Y.; Hoppe, D.; Kuksanov, N.; Fadeev, S.; Salimov, R.

    2012-09-15

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  14. TEBPP: Theoretical and Experimental study of Beam-Plasma-Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, H. R.; Bernstein, W.; Linson, L. M.; Papadopoulos, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Hallinan, T. J.; Leinbach, H.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of an electron beam (0 to 10 keV, 0 to 1.5 Amp) with the plasma and neutral atmospheres at 200 to 400 km altitude is studied with emphasis on applications to near Earth and cosmical plasmas. The interaction occurs in four space time regions: (1) near electron gun, beam coming into equilibrium with medium; (2) equilibrium propagation in ionosphere; (3) ahead of beam pulse, temporal and spatial precursors; (4) behind a beam pulse. While region 2 is of the greatest interest, it is essential to study Region 1 because it determines the characteristics of the beam as it enters 2 through 4.

  15. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography.

    PubMed

    Hampel, U; Bärtling, Y; Hoppe, D; Kuksanov, N; Fadeev, S; Salimov, R

    2012-09-01

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  16. Annular Laser Beam Cladding Process Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Alexander; Jeromen, Andrej; Levy, Gideon; Fujishima, Makoto; Govekar, Edvard

    In the paper a novel annular - ring shaped - laser beam cladding head and related cladding process are presented. In the cladding head a laser beam is shaped into an annular ring and guided coaxially with the powder tube disposing the powder jet in the centre of the focused annular laser beam ring. An experimental process feasibility analysis was performed using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser system with a maximal average power 250 W. Beside the known influencing parameters of laser cladding process including the powder mass flow, workpiece feeding velocity, and laser beam intensity, the important parameters related to the annular laser beam caustics were defined. The process feasibility and influence of the process parameters on powder catchment efficiency was analysed based on the cladding experiments of SS 316L powder on SS 304 workpiece material. The potential benefits related to the annular laser beam melt pool geometry and related powder catchment efficiency are discussed.

  17. Technology integration box beam failure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Ambur, D. R.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Davis, Randall C.; Farley, G. L.; Lotts, C. G.; Wang, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    Composite structures have the potential to be cost effective, structurally efficient primary aircraft structures. As part of the Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program to exploit this potential for heavily loaded aircraft structures, the design and fabrication of the technology integration box beam (TIBB) was completed. The TIBB is an advanced composite prototype structure for the center wing section of the Lockheed C-130 aircraft. The TIBB was tested for downbending, upbending, torsion, and combined upbending and torsion load conditions to verify the design. The TIBB failed at 83 percent of design ultimate load for the combined upbending and torsion load condition. Current analytical and experimental results are described for a study of the mechanisms that led to the failure of the TIBB. Experimental results include load, strain, and deflection data. An analytical study was conducted of the TIBB structural response. Analytical results include strain and deflection results from a global analysis of the TIBB.

  18. Beam Dynamics Simulation Platform and Studies of Beam Breakup in Dielectric Wakefield Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Gai, W.

    2010-11-04

    A particle-Green's function beam dynamics code (BBU-3000) to study beam breakup effects is incorporated into a parallel computing framework based on the Boinc software environment, and supports both task farming on a heterogeneous cluster and local grid computing. User access to the platform is through a web browser.

  19. Beam Dynamics Simulation Platform and Studies of Beam Breakup in Dielectric Wakefield Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Gai, W.

    2010-11-01

    A particle-Green's function beam dynamics code (BBU-3000) to study beam breakup effects is incorporated into a parallel computing framework based on the Boinc software environment, and supports both task farming on a heterogeneous cluster and local grid computing. User access to the platform is through a web browser.

  20. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  1. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2016-02-15

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H{sup +} beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H{sup −} ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  2. The Hip-Spine Effect: A Biomechanical Study of Ischiofemoral Impingement Effect on Lumbar Facet Joints.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hoyos, Juan; Khoury, Anthony; Schröder, Ricardo; Johnson, Eric; Palmer, Ian J; Martin, Hal D

    2017-01-01

    To assess the relation between ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) and lumbar facet joint load during hip extension in cadavers. Twelve hips in 6 fresh T1-to-toes cadaveric specimens were tested. A complete pretesting imaging evaluation was performed using computed tomography scan. Cadavers were positioned in lateral decubitus and fixed to a dissection table. Both legs were placed on a frame in a simulated walking position. Through a posterior lumbar spine approach L3-4 and L4-5 facet joints were dissected bilaterally. In addition, through a posterolateral approach to the hip, the space between the ischium and the lesser trochanter was dissected and measured. Ultrasensitive, and previously validated, piezoresistive force sensors were placed in lumbar facet joints of L3-4 and L4-5. Lumbar facet loads during hip extension were measured in native hip conditions and after simulating IFI by performing lesser trochanter osteotomy and lengthening. Four paired t-tests were performed comparing normal and simulated IFI on the L3-L4 and L4-L5 facet joint loads. After simulating IFI, mean absolute differences of facet joint load were 10.8 N (standard error of the mean [SEM] ±4.53, P = .036) for L3-4 at 10° of hip extension, 13.71 N (SEM ±4.53, P = .012) for L3-4 at 20° of hip extension, 11.49 N (SEM ±4.33, P = .024) for L4-5 at 10° of hip extension, and 6.67 N (SEM ±5.43, P = .245) for L4-5 at 20° of hip extension. A statistically significant increase in L3-4 and L4-5 lumbar facet joint loads of 30.81% was found in the IFI state as compared with the native state during terminal hip extension. Limited terminal hip extension due to simulated IFI significantly increases L3-4 and L4-5 lumbar facet joint load when compared with non-IFI native hips. This biomechanical study directly links IFI to increased lumbar facet loads and supports the clinical findings of IFI causing lumbar pathology. Assessing and treating (open or endoscopic) hip disorders that limit extension

  3. Biomechanics of fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix studied by Brillouin scattering

    PubMed Central

    Palombo, Francesca; Winlove, C. Peter; Edginton, Ryan S.; Green, Ellen; Stone, Nick; Caponi, Silvia; Madami, Marco; Fioretto, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) spectroscopy is a technique that is able to detect thermally excited phonons within a material. The speed of propagation of these phonons can be determined from the magnitude of the Brillouin frequency shift between incident and scattered light, thereby providing a measure of the mechanical properties of the material in the gigahertz range. The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices of biological tissues and their constituent biopolymers are important for normal tissue function and disturbances in these properties are widely implicated in disease. BLS offers the prospect of measuring mechanical properties on a microscopic scale in living tissues, thereby providing insights into structure–function relationships under normal and pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated BLS in collagen and elastin—the fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Measurements were made on type I collagen in rat tail tendon, type II collagen in articular cartilage and nuchal ligament elastin. The dependence of the BLS spectrum on fibre orientation was investigated in a backscattering geometry using a reflective substrate. Two peaks, a bulk mode arising from phonon propagation along a quasi-radial direction to the fibre axis and a mode parallel to the surface, depending on sample orientation relative to the fibre axis, could be distinguished. The latter peak was fitted to a model of wave propagation through a hexagonally symmetric elastic solid, and the five components of the elasticity tensor were combined to give axial and transverse Young's, shear and bulk moduli of the fibres. These were 10.2, 8.3, 3.2 and 10.9 GPa, and 6.1, 5.3, 1.9 and 8 GPa for dehydrated type I collagen and elastin, respectively. The former values are close to those previously reported. A microfocused BLS approach was also applied providing selection of single fibres. The moduli of collagen and elastin are much higher than those measured at

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of an integrated fixation cage during fatigue loading: a human cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Palepu, Vivek; Peck, Jonathan H; Simon, David D; Helgeson, Melvin D; Nagaraja, Srinidhi

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Lumbar cages with integrated fixation screws offer a low-profile alternative to a standard cage with anterior supplemental fixation. However, the mechanical stability of integrated fixation cages (IFCs) compared with a cage with anterior plate fixation under fatigue loading has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability of a screw-based IFC with a standard cage coupled with that of an anterior plate under fatigue loading. METHODS Eighteen functional spinal units were implanted with either a 4-screw IFC or an anterior plate and cage (AP+C) without integrated fixation. Flexibility testing was conducted in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR) on intact spines, immediately after device implantation, and post-fatigue up to 20,000 cycles of FE loading. Stability parameters such as range of motion (ROM) and lax zone (LZ) for each loading mode were compared between the 2 constructs at multiple stages of testing. In addition, construct loosening was quantified by subtracting post-instrumentation ROM from post-fatigue ROM. RESULTS IFC and AP+C configurations exhibited similar stability (ROM and LZ) at every stage of testing in FE (p ≥ 0.33) and LB (p ≥ 0.23) motions. In AR, however, IFCs had decreased ROM compared with AP+C constructs at pre-fatigue (p = 0.07) and at all post-fatigue time points (p ≤ 0.05). LZ followed a trend similar to that of ROM in AR. ROM increased toward intact motion during fatigue cycling for AP+C and IFC implants. IFC specimens remained significantly (p < 0.01) more rigid than specimens in the intact condition during fatigue for each loading mode, whereas AP+C construct motion did not differ significantly (p ≥ 0.37) in FE and LB and was significantly greater (p < 0.01) in AR motion compared with intact specimens after fatigue. Weak to moderate correlations (R(2) ≤ 56%) were observed between T-scores and construct loosening, with lower T

  5. Biomechanics of fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix studied by Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Francesca; Winlove, C Peter; Edginton, Ryan S; Green, Ellen; Stone, Nick; Caponi, Silvia; Madami, Marco; Fioretto, Daniele

    2014-12-06

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) spectroscopy is a technique that is able to detect thermally excited phonons within a material. The speed of propagation of these phonons can be determined from the magnitude of the Brillouin frequency shift between incident and scattered light, thereby providing a measure of the mechanical properties of the material in the gigahertz range. The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices of biological tissues and their constituent biopolymers are important for normal tissue function and disturbances in these properties are widely implicated in disease. BLS offers the prospect of measuring mechanical properties on a microscopic scale in living tissues, thereby providing insights into structure-function relationships under normal and pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated BLS in collagen and elastin-the fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Measurements were made on type I collagen in rat tail tendon, type II collagen in articular cartilage and nuchal ligament elastin. The dependence of the BLS spectrum on fibre orientation was investigated in a backscattering geometry using a reflective substrate. Two peaks, a bulk mode arising from phonon propagation along a quasi-radial direction to the fibre axis and a mode parallel to the surface, depending on sample orientation relative to the fibre axis, could be distinguished. The latter peak was fitted to a model of wave propagation through a hexagonally symmetric elastic solid, and the five components of the elasticity tensor were combined to give axial and transverse Young's, shear and bulk moduli of the fibres. These were 10.2, 8.3, 3.2 and 10.9 GPa, and 6.1, 5.3, 1.9 and 8 GPa for dehydrated type I collagen and elastin, respectively. The former values are close to those previously reported. A microfocused BLS approach was also applied providing selection of single fibres. The moduli of collagen and elastin are much higher than those measured at lower

  6. Anatomic, arthroscopically assisted, mini-open fibular collateral ligament reconstruction: an in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Wang, Jianquan; Zhao, Feng; Xu, Yan; Ao, Yingfang

    2014-02-01

    The fibular collateral ligament (FCL) is the primary restraint to varus rotation of the knee joint. Arthroscopic techniques are widely used and minimally invasive, but anatomic arthroscopic reconstruction of an isolated FCL injury has not been reported. Anatomic reconstruction of an isolated FCL injury can be performed arthroscopically and will restore the knee to near-normal stability. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 12 nonpaired, fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were biomechanically subjected to a 10-N·m varus moment and 5-N·m external and internal rotation torques at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° of knee flexion, respectively (0° only for varus loading). Testing was performed with an intact and sectioned FCL and also after an anatomic reconstruction of the FCL by arthroscopic technique. Kinematics of each knee under various loading conditions was determined with a robotic universal force/moment sensor testing system. After sectioning, significant increases were found in varus rotation at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° of knee flexion; in external rotation at 15°, 30°, and 60° of knee flexion; and in internal rotation at 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion. After reconstruction, full recovery of knee stability was observed in varus rotation at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 60°; in external rotation at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120°; and in internal rotation at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120°. When the sectioned and intact FCL knee conditions were compared, significant increases of 3.4° at 90° of flexion and 3.4° at 120° of flexion were found (P < .001, both conditions); when the reconstructed and sectioned FCL knee conditions were compared, significant decreases of 1.7° at 90° of flexion and 1.7° at 120° of knee flexion were found (P = .033 and .043, respectively). An anatomic reconstruction of the FCL can be performed by an arthroscopically assisted mini-open technique with an isolated FCL injury, and near

  7. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark, D.M.

    1993-12-01

    The authors have developed a novel technique for studying the photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals. In these experiments, radicals are generated by laser photodetachment of a fast (6-8 keV) mass-selected negative ion beam. The resulting radicals are photodissociated with a second laser, and the photofragments are collected and detected with high efficiency using a microchannel plate detector. The overall process is: ABC{sup -} {yields} ABC + e{sup -} {yields} A + BC, AB + C. Two types of fragment detection schemes are used. To map out the photodissociation cross-section of the radical, the photodissociation laser is scanned and the total photofragment yield is measured as a function of wavelength. In other experiments, the photodissociation frequency is fixed and the photofragment masses, kinetic energy release, and scattering angle is determined for each photodissociation event.

  8. Multiple beam antenna/switch system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    In the study of the Multiple Beam Antenna/Switch for the space to ground link (SGL) uplink and downlink services, several issues related to system engineering, antenna, transmit/receive, and switch systems were addressed and the results are provided. Bandwidth allocation at Ku band is inadequate to serve the data rate requirements for the forward and return services. Rain and depolarization effects at EHF, especially at Ka band, pose a significant threat to the link availabilities at heavy rain areas. Hardware induced effects such as the nonlinear characteristics of the power amplifier may necessitate the use of linearizers and limiters. It is also important to identify the components that are susceptible to the space radiation effects and shield or redesign them with rad-hard technologies for meeting the requirements of the space environment.

  9. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Kaya, Motoshi; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    Compared with the other exercise, such as walking and cycling, rowing was expected to have some fitness advantage, while there were some misgivings about the risk of injury. The objectives of this study were to quantify biomechanical characteristics of rowing for fitness and rehabilitation and to offer normative data for the prevention of injury and for determining effective exercise. An experiment was performed to collect the kinematic and kinetic data during rowing by experienced and non-experienced subjects. A three-dimensional whole-body musculo-skeletal model was used to calculate the biomechanical loads, such as the joint moments, the muscular tensions, the joint contact forces and the energy consumption. The results of this study indicate that rowing is an effective exercise for rehabilitation and fitness. However, the non-experienced rower should acquire considerable skill to obtain sufficient exercise. The rowing cadence should be decided according to the purpose of the exercise.

  10. Validation of an experimental polyurethane model for biomechanical studies on implant-supported prosthesis – compression tests

    PubMed Central

    MORETTI NETO, Rafael Tobias; HIRAMATSU, Daniel Afonso; SUEDAM, Valdey; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; RUBO, José Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The complexity and heterogeneity of human bone, as well as ethical issues, most always hinder the performance of clinical trials. Thus, in vitro studies become an important source of information for the understanding of biomechanical events on implantsupported prostheses, although study results cannot be considered reliable unless validation studies are conducted. The purpose of this work was to validate an artificial experimental model based on its modulus of elasticity, to simulate the performance of human bone in vivo in biomechanical studies of implant-supported prostheses. Material and Methods In this study, fast-curing polyurethane (F16 polyurethane, Axson) was used to build 40 specimens that were divided into five groups. The following reagent ratios (part A/part B) were used: Group A (0.5/1.0), Group B (0.8/1.0), Group C (1.0/1.0), Group D (1.2/1.0), and Group E (1.5/1.0). A universal testing machine (Kratos model K – 2000 MP) was used to measure modulus of elasticity values by compression. Results Mean modulus of elasticity values were: Group A – 389.72 MPa, Group B – 529.19 MPa, Group C – 571.11 MPa, Group D – 470.35 MPa, Group E – 437.36 MPa. Conclusion The best mechanical characteristics and modulus of elasticity value comparable to that of human trabecular bone were obtained when A/B ratio was 1:1. PMID:21437469

  11. Biomechanical characteristics of bone in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: An in-vivo randomized controlled experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Korres, Nektarios; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Pavlou, George; Mitsoudis, Athanasios; Perrea, Despina N; Zoumbos, Aristedes B

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vivo effects of type I diabetes on the mechanical strength of tibial bone in a rodent model. METHODS: The biomechanical effect of diabetes on the structural integrity of the tibia in streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats was analysed. Induction of diabetes was achieved by an intra-peritoneal injection and confirmed by measuring serial blood glucose levels (> 150 mg/dL). After 8 wk the tibiae were harvested and compared to a control group. Biomechanical analysis of harvested tibiae was performed using a three-point bending technique on a servo hydraulic MTS 858 MiniBionix frame. Maximum force applied to failure (N), stiffness (N × mm) and energy absorbed (N/mm) were recorded and plotted on load displacement curves. A displacement control loading mode of 1 mm/min was selected to simulate quasi-static loading conditions. Measurements from load-displacement curves were directly compared between groups. RESULTS: Fourteen streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats were compared against nineteen non-diabetic controls. An average increase of 155.2 g in body weight was observed in the control group compared with only 5 g in the diabetic group during the experimental study period. Levels of blood glucose increased to 440.25 mg/dL in the diabetic group compared to 116.62 mg/dL in the control group.The biomechanical results demonstrate a highly significant reduction in the maximum load to failure from 69.5 N to 58 N in diabetic group compared to control (P = 0.011). Energy absorption to fracture was reduced from 28.2 N in the control group to 23.5 N in the diabetic group (P = 0.082). No significant differences were observed between the groups for bending stiffness. CONCLUSION: Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rodents reduces the maximum force and energy absorption to failure of bone, suggesting a predisposition for fracture risk. PMID:23878780

  12. A motor learning approach to training wheelchair propulsion biomechanics for new manual wheelchair users: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kerri A; Tucker, Susan M; Klaesner, Joseph W; Engsberg, Jack R

    2017-05-01

    Developing an evidence-based approach to teaching wheelchair skills and proper propulsion for everyday wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury (SCI) is important to their rehabilitation. The purpose of this project was to pilot test manual wheelchair training based on motor learning and repetition-based approaches for new manual wheelchair users with an SCI. A repeated measures within-subject design was used with participants acting as their own controls. Six persons with an SCI requiring the use of a manual wheelchair participated in wheelchair training. The training included nine 90-minute sessions. The primary focus was on wheelchair propulsion biomechanics with a secondary focus on wheelchair skills. During Pretest 1, Pretest 2, and Posttest, wheelchair propulsion biomechanics were measured using the Wheelchair Propulsion Test and a Video Motion Capture system. During Pretest 2 and Posttest, propulsion forces using the WheelMill System and wheelchair skills using the Wheelchair Skills Test were measured. Significant changes in area of the push loop, hand-to-axle relationship, and slope of push forces were found. Changes in propulsion patterns were identified post-training. No significant differences were found in peak and average push forces and wheelchair skills pre- and post-training. This project identified trends in change related to a repetition-based motor learning approach for propelling a manual wheelchair. The changes found were related to the propulsion patterns used by participants. Despite some challenges associated with implementing interventions for new manual wheelchair users, such as recruitment, the results of this study show that repetition-based training can improve biomechanics and propulsion patterns for new manual wheelchair users.

  13. Effects of joint contracture on the contralateral unoperated limb in a rabbit knee contracture model: a biomechanical and genetic study.

    PubMed

    Abdel, Matthew P; Morrey, Mark E; Grill, Diane E; Kolbert, Christopher P; An, Kai-Nan; Steinmann, Scott P; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin; Morrey, Bernard F

    2012-10-01

    In most animal models, unoperated contralateral limbs are used as controls. However, in some experimental circumstances, the contralateral limb may represent a skewed control. The main purpose of this study was to determine if the unoperated contralateral limb could be used as a control, or if a different unoperated animal's limb should be used instead. Seventeen rabbits were divided into two groups. Group 1 rabbits (n = 12) underwent surgery on their right limbs to induce a contracture. Group 2 rabbits (n = 5) underwent no surgery. The left non-operated limbs of rabbits in group 1 were biomechanically and genetically compared to the limbs of unoperated rabbits in group 2 with the use of a validated joint measuring device and custom microarray, respectively. After 8 weeks of immobilization, there was a statistically greater flexion contracture in the unoperated contralateral limbs compared to the limbs of animals that received no surgery(8.4 ± 8.9° vs. 0 ± 0°; p-value = 0.03). When animals were remobilized for an additional 16 weeks, the significance between groups was lost (11.9 ± 21.4° vs. 8.9 ± 9.5°; p = 0.38). Similarly, there was a statistically significant increase in nine genes at 8 weeks (p < 0.001). However, at 24 weeks, only the PMCA 1 gene was statically increased (p < 0.001). In our rabbit model, the non-operated limb develops a small flexion contracture at 8 weeks. After 16 weeks of remobilization, there is no biomechanical or genetic difference between contralateral non-operated limbs and limbs of animals not undergoing any surgical intervention. Given the biomechanical and genetic findings, the contralateral non-operated limb can be used as a valid control. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  14. Positional effects of transforaminal interbody spacer placement at the L5-S1 intervertebral disc space: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Tallarico, Richard A; Lavelle, William F; J Bianco, Aaron; Taormina, Jennifer L; Ordway, Nathaniel R

    2014-12-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an increasingly used alternative fusion method over anterior and posterior lumbar interbody fusions. There are conflicting results on the optimal positioning of interbody devices. No study has addressed the lumbosacral segment, L5-S1, where the lordotic configuration presents unique challenges. To determine if there are biomechanical and/or anatomical advantages related to the positioning of an interbody device at L5-S1, either anterior or posterior to the neutral axis. An in vitro biomechanical study using human cadaveric lumbar specimens. Lumbar specimens were biomechanically tested using pure moments with and without compressive axial loading. Testing was performed in intact and after TLIF with the implant posterior (TLIF-post) and anterior (TLIF-ant) to neutral axis. Segmental range of motion (ROM) and stiffness were analyzed at the L5-S1 surgical level and the adjacent L4-L5 level. Neuroforaminal height measurements of L5-S1 were analyzed in neutral and end range positions. Compared with the intact condition, ROM decreased more than 75% at L5-S1 and stiffness increased up to 270% with TLIF. There was no significant difference between anterior or posterior placement for ROM and stiffness. There was a change in L5-S1 neuroforaminal height based on the placement, with posterior placement showing a significant increase compared with anterior placement. There were no relative changes in neuroforaminal height under loading after TLIF. Compressive load did not affect the magnitudes or resulting significance of outcome measures at L5-S1 after either TLIFs. An interbody spacer with the addition of posterior instrumentation significantly enhances the mechanical stability of L5-S1 regardless of interbody position. There were noticeable increases in terms of construct stability and stiffness after both TLIF-ant and TLIF-post in comparison with the intact condition. A posteriorly placed interbody implant did result in the

  15. Confidence crisis of results in biomechanics research.

    PubMed

    Knudson, Duane

    2017-11-01

    Many biomechanics studies have small sample sizes and incorrect statistical analyses, so reporting of inaccurate inferences and inflated magnitude of effects are common in the field. This review examines these issues in biomechanics research and summarises potential solutions from research in other fields to increase the confidence in the experimental effects reported in biomechanics. Authors, reviewers and editors of biomechanics research reports are encouraged to improve sample sizes and the resulting statistical power, improve reporting transparency, improve the rigour of statistical analyses used, and increase the acceptance of replication studies to improve the validity of inferences from data in biomechanics research. The application of sports biomechanics research results would also improve if a larger percentage of unbiased effects and their uncertainty were reported in the literature.

  16. Physical modelling in biomechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, M A R

    2003-01-01

    Physical models, like mathematical models, are useful tools in biomechanical research. Physical models enable investigators to explore parameter space in a way that is not possible using a comparative approach with living organisms: parameters can be varied one at a time to measure the performance consequences of each, while values and combinations not found in nature can be tested. Experiments using physical models in the laboratory or field can circumvent problems posed by uncooperative or endangered organisms. Physical models also permit some aspects of the biomechanical performance of extinct organisms to be measured. Use of properly scaled physical models allows detailed physical measurements to be made for organisms that are too small or fast to be easily studied directly. The process of physical modelling and the advantages and limitations of this approach are illustrated using examples from our research on hydrodynamic forces on sessile organisms, mechanics of hydraulic skeletons, food capture by zooplankton and odour interception by olfactory antennules. PMID:14561350

  17. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    A new control model for the study of biomechanical simulation of human movement was investigated using rowing as an example. The objectives were to explore biological and mechanical alternatives to optimal control methods. The simulation methods included simple control mechanisms based on proportional and derivative (PD) control, consideration of a simple neural model, introduction of an inverse dynamics system for feedback, and computational adjustment of control parameters by using an evaluative criterion and optimization method. By using simulation, appropriate rowing motions were synthesized. The generated rowing motion was periodic, continuous, and adaptable so that the pattern was stable against the mechanical force and independent of the initial condition. We believe that the simulation model is not only practical as a computational research tool from a biomechanical-engineering viewpoint but also significant from the point of view of fundamental biological theories of movement.

  18. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scisciò, M.; Antici, P.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.

    2016-03-07

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  19. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  20. Application Of Biomechanics Cinematography To The Study Of Sports And Industrial Injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagenhoef, Stanley

    1982-02-01

    A personal history of biomechanical analyses from motion pictures is presented. The areas of work are of total body motions of athletes in many sports, analysis of work-related injuries in industry, measurements of synthetic turfs, diagnosis of muscular imbalance, and animal motion. A film presentation illustrates each of these areas.The filming and analysing of any motion should produce data that has practical applications. This means taking measured data, interpreting it properly, and then using the information to actually obtain useful results. The practical application of data obtained from the high speed filming of humans and animals is presented here.

  1. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Andrew P.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  2. A Static Biomechanical Load Carriage Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    three categories: physiological studies, biomechanical studies, and subjective appraisal studies. Most of the biomechanical studies concentrate on gait ... analysis (e.g. DeVita et al., 1991). As there are several comprehensive survey articles on various aspects of load carriage (e.g. Rorke, 1990; Haisman

  3. Beam dynamics studies for the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    2001-06-22

    Two-beam accelerators based upon relativistic klystron s (RK s) have been proposed as power sources for future generation linear electron-positron colliders. These drivers are known to suffer from several transverse beam break-up (BBU) instabilities. A program to study a particular technique (the betatron node scheme ) for ameliorating the high frequency BBU is under way at LBNL. Central to this study are the pillbox RF cavities and RF beam position monitors (BPM s) employed. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the RF components. Performance details during operation are also discussed.

  4. Dinosaur biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R. McNeill

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result. PMID:16822743

  5. Dinosaur biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R McNeill

    2006-08-07

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result.

  6. Competing influences on morphological modularity in biomechanical systems: a case study in mantis shrimp.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Philip S L; Smith, Danielle C; Patek, S N

    2016-05-01

    Related species that share similar biomechanical systems and segmentation patterns may exhibit different patterns of morphological covariation. We examined morphological covariation of the potent prey capture appendage of two mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) species-a spearer (Squilla empusa) and smasher (Gonodactylaceus falcatus). We assessed three frameworks for modularity, two based on the biomechanics of the appendage and one based on its segmentation as a proxy for shared developmental pathways. We collected morphometric data from S. empusa, and compared morphological covariation patterns across the raptorial appendage with patterns from a new analysis of previously published morphometric data from G. falcatus. The relative importance of the different hypothetical influences differed between the two species, and was dependent on whether specimens were analyzed all together or subdivided based on sex or sub-populations, including one particularly distinct population in the Gulf of Mexico. We also found an intriguing handedness pattern in which right-hand appendages had a variable number of spines, whereas the left had a constant number of spines. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of testing multiple, alternative frameworks for morphological covariation and suggest that mantis shrimp experience contrasting influences on covariation depending on their feeding mechanisms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Marking-dots digital image correlation and application to studies of spinal biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinlong; Sun, Cuiru; Qin, Yuwen; Ji, Xinhua

    2005-04-01

    A method of marking-dots digital image correlation is developed to measure the biomechanics behavior of cattle spine. In the system, a video camera and personal computer are used to acquire digitized images of a random speckle pattern on the surface of a marking-dot before and after deformation. The method of making-dots digital image correlation can immediately measure the transformation by tracking the gray value pattern in small local neighborhoods commonly referred to as subsets. In the experiment, a specimen was selected from the cattle's spine that was covered with some muscles and tissues. It is apparent that the covering muscles and tissues cannot be treated as the information carrier, for they must be kept active and moist curing by the physiological brine in the course of the experiment. In order to solve the problem, the marking-dots were fixed into the vertebrae, and the front surface of a marking-dot was coated with a thin layer of white paint and splattered with black spot so as to create a random black-on-white speckle pattern. Experimental results have shown that the marking-dots digital image correlation method can be applied to the measurement of the biomechanical behavior of cattle spine, and offer an effective measurement tool to research the range of motion of the adjacent segment in spine under intervertebral fusion.

  8. Bioinspirations: cell-inspired small-scale systems for enabling studies in experimental biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Warren C; Leduc, Philip R

    2011-07-01

    Biomechanical forces govern the behaviors of organisms and their environment and examining these behaviors to understand the underlying phenomena is an important challenge. One experimental approach for probing these interactions between organisms and their biomechanical environment uses biologically-inspired, artificial surrogates that reproduce organic mechanical systems. For the case of complex, multicellular organisms, robot surrogates have been particularly effective, such as in the analysis of the fins of fish and insects' wings. This biologically-inspired approach is also exciting when examining cell-scale responses as multicellular organisms' behavior is directly influenced by the integrated interactions of smaller-scale components (i.e., cells). In this review, we introduce the burgeoning field of engineering of artificial cells, which focuses on developing cell-scale entities replicating cellular behaviors. We describe both a bottom-up approach to constructing artificial cells, using molecular components to directly assemble artificial cells, as well as a top-down approach, in which living cells are encapsulated in a single entity whose behavior is determined by its constituent members. In particular, we discuss the potential role of these artificial cells as implantable controllers, designed to alter the mechanical behavior of a host organism. Eventually, artificial cells designed to function as small-scale controllers may help alter organisms' phenotypes.

  9. Beams from boltwood: a feasibility study

    Treesearch

    Peter Koch

    1964-01-01

    Previous papers in this series of four have explored technical aspects of converting southern pine boltwood into long laminated beams of uniform high strength. This final discussion examines production and economic aspects of the proposed system.

  10. Orthopaedic sport biomechanics - a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kai-Ming; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Lui, Pauline Po-Yee

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes a new paradigm, "Orthopaedic sport biomechanics", for the understanding of the role of biomechanics in preventing and managing sports injury. Biomechanics has three main roles in this paradigm: (1) injury prevention, (2) immediate evaluation of treatment, and (3) long-term outcome evaluation. Related previous studies showing the approach in preventing and managing anterior cruciate ligament rupture and anterior talofibular ligament tear are highlighted. Orthopaedics and biomechanics specialists are encouraged to understand what they could contribute to the current and future practice of sports medicine.

  11. Comparison of cutout resistance of dynamic condylar screw and proximal femoral nail in reverse oblique trochanteric fractures: A biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Gursimrat Singh; Rastogi, Amit; Singh, Vakil; Goel, Satish Chandra; Mishra, Diwakar; Arora, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reverse oblique trochanteric fracture of femur is a distinct fracture pattern. 95° Dynamic condylar screw (DCS) and proximal femoral nail (PFN) are currently the most commonly used implants for its fixation. This study aims to biomechanically compare the cutout resistance as well as modes of failure of DCS and PFN in reverse oblique trochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Sixteen freshly harvested cadaveric proximal femoral specimens were randomly assigned to three mean bone mineral density matched groups, eight of which were implanted with 95° DCS and the other eight with PFN. The constructs were made unstable to resemble a reverse oblique trochanteric fracture by removing a standard size posteromedial wedge. These constructs were subjected to computer controlled cyclic compressive loading with 200 kg at a frequency of 1 cycle/second (1 Hz) and end points of both the groups were analyzed. Results: The bending moment of the PFN group was approximately 50% less than that of the DCS group (P<0.0001). The PFN group resisted more number of cycles than the DCS group (P=0.03) and showed lesser number of component failures as compared with the DCS group (P=0.003). Conclusions: The PFN is biomechanically superior to DCS for the fixation of reverse oblique trochanteric fractures of femur. PMID:22719110

  12. Comparison of two tension-band fixation materials and techniques in transverse patella fractures: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Rabalais, R David; Burger, Evalina; Lu, Yun; Mansour, Alfred; Baratta, Richard V

    2008-02-01

    This study compared the biomechanical properties of 2 tension-band techniques with stainless steel wire and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cable in a patella fracture model. Transverse patella fractures were simulated in 8 cadaver knees and fixated with figure-of-8 and parallel wire configurations in combination with Kirschner wires. Identical configurations were tested with UHMWPE cable. Specimens were mounted to a testing apparatus and the quadriceps was used to extend the knees from 90 degrees to 0 degrees; 4 knees were tested under monotonic loading, and 4 knees were tested under cyclic loading. Under monotonic loading, average fracture gap was 0.50 and 0.57 mm for steel wire and UHMWPE cable, respectively, in the figure-of-8 construct compared with 0.16 and 0.04 mm, respectively, in the parallel wire construct. Under cyclic loading, average fracture gap was 1.45 and 1.66 mm for steel wire and UHMWPE cable, respectively, in the figure-of-8 construct compared with 0.45 and 0.60 mm, respectively, in the parallel wire construct. A statistically significant effect of technique was found, with the parallel wire construct performing better than the figure-of-8 construct in both loading models. There was no effect of material or interaction. In this biomechanical model, parallel wires performed better than the figure-of-8 configuration in both loading regimens, and UHMWPE cable performed similarly to 18-gauge steel wire.

  13. Plating of metacarpal fractures with locked or nonlocked screws, a biomechanical study: how many cortices are really necessary?

    PubMed

    Barr, Cameron; Behn, Anthony W; Yao, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    Dorsal plate and screw fixation is a popular choice for metacarpal stabilization. The balance between construct stability and soft tissue dissection remains a surgical dilemma. Historically, six cortices of bone fixation on either side of a fracture were deemed necessary. This study aims to elucidate whether four cortices of locked fixation on either side of the fracture is equivalent to the current gold standard of six cortices of nonlocked fixation on either side of the fracture. If so, less dissection to insert shorter plates with fewer screws could be used to stably fix these fractures. With biomechanical testing-grade composite Sawbones, a comminuted metacarpal fracture model was used to test two fixation constructs consisting of a standard dorsal plate and either six bicortical nonlocking screws (three screws per segment) or four bicortical locking screws (two screws per segment). Thirty specimens were tested to failure in cantilever bending and torsion. There was statistical equivalence between the locking and nonlocking constructs in cantilever bending stiffness, torsional stiffness, maximum bending load, and maximum torque. The tested metacarpal fracture model had equivalent biomechanical properties when fixed with a standard dorsal plate and either six bicortical nonlocking screws or four bicortical locking screws. By utilizing fewer cortices of fixation, there will be less dissection and less soft tissue stripping during fixation of metacarpal fractures. This will also be of benefit in very proximal or distal fractures as multiple cortices of fixation are often difficult to obtain during stabilization of these challenging fractures.

  14. Technology integration box beam failure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Davis, R. C.; Farley, G. L.; Lotts, C. G.; Wang, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe current results from an on-going study of the mechanisms that led to the failure of the TIBB. Experimental and analytical results are presented. Experimental results include load, strain, and deflection data for the TIBB (Technology Integration Box Beam). An analytical investigation was conducted to compliment the experimental investigation and to gain additional insight into the TIBB structural response. Analytical results include strain and deflection results from a global analysis of the TIBB. A local analysis of the failure region is being completed. These analytical results are validated through comparisons with the experimental results from the TIBB tests. The experimental and analytical results from the TIBB tests are used to determine a sequence of events that may have resulted in failure of the TIBB. A potential cause of failure is high stresses in a stiffener runout region. Typical analytical results are presented for a stiffener runout specimen that is being defined to simulate the TIBB failure mechanisms. The results of this study are anticipated to provide better understanding of potential failure mechanisms in composite aircraft structures, to lead to future design improvements, and to identify needed analytical tools for design and analysis.

  15. Recent study of beam stability in the PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Cooper, R.; Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Hardek, T.; Hutson, R.; Macek, R.; Ohmori, C.; Plum, M.; Thiessen, H.; Wilkinson, C.; Colton, E.; Neuffer, D.; Rees, G.

    1993-06-01

    A fast transverse instability with beam loss has been observed in the 800 MeV Los Alamos Pro Ring (PSR) when the injected beam intensity reaches 2 - 4 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. Previous observations in that the instability is most likely driven by electrons trapped within the proton beam. Theoretical study shown that beam leakage into the inter-bunch gap leads to electron trapping. Recent experiments were carried out by using the newly implemented ``pinger`` and by varying the machine transition gamma to explore further the ``e-p`` instability and the nature of the instability. This paper summarizes some of these recent experimental results and theoretical studies.

  16. Recent study of beam stability in the PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Cooper, R.; Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Hardek, T.; Hutson, R.; Macek, R.; Ohmori, C.; Plum, M.; Thiessen, H.; Wilkinson, C. ); Colton, E. ); Neuffer, D. ); Rees, G. )

    1993-01-01

    A fast transverse instability with beam loss has been observed in the 800 MeV Los Alamos Pro Ring (PSR) when the injected beam intensity reaches 2 - 4 [times] 10[sup 13] protons per pulse. Previous observations in that the instability is most likely driven by electrons trapped within the proton beam. Theoretical study shown that beam leakage into the inter-bunch gap leads to electron trapping. Recent experiments were carried out by using the newly implemented pinger'' and by varying the machine transition gamma to explore further the e-p'' instability and the nature of the instability. This paper summarizes some of these recent experimental results and theoretical studies.

  17. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  18. Biomechanics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  19. Biomechanics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  20. Technology integration box beam failure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Davis, R. C.; Farley, G. L.; Lotts, C. G.; Wang, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Composite structures have the potential to be cost-effective, structurally efficient primary aircraft structures. The Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program has the goal to develop the technology to exploit this potential for heavily loaded aircraft structures. As part of the ACT Program, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company completed the design and fabrication of the Technology Integration Box Beam (TIBB). The TIBB is an advanced composite prototype structure for the center wing section of the C-130 aircraft. Lockheed subjected the TIBB to downbending, upbending, torsion and combined upbending and torsion load conditions to verify the design. The TIBB failed at 83 percent of design ultimate load for the combined upbending and torsion load condition. The objective of this paper is to describe the mechanisms that led to the failure of the TIBB. The results of a comprehensive analytical and experimental study are presented. Analytical results include strain and deflection results from both a global analysis of the TIBB and a local analysis of the failure region. These analytical results are validated by experimental results from the TIBB tests. The analytical and experimental results from the TIBB tests are used to determine a sequence of events that resulted in failure of the TIBB. A potential cause of failure is high stresses in a stiffener runout region. Analytical and experimental results are also presented for a stiffener runout specimen that was used to simulate the TIBB failure mechanisms.

  1. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  2. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1990-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation. 34 refs.

  3. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  4. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  5. A feasibility study of multiplexing parallel beam.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiayi; Zhao, Jingwu; Shi, Xiaodong; Huang, Runshen

    2013-05-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a suitable tool for clinically localizing deep-sited tumors; SPECT with high spatial resolution has the ability to localize deep-sited tumors precisely. However, because of its poor sensitivity, in China SPECT now only plays a complementary role. To improve the sensitivity of the parallel beam collimator mainly used in China, a multiplexing parallel beam collimator is proposed, which can improve sensitivity while maintaining higher spatial resolution by using theoretical prediction and Monte Carlo simulation. The improved sensitivity-to-spatial resolution ratio has an optimal value. In addition, a set of gamma ray channels, introduced only in the transverse direction, did not have any effect in the axial direction. In the transverse direction, the projection data are the sum of the parallel beam and two oblique parallel beams. From visual assessment obtained using computer simulations with equal sensitivity, the reconstructed image at deep-sited was noticeably better than that with the high sensitivity parallel beam.

  6. Hydroxyapatite coating on PEEK implants: Biomechanical and histological study in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Durham, John W; Montelongo, Sergio A; Ong, Joo L; Guda, Teja; Allen, Matthew J; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2016-11-01

    A bioactive two-layer coating consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated on cylindrical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Post-deposition heat treatments via variable frequency microwave annealing with and without subsequent autoclaving were used to crystallize the as-deposited amorphous HA layer. Microstructural analysis, performed by TEM and EDS, showed that these methods were capable of crystallizing HA coating on PEEK. The in vivo response to cylindrical PEEK samples with and without coating was studied by implanting uncoated PEEK and coated PEEK implants in the lateral femoral condyle of 18 rabbits. Animals were studied in two groups of 9 for observation at 6 or 18weeks post surgery. Micro-CT analysis, histology, and mechanical pull-out tests were performed to determine the effect of the coating on osseointegration. The heat-treated HA/YSZ coatings showed improved implant fixation as well as higher bone regeneration and bone-implant contact area compared to uncoated PEEK. The study offers a novel method to coat PEEK implants with improved osseointegration.

  7. Research Techniques in Biomechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Terry

    Biomechanics involves the biological human beings interacting with his/her mechanical environment. Biomechanics research is being done in connection with sport, physical education, and general motor behavior, and concerns mechanics independent of implements. Biomechanics research falls in the following two general categories: (1) that specific…

  8. Cementation of a polyethylene liner into a metal acetabular shell: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Aaron A; Prince, Edward J; Drake, F Thurston; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2009-08-01

    Cementation of a liner into a well-fixed acetabular shell is common in revision hip arthroplasty. We compare the biomechanical strengths of cemented liners with standard locked liners. Fifty polyethylene liners were inserted into acetabular shells using the standard locking mechanism or 1 of 2 cement types then loaded to failure by torsion or lever-out testing. Lever-out testing showed that all cemented liners failed at similar loads to standard locked liners. With torsion testing, cemented liners failed at significantly higher loads than standard locked liners; roughening the liner increased load to failure. Cementation of an acetabular liner into a metal shell is safe and strong and a good alternative to metal shell replacement. Saw roughening of the polyethylene liner strengthens the poly-cement interface.

  9. ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

  10. Experimental Studies of Ion Beam Neutralization: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, N.; Polansky, J.; Downey, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    A testing platform is designed to study ion beam neutralization in the mesothermal, collisionless region. In the experimental setup, argon neutrals were ionized in a microwave cavity and accelerated by a plasma lens system which was biased to 2500 V above the system ground. Electrons were boiled off from two hot tungsten filaments to neutralize the ion beam. The plasma is diagnosed using Langmuir probe and Faraday probe. A 3-D traversing system and a complete data acquisition loop were developed to efficiently measure 3-D beam profile. Preliminary measurements of beam profiles are presented for different operating conditions.

  11. Alignment Sensitivity Study of the St. ANA Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, Michelle; Couder, Manoel; Jung, Hyo Soon; Setoodehnia, Kiana

    2014-09-01

    The St. ANA (STable Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics) accelerator is being prepared for use with the St. George recoil mass separator. The accelerator is in working condition for use in direct kinematic experiments but the St. George separator works with inverse kinematics and requires a highly controlled beam restricted by severe position and divergence parameters that are not achieved at the present time. A systematic sensitivity study was conducted using a simulation of the beam line in order to assess the impact of a misalignment in each optical element or in the beam itself. Tests were done with the beam to analyze how the beam behaves at various points in the line and to compare this data with simulation results to determine possible causes of misalignment. The results of these tests and simulations are that the beam characteristics are now better understood and the possible causes of the limitations have been narrowed down. The St. ANA (STable Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics) accelerator is being prepared for use with the St. George recoil mass separator. The accelerator is in working condition for use in direct kinematic experiments but the St. George separator works with inverse kinematics and requires a highly controlled beam restricted by severe position and divergence parameters that are not achieved at the present time. A systematic sensitivity study was conducted using a simulation of the beam line in order to assess the impact of a misalignment in each optical element or in the beam itself. Tests were done with the beam to analyze how the beam behaves at various points in the line and to compare this data with simulation results to determine possible causes of misalignment. The results of these tests and simulations are that the beam characteristics are now better understood and the possible causes of the limitations have been narrowed down. Project advisor

  12. Ecological character displacement in Plethodon: biomechanical differences found from a geometric morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Adams, D C; Rohlf, F J

    2000-04-11

    Ecological character displacement describes a pattern where morphological differences between sympatric species are enhanced through interspecific competition. Although widely considered a pervasive force in evolutionary ecology, few clear-cut examples have been documented. Here we report a case of ecological character displacement between two salamander species, Plethodon cinereus and Plethodon hoffmani. Morphology was quantified by using linear measurements and landmark-based geometric morphometric methods for specimens from allopatric and sympatric populations from two geographic transects in south-central Pennsylvania, and stomach contents were assayed to quantify food resource use. Morphological variation was also assessed in 13 additional allopatric populations. In both transects, we found significant morphological differentiation between sympatric populations that was associated with a reduction in prey consumption in sympatry and a segregation of prey according to prey size. No trophic morphological or resource use differences were found between allopatric populations, and comparisons of sympatric populations with randomly paired allopatric populations revealed that the observed sympatric morphological differentiation was greater than expected by chance. The major trophic anatomical differences between sympatric populations relates to functional and biomechanical differences in jaw closure: sympatric P. hoffmani have a faster closing jaw, whereas sympatric P. cinereus have a slower, stronger jaw. Because salamanders immobilize prey of different sizes in different ways, and because the observed sympatric biomechanical differences in jaw closure are associated with the differences in prey consumption, the observed character displacement has a functional ecological correlate, and we can link changes in form with changes in function in this apparent example of character displacement.

  13. Ecological character displacement in Plethodon: Biomechanical differences found from a geometric morphometric study

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Dean C.; Rohlf, F. James

    2000-01-01

    Ecological character displacement describes a pattern where morphological differences between sympatric species are enhanced through interspecific competition. Although widely considered a pervasive force in evolutionary ecology, few clear-cut examples have been documented. Here we report a case of ecological character displacement between two salamander species, Plethodon cinereus and Plethodon hoffmani. Morphology was quantified by using linear measurements and landmark-based geometric morphometric methods for specimens from allopatric and sympatric populations from two geographic transects in south-central Pennsylvania, and stomach contents were assayed to quantify food resource use. Morphological variation was also assessed in 13 additional allopatric populations. In both transects, we found significant morphological differentiation between sympatric populations that was associated with a reduction in prey consumption in sympatry and a segregation of prey according to prey size. No trophic morphological or resource use differences were found between allopatric populations, and comparisons of sympatric populations with randomly paired allopatric populations revealed that the observed sympatric morphological differentiation was greater than expected by chance. The major trophic anatomical differences between sympatric populations relates to functional and biomechanical differences in jaw closure: sympatric P. hoffmani have a faster closing jaw, whereas sympatric P. cinereus have a slower, stronger jaw. Because salamanders immobilize prey of different sizes in different ways, and because the observed sympatric biomechanical differences in jaw closure are associated with the differences in prey consumption, the observed character displacement has a functional ecological correlate, and we can link changes in form with changes in function in this apparent example of character displacement. PMID:10760280

  14. H line; a beam line for fundamental physics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Naritoshi; Toyoda, Akihisa; Aoki, Masaharu; Shimomura, Koichiro; Mibe, Tsutomu; Nakatsugawa, Yohei; Otani, Masashi; Saito, Naohito; Miyake, Yasuhiro

    2014-12-01

    The muon facility, J-PARC (Muon Science Establishment; MUSE), has been operating since the first beam in 2008. Starting with a 200 kW proton beam, a beam intensity of 3 × 106 muons/s was reached in 2009 which was the most intense pulsed muon beam in the world. From the 2 cm thick graphite target, four secondary muon beam lines are designed to be extracted. Three beam lines currently exist, the first being operational and the other two undergoing commissioning. The fourth and the last beam line, the H line, is planned to be constructed. This new beam line is designed to have a large acceptance, provides the ability to tune the momentum, and use a kicker magnet and/or a Wien filter. The H line is designed to provide an intense beam of 108 surface muons/s for fundamental physics studies to observe new physics beyond the standard model. Such studies require high statistics and they need to occupy the experimental areas for a relatively long period.

  15. Biomechanics of corneal ectasia and biomechanical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Cynthia J.; Dupps, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Many algorithms exist for the topographic/tomographic detection of corneas at risk for post-refractive surgery ectasia. It is proposed that the reason for the difficulty to find a universal screening tool based on corneal morphologic features is that curvature, elevation, and pachymetric changes are all secondary signs of keratoconus and post-refractive surgery ectasia and that the primary abnormality is in the biomechanical properties. It is further proposed that the biomechanical modification is focal in nature, rather than a uniform generalized weakening, and that the focal reduction in elastic modulus precipitates a cycle of biomechanical decompensation that is driven by asymmetry in the biomechanical properties. This initiates a repeating cycle of increased strain, stress redistribution, and subsequent focal steepening and thinning. Various interventions are described in terms of how this cycle of biomechanical decompensation is interrupted, such as intrastromal corneal ring segments, which redistribute the corneal stress, and collagen crosslinking, which modifies the basic structural properties. PMID:24774009

  16. Associations of Biomechanical Properties of the Cornea With Environmental and Metabolic Factors in an Elderly Population: The ALIENOR Study.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Cedric; Korobelnik, Jean-Francois; Boniol, Mathieu; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Le Goff, Melanie; Malet, Florence; Rougier, Marie-Benedicte; Delyfer, Marie-Noelle; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Delcourt, Cecile

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the associations of biomechanical properties of the cornea with metabolic and environmental factors in an elderly population. The ALIENOR (Antioxydants, Lipides Essentiels, Nutrition, and Maladies OculaiRes) study is a population-based study. In 2009-2010, 624 subjects, aged 74 years or more, underwent an eye examination, including intraocular pressure (IOP), central corneal thickness (CCT), and biomechanical properties of the cornea measurements using the Ocular Response Analyzer. Socio-demographic, lifestyle, and medical history data were collected using standardized questionnaires. Mean lifetime ambient ultraviolet (UV) exposure was estimated using residential history and statistics of UV radiation at each location using the Eurosun UV database. Mean age was 82.2 ± 4.3 years. Mean corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), and CCT were 9.4 ± 1.9, 9.8 ± 1.9 mm Hg, and 551.6 ± 36.8 μm, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, CH and CRF values were significantly lower in subjects older than 80 years (-0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.89; -0.24); P < 0.001 and -0.48; 95% CI: -0.75;-0.20; P < 0.001, respectively), in subjects having higher ambient UV exposure (-0.50; 95% CI: -0.88; -0.12; P < 0.01; and -0.46; 95% CI: -0.78; -0.13); P < 0.05, respectively), and in subjects with high plasma LDL cholesterol (CH: -0.46; 95% CI: -0.86; -0.03; P < 0.05; and CRF: -0.37; 95% CI: -0.72; -0.008; P < 0.05). Central corneal thickness was significantly higher in former smokers than in never smokers (+11.01; 95% CI: 0.48; 21.55; P < 0.05) and was not significantly associated with age, ambient UV exposure, diabetes, or LDL cholesterol. Biomechanical properties of the cornea are modified by metabolic and lifetime environmental factors, especially UV exposure. The manner these factors may influence onset and progression of ocular diseases or IOP measurements need further investigation.

  17. Biomechanical and histological comparison between the cryopreserved and the lyophilized Gracilis tendon allograft for MPFL reconstruction, a cadaveric experimental study.

    PubMed

    Negrín, Roberto; Duboy, Jaime; Olavarría, Fernando; Wainer, Mauricio; Jimenez, Horacio; Las Heras, Facundo; Reyes, Nicolas; Godoy, Hugo

    2016-12-01

    Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the main restrictor of lateral shifting of the patella, contributing by 60 % in the first 20° flexion of the knee. MPFL reconstruction has been performed in order to restore the stability of the patella with good results.Lyophilized Gracilis tendon allograft (LGA) compared to Cryopreserved Gracilis tendon allograft (CGA) has a lower cost, does not require to maintain cooling chain or preparation. The purpose of this study is to compare the histological and biomechanical characteristics of an experimental model of reconstruction of the MPFL in porcine patellas with LGA versus CGA. Randomized controlled experimental study in porcine model conducted on 36 porcine patellas in which 18 were intervened with LGA and 18 were intervened with CGA. The confluent tunnel technique was used for MPFL reconstruction. Maximum tensile force, allograft elongation and stiffness of the construct were measured. The cellularity and collagen tissue distribution were evaluated in the allografts. The histological and biomechanical characteristics of the LGA were compared to those of the CGA. The median of the maximum tensile force for the LGA group was 299.63 N and 280.86 N for the CGA group (p = 0.45). The median of the stiffness was 57.86 N/mm for the LGA and 54.23 N/mm for the CGA (p = 0.2). The median of the elongation for the LGA was 5.95 mm and 6.12 mm for the CGA (p = 0,29). The bone bridge failed in 88.88 % of the constructs with LGA and 94.44 % in those with CGA (p = 0.5). No differences were observed between the LGA group and the CGA group in maximum tensile force, elongation, stiffness, site of rupture and histological characteristics. The use of a lyophilized Gracilis tendon allograft for MPFL reconstruction confers the same histological and biomechanical characteristics as a cryopreserved Gracilis tendon allograft.

  18. Beam Dynamics Studies for the SPARC Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrario, M.; Biagini, Maria E.; Boscolo, M.; Fusco, V.; Guiducci, S.; Migliorati, M.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Bartolini, R.; Giannessi, L.; Quattromini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Limborg, C.G.; /Unlisted /Unlisted /ENEA, Frascati /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    The aim of the SPARC project, is to promote an R&D activity oriented to the development of a high brightness photoinjector to drive SASE-FEL experiments. We discuss in this paper the status of the beam dynamics simulation activities.

  19. Cervical Spine Muscle-Tendon Unit Length Differences Between Neutral and Forward Head Postures: Biomechanical Study Using Human Cadaveric Specimens.

    PubMed

    Khayatzadeh, Saeed; Kalmanson, Olivia A; Schuit, Dale; Havey, Robert M; Voronov, Leonard I; Ghanayem, Alexander J; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2017-07-01

    Forward head posture (FHP) may be associated with neck pain and poor health-related quality of life. Literature describes only qualitative muscle length changes associated with FHP. The purpose of this study was to quantify how muscle-tendon unit lengths are altered when human cadaveric specimens are placed in alignments representing different severities of FHP. This biomechanical study used 13 fresh-frozen cadaveric cervical spine specimens (Occiput-T1, 54±15 y). Specimens' postural changes simulating increasing FHP severity while maintaining horizontal gaze were assessed. Specimen-specific anatomic models derived from computed tomography-based anatomic data were combined with postural data and specimen-specific anatomy of muscle attachment points to estimate the muscle length changes associated with FHP. Forward head posture was associated with flexion of the mid-lower cervical spine and extension of the upper cervical (sub-occipital) spine. Muscles that insert on the cervical spine and function as flexors (termed "cervical flexors") as well as muscles that insert on the cranium and function as extensors ("occipital extensors") shortened in FHP when compared to neutral posture. In contrast, muscles that insert on the cervical spine and function as extensors ("cervical extensors") as well as muscles that insert on the cranium and function as flexors ("occipital flexors") lengthened. The greatest shortening was seen in the major and minor rectus capitis posterior muscles. These muscles cross the Occiput-C2 segments, which exhibited extension to maintain horizontal gaze. The greatest lengthening was seen in posterior muscles crossing the C4-C6 segments, which exhibited the most flexion. This cadaver study did not incorporate the biomechanical influence of active musculature. This study offers a novel way to quantify postural alignment and muscle length changes associated with FHP. Model predictions are consistent with qualitative descriptions in the literature.

  20. Atom beam surface interaction studies: Experimental system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Quantitative deposition by standard techniques of adsorbates containing C and Si onto selected substrates is studied. The interaction kinetics of a beam of oxygen, nitrogen, or hydrogen atoms of known flux are investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and LEED. Desborbed molecules will be analyzed by mass spectroscopy using modulated beam techniques. Experimental conditions permitting, two sets of measurements will be correlated.

  1. Long-Range And Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation Studies in RHIC With Lessons for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-28

    Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. Electron lenses were proposed for both RHIC and the LHC to reduce the head-on beam-beam effect. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

  2. Long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation studies in RHIC with lessons for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H.-J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.

    2009-01-12

    Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. Electron lenses were proposed for both RHIC and the LHC to reduce the head-on beam-beam effect. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

  3. Long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation studies in RHIC with lessons for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer,W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J. -P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H. -J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.

    2008-11-24

    Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both RIDC and the LHC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

  4. The effects of orientation of lumbar facet joints on the facet joint contact forces: an in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Huang, Zhiping; Zhou, Ruozhou; Zhu, Qingan; Ji, Wei; Long, Yaowu; Wang, Jixing

    2017-07-28

    A biomechanical human cadaveric study. The aim of this study was to measure L2-L3 facet joint contact forces in a flexibility test using thin film electroresistive sensors, and facet joint orientation on CT scan images, to examine the effects of orientation of lumbar facet joint on the facet joint contact forces. Biomechanically the bilateral facet joints play a critical role in maintaining stability of the lumbar spine by sharing load. The effect of orientation of lumbar facet joints on the contact forces remains unknown. Eight human cadaveric lumbar spine specimens (L2-L3) were tested by applying a pure moment of ± 7.5 Nm in 3 directions of loading(flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial rotation) with and without a follower preload of 300 N. The orientation of the lumbar facet joints at the L2-L3 was measured on axial CT scans. Bilateral facet contact forces were measured during flexibility tests using thin film electroresistive sensors (Tekscan 6900). The average total peak facet loads was 66 N in axial rotation, 27 N in extension and 20 N in lateral bending under a pure moment. Under a pure moment and with a follower preload of 300N, the average total peak facet loads was 53 N in axial rotation, 43 N in extension and 24 N in lateral bending. The facet joint forces were correlated positively and significantly with the orientation in all directions with and without a compressive follower preload (P < 0.05). In addition, the facet joint contact forces at neutral position with a follower preload were correlated positively with the orientation (rs = 0.759, P = 0.001). This study identified that the greater coronal orientation of lumbar facet joints are, the higher the facet joint contact forces are. 3.

  5. Further studies of shoulder and neck pain and exposures in customer service work with low biomechanical demands.

    PubMed

    Holte, Kari Anne; Westgaard, Rolf H

    2002-10-20

    The aim of the study was to establish insight into work exposures that cause shoulder and neck pain among occupational groups that have low biomechanical exposure and experience work stress from client/customer contact, among other exposures. Four occupational groups were studied, in health care (n = 20), retail (n = 22), banking (n = 26), and university secretaries (n = 26), a total of 94 volunteers. Thirty-nine were classified as pain-afflicted in the shoulder and neck, while 55 were pain-free. The subjects' perceptions of biomechanical and psychosocial exposures were established by use of quantitative questionnaires and by explorative interviews with open-ended questions, covering the same themes. Heart rate and trapezius EMG were recorded over a full workday and the following leisure period. Trapezius median and static activity during work were 3.3% and 0.3% EMG(max), only marginally higher than trapezius activity in the leisure period (2.7% and 0.2% EMG(max)). The quantitative questionnaire did not identify any variable that correlated with shoulder and neck pain except perceived general tension. The interviews established that the interaction with clients or customers was an important source of work stress. Such stress appeared to be a complex entity not easily characterized by established psychosocial questionnaires. The physiological variables were at most weakly elevated in periods with high stress as compared to periods with low stress. The authors caution against relying on standardized quantitative questionnaires and/or physiological recordings to characterize work stress in occupations with emotional stress through client/customer service work.

  6. [A biomechanical study on internal fixation of proximal ulna combined with olecranon fracture].

    PubMed

    Teng, Lin; Zhong, Gang; Liu, Gang; Xiao, Cong; Liu, Guoming; Huang, Fuguo

    2012-01-01

    To compare the biomechanical stability of Kirschner wire and tension band wiring, reconstruction plate combined with tension band wiring, and olecranon anatomical plate in fixing proximal ulna combined with olecranon fracture, so as to provide the theoretical evidence for clinical selection of internal fixation. Eight specimens of elbow joints and ligaments were taken from eight fresh male adult cadaveric elbows (aged 26-43 years, mean 34.8 years) donated voluntarily. The model of proximal ulna combined with olecranon fracture was made by an osteotomy in each specimen. Fracture end was fixed successively by Kirschner wire and tension band wiring (group A), reconstruction plate combined with tension band wiring (group B), and olecranon anatomical plate (group C), respectively. The biomechanical test was performed for monopodium compression experiments, and load-displacement curves were obtained. The stability of the fixation was evaluated according to the load value when the compression displacement of fracture segment was 2 mm. No Kirschner wire withdrawal, broken plate and screw, loosening and specimens destruction were observed. The load-displacement curves of 3 groups showed that the displacement increased gradually with increasing load, while the curve slope of groups B and C was significantly higher than that of group A. When the compression displacement was 2 mm, the load values of groups A, B, and C were (218.6 +/- 66.9), (560.3 +/- 116.1), and (577.2 +/- 137.6) N, respectively; the load values of groups B and C were significantly higher than that of group A (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was observed between groups B and C (t = 0.305, P = 0.763). The proximal ulna combined with olecranon fracture is unstable. Reconstruction plate combined with tension band wiring and olecranon anatomical plate can meet the requirement of fracture fixation, so they are favorable options for proximal ulna combined with olecranon fracture. Kirschner wire and tension

  7. Comparative study of the beam-width spreading of partially coherent Hermite-sinh-Gaussian beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Yang, Ailin; Lü, Baida

    2008-11-01

    Taking the partially coherent Hermite-sinh-Gaussian (H-ShG) beam as a more general type of partially coherent beams, a comparative study of the beam-width spreading of partially coherent H-ShG beams in atmospheric turbulence is performed by using the relative width, normalized beam width, and turbulence length. It is shown that the relative width versus the beam parameters, such as the spatial correlation length sigma(0), beam orders m, n, Sh-part parameter Omega(0), and waist width w(0), provides a simple and intuitive insight into the beam-width spreading of partially coherent H-ShG beams in turbulence, and the results are consistent with those using the turbulence length. The validity of our results is interpreted physically.

  8. Neutral beam source commercialization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.J.

    1980-06-01

    The basic tasks of this Phase II project were to: generate a set of design drawings suitable for quantity production of sources of this design; fabricate a functional neutral beam source incorporating as many of the proposed design changes as proved feasible; and document the procedures and findings developed during the contract. These tasks have been accomplished and represent a demonstrated milestone in the industrialization of this complete device.

  9. Mechanical stress on tensioned wires at direct and indirect loading: a biomechanical study on the Ilizarov external fixator.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Jan; Jettkant, Birger; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Seybold, Dominik

    2011-10-01

    The biomechanical effect of indirect weight loading with the Ilizarov ring fixator using a weight-bearing platform has not yet been investigated. The problem of wire loosening and breakage occurs more frequently when patients are mobilised with a weight-bearing platform. Therefore, the aim of this research was to compare the influence of direct and indirect weight loading on the tensioned wires. A universal testing machine (UTS, Germany) was used in this study. A composite tibia model with a standard four-ring Ilizarov fixator and 1.8-mm wires in anatomical position was used to simulate a clinical situation. Wire strain was measured with two strain gauges positioned at the ring-wire interface of each wire. After a standardised 2-mm mid-diaphyseal osteotomy, an axial load of up to 1000 N was applied to the bone; the different methods of weight loading were evaluated in two experimental set-ups. A higher axial load was necessary to achieve an osteotomy gap closure at indirect loading. Mechanical stress on the tensioned wires was 400% higher on the proximal wires and 250% higher on the distal wires at a maximum axial loading of 1000 N. Mechanical stress remained on the wires in indirect loading, even after bone end contact, and led to excessive stress under higher weight-bearing amounts. There is a substantial change in the biomechanical characteristics of the Ilizarov ring fixator when mobilising a patient with a weight-bearing platform. The considerable higher mechanical stress on the wires needs to be considered when patients are mobilised with a weight-bearing platform. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cumulative loads increase at the knee joint with slow-speed running compared to faster running: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jesper; Sørensen, Henrik; Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard

    2015-04-01

    Biomechanical cross-sectional study. To investigate the hypothesis that the cumulative load at the knee during running increases as running speed decreases. The knee joint load per stride decreases as running speed decreases. However, by decreasing running speed, the number of strides per given distance is increased. Running a given distance at a slower speed may increase the cumulative load at the knee joint compared with running the same distance at a higher speed, hence increasing the risk of running-related injuries in the knee. Kinematic and ground reaction force data were collected from 16 recreational runners, during steady-state running with a rearfoot strike pattern at 3 different speeds (mean ± SD): 8.02 ± 0.17 km/h, 11.79 ± 0.21 km/h, and 15.78 ± 0.22 km/h. The cumulative load (cumulative impulse) over a 1000-m distance was calculated at the knee joint on the basis of a standard 3-D inverse-dynamics approach. Based on a 1000-m running distance, the cumulative load at the knee was significantly higher at a slow running speed than at a high running speed (relative difference, 80%). The mean load per stride at the knee increased significantly across all biomechanical parameters, except impulse, following an increase in running speed. Slow-speed running decreases knee joint loads per stride and increases the cumulative load at the knee joint for a given running distance compared to faster running. The primary reason for the increase in cumulative load at slower speeds is an increase in number of strides needed to cover the same distance.

  11. Supplemental S1 fixation for type C pelvic ring injuries: biomechanical study of a long iliosacral versus a transsacral screw.

    PubMed

    Salari, Pooria; Moed, Berton R; Bledsoe, J Gary

    2015-12-01

    A single iliosacral screw placed into the S1 vertebral body has been shown to be clinically unreliable for certain type C pelvic ring injuries. Insertion of a second supplemental iliosacral screw into the S1 or S2 vertebral body has been widely used. However, clinical fixation failures have been reported using this technique, and a supplemental long iliosacral or transsacral screw has been used. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical effect of a supplemental S1 long iliosacral screw versus a transsacral screw in an unstable type C vertically oriented sacral fracture model. A type C pelvic ring injury was created in ten osteopenic/osteoporotic cadaver pelves by performing vertical osteotomies through zone 2 of the sacrum and the ipsilateral pubic rami. The sacrum was reduced maintaining a 2-mm fracture gap to simulate a closed-reduction model. All specimens were fixed using one 7.0-mm iliosacral screw into the S1 body. A supplemental long iliosacral screw was placed into the S1 body in five specimens. A supplemental transsacral S1 screw was placed in the other five. Each pelvis underwent 100,000 cycles at 250 N, followed by loading to failure. Vertical displacements at 25,000, 50,000, 75,000, and 100,000 cycles and failure force were recorded. Vertical displacement increased significantly (p < 0.05) within each group with each increase in the number of cycles. However, there was no statistically significant difference between groups in displacement or load to failure. Although intuitively a transsacral screw may seem to be better than a long iliosacral screw in conveying additional stability to an unstable sacral fracture fixation construct, we were not able to identify any biomechanical advantage of one method over the other.

  12. Implant impingement during internal rotation after reverse shoulder arthroplasty. The effect of implant configuration and scapula anatomy: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Manuel; Bäunker, Alexandra; Wellmann, Mathias; Hurschler, Christof; Smith, Tomas

    2016-03-01

    Internal rotation after reverse shoulder arthroplasty is essential to perform fundamental daily living activities. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of anatomical and implant related factors on impingement-free internal rotation of the glenohumeral joint. CT-scans of 13 human shoulder specimens with implanted reverse shoulder prostheses were carried out and scapula neck length, lateral pillar angle, and implantation height of the metaglene were measured. Internal rotation testing of all specimens was performed by the use of a robot assisted shoulder simulator. Biomechanical variables were analyzed using a three-way ANOVA. Spearman's rank correlations were performed to determine the relationship between biomechanical and anatomical data. The maximum internal rotation angle for a 38 mm centric glenosphere and a standard onlay was 93.4(SD 34.9°). The change of the diameter of the glenosphere resulted in no significant increase of the maximum rotation angle (P=0.16), while change of the glenosphere type from concentric to eccentric (P=0.005) as well as the change of the onlay type from standard to a more shallow one (P=0.002) both had a significant effect on the internal rotation. The distance between the inferior rim of the metaglene and the inferior aspect of the glenoid (P=0.21), scapula pillar angle (P=0.13) as well as the scapula neck length (P=0.81) showed no significant correlation with the maximum internal rotation angle. Implant component selection shows strong influence on the impingement-free internal rotation. The use of an eccentric glenosphere and a shallow humeral cup may improve internal rotation after reverse shoulder arthroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fixation of HA-coated unicortical locking screws in a sheep gap model: a comparative biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Antonio; Pegreffi, Francesco; Hoang-Kim, Amy; Tesei, Federico; Giannini, Sandro; Wippermann, Burkhardt

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate whether fixing a locking compression plate (LCP) with hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated screws provides improved biomechanical fixation and healing compared with standard screws under loaded conditions. Ten sheep were randomly divided into 2 groups. A resection osteotomy of 8 mm was performed in the sheep's right tibiae. Five tibiae were fixed with a 9-hole LCP and 8 standard unicortical locking screws (Group Non-HA), and 5 tibiae were fixed with a 9-hole LCP and 8 HA-coated unicortical locking screws (Group HA). All screws were implanted at the same insertion torque of 4000 Nmm. Three months after surgery, all the sheep were euthanized. Bone segments after screw removal were randomly chosen from each group for histologic analysis (Group Non-HA=5, Group HA=5). Mean screw extraction torque was 438+/-288 Nmm in Group Non-HA (n=40) and 2317+/-657 Nmm in Group HA (n=40) (P<0.0005). The tibial torque resistance of the resected tibiae was 24+/-8 Nm in Group Non-HA (n=5) and 31+/-3 in Group HA (n=5) (P=0.045). In Group Non-HA, histology showed bone resorption and fibrous tissue encapsulation in all the samples, but this was not found in any of the Group HA samples. This study shows that an LCP with HA-coated screws provides improved biomechanical fixation than an LCP with similar standard screws as shown by a 5-fold greater screw extraction torque (P<0.0005). Furthermore, the higher tibial torque resistance is potentially beneficial for improved gap healing, as shown by higher tibial torque resistance.

  14. Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is a local event in the aneurysm wall that naturally demands tools to assess the risk for local wall rupture. Consequently, global parameters like the maximum diameter and its expansion over time can only give very rough risk indications; therefore, they frequently fail to predict individual risk for AAA rupture. In contrast, the Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment (BRRA) method investigates the wall’s risk for local rupture by quantitatively integrating many known AAA rupture risk factors like female sex, large relative expansion, intraluminal thrombus-related wall weakening, and high blood pressure. The BRRA method is almost 20 years old and has progressed considerably in recent years, it can now potentially enrich the diameter indication for AAA repair. The present paper reviews the current state of the BRRA method by summarizing its key underlying concepts (i.e., geometry modeling, biomechanical simulation, and result interpretation). Specifically, the validity of the underlying model assumptions is critically disused in relation to the intended simulation objective (i.e., a clinical AAA rupture risk assessment). Next, reported clinical BRRA validation studies are summarized, and their clinical relevance is reviewed. The BRRA method is a generic, biomechanics-based approach that provides several interfaces to incorporate information from different research disciplines. As an example, the final section of this review suggests integrating growth aspects to (potentially) further improve BRRA sensitivity and specificity. Despite the fact that no prospective validation studies are reported, a significant and still growing body of validation evidence suggests integrating the BRRA method into the clinical decision-making process (i.e., enriching diameter-based decision-making in AAA patient treatment). PMID:27757402

  15. Modifying the biomechanical response of mouthguards with hard inserts: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Verissimo, Crisnicaw; Santos-Filho, Paulo César Freitas; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the influence of a high elastic modulus material insert on the stress, shock absorption and displacement of mouthguards. Finite element models of a human maxillary central incisor with and without mouthguard were created based on cross-sectional CT-tomography. The mouthguard models had four designs: without insert, and middle, external, or palatal hard insert. The hard inserts had a relatively high elastic modulus when compared to the elastic modulus of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA): 15 GPa versus 18 MPa. A non-linear dynamic impact analysis was performed in which a heavy rigid object hit the model at 1 m/s. Strain and stress (von Mises and critical modified von Mises) distributions and shock absorption during impact were calculated as well as the mouthguard displacement. The model without mouthguard had the highest stress values at the enamel and dentin structures in the tooth crown during the impact. It was concluded that the use of a mouthguard promoted lower stress and strain values in the teeth during impact. Hard insertion in the middle and palatal side of the mouthguard improved biomechanical response by lowering stress and strain on the teeth and lowering mouthguard displacement.

  16. Dynamic biomechanics correlate with histopathology in human tibial cartilage: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Young, Allan A; Appleyard, Richard C; Smith, Margaret M; Melrose, James; Little, Christopher B

    2007-09-01

    Improved staging of cartilage degeneration is required, particularly during early stages when minimal surface damage is visible arthroscopically. Degradation of articular cartilage extracellular matrix, resulting from degenerative changes associated with osteoarthritis, can influence its functional properties. Cartilage mechanical properties therefore may provide a quantitative method for monitoring degenerative change in this tissue. We determined whether dynamic mechanical properties of cartilage (effective shear modulus and phase lag) measured with a handheld indenter correlated with histopathology scores, proteoglycan, and collagen content or expression of chondrocyte-specific (aggrecan, collagen II) or dedifferentiation (collagen I and III) genes in human osteoarthritic cartilage with International Cartilage Repair Society scores of 0 to 1. We observed an association between the histopathologic stage of cartilage disease and dynamic shear modulus and phase lag. In contrast, there generally was a poor relationship between cartilage biomechanical properties and biochemistry with the only noteworthy correlation being between shear modulus and collagen. Phase lag but not shear modulus correlated with gene expression. These data support the potential of dynamic indentation for assessing the stage of cartilage degeneration in tissue with minimal gross surface damage.

  17. Classroom Journal Club: Collaborative Study of Contemporary Primary Literature in the Biomechanics Classroom.

    PubMed

    Kuxhaus, Laurel; Corbiere, Nicole C

    2016-07-01

    Current engineering pedagogy primarily focuses on developing technical proficiency and problem solving skills; the peer-review process for sharing new research results is often overlooked. The use of a collaborative classroom journal club can engage students with the excitement of scientific discovery and the process of dissemination of research results, which are also important lifelong learning skills. In this work, a classroom journal club was implemented and a survey of student perceptions spanning three student cohorts was collected. In this collaborative learning activity, students regularly chose and discussed a recent biomechanics journal article, and were assessed based on specific, individual preparation tasks. Most student-chosen journal articles were relevant to topics discussed in the regular class lecture. Surveys assessed student perceptions of the activity. The survey responses show that, across all cohorts, students both enjoyed the classroom journal club and recognized it as an important learning experience. Many reported discussing their journal articles with others outside of the classroom, indicating good engagement. The results demonstrate that student engagement with primary literature can foster both technical knowledge and lifelong learning skills.

  18. Biomechanical studies in an ovine model of non-accidental head injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R W G; Sandoz, B; Dutschke, J K; Finnie, J W; Turner, R J; Blumbergs, P C; Manavis, J; Vink, R

    2014-08-22

    This paper presents the head kinematics of a novel ovine model of non-accidental head injury (NAHI) that consists only of a naturalistic oscillating insult. Nine, 7-to-10-day-old anesthetized and ventilated lambs were subjected to manual shaking. Two six-axis motion sensors tracked the position of the head and torso, and a triaxial accelerometer measured head acceleration. Animals experienced 10 episodes of shaking over 30 min, and then remained under anesthesia for 6h until killed by perfusion fixation of the brain. Each shaking episode lasted for 20s resulting in about 40 cycles per episode. Each cycle typically consisted of three impulsive events that corresponded to specific phases of the head's motion; the most substantial of these were interactions typically with the lamb's own torso, and these generated accelerations of 30-70 g. Impulsive loading was not considered severe. Other kinematic parameters recorded included estimates of head power transfer, head-torso flexion, and rate of flexion. Several styles of shaking were also identified across episodes and subjects. Axonal injury, neuronal reaction and albumin extravasation were widely distributed in the hemispheric white matter, brainstem and at the craniocervical junction and to a much greater magnitude in lower body weight lambs that died. This is the first biomechanical description of a large animal model of NAHI in which repetitive naturalistic insults were applied, and that reproduced a spectrum of injury associated with NAHI.

  19. A biomechanical study on burst mechanisms of plant fruit: stress analysis of pericarps before bursting.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Jiro; Kashiwano, Yuki; Yokota, Hideo; Nakamura, Sakiko; Kinoshita, Eichiro

    2010-10-01

    Bursting of fruit is a very interesting biomechanical phenomenon because its mechanism is directly related to the plant's reproduction. A plant that produces fruit that bursts powerfully and spreads the seeds widely has the advantage of reproduction without relying on other mechanisms such as transportation of fruit by insects. The structures of many types of fruit have likely been optimized by evolution, although the structure itself appears rather simplistic. Strain energy is stored in each pericarp because of growth deformation, swelling or desiccation just before bursting. Throughout these changes, the mechanical stress of the pericarps is at equilibrium. At the instant of bursting, the stored strain energy is released very rapidly. Quick and wide motion of the pericarps in a certain direction is advantageous for throwing the seed a long distance. The motion and deformation of bursting pericarps depend on their tissue structure and mechanical stress condition just before the burst. We tracked the bursting motion by using a high-speed camera. Then we calculated the pre-burst stress generated in a pericarp of Impatiens by using the finite-element method. The boundary condition obtained by experiments using a high-speed video camera is given, and the stress was calculated using reverse deformation analysis. The stress distribution of the pericarp is effective in causing the pericarp motion to throw the seeds far away.

  20. Holographic otoscope using dual-shot-acquisition for the study of eardrum biomechanical displacements.

    PubMed

    Flores-Moreno, Jorge Mauricio; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Estrada Rico, Julio Cesar

    2013-03-10

    Recently an optoelectronic holography system was deployed in the clinic with the purpose of quantifying the tympanic membrane (TM) displacements of various mammal species, the objective being the understanding of their middle ear biomechanics. The optoelectronic holography system has an in-line configuration where the data gathered is decoded using lensless digital holography with the Fresnel approximation. This paper presents quantitative data obtained from an acoustically excited postmortem chinchilla's TM. To achieve this we used a robust customized windowed unwrapping method to unwrap the noisy optical phase obtained by subtracting phase maps of two recorded holograms and the results were compared with those obtained when using the unwrapping branch-cut algorithm. Additionally, phase maps obtained by the phase-stepping technique were compared applying both unwrapping methods. For in vivo applications particular emphasis is made on post-processing dual-shot-acquisition of holograms as one of various acquisition strategies and algorithms to diminish measurement error due to heartbeat, breathing, and patient's head motion as well as environment induced mechanical disturbances present in a noncontrolled environment, such as in a clinic. By recording only two holograms representing a stationary and deformed state of eardrum, respectively, we can increase the acquisition speed of the camera used to record faster events happening on the TM surface.

  1. Effects of the fibers distribution in the human eardrum: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gentil, Fernanda; Parente, Marco; Martins, Pedro; Garbe, Carolina; Santos, Carla; Areias, Bruno; Branco, Carla; Paço, João; Jorge, Renato Natal

    2016-06-14

    The eardrum separates the external ear from the middle ear and it is responsible to convert the acoustical energy into mechanical energy. It is divided by pars tensa and pars flaccida. The aim of this work is to analyze the susceptibility of the four quadrants of the pars tensa under negative pressure, to different lamina propria fibers distribution. The development of associated ear pathology, in particular the formation of retraction pockets, is also evaluated. To analyze these effects, a computational biomechanical model of the tympano-ossicular chain was constructed using computerized tomography images and based on the finite element method. Three fibers distributions in the eardrum middle layer were compared: case 1 (eardrum with a circular band of fibers surrounding all quadrants equally), case 2 (eardrum with a circular band of fibers that decreases in thickness in posterior quadrants), case 3 (eardrum without circular fibers in the posterior/superior quadrant). A static analysis was performed by applying approximately 3000Pa in the eardrum. The pars tensa of the eardrum was divided in four quadrants and the displacement of a central point of each quadrant analyzed. The largest displacements of the eardrum were obtained for the eardrum without circular fibers in the posterior/superior quadrant.

  2. Biomechanical finite element analysis of small diameter and short dental implants: extensive study of commercial implants.

    PubMed

    Bourauel, Christoph; Aitlahrach, Maria; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Hasan, Istabrak

    2012-01-26

    In recent years, mini and short dental implants have become increasingly popular as treatment alternatives for patients in whom the bone is unsuitable for a standard implant. As yet, no detailed scientific analysis of the mechanical and biomechanical impact of the reduced diameter and length of these implants has been published. We analysed 21 commercially available implants (13 mini, eight short) with respect to material behaviour and load transfer to the alveolar bone, using finite element (FE) analysis. Following μCT scanning and geometry reconstruction, FE models of mini implants and short implants were inserted into idealised bone segments. Mini implants were analysed in the anterior mandibular jaw region at a force of 150 N under immediate loading, using a contact analysis in the FE software package Marc Mentat 2007. Short implants were inserted in posterior bone segments and analysed in the osseointegrated state at an occlusal force of 300 N. Von Mises stresses (up to 1150 MPa) in mini implants partly exceeded the ultimate strength. Implant diameter and geometry had a pronounced effect on stresses in the cortical plate (up to 266 MPa). Strains in spongy bone and stresses in cortical bone around short implants were markedly increased compared to those in standard implants. An increased risk of bone damage or implant failure may be assumed in critical clinical situations.

  3. Bone loss during simulated weightlessness: a biomechanical and mineralization study in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Garber, M A; McDowell, D L; Hutton, W C

    2000-06-01

    Astronauts exposed to weightlessness for extended periods experience significant decreases in bone mineral density. The clinical implications of this demineralization are not entirely clear, and the biomechanics involved are not completely understood. Local (rather than global) measurements of geometry and calcium concentration effectively predict femur strength in adult rats exposed to a hind-limb suspension model of weightlessness. Female Fischer rats (6-mo-old) were divided into groups of control and hind-limb-suspended animals. Animals were sacrificed after 2 or 4 wk of hind-limb suspension, and both femurs removed from each animal. The 3-point bending strength and total bone mineralization were determined for one femur from each animal, and the mid-shaft cross-sectional geometrical properties and distribution of calcium were determined for the contralateral femur. Although suspension led to significant decreases in total bone mineralization, the concentration of calcium at the anterior periosteal surface was unaffected. Total bone percent mineralization was not well correlated with structural properties, but bone geometrical properties (particularly cross-sectional moment of inertia and length) correlated strongly with ultimate bending strength (r2 = 0.81). Differences in bone geometry due to suspension were consistent with a distribution of bone material closer to the axis of the femur. Structural properties of bone are predicted well by bone geometry and poorly by total bone percent mineralization. Decreased bone mechanical strength in this model of weightlessness is primarily due to a distribution of bone material nearer the axis of the bone.

  4. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  5. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka band (~ 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also

  6. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka band (~ 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also

  7. Cellular track model for study of heavy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1993-01-01

    Track theory is combined with a realistic model of a heavy ion beam to study the effects of nuclear fragmentation on cell survival and biological effectiveness. The effects of secondary reaction products are studied as a function of depth in a water column. Good agreement is found with experimental results for the survival of human T-l cells exposed to monoenergetic carbon, neon, and argon beams under aerobic and hypoxia conditions. The present calculation, which includes the effect of target fragmentation, is a significant improvement over an earlier calculation because of the use of a vastly improved beam model with no change in the track theory or cellular response parameters.

  8. Polarization Studies in Fast-Ion Beam Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2001-12-20

    In a historical review, the observations and the insight gained from polarization studies of fast ions interacting with solid targets are presented. These began with J. Macek's recognition of zero-field quantum beats in beam-foil spectroscopy as indicating alignment, and D.G. Ellis' density operator analysis that suggested the observability of orientation when using tilted foils. Lastly H. Winter's studies of the ion-beam surface interaction at grazing incidence yielded the means to produce a high degree of nuclear orientation in ion beams.

  9. Study of propagation of vortex beams in aerosol optical medium.

    PubMed

    Porfirev, Alexey P; Kirilenko, Mikhail S; Khonina, Svetlana N; Skidanov, Roman V; Soifer, Victor A

    2017-04-10

    A theoretical and experimental study of the propagation of vortex laser beams in a random aerosol medium is presented. The theoretical study is based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle with the generation of a random field, using the fast Fourier transform. The simulation shows that the stability of vortex beams to fluctuations of an optical medium falls with rising order of optical vortices. Moreover, a coherence length (radius) of the random medium is of great importance. The coherence radius extension affects adversely the conservation of a beam structure in the random medium. During further free-space propagation, increasing coherence enables reduction of the negative effects of fluctuations for beams with high-value topological charges. Experimental studies in the random aerosol medium have shown that at small distances vortex beams mostly demonstrate lower stability than a Gaussian beam. However, at considerable distances, vortex beams start to demonstrate greater stability that may be explained by their capacity to be regenerated after they passed obstacles.

  10. Study of the bending vibration characteristic of phononic crystals beam-foundation structures by Timoshenko beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ni, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Han, Lin; Kang, Xue-Wei

    2015-07-01

    Vibration problems wildly exist in beam-foundation structures. In this paper, finite periodic composites inspired by the concept of ideal phononic crystals (PCs), as well as Timoshenko beam theory (TBT), are proposed to the beam anchored on Winkler foundation. The bending vibration band structure of the PCs Timoshenko beam-foundation structure is derived from the modified transfer matrix method (MTMM) and Bloch's theorem. Then, the frequency response of the finite periodic composite Timoshenko beam-foundation structure by the finite element method (FEM) is performed to verify the above theoretical deduction. Study shows that the Timoshenko beam-foundation structure with periodic composites has wider attenuation zones compared with homogeneous ones. It is concluded that TBT is more available than Euler beam theory (EBT) in the study of the bending vibration characteristic of PCs beam-foundation structures with different length-to-height ratios.

  11. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  12. Biomechanics in Paralympics: Implications for Performance.

    PubMed

    Morriën, Floor; Taylor, Matthew J D; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2017-05-01

    To provide an overview of biomechanical studies in Paralympic research and their relevance for performance in Paralympic sports. The search terms paralympic biomechanics, paralympic sport performance, paralympic athlete performance, and paralympic athlete were entered into the electronic database PubMed. Thirty-four studies were found. Biomechanical studies in Paralympics mainly contributed to performance enhancement by technical optimization (n = 32) and/or injury prevention (n = 6). In addition, biomechanics was found to be important in understanding activity limitation caused by various impairments, which is relevant for evidence-based classification in Paralympic sports (n = 6). Distinctions were made between biomechanical studies in sitting (41%), standing (38%), and swimming athletes (21%). In sitting athletes, mostly kinematics and kinetics in wheelchair propulsion were studied, mainly in athletes with spinal-cord injuries. In addition, kinetics and/or kinematics in wheelchair basketball, seated discus throwing, stationary shot-putting, hand-cycling, sit-skiing, and ice sledge hockey received attention. In standing sports, primarily kinematics of athletes with amputations performing jump sports and running and the optimization of prosthetic devices were investigated. No studies were reported on other standing sports. In swimming, mainly kick rate and resistance training were studied. Biomechanical research is important for performance by gaining insight into technical optimization, injury prevention, and evidence-based classification in Paralympic sports. In future studies it is advised to also include physiological and biomechanical measures, allowing the assessment of the capability of the human body, as well as the resulting movement.

  13. [Preparation and biomechanics study of biological artificial knee joint prosthesis with stereo mesh surface in rabbit].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Dongliang; Yu, Shiming; Hu, Junyong; Chen, Jianwei; Lei, Lei; Li, Zhanchun; Zeng, Xianshang

    2009-04-01

    To develop a kind of biological artificial knee joint prosthesis with stereo mesh surface for rabbit, to observe its function after being implanted into rabbit knee joint and to evaluate its biomechanical property. Thirty adult New Zealand rabbits were randomized into experimental and control groups (n=15), total left knee arthroplasty was performed in both groups, no patella replacement was performed. Biological artificial knee joint prosthesis with stereo mesh surface was self-designed. The adjacent 4/5 surface of femur and tibia stem of the prosthesis was covered by stainless steel stereo mesh, the inner surface of femur condyles and tibia plateau was welded with two layers of stainless steel stereo mesh, then the prosthesis underwent biological fixation in the experimental group. Meanwhile, prosthesis having smooth marrow internal stem, femoral condyle and tibial plateau internal surface and sharing the same shape and size with the experimental group were prepared and fixed with bone cement in the control group. The postoperative general condition of animal was observed. At 1, 3 and 6 months after operation, the rabbits were killed for gross observation, X-ray examination was conducted to observe the fixation condition of prosthesis and healing condition, the range of motion (ROM) of knee joints was tested, biomechanics test was carried out and the maximum shear strength of prosthesis bone interface was calculated. In each group, there was 1 rabbit died and new one was added during the second experiment. The others survived till the end of the experiment and crawled normally 7 days after operation. For the excellent and good rate concerning the recovery of ROM of the knee joint at 1, 3 and 6 months after operation, the experimental group was 60%, 80% and 80%, respectively, and the control group was 60%, 80% and 60%, respectively, indicating there were no significant differences between two groups (P > 0.05). For the experimental group, the gross observation

  14. Bankart repair versus Bankart repair plus remplissage: an in vitro biomechanical comparative study.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Jean; Diop, Amadou; Bou Ghosn, Rony; Ghosn, Rosny Bou; Lanari, Dimitri; Canonne, Adrien; Maurel, Nathalie

    2016-02-01

    To biomechanically compare Bankart lesion repair alone and Bankart lesion repair associated with infraspinatus capsulotenodesis described as «remplissage», in the treatment of combined Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. Seven pairs (right and left) of cadaveric shoulders have been tested, first without any lesion and then after performing a combined Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. For each pair, the specimens were then randomly assigned for Bankart lesion repair alone on one side or for Bankart lesion repair associated with remplissage on the other side. During tests, the shoulder was placed at 90° of abduction and at maximal external rotation, which value was recorded. A 50 N postero-anterior load was then applied to the proximal humerus, and the stiffness was calculated from the obtained load-displacement curve. Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions significantly (p < 0.05) decreased joint stiffness compared with intact joint. Bankart lesion repair alone did not restore stiffness to the level of intact, while adding the remplissage to the Bankart lesion repair did. External rotation was significantly increased after creation of the Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesion; Bankart repair restored the external rotation to the level of intact, while Bankart lesion repair associated with remplissage significantly decreased external rotation compared with intact and to Bankart lesion repair alone. In cadaveric shoulders with combined Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions, Bankart lesion repair associated with remplissage restored intact joint stiffness contrary to Bankart lesion repair alone. This increase in stiffness was associated with a decrease in external rotation.

  15. Spes: Exotic Beams for Nuclear Physics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Corradetti, Stefano; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesu; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-02-01

    The SPES project at Laboratori di Legnaro of INFN (Italy) is concentrating on the production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei for nuclear physics experiments using uranium fission at a rate of 1013 fission/s. The emphasis on neutron-rich isotopes is justified by the fact that this vast territory has been little explored. The Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) will be produced by the ISOL technique using proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx. The most critical element of the SPES project is the Multi-Foil Direct Target. Up to the present time, the proposed target represents an innovation in terms of its capability to sustain the primary beam power. This talk will present the status of the project financed by INFN, which is actually in the construction phase at Legnaro. In particular, developments related to the target and the ion-source activities using the surface ion source, plasma ion source, and laser ion source techniques will be reported.

  16. Biomechanics of hair cell kinocilia: experimental measurement of kinocilium shaft stiffness and base rotational stiffness with Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam analysis.

    PubMed

    Spoon, Corrie; Grant, Wally

    2011-03-01

    Vestibular hair cell bundles in the inner ear contain a single kinocilium composed of a 9+2 microtubule structure. Kinocilia play a crucial role in transmitting movement of the overlying mass, otoconial membrane or cupula to the mechanotransducing portion of the hair cell bundle. Little is known regarding the mechanical deformation properties of the kinocilium. Using a force-deflection technique, we measured two important mechanical properties of kinocilia in the utricle of a turtle, Trachemys (Pseudemys) scripta elegans. First, we measured the stiffness of kinocilia with different heights. These kinocilia were assumed to be homogenous cylindrical rods and were modeled as both isotropic Euler-Bernoulli beams and transversely isotropic Timoshenko beams. Two mechanical properties of the kinocilia were derived from the beam analysis: flexural rigidity (EI) and shear rigidity (kGA). The Timoshenko model produced a better fit to the experimental data, predicting EI=10,400 pN μm(2) and kGA=247 pN. Assuming a homogenous rod, the shear modulus (G=1.9 kPa) was four orders of magnitude less than Young's modulus (E=14.1 MPa), indicating that significant shear deformation occurs within deflected kinocilia. When analyzed as an Euler-Bernoulli beam, which neglects translational shear, EI increased linearly with kinocilium height, giving underestimates of EI for shorter kinocilia. Second, we measured the rotational stiffness of the kinocilium insertion (κ) into the hair cell's apical surface. Following BAPTA treatment to break the kinocilial links, the kinocilia remained upright, and κ was measured as 177±47 pN μm rad(-1). The mechanical parameters we quantified are important for understanding how forces arising from head movement are transduced and encoded by hair cells.

  17. Biomechanics of hair cell kinocilia: experimental measurement of kinocilium shaft stiffness and base rotational stiffness with Euler–Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam analysis

    PubMed Central

    Spoon, Corrie; Grant, Wally

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular hair cell bundles in the inner ear contain a single kinocilium composed of a 9+2 microtubule structure. Kinocilia play a crucial role in transmitting movement of the overlying mass, otoconial membrane or cupula to the mechanotransducing portion of the hair cell bundle. Little is known regarding the mechanical deformation properties of the kinocilium. Using a force-deflection technique, we measured two important mechanical properties of kinocilia in the utricle of a turtle, Trachemys (Pseudemys) scripta elegans. First, we measured the stiffness of kinocilia with different heights. These kinocilia were assumed to be homogenous cylindrical rods and were modeled as both isotropic Euler–Bernoulli beams and transversely isotropic Timoshenko beams. Two mechanical properties of the kinocilia were derived from the beam analysis: flexural rigidity (EI) and shear rigidity (kGA). The Timoshenko model produced a better fit to the experimental data, predicting EI=10,400 pN μm2 and kGA=247 pN. Assuming a homogenous rod, the shear modulus (G=1.9 kPa) was four orders of magnitude less than Young's modulus (E=14.1 MPa), indicating that significant shear deformation occurs within deflected kinocilia. When analyzed as an Euler–Bernoulli beam, which neglects translational shear, EI increased linearly with kinocilium height, giving underestimates of EI for shorter kinocilia. Second, we measured the rotational stiffness of the kinocilium insertion (κ) into the hair cell's apical surface. Following BAPTA treatment to break the kinocilial links, the kinocilia remained upright, and κ was measured as 177±47 pN μm rad–1. The mechanical parameters we quantified are important for understanding how forces arising from head movement are transduced and encoded by hair cells. PMID:21307074

  18. Patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Seth L; Plackis, Andreas C; Nuelle, Clayton W

    2014-07-01

    Patellofemoral disorders are common. There is a broad spectrum of disease, ranging from patellofemoral pain and instability to focal cartilage disease and arthritis. Regardless of the specific condition, abnormal anatomy and biomechanics are often the root cause of patellofemoral dysfunction. A thorough understanding of normal patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics is critical for the treating physician. Recognizing and addressing abnormal anatomy will optimize patellofemoral biomechanics and may ultimately translate into clinical success. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An analytical study on the bending of prismatic SMA beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Arghavani, Jamal; Poorasadion, Saeid

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an analytical solution is presented for pure bending of shape memory alloy (SMA) beams with symmetric cross section as well as symmetric behavior in tension and compression. To this end, a three-dimensional constitutive equation is reduced to one-dimensional form and employed to study the bending response of SMA beams at high (pseudo-elasticity) and low (shape memory effect) temperatures. An analytical expression for bending stress as well as polynomial approximation for shear stress and deflection are obtained. Derived equations for bending are employed to analyze an SMA beam with rectangular cross section and results are compared with those of the finite element method. The results of this work show good agreement when compared with experimental data and finite element results. Furthermore, the existence of several zero-stress fibers during unloading of SMA beams at low temperature is demonstrated.

  20. Ionosphere/microwave beam interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. E.; Duncan, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave beam of the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) is predicted to interact with the ionosphere producing thermal runaway up to an altitude of about 100 kilometers at a power density threshold of 12 mW/cm sq (within a factor of two). The operation of the SPS at two frequencies, 2450 and 5800 MHz, is compared. The ionosphere interaction is less at the higher frequency, but the tropospheric problem scattering from heavy rain and hail is worse at the higher frequency. Microwave signals from communication satellites were observed to scintillate, but there is some concern that the uplink pilot signal may be distorted by the SPS heated ionosphere. The microwave scintillations are only observed in the tropics in the early evenings near the equinoxes. Results indicate that large phase errors in the uplink pilot signal can be reduced.

  1. Slow positron beam generator for lifetime studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J. (Inventor); Eftekhari, Abe (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A slow positron beam generator uses a conductive source residing between two test films. Moderator pieces are placed next to the test film on the opposite side of the conductive source. A voltage potential is applied between the moderator pieces and the conductive source. Incident energetic positrons: (1) are emitted from the conductive source; (2) are passed through test film; and (3) isotropically strike moderator pieces before diffusing out of the moderator pieces as slow positrons, respectively. The slow positrons diffusing out of moderator pieces are attracted to the conductive source which is held at an appropriate potential below the moderator pieces. The slow positrons have to pass through the test films before reaching the conductive source. A voltage is adjusted so that the potential difference between the moderator pieces and the conductive source forces the positrons to stop in the test films. Measurable annihilation radiation is emitted from the test film when positrons annihilate (combine) with electrons in the test film.

  2. Positron beam studies of transients in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beling, C. D.; Ling, C. C.; Cheung, C. K.; Naik, P. S.; Zhang, J. D.; Fung, S.

    2006-02-01

    Vacancy-sensing positron deep level transient spectroscopy (PDLTS) is a positron beam-based technique that seeks to provide information on the electronic ionization levels of vacancy defects probed by the positron through the monitoring of thermal transients. The experimental discoveries leading to the concept of vacancy-sensing PDLTS are first reviewed. The major problem associated with this technique is discussed, namely the strong electric fields establish in the near surface region of the sample during the thermal transient which tend to sweep positrons into the contact with negligible defect trapping. New simulations are presented which suggest that under certain conditions a sufficient fraction of positrons may be trapped into ionizing defects rendering PDLTS technique workable. Some suggestions are made for techniques that might avoid the problematic electric field problem, such as optical-PDLTS where deep levels are populated using light and the use of high forward bias currents for trap filling.

  3. Biomechanical strain of goldsmiths.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Paula Emanuela Fernandes; Teixeira, Juliana Vieira Schmidt; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira; Gontijo, Leila Amaral

    2012-01-01

    The work of the goldsmiths consists in the manufacture of jewelry. The piece, be it an earring, bracelet or necklace, is hand-assembled. This task requires precision, skill, kindness and patience. In this work, we make use of tools such as cuticle clippers and rounded tip, beads or precious stones and also pieces of metal. This type of activity requires a biomechanical stress of hands and wrists. In order to quantify the biomechanical stress, we performed a case study to measure the movements performed by an assembly of pieces of jewelry. As method for research, filming was done during assembly of parts to a paste, using a Nikon digital camera, for 1 (one) hour. The film was edited by Kinovea software, and the task was divided into cycles, each cycle corresponds to a complete object. In one cycle, there are four two movements of supination and pronation movements of the forearm. The cycle lasts approximately sixteen seconds, totaling 1800 cycles in eight hours. Despite the effort required of the wrists, the activity shows no complaints from the employees, but this fact does not mischaracterizes the ability of employees to acquire repetitive strain injuries and work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  4. The effect of erythropoietin on biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon during the healing process: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Okkes; Guney, Ahmet; Kalender, Ali Murat; Kafadar, Ibrahim Halil; Yildirim, Muzaffer; Dundar, Nuh

    2016-04-28

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential biomechanical and histological benefits of systemic erythropoietin administration during the healing of Achilles tendon injury in a rat experimental model. Eighty Sprague-Dawley female rats were included in this study. Animals were randomly assigned into two groups with 40 animals in each: erythropoietin group and control group. Then each group was further divided into four subgroups corresponding to four time points with 10 animals in each. A full-thickness cut was made on the Achilles tendon of each animal and then the tendon was sutured with modified Kessler method. Erythropoietin groups received intraperitoneal erythropoietin (500 IU/kg/day) every day at same time throughout the study period, and the control groups received saline in a similar manner. Animals were sacrificed at four time points, and tensile test was performed on each tendon sample to assess maximum load for each sample. In addition, histopathological examination and scoring was done. Both groups had improvement on tensile test (maximum load) over time. However, groups did not differ with regard to maximum load in any of the time points. Similarly, groups did not differ with regard to any of the histopathological scores over time. The findings of this study do not support the benefit of systemic erythropoietin administration in Achilles tendon healing process. Further evidence from larger experimental studies is required to justify any such potential benefit.

  5. Anatomy and Biomechanical Properties of the Plantar Aponeurosis: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Da-wei; Li, Bing; Aubeeluck, Ashwin; Yang, Yun-feng; Huang, Yi-gang; Zhou, Jia-qian; Yu, Guang-rong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the anatomy of the plantar aponeurosis (PA) and its biomechanical effects on the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint and foot arch. Methods Anatomic parameters (length, width and thickness of each central PA bundle and the main body of the central part) were measured in 8 cadaveric specimens. The ratios of the length and width of each bundle to the length and width of the central part were used to describe these bundles. Six cadaveric specimens were used to measure the range of motion of the first MTP joint before and after releasing the first bundle of the PA. Another 6 specimens were used to evaluate simulated static weight-bearing. Changes in foot arch height and plantar pressure were measured before and after dividing the first bundle. Results The average width and thickness of the origin of the central part at the calcaneal tubercle were 15.45 mm and 2.79 mm respectively. The ratio of the length of each bundle to the length of the central part was (from medial to lateral) 0.29, 0.30, 0.28, 0.25, and 0.27, respectively. Similarly, the ratio of the widths was 0.26, 0.25, 0.23, 0.19 and 0.17. The thickness of each bundle at the bifurcation of the PA into bundles was (from medial to lateral) 1.26 mm, 1.04 mm, 0.91 mm, 0.84 mm and 0.72 mm. The average dorsiflexion of the first MTP joint increased 10.16° after the first bundle was divided. Marked acute changes in the foot arch height and the plantar pressure were not observed after division. Conclusions The first PA bundle was not the longest, widest, or the thickest bundle. Releasing the first bundle increased the range of motion of the first MTP joint, but did not acutely change foot arch height or plantar pressure during static load testing. PMID:24392127

  6. [BIOMECHANICAL STUDY ON KIDNEY-SHAPED NANO-HYDROXYAPATITE/POLYAMIDE 66 CAGE].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Ou, Yunsheng; Jiang, Dianming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yang, Dongjun

    2015-06-01

    To compare the biomechanical differences between the kidney-shaped nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) Cage and the bullet-shaped n-HA/PA66 Cage. L2-L5 spinal specimens were selected from 10 adult male pigs. L2, L3 and L4, L5 served as a motor unit respectively, 20 motor units altogether. They were divided into 4 groups (n = 5): no treatment was given as control group (group A); nucleus pulposus resection was performed (group B); bullet-shaped Cage (group C), and kidney-shaped Cage (group D) were used in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) through left intervertebral foramen and supplemented by posterior pedicle screw fixation. The intervertebral height (IH) and the position of Cages were observed on the X-ray films. The range of motion (ROM) was measured. There was no significant difference in the preoperative IH among 4 groups (F = 0.166, P = 0.917). No significant change was found in IH between at pre- and post-operation in group B (P > 0.05); it increased after operation in groups C and.D, but difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the postoperative IH among groups B, C, and D (P > 0.05). The distance from Cage to the left margin was (3.06 ± 0.51) mm in group C (close to the left) and (5.68 ± 0.69) mm in group D (close to the middle), showing significant difference (t = 6.787, P = 0.000). The ROM in all directions were significantly lower in groups C and D than in groups A and B (P < 0.05), and in group A than in group B (P < 0.05). The right bending and compression ROM of group C were significantly higher than those of group D (P < 0.05), but no statistically significant difference was found in the other direction ROM (P > 0.05). The bullet-shaped and kidney-shaped Cages have similar results in restoring IH and maintaining the stability of the spine assisted by internal fixation. Kidney-shaped Cage is more stable than bullet-shaped Cage in the axial compression and the bending load

  7. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    PubMed

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  8. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding

    PubMed Central

    Fethke, Nathan B.; Peters, Thomas M.; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.

    2016-01-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2mg m−3 for bare beam; 65.7mg m−3 for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8mg m−3 for bare beam; 15.8mg m−3 for through deck), zinc (0.2mg m−3 for bare beam; 15.8mg m−3 for through deck), and manganese (0.9mg m−3 for bare beam; 1.5mg m−3 for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17nm) through deck conditions (34±34nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure levels during

  9. Lateral Meniscus Posterior Root and Meniscofemoral Ligaments as Stabilizing Structures in the ACL-Deficient Knee: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Jonathan M.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Brady, Alex W.; Dornan, Grant J.; Coggins, Ashley; Muckenhirn, Kyle J.; Slette, Erik L.; Mikula, Jacob D.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The biomechanical effects of lateral meniscal posterior root tears with and without meniscofemoral ligament (MFL) tears in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)–deficient knees have not been studied in detail. Purpose: To determine the biomechanical effects of the lateral meniscus (LM) posterior root tear in ACL-intact and ACL-deficient knees. In addition, the biomechanical effects of disrupting the MFLs in ACL-deficient knees with meniscal root tears were evaluated. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten paired cadaveric knees were mounted in a 6-degrees-of-freedom robot for testing and divided into 2 groups. The sectioning order for group 1 was (1) ACL, (2) LM posterior root, and (3) MFLs, and the order for group 2 was (1) LM posterior root, (2) ACL, and (3) MFLs. For each cutting state, displacements and rotations of the tibia were measured and compared with the intact state after a simulated pivot-shift test (5-N·m internal rotation torque combined with a 10-N·m valgus torque) at 0°, 20°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion; an anterior translation load (88 N) at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion; and internal rotation (5 N·m) at 0°, 30°, 60°, 75°, and 90°. Results: Cutting the LM root and MFLs significantly increased anterior tibial translation (ATT) during a pivot-shift test at 20° and 30° when compared with the ACL-cut state (both Ps < .05). During a 5-N·m internal rotation torque, cutting the LM root in ACL-intact knees significantly increased internal rotation by between 0.7° ± 0.3° and 1.3° ± 0.9° (all Ps < .05) except at 0° (P = .136). When the ACL + LM root cut state was compared with the ACL-cut state, the increase in internal rotation was significant at greater flexion angles of 75° and 90° (both Ps < .05) but not between 0°and 60° (all Ps > .2). For an anterior translation load, cutting the LM root in ACL-deficient knees significantly increased ATT only at 30° (P = .007). Conclusion: The LM

  10. Titanium mesh as a low-profile alternative for tension-band augmentation in patella fracture fixation: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Aaron J; Salas, Christina; Rise, LeRoy; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Taha, Mahmoud Reda; DeCoster, Thomas A; Gehlert, Rick J

    2015-01-01

    We performed a simple biomechanical study to compare the fixation strength of titanium mesh with traditional tension-band augmentation, which is a standard treatment for transverse patella fractures. We hypothesised that titanium mesh augmentation is not inferior in fixation strength to the standard treatment. Twenty-four synthetic patellae were tested. Twelve were fixed with stainless steel wire and parallel cannulated screws. Twelve were fixed with parallel cannulated screws, augmented with anterior titanium mesh and four screws. A custom test fixture was developed to simulate a knee flexed to 90°. A uniaxial force was applied to the simulated extensor mechanism at this angle. A non-inferiority study design was used to evaluate ultimate force required for failure of each construct as a measure of fixation strength. Stiffness of the bone/implant construct, fracture gap immediately prior to failure, and modes of failure are also reported. The mean difference in force at failure was -23.0 N (95% CI: -123.6 to 77.6N) between mesh and wire constructs, well within the pre-defined non-inferiority margin of -260 N. Mean stiffness of the mesh and wire constructs were 19.42 N/mm (95% CI: 18.57-20.27 N/mm) and 19.49 N/mm (95% CI: 18.64-20.35 N/mm), respectively. Mean gap distance for the mesh constructs immediately prior to failure was 2.11 mm (95% CI: 1.35-2.88 mm) and 3.87 mm (95% CI: 2.60-5.13 mm) for wire constructs. Titanium mesh augmentation is not inferior to tension-band wire augmentation when comparing ultimate force required for failure in this simplified biomechanical model. Results also indicate that stiffness of the two constructs is similar but that the mesh maintains a smaller fracture gap prior to failure. The results of this study indicate that the use of titanium mesh plating augmentation as a low-profile alternative to tension-band wiring for fixation of transverse patella fractures warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  11. Study of the beam profile and position instability of a post-accelerated pseudospark-sourced electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Yin, H.; Zhang, L.; Shu, G.; He, W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.; Pang, L.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-03-01

    A pseudospark-sourced electron beam is a promising candidate for driving a THz millimeter wave radiation source. However, the physics governing the electron beam density profile and the beam center deviation from the axis of the structure, which may be caused by the randomness in the pseudospark discharge process, remains still unclear especially for the high energy component of the pseudospark-sourced electron beam, which is usually non-mono-energetic. It is essential to study the electron beam density profile and the beam center position distribution for optimizing the pseudospark discharge configuration. In this paper, images of some single-shot electron beam pulses have been captured using a 50 μm thickness stopping copper foil and a phosphor screen coated with a P47 scintillator to study the electron beam density profile and the beam center position distribution of the high energy component of the electron beam. The experiments have been carried out on two pseudospark discharge configurations with two different size hollow cathode cavities. The influence of the cathode aperture of each configuration has also been studied according to the beam images. Experimental results show that the beam profile of the high energy component has a Lorentzian distribution and is much smaller than the axial aperture size with the beam centers dispersing within a certain range around the axis of the discharge structure. The pseudospark-sourced electron beam with a larger hollow cathode cavity shows a smaller full width at half maximum radius and a more concentrated beam center distribution.

  12. Lateral Meniscus Posterior Root and Meniscofemoral Ligaments as Stabilizing Structures in the ACL-Deficient Knee: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jonathan M; Moatshe, Gilbert; Brady, Alex W; Dornan, Grant J; Coggins, Ashley; Muckenhirn, Kyle J; Slette, Erik L; Mikula, Jacob D; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-06-01

    The biomechanical effects of lateral meniscal posterior root tears with and without meniscofemoral ligament (MFL) tears in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees have not been studied in detail. To determine the biomechanical effects of the lateral meniscus (LM) posterior root tear in ACL-intact and ACL-deficient knees. In addition, the biomechanical effects of disrupting the MFLs in ACL-deficient knees with meniscal root tears were evaluated. Controlled laboratory study. Ten paired cadaveric knees were mounted in a 6-degrees-of-freedom robot for testing and divided into 2 groups. The sectioning order for group 1 was (1) ACL, (2) LM posterior root, and (3) MFLs, and the order for group 2 was (1) LM posterior root, (2) ACL, and (3) MFLs. For each cutting state, displacements and rotations of the tibia were measured and compared with the intact state after a simulated pivot-shift test (5-N·m internal rotation torque combined with a 10-N·m valgus torque) at 0°, 20°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion; an anterior translation load (88 N) at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion; and internal rotation (5 N·m) at 0°, 30°, 60°, 75°, and 90°. Cutting the LM root and MFLs significantly increased anterior tibial translation (ATT) during a pivot-shift test at 20° and 30° when compared with the ACL-cut state (both Ps < .05). During a 5-N·m internal rotation torque, cutting the LM root in ACL-intact knees significantly increased internal rotation by between 0.7° ± 0.3° and 1.3° ± 0.9° (all Ps < .05) except at 0° (P = .136). When the ACL + LM root cut state was compared with the ACL-cut state, the increase in internal rotation was significant at greater flexion angles of 75° and 90° (both Ps < .05) but not between 0°and 60° (all Ps > .2). For an anterior translation load, cutting the LM root in ACL-deficient knees significantly increased ATT only at 30° (P = .007). The LM posterior root was a significant stabilizer of the knee for ATT

  13. Optics Studies of the LHC Beam Transfer Line TI8

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wenninger; G. Arduini; B. Goddard; D. Jacquet; V. Kain; M. Lamont; V. Mertens; J.A. Uythoven; Y.-C. Chao

    2005-05-16

    The optics of the newly commissioned LHC beam transfer line TI 8 was studied with beam trajectories, dispersion and profile measurements. Steering magnet response measurements were used to analyze the quality of the steering magnets and of the beam position monitors. A simultaneous fit of the quadrupole strengths was used to search for setting or calibration errors. Residual coupling between the planes was evaluated using high statistics samples of trajectories. Initial conditions for the optics at the entrance of the transfer line were reconstructed from beam profile measurements with Optical Transition Radiation monitors. The paper presents the various analysis methods and their errors. The expected emittance growth arising from optical mismatch into the LHC is evaluated.

  14. Posterior-only stabilization of 2-column and 3-column injuries at the cervicothoracic junction: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Joseph R; Dmitriev, Anton E; Yu, Warren; Gelb, Daniel; Ludwig, Steven

    2009-07-01

    A biomechanical study conducted on cadaveric specimens. The objectives of the study were (1) to determine whether a 3-column injury at the cervicothoracic junction may be stabilized with only posterior instrumentation and (2) to determine optimal cross-link position. Previous literature has suggested that 3-column cervicothoracic injury requires both anterior and posterior instrumentation to restore spinal stability. Multidirectional flexibility analysis was performed under axial rotation, flexion extension, and lateral bending. After intact analysis, C7-T1 was destabilized simulating a 2-column injury and specimens instrumented from C6-T2 with lateral mass (C6) and pedicle (C7-T2) screws using dual diameter rods and retested. C7-T1 was further destabilized to a 3-column injury and specimens retested once again. The addition of a cross-link in either the cervical, thoracic, or combined positions was also analyzed. Range of motion (ROM) at C7-T1 and of the whole construct was recorded using optoelectronic markers and data normalized to intact condition (% intact). Statistical significance criterion was set at P<0.05. Greater than 75% reduction of intact ROM was achieved after posterior-only instrumentation of a 3-column injury (P<0.05) using modern instrumentation and technique. For a 2-column injury, no significant difference (P>0.05) was found with or without cross-links. ROM at C7-T1 was effectively reduced by 85% or more compared with intact preinjury motion in all planes. A trend toward increased stability at C7-T1 was noted from the application of a thoracic cross-link versus a cervical cross-link. A 3-column injury at the cervicothoracic junction may be stabilized from a biomechanical standpoint using posterior-only instrumentation. The addition of 2 cross-links further stabilizes the cervicothoracic junction in a 3-column injury. A thoracic cross-link was not significantly different from 2 cross-links. The use of a cross-link in 2-column flexion distraction

  15. Influences of tongue biomechanics on speech movements during the production of velar stop consonants: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan; Zandipour, Majid; Perkell, Joseph

    2003-09-01

    This study explores the following hypothesis: forward looping movements of the tongue that are observed in VCV sequences are due partly to the anatomical arrangement of the tongue muscles, how they are used to produce a velar closure, and how the tongue interacts with the palate during consonantal closure. The study uses an anatomically based two-dimensional biomechanical tongue model. Tissue elastic properties are accounted for in finite-element modeling, and movement is controlled by constant-rate control parameter shifts. Tongue raising and lowering movements are produced by the model mainly with the combined actions of the genioglossus, styloglossus, and hyoglossus. Simulations of V1CV2 movements were made, where C is a velar consonant and V is [a], [i], or [u]. Both vowels and consonants are specified in terms of targets, but for the consonant the target is virtual, and cannot be reached because it is beyond the surface of the palate. If V1 is the vowel [a] or [u], the resulting trajectory describes a movement that begins to loop forward before consonant closure and continues to slide along the palate during the closure. This pattern is very stable when moderate changes are made to the specification of the target consonant location and agrees with data published in the literature. If V1 is the vowel [i], looping patterns are also observed, but their orientation was quite sensitive to small changes in the location of the consonant target. These findings also agree with patterns of variability observed in measurements from human speakers, but they contradict data published by Houde [Ph.D. dissertation (1967)]. These observations support the idea that the biomechanical properties of the tongue could be the main factor responsible for the forward loops when V1 is a back vowel, regardless of whether V2 is a back vowel or a front vowel. In the [i] context it seems that additional factors have to be taken into consideration in order to explain the observations made

  16. A surface energy spectral study on the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity using the flattened and unflattened photon beams.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L; Owrangi, Amir M

    2016-01-01

    Using flattened and unflattened photon beams, this study investigated the spectral variations of surface photon energy and energy fluence in the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity. Surface dose enhancement is a dosimetric concern when using unflattened photon beam in radiotherapy. It is because the unflattened photon beam contains more low-energy photons which are removed by the flattening filter of the flattened photon beam. We used a water and bone heterogeneity phantom to study the distributions of energy, energy fluence and mean energy of the 6 MV flattened and unflattened photon beams (field size = 10 cm × 10 cm) produced by a Varian TrueBEAM linear accelerator. These elements were calculated at the phantom surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations. The photon energy and energy fluence calculations were repeated with the beam angle turned from 0° to 15°, 30° and 45° in the water and bone phantom. Spectral results at the phantom surfaces showed that the unflattened photon beams contained more photons concentrated mainly in the low-energy range (0-2 MeV) than the flattened beams associated with a flattening filter. With a bone layer of 1 cm under the phantom surface and within the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam, it is found that both the flattened and unflattened beams had slightly less photons in the energy range <0.4 MeV compared to the water phantom. This shows that the presence of the bone decreased the low-energy photon backscatters to the phantom surface. When both the flattened and unflattened photon beams were rotated from 0° to 45°, the number of photon and mean photon energy increased. This indicates that both photon beams became more hardened or penetrate when the beam angle increased. In the presence of bone, the mean energies of both photon beams increased. This is due to the absorption of low-energy photons by the bone, resulting in more beam hardening. This study explores the spectral relationships of surface photon

  17. A surface energy spectral study on the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity using the flattened and unflattened photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Chow, James C.L.; Owrangi, Amir M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Using flattened and unflattened photon beams, this study investigated the spectral variations of surface photon energy and energy fluence in the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity. Background Surface dose enhancement is a dosimetric concern when using unflattened photon beam in radiotherapy. It is because the unflattened photon beam contains more low-energy photons which are removed by the flattening filter of the flattened photon beam. Materials and methods We used a water and bone heterogeneity phantom to study the distributions of energy, energy fluence and mean energy of the 6 MV flattened and unflattened photon beams (field size = 10 cm × 10 cm) produced by a Varian TrueBEAM linear accelerator. These elements were calculated at the phantom surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations. The photon energy and energy fluence calculations were repeated with the beam angle turned from 0° to 15°, 30° and 45° in the water and bone phantom. Results Spectral results at the phantom surfaces showed that the unflattened photon beams contained more photons concentrated mainly in the low-energy range (0–2 MeV) than the flattened beams associated with a flattening filter. With a bone layer of 1 cm under the phantom surface and within the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam, it is found that both the flattened and unflattened beams had slightly less photons in the energy range <0.4 MeV compared to the water phantom. This shows that the presence of the bone decreased the low-energy photon backscatters to the phantom surface. When both the flattened and unflattened photon beams were rotated from 0° to 45°, the number of photon and mean photon energy increased. This indicates that both photon beams became more hardened or penetrate when the beam angle increased. In the presence of bone, the mean energies of both photon beams increased. This is due to the absorption of low-energy photons by the bone, resulting in more beam hardening. Conclusions This study

  18. Primary Apical Stability of Tapered Implants Through Reduction of Final Drilling Dimensions in Different Bone Density Models: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Rebolledo, Alejandro; Allais-Leon, Marvis; Maurette-OʼBrien, Paul; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2016-12-01

    A biomechanical study of the primary apical stability obtained in tapered implants through the reduction of final drilling dimensions in different bone density models. An in vitro study of maximum insertion torque and primary stability based on the resonance frequency analysis (RFA) of 24 conical implants measuring 13 mm in length and 3.75 and 4.20 mm in diameter, randomly inserted in 10-mm sockets prepared in 4 polyurethane blocks with a density of 15, 20, 30, and 40 pounds per cu ft, respectively, reducing the diameter of the final drill at constant speed (400 rpm) to obtain exclusive 4 mm anchoring of the apical third of each implant. The decrease in drilling diameter resulted in an increase in the insertion torque and implant stability quotient (ISQ) values in all implants, although without reaching statistical significance. In turn, a significant direct correlation was found between increasing bone analog block density and the insertion torque and ISQ values. Under the conditions of this study, the primary apical stability obtained may be more dependent on bone density than on reduction of the final drilling diameter.

  19. Is tip apex distance as important as we think? A biomechanical study examining optimal lag screw placement.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patrick; Vopat, Bryan; Heard, Wendell; Thakur, Nikhil; Paller, David; Koruprolu, Sarath; Born, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    Intertrochanteric hip fractures pose a significant challenge for the orthopaedic community as optimal surgical treatment continues to be debated. Currently, varus collapse with lag screw cutout is the most common mode of failure. Multiple factors contribute to cutout. From a surgical technique perspective, a tip apex distance less than 25 mm has been suggested to decrease the risk of cutout. We hypothesized that a low-center lag screw position in the femoral head, with a tip apex distance greater than 25 mm will provide equal, if not superior, biomechanical stability compared with a center-center position with a tip apex distance less than 25 mm in an unstable intertrochanteric hip fracture stabilized with a long cephalomedullary nail. We attempted to examine the biomechanical characteristics of intertrochanteric fractures instrumented with long cephalomedullary nails with two separate lag screw positions, center-center and low-center. Our first research purpose was to examine if there was a difference between the center-center and low-center groups in cycles to failure and failure load. Second, we analyzed if there was a difference in fracture translation between the study groups during loading. Nine matched pairs of femurs were assigned to one of two treatment groups: low-center lag screw position and center-center lag screw position. Cephalomedullary nails were placed and tip apex distance was measured. A standard unstable four-part intertrochanteric fracture was created in all samples. The femurs were loaded dynamically until failure. Cycles to failure and load and displacement data were recorded, and three-dimensional (3-D) motion was recorded using an Optotrak(®) motion tracking system. There were no significant differences between the low-center and center-center treatment groups regarding the mean number of cycles to failure and mean failure load. The 3-D kinematic data showed significantly increased motion in the center-center group compared with the low

  20. Ion source studies for particle beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bieg, K.W.; Burns, E.J.T.; Olsen, J.N.; Dorrell, L.R.

    1985-05-01

    High power particle beam accelerators are being developed for use in inertial confinement fusion applications. These pulsed power accelerators require sources of low atomic number ions (e.g., protons, deuterons, carbon, or lithium). The sources must be of high purity for efficient accelerator operation and proper target coupling, must have a rapid ''turn-on,'' and must be compatible with ion diode configurations under development. A particular type of source presently being investigated is the flashover ion source which generates ions by means of the vacuum flashover of an insulating anode material when the high voltage pulse arrives at the diode. We have developed an applied-magnetic-field, extraction ion diode for the 0.03 TW Nereus accelerator specifically to investigate these sources. Extracted ion species are measured by means of a Thomson-parabola ion analyzer, dB/dt current monitors, and Faraday cups. Experiments have been performed to investigate the surface flashover mechanism and the effects of various dielectric source materials, anode preparation methods (including rf glow discharge cleaning), and vacuum conditions on ion species and diode operation.

  1. Study of crack patterns in beam column joint due to upwards anchoring beam effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabariman, Bambang; Sofianto, Mochamad Firmansyah

    2017-06-01

    Beam-column joint (BCJ) of reinforced concrete is an area of critical which must be carefully designed to absorb the seismic energy. Inability to absorb seismic energy will cause serious damage to structural failure. It will lead to shear failure, i.e. brittle and endanger users of the building if the BCJ area is not designed properly. In order to get a building structure is safe and resistant to disasters, mainly due to the earthquake, the structure must be designed in accordance to the rules of standard construction (eligible detailing). In general, the anchorages (detailing) reinforcement beams to the column is pointing downwards, however, what if the steel anchoring beams are pointing upwards. Different anchoring will result in the behavior of different structures, such as fracturing pattern. This study observes two anchoring model, by making two test specimens of BCJ. One set of reinforcement beams anchored BCJ upward and downward respectively, which are applied with monotonic static load. The study investigated the pattern of cracks and ductility of the beam displacement on BCJ. The results showed that the downward anchoring in the fracturing pattern out of the area BCJ was anchoring upward pattern rift goes deep into the area BCJ, thus anchoring above makes BCJ unsafe. Downward anchoring are more ductile than the upward anchoring, however the deflection of all BJC specimens was higher than the boundaries maximum deflection prediction (Δprediction = 10.45 mm < eksp Δexp-min = 13.15 mm), which can be assumed that all BCJ specimens were ductile, but it still in ductile limited due to displacement ductility μΔ<3,5.

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of reconstruction plates with locking, nonlocking, and hybrid screws configurations in calcaneal fracture: a finite element model study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Hsuan; Hung, Chinghua; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Chiang, Chao-Ching

    2017-02-21

    Calcaneal fractures are the most common fractures of the tarsal bones. The stability of fixation is an important factor for successful reconstruction of calcaneal fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the biomechanical influence of plate fixation with different combinations of locking and nonlocking screws during early weight-bearing phase. A three-dimensional FE foot model was established using ANSYS software, which comprised bones, cartilages, plantar fascia, and soft tissue. Calcaneal plate was fixed with whole locking (WLS), whole nonlocking (WNS), and hybrid screw configurations for FE analysis. The WNS generated a 6.1° and 2.2° Bohler angle decrease compared with the intact model and WLS (WNS: 18.9; WLS: 21.1; intact: 25.0°). Some hybrid screw configurations (Bohler angle: 21.5° and 21.2°) generated stability similar to WLS. The FE results showed that the fragments at the posterior facet and the posterior tuberosity sustained more stress. This study recommends that the hybrid screw configuration with at least four locking screws, two at the posterior facet fragment and two at the posterior tuberosity fragment, is the optimal choice for the fixation of Sanders type IIB calcaneal fractures.

  3. The morphological and biomechanical changes of keratocytes cultured on modified p (HEMA-MMA) hydrogel studied by AFM.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tuo; Sun, Rong; Deng, Hua; Tan, Baihua; Ao, Ningjian

    2009-01-01

    The poor integration with host cornea tissue and the low mechanical properties of pHEMA hydrogel for artificial cornea remains a difficult problem to solve. A modified pHEMA hydrogel, MMA copolymerized and type-I collagen and bFGF immobilized, was previously prepared in an attempt to solve the problems. In this study, the cytotoxicity of Col/bFGF-p (HEMA-MMA) and p (HEMA-MMA) was studied by cell adhesion assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results of cell adhesion assay show that the attachment of keratocytes on the modified membrane is much higher than that of the unmodified membrane. This indicates that the material after modification have better cell-material interaction. The AFM images reveal that the morphology of keratocytes cultured on different substrate is obviously different. The cell cultured on modified membrane presented a completely elongated and spindle-shape morphology. The force-distance indicates that the biomechanical of keratocytes changes significantly after culturing on different substrates. The adhesion force (2328+/-523 pN) and Young's modulus (0.51+/-0.125 kPa) of the cell cultured on modified membrane are much higher, and the stiffness (0.08+/-0.022 mN/m) is lower than those of the cell cultured on unmodified membrane. These results show that the cytotoxicity of Col/bFGF-p (HEMA-MMA) for keratocytes is much improved.

  4. The effect of the arthroscopic augmentation of the subscapularis tendon on shoulder instability and range of motion: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Schröter, S; Krämer, M; Welke, B; Hurschler, C; Russo, R; Herbst, M; Stöckle, U; Ateschrang, A; Maiotti, M

    2016-10-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation is common. The treatment of recurrence with glenoid bone defect is still considered controversial. A new arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation has recently been described that functions to decrease the anterior translation of the humeral head. The purpose of the presented study was to examine the biomechanical effect on glenohumeral joint motion and stability. Eight fresh frozen cadaver shoulders were studied by use of a force guided industrial robot fitted with a six-component force-moment sensor to which the humerus was attached. The testing protocol includes measurement of glenohumeral translation in the anterior, anterior-inferior and inferior directions at 0°, 30° and 60° of glenohumeral abduction, respectively, with a passive humerus load of 30N in the testing direction. The maximum possible external rotation was measured at each abduction angle applying a moment of 1Nm. Each specimen was measured in a physiologic state, as well as after Bankart lesion with an anterior bone defect of 15-20% of the glenoid, after arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation and after Bankart repair. The arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation decreased the anterior and anterior-inferior translation. The Bankart repair did not restore the mechanical stability compared to the physiologic shoulder group. External rotation was decreased after arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation compared to the physiologic state, however, the limitation of external rotation was decreased at 60° abduction. The arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation investigated herein was observed to restore shoulder stability in an experimental model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Biomechanical study on repairing distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injuries with artificial ligaments].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zizheng; Wang, Bing; Cao, Yun; Zhao, Yi; Wang, Yijin

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the biomechanical properties of artificial ligament in the treatment of injuries to distal tibiofibular syndesmosis so as to provide a scientific basis for clinical application. Sixteen fresh ankle specimens were harvested from 8 normal fresh-frozen cadavers. The initial tests were performed on 16 intact specimens (group A) and then the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury models were made (group B); the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis was fixed with artificial ligament in 8 specimens (group C) and with cannulated lag screw in the other 8 specimens (group D). The pros and cons of different fixation methods were analyzed by displacement, stress shielding effect, the strength and stiffness of ankle joints, the contact area of tibiotalar articular surface and the contact stress. Under the physiological loading or combined with external rotation moment, the displacement of group C was significantly lower than that of groups B and D (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was found between groups A and C (P > 0.05); and there were significant differences among groups A, B, and D (P < 0.05). The rates of stress shielding in the tibia and fibula of group C were significantly lower than those of group D (t = -71.288, P = 0.000; t = -97.283, P = 0.000). The stress strength in tibia of group C was significantly higher than that of groups A and D (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was found between groups A and D (P > 0.05). Group C had the highest stress strength in fibula, followed by group A, group D had the lowest; differences were significant among 3 groups (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in shear strength among groups A, C, and D (P > 0.05). The axial stiffness in tibia of group D was significantly lower than that of groups A and C (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was found between groups A and C (P > 0.05). The axial stiffness in fibula of group C was significantly higher than that of groups A and D (P < 0.05), but no

  6. Experimental Study on Voided Reinforced Concrete Beams with Polythene Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaneshan, P.; Harishankar, S.

    2017-07-01

    The primary component in any structure is concrete, that exist in buildings and bridges. In present situation, a serious problems faced by construction industry is exhaustive use of raw materials. Recent times, various methods are being adopted to limit the use of concrete. In structural elements like beams, polythene balls can be induced to reduce the usage of concrete. A simply supported reinforced concrete beam has two zones, one above neutral axis and other below neutral axis. The region below neutral axis is in tension and above neutral axis is in compression. As concrete is weak in tension, steel reinforcements are provided in tension zone. The concrete below the neutral axis acts as a stress transfer medium between the compression zone and tension zone. The concrete above the neutral axis takes minimum stress so that we could partially replace the concrete above neutral axis by creating air voids using recycled polythene balls. Polythene balls of varying diameters of 75 mm, 65 mm and 35 mm were partially replaced in compression zone. Hence the usage of concrete in beams and self-weight of the beams got reduced considerably. The Load carrying capacity, Deflection of beams and crack patterns were studied and compared with conventional reinforced concrete beams.

  7. Nuclear photofission studies with monochromatic γ ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csige, L.; Gulyás, J.; Habs, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2012-07-01

    Two new research facilities will be ready for operation very soon (MEGa-Ray at Liver-more National Laboratory) or start construction (ELI-Nuclear Physics in Bucharest), both providing highly brilliant γ beams with so far unprecedented properties via Compton backscattering of laser photons from a high-quality, relativistic electron beam. With these intense, monochromatic γ beams, a new era of photonuclear physics will be enabled. A new research campaign is proposed to exploit the unprecedented properties of these highly-brilliant, novel γ beams on highly-selective studies of extremely deformed nuclei in the multiple-humped potential energy landscape of the actinides via photofission. With the unique γ beam bandwidth of ΔE/E = 10-3, we can aim at resolving individual resonances which could never be achieved so far due to the limited γ bandwidth of bremsstrahlung beams. Exploratory, non-bremsstrahlung photofission experiments are going to be performed very soon at the HIγS facility (Duke University, USA) to investigate the fine structure of the sub-barrier transmission resonances of the actinides.

  8. Nuclear photofission studies with monochromatic {gamma} ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Csige, L.; Gulyas, J.; Habs, D.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2012-07-09

    Two new research facilities will be ready for operation very soon (MEGa-Ray at Liver-more National Laboratory) or start construction (ELI-Nuclear Physics in Bucharest), both providing highly brilliant {gamma} beams with so far unprecedented properties via Compton backscattering of laser photons from a high-quality, relativistic electron beam. With these intense, monochromatic {gamma} beams, a new era of photonuclear physics will be enabled. A new research campaign is proposed to exploit the unprecedented properties of these highly-brilliant, novel {gamma} beams on highly-selective studies of extremely deformed nuclei in the multiple-humped potential energy landscape of the actinides via photofission. With the unique {gamma} beam bandwidth of {Delta}E/E = 10{sup -3}, we can aim at resolving individual resonances which could never be achieved so far due to the limited {gamma} bandwidth of bremsstrahlung beams. Exploratory, non-bremsstrahlung photofission experiments are going to be performed very soon at the HI{gamma}S facility (Duke University, USA) to investigate the fine structure of the sub-barrier transmission resonances of the actinides.

  9. [Biomechanics and aging].

    PubMed

    Struck, H J

    1991-01-01

    Starting from the physical basics of the biomechanics of connective tissues, organ structures and the corresponding age-related changes of skin, tendons, ligaments, cartilage, bones, blood vessels, and lungs are described. Finally, exogenous factors such as nutrition, hormones, immobilization, activity and adaptive mechanisms and their influence on the biomechanical properties of connective tissue are represented.

  10. Evaluation of biomechanical properties: are porcine flexor tendons and bovine extensor tendons eligible surrogates for human tendons in in vitro studies?

    PubMed

    Domnick, C; Wieskötter, B; Raschke, M J; Schulze, M; Kronenberg, D; Wefelmeier, M; Langer, M F; Herbort, M

    2016-10-01

    Porcine flexor tendons, bovine extensor tendons, and human (semitendinosus) tendons are frequently used as substitutes for human ACL grafts in biomechanical in vitro studies. This study compares the biomechanical properties and structural differences of these tendons. In this biomechanical study, fresh-frozen porcine flexor tendons, bovine extensor tendons, and human semitendinosus tendons were used (n = 36). The tendons were mounted in a uniaxial testing machine (Zwick/Roell) with cryo-clamps, leaving a 60 mm tendon part free between the two clamps. Specimens have been loaded to failure to evaluate the biomechanical parameters stiffness, yield load, and maximum load. A Total Collagen Assay Kit was used to detect differences in the total collagen type I concentration (n = 30). A one-way ANOVA was performed to detect differences in the means. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. There were no significant differences in the stiffness between the groups (bovine 194 ± 43 N/mm, porcine 211 ± 63 N/mm, and human cadaveric 208 ± 58 N/mm). The yield and maximum loads were high (>1000 N) in all groups, but they were significantly increased in both animal specimens (means of 1681-1795 N) compared with human cadaveric specimen (means of 1289-1406 N; p < 0.01). No difference in the collagen type I concentration was detected (N.S.). Porcine flexor and bovine extensor tendons are eligible substitutes with similar stiffness and high failure loads compared with human cadaveric semitendinosus tendons in in vitro studies.

  11. Study of the beam-beam limit in e{sup +}e{sup -} circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Cai, Y.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Qiang, J.

    2004-04-02

    Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be (xi) {approx} 0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns.

  12. Beam dynamics and error study of the medium energy beam transport line in the Korea Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San; Hahn, Garam

    2016-11-01

    The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator consists of an injector and a synchrotron for an ion medical accelerator that is the first carbon-ion therapy system in Korea. The medium energy beam transport(MEBT) line connects the interdigital H-mode drift tube linac and the synchrotron. We investigated the beam conditions after the charge stripper by using the LISE++ and the SRIM codes. The beam was stripped from C4+ into C6+ by using the charge stripper. We investigated the performance of a de-buncher in optimizing the energy spread and the beam distribution in z-dW/W (direction of beam progress-beam and energy) phase. We obtained the results of the tracking simulation and the error analysis by using the TRACK code. Possible misalignments and rotations of the magnets were considered in the simulations. States of the beam were examined when errors occurred in the magnets by the applying analytic fringe field model in TRACK code. The condition for the beam orbit was optimized by using correctors and profile monitors to correct the orbit. In this paper, we focus on the beam dynamics and the error studies dedicated to the MEBT beam line and show the optimized beam parameters for the MEBT.

  13. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics.

  14. Biomechanical analysis of distalization of mandibular molars by placing a mini-plate: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myungsoon; Na, Yonghyun; Park, Minbong

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the patterns of tooth movements when distalization of mandibular molars using a mini-plate took place. A finite element analysis was applied to analyze patterns of tooth movements. Methods The model of the mandible and teeth were used to build a finite element analysis model, and a mini-plate was inserted in the mandibular ramus. Two different orthodontic forces were established for displacement of mandibular molars. Orthodontic forces were applied at the level of the bracket and at the level of the cemento-enamel junction in the mandibular canine respectively. Results orthodontic forces at the level of the cemento-enamel junction resulted in a greater biomechanical bodily movement in distalization of the mandibular molars compared to when the orthodontic forces were applied at the level of the bracket. Applying orthodontic forces to the cemento-enamel junction also resulted in unwanted greater extrusive movements in distalization of the mandibular molars compared to the bracket level. Conclusions With considering the mode of orthodontic teeth movement, applying different vertical orthodontic forces for distalization of mandibular molars can lead to more effective distalization of teeth. PMID:28861390

  15. Eccentric and concentric loading of the triceps surae: an in vivo study of dynamic muscle and tendon biomechanical parameters.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Saira; Morrissey, Dylan; Woledge, Roger C; Bader, Dan L; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-04-01

    Triceps surae eccentric exercise is more effective than concentric exercise for treating Achilles tendinopathy, however the mechanisms underpinning these effects are unclear. This study compared the biomechanical characteristics of eccentric and concentric exercises to identify differences in the tendon load response. Eleven healthy volunteers performed eccentric and concentric exercises on a force plate, with ultrasonography, motion tracking, and EMG applied to measure Achilles tendon force, lower limb movement, and leg muscle activation. Tendon length was ultrasonographically tracked and quantified using a novel algorithm. The Fourier transform of the ground reaction force was also calculated to investigate for tremor, or perturbations. Tendon stiffness and extension did not vary between exercise types (P = .43). However, tendon perturbations were significantly higher during eccentric than concentric exercises (25%-40% higher, P = .02). Furthermore, perturbations during eccentric exercises were found to be negatively correlated with the tendon stiffness (R2 = .59). The particular efficacy of eccentric exercise does not appear to result from variation in tendon stiffness or extension within a given session. However, varied perturbation magnitude may have a role in mediating the observed clinical effects. This property is subject-specific, with the source and clinical time-course of such perturbations requiring further research.

  16. Biomechanical Effects of Various Bone-Implant Interfaces on the Stability of Orthodontic Miniscrews: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Fabing; Yang, Chongshi; Huang, Yuanding

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Osseointegration is required for prosthetic implant, but the various bone-implant interfaces of orthodontic miniscrews would be a great interest for the orthodontist. There is no clear consensus regarding the minimum amount of bone-implant osseointegration required for a stable miniscrew. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of different bone-implant interfaces on the miniscrew and its surrounding tissue. Methods Using finite element analysis, an advanced approach representing the bone-implant interface is adopted herein, and different degrees of bone-implant osseointegration were implemented in the FE models. A total of 26 different FE analyses were performed. The stress/strain patterns were calculated and compared, and the displacement of miniscrews was also evaluated. Results The stress/strain distributions are changing with the various bone-implant interfaces. In the scenario of 0% osseointegration, a rather homogeneous distribution was predicted. After 15% osseointegration, the stress/strains were gradually concentrated on the cortical bone region. The miniscrew experienced the largest displacement under the no osseointegra condition. The maximum displacement decreases sharply from 0% to 3% and tends to become stable. Conclusion From a biomechanical perspective, it can be suggested that orthodontic loading could be applied on miniscrews after about 15% osseointegration without any loss of stability.

  17. A biomechanical study comparing helical blade with screw design for sliding hip fixations of unstable intertrochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiang; Yuen, Grace; Lau, Tak-Wing; Yeung, Kelvin; Leung, Frankie

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw (DHS) is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade) was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC), superior-centre (SC), inferior-center (IC), centre-anterior (CA), and centre-posterior (CP). All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups.

  18. An MRI-based leg model used to simulate biomechanical phenomena during cuff algometry: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Manafi-Khanian, Bahram; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cuff pressure stimulation is applicable for assessing deep-tissue pain sensitivity by exciting a variety of deep-tissue nociceptors. In this study, the relative transfer of biomechanical stresses and strains from the cuff via the skin to the muscle and the somatic tissue layers around bones were investigated. Cuff pressure was applied on the lower leg at three different stimulation intensities (mild pressure to pain). Three-dimensional finite element models including bones and three different layers of deep tissues were developed based on magnetic resonance images (MRI). The skin indentation maps at mild pressure, pain threshold, and intense painful stimulations were extracted from MRI and applied to the model. The mean stress under the cuff position around tibia was 4.6, 4.9 and around fibula 14.8, 16.4 times greater than mean stress of muscle surface in the same section at pain threshold and intense painful stimulations, respectively. At the same stimulation intensities, the mean strains around tibia were 36.4, 42.3 % and around fibula 32.9, 35.0 %, respectively, of mean strain on the muscle surface. Assuming strain as the ideal stimulus for nociceptors the results suggest that cuff algometry is less capable to challenge the nociceptors of tissues around bones as compared to more superficially located muscles.

  19. Influence of screw augmentation in posterior dynamic and rigid stabilization systems in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae: a biomechanical cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Sven; Sven, Hoppe; Loosli, Yannick; Yannick, Loosli; Baumgartner, Daniel; Daniel, Baumgartner; Heini, Paul; Paul, Heini; Benneker, Lorin; Lorin, Benneker

    2014-03-15

    Biomechanical cadaveric study. To determine whether augmentation positively influence screw stability or not. Implantation of pedicle screws is a common procedure in spine surgery to provide an anchorage of posterior internal fixation into vertebrae. Screw performance is highly correlated to bone quality. Therefore, polymeric cement is often injected through specifically designed perforated pedicle screws into osteoporotic bone to potentially enhance screw stability. Caudocephalic dynamic loading was applied as quasi-physiological alternative to classical pull-out tests on 16 screws implanted in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae and 20 screws in nonosteoporotic specimen. Load was applied using 2 different configurations simulating standard and dynamic posterior stabilization devices. Screw performance was quantified by measurement of screwhead displacement during the loading cycles. To reduce the impact of bone quality and morphology, screw performance was compared for each vertebra and averaged afterward. All screws (with or without cement) implanted in osteoporotic vertebrae showed lower performances than the ones implanted into nonosteoporotic specimen. Augmentation was negligible for screws implanted into nonosteoporotic specimen, whereas in osteoporotic vertebrae pedicle screw stability was significantly increased. For dynamic posterior stabilization system an increase of screwhead displacement was observed in comparison with standard fixation devices in both setups. Augmentation enhances screw performance in patients with poor bone stock, whereas no difference is observed for patients without osteoporosis. Furthermore, dynamic stabilization systems have the possibility to fail when implanted in osteoporotic bone.

  20. SU-E-T-635: Quantitative Study On Beam Flatness Variation with Beam Energy Change

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J S; Eldib, A; Ma, C; Lin, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam flatness check has been proposed for beam energy check for photon beams with flattering filters. In this work, beam flatness change with beam energy was investigated quantitatively using the Monte Carlo method and its significance was compared with depth dose curve change. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations for a linear accelerator with flattering filter were performed with different initial electron energies for photon beams of 6MV and 10MV. Dose calculations in a water phantom were then perform with the phase space files obtained from the simulations. The beam flatness was calculated based on the dose profile at 10 cm depth for all the beams with different initial electron energies. The percentage depth dose (PDD) curves were also analyzed. The dose at 10cm depth (D10) and the ratio of the dose at 10cm and 20cm depth (D10/D20) and their change with the beam energy were calculated and compared with the beam flatness variation. Results: It was found that the beam flatness variation with beam energy change was more significant than the change of D10 and the ratio between D10 and D20 for both 6MV and 10MV beams. Half MeV difference on the initial electron beam energy brought in at least 20% variation on the beam flatness but only half percent change on the ratio of D10 and D20. The change of D10 or D20 alone is even less significant. Conclusion: The beam energy impact on PDD is less significant than that on the beam flatness. If the PDD is used for checking the beam energy, uncertainties of the measurement could possibly disguise its change. Beam flatness changes more significantly with beam energy and therefore it can be used for monitoring the energy change for photon beams with flattering filters. However, other factors which may affect the beam flatness should be watched as well.

  1. Beam-beam interaction study of medium energy eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao,Y.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2009-07-15

    Medium Energy eRHIC (MeRHIC), the first stage design of eRHIC, includes a multi-pass ERL that provides 4GeV high quality electron beam to collide with the ion beam of RHIC. It delivers a minimum luminosity of 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Beam-beam effects present one of major factors limiting the luminosity of colliders. In this paper, both beam-beam effects on the electron beam and the proton beam in MeRHIC are investigated. The beam-beam interaction can induce a head-tail type instability of the proton beam referred to as the kink instability. Thus, beam stability conditions should be established to avoid proton beam loss. Also, the electron beam transverse disruption by collisions has to be evaluated to ensure that the beam quality is good enough for the energy recovery pass. The relation of proton beam stability, electron disruption and consequential luminosity are carried out after thorough discussion.

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of native acromioclavicular joint ligaments and two reconstruction techniques in the presence of the sternoclavicular joint: A cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Masionis, Povilas; Šatkauskas, Igoris; Mikelevičius, Vytautas; Ryliškis, Sigitas; Bučinskas, Vytautas; Griškevičius, Julius; Martin Oliva, Xavier; Monzó Planella, Mariano; Porvaneckas, Narūnas; Uvarovas, Valentinas

    2017-01-01

    Where is over 100 reconstruction techniques described for acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction. Although, it is not clear whether the presence of the sternoclavicular (SC) joint influences the biomechanical properties of native AC ligaments and reconstruction techniques. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of native AC joint ligaments and two reconstruction techniques in cadavers with the SC joint still present. We tested eight fresh-frozen cadaver hemithoraces for superior translation (70 N load) and translation increment after 1000 cycles (loading from 20 to 70 N) in a controlled laboratory study. There were three testing groups created: native ligaments, the single coracoclavicular loop (SCL) technique, and the two coracoclavicular loops (TCL) technique. Superior translation was measured after static loading. Translation increment was calculated as the difference between superior translation after cyclic and static loading. Native AC ligaments showed significantly lower translation than the SCL ( p = 0.023) and TCL ( p = 0.046) groups. The SCL had a significantly lower translation increment than native AC ligaments ( p = 0.028). There was no significant difference between reconstruction techniques in terms of translation ( p = 0.865) and translation increment ( p = 0.113). Native AC joint ligaments had better static properties than both reconstruction techniques and worse dynamic biomechanical properties than the SCL technique. The SCL technique appeared to be more secure than the TCL technique. The presence of the SC joint did not have an observable influence on test results.

  3. Study of longitudinal dynamics in space-charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai

    from the 6-D phase space measurement has been used as initial conditions in computer simulations in order to explore the cause of discrepancies we have observed earlier between the experimental and theoretical models. After extensive simulation studies, we find that the beam loss inside the perturbation due to mismatch or misalignment is an important factor that needs to be included in the models for better reliability.

  4. A modified prebind engagement process reduces biomechanical loading on front row players during scrummaging: a cross-sectional study of 11 elite teams.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Dario; Preatoni, Ezio; Stokes, Keith A; England, Michael E; Trewartha, Grant

    2015-04-01

    Biomechanical studies of the rugby union scrum have typically been conducted using instrumented scrum machines, but a large-scale biomechanical analysis of live contested scrummaging is lacking. We investigated whether the biomechanical loading experienced by professional front row players during the engagement phase of live contested rugby scrums could be reduced using a modified engagement procedure. Eleven professional teams (22 forward packs) performed repeated scrum trials for each of the three engagement techniques, outdoors, on natural turf. The engagement processes were the 2011/2012 (referee calls crouch-touch-pause-engage), 2012/2013 (referee calls crouch-touch-set) and 2013/2014 (props prebind with the opposition prior to the 'Set' command; PreBind) variants. Forces were estimated by pressure sensors on the shoulders of the front row players of one forward pack. Inertial Measurement Units were placed on an upper spine cervical landmark (C7) of the six front row players to record accelerations. Players' motion was captured by multiple video cameras from three viewing perspectives and analysed in transverse and sagittal planes of motion. The PreBind technique reduced biomechanical loading in comparison with the other engagement techniques, with engagement speed, peak forces and peak accelerations of upper spine landmarks reduced by approximately 20%. There were no significant differences between techniques in terms of body kinematics and average force during the sustained push phase. Using a scrum engagement process which involves binding with the opposition prior to the engagement reduces the stresses acting on players and therefore may represent a possible improvement for players' safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. [Leather bags production: organization study, general identification of hazards, biomechanical overload risk pre-evaluation using an easily applied evaluation tool].

    PubMed

    Montomoli, Loretta; Coppola, Giuseppina; Sarrini, Daniela; Sartorelli, P

    2011-01-01

    Craft industries are the backbone of the Italian manufacturing system and in this sector the leather trade plays a crucial role. The aim of the study was to experiment with a risk pre-mapping data sheet in leather bag manufacture by analyzing the production cycle. The prevalence of biomechanical, organizational and physical factors was demonstrated in tanneries. With regard to chemical agents the lack of any priority of intervention could be due to the lack of information on the chemicals used. In the 2 enterprises that used mechanical processes the results showed different priorities for intervention and a different level of the extent of such intervention. In particular in the first enterprise biomechanical overload was a top priority, while in the second the results were very similar to those of the tannery. The analysis showed in both companies that there was a high prevalence of risk of upper limb biomechanical overload in leather bag manufacture. Chemical risk assessment was not shown as a priority because the list of chemicals used was neither complete nor sufficient. The risk pre-mapping data sheet allowed us to obtain a preliminary overview of all the major existing risks in the leather industry. Therefore the method can prove a useful tool for employers as it permits instant identification of priorities for intervention for the different risks.

  6. Biomechanical patterns of text-message distraction.

    PubMed

    Le, Peter; Hwang, Jaejin; Grawe, Sarah; Li, Jing; Snyder, Alison; Lee, Christina; Marras, William S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify biomechanical measures that can distinguish texting distraction in a laboratory-simulated driving environment. The goal would be to use this information to provide an intervention for risky driving behaviour. Sixteen subjects participated in this study. Three independent variables were tested: task (texting, visual targeting, weighted and non-weighted movements), task direction (front and side) and task distance (close and far). Dependent variables consisted of biomechanical moments, head displacement and the length of time to complete each task. Results revealed that the time to complete each task was higher for texting compared to other tasks. Peak moments during texting were only distinguishable from visual targeting. Peak head displacement and cumulative biomechanical exposure measures indicated that texting can be distinguished from other tasks. Therefore, it may be useful to take into account both temporal and biomechanical measures when considering warning systems to detect texting distraction.

  7. A Biomechanical Modeling Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis Oris Muscle and Jaw Posture on Lip Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavness, Ian; Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Demolin, Didier; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors' general aim is to use biomechanical models of speech articulators to explore how possible variations in anatomical structure contribute to differences in articulatory strategies and phone systems across human populations. Specifically, they investigated 2 issues: (a) the link between lip muscle anatomy and variability in…

  8. A Biomechanical Modeling Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis Oris Muscle and Jaw Posture on Lip Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavness, Ian; Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Demolin, Didier; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors' general aim is to use biomechanical models of speech articulators to explore how possible variations in anatomical structure contribute to differences in articulatory strategies and phone systems across human populations. Specifically, they investigated 2 issues: (a) the link between lip muscle anatomy and variability in…

  9. A Case Study in Proton Pencil-Beam Scanning Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Kooy, Hanne M.; Clasie, Benjamin M.; Lu, H.-M.; Madden, Thomas M.; Bentefour, Hassan; Depauw, Nicolas M.S.; Adams, Judy A.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Demaret, Denis; Delaney, Thomas F.; Flanz, Jacob B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: We completed an implementation of pencil-beam scanning (PBS), a technology whereby a focused beam of protons, of variable intensity and energy, is scanned over a plane perpendicular to the beam axis and in depth. The aim of radiotherapy is to improve the target to healthy tissue dose differential. We illustrate how PBS achieves this aim in a patient with a bulky tumor. Methods and Materials: Our first deployment of PBS uses 'broad' pencil-beams ranging from 20 to 35 mm (full-width-half-maximum) over the range interval from 32 to 7 g/cm{sup 2}. Such beam-brushes offer a unique opportunity for treating bulky tumors. We present a case study of a large (4,295 cc clinical target volume) retroperitoneal sarcoma treated to 50.4 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) (presurgery) using a course of photons and protons to the clinical target volume and a course of protons to the gross target volume. Results: We describe our system and present the dosimetry for all courses and provide an interdosimetric comparison. Discussion: The use of PBS for bulky targets reduces the complexity of treatment planning and delivery compared with collimated proton fields. In addition, PBS obviates, especially for cases as presented here, the significant cost incurred in the construction of field-specific hardware. PBS offers improved dose distributions, reduced treatment time, and reduced cost of treatment.

  10. Experimental Study of Electron Beam Focusing Through Overdense Plasma Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govil, R.; Wheeler, S. J.; Leemans, W. P.

    1997-05-01

    A comprehensive experimental study of focusing of relativistic electron beams with overdense and underdense plasma lenses is being conducted at the Beam Test Facility at LBNL footnote W. Leemans et al., Proc. 1993 Part. Accel. Conf., 83 (1993).. Short (15ps rms) electron bunches, from the 50 MeV LBNL Advanced Light Source injector are transported through laser produced plasmas. The electron beam spot size and divergence at the plasma lens is adjusted using quadrupoles. The plasmas are 1-5 cm long with densities of 10^13-10^14 cm-3. By changing the laser intensity and shape, the plasma density and profile can be controlled. This allows for exploration of both the charge and current compensation regimes, by changing the ratio of the plasma wavenumber, k_p, to the electron beam size, σ_r. Experimental results on the production of plasmas through two-photon UV ionization and electron beam diagnostics have been presented earlier (R. Govil et al., Proc. 1995 Part. Accel. Conf., 776 (1995).). Here we present results from the experimentally observed plasma focusing for overdense lenses in charge and current compensation regimes. Detailed interferometric results from the production of highly overdense plasmas are also discussed.

  11. Biomechanics of Gait during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Filomena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. During pregnancy women experience several changes in the body's physiology, morphology, and hormonal system. These changes may affect the balance and body stability and can cause discomfort and pain. The adaptations of the musculoskeletal system due to morphological changes during pregnancy are not fully understood. Few studies clarify the biomechanical changes of gait that occur during pregnancy and in postpartum period. Purposes. The purpose of this review was to analyze the available evidence on the biomechanical adaptations of gait that occur throughout pregnancy and in postpartum period, specifically with regard to the temporal, spatial, kinematic, and kinetic parameters of gait. Methods. Three databases were searched and 9 studies with a follow-up design were retrieved for analysis. Results. Most studies performed temporal, spatial, and kinematic analysis. Only three studies performed kinetic analysis. Conclusion. The adaptation strategies to the anatomical and physiological changes throughout pregnancy are still unclear, particularly in a longitudinal perspective and regarding kinetic parameters. PMID:25587566

  12. Course setting and selected biomechanical variables related to injury risk in alpine ski racing: an explorative case study

    PubMed Central

    Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Schwameder, Hermann; Schiefermüller, Christian; Müller, Erich

    2012-01-01

    Background Course setting has often been discussed as a potential preventative measure in the World Cup ski-racing community. However, there is limited understanding of how it is related to injury risk. Objective This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of increased horizontal gate distance on energy-related and injury mechanism-related variables. Methods During a video-based three-dimensional (3D)-kinematic field measurement, a top world-class racer performed giant slalom runs at two course settings with different horizontal gate distances. A full-body segment model was reconstructed in 3D and selected biomechanical parameters were calculated. Results For the analysed turn, no significant differences were found in turn speed for increased horizontal gate distance. However, a large effect size was observed for speed reduction towards the end of the turn. Turn forces were by tendency higher at the beginning and significantly higher towards the end of the turn. Additionally, significant differences were found in higher inward leaning, and large effect sizes were observed for a decreased fore/aft position after gate passage. Conclusions On the basis of the data of this study, no final conclusion can be made about whether, for a section of consecutive turns, increasing horizontal gate distance is an effective tool for speed reduction. However, this study pointed out two major drawbacks of this course setting modification: (1) it may increase fatigue as a consequence of loading forces acting over a longer duration; (2) it may increase the risk of out-of-balance situations by forcing the athlete to exhaust his backward and inward leaning spectrum. PMID:22983120

  13. Simulation study of dynamic aperture with head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the calculated 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures with the proposed head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in the RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run, we are planning to introduce a DC electron beam with the same transverse profile as the proton beam to collide with the proton beam. Such a device to provide the electron beam is called an electron lens (e-lens). In this note we first present the optics and beam parameters and the tracking setup. Then we compare the calculated dynamic apertures without and with head-on beam-beam compensation. The effects of adjusted phase advances between IP8 and the center of e-lens and second order chromaticity correction are checked. In the end we will scan the proton and electron beam parameters with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  14. Fermilab Booster Transition Crossing Simulations and Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C. M.; Tan, C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Fermilab Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV at 15 Hz. In the PIP (Proton Improvement Plan) era, it is required that Booster deliver 4.2 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse to extraction. One of the obstacles for providing quality beam to the users is the longitudinal quadrupole oscillation that the beam suffers from right after transition. Although this oscillation is well taken care of with quadrupole dampers, it is important to understand the source of these oscillations in light of the PIP II requirements that require 6.5 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse at extraction. This paper explores the results from machine studies, computer simulations and solutions to prevent the quadrupole oscillations after transition.

  15. High Brightness Electron Beam Studies at the NSLS SDL

    SciTech Connect

    Qian,H.; Hidaka, Y.; Murphy, J. B.; Podobedov, B.; Seletskiy, S.; Shen, Y.; Yang, X.; Wang, X. J.; Tang, C. X.

    2009-05-04

    Experimental optimization of electron beam brightness at the NSLS SDL is reported in this paper. Using a high quantum efficiency (QE) Mg metal cathode and the S-band BNL-type RF gun, we have systematically studied electron beams transverse and longitudinal emittance. The measured thermal emittance for the Mg cathode is 0.85{+-}0.04 mm-mrad/mm, which contradicts the current thermal emittance model. For a 50 pC beam, measured normalized transverse and longitudinal RMS emittance are 0.6 mm-mrd and 5.2 ps-keV, respectively. The smallest projected transverse emittance observed for a 20 pC charge is 0.15 {+-} 0.02 mm-mrad.

  16. Spheromak Energy Transport Studies via Neutral Beam Injection

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, H S; Hill, D N; Wood, R D; Jayakumar, J; Pearlstein, L D

    2008-02-11

    Results from the SSPX spheromak experiment provide strong motivation to add neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Such auxiliary heating would significantly advance the capability to study the physics of energy transport and pressure limits for the spheromak. This LDRD project develops the physics basis for using NBI to heat spheromak plasmas in SSPX. The work encompasses three activities: (1) numerical simulation to make quantitative predictions of the effect of adding beams to SSPX, (2) using the SSPX spheromak and theory/modeling to develop potential target plasmas suitable for future application of neutral beam heating, and (3) developing diagnostics to provide the measurements needed for transport calculations. These activities are reported in several publications.

  17. Studies of polarized beam acceleration and Siberian Snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1992-12-31

    We studied depolarization mechanisms of polarized proton acceleration in high energy accelerators with snakes and found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two. Thus the available betatron tune space becomes smaller. Some constraints on polarized beam colliders were also examined.

  18. Theoretical study of longitudinal beam splitting and related phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Shih, H.J.; Kummer, M.

    1993-10-01

    A recent experiment at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) with electron cooling showed that rf phase modulation near 1:1 resonance leads to longitudinal beam splitting. Here we explain this by applying the method of averaging, a powerful tool from the study of dynamical systems, to the underlying equation of motion -- a pendulum equation with small damping and periodic forcing. The beam splitting is explained by showing that the associated Poincare map has two attracting fixed points, each with a well-defined basin of attraction. Our approach can be immediately applied to other accelerator physics problems governed by a similar equation.

  19. Theoretical study of longitudinal beam splitting and related phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.A.; Shih, H. ); Kummer, M. )

    1994-03-01

    A recent experiment at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility with electron cooling showed that rf phase modulation near the 1:1 resonance leads to longitudinal beam splitting. Here we explain this by applying the method of averaging, a powerful tool from the study of dynamical systems, to the underlying equation of motion---a pendulum equation with small damping and periodic forcing. The beam splitting is explained by showing that the associated Poincare map has two attracting fixed points, each with a well-defined basin of attraction. Our approach can be immediately applied to other accelerator-physics problems governed by a similar equation.

  20. Effectiveness of Adjustable Cervical Orthoses and Modular Cervical Thoracic Orthoses in Restricting Neck Motion: A Comparative In vivo Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fan

    2015-10-01

    In vivo biomechanical study. To compare the effectiveness of adjustable cervical orthoses (COs) and modular cervical thoracic orthoses (CTOs) with standard devices in restricting neck motion in all 3 anatomical planes. No literature is available regarding the effectiveness of adjustable COs and modular CTOs in restricting neck motion, and existing in vivo evaluation methodologies lack consistency and objectivity. The effectiveness of adjustable COs (Vista collar and Vista multipost collar) and modular CTOs (Vista TS, Vista TS with multipost, and Vista TS4 with multipost) in comparison with standard devices (Aspen collar [AC] and Aspen cervical thoracic orthosis) in restricting neck motion across 3 anatomical planes was studied in vivo in 27 healthy participants across prescribed loading levels ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 N·m. Neck range of motion allowed was compared between devices using Tukey post hoc test. The compliance of devices in restricting flexion and extension was obtained via a linear regression model. When compared with modular CTOs, Aspen CTO was significantly more effective at motion restriction in both sagittal and frontal planes under loading level higher than 1.5 N·m. Modular CTOs outperformed adjustable COs in most of the cases but were fairly comparable with the standard CO (i.e., AC). Adjustable COs were just as effective as standard COs. The compliances of devices in restricting neck flexion ranked in ascending order were 0.83 (Aspen CTO), 1.53 (Vista TS with multipost), 1.60 (Vista TS4 with multipost), 1.77 (Vista multipost collar), 1.78 (AC), 1.99 (Vista TS), and 2.43 (Vista Collar) degrees per N·m. Overall, modular CTOs had poorer performance in neck restriction than their standard counterpart (ACTO), whereas adjustable COs showed overall comparable performance to their standard counterpart (AC). The outcomes may assist clinicians in selecting appropriate devices. N/A.

  1. Effect of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells and BMP12 on Intrasynovial Tendon Repair: A Biomechanical, Biochemical, and Proteomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Gelberman, Richard H.; Shen, Hua; Kormpakis, Ioannis; Rothrauff, Benjamin; Yang, Guang; Tuan, Rocky S.; Xia, Younan; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly; Silva, Matthew J.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The outcomes of flexor tendon repair are highly variable. As recent efforts to improve healing have demonstrated promise for growth factor- and cell-based therapies, the objective of the current study was to enhance repair via application of autologous adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) and the tenogenic growth factor bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 12. Controlled delivery of cells and growth factor was achieved in a clinically relevant canine model using a nanofiber/fibrin-based scaffold. Control groups consisted of repair-only (no scaffold) and acellular scaffold. Repairs were evaluated after 28 days of healing using biomechanical, biochemical, and proteomics analyses. Range of motion was reduced in the groups that received scaffolds compared to normal. There was no effect of ASC+BMP12 treatment for range of motion or tensile properties outcomes versus repair-only. Biochemical assays demonstrated increased DNA, glycosaminoglycans, and crosslink concentration in all repair groups compared to normal, but no effect of ASC+BMP12. Total collagen was significantly decreased in the acellular scaffold group compared to normal and significantly increased in the ASC+BMP12 group compared to the acellular scaffold group. Proteomics analysis comparing healing tendons to uninjured tendons revealed significant increases in proteins associated with inflammation, stress response, and matrix degradation. Treatment with ASC+BMP12 amplified these unfavorable changes. In summary, the treatment approach used in this study induced a negative inflammatory reaction at the repair site leading to poor healing. Future approaches should consider cell and growth factor delivery methods that do not incite negative local reactions. PMID:26445383

  2. Propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bley, Andre Serra; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF) joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT), which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM), gluteus medius (GMed), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress.

  3. Radiofrequency-targeted vertebral augmentation versus traditional balloon kyphoplasty: radiographic and morphologic outcomes of an ex vivo biomechanical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Brian E; Kohm, Andrew C; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E; Poser, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Traditional balloon kyphoplasty (BK) is a common treatment for symptomatic vertebral compression fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare a novel vertebral augmentation technique, radiofrequency-targeted vertebral augmentation (RF-TVA), to BK for restoration of vertebral height, cavity creation, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) delivery and interdigitation into the surrounding trabeculae. Methods This ex vivo biomechanical pilot study utilized 16 osteoporotic cadaveric vertebral bodies in a standardized fracture model to compare unipedicular RF-TVA (n = 8) to bipedicular BK (n = 8). Four specimens from each group were tested in loaded and unloaded conditions. All specimens were imaged, assessed for height restoration, and sectioned to observe PMMA distribution. A subset of specimens underwent computed tomography scanning to assess cavity creation and trabecular architecture prior to cement delivery. Results Anterior height restoration was greater with RF-TVA (median: 84%, interquartile range: 62%–95%) compared to BK (median: 69%, interquartile range: 60%–81%), although the difference did not achieve statistical significance (P = 0.16). Anterior height restoration was numerically greater under loaded (median: 70% versus 66%) and unloaded (median: 94% versus 77%) conditions with RF-TVA versus BK. RF-TVA produced more discrete cavities and less native trabecular destruction compared to marked trabecular destruction observed with BK. RF-TVA consistently showed a well-identified focal area of PMMA with an extensive peripheral zone of PMMA interdigitation, providing mechanical interlock into the adjacent intact trabecular matrix. In contrast, BK yielded little evidence of PMMA interdigitation beyond the boundaries created by the balloon tamp due to the crushed trabecular bone peripherally. Conclusion RF-TVA achieves favorable vertebral height restoration with targeted PMMA delivery and less trabecular destruction compared to BK. RF-TVA has

  4. Molecular Beam Studies of Low Energy Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-31

    COMPLETING PORN . REPORT NUMBER 1 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. S. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER A D A Oaq J- 4. TITLE (And Subtitle) . TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED...Gatlinburg, Tenn . in 1981. 2+ c) Studies were made of the charge transfer reaction Ar + Ar 4 2+ Ar + Ar at relative energies from 2 to 1000 eV. Reasons for

  5. Nuclear Structure Studies with Polarized Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, K.; Uchida, M.; Inoue, T.; Hatakeyama, M.; Kagami, S.; Hasama, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Ueno, H.; Nagatomo, T.; Yoshimi, A.; Kameda, D.; Ishihara, M.; Shimada, K.; Nagae, D.; Murata, J.; Narita, K.; Kawamura, H.

    2009-08-04

    Nuclear moment studies on nuclei far from the beta-stability line, performed by taking advantage of the projectile fragmentation reaction, are reviewed. A method to produce spin polarization/alignment in the projectile fragments was developed and utilized for the beta-NMR/NQR measurements. Several new findings in nuclear structure physics were obtained from the nuclear moment experiments done with these techniques.

  6. Biomechanical comparison of multilevel lateral interbody fusion with and without supplementary instrumentation: a three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xilin; Ma, Jun; Park, Paul; Huang, Xiaodong; Xie, Ning; Ye, Xiaojian

    2017-02-02

    group by 52.7, 63.8, and 54.2% in flexion, 22.3, 40.1, and 31.4% in extension, 170.2, 175.1, and 134.0% in lateral bending, and 90.7, 45.5, and 30.0% in axial rotation, respectively. The stresses tended to be more concentrated at the periphery of the endplates. SLC and LPC provided inadequate ROM restriction for the multilevel LLIF constructs, whereas lateral cages with BPSR or UPSR fixation provided favorable biomechanical stability. Moreover, SLC generated significantly higher endplate stress compared with supplemental instrumentation, which may have increased the risk of cage subsidence. Further biomechanical and clinical studies are required to validate our FEA findings.

  7. Commisioning of the second Tevatron electron lens and beam study results

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Fellenz, B.; Hively, R.; Kuznetsov, G.; Olson, M.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    In the framework of Fermilab's Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project, the 2nd Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL2) was installed in the Tevatron during Spring 2006 shutdown. It was successfully commissioned and a series of beam studies has been carried out in single bunch and all-bunch modes. The paper describes TEL2 commissioning and beam studies results.

  8. Cluster Beam Studies of Metal Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-21

    begun the first high-quality experiments on reactions of clean boron surfaces. This work is important because it directly measures the elementary...studies. (See Fig. 1 for a schematic diagram of one of the instruments). * Measurements of reaction cross sections over a wide collision energy range... Measurement of exciton structure near the boron K-edge. * High level ab iniflo calculation of boron duster ion structures and properties to compliment

  9. Biomechanical assessment of composite versus metallic intramedullary nailing system in femoral shaft fractures: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Samiezadeh, Saeid; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2014-08-01

    Intramedullary nails are the primary choice for treating long bone fractures. However, complications following nail surgery including non-union, delayed union, and fracture of the bone or the implant still exist. Reducing nail stiffness while still maintaining sufficient stability seems to be the ideal solution to overcome the abovementioned complications. In this study, a new hybrid concept for nails made of carbon fibers/flax/epoxy was developed in order to reduce stress shielding. The mechanical performance of this new implant in terms of fracture stability and load sharing was assessed using a comprehensive non-linear FE model. This model considers several mechanical factors in nine fracture configurations at immediately post-operative, and in the healed bone stages. Post-operative results showed that the hybrid composite nail increases the average normal force at the fracture site by 319.23N (P<0.05), and the mean stress in the vicinity of fracture by 2.11MPa (P<0.05) at 45% gait cycle, while only 0.33mm and 0.39mm (P<0.05) increases in the fracture opening and the fragments' shear movement were observed. The healed bone results revealed that implantation of the titanium nail caused 20.2% reduction in bone stiffness, while the composite nail lowered the stiffness by 11.8% as compared to an intact femur. Our results suggest that the composite nail can provide a preferred mechanical environment for healing, particularly in transverse shaft fractures. This may help bioengineers better understand the biomechanics of fracture healing, and aid in the design of effective implants. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Histological and biomechanical analysis of porous additive manufactured implants made by direct metal laser sintering: a pilot study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Stübinger, Stefan; Mosch, Isabel; Robotti, Pierfrancesco; Sidler, Michéle; Klein, Karina; Ferguson, Stephen J; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2013-10-01

    It was the aim of this study to analyze osseointegrative properties of porous additive manufactured titanium implants made by direct metal laser sintering in a sheep model after an implantation period of 2 and 8 weeks. Three different types of implants were placed in the pelvis of six sheep. In each sheep were placed three standard machined (M), three sandblasted and etched (SE), and three porous additive manufactured (AM) implants. Of these three implants (one per type) were examined histologically and six implants were tested biomechanically. Additionally a semiquantitative histomorphometrical and qualitative fluorescent microscopic analysis were performed. After 2 and 8 weeks bone-to-implant-contact (BIC) values of the AM surface (2w: 20.49% ± 5.18%; 8w: 43.91% ± 9.69%) revealed no statistical significant differences in comparison to the M (2w: 20.33% ± 11.50%; 8w: 25.33% ± 4.61%) and SE (2w: 43.67 ± 12.22%; 8w: 53.33 ± 8.96%) surfaces. AM surface showed the highest increase of the BIC between the two observation time points. Considering the same implantation period histomorphometry and fluorescent labelling disclosed no significant differences in the bone surrounding the three implants groups. In contrast Removal-torque-test showed a significant improve in fixation strength (P ≤ 0.001) for the AM (1891.82 ± 308, 44 Nmm) surface after eight weeks in comparison to the M (198.93±88,04 Nmm) and SE (730.08 ± 151,89 Nmm) surfaces. All three surfaces (M, SE, and AM) showed sound osseointegration. AM implants may offer a possible treatment option in clinics for patients with compromised bone situations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company.

  11. Torsional Fracture of the Humerus after Subpectoral Biceps Tenodesis with an Interference Screw: A Biomechanical Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Beason, David P; Shah, Jay P; Duckett, James W; Jost, Patrick W; Fleisig, Glenn S; Cain, E Lyle

    2015-11-01

    Humeral fracture following subpectoral biceps tenodesis has been previously reported; however, there are no published biomechanical studies reporting the resulting torsional strength of the humerus. Our purpose was to determine if there is an increased risk of humerus fracture after subpectoral biceps tenodesis with an interference screw and to determine if screw size is also a factor. We hypothesized that limbs receiving the procedure would have reduced failure torque and rotation under external rotation compared to untreated controls and that the larger screw size would result in inferior mechanical properties compared to the smaller. Twenty matched pairs of embalmed cadaveric humeri were subjected to subpectoral biceps tenodesis using either a 6.25 or 8.0mm interference screw, with the untreated contralateral limb serving as a control. Each humerus was mechanically tested in torsional external rotation to failure. Maximum torque and rotation to failure were reduced in the tenodesis group compared to controls; however, there was no difference between screw sizes. When both screw sizes were combined into a single group, paired t-tests also showed similar differences. Based on our experiment, there is an increased risk for humerus spiral fracture when subjected to torsional external rotation after subpectoral biceps tenodesis with an interference screw compared to an intact humerus; however, there is not a significant difference between a 6.25mm and 8.0mm screw. Surgeons may elect to use alternative fixation methods in patients at high risk (e.g., overhead throwing athletes, etc.) for torsional loads and fracture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-precision satellite positioning system as a new tool to study the biomechanics of human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Terrier, P; Ladetto, Q; Merminod, B; Schutz, Y

    2000-12-01

    New Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers allow now to measure a location on earth at high frequency (5Hz) with a centimetric precision using phase differential positioning method. We studied whether such technique was accurate enough to retrieve basic parameters of human locomotion. Eight subjects walked on an athletics track at four different imposed step frequencies (70-130steps/min) plus a run at free pace. Differential carrier phase localization between a fixed base station and the mobile antenna mounted on the walking person was calculated. In parallel, a triaxial accelerometer, attached to the low back, recorded body accelerations. The different parameters were averaged for 150 consecutive steps of each run for each subject (total of 6000 steps analyzed). We observed a perfect correlation between average step duration measured by accelerometer and by GPS (r=0.9998, N=40). Two important parameters for the calculation of the external work of walking were also analyzed, namely the vertical lift of the trunk and the velocity variation per step. For an average walking speed of 4.0km/h, average vertical lift and velocity variation were, respectively, 4.8cm and 0.60km/h. The average intra-individual step-to-step variability at a constant speed, which includes GPS errors and the biological gait style variation, were found to be 24. 5% (coefficient of variation) for vertical lift and 44.5% for velocity variation. It is concluded that GPS technique can provide useful biomechanical parameters for the analysis of an unlimited number of strides in an unconstrained free-living environment.

  13. Biomechanical comparison of the track start and the modified one-handed track start in competitive swimming: an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, H; Scurr, J; Hencken, C; Wood, L; Graham-Smith, P

    2008-11-01

    This study compared the conventional track and a new one-handed track start in elite age group swimmers to determine if the new technique had biomechanical implications on dive performance. Five male and seven female GB national qualifiers participated (mean +/- SD: age 16.7 +/- 1.9 years, stretched stature 1.76 +/- 0.8 m, body mass 67.4 +/- 7.9 kg) and were assigned to a control group (n = 6) or an intervention group (n = 6) that learned the new one handed dive technique. All swimmers underwent a 4-week intervention comprising 12 +/- 3 thirty-minute training sessions. Video cameras synchronized with an audible signal and timing suite captured temporal and kinematic data. A portable force plate and load cell handrail mounted to a swim starting block collected force data over 3 trials of each technique. A MANCOVA identified Block Time (BT), Flight Time (FT), Peak Horizontal Force of the lower limbs (PHF) and Horizontal Velocity at Take-off (Vx) as covariates. During the 10-m swim trial, significant differences were found in Time to 10 m (TT10m), Total Time (TT), Peak Vertical Force (PVF), Flight Distance (FD), and Horizontal Velocity at Take-off (Vx) (p < .05). Results indicated that the conventional track start method was faster over 10 m, and therefore may be seen as a superior start after a short intervention. During training, swimmers and coaches should focus on the most statistically significant dive performance variables: peak horizontal force and velocity at take-off, block and flight time.

  14. Corneal biomechanics - a review.

    PubMed

    Kling, Sabine; Hafezi, Farhad

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the interest in corneal biomechanics has strongly increased. The material properties of the cornea determine its shape and therefore play an important role in corneal ectasia and related pathologies. This review addresses the molecular origin of biomechanical properties, models for their description, methods for their characterisation, techniques for their modification, and computational simulation approaches. Recent research has focused on developing non-contact techniques to measure the biomechanical properties in vivo, on determining structural and molecular abnormalities in pathological corneas, on developing and optimising techniques to reinforce the corneal tissue and on the computational simulation of surgical interventions. A better understanding of corneal biomechanics will help to improve current refractive surgeries, allow an earlier diagnosis of ectatic disorders and a better quantification of treatments aiming at reinforcing the corneal tissue. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  15. Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Tekla S.

    1991-01-01

    The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

  16. Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Tekla S.

    1991-01-01

    The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

  17. Parametric study of beam refraction problems across laser anemometer windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experimenter is often required to view flows through a window with a different index of refraction than either the medium being observed or the medium that the laser anemometer is immersed in. The refraction that occurs at the window surfaces may lead to undesirable changes in probe volume position or beam crossing angle and can lead to partial or complete beam uncrossing. This report describes the results of a parametric study of this problem using a ray tracing technique to predict these changes. The windows studied were a flat plate and a simple cyclinder. For the flat-plate study: (1) surface thickness, (2) beam crossing angle, (3) bisecting line - surface normal angle, and (4) incoming beam plane surface orientation were varied. For the cylindrical window additional parameters were also varied: (1) probe volume immersion, (2) probe volume off-radial position, and (3) probe volume position out of the R-theta plane of the lens. A number of empirical correlations were deduced to aid the interested reader in determining the movement, uncrossing, and change in crossing angle for a particular situation.

  18. Beam Dynamics Studies on the ISAC RFQ at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koscielniak, S.; Laxdal, R. E.; Lee, R.; Root, L.

    1997-05-01

    An 8 m long split-ring RFQ linac is being constructed at TRIUMF as part of the ISAC radioactive beam project. The RFQ is designed to accelerate unstable nuclei with A/q >= 1/30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u. Initially a 2.8 m long section of the RFQ is being constructed for beam tests to 53 keV/u. Several unusual beam dynamics studies have been pursued during the latter stages of the accelerator design. To furnish engineering alignment tolerances, particle tracking in the 12-term potential was performed to estimate the RFQ performance (transmission and emittance) with respect to various types of vane displacement errors. The results compare favorably with a simple analytical model. In order to explore fringe field effects, particle tracking studies through computed three-dimensional fields at the RFQ entrance and exit were made to optimize the radial matching section to the LEBT optics, and to appraise the value of a transition cell(Crandall: Proc. Linac '94, pp.227-229.) in mitigating exit-energy variability. The commissioning strategy and testing procedure developed for the initial 2.8 m section of the RFQ have been evaluated by extensive simulation studies. In this paper we describe the methods and results of the beam dynamics simulations and summarize final specifications for the RFQ.

  19. Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Aronson, A.

    2011-03-01

    The primary advantages that accelerator driven systems have over critical reactors are: (1) Greater flexibility regarding the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the blanket surrounding the target, and (2) Potentially enhanced safety brought about by operating at a sufficiently low value of the multiplication factor to preclude reactivity induced events. The control of the power production can be achieved by vary the accelerator beam current. Furthermore, once the beam is shut off the system shuts down. The primary difference between the operation of an accelerator driven system and a critical system is the issue of beam interruptions of the accelerator. These beam interruptions impose thermo-mechanical loads on the fuel and mechanical components not found in critical systems. Studies have been performed to estimate an acceptable number of trips, and the value is significantly less stringent than had been previously estimated. The number of acceptable beam interruptions is a function of the length of the interruption and the mission of the system. Thus, for demonstration type systems and interruption durations of 1sec < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins 2500/yr and 50/yr are deemed acceptable. However, for industrial scale power generation without energy storage type systems and interruption durations of t < 1sec., 1sec < t < 10secs., 10secs < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins, the acceptable number of interruptions are 25000, 2500, 250, and 3 respectively. However, it has also been concluded that further development is required to reduce the number of trips. It is with this in mind that the following study was undertaken. The primary focus of this study will be the merit of a multi-beam target system, which allows for multiple spallation sources within the target/blanket assembly. In this manner it is possible to ameliorate the effects of sudden accelerator beam interruption on the surrounding reactor, since the remaining beams will still

  20. Theoretical studies of a molecular beam generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John

    1994-01-01

    At present no adequate computer code exists for predicting the effects of thermal nonequilibrium on the flow quality of a converging-diverging N2 nozzle. It is the purpose of this research to develop such a code and then perform parametric studies to determine the effects of intermolecular forces (high gas pressure) and thermal nonequilibrium (the splitting of temperature into a vibrational and rotational-translational excitation) upon the flow quality. The two models to be compared are given. Appendix A contains nomenclature and additional relationships.

  1. Biomechanics and tennis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B

    2006-05-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause.

  2. Biomechanics and tennis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, B

    2006-01-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause. PMID:16632567

  3. Non Linear Beam Dynamics Studies at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Terebilo, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Cornacchia, M.; Corbett, J.; Martin, D.; /SLAC

    2011-09-12

    The frequency map analysis of a Hamiltonian system recently introduced to accelerators physics in combination with turn-by-turn phase space measurements opens new experimental opportunities for studying non linear dynamic in storage rings. In this paper we report on the experimental program at SPEAR having the goal of measuring the frequency map of the machine. In this paper we discuss the accuracy of the instantaneous tune extraction from experimental data and demonstrate the possibility of the frequency map measurement. The instantaneous tune extraction technique can be applied to experimental tracking data with reasonable accuracy. Frequency map can be experimentally determined using the existing turn-by-turn phase space measurement techniques and NAFF instantaneous tune extraction.

  4. Comparison of the biomechanical effect of pedicle-based dynamic stabilization: a study using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Young Eun; Moon, Kyung Yun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, nonfusion pedicle-based dynamic stabilization systems (PBDSs) have been developed and used in the management of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Still effects on spinal kinematics and clinical effects are controversial. Little biomechanical information exists for providing biomechanical characteristics of pedicle-based dynamic stabilization according to the PBDS design before clinical implementation. To investigate the effects of implanting PBDSs into the spinal functional unit and elucidate the differences in biomechanical characteristics according to different materials and design. The biomechanical effects of implantation of PBDS were investigated using the nonlinear three-dimensional finite element model of L4-L5. An already validated three-dimensional, intact osteoligamentous L4-L5 finite element model was modified to incorporate the insertion of pedicle screws. The implanted models were constructed after modifying the intact model to simulate postoperative changes using four different fixation systems. Four models instrumented with PBDS (Dynesys, NFlex, and polyetheretherketone [PEEK]) and rigid fixation systems (conventional titanium rod) were developed for comparison. The instrumented models were compared with those of the intact and rigid fixation model. Range of motion (ROM) in three motion planes, center of rotation (COR), force on the facet joint, and von Mises stress distribution on the vertebral body and implants with flexion-extension were compared among the models. Simulated results demonstrated that implanted segments with PBDSs have limited ROM when compared with the intact spine. Flexion motion was the most limited, and axial rotation was the least limited, after device implantation. Among the PBDS selected in this analysis, the NFlex system had the closest instantaneous COR compared with the intact model and a higher ROM compared with other PBDS. Contact force on the facet joint in extension increased with an increase of moment in

  5. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, Douglas Robert

    1993-11-01

    The photodissociation of free radicals is studied in order to characterize the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a novel method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with a highly complementary form of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopy of transitions to dissociative states is determined by monitoring the total photofragment yield as a function of dissociation photon energy. Branching ratios to various product channels, internal energy distributions of the fragments, bond dissociation energies, and the translational energy-dependent photofragment recoil angular distributions are then determined at selected excitation energies. A detailed picture of the dissociation dynamics can then be formulated, allowing insight concerning the interactions of potential energy surfaces involved in the dissociation. After an introduction to the concepts and techniques mentioned above, the experimental apparatus used in these experiments is described in detail. The basis and methods used in the treatment of data, especially in the dissociation dynamics experiments, are then put forward.

  6. American Society of Biomechanics Clinical Biomechanics Award 2013: tibiofemoral contact location changes associated with lateral heel wedging--a weight bearing MRI study.

    PubMed

    Barrance, Peter J; Gade, Venkata; Allen, Jerome; Cole, Jeffrey L

    2014-11-01

    Vertically open magnetic resonance imaging permits study of knee joint contact during weight bearing. Lateral wedging is a low cost intervention for knee osteoarthritis that may influence load distribution and contact. This study assessed the ability of feedback-assisted weight bearing magnetic resonance imaging to detect changes in tibiofemoral contact associated with lateral wedging. One knee in each of fourteen subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis was studied, without specification of compartmental involvement. Knees were imaged during upright standing and at 20° knee flexion. Bilateral external heel wedges were used to provide non-wedged and 5° lateral wedging conditions. Computer modeling was used to measure the medial and lateral compartment contact patch center coordinates on the tibial plateau and the respective contact areas. Lateral heel wedging in flexion was associated with a significant anterior shift of the contact patch of the lateral femoral condyle. Changes with knee flexion were similar to previous reports: both medial and lateral contact centers moved posteriorly with flexion, and lateral condyle contact also moved laterally. Lateral condyle contact area significantly reduced with flexion, while lateral wedging did not significantly affect contact areas. In symptomatic knee osteoarthritis patients standing in knee flexion, weight bearing magnetic resonance imaging recorded an anterior shift of lateral condyle contact in response to lateral heel wedging. Future studies may investigate lateral wedging effects more specifically in candidates for this clinical intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Study to Determine the Biomechanics of Running in Skilled Trackmen. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the manner in which selected mechanical elements of the running stride are altered with accompanying variations in the speed of running and the slope upon which running occurs. Subjects, 16 intercollegiate runners, were marked at reference points of the body pertinent to this study and filmed twice…

  8. A simulation study of radial expansion of an electron beam injected into an ionospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, J.; Lin, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from a finite equipotential conductor into an ionospheric plasma have been simulated using a two-dimensional electrostatic particle code. The purpose of the study is to survey the simulation parameters for understanding the dependence of beam radius on physical variables. The conductor is charged to a high potential when the background plasma density is less than the beam density. Beam electrons attracted by the charged conductor are decelerated to zero velocity near the stagnation point, which is at a few Debye lengths from the conductor. The simulations suggest that the beam electrons at the stagnation point receive a large transverse kick and the beam expands radially thereafter. The buildup of beam electrons at the stagnation point produces a large electrostatic force responsible for the transverse kick. However, for the weak charging cases where the background plasma density is larger than the beam density, the radial expansion mechanism is different; the beam plasma instability is found to be responsible for the radial expansion. The simulations show that the electron beam radius for high spacecraft charging cases is of the order of the beam gyroradius, defined as the beam velocity divided by the gyrofrequency. In the weak charging cases, the beam radius is only a fraction of the beam gyroradius. The parameter survey indicates that the beam radius increases with beam density and decreases with magnetic field and beam velocity. The beam radius normalized by the beam gyroradius is found to scale according to the ratio of the beam electron Debye length to the ambient electron Debye length. The parameter dependence deduced would be useful for interpreting the beam radius and beam density of electron beam injection experiments conducted from rockets and the space shuttle.

  9. Recent observations of beam plasma interactions in the ionosphere and a comparison with laboratory studies of the beam plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Monson, S. J.; Holzworth, R. H.; Whalen, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results from an electron beam injection rocket flight (27:010 AE) launched into an active aurora are summarized. The rocket carried an accelerator which injected programmed electron beams of less than 100 ma at 2 and 4 kV into the ionospheric plasma over the altitude range 120-240 km. A major objective of the experiment was the study of beam-plasma interactions and the possible identification of the ignition of the beam-plasma discharge (BPD) which had been intensively studied in the laboratory. A qualitative assessment of the data indicates that BPD ignition was produced by both 10 ma and Im beams at 2 and 4 kV. Many of the observed characteristics are similar to the BPD characteristics observed in the laboratory.

  10. Recent observations of beam plasma interactions in the ionosphere and a comparison with laboratory studies of the beam plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Monson, S. J.; Holzworth, R. H.; Whalen, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results from an electron beam injection rocket flight (27:010 AE) launched into an active aurora are summarized. The rocket carried an accelerator which injected programmed electron beams of less than 100 ma at 2 and 4 kV into the ionospheric plasma over the altitude range 120-240 km. A major objective of the experiment was the study of beam-plasma interactions and the possible identification of the ignition of the beam-plasma discharge (BPD) which had been intensively studied in the laboratory. A qualitative assessment of the data indicates that BPD ignition was produced by both 10 ma and Im beams at 2 and 4 kV. Many of the observed characteristics are similar to the BPD characteristics observed in the laboratory.

  11. A study on beam homogeneity for a Siemens Primus linac.

    PubMed

    Cutanda Henriquez, F; Vargas-Castrillón, S T

    2007-06-01

    Asymmetric offset fields are an important tool for radiotherapy and their suitability for treatment should be assessed. Dose homogeneity for highly asymmetric fields has been studied for a Siemens PRIMUS clinical linear accelerator. Profiles and absolute dose have been measured in fields with two jaws at maximal position (20 cm) and the other two at maximal overtravel (10 cm), corresponding to 10 cm x 10 cm fields with extreme offset. Measured profiles have a marked decreasing gradient towards the beam edge, making these fields unsuitable for treatments. The flattening filter radius is smaller than the primary collimator aperture, and this creates beam inhomogeneities that affect large fields in areas far from the collimator axis, and asymmetric fields with large offset. The results presented assess the effect that the design of the primary collimator and flattening filter assembly has on beam homogeneity. This can have clinical consequences for treatments involving fields that include these inhomogeneous areas. Comparison with calculations from a treatment planning system, Philips Pinnacle v6.3, which computes under the hypotheses of a uniformly flattened beam, results in severe discrepancies.

  12. Experimental Studies of Electrons in a Heavy-Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Seidl, P A; Bieniosek, F M; Cohen, R H; Faltens, A; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S M; Prost, L

    2004-06-23

    Electron cloud effects, ECEs, are normally a problem only in ring accelerators. However, heavy-ion induction linacs for inertial fusion energy have an economic incentive to fit beam tubes tightly to intense beams. This places them at risk from electron clouds produced by emission of electrons and gas from walls. We have measured electron and gas emission from 1 MeV K{sup +} impact on surfaces near grazing incidence on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. Electron emission coefficients reach *values of 130, whereas gas desorption coefficients are near 10{sup 4}. Mitigation techniques are being studied: A bead-blasted rough surface reduces electron emission by a factor of 10 and gas desorption by a factor of 2. Diagnostics are installed on HCX, between and within quadrupole magnets, to measure the beam halo loss, net charge and expelled ions, from which we infer gas density, electron trapping, and the effects of mitigation techniques. Here we discuss a new diagnostic technique that measures gas pressure and electron ionization rates within quadrupole magnets during the beam transit.

  13. Study of the neutron beam line shield design for JSNS.

    PubMed

    Kawai, M; Saito, K; Sanami, T; Nakao, N; Maekawa, F

    2005-01-01

    The JSNS, a spallation neutron source of J-PARC (JAERI-KEK Joint Project of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator) has 23 neutron beam lines. In the present study, a database was formulated for an optimum shielding design using the MCNP-X code. The calculations involved two steps. In the first step, the neutron distributions were created in the typical neutron beam line with a model that included the spallation neutron source target. The neutron currents evaluated flowed from the duct into the duct wall which was the boundary source for the bulk shield surrounding the beam line. In the second step, bulk-shield calculations were performed for the various shielding materials (iron, concrete, heavy concrete and so on) used and their composites up to thicknesses of 3 m. The results were compared with each other. Composite material shields of iron and such hydrogeneous materials as polyethylene or concrete were more effective. A typical design was prepared for a beam line within 25 m distance from a moderator, as a sample.

  14. Beam dynamics experiments to study the suppression of transverse instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, T.; Lidia, S.

    2003-03-01

    Two-beam accelerators based upon relativistic klystron’s (RK’s) have been proposed as power sources for future generation linear electron-positron colliders. These drivers are susceptible to several transverse beam breakup (BBU) instabilities. An experiment to study a particular technique (the “betatron node scheme”) for ameliorating the high-frequency BBU has been performed at LBNL on a 1MeV, 500A induction accelerator beam. The results of this experiment are particularly important for RK, but apply to any system where the betatron phase advance between perturbing structures is an integral multiple of 180°. This phase advance is beneficial in linear accelerators as the instability growth changes from exponential to linear. In the experiment described below, the beam is contained in a solenoidal focusing channel, rf cavities are spaced every 60cm, and growth in the transverse motion was measured as a function of phase advance. Details of the experiment and results are presented.

  15. Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

  16. Theoretical study of a cold-atom beam splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Gaaloul, Naceur; Suzor-Weiner, Annick; Charron, Eric; Pruvost, Laurence; Telmini, Mourad

    2006-08-15

    A theoretical model is presented for the study of the dynamics of a cold atomic cloud falling in the gravity field in the presence of two crossing dipole guides. The cloud is split between the two branches of this laser guide, and we compare experimental measurements of the splitting efficiency with semiclassical simulations. We then explore the possibilities of optimization of this beam splitter. Our numerical study also gives access to detailed information, such as the atom temperature after the splitting.

  17. Study on Flexural Behaviour of Ternary Blended Reinforced Self Compacting Concrete Beam with Conventional RCC Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshaline Seles, M.; Suryanarayanan, R.; Vivek, S. S.; Dhinakaran, G.

    2017-07-01

    The conventional concrete when used for structures having dense congested reinforcement, the problems such as external compaction and vibration needs special attention. In such case, the self compacting concrete (SCC) which has the properties like flow ability, passing and filling ability would be an obvious answer. All those SCC flow behavior was governed by EFNARC specifications. In present study, the combination type of SCC was prepared by replacing cement with silica fume (SF) and metakaolin (MK) along with optimum dosages of chemical admixtures. From the fresh property test, cube compressive strength and cylinder split tensile strength, optimum ternary mix was obtained. In order to study the flexural behavior, the optimum ternary mix was taken in which beam specimens of size 1200 mm x 100 mm x 200 mm was designed as singly reinforced section according to IS: 456-2000, Limit state method. Finally the comparative experimental analysis was made between conventional RCC and SCC beams of same grade in terms of flexural strength namely yield load & ultimate load, load- deflection curve, crack size and pattern respectively.

  18. The effect of a cadence retraining protocol on running biomechanics and efficiency: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hafer, Jocelyn F; Brown, Allison M; deMille, Polly; Hillstrom, Howard J; Garber, Carol Ewing

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented the association between mechanical deviations from normal and the presence or risk of injury. Some runners attempt to change mechanics by increasing running cadence. Previous work documented that increasing running cadence reduces deviations in mechanics tied to injury. The long-term effect of a cadence retraining intervention on running mechanics and energy expenditure is unknown. This study aimed to determine if increasing running cadence by 10% decreases running efficiency and changes kinematics and kinetics to make them less similar to those associated with injury. Additionally, this study aimed to determine if, after 6 weeks of cadence retraining, there would be carryover in kinematic and kinetic changes from an increased cadence state to a runner's preferred running cadence without decreased running efficiency. We measured oxygen uptake, kinematic and kinetic data on six uninjured participants before and after a 6-week intervention. Increasing cadence did not result in decreased running efficiency but did result in decreases in stride length, hip adduction angle and hip abductor moment. Carryover was observed in runners' post-intervention preferred running form as decreased hip adduction angle and vertical loading rate.

  19. IMMEDIATE AND LATE EFFECT OF SUTURES IN EXTRASYNOVIAL TENDONS: BIOMECHANICAL STUDY IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Sardenberg, Trajano; Muller, Sérgio Swain; Garms, Luciana Zauhy; Miduati, Francini Belluci

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on the mechanical properties of rats’ calcaneus tendons, of repair arrangements using suture material in the absence of any healing process. Method: Twelve male Wistar rats were used. They were subjected to placement of a modified Kessler suture stitch in the calcaneus tendon. The sacrifices were performed immediately after and six weeks after the operation. The mechanical properties studied were maximum load, tension in the maximum load and module of elasticity. The contralateral tendon was used as a control. Results: The statistical analysis showed that for the times studied, the values for mechanical properties did not present any significant differences. In relation to the control, i.e. the contralateral tendon without a suture, the results demonstrated that, six weeks after the operation, the values for the modulus of elasticity were lower, whereas there were no significant variations in maximum load or tension at maximum load. Conclusion: Placement of suture material on an extrasynovial tendon without lesions decreased the modulus of elasticity, but it did not interfere with the maximum load or tension at maximum load, six weeks after the operation. PMID:27047823

  20. Effect of an artificial disc on lumbar spine biomechanics: a probabilistic finite element study.

    PubMed

    Rohlmann, Antonius; Mann, Anke; Zander, Thomas; Bergmann, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The effects of different parameters on the mechanical behaviour of the lumbar spine were in most cases determined deterministically with only one uncertain parameter varied at a time while the others were kept fixed. Thus most parameter combinations were disregarded. The aim of the study was to determine in a probabilistic finite element study how intervertebral rotation, intradiscal pressure, and contact force in the facet joints are affected by the input parameters implant position, implant ball radius, presence of scar tissue, and gap size in the facet joints. An osseoligamentous finite element model of the lumbar spine ranging from L3 vertebra to L5/S1 intervertebral disc was used. An artificial disc with a fixed center of rotation was inserted at level L4/L5. The model was loaded with pure moments of 7.5 Nm to simulate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. In a probabilistic study the implant position in anterior-posterior (ap) and in lateral direction, the radius of the implant ball, and the gap size of the facet joint were varied. After implanting an artificial disc, scar tissue may develop, replacing the anterior longitudinal ligament. Thus presence and absence of scar tissue were also simulated. For each loading case studied, intervertebral rotations, intradiscal pressures and contact forces in the facet joints were calculated for 1,000 randomized input parameter combinations in order to determine the probable range of these output parameters. Intervertebral rotation at implant level varies strongly for different combinations of the input parameters. It is mainly affected by gap size, ap-position and implant ball radius for flexion, by scar tissue and implant ball radius for extension and lateral bending, and by gap size and implant ball radius for axial torsion. For extension, intervertebral rotation at implant level varied between 1.4 degrees and 7.5 degrees . Intradiscal pressure in the adjacent discs is only slightly affected by all

  1. The Application of Biomechanics to Penalty Corner Drag-Flick Training: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    de Subijana, Cristina López; Juárez, Daniel; Mallo, Javier; Navarro, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The penalty corner is one of the most important game situations in field hockey with one third of all goals resulting from this tactical situation. The aim of this study was to develop and apply a training method, based on previous studies, to improve the drag- flick skill on a young top-class field hockey player. A young top-class player exercised three times per week using specific drills over a four week period. A VICON optoelectronic system (Oxford Metrics, Oxford, UK) was employed to capture twenty drag-flicks, with six cameras sampling at 250 Hz, prior and after the training period. In order to analyze pre- and post-test differences a dependent t-test was carried out. Angular velocities and the kinematic sequence were similar to previous studies. The player improved (albeit not significantly) the angular velocity of the stick. The player increased front foot to the ball at T1 (p < 0.01) and the drag-flick distances. The range of motion from the front leg decreased from T1 to T6 after the training period (p < 0.01). The specific training sessions conducted with the player improved some features of this particular skill. This article shows how technical knowledge can help with the design of training programs and whether some drills are more effective than others. Key points This article adds information about the drag-flick kinematics. This article adds information about how to train the drag-flick. The drag-flick is the most efficient technique shooting for goal after a penalty corner. PMID:24150638

  2. Comparison of the Suture Anchor and Transosseous Techniques for Patellar Tendon Repair: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Lanzi, Joseph T; Felix, Justin; Tucker, Christopher J; Cameron, Kenneth L; Rogers, John; Owens, Brett D; Svoboda, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    Minimizing gap formation and maximizing the strength of patellar tendon repairs are 2 critical factors for successful healing of these injuries. The purpose of this study was to compare transosseous and screw-in anchor repair techniques to determine if there is a difference in gap formation and load to failure of the 2 constructs. The research hypotheses were that the anchor construct would have significantly less gap formation and would also have significantly greater load-to-failure strength. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 24 porcine specimens were randomly assigned into transosseous and 4.75-mm polyetheretherketone (PEEK) screw-in anchor repair groups. The repairs were then completed using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures, and each specimen was cyclically loaded on a tensile test machine to 250 N for a total of 1000 cycles. Gap formation was measured at 1, 10, 250, 500, and 1000 cycles. Each specimen was loaded to failure after 1000 cycles. Independent t tests were conducted. Statistically significant gap formation and load-to-failure differences were found between the 2 repair techniques. The mean gap in the anchor group (2.16 ± 1.81 mm) was significantly less than that seen in the transosseous group (5.71 ± 1.58 mm) (P < .001). The mean load to failure of the anchor group (669.9 ± 91.8 N) was significantly higher than that of the transosseous group (582.8 ± 92.6 N) (P = .03). The results support the 2 study hypotheses. These findings suggest that the 4.75-mm PEEK screw-in anchor construct may be superior to the transosseous technique for minimizing gap formation and improving load-to-failure strength after surgical repair of the patellar tendon. The use of the suture anchor technique in patellar tendon repair may support early load-bearing rehabilitation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. The application of biomechanics to penalty corner drag-flick training: a case study.

    PubMed

    de Subijana, Cristina López; Juárez, Daniel; Mallo, Javier; Navarro, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The penalty corner is one of the most important game situations in field hockey with one third of all goals resulting from this tactical situation. The aim of this study was to develop and apply a training method, based on previous studies, to improve the drag- flick skill on a young top-class field hockey player. A young top-class player exercised three times per week using specific drills over a four week period. A VICON optoelectronic system (Oxford Metrics, Oxford, UK) was employed to capture twenty drag-flicks, with six cameras sampling at 250 Hz, prior and after the training period. In order to analyze pre- and post-test differences a dependent t-test was carried out. Angular velocities and the kinematic sequence were similar to previous studies. The player improved (albeit not significantly) the angular velocity of the stick. The player increased front foot to the ball at T1 (p < 0.01) and the drag-flick distances. The range of motion from the front leg decreased from T1 to T6 after the training period (p < 0.01). The specific training sessions conducted with the player improved some features of this particular skill. This article shows how technical knowledge can help with the design of training programs and whether some drills are more effective than others. Key pointsThis article adds information about the drag-flick kinematics.This article adds information about how to train the drag-flick.The drag-flick is the most efficient technique shooting for goal after a penalty corner.

  4. Biomechanical study of patient positioning: influence of lower limb positioning on spinal geometry.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Christopher; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Canet, Fanny; Labelle, Hubert; Horton, William; Dansereau, Jean

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to use finite element model (FEM) simulations and experimental testing to study the relationship between lower limb positioning for surgeries of the spine and changes in sagittal curves. Four volunteers underwent lower limb flexibility and range of motion testing before being placed prone on a new surgical frame where lateral radiographs of their spines were taken in positions of hip flexion (average 48 degrees) and extension (average 13 degrees). Personalized FEMs were created representing each volunteer's spine, rib cage, pelvis, and lower limbs. Optimization of model behavior was performed by adjustment of lower limb muscle initial strains. The FEMs were exploited to examine the impact of more extreme and intermediate lower limb positions; 30 degrees of hip extension to 90 degrees of flexion at intervals of 20 degrees. With increased hip flexion, lordosis and kyphosis decreased to an average of 52% (35 degrees) and 16% (6 degrees), respectively. Personalization of the 4 FEMs allowed reproduction of the experimental results within 5 degrees and their subsequent exploitation showed the linear changes in lordosis and kyphosis between extreme positions decreasing an average of 84% (59 degrees) and 34% (13 degrees) with increased hip flexion. A strong correlation was found between experimental change in lordosis and individual hamstring flexibilities (R=-0.93) which allowed for the development of a predictive equation for lordosis in terms of hip flexion which factors straight leg raise test results. Knowledge gained through this study can be used to improve intraoperative control of sagittal curves through lower limb positioning.

  5. The effect of cement on hip stem fixation: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Talip; Mutlu, İbrahim; Özkan, Arif; Kişioğlu, Yasin

    2017-03-20

    This study presents the numerical analysis of stem fixation in hip surgery using with/without cement methods since the use of cement is still controversial based on the clinical studies in the literature. Many different factors such as stress shielding, aseptic loosening, material properties of the stem, surgeon experiences etc. play an important role in the failure of the stem fixations. The stem fixation methods, cemented and uncemented, were evaluated in terms of mechanical failure aspects using computerized finite element method. For the modeling processes, three dimensional (3D) femur model was generated from computerized tomography (CT) images taken from a patient using the MIMICS Software. The design of the stem was also generated as 3D CAD model using the design parameters taken from the manufacturer catalogue. These 3D CAD models were generated and combined with/without cement considering the surgical procedure using SolidWorks program and then imported into ANSYS Workbench Software. Two different material properties, CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V, for the stem model and Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) for the cement were assigned. The material properties of the femur were described according to a density calculated from the CT images. Body weight and muscle forces were applied on the femur and the distal femur was fixed for the boundary conditions. The calculations of the stress distributions of the models including cement and relative movements of the contacts examined to evaluate the effects of the cement and different stem material usage on the failure of stem fixation. According to the results, the use of cement for the stem fixation reduces the stress shielding but increases the aseptic loosening depending on the cement crack formations. Additionally, using the stiffer material for the stem reduces the cement stress but increases the stress shielding. Based on the results obtained in the study, even when taking the disadvantages into account, the cement usage

  6. Coupled Biomechanical Response of the Cornea Assessed by Non-Contact Tonometry. A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical response of the cornea subjected to a non-contact air-jet tonometry diagnostic test represents an interplay between its geometry, the corneal material behavior and the loading. The objective is to study this interplay to better understand and interpret the results obtained with a non-contact tonometry test. A patient-specific finite element model of a healthy eye, accounting for the load free configuration, was used. The corneal tissue was modeled as an anisotropic hyperelastic material with two preferential directions. Three different sets of parameters within the human experimental range obtained from inflation tests were considered. The influence of the IOP was studied by considering four pressure levels (10–28 mmHg) whereas the influence of corneal thickness was studied by inducing a uniform variation (300–600 microns). A Computer Fluid Dynamics (CFD) air-jet simulation determined pressure loading exerted on the anterior corneal surface. The maximum apex displacement showed a linear variation with IOP for all materials examined. On the contrary, the maximum apex displacement followed a cubic relation with corneal thickness. In addition, a significant sensitivity of the apical displacement to the corneal stiffness was also obtained. Explanation to this behavior was found in the fact that the cornea experiences bending when subjected to an air-puff loading, causing the anterior surface to work in compression whereas the posterior surface works in tension. Hence, collagen fibers located at the anterior surface do not contribute to load bearing. Non-contact tonometry devices give useful information that could be misleading since the corneal deformation is the result of the interaction between the mechanical properties, IOP, and geometry. Therefore, a non-contact tonometry test is not sufficient to evaluate their individual contribution and a complete in-vivo characterization would require more than one test to independently determine the membrane

  7. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF BIOMECHANICS OF PROXIMAL ROW CARPAL INSTABILITY].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinhai; Huang, Fuguo

    2015-01-01

    To review the research progress of the biomechanics of proximal row carpal instability (IPRC). The related literature concerning IPRC was extensively reviewed. The biomechanical mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue in maintaining the stability of the proximal row carpal (PRC) was analyzed, and the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC were summarized from two aspects including basic biomechanics and clinical biomechanics. The muscles and ligaments of the PRC are critical to its stability. Most scholars have reached a consensus about biomechanical mechanism of the PRC, but there are still controversial conclusions on the biomechanics mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue to stability of distal radioulnar joint when the triangular fibrocartilage complex are damaged and the biomechanics mechanism of the scapholunate ligament. At present, there is no unified standard about the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC. So, it is difficult for clinical practice. Some strides have been made in the basic biomechanical study on muscle and ligament and clinical biomechanical study on the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of PRC, but it will be needed to further study the morphology of carpal articular surface and the adjacent articular surface, the pressure of distal carpals to proximal carpal and so on.

  8. Effect of three remplissage techniques on tendon coverage and shoulder kinematics: a navigated robotic biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chung Hui James; Saier, Tim; von Deimling, Constantin; Martetschläger, Frank; Minzlaff, Philipp; Feucht, Matthias J; Martinez, Horazio; Braun, Sepp; Imhoff, Andreas B; Burgkart, Rainer

    2016-01-04

    In addition to Bankart repair engaging Hill-Sachs defects in glenohumeral instability have been treated successfully with remplissage procedure. The purpose of this study was to compare three remplissage techniques regarding (I) ability of preventing Hill-Sachs defect from engaging, (II) influence on glenohumeral rotational torque, and (III) resulting tendon coverage over the Hill-Sachs defect. Standardized engaging Hill-Sachs defects and Bankart lesions were created in n = 7 fresh frozen human shoulder specimens. Besides Bankart repair three remplissage techniques (T) with double anchor position in the valley of the defect zone were studied: T1, knots tied over anchors; T2, knots tied between anchors (double-pulley); T3, knotless anchors with a suture tape. A parallel position-orientation and force-moment controlled navigated roboticsystem was used to compare prevention of Hill-Sachs defect engagement and torque [Nm]. Pressure sensitive film was used to study area of infraspinatus tendon coverage over Hill-Sachs defect [%]. All remplissage techniques prevented engagement of the Hill-Sachs defect without showing any construct failures. Regarding humeral torque there were significant impairments observed between intact conditions and the three investigated repair techniques in 60° abduction and ≥30° external rotation (p < .04). There was no significant difference in torque between intervention groups (n.s.). With a mean coverage of 26.8 % over the defect zone the knotless suture tape technique (T3) significantly improved area of soft tissue coverage compared to the other techniques (p = .03). All remplissage techniques prevented engagement of the Hill Sachs defect. With high abduction and external rotation ≥30° all techniques showed significant higher humeral torque compared to the intact specimens, while there was not one technique superior over the others. The suture tape technique conferred the largest and most effective area of tendon

  9. Biomechanics of whiplash injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-bin; Yang, King H; Wang, Zheng-guo

    2009-10-01

    Despite a large number of rear-end collisions on the road and a high frequency of whiplash injuries reported, the mechanism of whiplash injuries is not completely understood. One of the reasons is that the injury is not necessarily accompanied by obvious tissue damage detectable by X-ray or MRI. An extensive series of biomechanics studies, including injury epidemiology, neck kinematics, facet capsule ligament mechanics, injury mechanisms and injury criteria, were undertaken to help elucidate these whiplash injury mechanisms and gain a better understanding of cervical facet pain. These studies provide the following evidences to help explain the mechanisms of the whiplash injury: (1) Whiplash injuries are generally considered to be a soft tissue injury of the neck with symptoms such as neck pain and stiffness, shoulder weakness, dizziness, headache and memory loss, etc. (2) Based on kinematical studies on the cadaver and volunteers, there are three distinct periods that have the potential to cause injury to the neck. In the first stage, flexural deformation of the neck is observed along with a loss of cervical lordosis; in the second stage, the cervical spine assumes an S-shaped curve as the lower vertebrae begin to extend and gradually cause the upper vertebrae to extend; during the final stage, the entire neck is extended due to the extension moments at both ends. (3) The in vivo environment afforded by rodent models of injury offers particular utility for linking mechanics, nociception and behavioral outcomes. Experimental findings have examined strains across the facet joint as a mechanism of whiplash injury, and suggested a capsular strain threshold or a vertebral distraction threshold for whiplash-related injury, potentially producing neck pain. (4) Injuries to the facet capsule region of the neck are a major source of post-crash pain. There are several hypotheses on how whiplash-associated injury may occur and three of these injuries are related to strains

  10. Biomechanics and Biotensegrity: Study Method and Frequency Response of the Simplex and 3-bar-SVD Tensegrity Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Arenas, C.; Ghersi, I.; Miralles, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the frequency response of 3D tensegrity structures. These are structures that have been used, since the 80’s, to model biological systems of different scales. This fact led to the origin of the field of biotensegrity, which includes biomechanics as a natural field of application. In this work: a) A simple method for the analysis of frequency response of different nodes in 3D tensegrity structures was set up and tuned. This method is based on a video-analysis algorithm, which was applied to the structures, as they were vibrated along their axis of symmetry, at frequencies from 1 Hz to 60 Hz. b) Frequency-response analyses were performed, for the simplest 3D structure, the Simplex module, as well as for two towers, formed by stacking two and three Simplex modules, respectively. Resonant frequencies were detected for the Simplex module at (19.2±0.1) Hz and (50.2±0.1) Hz (the latter being an average of frequencies between homologous nodes). For the towers with two and three modules, each selected node presented a characteristic frequency response, modulated by their spatial placement in each model. Resonances for the two-stage tower were found at: (12±0.1) Hz; (16.2±0.1) Hz; (29.4±0.1) Hz and (37.2±0.1) Hz. For the tower with three Simplex modules, the main resonant frequencies were found at (12.0±0.1) Hz and (21.0±0.1) Hz. Results show that the proposed method is adequate for the study (2D) of any 3D tensegrity structure, with the potential of being generalized to the study of oscillations in three dimensions. A growing complexity and variability in the frequency response of the nodes was observed, as modules were added to the structures. These findings were compared to those found in the available literature.

  11. Hydrolyzed collagen improves bone metabolism and biomechanical parameters in ovariectomized mice: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Guillerminet, Fanny; Beaupied, Hélène; Fabien-Soulé, Véronique; Tomé, Daniel; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent; Roux, Christian; Blais, Anne

    2010-03-01

    Collagen has an important structural function in several organs of the body, especially in bone and cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydrolyzed collagen on bone metabolism, especially in the perspective of osteoporosis treatment and understanding of its mechanism of action. An in vivo study was carried out in 12-week-old female C3H/HeN mice. These were either ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-operated (SHAM) and fed for 12 weeks with a diet containing 10 or 25 g/kg of hydrolyzed collagen. We measured bone mineral density (BMD) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), marker of bone resorption, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), marker of bone formation, were assayed after 4 and 12 weeks. Femur biomechanical properties were studied by a 3-point bending test and bone architecture by microtomography. The BMD for OVX mice fed the diet including 25 g/kg of hydrolyzed collagen was significantly higher as compared to OVX mice. The blood CTX level significantly decreased when mice were fed with either of the diets containing hydrolyzed collagen. Finally, we have shown a significant increase in bone strength correlated to geometrical changes for the OVX mice fed the 25 g/kg hydrolyzed collagen diet. Primary cultures of murine bone cells were established from the tibia and femur marrow of BALB/c mice. The growth and differentiation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts cultured with different concentrations (from 0.2 to 1.0 mg/mL) of bovine, porcine or fish hydrolyzed collagens (2 or 5 kDa) were measured. Hydrolyzed collagens (2 or 5 kDa) in the tissue culture medium did not have any significant effects on cell growth as compared to controls. However, there was a significant and dose-dependent increase in ALP activity, a well-known marker of osteogenesis, and a decrease in octeoclast activity in primary culture of bone cells cultured with hydrolyzed collagens (2 kDa only) as compared to the control. It

  12. Forces involved in lower limb lengthening: an in vivo biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lauterburg, Martin Th; Exner, G Ulrich; Jacob, Hilaire A C

    2006-09-01

    Despite improvements in surgical techniques for limb-lengthening procedures, the complication rate remains high. Bone fixators must cope with the forces involved during treatment, providing sufficient strength to maintain integrity of the limb in the course of lengthening, while permitting some "micromotion" across the bone gap that could enhance healing during the final phase of bone consolidation. This study reports on the forces generated during limb lengthening in the distraction and consolidation phases. Forces were measured on 19 patients between 6 and 22 years of age with 10 femoral and 11 tibial lengthenings of 1 mm/day by means of a monotube external fixator, fitted diaphysially, and modified to measure tension and weight-bearing forces. Peak force measured during the lengthening period amounted to about 14 N/kg of body mass. Generally, distraction forces leveled off at between 8 and 10 N/kg of body mass. During the consolidation period, the average force carried by the fixator dropped from 55% initially to about 10% of the force transmitted to the ground, consistent with increased load carrying capacity of the bone as healing progressed. Studying the forces involved in limb lengthening is important to gain knowledge of the forces required to overcome the resistance offered by the tissues that bridge the osteotomy site, to understand the biology of distraction osteogenesis and histiogenesis across the regenerate over time, and to provide scientific guidelines for frame removal.

  13. Gliding resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions: (1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; (2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; (3) 30 mmHg; (4) 60 mmHg; (5) 90 mmHg; (6) 120 mmHg. The gliding resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in gliding resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon gliding resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  14. Gliding Resistance of Flexor Tendon Associated with Carpal Tunnel Pressure: A Biomechanical Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M.; Berglund, Lawrence J.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions 1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; 2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; 3) 30 mmHg; 4) 60 mmHg; 5) 90 mmHg; 6) 120 mmHg. The gliding resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in gliding resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon gliding resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients. PMID:20661935

  15. Experimental and constitutive modeling approaches for a study of biomechanical properties of human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Malgorzata A; Bartkowiak-Jowsa, Magdalena; Bedzinski, Romuald

    2015-10-01

    The study concerns the determination of mechanical properties of human coronary arterial walls with both experimental and constitutive modeling approaches. The research material was harvested from 18 patients (range 50-84 years). On the basis of hospital records and visual observation, each tissue sample was classified according to the stage (0, I, II, III) of atherosclerosis development (SAD). Then, strip samples considered as a membrane with the shape of rectangular parallelepiped were preconditioned and subjected to uniaxial tensile tests in longitudinal (n=27) and circumferential (n=4) direction. With experimental data obtained, the stress-strain characteristics were prepared. Furthermore, tensile strengths and related strains, stiffness coefficients and tangent modules of elasticity were computed. For a constitutive model of passive mechanical behavior of coronary arteries, values of material parameters were computed. The studies led to the following conclusions. Most importantly, the atherosclerotic changes affect all the mechanical properties of arterial walls. A progress of arteriosclerosis contributes to an increase of vascular stiffness. The highest values of the stiffness coefficients are obtained for the tissues in the advanced stage of the disease. We were also able to observe that gradual calcification, progression of atherosclerosis and degradation of collagen in the tissue caused a decrease of tensile strengths and related strains. Finally, a comparison made for the tissues with the advanced SAD showed that the tensile strengths and strains were much higher in the case of the samples with the circumferential orientation rather than those with the longitudinal one.

  16. [Bond strength of a bioresorbable bone adhesive: results of a biomechanical study in a sheep model].

    PubMed

    Heiss, Christian; Schettler, Nicky; Schilke, Peter; Horas, Uwe; Kilian, Olaf; Meyer, Christof; Kraus, Ralf; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength of a new bone adhesive based on ethylene glycol-oligolactide-bismethacrylate on 36 sheep. A 2-cm metaphysial segment was produced on the ulna of each sheep by an oscillating saw and it was not stabilized by any type of additional osteosynthesis. Adhesive was applied to the osteotomy gaps in 18 sheep, the remaining 18 animals served as controls. A total of 6 animals with glue and 6 controls were euthanized after 21, 42 and 84 days. The bond strength after repair of the gaps through bone adhesive compared to a control group was studied by using a four-point bending test. There was a continual increase of bending stiffness from 21 to 84 days in all sheep, with the highest bending stiffness of 102.83 N/mm2 by the glue group after 84 days as opposed to the control group with 58.48 N/mm2 (p = 0.25). Morphological investigations showed more callus formation by the control group than the adhesive group after 84 days (p = 0.04). In addition, an in vitro gluing of the ulna segment was performed with a four-point bending test after 10, 60 and 360 min polymerization time. The in vitro gluing of the ulna segment showed a continual increase of bending stiffness to 17.32 N/mm2 after 360 min (p = 0.59).

  17. Kinematic MRI study of upper-airway biomechanics using electrical muscle stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennick, Michael J.; Margulies, Susan S.; Ford, John C.; Gefter, Warren B.; Pack, Allan I.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a new and powerful method to study the movement and function of upper airway muscles. Our method is to use direct electrical stimulation of individual upper airway muscles, while performing state of the art high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We have adapted a paralyzed isolated UA cat model so that positive or negative static pressure in the UA can be controlled at specific levels while electrical muscle stimulation is applied during MRI. With these techniques we can assess the effect of muscle stimulation on airway cross-sectional area compliance and soft tissue motion. We are reporting the preliminary results and MRI techniques which have enabled us to examine changes in airway dimensions which result form electrical stimulation of specific upper airway dilator muscles. The results of this study will be relevant to the development of new clinical treatments for obstructive sleep apnea by providing new information as to exactly how upper airway muscles function to dilate the upper airway and the strength of stimulation required to prevent the airway obstruction when overall muscle tone may not be sufficient to maintain regular breathing.

  18. Biomechanical assessment of the effects of significant hamstring injury: an isokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Paton, R W; Grimshaw, P; McGregor, J; Noble, J

    1989-05-01

    Soccer players may develop recurrent hamstring injuries. This may be due to inadequate rehabilitation or to recurrent injury. In addition, following injury, the hamstring muscular complex may be permanently damaged, resulting in decreased strength, and increased likelihood of recurrent injury. Fourteen professional soccer players were assessed by clinical examination and by isokinetic testing with a Cybex II machine. Seven had suffered moderate or major hamstring injuries in the past year. There were seven controls. None of the hamstring group were currently suffering from an acute hamstring injury. The results of the two groups were compared. There were no differences in the mean results. This pilot study suggests that no permanent functional damage occurs to the muscular complex after moderate or major hamstring injuries after correct treatment. However, further research is required to confirm this.

  19. Biomechanical and histomorphometric study of dental implants with different surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yeo, In-Sung; Han, Jung-Suk; Yang, Jae-Ho

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the early bone response to the titanium dental implants with different surface characteristics using the rabbit tibia model. Calcium metaphosphate coated, anodic oxidized, hydroxyapatite particle-blasted, and turned (control) surfaces were compared. Surface topography was evaluated by field emission scanning electron microscope and optical interferometer. Eighteen rabbits received 72 implants in the tibia. Resonance frequency was analyzed every week for 6 weeks. Removal torque values were measured 2 and 6 weeks after placement. The implant-bone interfaces were directly observed by light microscope and bone-to-implant contact ratios were measured 2 and 6 weeks after insertion. All the surface-modified implants showed superior initial bone responses to the control. No significant differences were found among the surface-modified groups. Data suggest that various surface modification methods can provide favorable bone responses for early functioning and healing of dental implants.

  20. Case study: a novel biomechanical approach for evaluating extended body armor systems.

    PubMed

    Selinger, Jessica C; Gooyers, Chad E; Stevenson, Joan M; Costigan, Patrick A; Chafe, Gabrielle S

    2010-11-01

    To combat the devastating effects of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), body armor that provides extended coverage has been developed. However, this extended coverage increases the armor's weight and may restrict movement. Throughout this case study, a novel technique to assess several armor systems was investigated. Four soldiers performed shoulder and trunk movements while wearing each of the six different armor inserts. Electromyography (EMG) was used to quantify muscular activity and inertial motion sensors were used to determine joint range of motion (ROM). Outcome measures included maximum ROM, integrated EMG, and the soldiers' subjective rankings. For the shoulder tasks, objective ROM and EMG measures were related to each other as well as to subjective rankings and armor material properties. Conversely, little agreement was found between measures for the trunk tasks. Results of this preliminary investigation indicate that combining shoulder ROM and EMG measures has the potential to provide an objective assessment of body armor systems.

  1. Contribution of the olecranon to elbow stability: an in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bell, Timothy H; Ferreira, Louis M; McDonald, Colin P; Johnson, James A; King, Graham J W

    2010-04-01

    The amount of the olecranon that can be removed without substantially affecting the kinematics and stability of the elbow is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of serial resections of the olecranon on elbow kinematics and stability. Eight fresh, previously frozen cadaver arms were mounted in an in vitro motion simulator, and kinematic data were obtained with use of an electromagnetic tracking system for active and passive motion. Flexion was studied in the varus, valgus, horizontal, and dependent positions. Custom-written three-dimensional computer navigation software was utilized to guide serial resection of the olecranon in 12.5% increments from 0% to 100%. A traditional triceps advancement repair was performed following each resection. Flexion angle, amount of olecranon resection, and active and passive motion measurements were compared. Serial resection of the olecranon resulted in a significant increase in varus-valgus angulation with the arm in the varus (p < 0.04) and valgus (p = 0.01) orientations. Ulnohumeral rotation significantly increased in the varus (p < 0.001) and valgus (p < 0.007) orientations. Angular (p = 0.02) and rotational (p < 0.001) kinematics were greater with passive compared with active motion. There was no difference in elbow kinematics following olecranon resection with the arm positioned in the horizontal and dependent positions. Valgus-varus angulation and ulnohumeral rotation progressively increase with sequential excision of up to 75% of the olecranon. Elbow stability is progressively lost with sequential excision, with gross instability noted at resection of > or = 87.5% of the olecranon.

  2. Corneal biomechanical properties and glaucoma-related quantitative traits in the EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Anthony P; Chan, Michelle P Y; Broadway, David C; Garway-Heath, David F; Luben, Robert; Yip, Jennifer L Y; Hayat, Shabina; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J

    2014-01-07

    We examined the association of corneal hysteresis (CH) with Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT)- and Glaucoma Detection with Variable Corneal Compensation scanning laser polarimeter (GDxVCC)-derived measures in a British population. The EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study is nested within a multicenter cohort study--the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer. Ocular response analyzer (ORA), HRT3, and GDxVCC measurements were taken at the research clinic. Three ORA measurements were taken per eye, and the single best value used. Participants meeting predefined criteria were referred for a second examination, including Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) and central corneal thickness (CCT) measurement. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the associations of CH with HRT and GDxVCC parameters, adjusted for disc area. The GDxVCC analyses were adjusted further for typical scan score to handle atypical retardation. There were complete research clinic data from 5134 participants. Corneal hysteresis was associated positively with HRT rim area (P < 0.001), and GDxVCC retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) average thickness (P = 0.006) and modulation (P = 0.003), and associated negatively with HRT linear cup-to-disc ratio (LCDR, P < 0.001), after adjustment for Goldmann-correlated IOP and other possible confounders. In the 602 participants undergoing the second examination, CH was associated negatively with LCDR (P = 0.008) after adjustment for GAT, CCT, and other possible confounders. Lower CH was associated with HRT and GDxVCC parameters in a direction that is seen in glaucoma and with ageing. Further research is required to establish if this is a causal relationship, or due to residual confounding by age, IOP, or CCT.

  3. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  4. Patients with knee osteoarthritis demonstrate improved gait pattern and reduced pain following a non-invasive biomechanical therapy: a prospective multi-centre study on Singaporean population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the effect of a unique therapy with a non-invasive biomechanical foot-worn device (AposTherapy) on Caucasian western population suffering from knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of this therapy on the level of symptoms and gait patterns in a multi-ethnic Singaporean population suffering from knee osteoarthritis. Methods Fifty-eight patients with bilateral medial compartment knee osteoarthritis participated in the study. All patients underwent a computerized gait test and completed two self-assessment questionnaires (WOMAC and SF-36). The biomechanical device was calibrated to each patient, and therapy commenced. Changes in gait patterns and self-assessment questionnaires were reassessed after 3 and 6 months of therapy. Results A significant improvement was seen in all of the gait parameters following 6 months of therapy. Specifically, gait velocity increased by 15.9%, step length increased by 10.3%, stance phase decreased by 5.9% and single limb support phase increased by 2.7%. In addition, pain, stiffness and functional limitation significantly decreased by 68.3%, 66.7% and 75.6%, respectively. SF-36 physical score and mental score also increased significantly following 6 months of therapy (46.1% and 22.4%, respectively) (P < 0.05 for all parameters). Conclusions Singaporean population with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis demonstrated improved gait patterns, reported alleviation in symptoms and improved function and quality of life following 6 months of therapy with a unique biomechanical device. Trial registration Registration number NCT01562652. PMID:24383821

  5. Diminished abductor muscular strength in patients with valgus-impacted femoral neck fractures treated by internal fixation: Clinical study and biomechanical considerations.

    PubMed

    Noda, Mitsuaki; Saegusa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Masayasu; Kuroda, Yuichi; Takada, Yuma; Yoshikawa, Chihiro; Wakabayashi, Mimami; Adachi, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Yukiko

    2017-01-01

    Valgus-impacted femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation occasionally result in unsatisfactory postoperative locomotive function, partially due to muscle shortening and a decrease in the moment arm. This study quantifies the degree of diminished abduction strength both clinically and biomechanically. Fifteen patients were enrolled in this study. Twelve patients with fracture healed in valgus-impacted position were further evaluated. Muscular strength around hip was examined, and values between the nonoperated and operated side were compared and analyzed. For the biomechanical study, two three-dimensional models were prepared: model I (control model without displacement) and model II (simulated malunion of a 15° valgus-impacted fracture). Two sets of hip flexion angles in each of the models were simulated with flexion angles of 0° and 23°. Mean and standard deviation values for muscle strength from the nonoperative/operative side among the valgus group are as follows: flexion strength was 9.2 ± 4.0/9.2 ± 3.2, extension strength was 5.8 ± 2.8/6.1 ± 3.2, abduction strength at 0° was 9.1 ± 3.7/7.4 ± 3.6, abduction strength at 10° was 6.7 ± 3.0/5.5 ± 2.2, and knee extension strength was 15.3 ± 6.2/15.1 ± 6.0 (kgf). When comparing values between the nonoperative and operative sides, statistical significance was only observed in abduction strength ( p < 0.01). The biomechanical models prove that valgus impaction decreases the moment arm by approximately 10% at both flexion angle. A significant decrease in abductor strength at 0° and 10° was observed in the valgus-healed group. This may be related to a decrease in the moment arm. Further research should be done to define the acceptable limit of deformity for the satisfactory postoperative functioning.

  6. Study on astrophysical reactions using low-energy RI beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, low-energy RI beams can be produced in a good intensity and they have been used for studying many astrophysical reactions. One of the facilities producing low-energy RI beams is CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) [1,2], an RI-beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Taking CRIB as an example, recent improvements on the RI-beam production and experimental results on astrophysical studies are presented. Several experimental approaches have been taken for the studies on astrophysical reactions.The feature of each method are discussed based on real measurements performed at CRIB. One is the direct method, applied for measurements of reactions such as (α,p) [3]. Another is the measurement of proton/alpha resonance scattering using the thick target method in inverse kinematics, by which we can obtain information on the resonances relevant in astrophysical reactions [4,5]. A recent fruitful result was from a measurement of proton resonance scattering using a ^7Be beam [5]. The energy level structure of ^8B, revealed by the experiment, is especially of interest as it is related with the ^7Be(p,γ) ^8B reaction, responsible for the production of ^8B neutrinos in the sun. We successfully determined parameters of resonances in ^8B below 6.7 MeV, which may affect the ^7Be(p,γ)^8B reaction rate at the solar temparature. Indirect methods, such as ANC and the Trojan Horse Method, were also used in some of the measurements.[4pt] [1] S. Kubono et al., Eur. Phys. J. A13 (2002) 217.[0pt] [2] Y. Yanagisawa et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res., Sect. A 539 (2005) 74.[0pt] [3] M. Notani et al., Nucl. Phys. A 764 (2004) 113c.[0pt] [4] T. Teranishi et al., Phys. Lett. B 650 (2007) 129.[0pt] [5] H. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Lett. B 672 (2009) 230.

  7. Comparison of three different pelvic circumferential compression devices: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Knops, S P; Schep, N W L; Spoor, C W; van Riel, M P J M; Spanjersberg, W R; Kleinrensink, G J; van Lieshout, E M M; Patka, P; Schipper, I B

    2011-02-02

    Pelvic circumferential compression devices are designed to stabilize the pelvic ring and reduce the volume of the pelvis following trauma. It is uncertain whether pelvic circumferential compression devices can be safely applied for all types of pelvic fractures because the effects of the devices on the reduction of fracture fragments are unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of circumferential compression devices on the dynamic realignment and final reduction of the pelvic fractures as a measure of the quality of reduction. Three circumferential compression devices were evaluated: the Pelvic Binder, the SAM Sling, and the T-POD. In sixteen cadavers, four fracture types were generated according to the Tile classification system. Infrared retroreflective markers were fixed in the different fracture fragments of each pelvis. The circumferential compression device was applied sequentially in a randomized order with gradually increasing forces applied. Fracture fragment movement was studied with use of a three-dimensional infrared video system. Dynamic realignment and final reduction of the fracture fragments during closure of the circumferential compression devices were determined. A factorial repeated-measures analysis of variance with pairwise post hoc comparisons was performed to analyze the differences in pulling force between the circumferential compression devices. In the partially stable and unstable (Tile type-B and C) pelvic fractures, all circumferential compression devices accomplished closure of the pelvic ring and consequently reduced the pelvic volume. No adverse fracture displacement (>5 mm) was observed in these fracture types. The required pulling force to attain complete reduction at the symphysis pubis varied substantially among the three different circumferential compression devices, with a mean (and standard error of the mean) of 43 ± 7 N for the T-POD, 60 ± 9 N for the Pelvic Binder, and 112 ± 10 N for the SAM Sling. The

  8. Biomechanical investigation of the supraorbital arch - a transient FEA study on the impact of physical blows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As fractures of the supraorbital region are far less common than midfacial or orbital fractures, a study was initiated to investigate whether fist blows could lead to fractures similar to those often seen in the midface. Methods A detailed skull model and an impactor resembling a fist were created and a fist blow to the supraorbital region was simulated. A transient finite element analysis was carried out to calculate von Mises stresses, peak force, and impact time. Results Within the contact zone of skull and impactor critical stress values could be seen which lay at the lower yield border for potential fractures. A second much lower stress zone was depicted in the anterior-medial orbital roof. Conclusions In this simulation a fist punch, which could generate distinct fractures in the midface and naso-ethmoid-orbital region, would only reach the limits of a small fracture in the supraorbital region. The reason is seen in the strong bony architecture. Much higher forces are needed to create severe trauma in the upper face which is supported by clinical findings. Finite element analysis is the method of choice to investigate the impact of trauma on the human skeleton. PMID:24745339

  9. Biomechanical investigation of the supraorbital arch - a transient FEA study on the impact of physical blows.

    PubMed

    Huempfner-Hierl, Heike; Schaller, Andreas; Hierl, Thomas

    2014-04-21

    As fractures of the supraorbital region are far less common than midfacial or orbital fractures, a study was initiated to investigate whether fist blows could lead to fractures similar to those often seen in the midface. A detailed skull model and an impactor resembling a fist were created and a fist blow to the supraorbital region was simulated. A transient finite element analysis was carried out to calculate von Mises stresses, peak force, and impact time. Within the contact zone of skull and impactor critical stress values could be seen which lay at the lower yield border for potential fractures. A second much lower stress zone was depicted in the anterior-medial orbital roof. In this simulation a fist punch, which could generate distinct fractures in the midface and naso-ethmoid-orbital region, would only reach the limits of a small fracture in the supraorbital region. The reason is seen in the strong bony architecture. Much higher forces are needed to create severe trauma in the upper face which is supported by clinical findings. Finite element analysis is the method of choice to investigate the impact of trauma on the human skeleton.

  10. Ultrasonic evaluation of dental implant biomechanical stability: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Vincent; Anagnostou, Fani; Soffer, Emmanuel; Haïat, Guillaume

    2011-02-01

    Dental implants are widely used for oral rehabilitation. However, there remain risks of failure that are difficult to anticipate. The objective of this ex vivo study is to investigate the potentiality of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) to assess the amount of bone in contact with titanium prototype cylindrical implants. Four groups of 10 rabbit femurs each are considered, corresponding to different amounts of bone in contact with the implant. The 10 MHz ultrasonic response of the implant is processed to derive a quantitative indicator I, based on the temporal variation of the signal amplitude. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) (p < 10(-5)) tests revealed a statistical distribution of I significantly correlated with the amount of bone in contact with the cylinders. An analytical model considering the propagation of lateral waves allows the understanding of the physical origin of the echoes. QUS technique may be used to investigate the amount of bone in contact with a cylinder implant. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Zeroing of six-component handrim dynamometer for biomechanical studies of manual wheelchair locomotion.

    PubMed

    Sauret, Christophe; Dabonneville, Michel; Couétard, Yves; de Saint Rémy, Nicolas; Kauffmann, Philippe; Cid, Mariano; Vaslin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A six-component handrim dynamometer (HRD) is a dynamometer that rotates around the wheel axle during measurements. For this kind of dynamometer, static zero level calibration is insufficient because the proportion of the forces (i.e. handrim weight and centrifugal force) measured by each sensor varies according to the angular position and velocity of the dynamometer. The dynamic calibration presented in this paper is based on the direct correction of the sensor signals using Fourier's polynomials that take into account the influences of both the handrim weight distribution on the sensors with respect to the wheel's angular position and the effect of the wheel's angular velocity. When these corrections were applied to the signals produced by the sensors while the HRD was rotating and no effort was being exerted on the handrim, the calculated forces and torques remained close to zero, as expected. Based on these results, the wheel dynamometer can be confidently used for studying manual wheelchair locomotion under various real conditions. The method could also be applied in other situations in which a dynamometer rotates during measurements.

  12. Design of human surrogates for the study of biomechanical injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Payne, Thomas; Mitchell, Séan; Bibb, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Human surrogates are representations of living human structures employed to replicate "real-life" injurious scenarios in artificial environments. They are used primarily to evaluate personal protective equipment (PPE) or integrated safety systems (e.g., seat belts) in a wide range of industry sectors (e.g., automotive, military, security service, and sports equipment). Surrogates are commonly considered in five major categories relative to their form and functionality: human volunteers, postmortem human surrogates, animal surrogates, anthropomorphic test devices, and computational models. Each surrogate has its relative merits. Surrogates have been extensively employed in scenarios concerning "life-threatening" impacts (e.g., penetrating bullets or automotive accidents). However, more frequently occurring nonlethal injuries (e.g., fractures, tears, lacerations, contusions) often result in full or partial debilitation in contexts where optimal human performance is crucial (e.g., military, sports). Detailed study of these injuries requires human surrogates with superior biofidelity to those currently available if PPE designs are to improve. The opportunities afforded by new technologies, materials, instrumentation, and processing capabilities should be exploited to develop a new generation of more sophisticated human surrogates. This paper presents a review of the current state of the art in human surrogate construction, highlighting weaknesses and opportunities, to promote research into improved surrogates for PPE development.

  13. Gliding characteristics between flexor tendons and surrounding tissues in the carpal tunnel: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Osamura, Naoki; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel with varied wrist positions and tendon motion styles, which may help us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and repetitive hand motion. Eight fresh human cadaveric wrists and hands were used. The peak (PGR) and mean (MGR) gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon were measured with the wrist in 0, 30, and 60 degrees of flexion and extension. While moving all three fingers together, the PGR at 60 degrees flexion was significantly higher than that at 0, 30, or 60 degrees extension. While moving the middle finger alone, the PGR at 60 and 30 degrees flexion was significantly higher than the PGR at 60 degrees extension. The PGR moving the middle finger FDS alone was significantly greater than that for all three digits moving together in 0, 30, and 60 degrees flexion. Differential finger motion with wrist flexion elevated the tendon gliding resistance in the carpal tunnel, which may be relevant in considering the possible role of wrist position and activity in the etiology of CTS.

  14. Biomechanical study of the influence of the weight of equipment on selected trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christoph; Lindner, Tobias; Woitge, Sandra; Glass, Aenne; Finze, Susanne; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Overexertion and pain of the musculoskeletal system may occur partly owing to load application by the equipment. Both the weight of equipment and the duration of loading are relevant. The aim of the present study was to examine the extent of loading and resultant strain in the trunk muscles. Therefore, the trunk posture of soldiers and muscular activity in reaction to different equipment components (helmet, load-carrying equipment, gun and backpack) were evaluated. Electromyography was performed and a visual assessment of body axis was conducted based on standardised planar images. Data indicate that the activity of the trunk muscles examined (latissimus dorsi, trapezius and pectoralis major) is dependent on the weight and distribution of the equipment components. Activity in the trapezius muscle, for instance, was doubled during specific load application. Moreover, the method of carrying the rifle had a significant influence on the activity of the trapezius muscle (one-sided decrease of activity by 50%). Subjects were able to stabilise the body axis in the coronal plane through increased muscle activity, however, in the sagittal plane a compensatory ventral inclination of the body was observed. Uneven load distribution can lead to an irregular strain on the musculoskeletal system.

  15. Biomechanical Study of the Fixation Plates For Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kug Jin; Song, Eun Kyoo; Seon, Jong Keun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the mechanical stability of three types of plate systems for opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. Materials and Methods Forty-eight fresh frozen porcine tibia specimens were assigned to three different fixation device groups: Aescular group (16 specimens) was fixed with Aescular plates; Puddu group (16 specimens) with a Puddu plate, and TomoFix group (16 specimens) with a TomoFix plate. We compared axial displacements under compression loads from 200 to 2,000 N and maximal loads at failure among 8 specimens per group. We also compared displacements under cyclic load after 100 cycles at a compressive load of 2,000 N among 8 specimens per group. Results In all three groups, displacement under compression load increased with the increase in the axial compressive load; however, no significant intergroup differences were observed in the mean values under tested loading conditions. The mean maximal loads at failure were not significantly different (6,055, 6,798, and 6,973 N in the Aescular, Puddu, and TomoFix groups, respectively; p=0.41). While the TomoFix group showed less extension and strain during the cyclic load test, the mean values showed no significant differences among groups. Conclusions All three plate systems were found to provide fixation stability suitable for bearing axial compression and cyclic loads while walking. PMID:26389072

  16. The importance of accurate muscle modelling for biomechanical analyses: a case study with a lizard skull

    PubMed Central

    Gröning, Flora; Jones, Marc E. H.; Curtis, Neil; Herrel, Anthony; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E.; Fagan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-based simulation techniques such as multi-body dynamics analysis are becoming increasingly popular in the field of skull mechanics. Multi-body models can be used for studying the relationships between skull architecture, muscle morphology and feeding performance. However, to be confident in the modelling results, models need to be validated against experimental data, and the effects of uncertainties or inaccuracies in the chosen model attributes need to be assessed with sensitivity analyses. Here, we compare the bite forces predicted by a multi-body model of a lizard (Tupinambis merianae) with in vivo measurements, using anatomical data collected from the same specimen. This subject-specific model predicts bite forces that are very close to the in vivo measurements and also shows a consistent increase in bite force as the bite position is moved posteriorly on the jaw. However, the model is very sensitive to changes in muscle attributes such as fibre length, intrinsic muscle strength and force orientation, with bite force predictions varying considerably when these three variables are altered. We conclude that accurate muscle measurements are crucial to building realistic multi-body models and that subject-specific data should be used whenever possible. PMID:23614944

  17. Vein grafts to augment flexor tendon repairs: a biomechanical study on strength and gap resistance.

    PubMed

    Rodger, M P; Theobald, P; Giddins, G

    2015-09-01

    The ultimate tensile repair strength and gap formation of the pig extensor tendons repaired with a standard 4-strand Savage with epitendinous suture repair, was compared with a new technique of adding a vein sleeve. Force and displacement data were recorded, and video images during linear cyclic loading up to failure. At 35 N, video-graphic observation detected significantly smaller gap lengths in the standard and vein repair specimens compared with standard repair specimens (p = 0.047). The incidence of 3 mm gaps between the repaired tendon ends in the standard repair group was 20 %, but no 3 mm gaps were seen in the standard and vein specimens. The addition of a vein sleeve increased the ultimate tensile strength of the standard repair from 50.4 N (4.5) to 55.4 N (4.5); this was statistically significant (p = 0.03). This study demonstrated that the addition of a vein graft prevented gap formation and increased ultimate tensile strength of tendon repair.

  18. Elbow Biomechanics of Pitching

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Shayne; Damrow, Derek; Kilian, Christopher; Lyon, Roger; Liu, Xue-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elbow pain and elbow injuries are common in youth baseball players. It is not clear whether pitching experience and/or age creates biomechanical differences at the elbow and whether these differences place an athlete at greater risk. Hypotheses: (1) Youth pitchers will have differing elbow kinematics with regard to flexion/extension, internal/external rotation, and pronation/supination when compared with nonbaseball athletes and (2) younger youth pitchers will have differing elbow kinematics when compared with older youth pitchers. Study Design: Case-control study. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Twenty-seven healthy male youths age 10 to 18 years were recruited and divided into an experience group (n = 18 pitchers) and a no experience group (n = 9 nonbaseball athletes). The experience group was subdivided by age into the younger experience subgroup (n = 10 pitchers) and the older experience subgroup (n = 8 pitchers). Biomechanics were recorded using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. Subjects from each group were averaged together, and a Mann-Whitney U test was utilized for statistical analysis. Results: The experience group had greater external rotation during late cocking (−47.8° vs 5.8°) and greater flexion during early cocking (112.8° vs 100.1°). The younger experience subgroup had greater range of motion with supination-pronation during early cocking (21.9° vs 11.2°) and late cocking (5.9° vs 2.0°). Conclusion: Youth athletes with pitching experience had an increase in maximal external rotation in late cocking and maximal flexion in early cocking, which suggests experience may be a factor to these parameters. The age of experienced baseball pitchers may be a factor due to differences observed with supination and pronation. Clinical Relevance: Learning to throw is a skill that leads to changes in elbow motion; however, these changes may be stable once athletes reach grade school age. Minimal differences were noted between the

  19. Numerical Optimization of the Position in Femoral Head of Proximal Locking Screws of Proximal Femoral Nail System; Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Konya, Mehmet Nuri; Verim, Özgür

    2017-09-29

    Proximal femoral fracture rates are increasing due to osteoporosis and traffic accidents. Proximal femoral nails are routinely used in the treatment of these fractures in the proximal femur. To compare various combinations and to determine the ideal proximal lag screw position in pertrochanteric fractures (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen classification 31-A1) of the femur by using optimized finite element analysis. Biomechanical study. Computed tomography images of patients' right femurs were processed with Mimics. Afterwards a solid femur model was created with SolidWorks 2015 and transferred to ANSYS Workbench 16.0 for response surface optimization analysis which was carried out according to anterior-posterior (-10°study, we couldn't find any correlation between proximal lag screw movement and tip-apex distance on stresses of the fracture surfaces, but the proximal lag screw

  20. Knotless single-row rotator cuff repair: a comparative biomechanical study of 2 knotless suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Efird, Chad; Traub, Shaun; Baldini, Todd; Rioux-Forker, Dana; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana; Hawkins, Monica; McCarty, Eric

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the gap formation during cyclic loading, maximum repair strength, and failure mode of single-row full-thickness supraspinatus repairs performed using 2 knotless suture anchors with differing internal suture-retention mechanisms in a human cadaver model. Nine matched pairs of cadaver shoulders were used. Full-thickness tears were induced by detaching the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tuberosity. Single-row repairs were performed with either type I (Opus Magnum PI; ArthroCare, Austin, Texas) or type II (ReelX STT; Stryker, Mahwah, New Jersey) knotless suture anchors. The repaired tendon was cycled from 10 to 90 N for 500 cycles, followed by load to failure. Gap formation was measured at 5, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 cycles with a video digitizing system. Anchor type or location (anterior or posterior) had no effect on gap formation during cyclic loading regardless of position (anterior, P=.385; posterior, P=.389). Maximum load to failure was significantly greater (P=.018) for repairs performed with type II anchors (288±62 N) compared with type I anchors (179±39 N). Primary failure modes were anchor pullout and tendon tearing for type II anchors and suture slippage through the anchor for type I anchors. The internal ratcheting suture-retention mechanism of type II anchors may have helped this anchor outperform the suture-cinching mechanism of type I anchors by supporting significantly higher loads before failure and minimizing suture slippage, potentially leading to stronger repairs clinically. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. The use of biomechanics in the study of movement in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregor, R. J.; Broker, J. P.; Ryan, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    As biomechanists interested in the adaptability of the human body to microgravity conditions, it appears that our job is not only to make sure that the astronauts can function adequately in space but also that they can function upon their return to Earth. This is especially significant since many of the projects now being designed at NASA concern themselves with humans performing for up to 3 years in microgravity. While the Extended Duration Orbiter flights may last 30 to 60 days, future flights to Mars using current propulsion technology may last from 2 to 3 years. It is for this range of time that the adaptation process must be studied. Specifically, biomechanists interested in space travel realize that human performance capabilities will change as a result of exposure to microgravity. The role of the biomechanist then is to first understand the nature of the changes realized by the body. These changes include adaptation by the musculoskeletal system, the nervous system, cardiorespiratory system, and the cardiovascular system. As biomechanists, it is also our role to take part in the development of countermeasure programs that involve some form of regular exercise. Exercise countermeasure programs should include a variety of modalities with full knowledge of the loads imposed on the body by these modalities. Any exercise programs that are to be conducted by the astronauts during space travel must consider the fact that the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems degrade as a function of flight duration. Additionally, it must be understood that the central nervous system modifies its output in the control of the human body during space flight and most importantly, we must prepare the astronauts for their return to one g.

  2. Upward squatting in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Valdeci C; Marconi, Nádia F; dos Santos, Irlei; Almeida, Gil L

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis on whether individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) try to avoid knee position during upward squatting so as not to aggravate this syndrome. Also, we tested whether PFPS would generate changes in the kinetic and electromyographic (EMG) strategies used to perform this task. Eight healthy subjects and 8 subjects with PFPS, but without a history of pain for at least 30 days, took part in the experiment. They were asked to perform upward squatting with knees initially flexed at 60° (very flexed) until reaching an upright position. Angle, velocity, and acceleration (kinematic) were reconstructed for knee and ankle joints. The torques at these joints were calculated using inverse dynamics, taking into account anthropometric and inertial characteristics of each subject, including records from force data. Only activities of major muscles were recorded. The kinetic and EMG profiles were quantified during acceleration and deceleration phases of the upward squatting. Both healthy and PFPS subjects used the same kinetic and EMG strategies to perform the upward squatting, even though the magnitude of the muscle activities were decreased for the latter group. Compared to the control group, the PFPS subjects presented larger joint ankle torques and smaller knee joint torques. However, the subjects avoided keeping their knees very flexed at the initial position. Group differences in the kinetic and EMG strategies can be explained by differences in the initial position, suggesting a protective strategy used by subjects with PFPS. Therefore, for these subjects, coaches and therapists should avoid using this exercise when the knee is required to move above 40° flexion.

  3. Latarjet Fixation: A Cadaveric Biomechanical Study Evaluating Cortical and Cannulated Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Hasham M; Monroe, Emily J; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option.

  4. Fracture resistance of orthodontic mini-implants: a biomechanical in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Wilmes, Benedict; Panayotidis, Agamemnon; Drescher, Dieter

    2011-08-01

    Sufficient primary stability is of importance for the survival of orthodontic mini-implants. This means that adequate torque has to be achieved during insertion. However, as moments exceeding the fracture resistance of a mini-implant may result in their fracture, the maximum torque load capacity should be known. In this study, the threshold torque values resulting in the fracture of various mini-implant types and diameters were evaluated. Forty-one different mini-implants with diameters ranging from 1.3 to 2.0 mm (Aarhus screw, Abso Anchor, Ancora, Bone screw, Dual Top, Lomas, MAS, O.S.A.S, Ortho Easy, Spider Screw, and Tomas pin) were inserted in acrylic glass by a robot system. Ten specimens of each mini-implant type were tested. The insertion torque was measured and the maximum torque at the time of mini-implant fracture was evaluated. Significance of the mean value differences was evaluated by Kruskal-Wallis tests. Fracture moments varied depending on the diameter of the mini-implants. The measured values ranged from 108.9 Nmm (MAS 1.3×11 mm) to 640.9 Nmm (Lomas 2.0×11 mm). The differences were highly statistically significant (P<0.001). The risk of mini-implant fracture should be borne in mind at the time of insertion, especially if mini-implants with a small diameter are employed. To minimize the risk of fracture, pre-drilling should be carried out if the mini-implants are to be inserted at a site with a high bone density.

  5. Modified fixations for distal femur fractures following total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and clinical relevance study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Tai, Ching-Lung; Yu, Tzai-Chiu; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chen-Yu; Liu, Keng-Chang

    2016-10-01

    Distal femur fractures adjacent to total knee arthroplasty are a rare yet complex problem. Recently, extramedullary locking plate and retrograde intramedullary nail fixations have become popular options, but the complication rates associated with these procedures are 15-20 %. Modified fixations were assessed in an effort to reduce complications from unstable periprosthetic fractures. Using experimental and finite element methods, this study compared the construct behaviours of a locking plate, a retrograde intramedullary nail, and their modifications (a spiral-blade supplemented in an intramedullary nail or a locking plate/allograft hybrid) when subjected to various fracture types, locations, loading conditions, and bony strength. The implanted models were used to assess construct stiffness, fracture micromotion, and implant stress under different osteoporotic conditions. Finally, we collected 40 cases for radiological analysis to indicate the appropriate procedure for treating periprosthetic fractures following total knee arthroplasty. Regardless of the fracture type, femoral constructs fixed with a conventional or spiral-blade supplemented intramedullary nail exhibited higher axial but lower torsional stiffness than those fixed with a locking plate. Torsional deformation occurred if the lower-positioned fracture had no medial support. The locking plate/allograft construct exhibited the highest stiffness and the least micromotion. A review of 40 clinical cases confirmed the above findings regarding the locking plate/allograft construct. The spiral-blade supplement of retrograde intramedullary nail and locking plate/allograft modified constructs significantly stabilizes the unstable fractured gaps. The locking plate/allograft is recommended for the periprosthetic fractures with deficient bone stock and severe osteoporosis to improve alignment and healing potentials.

  6. Corneal Biomechanical Properties and Glaucoma-Related Quantitative Traits in the EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Anthony P.; Chan, Michelle P. Y.; Broadway, David C.; Garway-Heath, David F.; Luben, Robert; Yip, Jennifer L. Y.; Hayat, Shabina; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We examined the association of corneal hysteresis (CH) with Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT)– and Glaucoma Detection with Variable Corneal Compensation scanning laser polarimeter (GDxVCC)–derived measures in a British population. Methods. The EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study is nested within a multicenter cohort study—the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer. Ocular response analyzer (ORA), HRT3, and GDxVCC measurements were taken at the research clinic. Three ORA measurements were taken per eye, and the single best value used. Participants meeting predefined criteria were referred for a second examination, including Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) and central corneal thickness (CCT) measurement. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the associations of CH with HRT and GDxVCC parameters, adjusted for disc area. The GDxVCC analyses were adjusted further for typical scan score to handle atypical retardation. Results. There were complete research clinic data from 5134 participants. Corneal hysteresis was associated positively with HRT rim area (P < 0.001), and GDxVCC retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) average thickness (P = 0.006) and modulation (P = 0.003), and associated negatively with HRT linear cup-to-disc ratio (LCDR, P < 0.001), after adjustment for Goldmann-correlated IOP and other possible confounders. In the 602 participants undergoing the second examination, CH was associated negatively with LCDR (P = 0.008) after adjustment for GAT, CCT, and other possible confounders. Conclusions. Lower CH was associated with HRT and GDxVCC parameters in a direction that is seen in glaucoma and with ageing. Further research is required to establish if this is a causal relationship, or due to residual confounding by age, IOP, or CCT. PMID:24334448

  7. Comparison of two fixation methods for arthrodesis of the calcaneocuboid joint: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Milshteyn, Michael A; Dwyer, Mark; Andrecovich, Christopher; Bir, Cynthia; Needleman, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    The traditional fixation for a calcaneocuboid (CC) arthrodesis in triple arthrodesis is with a 6.5-mm cancellous screw. This procedure can be technically challenging. Fixation with a locking compression plate (LCP) may be easier to perform while achieving compression perpendicular to the fusion site. The purpose of this study was to compare the load to failure and the stiffness for each fixation method. Five matched-pair cadaver feet had an arthrodesis of the CC joint. For each matched pair, one was fixed with a screw and the other with an LCP. Surface bead markers were applied. Each specimen was then secured to a material testing machine through the calcaneus. The plantar surface of the cuboid faced the hydraulic ram to simulate weightbearing. A force was applied while the specimen was recorded with a high-resolution camera. The endpoint was maximal force at 2-mm separation between the calcaneus and cuboid measured along a horizontal axis. The average force to failure and the average stiffness in the screw group were significantly less than the LCP group (P < .05). The screw construct failed in pullout from the cuboid; the LCP construct failed by plastic deformation of the plate. Calcaneocuboid joint fixation with the LCP withstood a higher load until failure and demonstrated greater stiffness than with a 6.5-mm cancellous lag screw. The use of LCP fixation can be considered as an alternative to oblique lag screw fixation for CC arthrodesis in a triple arthrodesis. It remains to be determined if LCP fixation leads to better clinical outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. In vitro biomechanical study of femoral torsion disorders: effect on femoro-tibial kinematics.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, S; Dugailly, P-M; Baillon, B; Lefevre, P; Rooze, M; Salvia, P; Feipel, V

    2012-12-01

    Gonarthrosis is a degenerative disease mainly found in elderly persons. Frontal plane deviations are known to induce lateral and medial gonarthrosis. Nevertheless, patients suffer from gonarthrosis without frontal deviations. Lower limb torsions disorders have been considered as a factor inducing lateral and medial gonarthrosis. This paper reports an in vitro study aiming at quantifying the relationships between experimental femoral torsion disorders and femoro-tibial kinematics. Five fresh-frozen lower limbs were used. Specimens were fixed on an experimental jig and muscles were loaded. A six-degree-of-freedom Instrumented Spatial Linkage was used to measure femoro-tibial kinematics. Experimental femoral osteotomies were performed to simulate various degrees of medial and lateral torsion. Internal tibial rotation, abduction/adduction and proximo-distal, medio-lateral and antero-posterior translations were measured during knee flexion. Internal tibial rotation and abduction/adduction were significantly influenced (P<0.001) by femoral torsion disorder conditions. Medial femoral torsion increased tibial adduction and decreased internal rotation during knee flexion. Opposite changes were observed during lateral femoral torsion. Concerning translations, medial femoral torsion induced a significant (P<0.05) decrease of medial translation and inversely for lateral femoral torsion. No interactions between femoral torsion disorders and range of motion were observed. Our results showed that medial and lateral femoral torsion disorders induced alterations of femoro-tibial kinematics when applied in normally aligned lower limbs. These results highlight a potential clinical relevance of the effect of femoral torsion alterations on knee kinematics that may be related to the development of long-term knee disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.