Science.gov

Sample records for beam blank continuous

  1. An electron optical theory of beam blanking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesley, M.

    1993-11-01

    Trajectory equations are derived in closed form for electrons in time-dependent electric fields produced by beam blankers. Simple parallel plate and double-deflection blankers with transmission delay lines are evaluated. Lens imaging of the apparent beam motion is analyzed by developing the virtual electron trajectories obtained from linear extrapolation back into the blanker region. Lens excitation effects and conjugate blanking optics can then be described. The blanker voltage is represented by a damped exponential cosine term, which satisfies a typical circuit equation for the driver-amplifier. The form of the trajectory equation is written as a 3×3 matrix, which comprises a set of conditional solutions that are determined by blanker geometry. The optimum delay line length of any double-deflection blanker can then be determined. The blanker-induced beam jitter is shown to be significantly reduced by using this configuration. The effect of the blanker beam stop on the motion at the target plane is given by combining results on the real and apparent beam trajectories.

  2. Testing glueline continuity in standard-size hardwood blanks by mechanical methods

    Treesearch

    David W. Patterson; Nathan D. Hesterman; Charles Gatchell

    1991-01-01

    Glueline continuity is very critical in standard-size hardwood blanks because the blanks are cut up into small furniture parts, and a small gap in the glueline of a blank may extend across the whole part—or a gap may appear as a crack in the final product. Strength is not a critical factor. The objective of this study was to determine if a gap in a glueline can be...

  3. Time-resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy with sub-nanosecond beam blanking for direct evaluation of the local density of states.

    PubMed

    Moerland, Robert J; Weppelman, I Gerward C; Garming, Mathijs W H; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P

    2016-10-17

    We show cathodoluminescence-based time-resolved electron beam spectroscopy in order to directly probe the spontaneous emission decay rate that is modified by the local density of states in a nanoscale environment. In contrast to dedicated laser-triggered electron-microscopy setups, we use commercial hardware in a standard SEM, which allows us to easily switch from pulsed to continuous operation of the SEM. Electron pulses of 80-90 ps duration are generated by conjugate blanking of a high-brightness electron beam, which allows probing emitters within a large range of decay rates. Moreover, we simultaneously attain a resolution better than λ/10, which ensures details at deep-subwavelength scales can be retrieved. As a proof-of-principle, we employ the pulsed electron beam to spatially measure excited-state lifetime modifications in a phosphor material across the edge of an aluminum half-plane, coated on top of the phosphor. The measured emission dynamics can be directly related to the structure of the sample by recording photon arrival histograms together with the secondary-electron signal. Our results show that time-resolved electron cathodoluminescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool of choice for nanophotonics, within reach of a large audience.

  4. Reticle blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography: Ion beam sputter deposition of low defect density Mo/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S.P.; Kania, D.R.; Kearney, P.A.; Levesque, R.A.; Hayes, A.V.; Druz, B.; Osten, E.; Rajan, R.; Hedge, H.

    1996-06-24

    We report on growth of low defect density Mo/Si multilayer (ML) coatings. The coatings were grown in a deposition system designed for EUVL reticle blank fabrication. Complete, 81 layer, high reflectance Mo/Si ML coatings were deposited on 150 mm dia (100) oriented Si wafer substrates using ion beam sputter deposition. Added defects, measured by optical scattering, correspond to defect densities of 2x10{sup -2}/cm{sup 2}. This represents a reduction in defect density of Mo/Si ML coatings by a factor of 10{sup 5}.

  5. Analysis of continuous beams with joint slip

    Treesearch

    L. A. Soltis

    1981-01-01

    A computer analysis with user guidelines to analyze partially continuous multi-span beams is presented. Partial continuity is due to rotational slip which occurs at spliced joints at the supports of continuous beams such as floor joists. Beam properties, loads, and joint slip are input; internal forces, reactions, and deflections are output.

  6. High-performance 6-inch EUV mask blanks produced under real production conditions by ion-beam sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Hans W.; Sobel, Frank; Aschke, Lutz; Renno, Markus; Krieger, Juergen; Buttgereit, Ute; Hess, Guenter; Lenzen, Frank; Knapp, Konrad; Yulin, Sergey A.; Feigl, Torsten; Kuhlmann, Thomas; Kaiser, Norbert

    2002-12-01

    EUV mask blanks consist of two thin film systems deposited on low thermal expansion 6 inch substrates (LTEM). First there is the multilayer stack with around 100 alternating layers of elements with different optical properties which are topped by a capping layer. The absorber stack which consists of a buffer and a absorber layer is next. Here a minimum absorption of EUV light of 99 % is required. The stress in both layer systems should be as low as possible. The reduction of defects to an absolute minimum is one of the main challenges. The high-reflective Mo/Si multilayer coatings were designed for normal incidence reflectivity and successfully deposited on 6-inch LTEM substrates by ion-beam sputtering. X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used for characterization of the multilayer interfaces and the surface morphology. The results are correlated to the measured normal incidence reflectivity using synchrotron radiation at the "Physikalisch- Technischen Bundesanstalt" (PTB) refelctometer at BESSY II, Berlin, Germany. A high resolution laser scanner was used to measure the particle distribution. First multilayer defect results are presented.

  7. EUVL Mask Blank Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Mirkarimi, P; Stearns, D G; Sweeney, D; Chapman, H N; Clift, M; Hector, S; Yi, M

    2002-05-22

    EUV mask blanks are fabricated by depositing a reflective Mo/Si multilayer film onto super-polished substrates. Small defects in this thin film coating can significantly alter the reflected field and introduce defects in the printed image. Ideally one would want to produce defect-free mask blanks; however, this may be very difficult to achieve in practice. One practical way to increase the yield of mask blanks is to effectively repair multilayer defects, and to this effect they present two complementary defect repair strategies for use on multilayer-coated EUVL mask blanks. A defect is any area on the mask which causes unwanted variations in EUV dose in the aerial image obtained in a printing tool, and defect repair is correspondingly defined as any strategy that renders a defect unprintable during exposure. The term defect mitigation can be adopted to describe any strategy which renders a critical defect non-critical when printed, and in this regard a non-critical defect is one that does not adversely affect device function. Defects in the patterned absorber layer consist of regions where metal, typically chrome, is unintentionally added or removed from the pattern leading to errors in the reflected field. There currently exists a mature technology based on ion beam milling and ion beam assisted deposition for repairing defects in the absorber layer of transmission lithography masks, and it is reasonable to expect that this technology will be extended to the repair of absorber defects in EUVL masks. However, techniques designed for the repair of absorber layers can not be directly applied to the repair of defects in the mask blank, and in particular the multilayer film. In this paper they present for the first time a new technique for the repair of amplitude defects as well as recent results on the repair of phase defects.

  8. A slow, continuous beam of cold benzonitrile.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David; Doyle, John M

    2015-02-21

    A cold, continuous, high flux beam of benzonitrile has been created via buffer gas cooling. The beam has a typical forward velocity of 67 ± 5 m s(-1), a velocity spread of ±30 m s(-1) and a typical flux of 10(15) molecules s(-1), measured via microwave spectroscopy. This beam represents the slowest demonstrated forward velocity for any cold beam of medium sized (>5 atoms) polyatomic molecules produced to date, demonstrating a new source for high resolution spectroscopy. The expected resolution of a spectrometer based on such beams exceeds current instrument-limited resolution by almost an order of magnitude. This source also provides an attractive starting point for further spatial manipulation of such molecules, including eventual trapping.

  9. A continuous cold atomic beam interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hongbo; Feng, Yanying Yan, Xueshu; Jiang, Zhikun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Xiaojia; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2015-03-07

    We demonstrate an atom interferometer that uses a laser-cooled continuous beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms having velocities of 10–20 m/s. With spatially separated Raman beams to coherently manipulate the atomic wave packets, Mach–Zehnder interference fringes are observed at an interference distance of 2L = 19 mm. The apparatus operates within a small enclosed area of 0.07 mm{sup 2} at a bandwidth of 190 Hz with a deduced sensitivity of 7.8×10{sup −5} rad/s/√(Hz) for rotations. Using a low-velocity continuous atomic source in an atom interferometer enables high sampling rates and bandwidths without sacrificing sensitivity and compactness, which are important for applications in real dynamic environments.

  10. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply the...

  11. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply the...

  12. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply the...

  13. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply...

  14. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply...

  15. Mask Blank Defect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M A; Sommargren, G E

    2000-02-04

    required to keep pace with this aggressive roadmap. Depending on the specific lithography used for a particular generation, mask inspection specifics may change, but the methodology will essentially remain the same. Mask blanks will have to undergo 100% area inspection for defects larger than the maximum acceptable size. Since masks are becoming a significant cost factor in the ownership of lithography tools, this is a critical step--patterning defective mask blanks would be an economic disaster. Inspection does not necessarily have to be done at the ultraviolet wavelength used for the lithography since defects at the mask blank level will interact with visible light, albeit very weakly. Techniques using visible light are appealing because they are familiar to the user, relatively straightforward to manufacture and safe to use, and when designed properly, extendable over many generations. The technology used in commercial wafer inspection tools is currently the prime candidate for mask blank inspection. It is based on direct detection of scattered light from the defect in one or more directions. Figure 1 shows a typical setup with detectors in both the forward scatter direction (bright-field detection) and away from the specular direction (dark-field detection). In these setups the beam and/or mask blank is scanned to achieve full inspection of the blank. The scattered signal from a defect is therefore a short pulse immersed in the dynamic background scatter from the inherent surface roughness of the mask blank and in the light scattered from the optics and mechanical parts within the instrument. State-of-the-art instruments cannot detect defects smaller than 80 nm, insufficient for the next technology node. The research done over the last year addressed defect detection using a different approach --a heterodyne interference/synchronous detection technique that has the potential of enhanced detection of the scattered light from small defects. This detection is accomplished

  16. Evaluation of backside particle contamination and electrostatic chuck design on the cleanliness of EUV reticle mask blanks in a multilayer Mo/Si ion beam deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. V.; Randive, R.; Reiss, I.; Menendez, J.; Kearney, P.; Sugiyama, T.

    2008-10-01

    A key requirement for the success of EUV lithography is a high volume supply of defect-free Mo/Si multilayer (ML)- coated mask blanks. The process of fabricating mask blanks is particularly sensitive to particle contamination because decoration by the deposition of the reflective stack on sub-lithographic (< 22 nm) particles can create larger, printable defects. One possible source of added defects is the mask substrate fixturing method, which, in the Veeco ion beam deposition (IBD) system used to deposit our ML coatings, must allow tilt and rotation of a vertically oriented substrate. As commonly practiced, an electrostatic chuck (ESC) is used instead of a mechanical clamping fixture to avoid transferring particles to the front surface of the mask by mechanical clamping and declamping operations. However, a large number of particles can be introduced to the backside of the mask by electrostatic clamping. Up to now, there has been little concern about such backside particles, except for relatively large particles (> 1 micron) that may affect out-of-plane distortion of the mask in an EUV lithography tool. As the cleanliness of the EUV masks and mask blank fabrication approaches perfection, however, there is more concern that particles transferred from the backside to the frontside of the mask may be a significant issue. Such transfer may occur in the deposition chamber, in the substrate cassette, or in the transfer module and may be indirect. In this paper, we present data from characterizing the amount, size, shape, composition, and location of the backside particle defects generated by electrostatic clamping, using a particle counter and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and compare results for a pin-type e-chuck, which has a small contact area, with the standard flat e-chuck. The key result is a 10X to 30X reduction in the total number of backside particles for the pin chuck. Also, preliminary data indicates that the pin chuck stays cleaner under service

  17. Ion beam sputter deposition of low-defect EUV mask blanks on 6-in. LTEM substrates in a real production environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Hans W.; Aschke, Lutz; Schubert, Birgit; Krieger, Juergen; Lenzen, Frank; Yulin, Sergey A.; Feigl, Torsten; Kuhlmann, Thomas; Kaiser, Norbert

    2002-07-01

    EUV mask blanks consist of two thin film systems deposited on low thermal expansion 6 inch substrates (LTEM). First there is the multilayer stack with around 100 alternating layers of elements with different optical properties which are topped by a capping layer. Beside optimal optical properties it is also necessary to improve the heat stability of the layer system. The absorber stack which consists of a buffer and an absorber layer is next. Here a minimum absorption of EUV light of 99 percent is required. The stress in both layer systems should be as low as possible. The reduction of defects to an absolute minimum is one of the main challenges. The high-reflective Mo/Si multilayer coatings were designed for normal incidence reflectivity and successfully deposited on 6-inch LTEM substrates by ion-beam sputtering. X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used for characterization of the multilayer interfaces and the surface morphology. The results are correlated to the measured normal incidence reflectivity using synchrotron radiation at the PTB reflectometer at BESSY II, Berlin, Germany.

  18. Buckling of continuously supported hinged beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G. K. N.

    1975-01-01

    The effect on the buckling load of a hinge at the center of an infinite beam supported by a semiinfinite elastic continuum is analyzed using the complex Fourier transforms. An expression is obtained for the relationship between the surface deflection of the elastic continuum and the pressure distribution acting on the surface, and solutions are obtained for the assumed form of the pressure distribution below the beam. The analysis is applied to cases of uniform pressure over the width of the beam and a pressure distribution that occurs below a rigid stamp. The results show that the buckling loads for an infinite beam with a hinge at the center and supported by a semiinfinite elastic continuum are approximately one half of those for a beam without a hinge, and that this ratio is exactly one half for an infinite beam resting on a Winkler foundation.

  19. Buckling of continuously supported hinged beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G. K. N.

    1975-01-01

    The effect on the buckling load of a hinge at the center of an infinite beam supported by a semiinfinite elastic continuum is analyzed using the complex Fourier transforms. An expression is obtained for the relationship between the surface deflection of the elastic continuum and the pressure distribution acting on the surface, and solutions are obtained for the assumed form of the pressure distribution below the beam. The analysis is applied to cases of uniform pressure over the width of the beam and a pressure distribution that occurs below a rigid stamp. The results show that the buckling loads for an infinite beam with a hinge at the center and supported by a semiinfinite elastic continuum are approximately one half of those for a beam without a hinge, and that this ratio is exactly one half for an infinite beam resting on a Winkler foundation.

  20. Laser-cooled continuous ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Hangst, J.S.; Nielsen, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    A collaboration with a group in Arhus, Denmark, using their storage ring ASTRID, brought about better understanding of ion beams cooled to very low temperatures. The longitudinal Schottky fluctuation noise signals from a cooled beam were studied. The fluctuation signals are distorted by the effects of space charge as was observed in earlier measurements at other facilities. However, the signal also exhibits previously unobserved coherent components. The ions` velocity distribution, measured by a laser fluorescence technique suggests that the coherence is due to suppression of Landau damping. The observed behavior has important implications for the eventual attainment of a crystalline ion beam in a storage ring. A significant issue is the transverse temperature of the beam -- where no direct diagnostics are available and where molecular dynamics simulations raise interesting questions about equilibrium.

  1. EUV blank inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. H.; Tonk, C.; Spriegel, D.; Han, Hak-Seung; Cho, Wonil; Wurm, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    One of the major topics for the introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) technology is the availability of defect-free masks. From the mask makers' perspective, the quality of the incoming blank material is one of the key ingredients impacting the yield of structured masks. Besides flatness and layer thickness uniformity, the number of defects determines the final quality of the mask delivered to the customer for printing. Defects within the layers of optical blanks have shown that they have a growing impact on the mask structuring process, well below the usual defect specifications of the blanks. It is expected that this finding will also hold true for material layers above the multi-layer. In addition to printing performance, EUV masks need to have a defect-free multi-layer. While this layer is easily accessible during blank production, mask makers usually acquire the complete blank stacks with or without the coated resist. Incoming blank inspection, therefore, must check the quality of the complete stack without destroying any of the functionality of these layers. Siemens and AMTC have jointly developed a blank inspection tool that has been installed in AMTC's Dresden facility and that allows the screening of an EUV blank under these boundary conditions. Previously, SEMATECH successfully installed an M7360 from Lasertec in its Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC) in Albany, NY, that shows much better sensitivity data than SEMATECH's earlier tool, the Lasertec M1350. This paper describes the early performance of the Siemens DF-40XP on programmed multi-layer defect blanks and regular blanks and compares it to that of the existing tools at the SEMATECH MBDC.

  2. Modified blank ammunition injuries.

    PubMed

    Ogunc, Gokhan I; Ozer, M Tahir; Coskun, Kagan; Uzar, Ali Ihsan

    2009-12-15

    Blank firing weapons are designed only for discharging blank ammunition cartridges. Because they are cost-effective, are easily accessible and can be modified to live firearms plus their unclear legal situation in Turkish Law makes them very popular in Turkey. 2004 through 2008, a total of 1115 modified blank weapons were seized in Turkey. Blank firing weapons are easily modified by owners, making them suitable for discharging live firearm ammunition or modified blank ammunitions. Two common methods are used for modification of blank weapons. After the modification, these weapons can discharge the live ammunition. However, due to compositional durability problems with these types of weapons; the main trend is to use the modified blank ammunitions rather than live firearm ammunition fired from modified blank firing weapons. In this study, two types of modified blank weapons and two types of modified blank cartridges were tested on three different target models. Each of the models' shooting side was coated with 1.3+/-2 mm thickness chrome tanned cowhide as a skin simulant. The first model was only coated with skin simulant. The second model was coated with skin simulant and 100% cotton police shirt. The third model was coated with skin simulant and jean denim. After the literature evaluation four high risky anatomic locations (the neck area; the eyes; the thorax area and inguinal area) were pointed out for the steel and lead projectiles are discharged from the modified blank weapons especially in close range (0-50 cm). The target models were designed for these anatomic locations. For the target models six Transparent Ballistic Candle blocks (TCB) were prepared and divided into two test groups. The first group tests were performed with lead projectiles and second group with steel projectile. The shortest penetration depth (lead projectile: 4.358 cm; steel projectile 8.032 cm) was recorded in the skin simulant and jean denim coated block for both groups. In both groups

  3. Entanglement Rate for Gaussian Continuous Variable Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-24

    entangledGaussian beamswith arbitrary correlators . This expression is especially useful for situationswhere the source emits an arbitrary frequency spectrum...However, such a naive approach fails if there are correlations between subsequent pairs, or if we consider entangled beams of radiation that cannot be...frequency integral over what we call a ‘spectral density of entanglement’.We showhow to obtain this from the two-point time correlators of the entangled

  4. Modulation of continuous electron beams in plasma wake-fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1988-09-08

    In this paper we discuss the interaction of a continuous electron beam with wake-field generated plasma waves. Using a one-dimensional two fluid model, a fully nonlinear analytical description of the interaction is obtained. The phenomena of continuous beam modulation and wave period shortening are discussed. The relationship between these effects and the two-stream instability is also examined. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Photomultiplier blanking circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclenahan, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Circuit for protecting photomultiplier equipment from current surges which occur when exposed to brilliant illumination is discussed. Components of circuit and details of operation are provided. Circuit diagram to show action of blanking pulse on zener diode is included.

  6. Magnetron sputtering for the production of EUV mask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Patrick; Ngai, Tat; Karumuri, Anil; Yum, Jung; Lee, Hojune; Gilmer, David; Vo, Tuan; Goodwin, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Ion Beam Deposition (IBD) has been the primary technique used to deposit EUV mask blanks since 1995 when it was discovered it could produce multilayers with few defects. Since that time the IBD technique has been extensively studied and improved and is finally approaching usable defectivities. But in the intervening years, the defectivity of magnetron sputtering has been greatly improved. This paper evaluates the suitability of a modern magnetron tool to produce EUV mask blanks and the ability to support HVM production. In particular we show that the reflectivity and uniformity of these tools are superior to current generation IBD tools, and that the magnetron tools can produce EUV films with defect densities comparable to recent best IBD tool performance. Magnetron tools also offer many advantages in manufacturability and tool throughput; however, challenges remain, including transitioning the magnetron tools from the wafer to mask formats. While work continues on quantifying the capability of magnetron sputtering to meet the mask blank demands of the industry, for the most part the remaining challenges do not require any fundamental improvements to existing technology. Based on the recent results and the data presented in this paper there is a clear indication that magnetron deposition should be considered for the future of EUV mask blank production.

  7. W-CMOS blanking device for projection multibeam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurisch, Michael; Irmscher, Mathias; Letzkus, Florian; Eder-Kapl, Stefan; Klein, Christof; Loeschner, Hans; Piller, Walter; Platzgummer, Elmar

    2010-05-01

    As the designs of future mask nodes become more and more complex the corresponding pattern writing times will rise significantly when using single beam writing tools. Projection multi-beam lithography [1] is one promising technology to enhance the throughput compared to state of the art VSB pattern generators. One key component of the projection multi-beam tool is an Aperture Plate System (APS) to form and switch thousands of individual beamlets. In our present setup a highly parallel beam is divided into 43,008 individual beamlets by a Siaperture- plate. These micrometer sized beams pass through larger openings in a blanking-plate and are individually switched on and off by applying a voltage to blanking-electrodes which are placed around the blanking-plate openings. A charged particle 200x reduction optics demagnifies the beamlet array to the substrate. The switched off beams are filtered out in the projection optics so that only the beams which are unaffected by the blanking-plate are projected to the substrate with 200x reduction. The blanking-plate is basically a CMOS device for handling the writing data. In our work the blanking-electrodes are fabricated using CMOS compatible add on processes like SiO2-etching or metal deposition and structuring. A new approach is the implementation of buried tungsten electrodes for beam blanking.

  8. Apparatus and methods for continuous beam fourier transform mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.

    2002-01-01

    A continuous beam Fourier transform mass spectrometer in which a sample of ions to be analyzed is trapped in a trapping field, and the ions in the range of the mass-to-charge ratios to be analyzed are excited at their characteristic frequencies of motion by a continuous excitation signal. The excited ions in resonant motions generate real or image currents continuously which can be detected and processed to provide a mass spectrum.

  9. Image effects of cylindrical pipes on continuous beams

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.K.; Reiser, M.

    1996-09-01

    We analyze the image effects of a cylindrical pipe on continuous beams with elliptical symmetry. Differential equations involving the second-order spatial moments of a particle distribution are given. From the moment equations, a set of Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij-type equations is developed, which include the image effects of a cylindrical beam pipe. These equations are used to analyze the image effects for focusing, drift, defocusing, drift channels, sheet beams, and a magnetic quadrupole matching section. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Efficient beam splitting with continuous relief DOEs and microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnaberski, Aliaksei; Miklyaev, Yuri; Pikhulya, Denis; Kleinschmidt, Lisa; Imgrunt, Waleri; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Lissotschenko, Vitalij

    2012-02-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) are of rising importance for many industrial laser applications, especially for laser beam shaping and laser beam splitting. Typically, such applications require high damage threshold of the diffractive optical elements as well as high diffraction efficiency. Usually DOEs with multilevel (step-like) phase profiles are made microlithographically and suffer from "quantisation" errors and scattering on profile derivative discontinuities. The steplike structure lowers the DOE damage threshold compared to the intrinsic material values. LIMO's microoptical technology is suitable for the production of high-precision free programmable continuous surface profiles in optical glasses, crystals and metals. It can be applied for manufacturing of microlens and micro-mirror arrays as well as for manufacturing of diffractive optics with continuous reliefs. Both the arrays and DOEs with continuous relief are suitable for high efficiency laser beam splitting. However, the design approaches to obtain a desirable solution for the corresponding continuous phase profiles are different. The results of the wave-optical simulations made by LIMO's own program and by VirtualLab software, and experimental studies for a 1 to 11 beam splitter with a continuous profile for the wavelength of 532 nm are presented. Continuous phase profiles for the DOEs were designed by a procedure based on the theory of beam splitting by a phase grating. Comparative theoretical and experimental studies were also done for splitting with a double-sided microlens array. For both types of beam splitting the efficiency can be very high (> 98%). The DOEs show especially high homogeneities of the resulting intensity distribution, however, they are much more sensitive to wavelength variations. The microlens arrays demonstrate even weaker ghost orders as the DOE splitters and their surface profiles are simpler. However, the efficiency and homogeneity suffer on interlens gaps.

  11. Selective video blanking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saboe, M. M.; Treude, R. C.

    1968-01-01

    Adverse viewing effects caused by faulty photosensitive elements are eliminated. A linear maximal /or nonmaximal/ sequence generator gives a pseudorandom pulse train to selectively blank the display monitor during specified mosaic interrogation times. The outputs minimize the length of the required shift register generator.

  12. A piecewise continuous Timoshenko beam model for the dynamic analysis of tapered beam-like structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Ji Yao; Abu-Saba, Elias G.; Mcginley, William M.; Sharpe, Lonnie, Jr.; Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Distributed parameter modeling offers a viable alternative to the finite element approach for modeling large flexible space structures. The introduction of the transfer matrix method into the continuum modeling process provides a very useful tool to facilitate the distributed parameter model applied to some more complex configurations. A uniform Timoshenko beam model for the estimation of the dynamic properties of beam-like structures has given comparable results. But many aeronautical and aerospace structures are comprised of non-uniform sections or sectional properties, such as aircraft wings and satellite antennas. This paper proposes a piecewise continuous Timoshenko beam model which is used for the dynamic analysis of tapered beam-like structures. A tapered beam is divided into several segments of uniform beam elements. Instead of arbitrarily assumed shape functions used in finite element analysis, the closed-form solution of the Timoshenko beam equation is used. Application of the transfer matrix method relates all the elements as a whole. By corresponding boundary conditions and compatible conditions a characteristic equation for the global tapered beam has been developed, from which natural frequencies can be derived. A computer simulation is shown in this paper, and compared with the results obtained from the finite element analysis. While piecewise continuous Timoshenko beam model decreases the number of elements significantly; comparable results to the finite element method are obtained.

  13. Continuously variable, electrically addressed beam splitter based on vanadium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Allogho, Guy-Germain; Hamam, Habib; Beydaghyan, Gisia; Alloul, Sofiane; Haché, Alain

    2013-01-10

    Vanadium dioxide (VO(2)) is used to implement an electrically addressable beam splitter with continuously variable splitting ratios. The electrical control of temperature in a thin VO(2) layer is used to vary its transmission/reflection behavior. The technique is characterized for various incidence angles, s- and p-polarizations, and the wavelength range of 400-2000 nm. Splitting ratios continuously tunable over four orders of magnitude are reported.

  14. A method of calculating the ultimate strength of continuous beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newlin, J A; Trayer, George W

    1931-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the strength of continuous beams after the elastic limit has been passed. As a result, a method of calculation, which is applicable to maximum load conditions, has been developed. The method is simpler than the methods now in use and it applies properly to conditions where the present methods fail to apply.

  15. Piezoelectric performance of continuous beam and narrow supported beam arrays for artificial basilar membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Won Joon; Jang, Jongmoon; Kim, Sangwon; Choi, Hongsoo

    2014-09-01

    We report an experimental assessment of the electrical performance of two piezoelectric beam arrays for artificial basilar membranes (ABMs): a continuous beam array (CBA) and a narrow-supports beam array (NSBA). Both arrays consist of piezoelectric beams of sequentially varying lengths that mimic the frequency selectivity of mammalian cochleae. The narrow supports of the NSBA resulted in lateral deformation of the beams, whereas the CBA beams were flat. The displacement and piezoelectric output of each beam were measured at the resonance frequency of each beam using a scanning laser-Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). Both ABM prototypes showed mechanical frequency selectivity that depended on the beam length. The CBA generated a piezoelectric output in the range 6.6-23.2 μV and exhibited electrical frequency separability, whereas the NSBA failed to generate sufficient electrical potential due to the lateral deformation of the piezoelectric beams. The CBA was found to be more effective as an ABM, with potential for use in cochlear implants.

  16. Confining continuous manipulations of accelerator beam-line optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amstutz, Ph.; Plath, T.; Ackermann, S.; Bödewadt, J.; Lechner, C.; Vogt, M.

    2017-04-01

    Altering the optics in one section of a linear accelerator beam line will in general cause an alteration of the optics in all downstream sections. In circular accelerators, changing the optical properties of any beam-line element will have an impact on the optical functions throughout the whole machine. In many cases, however, it is desirable to change the optics in a certain beam-line section without disturbing any other parts of the machine. Such a local optics manipulation can be achieved by adjusting a number of additional corrector magnets that restore the initial optics after the manipulated section. In that case, the effect of the manipulation is confined in the region between the manipulated and the correcting beam-line elements. Introducing a manipulation continuously, while the machine is operating, therefore requires continuous correction functions to be applied to the correcting quadrupole magnets. In this paper, we present an approach to calculate such continuous correction functions for six quadrupole magnets by means of a homotopy method. Besides a detailed derivation of the method, we present its application to an algebraic example, as well as its demonstration at the seeding experiment sFLASH at the free-electron laser FLASH located at DESY in Hamburg.

  17. Beam dynamics and stability analysis of an intense beam in a continuously twisted quadrupole focusing channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the dynamics of a space-charge-dominated beam through a continuously twisted quadrupole magnet using ten independent first-order differential equations of the beam matrix elements under the assumption of linear space-charge force. Various beam optical properties of the magnet and the evolution of the emittance that results from the coupling between the two transverse planes are studied. The perturbed equations of motion around the matched beam envelopes have been derived and utilized to analyze the stability properties of the intense beam transport by calculating the eigenvalues of the transfer map over one lattice period. Detailed analysis shows the presence of instability due to parametric resonances in a twisted quadrupole channel which generally does not appear in the FODO quadrupole channel. A 2D particle-in-cell simulation code has been developed and utilized to verify the analytical results and to examine the behavior of the intense beam with Gaussian (GA) distribution in the twisted quadrupole channel.

  18. Design optimization of continuous partially prestressed concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Gahtani, A. S.; Al-Saadoun, S. S.; Abul-Feilat, E. A.

    1995-04-01

    An effective formulation for optimum design of two-span continuous partially prestressed concrete beams is described in this paper. Variable prestressing forces along the tendon profile, which may be jacked from one end or both ends with flexibility in the overlapping range and location, and the induced secondary effects are considered. The imposed constraints are on flexural stresses, ultimate flexural strength, cracking moment, ultimate shear strength, reinforcement limits cross-section dimensions, and cable profile geometries. These constraints are formulated in accordance with ACI (American Concrete Institute) code provisions. The capabilities of the program to solve several engineering problems are presented.

  19. Continuous-variable spatial entanglement for bright optical beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Magnus T.L.; Bowen, Warwick P.; Lam, Ping Koy; Treps, Nicolas

    2005-07-15

    A light beam is said to be position squeezed if its position can be determined to an accuracy beyond the standard quantum limit. We identify the position and momentum observables for bright optical beams and show that position and momentum entanglement can be generated by interfering two position, or momentum, squeezed beams on a beam splitter. The position and momentum measurements of these beams can be performed using a homodyne detector with local oscillator of an appropriate transverse beam profile. We compare this form of spatial entanglement with split detection-based spatial entanglement.

  20. The variable reagent blank: protein determination as a model.

    PubMed

    Bozimowski, D; Artiss, J D; Zak, B

    1985-10-01

    Three total protein assays were analyzed to determine the extent of deviation encountered when a constant measured reagent blank is compared to a continuously decreasing true reagent blank. This blank effect owes its regressive nature to the consumption of the active reagent ingredient by the protein reactive species, variably and sometimes, with certain reactants, nonlinearly in the presence of increasing protein concentrations. However, the blank effect of interest here is apparent only when the reagent and the reagent-protein complex present overlapping spectra and therefore absorb at the wavelength of measurement. Thus it was found that while the biuret and the Coomassie brilliant blue assays produced pronounced differences in the variable true reagent blanks, the Folin-Ciocalteau reaction did not develop a deviation from the true blank since the reagent blank does not absorb to any extent at the assay wavelength. In this manner, the latter procedure could serve as a marker against which the former two blank reactions can be shown to display relatively excessive deviations.

  1. Leukemia studies continue to draw a blank

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, N.

    1996-04-19

    When large numbers of childhood thyroid cancer cases began showing up in the three most heavily contaminated republics about Chernobyl 5 years after the accident, many thought there would be a jump in the incidence of leukemia. Studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors and other radiation accidents have pinpointed leukemia as the key early indicator of the effects of radiation. But so far, thyroid cancer remains an anomaly. Three major international studies have so far failed to detect any measurable increase in leukemia - or any other cancers - in the general population. This paper describes the studies and discusses possible reasons as well as what might happen in the future.

  2. A CONTINUOUS HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP OF THE HOT-DOG-COOKER TYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi

    1980-03-01

    A beam dump with partially rotating water-cooled tube arrays is proposed and studied for the dump of continuous high power density unneutralized ion beams out of the neutral beam injectors. Analyses were made of both steady and transient heat transfer characteristics.

  3. Hardwood Blanks Expand Export Opportunities

    Treesearch

    Bruce G. Hansen; Philip A. Araman

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews the latest statistics pertaining to the export of hardwood lumber to the Pacific Rim; discusses possible reasons for the emergence and growth of this market; offers alternatives to rough hardwood lumber (two forms of value-added, hardwood blanks); and develops estimates of prices needed at the mill to earn a 30% return on investment from the...

  4. Commercial EUV mask blank readiness for 32 nm HP manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Phil

    2007-05-01

    Successful commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) requires high quality EUV mask blanks for patterned masks that are essentially defect-free and very flat with high performance reflective multilayers. For 32 nm half-pitch (HP) integrated circuit manufacturing, such blanks require zero defects down to 25 nm diameter sizes while simultaneously meeting other specifications. At least three critical specifications that need continued improvements (total defects, defect size inspection, and substrate flatness control) are challenging to attain individually; meeting all requirements simultaneously will be especially challenging. Since early 2003, SEMATECH has been engaged with the mask blank materials and mask tool supplier community to drive the readiness of alpha, beta, and production mask blanks to support EUV lithography introduction. SEMATECH uses its commercial mask blank development roadmap together with neutral metrology evaluations of commercial suppliers' materials to monitor progress against needed production requirements. Commercial blank capability has improved significantly over the past two years; however, beta-level performance has still not been attained for all requirements. Attaining integrated blank specifications is more difficult than meeting individual specifications. Significant improvements including defectivity, flatness, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), reflectivity, wavelength control, and buffer/absorber stack performances are needed. Several orders of magnitude improvement is needed in defectivity levels alone coupled with increased detection sensitivity to 25 nm diameter defects. This paper will illustrate the recent rate of improvements along with an updated SEMATECH commercial roadmap, highlighting individual specification performances and total blank integrated performance levels currently better than 0.2 def/cm2 at >= 80 nm polystyrene latex (PSL), peak reflectivity >= 64.0%, substrate flatnesses <= 175 nm

  5. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-01

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  6. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-01

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  7. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-15

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  8. Study on shear strengthening of RC continuous T-beams using different layers of CFRP strips

    SciTech Connect

    Alferjani, M. B. S.; Samad, A. A. Abdul; Mohamad, Noridah; Elrawaff, Blkasem S.; Elzaroug, Omer

    2015-05-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates are externally bonded to reinforced concrete (RC) members to provide additional strength such as flexural, shear, etc. However, this paper presents the results of an experimental investigation for enhancing the shear capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) continuous T- beams using different layers of CFRP wrapping schemes. A total of three concrete beams were tested and various sheet configurations and layouts were studied to determine their effects on ultimate shear strength and shear capacity of the beams. One beam was kept as control beams, while other beams were strengthened with externally bonded CFRP strips with three side bonding and one or two layers of CFRP strips. From the test results, it was found that all schemes were found to be effective in enhancing the shear strength of RC beams. It was observed that the strength increases with the number of sheet layers provided the most effective strengthening for RC continuous T- beam. Beam strengthened using this scheme showed 23.21% increase in shear capacity as compared to the control beam. Two prediction models available in literature were used for computing the contribution of CFRP strips and compared with the experimental results.

  9. Study on shear strengthening of RC continuous T-beams using different layers of CFRP strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alferjani, M. B. S.; Samad, A. A. Abdul; Elrawaff, Blkasem S.; Elzaroug, Omer; Mohamad, Noridah

    2015-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates are externally bonded to reinforced concrete (RC) members to provide additional strength such as flexural, shear, etc. However, this paper presents the results of an experimental investigation for enhancing the shear capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) continuous T- beams using different layers of CFRP wrapping schemes. A total of three concrete beams were tested and various sheet configurations and layouts were studied to determine their effects on ultimate shear strength and shear capacity of the beams. One beam was kept as control beams, while other beams were strengthened with externally bonded CFRP strips with three side bonding and one or two layers of CFRP strips. From the test results, it was found that all schemes were found to be effective in enhancing the shear strength of RC beams. It was observed that the strength increases with the number of sheet layers provided the most effective strengthening for RC continuous T- beam. Beam strengthened using this scheme showed 23.21% increase in shear capacity as compared to the control beam. Two prediction models available in literature were used for computing the contribution of CFRP strips and compared with the experimental results.

  10. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Blank. 51.2001 Section 51.2001 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.2001 Blank. Blank means a...

  11. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Blank. 51.2001 Section 51.2001 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.2001 Blank. Blank means a...

  12. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Blank. 51.2001 Section 51.2001 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.2001 Blank. Blank means a...

  13. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Blank. 51.2001 Section 51.2001 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing....2001 Blank. Blank means a filbert containing no kernel or a kernel filling less than one-fourth...

  14. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Blank. 51.2001 Section 51.2001 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing....2001 Blank. Blank means a filbert containing no kernel or a kernel filling less than one-fourth...

  15. INVESTIGATION OF HALO FORMATION IN CONTINUOUS BEAMS USING WEIGHTED POLYNOMIAL EXPANSIONS AND PERTURBATIONAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    C. ALLEN

    2000-08-01

    We consider halo formation in continuous beams oscillating at natural modes by inspecting particle trajectories. Trajectory equations containing field nonlinearities are derived from a weighted polynomial expansion. We then use perturbational techniques to further analyze particle motion.

  16. Peptide structural analysis using continuous Ar cluster and C60 ion beams.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Fletcher, John S; Sheraz Rabbani, Sadia; Kawashima, Tomoko; Berrueta Razo, Irma; Henderson, Alex; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C

    2013-08-01

    A novel application of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) with continuous Ar cluster beams to peptide analysis was investigated. In order to evaluate peptide structures, it is necessary to detect fragment ions related to multiple neighbouring amino acid residues. It is, however, difficult to detect these using conventional ToF-SIMS primary ion beams such as Bi cluster beams. Recently, C60 and Ar cluster ion beams have been introduced to ToF-SIMS as primary ion beams and are expected to generate larger secondary ions than conventional ones. In this study, two sets of model peptides have been studied: (des-Tyr)-Leu-enkephalin and (des-Tyr)-Met-enkephalin (molecular weights are approximately 400 Da), and [Asn(1) Val(5)]-angiotensin II and [Val(5)]-angiotensin I (molecular weights are approximately 1,000 Da) in order to evaluate the usefulness of the large cluster ion beams for peptide structural analysis. As a result, by using the Ar cluster beams, peptide molecular ions and large fragment ions, which are not easily detected using conventional ToF-SIMS primary ion beams such as Bi3 (+), are clearly detected. Since the large fragment ions indicating amino acid sequences of the peptides are detected by the large cluster beams, it is suggested that the Ar cluster and C60 ion beams are useful for peptide structural analysis.

  17. Subsurface plasma in beam of continuous CO2-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danytsikov, Y. V.; Dymshakov, V. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Pismennyy, V. D.; Ryazanov, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments performed at the Institute of Atomic Energy established the conditions for formation of subsurface plasma in substances by laser radiation and its characteristics. A quasi-continuous CO2 laser emitting square pulses of 0.1 to 1.0 ms duration and 1 to 10 kW power as well as a continuous CO2 laser served as radiation sources. Radiation was focused on spots 0.1 to 0.5 mm in diameter and maintained at levels ensuring constant power density during the interaction time, while the temperature of the target surface was measured continuously. Metals, graphite and dielectric materials were tested with laser action taking place in air N2 + O2 mixtures, Ar or He atmosphere under pressures of 0.01 to 1.0 atm. Data on radiation intensity thresholds for evaporation and plasma formation were obtained. On the basis of these thresholds, combined with data on energy balance and the temperature profile in plasma layers, a universal state diagram was constructed for subsurface plasma with nonquantified surface temperature and radiation intensity coordinates.

  18. Large optical glass blanks for the ELT generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Petzold, Uwe; Dietrich, Volker; Wittmer, Volker; Rexius, Olga

    2016-07-01

    The upcoming extremely large telescope projects like the E-ELT, TMT or GMT telescopes require not only large amount of mirror blank substrates but have also sophisticated instrument setups. Common instrument components are atmospheric dispersion correctors that compensate for the varying atmospheric path length depending on the telescope inclination angle. These elements consist usually of optical glass blanks that have to be large due to the increased size of the focal beam of the extremely large telescopes. SCHOTT has a long experience in producing and delivering large optical glass blanks for astronomical applications up to 1 m and in homogeneity grades up to H3 quality in the past. The most common optical glass available in large formats is SCHOTT N-BK7. But other glass types like F2 or LLF1 can also be produced in formats up to 1 m. The extremely large telescope projects partly demand atmospheric dispersion components even in sizes beyond 1m up to a range of 1.5 m diameter. The production of such large homogeneous optical glass banks requires tight control of all process steps. To cover this demand in the future SCHOTT initiated a research project to improve the large optical blank production process steps from melting to annealing and measurement. Large optical glass blanks are measured in several sub-apertures that cover the total clear aperture of the application. With SCHOTT's new stitching software it is now possible to combine individual sub-aperture measurements to a total homogeneity map of the blank. In this presentation first results will be demonstrated.

  19. Deformed ellipsoidal diffraction grating blank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decew, Alan E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Deformed Ellipsoidal Grating Blank (DEGB) is the primary component in an ultraviolet spectrometer. Since one of the major concerns for these instruments is throughput, significant efforts are made to reduce the number of components and subsequently reflections. Each reflection results in losses through absorption and scattering. It is these two sources of photon loss that dictated the requirements for the DEGB. The first goal is to shape the DEGB in such a way that the energy at the entrance slit is focused as well as possible on the exit slit. The second goal is to produce a surface smooth enough to minimize the photon loss due to scattering. The program was accomplished in three phases. The first phase was the fabrication planning. The second phase was the actual fabrication and initial testing. The last phase was the final testing of the completed DEGB.

  20. Propagation characteristics of Bessel beams generated by continuous, incoherent light sources.

    PubMed

    Altıngöz, Ceren; Yalızay, Berna; Akturk, Selcuk

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the propagation behavior of Bessel beams generated by incoherent, continuous light sources. We perform experiments with narrowband and broadband light emitting diodes, and, for comparison, with a laser diode. We observe that the formation of Bessel beams is affected minimally by temporal coherence, while spatial coherence determines the longitudinal evolution of the beam profile. With spatially incoherent beams, the fringe contrast is comparable to the coherent case at the beginning of the Bessel zone, while it completely fades away by propagation, turning into a cylindrical light pipe. Our results show that beam shaping methods can be extended to cases of limited spatial coherence, paving the way for potential new uses and applications of such sources.

  1. Repairing native defects on EUV mask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawliss, Mark; Gallagher, Emily; Hibbs, Michael; Seki, Kazunori; Isogawa, Takeshi; Robinson, Tod; LeClaire, Jeff

    2014-10-01

    Mask defectivity is a serious problem for all lithographic masks, but especially for EUV masks. Defects in the EUV blank are particularly challenging because their elimination is beyond control of the mask fab. If defects have been identified on a mask blank, patterns can be shifted to place as many blank defects as possible in regions where printing impact will be eliminated or become unimportant. For those defects that cannot be mitigated through pattern shift, repair strategies must be developed. Repairing defects that occur naturally in the EUV blank is challenging because the printability of these defects varies widely. This paper describes some types of native defects commonly found and begins to outline a triage strategy for defects that are identified on the blank. Sample defects best suited to nanomachining repair are treated in detail: repairs are attempted, characterized using mask metrology and then tested for printability. Based on the initial results, the viability of repairing EUV blank native defects is discussed.

  2. Continuous beam divergence control via wedge-pair for laser communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, Keith M.; DeCew, Alan E.; Narkewich, Lawrence E.; Williams, Timothy H.

    2015-03-01

    Lasercom terminals often scan an area of uncertainty during acquisition with a wide-divergence beacon beam. Once the terminal has established cooperative tracking with the remote terminal, a narrow divergence beam is used for communication. A mechanism that enables continuous beam divergence control can provide significant size, weight, and power (SWaP) benefits to the terminal. First, the acquisition and the communication beams can be launched from the same fiber so only a single high-power optical amplifier is required. Second, by providing mid-divergences, it eases the remote terminal's transition from the acquisition phase to the communication phase. This paper describes a mechanism that provides gradual, progressive adjustment of far-field beam divergence, from wide divergence (> 300 μrad FWHM) through collimated condition (38 μrad FWHM) and that works over a range of wavelengths. The mechanism is comprised of a variable-thickness optical element, formed by a pair of opposing wedges that is placed between the launch fiber and the collimating lens. Variations in divergence with no beam blockage are created by laterally translating one wedge relative to a fixed wedge. Divergence is continuously adjustable within the thickness range, allowing for a coordinated transition of divergence, wavelength, and beam power. Measurements of this low-loss, low-wavefront error assembly show that boresight error during divergence transition is maintained to a fraction of the communication beamwidth over wavelength and optical power ranges.

  3. Scanning irradiation device for mice in vivo with pulsed and continuous proton beams.

    PubMed

    Greubel, Christoph; Assmann, Walter; Burgdorf, Christian; Dollinger, Günther; Du, Guanghua; Hable, Volker; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Hertenberger, Ralf; Kneschaurek, Peter; Michalski, Dörte; Molls, Michael; Reinhardt, Sabine; Röper, Barbara; Schell, Stefan; Schmid, Thomas E; Siebenwirth, Christian; Wenzl, Tatiana; Zlobinskaya, Olga; Wilkens, Jan J

    2011-08-01

    A technical set-up for irradiation of subcutaneous tumours in mice with nanosecond-pulsed proton beams or continuous proton beams is described and was successfully used in a first experiment to explore future potential of laser-driven particle beams, which are pulsed due to the acceleration process, for radiation therapy. The chosen concept uses a microbeam approach. By focusing the beam to approximately 100 × 100 μm(2), the necessary fluence of 10(9) protons per cm(2) to deliver a dose of 20 Gy with one-nanosecond shot in the Bragg peak of 23 MeV protons is achieved. Electrical and mechanical beam scanning combines rapid dose delivery with large scan ranges. Aluminium sheets one millimetre in front of the target are used as beam energy degrader, necessary for adjusting the depth-dose profile. The required procedures for treatment planning and dose verification are presented. In a first experiment, 24 tumours in mice were successfully irradiated with 23 MeV protons and a single dose of 20 Gy in pulsed or continuous mode with dose differences between both modes of 10%. So far, no significant difference in tumour growth delay was observed.

  4. Simulations of electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin plasma by a continuously injected electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Annenkov, V. V.; Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin beam-plasma system are studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, the problem of emission generation in such a system is considered in a realistic formulation allowing for the continuous injection of a relativistic electron beam through a plasma boundary. Specific attention is given to the thin plasma case in which the transverse plasma size is comparable to the typical wavelength of beam-driven oscillations. Such a case is often implemented in laboratory beam-plasma experiments and has a number of peculiarities. Emission from a thin plasma does not require intermediate generation of the electromagnetic plasma eigenmodes, as in an infinite case, and is more similar to the regular antenna radiation. In this work, we determine how efficiently the fundamental and the second harmonic emissions can be generated in previously modulated and initially homogeneous plasmas.

  5. Observation of coherent Smith-Purcell radiation using an initially continuous flat beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardelle, J.; Courtois, L.; Modin, P.; Donohue, J. T.

    2009-11-01

    A few years ago a new theory for producing coherent Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation from an initially continuous beam was proposed. This experiment confirms that two-dimensional theory. The beam was typically 10 cm wide, a few mm thick, with a peak current of 200 A and beam energy of 85 keV. The 10 cm-wide grating had twenty 2-cm periods, and radiation was produced at the fundamental frequency near 4.5 GHz. Second and third harmonics were observed at the expected angles. Beam bunching was measured using a B-dot probe placed at the end of a groove. Generally good agreement between this experiment and the 2D theory is found.

  6. Simulations of electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin plasma by a continuously injected electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin beam-plasma system are studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, the problem of emission generation in such a system is considered in a realistic formulation allowing for the continuous injection of a relativistic electron beam through a plasma boundary. Specific attention is given to the thin plasma case in which the transverse plasma size is comparable to the typical wavelength of beam-driven oscillations. Such a case is often implemented in laboratory beam-plasma experiments and has a number of peculiarities. Emission from a thin plasma does not require intermediate generation of the electromagnetic plasma eigenmodes, as in an infinite case, and is more similar to the regular antenna radiation. In this work, we determine how efficiently the fundamental and the second harmonic emissions can be generated in previously modulated and initially homogeneous plasmas.

  7. Quality control of laser tailor welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Tailor welded blanks were widely used in the automobile industry for their special advantages. A combination of different materials, thickness, and coatings could be welded together to form a blank for stamping car body panels. With the gradually growing consciousness on safety requirement of auto body structural, the business of laser tailor welded blanks is developing rapidly in China. Laser tailor welded blanks were just the semi products between steel factory and automobile manufacturers. As to the laser welding defects such as convexity and concavity, automobile industry had the strict requirement. In this paper, quality standard on laser tailor welded blanks were discussed. As for the production of laser tailor welded blanks, online quality control of laser tailor welded blanks was introduced. The image processing system for welding laser positioning and weld seam monitoring were used in the production of laser tailor welded blanks. The system analyzes images from the individual cameras and transmits the results to the machine control system via a CAN bus.

  8. FSW of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks across Machine Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carlson, Blair; Szymanski, Robert; Luzanski, Tom; Marshall, Dustin

    2015-02-16

    Development and characterization of friction stir welded aluminum tailor welded blanks was successfully carried out on three separate machine platforms. Each was a commercially available, gantry style, multi-axis machine designed specifically for friction stir welding. Weld parameters were developed to support high volume production of dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor welded blanks at speeds of 3 m/min and greater. Parameters originally developed on an ultra-high stiffness servo driven machine where first transferred to a high stiffness servo-hydraulic friction stir welding machine, and subsequently transferred to a purpose built machine designed to accommodate thin sheet aluminum welding. The inherent beam stiffness, bearing compliance, and control system for each machine were distinctly unique, which posed specific challenges in transferring welding parameters across machine platforms. This work documents the challenges imposed by successfully transferring weld parameters from machine to machine, produced from different manufacturers and with unique control systems and interfaces.

  9. Advances in Low-Defect Multilayers for EUVL Mask Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J A; Davidson, J C; Larson, C C; Walton, C C; Kearney, P A

    2002-04-15

    Low-defect multilayer coatings are required to fabricate mask blanks for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL). The mask blanks consist of high reflectance E W multilayers on low thermal expansion substrates. A defect density of 0.0025 printable defects/cm{sup 2} for both the mask substrate and the multilayer is required to provide a mask blank yield of 60%. Current low defect multilayer coating technology allows repeated coating-added defect levels of 0.05/cm{sup 2} for defects greater than 90 nm polystyrene latex sphere (PSL) equivalent size for lots of 20 substrates. Extended clean operation of the coating system at levels below 0.08/cm{sup 2} for 3 months of operation has also been achieved. Two substrates with zero added defects in the quality area have been fabricated, providing an existence proof that ultra low defect coatings are possible. Increasing the ion source-to-target distance from 410 to 560 mm to reduce undesired coating of the ion source caused the defect density to increase to 0.2/cm{sup 2}. Deposition and etching diagnostic witness substrates and deposition pinhole cameras showed a much higher level of ion beam spillover (ions missing the sputter target) than expected. Future work will quantify beam spillover, and test designs to reduce spillover, if it is confirmed to be the cause of the increased defect level. The LDD system will also be upgraded to allow clean coating of standard format mask substrates. The upgrade will confirm that the low defect process developed on Si wafers is compatible with the standard mask format 152 mm square substrates, and will provide a clean supply of EUVL mask blanks needed to support development of EUVL mask patterning processes and clean mask handling technologies.

  10. Exact analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitating in Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranskis, R. R.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2014-06-10

    The original continuity equation (CE) used for the interpretation of the power law energy spectra of beam electrons in flares was written and solved for an electron beam flux while ignoring an additional free term with an electron density. In order to remedy this omission, the original CE for electron flux, considering beam's energy losses in Coulomb collisions, was first differentiated by the two independent variables: depth and energy leading to partial differential equation for an electron beam density instead of flux with the additional free term. The analytical solution of this partial differential continuity equation (PDCE) is obtained by using the method of characteristics. This solution is further used to derive analytical expressions for mean electron spectra for Coulomb collisions and to carry out numeric calculations of hard X-ray (HXR) photon spectra for beams with different parameters. The solutions revealed a significant departure of electron densities at lower energies from the original results derived from the CE for the flux obtained for Coulomb collisions. This departure is caused by the additional exponential term that appeared in the updated solutions for electron differential density leading to its faster decrease at lower energies (below 100 keV) with every precipitation depth similar to the results obtained with numerical Fokker-Planck solutions. The effects of these updated solutions for electron densities on mean electron spectra and HXR photon spectra are also discussed.

  11. Synthesis of substituted lithium ferrites under the pulsed and continuous electron beam heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, Elena N.; Surzhikov, Anatoliy P.; Vlasov, Vitaliy A.; Nikolaev, Evgeniy V.; Malyshev, Andrey V.; Bryazgin, Alexandr A.; Korobeynikov, Mikhail V.; Mikhailenko, Mikhail A.

    2017-02-01

    Synthesis of substituted lithium ferrites with chemical formulas Li0.6Fe2.2Ti0.2O4 and Li0.649Fe1.598Ti0.5Zn0.2Mn0.051O4 under the pulsed and continuous electron beam heating was investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermomagnetometric analysis. The electron beams heating of Li2CO3-Fe2O3-TiO2 or Li2CO3-ZnO-Fe2O3-TiO2-MnO mixtures was carried out at a temperature of 750 °C during 60 min using two types of electron accelerators: ELV accelerator generating continuous electron beam or ILU-6 accelerator generating pulse electron beam. It was established that a high energy electron beam heating of initial reagents mixtures allows obtaining the substituted lithium ferrites with final composition at significantly lower temperatures (at least 200 °C lower than in the case of using traditional thermal synthesis) and times of synthesis. That statement is in agreement with results obtained by XRD analysis, showing single phase formation; by magnetic measurements, showing high values of specific magnetization; by DTG measurements showing the certain Curie temperatures of the synthesized samples.

  12. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility: CEBAF at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Chrisoph; Douglas, David R; Krafft, Geoffrey A

    2001-08-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory's superconducting radiofrequency (srf) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) provides multi-GeV continuous-wave (cw) beams for experiments at the nuclear and particle physics interface. CEBAF comprises two antiparallel linacs linked by nine recirculation beam lines for up to five passes. By the early 1990s, accelerator installation was proceeding in parallel with commissioning. By the mid-1990s, CEBAF was providing simultaneous beams at different but correlated energies up to 4 GeV to three experimental halls. By 2000, with srf development having raised the average cavity gradient up to 7.5 MV/m, energies up to nearly 6 GeV were routine, at 1-150 muA for two halls and 1-100 nA for the other. Also routine are beams of >75% polarization. Physics results have led to new questions about the quark structure of nuclei, and therefore to user demand for a planned 12 GeV upgrade. CEBAF's enabling srf technology is also being applied in other projects.

  13. Accelerated x-ray scatter projection imaging using multiple continuously moving pencil beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dydula, Christopher; Belev, George; Johns, Paul C.

    2017-03-01

    Coherent x-ray scatter varies with angle and photon energy in a manner dependent on the chemical composition of the scattering material, even for amorphous materials. Therefore, images generated from scattered photons can have much higher contrast than conventional projection radiographs. We are developing a scatter projection imaging prototype at the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility of the Canadian Light Source (CLS) synchrotron in Saskatoon, Canada. The best images are obtained using step-and-shoot scanning with a single pencil beam and area detector to capture sequentially the scatter pattern for each primary beam location on the sample. Primary x-ray transmission is recorded simultaneously using photodiodes. The technological challenge is to acquire the scatter data in a reasonable time. Using multiple pencil beams producing partially-overlapping scatter patterns reduces acquisition time but increases complexity due to the need for a disentangling algorithm to extract the data. Continuous sample motion, rather than step-and-shoot, also reduces acquisition time at the expense of introducing motion blur. With a five-beam (33.2 keV, 3.5 mm2 beam area) continuous sample motion configuration, a rectangular array of 12 x 100 pixels with 1 mm sampling width has been acquired in 0.4 minutes (3000 pixels per minute). The acquisition speed is 38 times the speed for single beam step-and-shoot. A system model has been developed to calculate detected scatter patterns given the material composition of the object to be imaged. Our prototype development, image acquisition of a plastic phantom and modelling are described.

  14. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Luo, Y.; Paskvan, D.; Perry, A.; Schrage, D.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Sommer, R.; Toter, W.; Zinkann, G.

    2012-11-01

    The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW) RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf) measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O5+ ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  15. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-15

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment.

  16. Neutron diffraction of titanium aluminides formed by continuous electron-beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkov, S.; Neov, D.; Luytov, D.; Petrov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Ti-Al-based alloys were produced by hybrid electron-beam technologies. A composite Ti-Al film was deposited on a Ti substrate by electron-beam evaporation (EBE), followed by electron-beam treatment (EBT) by a continuously scanned electron beam. The speed of the specimens motion during the EBT were V 1 = 1 cm/sec and V 2 = 5 cm/sec, in order to realize two different alloying mechanisms -- by surface melting and by electron-beam irradiation without melting the surface. The samples prepared were characterized by XRD and neutron diffraction to study the crystal structure on the surface and in depth. SEM/EDX analysis was conducted to explore the surface structure and analyze the chemical composition. Nanoindentation measurements were also carried out. No intermetallic phases were registered in the sample treated at velocity V 1, while the sample treated at V 2 exhibited a Ti3Al/TiAl structure on the surface, transformed to Ti/TiAl in depth. The nanoindentation test demonstrated a significant negative hardness gradient from the surface to the depth of the sample.

  17. Inspection of lithographic mask blanks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2001-01-01

    A visible light method for detecting sub-100 nm size defects on mask blanks used for lithography. By using optical heterodyne techniques, detection of the scattered light can be significantly enhanced as compared to standard intensity detection methods. The invention is useful in the inspection of super-polished surfaces for isolated surface defects or particulate contamination and in the inspection of lithographic mask or reticle blanks for surface defects or bulk defects or for surface particulate contamination.

  18. Dirac leaky-wave antennas for continuous beam scanning from photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Memarian, Mohammad; Eleftheriades, George V

    2015-01-05

    Leaky-Wave Antennas (LWAs) enable directive and scannable radiation patterns, which are highly desirable attributes at terahertz, infrared and optical frequencies. However, a LWA is generally incapable of continuous beam scanning through broadside, due to an open stopband in its dispersion characteristic. This issue is yet to be addressed at frequencies beyond microwaves, mainly as existing microwave solutions (for example, transmission line metamaterials) are unavailable at these higher frequencies. Here we report leaky-wave radiation from the interface of a photonic crystal (PC) with a Dirac-type dispersion and air. The resulting Dirac LWA (DLWA) can radiate at broadside, chiefly owing to the closed Γ-point bandgap of the Dirac PC. Thus, the DLWA can continuously scan a directive beam over a wide range of angles by varying the frequency. These DLWAs can be designed at microwave as well as terahertz to optical frequencies, with feasible dimensions and low losses.

  19. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars and Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    One type of "Blank Field X-ray Source" is now being seen in deep Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys. These are the newly dubbed "XBONGs" (X-ray Bright, Optically Normal Galaxies). The study of the brighter counterparts from ROSAT and XMM- Newton serendipitous surveys is therefore of renewed interest and topicality. We continue to define the properties of the ROSAT sample which is the basis of this grant. We expect to publish the SEDs of these sources soon.

  20. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars and Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    One type of "Blank Field X-ray Source" is now being seen in deep Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys. These are the newly dubbed "XBONGs" (X-ray Bright, Optically Normal Galaxies). The study of the brighter counterparts from ROSAT and XMM- Newton serendipitous surveys is therefore of renewed interest and topicality. We continue to define the properties of the ROSAT sample which is the basis of this grant. We expect to publish the SEDs of these sources soon.

  1. Formability Studies on Transverse Tailor Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, V. Vijay; Narasimhan, K.

    2005-08-01

    Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) technology is one of the several approaches that have been used to reduce the weight of the automobile body. TWBs are made up of two or more blanks having different/same properties (geometry, material etc.) prior to forming. The formability of these blanks depends on material and geometric parameters like strength ratio and thickness ratio. The study of these blanks can be classified on the basis of the weld orientation chosen viz. transverse weld or longitudinal weld with respect to the major straining direction. This paper studies the formability issues related to transverse TWB by FE simulation. The formability is assessed by analyzing tensile and Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests. The weld region is assumed to be a line in all the simulations. While modeling the tensile test, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation are monitored, and in LDH testing, pole height and maximum load (in near plane strain condition) are monitored. LDH testing shows that as thickness ratio increases, the load bearing capacity and the pole height decreases. There is a contribution from both the thicker and the thinner blank to the overall deforming volume. Failure location analysis shows that there is an abrupt change in the location of the failure from punch nose region to weld line region as the thickness ratio reaches a critical magnitude (1.08). The study of material properties shows that as the yield strength ratio (S ratio) and strain hardening exponent ratio (N ratio) between the blanks increases, the maximum load which the blank can sustain without failure (UTS) increases. This becomes constant and comparable to that of single sheet at higher N and S ratios.

  2. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Mask preparation stages are crucial in mask manufacturing, since this mask is to later act as a template for considerable number of dies on wafer. Defects on the initial blank substrate, and subsequent cleaned and coated substrates, can have a profound impact on the usability of the finished mask. This emphasizes the need for early and accurate identification of blank substrate defects and the risk they pose to the patterned reticle. While Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) is a well-developed technology for inspection and analysis of defects on patterned wafers and masks in the semiconductors industry, ADC for mask blanks is still in the early stages of adoption and development. Calibre ADC is a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of defects on mask blanks. Accurate, automated classification of mask blanks leads to better usability of blanks by enabling defect avoidance technologies during mask writing. Detailed information on blank defects can help to select appropriate job-decks to be written on the mask by defect avoidance tools [1][4][5]. Smart algorithms separate critical defects from the potentially large number of non-critical defects or false defects detected at various stages during mask blank preparation. Mechanisms used by Calibre ADC to identify and characterize defects include defect location and size, signal polarity (dark, bright) in both transmitted and reflected review images, distinguishing defect signals from background noise in defect images. The Calibre ADC engine then uses a decision tree to translate this information into a defect classification code. Using this automated process improves classification accuracy, repeatability and speed, while avoiding the subjectivity of human judgment compared to the alternative of manual defect classification by trained personnel [2]. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at MP Mask

  3. On the property of measurements with the PTW microLion chamber in continuous beams.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas; Johansson, Erik; Tölli, Heikki

    2012-08-01

    The performance of liquid ionization chambers, which may prove to be useful tools in the field of radiation dosimetry, is based on several chamber and liquid specific characteristics. The present work investigates the performance of the PTW microLion liquid ionization chamber with respect to recombination losses and perturbations from ambient electric fields at various dose rates in continuous beams. In the investigation, experiments were performed using two microLion chambers, containing isooctane (C(8)H(18)) and tetramethylsilane [Si(CH(3))(4)] as the sensitive media, and a NACP-02 monitor chamber. An initial activity of approximately 250 GBq (18)F was employed as the radiation source in the experiments. The initial dose rate in each measurement series was estimated to 1.0 Gy min(-1) by Monte Carlo simulations and the measurements were carried out during the decay of the radioactive source. In the investigation of general recombination losses, employing the two-dose-rate method for continuous beams, the liquid ionization chambers were operated at polarizing voltages 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 300 V. Furthermore, measurements were also performed at 500 V polarizing voltage in the investigation of the sensitivity of the microLion chamber to ambient electric fields. The measurement results from the liquid ionization chambers, corrected for general recombination losses according to the two-dose-rate method for continuous beams, had a good agreement with the signal to dose linearity from the NACP-02 monitor chamber for general collection efficiencies above 70%. The results also displayed an agreement with the theoretical collection efficiencies according to the Greening theory, except for the liquid ionization chamber containing isooctane operated at 25 V. At lower dose rates, perturbations from ambient electric fields were found in the microLion chamber measurement results. Due to the perturbations, measurement results below an estimated dose rate of 0.2 Gy min(-1

  4. A beam-scan type laser Doppler velocimeter for simultaneous and continuous measurement of velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, M.; Nadaoka, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Sato, Y.; Muramoto, T.

    A beam-scan-type LDV (SLV) with high spatial resolving power has been developed for the continuous measurement of nearly simultaneous velocity profiles in the cross sections of various flows. The SLV consists of a forward-scatter LDV and a beam-scan unit, using a reversed-scan method, capable of high-speed scanning of the measuring volume. An autofocusing device using an image sensor is employed to simplify the alignment of the receiving optics needed to match the transmitting optics. The SLV performance was validated by comparison of experimental results (for a wake flow of a circular cylinder, a reciprocally oscillatory flow, and a Karman vortex street flow) with flow visualization and computational results.

  5. Study of a national 2-GeV continuous beam electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Khoe, T.K.; Mavrogenes, G.S.

    1980-08-01

    Current trends in research in medium energy physics with electromagnetic probes are reviewed briefly and design objectives are proposed for a continuous beam 2 GeV electron accelerator. Various types of accelerator systems are discussed and exploratory designs developed for two concepts, the linac-stretcher ring and a double-sided microtron system. Preliminary cost estimates indicate that a linac-ring system which meets all the design objectives with the exception of beam quality and uses state-of-the-art technology can be built for approximately $29 million. However, the double-sided microtron shows promise for development into a substantially less expensive facility meeting all design objectives. Its technical feasibility remains to be established. Specific areas requiring additional engineering studies are discussed, and current efforts at Argonne and elsewhere are identified.

  6. Ion beam figuring of continuous phase plates based on the frequency filtering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingjin; Dai, Yifan; Xie, Xuhui; Zhou, Lin; Li, Shengyi; Peng, Wenqiang

    2017-03-01

    Ion beam figuring (IBF) technology is an effective technique for fabricating continuous phase plates (CPPs) with small feature structures. This study proposes a multi-pass IBF approach with different beam diameters based on the frequency filtering method to improve the machining accuracy and efficiency of CPPs during IBF. We present the selection principle of the frequency filtering method, which incorporates different removal functions that maximize material removal over the topographical frequencies being imprinted. Large removal functions are used early in the fabrication to figure the surface profile with low frequency. Small removal functions are used to perform final topographical correction with higher frequency and larger surface gradient. A high-precision surface can be obtained as long as the filtering frequency is suitably selected. This method maximizes the high removal efficiency of the large removal function and the high corrective capability of the small removal function. Consequently, the fast convergence of the machining accuracy and efficiency can be achieved.

  7. A beam monitoring and validation system for continuous line scanning in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimpki, G.; Psoroulas, S.; Bula, C.; Rechsteiner, U.; Eichin, M.; Weber, D. C.; Lomax, A.; Meer, D.

    2017-08-01

    Line scanning represents a faster and potentially more flexible form of pencil beam scanning than conventional step-and-shoot irradiations. It seeks to minimize dead times in beam delivery whilst preserving the possibility of modulating the dose at any point in the target volume. Our second generation proton gantry features irradiations in line scanning mode, but it still lacks a dedicated monitoring and validation system that guarantees patient safety throughout the irradiation. We report on its design and implementation in this paper. In line scanning, we steer the proton beam continuously along straight lines while adapting the speed and/or current frequently to modulate the delivered dose. We intend to prevent delivery errors that could be clinically relevant through a two-stage system: safety level 1 monitors the beam current and position every 10 μs. We demonstrate that direct readings from ionization chambers in the gantry nozzle and Hall probes in the scanner magnets provide required information on current and position, respectively. Interlocks will be raised when measured signals exceed their predefined tolerance bands. Even in case of an erroneous delivery, safety level 1 restricts hot and cold spots of the physically delivered fraction dose to  ±36~mGy (±2% of 2~Gy biologically). In safety level 2—an additional, partly redundant validation step—we compare the integral line profile measured with a strip monitor in the nozzle to a forward-calculated prediction. The comparison is performed between two line applications to detect amplifying inaccuracies in speed and current modulation. This level can be regarded as an online quality assurance of the machine. Both safety levels use devices and functionalities already installed along the beamline. Hence, the presented monitoring and validation system preserves full compatibility of discrete and continuous delivery mode on a single gantry, with the possibility of switching between modes during the

  8. Enhancing EUV mask blanks usability through smart shift and blank-design pairing optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Rakesh Kumar; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter; Thwaite, Peter

    2016-10-01

    EUV Defect avoidance techniques will play a vital role in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) photomask fabrication with the anticipation that defect free mask blanks won't be available and that cost effective techniques will not be available for defect repairing. In addition, mask shops may not have a large inventory of expensive EUV mask blanks. Given these facts, defect avoidance can be used as cost effective technique to optimize the mask blank and design data (mask data) pair selection across mask blank manufacturers and mask shops so that overall mask blank utilization can be enhanced. In previous work, it was determined that the pattern shift based solution increases the chance that a defective mask blank can be used that would otherwise be discarded [1]. In pattern shift, design data is shifted such that defects are either moved to isolated regions or hidden under the patterns that are written. However pattern shifts techniques don't perform well with masks with higher defect counts. Pattern shift techniques in this form assume all defects to be equally critical. In addition, a defect is critical or important only if it lands on the main pattern. A defect landing on fill, sub-resolution assist feature (SRAF) or fiducial areas may not be critical. In this paper we assess the performance of pattern shift techniques assuming defects that are not critical based upon size or type, as well as defects landing in non-critical areas (smart shift) can be ignored. In a production mask manufacturing environment it is necessary to co-optimize and prioritize blank-design pairing for multiple mask layouts in the queue with the available blanks. A blank-design pairing tool maximizes the utilization of blanks by finding the best pairing between blanks and design data so that the maximum number of mask blanks can be used. In this paper we also propose a novel process which would optimize the usage of costly EUV mask blanks across mask blank manufacturers and mask shops

  9. A 24-GHz portable FMCW radar with continuous beam steering phased array (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhengyu; Li, Changzhi

    2017-05-01

    A portable 24-GHz frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar with continuous beam steering phased array is presented. This board-level integrated radar system consists of a phased array antenna, a radar transceiver and a baseband. The phased array used by the receiver is a 4-element linear array. The beam of the phased array can be continuously steered with a range of ±30° on the H-plane through an array of vector controllers. The vector controller is based on the concept of vector sum with binary-phase-shift attenuators. Each vector controller is capable of independently controlling the phase and the amplitude of each element of the linear array. The radar transceiver is based on the six-port technique. A free-running voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) is controlled by an analog "sawtooth" voltage generator to produce frequency-modulated chirp signal. This chirp signal is used as the transmitter signal, as well as the local oscillator (LO) signal to drive the six-port circuit. The transmitter antenna is a single patch antenna. In the baseband, the beat signal of the FMCW radar is detected by the six-port circuit and then processed by a laptop in real time. Experiments have been performed to reveal the capabilities of the proposed radar system for applications including indoor inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, vital sign detection, and short-range navigation, etc. (This abstract is for the profiles session.)

  10. Generation and homodyne detection of continuous-variable entangled optical beams with a large wavelength difference

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Xiaomin; Xie Changde; Li Yongmin

    2011-08-15

    We present a scheme for generating and homodyne detecting of continuous-variable entanglement of bright optical beams with a large wavelength difference by utilizing an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) simultaneously. Entangled optical beams at 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m are generated from the OPA; the seed beams injected in the OPA as well as the local oscillators at the two wavelengths needed for homodyne detection are provided by the OPO. The entangler is a ring resonator involving a second-order nonlinear crystal that is pumped from two opposite directions. In one direction the pump power is above the oscillation threshold and the optical nonlinear resonator operates as an OPO. In the other direction the pump power is below the threshold and it operates as a phase-sensitive frequency nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier. Our scheme combines the advantages of both OPO and OPA quantum optical devices and opens another avenue for preparation and homodyne detection of high quality bright entangled light with a large wavelength difference.

  11. Effect of continuous longitudinal glass fiber reinforcement on the cantilever beam strength of particulate filler composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Christopher Watts, David

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of continuous longitudinal glass fibers on the bending properties of particulate filler composite resins. Four particulate filler composite resins (Tetric Ceram, Point 4, Z250, P60) and one continuous longitudinal glass fiber material (everStick) as reinforcement were selected. Three groups of beam specimens (5 x 5 x 25 mm) for each material were fabricated. For group I, specimens were not reinforced with fibers and were tested as the control group. For group II, specimens were reinforced with 2 layers of the fiber (6.5 vol%), and for group III with 3 layers (9.8 vol%). The specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days. One end of the beam specimen (14 mm) was fixed in a device, while the other (11 mm) was left free. Cantilever beam strength was measured using a universal testing machine, loading at a distance of 10 mm from the upright support through a steel ball of 2 mm diameter. The loads and deflection at initial failure and at final failure for each specimen were recorded. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the multiple comparison Scheffé test (alpha = 0.05). The bending moments of particulate filler composite at final failure, when reinforced with 3 layers of the glass fibers (272.4-325.2 Ncm), were significantly higher than for the composites without fibers. However, the materials reinforced with 3 layers of fibers were not significantly different from the materials reinforced with 2 layers of fibers (234.1-282.6 Ncm). The materials reinforced with 3 layers of fibers exhibited severe deflection at final failure, ranging from 2.8 mm to 3.4 mm. The bending moments of the particulate composites increased linearly with the weight fraction of the fillers, but there was no linear correlation between them when reinforced with fibers. The cantilever beam strength of the particulate filler composites increased significantly when layers of fibers were added and as the

  12. Acoustic prism for continuous beam steering based on piezo-electric metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Tang, J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates an acoustic prism for continuous acoustic beam steering by a simple frequency sweep. This idea takes advantages of acoustic wave velocity shifting in metamaterials in the vicinity of local resonance. We apply this concept into the piezoelectric metamaterial consisting of host medium and piezoelectric LC shunt. Theoretical modeling and FEM simulations are carried out. It is shown that the phase velocity of acoustic wave changes dramatically in the vicinity of local resonance. The directions of acoustic wave can be adjusted continuously between 2 to 16 degrees by a simple sweep of the excitation frequency. Such an electro-mechanical coupling system has a feature of adjusting local resonance without altering the mechanical part of the system.

  13. Production of multi-, oligo- and single-pore membranes using a continuous ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, P. Yu.; Ivanov, O. M.; Lizunov, N. E.; Mamonova, T. I.; Nechaev, A. N.; Olejniczak, K.; Vacik, J.; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Ion track membranes (ITM) have attracted significant interest over the past two decades due to their numerous applications in physical, biological, chemical, biochemical and medical experimental works. A particular feature of ITM technology is the possibility to fabricate samples with a predetermined number of pores, including single-pore membranes. The present report describes a procedure that allowed for the production of multi-, oligo- and single-pore membranes using a continuous ion beam from an IC-100 cyclotron. The beam was scanned over a set of small diaphragms, from 17 to ∼1000 μm in diameter. Ions passed through the apertures and impinged two sandwiched polymer foils, with the total thickness close to the ion range in the polymer. The foils were pulled across the ion beam at a constant speed. The ratio between the transport speed and the scanning frequency determined the distance between irradiation spots. The beam intensity and the aperture diameters were adjusted such that either several, one or no ions passed through the diaphragms during one half-period of scanning. After irradiation, the lower foil was separated from the upper foil and was etched to obtain pores 6-8 μm in diameter. The pores were found using a color chemical reaction between two reagents placed on opposite sides of the foil. The located pores were further confirmed using SEM and optical microscopy. The numbers of tracks in the irradiation spots were consistent with the Poisson statistics. Samples with single or few tracks obtained in this way were employed to study fine phenomena in ion track nanopores.

  14. Clinical characterization of a proton beam continuous uniform scanning system with dose layer stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J. B.; Mascia, A. E.; Hsi, W.-C.; Allgower, C. E.; Jesseph, F.; Schreuder, A. N.; Wolanski, M.; Nichiporov, D. F.; Anferov, V.

    2008-11-15

    A proton beam delivery system on a gantry with continuous uniform scanning and dose layer stacking at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute has been commissioned and accepted for clinical use. This paper was motivated by a lack of guidance on the testing and characterization for clinical uniform scanning systems. As such, it describes how these tasks were performed with a uniform scanning beam delivery system. This paper reports the methods used and important dosimetric characteristics of radiation fields produced by the system. The commissioning data include the transverse and longitudinal dose distributions, penumbra, and absolute dose values. Using a 208 MeV cyclotron's proton beam, the system provides field sizes up to 20 and 30 cm in diameter for proton ranges in water up to 27 and 20 cm, respectively. The dose layer stacking method allows for the flexible construction of spread-out Bragg peaks with uniform modulation of up to 15 cm in water, at typical dose rates of 1-3 Gy/min. For measuring relative dose distributions, multielement ion chamber arrays, small-volume ion chambers, and radiographic films were employed. Measurements during the clinical commissioning of the system have shown that the lateral and longitudinal dose uniformity of 2.5% or better can be achieved for all clinically important field sizes and ranges. The measured transverse penumbra widths offer a slight improvement in comparison to those achieved with a double scattering beam spreading technique at the facility. Absolute dose measurements were done using calibrated ion chambers, thermoluminescent and alanine detectors. Dose intercomparisons conducted using various types of detectors traceable to a national standards laboratory indicate that the measured dosimetry data agree with each other within 5%.

  15. Weakly diverging to tightly focused Gaussian beams: a single set of analytic expressions: continuation-symmetric beams.

    PubMed

    Levy, Uri; Silberberg, Yaron

    2017-03-01

    The always diverging-converging laser beams, more rigorously referred to as Gaussian beams, are part of many physical and electro-optical systems. Obviously, a single set of analytic expressions describing these beams in a large span of divergence-convergence angles at the focal plane, and at any distance away from the focal plane, will prove very handy. We have recently published three such analytic sets, one set for linearly polarized beams and two sets for radially polarized beams. However, our published analytic set for linearly polarized beams describes nonsymmetric electric-magnetic field components. Specifically, the strong transverse magnetic field component does not become elliptic at very large divergence angles as it should be, and the other transverse magnetic component, indeed very weak, is missing altogether. Here we present an analytic set of expressions symmetrically describing linearly polarized Gaussian beams. The symmetry applies to the x-electric y-magnetic components and vice versa and to the two electric-magnetic z-components. An important property of the presented set of expressions is power conservation. That is, the electromagnetic power crossing a plane transverse to the propagation direction in a unit time is conserved. Power conservation assures beam description accuracy at any axial distance. The presented analytic expressions, although not strictly satisfying Maxwell's equations, describe Gaussian beams with very reasonable accuracy from low divergence angles up to divergence angles as large as 0.8 rad in a medium with refractive index of 1.5, i.e., up to a NA of 1.1. These expressions should then readily assist in the design of practically all laser-related systems and in the research of diverse physics and electro-optic fields.

  16. A continuous-wave clinotron at 0.26 THz with sheet electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Hongzhu; He, Zhaochang; Wang, Jianguo; Li, Rong; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zaigao; liu, Jinsong; Liu, Luwei; Wang, Hao

    2017-03-01

    A high performance continuous-wave (CW) clinotron with a sheet electron beam at 0.26 THz is presented in this paper. The mode selection is discussed by studying the dispersion curve of the high frequency structure, distribution of the electric field, coupling impedance, and particle-in-cell simulation result, showing that the designed clinotron operates in the fundamental mode TM10. The planar comb gratings are fabricated by using the wire electrical discharge machining technology with the processing error less than 0.005 mm. The electron gun can provide the 2.5 mm × 0.14 mm sheet electron beam with a maximum current density of 57 A/cm2 at the CW mode. Experimental results show that the developed clinotron can operate at the fundamental mode TM10 and generate an output power of 820 mW at a frequency of 0.26 THz with a large frequency tuning range from 0.25 THz to 0.262 THz.

  17. Convolution Operations on Coding Metasurface to Reach Flexible and Continuous Controls of Terahertz Beams

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Quan; Wang, Qiu; Wan, Xiang; Gu, Jian Qiang; Tang, Wen Xuan; Qing Qi, Mei; Han, Jia Guang; Zhang, Wei Li; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Cheng, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The concept of coding metasurface makes a link between physically metamaterial particles and digital codes, and hence it is possible to perform digital signal processing on the coding metasurface to realize unusual physical phenomena. Here, this study presents to perform Fourier operations on coding metasurfaces and proposes a principle called as scattering‐pattern shift using the convolution theorem, which allows steering of the scattering pattern to an arbitrarily predesigned direction. Owing to the constant reflection amplitude of coding particles, the required coding pattern can be simply achieved by the modulus of two coding matrices. This study demonstrates that the scattering patterns that are directly calculated from the coding pattern using the Fourier transform have excellent agreements to the numerical simulations based on realistic coding structures, providing an efficient method in optimizing coding patterns to achieve predesigned scattering beams. The most important advantage of this approach over the previous schemes in producing anomalous single‐beam scattering is its flexible and continuous controls to arbitrary directions. This work opens a new route to study metamaterial from a fully digital perspective, predicting the possibility of combining conventional theorems in digital signal processing with the coding metasurface to realize more powerful manipulations of electromagnetic waves. PMID:27840801

  18. Convolution Operations on Coding Metasurface to Reach Flexible and Continuous Controls of Terahertz Beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Cui, Tie Jun; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Quan; Wang, Qiu; Wan, Xiang; Gu, Jian Qiang; Tang, Wen Xuan; Qing Qi, Mei; Han, Jia Guang; Zhang, Wei Li; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Cheng, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    The concept of coding metasurface makes a link between physically metamaterial particles and digital codes, and hence it is possible to perform digital signal processing on the coding metasurface to realize unusual physical phenomena. Here, this study presents to perform Fourier operations on coding metasurfaces and proposes a principle called as scattering-pattern shift using the convolution theorem, which allows steering of the scattering pattern to an arbitrarily predesigned direction. Owing to the constant reflection amplitude of coding particles, the required coding pattern can be simply achieved by the modulus of two coding matrices. This study demonstrates that the scattering patterns that are directly calculated from the coding pattern using the Fourier transform have excellent agreements to the numerical simulations based on realistic coding structures, providing an efficient method in optimizing coding patterns to achieve predesigned scattering beams. The most important advantage of this approach over the previous schemes in producing anomalous single-beam scattering is its flexible and continuous controls to arbitrary directions. This work opens a new route to study metamaterial from a fully digital perspective, predicting the possibility of combining conventional theorems in digital signal processing with the coding metasurface to realize more powerful manipulations of electromagnetic waves.

  19. Molar absorptivity and the blank correction factor.

    PubMed

    Kroll, M H; Elin, R J

    1985-03-01

    In photometry, where both the product formed and one or several reactants absorb light at the same wavelength, the absorbance of the "blank" of the sample at the end of the reaction may be less than that measured at the beginning of the reaction, because of consumption of reactant(s). The blank correction factor for the determined result with one light-absorbing reagent is epsilon P / (epsilon P - epsilon R), where epsilon R and epsilon P are the molar absorptivities of the reagent and the product, respectively. We derived a factor for the case when more than one reagent absorbs light at the same wavelength as the measured product. This factor is independent of the concentration of reagent(s) and can correct the determined result or absorbance for the consumption of light-absorbing reagent(s) during the reaction.

  20. Self-Organized Superlattice Formation during Crystal Growth from Continuous Beam Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Y. L.; Bratland, K. A.; Cho, B.; Lim, C. W.; Baker, J.; Wen, J. G.; Moon, D. W.; Greene, J. E.

    2003-06-01

    Alloy superlattice structures consisting of alternating Si-rich and C-rich layers form spontaneously during gas-source molecular beam epitaxy of Si1-yCy on Si(001) from constant Si2H6 and CH3SiH3 precursor fluxes at Ts=725 750 °C. The self-organized patterning is due to a complex interaction among competing surface reactions. During growth of the initial Si-rich layer, strain-driven C segregation to the subsurface results in charge transfer from surface Si atom dangling bonds to C backbonds. This decreases the Si2H6 sticking probability, and, hence, the instantaneous deposition rate, thereby enhancing C segregation. The Si-rich layer continues until a critical C coverage is reached allowing nucleation of a C-rich layer which grows until the excess subsurface C is depleted. The process then repeats with periods tunable through the choice of Ts and yavg.

  1. Dual focused coherent beams for three-dimensional optical trapping and continuous rotation of metallic nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohao; Cheng, Chang; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles and nanowires are extremely important for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Techniques to optically trap and rotate metallic nanostructures can enable their potential applications. However, because of the destabilizing effects of optical radiation pressure, the optical trapping of large metallic particles in three dimensions is challenging. Additionally, the photothermal issues associated with optical rotation of metallic nanowires have far prevented their practical applications. Here, we utilize dual focused coherent beams to realize three-dimensional (3D) optical trapping of large silver particles. Continuous rotation of silver nanowires with frequencies measured in several hertz is also demonstrated based on interference-induced optical vortices with very low local light intensity. The experiments are interpreted by numerical simulations and calculations. PMID:27386838

  2. Report on selected concerns regarding property accountability at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-24

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a federally funded research and development center at Newport News, Virginia, At the time of our review, Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) was operating CEBAF for the Department of Energy (DOE) under a management and operating (M&O) contract administered by DOE`s Oak Ridge Operations Office. SURA is currently operating CEBAF under a performance based management contract, The purpose of our inspection was to evaluate selected management issues regarding property accountability at CEBAF that we identified as a result of a complaint received by the Office of Inspector General. The complainant alleged a lack of accountability for Government equipment at CEBAF and the lack of an equipment inventory. Specifically, the complainant alleged, among other things, that after a named supervisor departed, CEBAF personnel had no idea what equipment had been assigned to the supervisor and could not account for any missing materials.

  3. Dual focused coherent beams for three-dimensional optical trapping and continuous rotation of metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohao; Cheng, Chang; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Baojun

    2016-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles and nanowires are extremely important for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Techniques to optically trap and rotate metallic nanostructures can enable their potential applications. However, because of the destabilizing effects of optical radiation pressure, the optical trapping of large metallic particles in three dimensions is challenging. Additionally, the photothermal issues associated with optical rotation of metallic nanowires have far prevented their practical applications. Here, we utilize dual focused coherent beams to realize three-dimensional (3D) optical trapping of large silver particles. Continuous rotation of silver nanowires with frequencies measured in several hertz is also demonstrated based on interference-induced optical vortices with very low local light intensity. The experiments are interpreted by numerical simulations and calculations.

  4. Transverse acceptance calculation for continuous ion beam injection into the electron beam ion trap charge breeder of the ReA post-accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittimanapun, K.; Baumann, T. M.; Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.

    2015-11-01

    The ReA post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) employs an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) as a charge breeder. A Monte-Carlo simulation code was developed to calculate the transverse acceptance phase space of the EBIT for continuously injected ion beams and to determine the capture efficiency in dependence of the transverse beam emittance. For this purpose, the code records the position and time of changes in charge state of injected ions, leading either to capture or loss of ions. To benchmark and validate the code, calculated capture efficiencies were compared with results from a geometrical model and measurements. The results of the code agree with the experimental findings within a few 10%. The code predicts a maximum total capture efficiency of 50% for EBIT parameters readily achievable and an efficiency of up to 80% for an electron beam current density of 1900 A/cm2.

  5. Novel EUV Mask Blank Defect Repair Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S; Barty, A; Mirkarimi, P

    2003-03-31

    The development of defect-free reticle blanks is an important challenge facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). The basis of EUVL reticles are mask blanks consisting of a substrate and a reflective Mo/Si multilayer. Defects on the substrate or defects introduced during multilayer deposition can result in critical phase and amplitude defects. Amplitude- or phase-defect repair techniques are being developed with the goal to repair many of these defects. In this report, we discuss progress in two areas of defect repair: (1) We discuss the effect of the residual reflectance variation over the repair zone after amplitude-defect repair on the process window. This allows the determination of the maximum tolerable residual damage induced by amplitude defect repair. (2) We further performed a quantitative assessment of the yield improvement due to defect repair. We found that amplitude- and phase-defect repair have the potential to significantly improve mask blank yield. Our calculations further show that yield can be maximized by increasing the number of Mo/Si bilayers.

  6. CARs blanks feasibility study results for advanced EB reticle fabrication: III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Fumiko; Yokoya, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Hideo

    2001-09-01

    For advanced EB reticle fabrication with CAR blanks, we have been trying blanks life improvement and resolution enhancement. This paper describes several options to extend CAR blanks life by shipping package and storage manners. Dry-N2 purged shipping package and desiccant showed efficiency for PCD improvement. However, desiccant is not available for products since it is not investigated yet if particle contamination could be happened. To extend blanks life after blanks package opened, we blanks maker really recommend the fresh dry-N2 purged box (overflowed) as an ideal storage manner, or regular shipping box storage at least. We tried a BARC as isolator and thinning CAR for resolution enhancement, and found that a neutral-BARC showed an improvement. However, we needs further study about its feasibility, especially for coating uniformity and defect quality control. Thin resist showed almost no improvement for CAR resolution enhancement. To improve CAR performance further, we continuously need the resist-makers cooperation to design and develop a CAR that provides us footing-less pattern profile and long-life after coating.

  7. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: Study of Red Quasars and Blank X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A major paper describing the technique and providing a list of 'blanks' was published in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below). The results revealed a fascinating trove of novel X-ray sources: high redshift clusters of galaxies found efficiently; X-ray absorbed, optically clean AGN, which may be the bright prototypes of Chandra Deep Survey sources; and several with a still unknown nature. Recent XMM-Newton results confirm the existence of this class of X-ray source with much refined positions. During the first year of this project we have made a major discovery. The second 'blanks' X-ray source observed with Chandra was found to be extended. Using Chandra data and ground-based R and K band imaging we estimated this to be a high redshift cluster of galaxies with z approx. 0.85. Spectroscopy agrees with this estimate (z=0.89). This success shows that our method of hunting down 'blank' field X-ray sources is a highly efficient method of finding the otherwise elusive high redshift clusters. With extensive follow-up we should be able to use 'blanks' to make cosmological tests. The paper is now in press in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below.) The other Chandra source is point-like, showing that there are a variety of 'blank' source types. Other follow-up observations with XMM-Newton, and (newly approved in cycle 2) with Chandra are eagerly awaited. A follow-up paper uses a large amount of supporting data for the remaining blanks. A combination of ROSAT, Chandra and ground based data convincingly identified one of the blanks as a Ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in a spiral galaxy (abstract below). This program resulted in 3 refereed papers in major journals, 4 conference proceedings and a significant fraction of the PhD thesis of Dr. Ilaria Cagnoni. Details of the publications are given.

  8. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: Study of Red Quasars and Blank X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A major paper describing the technique and providing a list of 'blanks' was published in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below). The results revealed a fascinating trove of novel X-ray sources: high redshift clusters of galaxies found efficiently; X-ray absorbed, optically clean AGN, which may be the bright prototypes of Chandra Deep Survey sources; and several with a still unknown nature. Recent XMM-Newton results confirm the existence of this class of X-ray source with much refined positions. During the first year of this project we have made a major discovery. The second 'blanks' X-ray source observed with Chandra was found to be extended. Using Chandra data and ground-based R and K band imaging we estimated this to be a high redshift cluster of galaxies with z approx. 0.85. Spectroscopy agrees with this estimate (z=0.89). This success shows that our method of hunting down 'blank' field X-ray sources is a highly efficient method of finding the otherwise elusive high redshift clusters. With extensive follow-up we should be able to use 'blanks' to make cosmological tests. The paper is now in press in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below.) The other Chandra source is point-like, showing that there are a variety of 'blank' source types. Other follow-up observations with XMM-Newton, and (newly approved in cycle 2) with Chandra are eagerly awaited. A follow-up paper uses a large amount of supporting data for the remaining blanks. A combination of ROSAT, Chandra and ground based data convincingly identified one of the blanks as a Ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in a spiral galaxy (abstract below). This program resulted in 3 refereed papers in major journals, 4 conference proceedings and a significant fraction of the PhD thesis of Dr. Ilaria Cagnoni. Details of the publications are given.

  9. Standard-Size Blanks for Furniture and Cabinets

    Treesearch

    Philip A. Araman

    1983-01-01

    Blanks are rough-dimension parts of a specific size which may be solid or glued up; quality depends on the final use of the material. Standard-size blanks are blanks made to standard thicknesses, lengths, and widths for each desired quality. Blanks in a few standard sizes can be used to make the thousands of different size rough-dimension parts needed by a furniture or...

  10. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  11. Extra projection data identification method for fast-continuous-rotation industrial cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Duan, Shengling; Duan, Jinghui; Wang, Xiaolong; Li, Xingdong; Meng, Fanyong; Zhang, Jianhai

    2013-01-01

    Fast-continuous-rotation is an effective measure to improve the scanning speed and decrease the radiation dose for cone-beam CT. However, because of acceleration and deceleration of the motor, as well as the response lag of the scanning control terminals to the host PC, uneven-distributed and redundant projections are inevitably created, which seriously decrease the quality of the reconstruction images. In this paper, we first analyzed the aspects of the theoretical sequence chart of the fast-continuous-rotation mode. Then, an optimized sequence chart was proposed by extending the rotation angle span to ensure the effective 2π-span projections were situated in the stable rotation stage. In order to match the rotation angle with the projection image accurately, structure similarity (SSIM) index was used as a control parameter for extraction of the effective projection sequence which was exactly the complete projection data for image reconstruction. The experimental results showed that SSIM based method had a high accuracy of projection view locating and was easy to realize.

  12. System 6: A pricing strategy for long blanks

    Treesearch

    Hugh W. Reynolds; Bruce G. Hansen; Bruce G. Hansen

    1986-01-01

    In System 6, small-diameter, low-grade hardwood timber is used to make blanks in standard sizes. Blanks are made in one thickness and one quality class but in all the standard lengths during each production run. The quantity of blanks per length can be varied, while keeping total yield high, by using proper production control techniques. However, when the percentage of...

  13. Continuous propagation and energy filtering of a cold atomic beam in a long high-gradient magnetic atom guide

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Spencer E.; Mhaskar, Rahul R.; Raithel, Georg

    2006-03-15

    We demonstrate the continuous injection and propagation of a cold atomic beam in a high-gradient (up to 2.7 kG/cm) magnetic guide of 1.7 m length. Continuous injection is accomplished using a side-loading scheme that involves a sequence of two modified magneto-optic traps. Methods are developed to measure the atomic-flow temperatures and the flux under steady-state conditions. In the high-gradient portion of the guide, the guided atomic beam has a transverse temperature of 420 {mu}K{+-}40 {mu}K, a longitudinal temperature of 1 mK, and an average velocity of order 1 m/s. Using a radio-frequency current of a fixed frequency {nu} coupled directly into the guide wires, atoms exceeding a transverse energy of h{nu} can be continuously and selectively removed from the atomic beam.

  14. EUV scanner printability evaluation of natural blank defects detected by actinic blank inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Noriaki; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Van den Heuvel, Dieter; Jonckheere, Rik; Gallagher, Emily

    2015-07-01

    In this study, on-wafer printability test results of native blank defects on an EUV reticle, previously detected on the ABI (Actinic blank inspection) tool, were interpreted with on-mask analysis. One of the main factors that affects printability is the relative defect position to the absorber pattern. The ABI tool has been used for this purpose, by means of on-mask review. Subsequently, by removing covered defects (blank defects which are covered with absorber pattern), a clear relationship between DSI (ABI defect signal intensity) and printability was confirmed. By considering a relationship between relative defect position and printability precisely, a tentative printability threshold was defined with DSI. This result suggests that DSI has valuable information to define printability threshold, and shows significance of ABI inspection.

  15. Design of a Second Harmonic Double-Beam Continuous Wave Gyrotron with Operating Frequency of 0.79 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. N.; Glyavin, M. Yu; Sedov, A. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu; Idehara, T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the most essential steps of a design study of a novel second harmonic gyrotron operating in CW (continuous wave) regime at a frequency of 0.79 THz and an output power of 1-100 W. It is based on a novel idea for suppression of the parasitic modes using a double-beam electron-optical system (EOS). It includes a triode magnetron injection gun (MIG), which forms two high-quality helical electron beams (HEB). Different schemes, namely one with two generating beams and another with one generating and one absorbing beam, have been investigated and compared. It has been shown that the scheme with two generating beams is more advantageous since it allows an effective suppression of the parasitic modes and a stable single-mode operation at the second harmonic resonance. A MIG which is appropriate for the realization of the latter scheme has been optimized using numerical codes for computer-aided design (CAD). It forms beams with practically equal pitch factors and moderate velocity spread. The construction of the gun is not sensitive to small misalignments and shifts of the electrodes and the magnetic field. Among the most promising characteristics of the presented design are an improved mode selection and a stable single-mode generation at currents that are two to three times higher than the currents in the single-beam (i.e., conventional) gyrotrons.

  16. Continuous Beam Steering Through Broadside Using Asymmetrically Modulated Goubau Line Leaky-Wave Antennas.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Qingfeng; Hu, Sanming; Zhuang, Yaqiang; Kandwal, Abhishek; Zhang, Ge; Chen, Yifan

    2017-09-15

    Goubau line is a single-conductor transmission line, featuring easy integration and low-loss transmission properties. Here, we propose a periodic leaky-wave antenna (LWA) based on planar Goubau transmission line on a thin dielectric substrate. The leaky-wave radiations are generated by introducing periodic modulations along the Goubau line. In this way, the surface wave, which is slow-wave mode supported by the Goubau line, achieves an additional momentum and hence enters the fast-wave region for radiations. By employing the periodic modulations, the proposed Goubau line LWAs are able to continuously steer the main beam from backward to forward within the operational frequency range. However, the LWAs usually suffer from a low radiation efficiency at the broadside direction. To overcome this drawback, we explore both transversally and longitudinally asymmetrical modulations to the Goubau line. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and experimental results are given in comparison with the symmetrical LWAs. It is demonstrated that the asymmetrical modulations significantly improve the radiation efficiency of LWAs at the broadside. Furthermore, the measurement results agree well with the numerical ones, which experimentally validates the proposed LWA structures. These novel Goubau line LWAs, experimentally demonstrated and validated at microwave frequencies, show also great potential for millimeter-wave and terahertz systems.

  17. Fiducial mark requirements from the viewpoints of actinic blank inspection tool for phase-defect mitigation on EUVL mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murachi, Tetsunori; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Oh, Sung H.

    2012-11-01

    For Extreme Ultra-Violet Lithography (EUVL), fabrication of defect free multi-layered (ML) mask blanks is one of the difficult challenges. ML defects come from substrate defects and adders during ML coating, cannot be removed, and are called as phase defect. If we can accept ML blanks with certain number of phase defects, the blank yield will be drastically up. In order to use such blanks, the phase defects need to be identified and located during ML blank defect inspection before absorber patterning. To locate phase defects on the blanks accurately and precisely, Fiducial Marks (FM) on ML blanks are needed for mask alignment and defect location information. The proposed requirement of defect location accuracy is less than 10 nm [1]. In addition to the previous study for which FMs were etched by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) [2], we fabricated FMs by resist exposure by E-Beam (EB) writer and etching process, and inspected FMs with EUV Actinic full-field mask Blank Inspection (ABI) prototype developed at MIRAI-Selete, EB writer and other mask inspection tools. Then we estimated FM registration accuracy for several line widths and depths. In this paper, we will present the result of feasibility study on the requirements of FM on EUVL mask by experiments to establish the phase defect mitigation method. And the optimum ranges of FM line width, depth, and fabrication method on EUVL mask based on above results are 3 - 5 m line width, not less than 100 nm depth FM etched into ML respectively.

  18. Continuous-Wave Laser Beam Fanning in Organic Solutions: A Novel Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Witherow, William K.; Shields, Angela; Penn, Benjamin; Frazier, Donald O.; Moghbel, Mehdi; Venkateswarlu, P.; Sekhar, P. Chandra; George, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    If a low-power cw Ar(+) laser beam (approx. 50 mW) is sent horizontally and focused on the entrance side of a cuvette containing an absorptive solution, the beam fans into the lower half of the cuvette instead of propagating through and forming self-phase-modulation fringes. We call this phenomenon self-beam fanning, which has been observed in several organic solutions. We present here several experimental results and a descriptive model of the phenomenon.

  19. 33 CFR 149.115 - What are the requirements for blank flange and shutoff valves?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for blank flange and shutoff valves? 149.115 Section 149.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION,...

  20. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of a continuous needle-like argon electron-beam plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaoyan; Chen, Chen; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong

    2017-05-01

    The fluid-Poisson equations coupled with the Monte Carlo method were used to simulate the spatio-temporal behavior of a needle-like argon electron-beam plasma. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation, three coupled parameters characterizing the electron beam propagation for initial energies above several keV were expressed using a universal dimensionless shape function given in terms of the beam range multiplied by a normalized coefficient. Therefore, a single run of the Monte Carlo code was sufficient for the simulations over a wide range of conditions. The spatial potential as a function of space and time was studied from the fluid-Poisson equations. The results indicate that the time evolution of the spatial potential was influenced by the presence of the slowed-down electrons and the flying beam electrons, whereas the potential in quasi-equilibrium was mainly determined from the spatial distribution of the secondary electron. The potential in quasi-equilibrium was positive near the beam entrance and most negative along the tip of the beam range, which was a result of ambipolar diffusion. When the enclosing boundary surfaces were moved within the beam range, the potential was nearly positive everywhere. The calculation on the diffusion-drift flux indicated that the net current of the secondary electrons flowing back to the incident plane in quasi-equilibrium balanced the incident beam current, which was the so-called return current in the three-dimensional space.

  1. Finite element modeling of light propagation in turbid media under illumination of a continuous-wave beam.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aichen; Lu, Renfu; Xie, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy provides a means for measuring the optical properties of biological tissues, based on analytical solutions to diffusion approximation for semi-infinite media under the normal illumination of an infinitely small light beam. The method is, however, prone to error in measurement because the actual boundary condition and light beam often deviate from that used in deriving the analytical solutions. It is therefore important to quantify the effect of different boundary conditions and light beams on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance in order to improve the measurement accuracy of the technique. This research was aimed at using finite element method (FEM) to model light propagation in turbid media, subjected to normal illumination by a continuous-wave beam of infinitely small or finite size. Three types of boundary conditions [i.e., partial current (PCBC), extrapolated (EBC), and zero (ZBC)] were evaluated and compared against Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, since MC could provide accurate fluence rate and diffuse reflectance. The effect of beam size was also investigated. Overall results showed that FEM provided results as accurate as those of the analytical method when an appropriate boundary condition was applied. ZBC did not give satisfactory results in most cases. FEM-PCBC yielded a better fluence rate at the boundary than did FEM-EBC, while they were almost identical in predicting diffuse reflectance. Results further showed that FEM coupled with EBC effectively simulated spatially resolved diffuse reflectance under the illumination of a finite size beam. A large beam introduced more error, especially within the region of illumination. Research also confirmed an earlier finding that a light beam of less than 1 mm diameter should be used for estimation of optical parameters. FEM is effective for modeling light propagation in biological tissues and can be used for improving the optical property measurement by the spatially resolved

  2. Continuous Beam Steering From a Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Charles M.; Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  3. Continuous Beam Steering From A Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Titus, Charles M.; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  4. Non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Scudiere, Matthew B.

    1993-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

  5. Continuous Beam Steering From A Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Titus, Charles M.; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  6. A double-beam magnetron-injection gun for third-harmonic continuous wave 1-THz gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M.; Manuilov, V.; Idehara, T.

    2013-12-01

    The concept of a continuous wave 1-kW/1-THz gyrotron operated at the third cyclotron harmonic of the transverse electric TE9,7 operating mode has been developed. To suppress the mode competition effects in a terahertz gyrotron, we propose a scheme with two generating helical electron beams (HEBs) formed in a double-beam triode magnetron-injection gun (MIG), where both emitters of the electron beams are located on a common cathode of the conventional MIG. An optimal geometry of the MIG electrodes is found. It is shown that in a proposed scheme two HEBs having close pitch factors and a moderate velocity spread can be formed. This makes them suitable for high-efficiency single-mode generation in the high frequency gyrotron at high harmonic.

  7. A double-beam magnetron-injection gun for third-harmonic continuous wave 1-THz gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Glyavin, M.; Manuilov, V.; Idehara, T.

    2013-12-15

    The concept of a continuous wave 1-kW/1-THz gyrotron operated at the third cyclotron harmonic of the transverse electric TE{sub 9,7} operating mode has been developed. To suppress the mode competition effects in a terahertz gyrotron, we propose a scheme with two generating helical electron beams (HEBs) formed in a double-beam triode magnetron-injection gun (MIG), where both emitters of the electron beams are located on a common cathode of the conventional MIG. An optimal geometry of the MIG electrodes is found. It is shown that in a proposed scheme two HEBs having close pitch factors and a moderate velocity spread can be formed. This makes them suitable for high-efficiency single-mode generation in the high frequency gyrotron at high harmonic.

  8. Neutron beam characteristics from 50 MeV protons on beryllium using a continuously variable multi-leaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Brahme, A; Eenmaa, J; Lindbäck, S; Montelius, A; Wootton, P

    1983-08-01

    The dose distributional properties of a p(50) Be neutron beam using a continuously variable multi-leaf collimator are presented and compared with a 6 MV photon beam. The differences in physical dose delivery between these two radiation modalities are generally insignificant for radiation therapy, and stringent comparisons of neutron and photon treatments should therefore be possible. The flexibility in field shaping with the multi-leaf collimator opens new possibilities in the treatment of complex irregular target volumes. The collimator consists of 40 wedge-shaped leaves that are independently moved under computer control with their collimating surfaces always aligned with the effective radiation source to minimize the penumbra. The leaf collimator eliminates the need for handling of heavy insert collimators and beam blocks at the same time that it allows dynamic conformation therapy with neutrons.

  9. Hydroforming Of Patchwork Blanks — Numerical Modeling And Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, Klaus; Merklein, Marion; Geiger, Manfred

    2005-08-01

    In comparison to the commonly applied technology of tailored blanks the concept of patchwork blanks offers a number of additional advantages. Potential application areas for patchwork blanks in automotive industry are e.g. local reinforcements of automotive closures, structural reinforcements of rails and pillars as well as shock towers. But even if there is a significant application potential for patchwork blanks in automobile production, industrial realization of this innovative technique is decelerated due to a lack of knowledge regarding the forming behavior and the numerical modeling of patchwork blanks. Especially for the numerical simulation of hydroforming processes, where one part of the forming tool is replaced by a fluid under pressure, advanced modeling techniques are required to ensure an accurate prediction of the blanks' forming behavior. The objective of this contribution is to provide an appropriate model for the numerical simulation of patchwork blanks' forming processes. Therefore, different finite element modeling techniques for patchwork blanks are presented. In addition to basic shell element models a combined finite element model consisting of shell and solid elements is defined. Special emphasis is placed on the modeling of the weld seam. For this purpose the local mechanical properties of the weld metal, which have been determined by means of Martens-hardness measurements and uniaxial tensile tests, are integrated in the finite element models. The results obtained from the numerical simulations are compared to experimental data from a hydraulic bulge test. In this context the focus is laid on laser- and spot-welded patchwork blanks.

  10. Blanks: a computer program for analyzing furniture rough-part needs in standard-size blanks

    Treesearch

    Philip A. Araman

    1983-01-01

    A computer program is described that allows a company to determine the number of edge-glued, standard-size blanks required to satisfy its rough-part needs for a given production period. Yield and cost information also is determined by the program. A list of the program inputs, outputs, and uses of outputs is described, and an example analysis with sample output is...

  11. Continuous wave stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugation and beam cleanup in optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Steven M.; Spring, Justin B.; Russell, Timothy H.

    2009-02-01

    A review of research into stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation and beam cleanup conducted at the Air Force Institute of Technology is presented. CW phase conjugation was demonstrated using SBS in short lengths of multi-mode, step-index fiber. A fidelity of 0.8 was achieved using a 0.06-NA fiber of 40 m length and a 0.13-NA fiber at 15 m length. In modeling and experiment, the fidelity declined as fiber length or numerical aperture increased. A relationship was established empirically between step-index fiber parameters and the phase conjugation fidelity. In addition, increased fidelity was related to an increase in the effective Brillouin gain coefficient in step-index fibers. Beam cleanup was observed in both graded-index and step-index fibers. The Stokes beam generated in long, multimode, graded-index fibers was analyzed using spatial and phase methods and found to be a low-order mode of the fiber instead of a phase conjugate of the pump. SBS in long, graded-index fibers was used to combine multiple beams and to improve the beam quality of a single aberrated beam.

  12. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Jonas; Tölli, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min-1. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  13. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas; Tölli, Heikki

    2011-01-21

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min(-1). The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C(8)H(18)) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH(3))(4)). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  14. A substructure approach tailored to the dynamic analysis of multi-span continuous beams under moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Salvo, Vera; Muscolino, Giuseppe; Palmeri, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    The paper deals with the dynamic analysis of multiply supported continuous beams subjected to moving loads, which in turn can be modelled either as moving forces or moving masses. A dedicated variant of the component mode synthesis (CMS) method is proposed in which the classical primary-secondary substructure approach (SA) is tailored to cope with slender (i.e. Euler-Bernoulli) continuous beams with arbitrary geometry. To do this, the whole structure is ideally decomposed in primary and secondary spans with convenient restraints, whose exact eigenfunctions are used as assumed local modes; the representation of the internal forces is improved with the help of two additional assumed modes for each primary span, while primary-secondary influence functions allow satisfying the kinematical compatibility between adjacent spans; the continuous beam is then re-assembled, and the Lagrange's equations of motion are derived in a compact block-matrix setting for both moving force and moving mass model. Numerical examples demonstrate accuracy and efficiency of the proposed procedure. An application with a platoon of high-speed moving masses confirms that the inertial effects neglected in the moving force model may have a significant impact in the structural response.

  15. Blank fire configuration for automatic pistol

    DOEpatents

    Teague, Tommy L.

    1990-01-01

    A pistol configured to fire blank cartridges includes a modified barrel with a breech portion connected to an aligned inner sleeve. Around the inner sleeve, there is disposed an outer sleeve having a vent therein through which the cartridge discharges. The breech portion is connected to a barrel anchor to move backward in a slight arc when the pistol is fired. A spring retention rod projects from the barrel anchor and receives a shortened recoil spring therearound which recoil spring has one end abutting a stop on the barrel anchor and the other end in abutment with the end of a spring retaining cup. The spring retaining cup is engaged by a flange projecting from a slide so that when the pistol is fired, the slide moves rearwardly against the compression of the spring to eject the spent cartridge and then moves forwardly under the urging of the spring to load a fresh cartridge into the breech portion. The spring then returns all of the slidable elements to their initial position so that the pistol may again be fired.

  16. Novel acid-free cleaning process for mask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Harald; Branz, Karsten; Dietze, Uwe; Dress, Peter; Hess, Guenter

    2005-06-01

    Knowledge of particle removal during the mask cleaning was transferred to the blank cleaning and vice versa. The experiments are focusing on a variety of blank substrates (glass substrates, chrome on glass blanks and phase shift mask blanks substrates). The principal equipment concept and the process optimization strategies for cleaning of those different kinds of blank substrates are presented. With a fixed process flow, including UV-treatment, Fulljet and MegaSonic treatment, Rinse and Dry, process parameters are varied to define the optimum process conditions. Criteria for an optimum process are particle removal efficiency in general and optical integrity for phase shift mask blanks in particular. The particle removal efficiency for all investigated blank types is within a range of 96-100%. Especially for Ta/SiO2 phase shift mask blanks we demonstrate that during the cleaning process the optical properties only change by 0.07° phase loss and 0.01% transmission loss per cleaning cycle, respectively.

  17. Enabling advanced mirror blank design through modern optical fabrication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Timothy J.; Genberg, Victor L.

    1994-02-01

    Mirror blanks used in high-reliability optical systems for airborne and spaceborne applications have many requirements in terms of weight, stiffness and moment of inertia, as well as mounting and gravitational influences. Lightweight and ultra-lightweight mirror blank design techniques have been enhanced by recent technological developments in mirror blank fabrication and optical figuring. This paper briefly reviews traditional mirror blank design considerations in light of new fabrication technologies such as abrasive water jet machining of mirror cores and ion figuring of optical surfaces. The impact of these new technologies on mirror blank design is also discussed, as well as new design and analytical techniques using NASTRAN. Actual production data using these techniques are presented.

  18. Finite element modeling of light propagation in fruit under illumination of continuous-wave beam

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spatially-resolved spectroscopy provides a means for measuring the optical properties of biological tissues, based on analytical solutions to diffusion approximation for semi-infinite media under the normal illumination of infinitely small size light beam. The method is, however, prone to error in m...

  19. Seismic Performance of RC Beam-Column Connections with Continuous Rectangular Spiral Transverse Reinforcements for Low Ductility Classes

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Azlan Bin; Bin Mohd Sam, Abdul Rahman; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Hodjati, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The seismic performance of RC columns could be significantly improved by continuous spiral reinforcement as a result of its adequate ductility and energy dissipation capacity. Due to post-earthquake brittle failure observations in beam-column connections, the seismic behaviour of such connections could greatly be improved by simultaneous application of this method in both beams and columns. In this study, a new proposed detail for beam to column connection introduced as “twisted opposing rectangular spiral” was experimentally and numerically investigated and its seismic performance was compared against normal rectangular spiral and conventional shear reinforcement systems. In this study, three full scale beam to column connections were first designed in conformance with Eurocode (EC2-04) for low ductility class connections and then tested by quasistatic cyclic loading recommended by ACI Building Code (ACI 318-02). Next, the experimental results were validated by numerical methods. Finally, the results revealed that the new proposed connection could improve the ultimate lateral resistance, ductility, and energy dissipation capacity. PMID:25309957

  20. Seismic performance of RC beam-column connections with continuous rectangular spiral transverse reinforcements for low ductility classes.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Mohammadamin; Bin Adnan, Azlan; Sam, Abdul Rahman Bin Mohd; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Faridmehr, Iman; Hodjati, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The seismic performance of RC columns could be significantly improved by continuous spiral reinforcement as a result of its adequate ductility and energy dissipation capacity. Due to post-earthquake brittle failure observations in beam-column connections, the seismic behaviour of such connections could greatly be improved by simultaneous application of this method in both beams and columns. In this study, a new proposed detail for beam to column connection introduced as "twisted opposing rectangular spiral" was experimentally and numerically investigated and its seismic performance was compared against normal rectangular spiral and conventional shear reinforcement systems. In this study, three full scale beam to column connections were first designed in conformance with Eurocode (EC2-04) for low ductility class connections and then tested by quasistatic cyclic loading recommended by ACI Building Code (ACI 318-02). Next, the experimental results were validated by numerical methods. Finally, the results revealed that the new proposed connection could improve the ultimate lateral resistance, ductility, and energy dissipation capacity.

  1. Flow speed of the ablation vapors generated during laser drilling of CFRP with a continuous-wave laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faas, S.; Freitag, C.; Boley, S.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2017-03-01

    The hot plume of ablation products generated during the laser drilling process of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with a continuous-wave laser beam was analyzed by means of high-speed imaging. The formation of compression shocks was observed within the flow of the evaporated material, which is an indication of flow speeds well above the local speed of sound. The flow speed of the hot ablation products can be estimated by analyzing the position of these compression shocks. We investigated the temporal evolution of the flow speed during the drilling process and the influence of the average laser power on the flow speed. The flow speed increases with increasing average laser powers. The moment of drilling through the material changes the conditions for the drilling process and was confirmed to influence the flow speed of the ablated material. Compression shocks can also be observed during laser cutting of CFRP with a moving laser beam.

  2. Damage identification of beam structures using free response shapes obtained by use of a continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. F.; Chen, Da-Ming; Zhu, W. D.

    2017-08-01

    Spatially dense operating deflection shapes and mode shapes can be rapidly obtained by use of a continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (CSLDV) system, which sweeps its laser spot over a vibrating structure surface. This paper introduces a new type of vibration shapes called a free response shape (FRS) that can be obtained by use of a CSLDV system, and a new damage identification methodology using FRSs is developed for beam structures. An analytical expression of FRSs of a damped beam structure is derived, and FRSs from the analytical expression compare well with those from a finite element model. In the damage identification methodology, a free-response damage index (FRDI) is proposed, and damage regions can be identified near neighborhoods with consistently high values of FRDIs associated with different modes; an auxiliary FRDI is defined to assist identification of the neighborhoods. A FRDI associated with a mode consists of differences between curvatures of FRSs associated with the mode in a number of half-scan periods of a CSLDV system and those from polynomials that fit the FRSs with properly determined orders. A convergence index is proposed to determine the proper order of a polynomial fit. One advantage of the methodology is that the FRDI does not require any baseline information of an undamaged beam structure, if it is geometrically smooth and made of materials that have no stiffness and mass discontinuities. Another advantage is that FRDIs associated with multiple modes can be obtained using free response of a beam structure measured by a CSLDV system in one scan. The number of half-scan periods for calculation of the FRDI associated with a mode can be determined by use of the short-time Fourier transform. The proposed methodology was numerically and experimentally applied to identify damage in beam structures; effects of the scan frequency of a CSLDV system on qualities of obtained FRSs were experimentally investigated.

  3. 12. BUILDING 227. BLANK AMMUNITION LOADING PLANT. ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. BUILDING 227. BLANK AMMUNITION LOADING PLANT. ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. November 1, 1940 - Frankford Arsenal, Building No. 227, South side of Hagner Road between Ripley & Mellon Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Predicting the forming limit of friction stir welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramulu, Perumalla Janaki; Narayanan, R. Ganesh

    2011-05-01

    Friction stir welded blanks (FSWB) are tailored blanks made by friction stir welding of sheets of different thicknesses and quality. In order to reduce the trial-and-error principles and costs, the computational simulation of stamping processes of FSW blanks is required for which a feasible methodology or theory to evaluate the forming characteristics has to be incorporated. In the present work, the validity of effective strain rate based necking criterion (ESRC) in both original and modified forms to predict the forming limit of FSW blanks made of AA6111, DP590 is analyzed. The FLC thus predicted is compared with FLC from thickness gradient based necking criterion and from literature. It is found from the validation done with literature results that a consistent and accurate forming limit prediction is obtained from modified ESRC when compared to original ESRC. The failure pattern prediction is also agreeing well with the literature results.

  5. Western view of coupling blank building, with general machine shop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Western view of coupling blank building, with general machine shop and pattern shop on left. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Auxiliary Buildings, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  6. Determination of Optimal Blank Shape by Radius Vector Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Bo; Park, Jong Kyu; Kim, Yang Soo

    2004-06-01

    A new method of optimal blank shape design for stampings of arbitrary shapes has been proposed. Similar to the sensitivity method, a past work of the present author, the basic nature of this method is iterative modification of an undeformed blank shape by adjusting the nodal positions at the boundary of the blank, until the final shape satisfies a target shape. The main difference from the sensitivity method is that both shape error measure and blank shape modification is done along the normal to a boundary direction in the current method instead of nodal moving direction as in the sensitivity method. Even though the sensitivity method has been proven to be excellent through experiment, huge computational effort is still a problem since the method requires a couple of deformation process analyses per each design stage. Differently from the sensitivity method, the present radius vector method requires only a single deformation analysis per each design step and it can handle an extraordinary motion due to a rigid-body rotation during forming. Drawings of L-shaped cup and wheel housing have been chosen as the examples to verify the present method. In every cases the optimal blank shapes have been obtained after a few times of modification. Through the investigation, the present method, which incorporates normal to boundary is found to be an excellent, or better than the sensitivity method, which incorporates moving direction, for the optimal blank design.

  7. High-power continuous-wave tunable 544- and 272-nm beams based on a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier for calcium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Kim, Yonghee; Park, Hyunmin; Cha, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Lim; Lim, Gwon; Han, Jaemin; Ko, Kwang-Hee; Jeong, Do-Young

    2015-08-01

    Continuous-wave single-frequency tunable 544- and 272-nm beams have been demonstrated by the second- and fourth-harmonic conversions of a 1088-nm fundamental beam from a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier. The single-pass second-harmonic generation with a MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal and the external-cavity frequency-doubling technique with a bulk BBO crystal were employed to achieve an approximately 6-W 544-nm beam and a 1.5-W 272-nm beam, respectively. We characterized the second- and fourth-harmonic generations and discussed their applications to calcium spectroscopy.

  8. Polarity and ion recombination corrections in continuous and pulsed beams for ionization chambers with high Z chamber walls.

    PubMed

    Aldosary, Ghada; Safigholi, Habib; Song, William; Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the response of Farmer-type ionization chambers fitted with high atomic number (Z) walls is studied, and results of the effects of such walls on polarity and ion recombination correction factors in both continuous and pulsed beams are presented. Measurements were made in a continuous Co-60 beam and a pulsed 6MV linac beam using an Exradin-A12 ionization chamber fitted with the manufacturer's C-552 plastic wall, as well as geometrically identical walls made from aluminum, copper and molybdenum. The bias voltage was changed between 10values (range: +50 to +560V). Ion recombination was determined from Jaffé plots and by using the "two-voltage technique". The saturation charge measured with each chamber wall was extrapolated from Jaffé plots. Additionally, the effect of different wall materials on chamber response was studied using MCNP simulations. Results showed that the polarity correction factor is not significantly affected by changes in chamber wall material (within 0.1%). Furthermore, although the saturation charges greatly vary with each chamber wall material, and charge multiplication increases for higher atomic number wall materials, the standard methods of calculating ion recombination yielded results that differed by only 0.2%. Therefore, polarity and ion recombination correction factors are not greatly affected by the chamber wall material. The experimental saturation charges for all the different wall materials agreed well within the uncertainty with MCNP simulations. The breakdown of the linear relationship in Jaffé plots that was previously reported to exist for conventional chamber walls was also observed with the different wall materials. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A study of storage life extension for high performance chemically amplified resist coated blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sin-Ju; Seo, Sung-Min; Ko, Sang-Hoon; Cha, Han-Sun; Kang, Geung-Won; Nam, Kee-Soo; Seo, Woong-Won; Jung, Woo-Kyun; Cho, Hyun-Kyoon; Kim, Jin-Min; Choi, Sang-Soo

    2005-06-01

    The importance of advanced e-beam writing system and chemically amplified resist (CAR) coated blank is increasing gradually in high-end grade photomask manufacture according to CD embodiment of 90 nm and beyond technology node requiring because of the shrinkage of design rule in the semiconductor industry. However, many studies have been reported that CAR has several troubles and especially, CAR sensitivity change is occurred by airborne molecular contamination (AMC). So, the storage life of CAR coated blank is shortened. This problem may cause the difficulty of high-end grade photomask manufacture because it is hard to secure stable mean to target (MTT) and CD uniformity by sensitivity change, T-top profile and footing profile. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the storage life extension for high performance CAR coated blank through improvement of the packing materials. Firstly, a variety of packing materials were collected and the selected packing materials were analyzed by Automatic Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (ATD GC/MS) and Ion Chromatograph (IC) to examine AMC generated from the packing materials. As a result, molecular condensables such as alcohols, hydrocarbons and fatty acids were detected and molecular acids and molecular bases those are NH4+, Cl-, NOx- and SOx- were also detected from the packing materials, respectively. From the above results, we selected the best packing materials which generated the least AMC and the worst packing materials which generated the most AMC. Additionally, we verified photomask process with CAR coated blanks which were packed with those packing materials with post coating delay (PCD) by 50 kV e-beam writing system. In consequence, dose to clear (DTC) showed 4.6 μC/cm2 at 0 day PCD for both of the best and the worst packing materials of CAR coated blank. After 90 days PCD, DTC variation was only 0.4 μC/cm2 for the best packing materials, but DTC variation of 4.0 μC/cm2

  10. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars And Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The primary source catalog of 'blanks' (bright ROSAT sources with no optical counterparts) has been published in the Astrophysical Journal. The first follow-up paper has also been published. This paper used a combination of ROSAT, Chandra and ground based data to convincingly identify one of the blanks as a Ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in a spiral galaxy. A paper detailing optical and near-IR imaging observations of the remaining sources is underway.

  11. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars And Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The primary source catalog of 'blanks' (bright ROSAT sources with no optical counterparts) has been published in the Astrophysical Journal. The first follow-up paper has also been published. This paper used a combination of ROSAT, Chandra and ground based data to convincingly identify one of the blanks as a Ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in a spiral galaxy. A paper detailing optical and near-IR imaging observations of the remaining sources is underway.

  12. A continuously variable beam-diameter, high-fluence, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for tattoo removal: comparison of the maximum beam diameter to a standard 4-mm-diameter treatment beam.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Eric F; Civiok, Jennifer M

    2013-12-01

    Laser beam diameter affects the depth of laser penetration. Q-switched lasers tend to have smaller maximum spot sizes than other dermatologic lasers, making beam diameter a potentially more significant factor in treatment outcomes. To compare the clinical effect of using the maximum-size treatment beam available for each delivered fluence during laser tattoo removal to a standard 4-mm-diameter treatment beam. Thirteen tattoos were treated in 12 subjects using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser equipped with a treatment beam diameter that was adjustable in 1 mm increments and a setting that would enable the maximally achievable diameter ("MAX-ON" setting) with any fluence. Tattoos were randomly bisected and treated on one side with the MAX-ON setting and on the contralateral side with a standard 4-mm-diameter spot ("MAX-OFF" setting). Photographs were taken 8 weeks following each treatment and each half-tattoo was evaluated for clearance on a 10-point scale by physicians blinded to the treatment conditions. Tattoo clearance was greater on the side treated with the MAX-ON setting in a statistically significant manner following the 1st through 4th treatments, with the MAX-OFF treatment site approaching the clearance of the MAX-ON treatment site after the 5th and 6th treatments. This high-energy, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a continuously variable spot-size safely and effectively removes tattoos, with greater removal when using a larger spot-size. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. SterStar system: continuous sterile transfer by e-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisseau, Didier; Malcolm, Fiona

    2004-09-01

    The choice of isolator technology and the use of tubs in a filling line necessitate sterilization of the outer surface of the tub, provided that the inside has been sterilized by another method, prior to entry into the sterile zone. It is a well-known fact that there is a relation between the radiation dose applied to the product and the log reduction of bacteria activity. Electron beam generation technique for sterilization is also well known and widely used in the field of sterilization, e.g. of non-woven materials. This paper describes the electron sterilization transfer system developed by Linac Technologies for pharmaceutical filling lines. The system, called SterStar, takes charge of products placed at the entrance by an operator, and directs the flow through the machine, ejecting into the filling isolator tubs which have been completely surface sterilized. This entirely automatic system can supply the filling machine in terms of throughput. The sterilization heads have a capacity well beyond the maximum performances of the filling line. A number of other applications of this sterilization unit are mentioned.

  14. Amplitude blanking in seismic profiles from Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Agena, W.F.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Imaging of the deepest sedimentary section in Lake Baikal using multichannel seismic profiling was hampered by amplitude blanking that is regionally extensive, is associated with water depths greater than about 900 m and occurs at sub-bottom depths of 1-2 km in association with the first water-bottom multiple. Application of a powerful multiple suppression technique improved the quality of occasional discontinuous, dipping primary reflections, but failed to substantially alter the non-reflective character of the blanking zone. Detailed analysis of amplitudes from original data and synthetic models show that the threshold for detecting primary energy in deep water of Lake Baikal occurs when the primary is about 14-20 dB less than the multiple energy. The blanking occurs because of anomalously low reflectivities of the deep sediments coupled with this 20 dB limitation in real data processing. The blanking cuts across seismic stratal boundaries, and is therefore probably unrelated to depositional lithologies. The deepest, early rift deposits, inferred to come from a mixed fluvial and lacustrine setting, do not easily explain the widespread and uniform character of the blanked deposits. More likely, blanking occurs because of processes or phenomena that physically alter the deposits, causing them to be non-reflective and/or highly attenuating. No single process explains all the observations, but a combination of diagenesis, overpressure, and the presence of dispersed free gas at sub-bottom depths of 1-2 km, offer plausible and possible conditions that contribute to blanking. Copyright ?? 1996 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. High-throughput automatic defect review for 300mm blank wafers with atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2015-03-01

    While feature size in lithography process continuously becomes smaller, defect sizes on blank wafers become more comparable to device sizes. Defects with nm-scale characteristic size could be misclassified by automated optical inspection (AOI) and require post-processing for proper classification. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is known to provide high lateral and the highest vertical resolution by mechanical probing among all techniques. However, its low throughput and tip life in addition to the laborious efforts for finding the defects have been the major limitations of this technique. In this paper we introduce automatic defect review (ADR) AFM as a post-inspection metrology tool for defect study and classification for 300 mm blank wafers and to overcome the limitations stated above. The ADR AFM provides high throughput, high resolution, and non-destructive means for obtaining 3D information for nm-scale defect review and classification.

  16. Actinic defect counting statistics over 1 cm2 area of EUVL mask blank

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Seongtae; Lai, Chih-Wei; Rekawa, Seno; Walton, Chris W.; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2000-02-18

    As a continuation of comparison experiments between EUV inspection and visible inspection of defects on EUVL mask blanks, we report on the result of an experiment where the EUV defect inspection tool is used to perform at-wavelength defect counting over 1 cm{sup 2} of EUVL mask blank. Initial EUV inspection found five defects over the scanned area and the subsequent optical scattering inspection was able to detect all of the five defects. Therefore, if there are any defects that are only detectable by EUV inspection, the density is lower than the order of unity per cm2. An upgrade path to substantially increase the overall throughput of the EUV inspection system is also identified in the manuscript.

  17. Research of beam conditioning technologies using continuous phase plate, Multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Jia, Huaiting; Tian, Xiaocheng; Yuan, Haoyu; Zhu, Na; Su, Jingqin; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-10-01

    In the research of inertial confinement fusion, laser plasma interaction (LPI) is becoming a key problem that affects ignition. Here, multi-frequency modulation (Multi-FM) smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), continuous phase plate (CPP) and polarization smoothing (PS) were experimentally studied and implemented on the SG-III laser facility. After using these techniques, the far field distribution of SG-Ⅲ laser facility can be adjusted, controlled and repeated accurately. The output spectrums of the cascade phase modulators used for Multi-FM SSD were stable and the FM-to-AM effect can be restrained. Experiments on SG-III laser facility indicate that when the number of color cycles adopts 1, imposing SSD with 3.3 times diffraction limit (TDL) did not lead to pinhole closure in the spatial filters of preamplifier and main amplifiers with 30-TDL pinhole size. The nonuniformity of the focal spots using Multi-FM SSD, CPP and PS drops to 0.18, comparing to 0.26 with CPP+SSD, 0.57 with CPP+PS and 0.84 with only CPP and wedged lens. Polarization smoothing using flat birefringent plate in the convergent beam of final optics assembly (FOA) was studied. The PS plates were manufactured and equipped on SG-III laser facility for LPI research. Combined beam smoothing and polarization manipulation were also studied to solve the LPI problem. Results indicate that through adjusting dispersion directions of SSD beams in a quad, two dimensional SSD can be obtained. Using polarization control plate (PCP), polarization on the near field and far field can be manipulated, providing new method to solve LPI problem in indirect drive laser fusion.

  18. Experimental and Numerical Study on Blanking Process with Negative Clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Kenji; Yanaga, Hiroki; Fukushima, Katsunori

    This study summarizes the characteristics of blanking behavior with a negative clearance. Several experiments were performed for two aluminum sheets over a wide range of clearances including negative values. Blanking with negatively large clearances was found to produce fine cut edges with less roll-over and no fracture zone even for a brittle material. Corresponding simulations were performed using the Ayada's criterion for predicting ductile fracture initiation. Each zone of blanked part edges such as roll-over and fractured zone agreed well with that obtained in the experiments except a few cases accompanied by secondary shear. The reason for prevention of fracture by using negative clearances was explained with the change of the damage value during the process; the damage value was kept low throughout the blanking operation since the mean stress dominating the damage value became compressive around the die edge. Influences of blanking parameters on load-stroke curves were also investigated. The curves for negative clearances showed gradual increase in load toward the end of stroke. The earlier fracture initiated, the earlier the load reached a peak. Simulated curves showed the same tendency and in good agreement with the experimental ones quantitatively.

  19. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars and Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have identified a population of 'blank field sources' (or 'blanks') among the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) bright unidentified X-ray sources with faint optical counterparts. The extreme X-ray over optical flux ratio of blank field sources is not compatible with the main classes of X-ray emitters except for extreme BL Lacertae objects at fx/fv is equal to or less than 35. From the analysis of ROSAT archival data we found evidence for only three sources, out of 16, needing absorption in excess of the Galactic value and no indication of variability. We also found evidence for an extended nature for only one of the five blanks with a serendipitous HRI (High Resolution Imager) detection; this source (1WGA J1226.9+3332) was confirmed as a z=0.89 cluster of galaxies. Palomar images reveal the presence of a red (O - E is equal to or greater than 2) counterpart in the X-ray error circle for six blanks. The identification process brought to the discovery of another high z cluster of galaxies, one (possibly extreme) BL Lac and two apparently normal type 1 AGNs (Active Galactic Nuclei). These AGNs, together with four more AGN-like objects seem to form a well defined group: they present type 1 X-ray spectra but red Palomar counterparts. We discuss the possible explanations for the discrepancy between the X-ray and optical data, among which: a suppressed big blue bump emission, an extreme dust to gas (approximately 40 - 60 the Galactic ratio) ratio value and a high redshift (z is greater than or equal to 3.5) QSO (Quasi-Stellar Object) nature. These AGN-like blanks seem to be the bright (and easier to study) analogs of the sources which are being found in deep Chandra observations. Five more blanks have a still an unknown nature.

  20. Reflectometric frequency-modulation continuous-wave distributed fiber-optic stress sensor with forward coupled beams.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G; Campbell, M; Wallace, P

    1996-10-01

    A distributed optical-fiber stress sensor whose principle of operation is based on the frequency-modulation continuous-wave technique is reported. The sensor consists of a length of birefringent fiber with a mirror attached to one end, a diode laser, and a p-i-n photodiode detector. The intensity and the location of an applied stress are determined simultaneously by detecting the amplitude and the frequency of the beat signal, which is produced by two forward-coupled mode beams. The system was found to have a reasonable spatial resolution of 0.85 m (rms error) in a sensing range of 100 m. The advantages and limitations of the sensor are also discussed.

  1. Exploiting kinetics and thermodynamics to grow phase-pure complex oxides by molecular-beam epitaxy under continuous codeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Eva H.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Heikes, Colin A.; Paik, Hanjong; Nie, Yuefeng; Adamo, Carolina; Heeg, Tassilo; Liu, Zi-Kui; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2017-07-01

    We report the growth of PbTiO3 thin films by molecular-beam epitaxy utilizing continuous codeposition. In addition to the requirements from thermodynamics, whether the resulting film is single-phase PbTiO3 or not at a particular temperature depends strongly on the film growth rate and the incident fluxes of all species, including titanium. We develop a simple theory for the kinetics of lead oxidation on the growing film surface and find that it qualitatively explains the manner in which the adsorption-controlled growth window of PbTiO3 depends on lead flux, oxidant flux, and titanium flux. We successfully apply the kinetic theory to the dependence of the growth of BiFeO3 on oxidant type and surmise that the theory may be generally applicable to the adsorption-controlled growth of complex oxides by MBE.

  2. Repair of localized defects in multilayer-coated reticle blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, Daniel G.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Mirkarimi, Paul B.

    2004-11-23

    A method is provided for repairing defects in a multilayer coating layered onto a reticle blank used in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system. Using high lateral spatial resolution, energy is deposited in the multilayer coating in the vicinity of the defect. This can be accomplished using a focused electron beam, focused ion beam or a focused electromagnetic radiation. The absorbed energy will cause a structural modification of the film, producing a localized change in the film thickness. The change in film thickness can be controlled with sub-nanometer accuracy by adjusting the energy dose. The lateral spatial resolution of the thickness modification is controlled by the localization of the energy deposition. The film thickness is adjusted locally to correct the perturbation of the reflected field. For example, when the structural modification is a localized film contraction, the repair of a defect consists of flattening a mound or spreading out the sides of a depression.

  3. Formation mechanism of the photomask blanks material related haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Jin; Choi, Junyoul; Koh, Soowan; Kim, Minho; Lee, Jiyoung; Lee, Han-Shin; Kim, Byung Gook; Jeon, Chan-uk

    2016-05-01

    We have observed a new type haze of which formation deviates from the generally accepted models with respect to the size, shape, and removability by chemicals. It has very small size of 50~100nm and are crowded around the cell boundary, while the typical haze doesn't prefer a special region on mask in the majority of cases. It is hard to remove by general cleaning, while the typical haze is easily removed by general cleaning process and even de-ionized water. It is confirmed that the source of the haze is blank material related ions which are formed by chemical etching of blanks during mask cleaning process or the photomask blanks itself.

  4. Environmental assessment of the proposed Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD). [Neutral Particle Beam Accelerator System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    An assessment was made of the potential environmental impacts of construction and operation of the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), including an evaluation of alternative actions. Key elements considered were on- and off-site radiological effects and potential impacts to cultural resources. The radiological consequences of routine operations of the CWDD are readily reduced to insignificant levels by bulk shielding, confinement, and containment. The radiation dose to the maximally exposed off-site individual would be 0.52 mrem/yr from direct radiation and 1.2 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] mrem/yr from airborne radionuclides, based on maximum planned facility operation. The maximum credible postulated accident would result in a dose to the maximally exposed individual of less than 20 mrem. A cultural resource survey has determined that the location for the CWDD has, no cultural resource sites or materials and construction is permitted by the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency. Demands for utility services would require only about two percent of excess capacity already installed at Argonne. Other environmental impact categories were considered, including socioeconomic effects, aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna, wetlands, and water and air quality.

  5. Fourier continuation methods for high-fidelity simulation of nonlinear acoustic beams.

    PubMed

    Albin, Nathan; Bruno, Oscar P; Cheung, Theresa Y; Cleveland, Robin O

    2012-10-01

    On the basis of recently developed Fourier continuation (FC) methods and associated efficient parallelization techniques, this text introduces numerical algorithms that, due to very low dispersive errors, can accurately and efficiently solve the types of nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) models of nonlinear acoustics in hundred-wavelength domains as arise in the simulation of focused medical ultrasound. As demonstrated in the examples presented in this text, the FC approach can be used to produce solutions to nonlinear acoustics PDEs models with significantly reduced discretization requirements over those associated with finite-difference, finite-element and finite-volume methods, especially in cases involving waves that travel distances that are orders of magnitude longer than their respective wavelengths. In these examples, the FC methodology is shown to lead to improvements in computing times by factors of hundreds and even thousands over those required by the standard approaches. A variety of one-and two-dimensional examples presented in this text demonstrate the power and capabilities of the proposed methodology, including an example containing a number of scattering centers and nonlinear multiple-scattering events.

  6. Continuous all-optical deceleration and single-photon cooling of molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayich, A. M.; Vutha, A. C.; Hummon, M. T.; Porto, J. V.; Campbell, W. C.

    2014-02-01

    Ultracold molecular gases are promising as an avenue to rich many-body physics, quantum chemistry, quantum information, and precision measurements. This richness, which flows from the complex internal structure of molecules, makes the creation of ultracold molecular gases using traditional methods (laser plus evaporative cooling) a challenge, in particular due to the spontaneous decay of molecules into dark states. We propose a way to circumvent this key bottleneck using an all-optical method for decelerating molecules using stimulated absorption and emission with a single ultrafast laser. We further describe single-photon cooling of the decelerating molecules that exploits their high dark state pumping rates, turning the principal obstacle to molecular laser cooling into an advantage. Cooling and deceleration may be applied simultaneously and continuously to load molecules into a trap. We discuss implementation details including multilevel numerical simulations of strontium monohydride. These techniques are applicable to a large number of molecular species and atoms with the only requirement being an electric dipole transition that can be accessed with an ultrafast laser.

  7. Information model construction of MES oriented to mechanical blanking workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-bo; Wang, Jin-ye; Yue, Yan-fang; Yao, Xue-min

    2016-11-01

    Manufacturing Execution System (MES) is one of the crucial technologies to implement informatization management in manufacturing enterprises, and the construction of its information model is the base of MES database development. Basis on the analysis of the manufacturing process information in mechanical blanking workshop and the information requirement of MES every function module, the IDEF1X method was adopted to construct the information model of MES oriented to mechanical blanking workshop, and a detailed description of the data structure feature included in MES every function module and their logical relationship was given from the point of view of information relationship, which laid the foundation for the design of MES database.

  8. CARs blanks feasibility study results for the advanced EB reticle fabrication (IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Masahiro; Ota, Fumiko; Yokoya, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Hideo

    2002-03-01

    In order to provide a platform for the industry, we have been working on positive-working CAR screening by joint-works with resist-makers. In this paper, firstly, we did validation of a technique 'dark erosion analysis by excess develop' on our latest benchmark CAR C-2, to re-introduce our baking optimization technique to all the blanks users. The baking condition described by the technique (the sweet spot) certainly provided us a superior pattern profile, a longer blanks life, and better sensitivity stability for PEB time. To find a CAR that exceeds C-2 performance, we continued CAR screening. A CAR with 'less-footing' and 'high-sensitivity' was found, however, it had still a difficulty of terrible 'spray-damages' due to insufficient remaining thickness after develop. Desiccant (silica-gel) worked significantly to extend CAR blanks life, however, we found that it was not available for practical use unfortunately due to excess particle contamination during shipment. As a technique to solve 'spray-develop damage' issue, it was certainly effective to form a protection layer, and aqueous TAR over-coating layer could be an option to prevent resists film from the spray-damages. Finally, we reported negative-working CARs screening results. And some negative CARs were superior to the most popular one today for sensitivity or pattern profile, however, they had a difficulty of excess-undercut.

  9. Steps toward 8m honeycomb mirror blanks. III - 1.8m honeycomb sandwich blanks cast from borosilicate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Hill, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The design, fabrication techniques, and equipment used for producing two 1.8-m honeycomb sandwich blanks, eventually leading to production of 8-m blanks, are reported. The procedure employed 85 cast hexagonal tiles at the bottom section, affixed against flotation by SiC bolts. The two plano concave mirrors are 1.83 m thick, weight 500 kg, and are each designed for 19 supports of astatic-lever type. Both blanks are of high quality and with an adequately low bubble content; one is to be figured to high-precision 0.25-arcsecond images, and is to be tested on the Multiple Mirror Telescope. Construction of a spin-casting facility based on the same principle is being planned for test-fabricating spin-cast mirrors on a smaller scale.

  10. The impact of continuously-variable dose rate VMAT on beam stability, MLC positioning, and overall plan dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Christopher; McWilliam, Alan; Johnstone, Emily; Rowbottom, Carl

    2012-11-06

    A recent control system update for Elekta linear accelerators includes the ability to deliver volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with continuously variable dose rate (CVDR), rather than a number of fixed binned dose rates (BDR). The capacity to select from a larger range of dose rates allows the linac to maintain higher gantry speeds, resulting in faster, smoother deliveries. The purpose of this study is to investigate two components of CVDR delivery - the increase in average dose rate and gantry speed, and a determination of their effects on beam stability, MLC positioning, and overall plan dosimetry. Initially, ten VMAT plans (5 prostate, 5head and neck) were delivered to a Delta4 dosimetric phantom using both the BDR and CVDR systems. The plans were found to be dosimetrically robust using both delivery methods, although CVDR was observed to give higher gamma pass rates at the 2%/2 mm gamma level for prostates (p < 0.01). For the dual arc head-and-neck plans, CVDR delivery resulted in improved pass rates at all gamma levels (2%/2 mm to 4%/4 mm) for individual arc verifications (p < 0.01), but gave similar results to BDR when both arcs were combined. To investigate the impact of increased gantry speed on MLC positioning, a dynamic leaf-tracking tool was developed using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Comparing the detected MLC positions to those expected from the plan, CVDR was observed to result in a larger mean error compared to BDR (0.13 cm and 0.06 cm, respectively, p < 0.01). The EPID images were also used to monitor beam stability during delivery. It was found that the CVDR deliveries had a lower standard deviation of the gun-target (GT) and transverse (AB) profiles (p < 0.01). This study has determined that CVDR may offer a dosimetric advantage for VMAT plans. While the higher gantry speed of CVDR appears to increase deviations in MLC positioning, the relative effect on dosimetry is lower than the positive impact of a flatter and more

  11. 17 CFR 230.419 - Offerings by blank check companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... companies. 230.419 Section 230.419 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... check companies. (a) Scope of the rule and definitions. (1) The provisions of this section shall apply to every registration statement filed under the Act relating to an offering by a blank check...

  12. 17 CFR 230.419 - Offerings by blank check companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... companies. 230.419 Section 230.419 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... check companies. (a) Scope of the rule and definitions. (1) The provisions of this section shall apply to every registration statement filed under the Act relating to an offering by a blank check...

  13. 17 CFR 230.419 - Offerings by blank check companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... companies. 230.419 Section 230.419 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... check companies. (a) Scope of the rule and definitions. (1) The provisions of this section shall apply to every registration statement filed under the Act relating to an offering by a blank check...

  14. 17 CFR 230.419 - Offerings by blank check companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... companies. 230.419 Section 230.419 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... check companies. (a) Scope of the rule and definitions. (1) The provisions of this section shall apply to every registration statement filed under the Act relating to an offering by a blank check...

  15. Strong Vocational Interest Blank Introversion Extraversion and Occupational Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Charles B.

    1970-01-01

    Item responses for the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB) were contrasted for a group of introverts and extraverts. A scale was constructed for the SVIB to measure a dimension of occupational introversion extraversion (OIE). Test retest reliability of the OIE was ofthe same magnitude as the other SVIB scales. Occupations were then ranked on…

  16. Strong Vocational Interest Blank Introversion Extraversion and Occupational Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Charles B.

    1970-01-01

    Item responses for the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB) were contrasted for a group of introverts and extraverts. A scale was constructed for the SVIB to measure a dimension of occupational introversion extraversion (OIE). Test retest reliability of the OIE was ofthe same magnitude as the other SVIB scales. Occupations were then ranked on…

  17. The Concurrent Validity of the Correctional Officers' Interest Blank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevy, Bruce A.

    1988-01-01

    Available data yields an estimated validity of .27 for the Corrections Officer Interest Blank (COIB) as a predictor of job performance of corrections officers. The COIB is only weakly related to the job performance of juvenile counselors and has no relationship to the performance of probation officers. (JOW)

  18. Flexible laser welding of tailored blanks in small batch series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagger, Claus B.; Olsen, Flemming O.

    2003-03-01

    In a EU Craft project including eight partners in five countries, the most important aspects regarding efficient and low cost manufacture by small and medium sized enterprises (SME) of tailored blanks has been systematically investigated. In this paper, small batch series laser welding of tailored blanks in SME will be described. This includes the design, development and systematic use of a flexible and low cost clamping device as well as the practical experience obtained on the job shop through systematic optimization of welding of tailored blanks with even and uneven thickness (0.75 and 1.25 mm). A clamping device that is able to hold finished parts up to 1 x 1 m is successfully manufactured and tested. A special arrangement with alignment needles along the weld line is used to precisely position the sheets. These needles are turned into the clamping device during welding, where root shielding is employed. Hydraulic presses hold down the sheets, so they move less than 0.01 mm during welding. High quality tailored blank welds are successfully manufactured in ten different combinations, including mild steel and medium strength steel with even and uneven thickness with and without zinc coating.

  19. A Study on the Welding Characteristics of Tailor Welded Blank Metal Sheets Using GTAW and Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thasanaraphan, Pornsak

    In this study, a computational and experimental effort was carried out to qualitatively understand the weld pool shape, distortion and residual stress for continuous laser welding and manual pulsed gas metal arc welding. For all the welding simulations given in this dissertation, a welding specific finite element package, SYSWELD, is used. This research focuses on the welding behavior observed in light-weight metal structures known as the tailor-welded blanks, TWBs. They are a combination of two or more metal sheets with different thickness and/or different materials that are welded together in a single plane prior to forming, e.g., stamping. They made from the low carbon steel. As laser welding experiment results show, the weld pool shape at the top and bottom surface, is strongly influenced by surface tension, giving it a characteristic hourglass shape. In order to simulate the hourglass shape, a new volumetric heat source model was developed to predict the transient temperature profile and weld pool shape, including the effect of surface tension. Tailor welded blanks with different thicknesses were examined in the laser welding process. All major physical phenomena such as thermal conduction, heat radiation and convection heat losses are taken into account in the model development as well as temperature-dependant thermal and mechanical material properties. The model is validated for the case of butt joint welding of cold rolled steel sheets. The results of the numerical simulations provide temperature distributions representing the shape of the molten pool, distortion and residual stress with varying laser beam power and welding speed. It is demonstrated that the finite element simulation results are in good agreement with the experiment results. This includes the weld pool shape and sheet metal distortion. While there is no experimental data to compare directly with residual stress results, the distorted shape provides an indirect measure of the welding

  20. Evaluation of weld porosity in laser beam seam welds: optimizing continuous wave and square wave modulated processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew; Faraone, Kevin M. (Honeywell FM&T, Kansas City, MO); Roach, Robert Allen; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-02-01

    Nd:YAG laser joining is a high energy density (HED) process that can produce high-speed, low-heat input welds with a high depth-to-width aspect ratio. This is optimized by formation of a ''keyhole'' in the weld pool resulting from high vapor pressures associated with laser interaction with the metallic substrate. It is generally accepted that pores form in HED welds due to the instability and frequent collapse of the keyhole. In order to maintain an open keyhole, weld pool forces must be balanced such that vapor pressure and weld pool inertia forces are in equilibrium. Travel speed and laser beam power largely control the way these forces are balanced, as well as welding mode (Continuous Wave or Square Wave) and shielding gas type. A study into the phenomenon of weld pool porosity in 304L stainless steel was conducted to better understand and predict how welding parameters impact the weld pool dynamics that lead to pore formation. This work is intended to aid in development and verification of a finite element computer model of weld pool fluid flow dynamics being developed in parallel efforts and assist in weld development activities for the W76 and future RRW programs.

  1. Continuous and breakdown currents in cold-plasma coated Mylar[reg sign] foils under irradiation by nonpenetrating electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.; Guenther, P. )

    1993-04-01

    Breakdown and flash-over effects are known to occur in thin polymer foils used as thermal blankets in space satellites, where they are exposed to irradiation by nonpenetrating space electrons. These effects are investigated by means of a Split Faraday Cup system mounted under an electron gun [1]. Continuous and breakdown currents are measured from a metal ring electrode at the surface of incidence and from a rear electrode, respectively. The equivalent circuit of the system is developed. Measurements were carried out on Mylar foils uncoated or coated with aluminum, plasma-deposited SiO[sub 2] or Si[sub 3]N[sub 4](p-SiO[sub 2] or p-Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]), or electron-beam evaporated SiO[sub 2]. It was found, that some plasma-deposited coatings form a conductive layer under irradiation and reduce breakdown effects. But after termination of the electron bombardment discharge and breakdown effects were observed for all samples except those aluminized on both surfaces.

  2. Three cases of death caused by shots from blank cartridge.

    PubMed

    Zdravkovic, Miodrag; Milic, Miroslav; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Kostov, Milos

    2009-12-01

    The authors describe 3 cases of lethal injuries caused by 7.62 mm blank cartridge shots from military automatic rifle of domestic origin (AK 47, 7.62 mm). In 1 case, the cartridge was fired from a weapon that had been leaned on the head, with subsequent destruction of brain, and in other 2 cases, the weapon had been leaned on the chests, which led to destruction of heart parts. The injuries were caused by the action of striking wave of gunpowder explosion, the air blast type. The cases demonstrate that the gas pressure from the exploding propellant of blank cartridge is powerful enough to penetrate the thoracic wall and the skull.

  3. Printability and actinic AIMS review of programmed mask blank defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduijn, Erik; Mangat, Pawitter; Wood, Obert; Rankin, Jed; Chen, Yulu; Goodwin, Francis; Capelli, Renzo; Perlitz, Sascha; Hellweg, Dirk; Bonam, Ravi; Matham, Shravan; Felix, Nelson; Corliss, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    We report on the printability, mitigation and actinic mask level review of programmed substrate blank pit and bump defects in a EUV lithography test mask. We show the wafer printing behavior of these defects exposed with an NXE:3300 EUV lithography scanner and the corresponding mask level actinic review using the AIMSTM tool. We will show which categories of these blank substrate defects print on wafer and how they can be mitigated by hiding these defects under absorber lines. Furthermore we show that actinic AIMSTM mask review images of these defects, in combination with a simple thresholded resist transfer model, can accurately predict their wafer printing profiles. We also compare mask level actinic AIMSTM to top down mask SEM review in their ability to detect these defects.

  4. Extension of the standard addition method by blank addition.

    PubMed

    Steliopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Standard addition involves adding varying amounts of the analyte to sample portions of fixed mass or fixed volume and submitting those portions to the sample preparation procedure. After measuring the final extract solutions, the observed signals are linearly regressed on the spiked amounts. The original unknown amount is estimated by the opposite of the abscissa intercept of the fitted straight line [1]. A limitation of this method is that only data points with abscissa values equal to and greater than zero are available so that there is no information on whether linearity holds below the spiking level zero. An approach to overcome this limitation is introduced.•Standard addition is combined with blank addition.•Blank addition means that defined mixtures of blank matrix and sample material are subjected to sample preparation to give final extract solutions.•Equations are presented to estimate the original unknown amount and to calculate the 1-2α confidence interval about this estimate using the combined data set.

  5. Process Design of Aluminum Tailor Heat Treated Blanks.

    PubMed

    Kahrimanidis, Alexander; Lechner, Michael; Degner, Julia; Wortberg, Daniel; Merklein, Marion

    2015-12-09

    In many industrials field, especially in the automotive sector, there is a trend toward lightweight constructions in order to reduce the weight and thereby the CO₂ and NOx emissions of the products. An auspicious approach within this context is the substitution of conventional deep drawing steel by precipitation hardenable aluminum alloys. However, based on the low formability, the application for complex stamping parts is challenging. Therefore, at the Institute of Manufacturing Technology, an innovative technology to enhance the forming limit of these lightweight materials was invented. The key idea of the so-called Tailor Heat Treated Blanks (THTB) is optimization of the mechanical properties by local heat treatment before the forming operation. An accurate description of material properties is crucial to predict the forming behavior of tailor heat treated blanks by simulation. Therefore, within in this research project, a holistic approach for the design of the THTB process in dependency of the main influencing parameters is presented and discussed in detail. The capability of the approach for the process development of complex forming operations is demonstrated by a comparison of local blank thickness of a tailgate with the corresponding results from simulation.

  6. CO{sub 2} laser tailored blanks welding process monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    D`Angelo, G.; Borello, E.; Pallaro, N.

    1996-12-31

    Tailored blank welding has been a rapidly growing segment of the automotive industry over the last five years. It allows to choose the optimal thickness of the sheets for different zones taking into account different mechanical stresses, vehicle safety reinforcement. Through the elimination of extra reinforcement parts, the use of tailored blanks allows to produce lighter car bodies and to simplify the production cycle. As more laser welding systems are being installed in industry, in order to increase the productivity and maintain constant quality of the products, the demand for the development of process monitoring systems, increases. In this paper a monitoring system, based on the measurement of the radiation from the plasma plume during the CO{sub 2} tailored blanks laser welding, is presented. Using an appropriate combination of optical components, detectors and a special software, a complete apparatus has been developed. The signals were found to be correlated to weld quality parameters including the defects such as holes, overlapping and open butts.

  7. Process Design of Aluminum Tailor Heat Treated Blanks

    PubMed Central

    Kahrimanidis, Alexander; Lechner, Michael; Degner, Julia; Wortberg, Daniel; Merklein, Marion

    2015-01-01

    In many industrials field, especially in the automotive sector, there is a trend toward lightweight constructions in order to reduce the weight and thereby the CO2 and NOx emissions of the products. An auspicious approach within this context is the substitution of conventional deep drawing steel by precipitation hardenable aluminum alloys. However, based on the low formability, the application for complex stamping parts is challenging. Therefore, at the Institute of Manufacturing Technology, an innovative technology to enhance the forming limit of these lightweight materials was invented. The key idea of the so-called Tailor Heat Treated Blanks (THTB) is optimization of the mechanical properties by local heat treatment before the forming operation. An accurate description of material properties is crucial to predict the forming behavior of tailor heat treated blanks by simulation. Therefore, within in this research project, a holistic approach for the design of the THTB process in dependency of the main influencing parameters is presented and discussed in detail. The capability of the approach for the process development of complex forming operations is demonstrated by a comparison of local blank thickness of a tailgate with the corresponding results from simulation. PMID:28793727

  8. A continuous microwave discharge maintained by two crossing millimeter-wave beams in hydrogen and argon: numerical simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. V.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Vikharev, A. L.; Radishev, D. B.; Kozlov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of numerical simulation of a continuous microwave discharge in two crossing wave beams of 30 GHz radiation in a mixture of hydrogen and argon are presented. The model describes the steady state of the gas discharge in Ar-H2-H through the self-consistent solution of the following equations: Maxwell’s equations, the electron balance equation, the transport of hydrogen atoms in the ternary mixture, the heat conduction equation and the equation of state of ideal gas. In Maxwell’s equations the effect of the plasma is taken into account through the conduction current. It is assumed that the generation of electrons occurs due to ionization processes and their loss occurs due to processes of electron-ion recombination and ambipolar diffusion. In the model the heat transfer is considered to be due to gas thermal conductivity and transfer of dissociation energy through the flow of hydrogen atoms. The gas pressure is assumed to be constant, and convection effects are neglected. The other approximations and reductions used in the model are discussed. The adequacy of the obtained model is confirmed by comparing the calculation results to experimental data. For comparison the distributions of gas temperature along the substrate in the center of the discharge and the atomic hydrogen flow to the substrate are used. The temperature is experimentally obtained through the analysis of the optical emission of the C2 Swan line. The atomic hydrogen flow to the substrate is measured from the etching of graphite samples imbedded into the substrate. The possibility of obtaining large-area uniform plasma layers in hydrogen with a small addition of methane is predicted. The applications of such gas discharge are discussed.

  9. High speed reflectometer for EUV mask-blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wies, Christian; Lebert, Rainer; Jagle, Bernhard; Juschkin, L.; Sobel, F.; Seitz, H.; Walter, Ronny; Laubis, C.; Scholze, F.; Biel, W.; Steffens, O.

    2005-06-01

    AIXUV GmbH and partners have developed a high speed Reflectometer for EUV mask-blanks which is fully compliant with the SEMI-standard P38 for EUV-mask-blank metrology. The system has been installed in June 2004 at SCHOTT Lithotec AG. It features high throughput, high lateral and spectral resolution, high reproducibility and low absolute uncertainty. Using AIXUV's EUV-LAMP and debris mitigation, low cost-of-ownership and high availability is expected. The spectral reflectance of up to 3 mask-blanks per hour can be measured with at least 20 spots each. The system is push button-controlled. Results are stored in CSV file format. For a spot size of 0.1x1 mm2, 2000 spectral channels of 1.6 pm bandwidth are recorded from 11.6 nm to 14.8 nm. The reflectance measurement is based on the comparison of the sample under test to two reference mirrors calibrated at the PTB radiometry laboratory at BESSY II. The three reflection spectra are recorded simultaneously. For each spot more than 107 photons are accumulated in about 20 s, providing statistical reproducibility below 0.2% RMS. The total uncertainty is below 0.5% absolute. Wavelength calibration better than 1 pm RMS over the whole spectral range is achieved by reference to NIST published wavelengths of about 100 xenon emission lines. It is consistent with the wavelength of the krypton 3d-5p absorption resonance at 13.5947 nm to better than 2 pm.

  10. High speed reflectometer for EUV mask-blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wies, C.; Lebert, R.; Jaegle, B.; Juschkin, L.; Sobel, F.; Seitz, H.; Walter, R.; Laubis, C.; Scholze, F.; Biel, W.; Steffens, O.

    2005-05-01

    AIXUV GmbH and partners have developed a high speed Reflectometer for EUV mask-blanks which is fully compliant with the SEMI-standard P38 for EUV-mask-blank metrology. The system has been installed in June 2004 at SCHOTT Lithotec AG. It features high throughput, high lateral and spectral resolution, high reproduci-bility and low absolute uncertainty. Using AIXUV's EUV-LAMP and debris mitigation, low cost-of-ownership and high availability is expected. The spectral reflectance of up to 3 mask-blanks per hour can be measured with at least 20 spots each. The system is push button-controlled. Results are stored in CSV file format. For a spot size of 0.1×1 mm2, 2000 spectral chan-nels of 1.6 pm bandwidth are recorded from 11.6 nm to 14.8 nm. The reflectance measurement is based on the comparison of the sample under test to two reference mirrors calibrated at the PTB radiometry laboratory at BESSY II. The three reflection spectra are recorded simultaneously. For each spot more than 107 photons are ac-cumulated in about 20 s, providing statistical reproducibility below 0.2 % RMS. The total uncertainty is below 0.5 % absolute. Wavelength calibration better than 1 pm RMS over the whole spectral range is achieved by refe-rence to NIST published wavelengths of about 100 xenon emission lines. It is consistent with the wavelength of the krypton 3d-5p absorption resonance at 13.5947 nm to better than 2 pm.

  11. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    A blank mask and its preparation stages, such as cleaning or resist coating, play an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using it. Blank mask defects' impact analysis directly depends on the amount of available information such as the number of defects observed, their accurate locations and sizes. Mask usability qualification at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect information such as size is sought to estimate eventual defect printability on the wafer. Tracking of defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, across multiple stages, can further be indicative of process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. At the first level, inspection machines address the requirement of defect characterization by detecting and reporting relevant defect information. The analysis of this information though is still largely a manual process. With advancing technology nodes and reducing half-pitch sizes, a large number of defects are observed; and the detailed knowledge associated, make manual defect review process an arduous task, in addition to adding sensitivity to human errors. Cases where defect information reported by inspection machine is not sufficient, mask shops rely on other tools. Use of CDSEM tools is one such option. However, these additional steps translate into increased costs. Calibre NxDAT based MDPAutoClassify tool provides an automated software alternative to the manual defect review process. Working on defect images generated by inspection machines, the tool extracts and reports additional information such as defect location, useful for defect avoidance[4][5]; defect size, useful in estimating defect printability; and, defect nature e.g. particle, scratch, resist void, etc., useful for process monitoring. The tool makes use of smart and elaborate post-processing algorithms to achieve this. Their elaborateness is a consequence of the variety and

  12. Method and apparatus for inspecting an EUV mask blank

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2005-11-08

    An apparatus and method for at-wavelength EUV mask-blank characterization for inspection of moderate and low spatial frequency coating uniformity using a synchrotron or other source of EUV light. The apparatus provides for rapid, non-destruction, non-contact, at-wavelength qualification of large mask areas, and can be self-calibrating or be calibrated to well-characterized reference samples. It can further check for spatial variation of mask reflectivity or for global differences among masks. The apparatus and method is particularly suited for inspection of coating uniformity and quality and can detect defects in the order of 50 .mu.m and above.

  13. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  14. Azobenzene liquid crystalline materials for efficient optical switching with pulsed and/or continuous wave laser beams.

    PubMed

    Hrozhyk, Uladzimir A; Serak, Svetlana V; Tabiryan, Nelson V; Hoke, Landa; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2010-04-12

    This study compares optical switching capabilities of liquid crystal (LC) materials based on different classes of azobenzene dyes. LCs based on molecules containing benzene rings with nearly symmetrical pi-pi conjugation respond more efficiently to a cw beam than to a nanosecond laser pulse and maintain the changes induced by the beam for tens of hours. Using azo dye molecules containing two benzene rings with push-pull pi-pi conjugation we demonstrate high photosensitivity to both a cw beam as well as nanosecond laser pulse with only 1 s relaxation of light-induced changes in material properties. Even faster, 1 ms restoration time is obtained for azo dye molecules containing hetaryl (benzothiazole) ring with enhanced push-pull pi-pi conjugation. These materials respond most efficiently to pulsed excitation while discriminating cw radiation.

  15. Note: Proton microbeam formation with continuously variable kinetic energy using a compact system for three-dimensional proton beam writing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, T. Ishii, Y.

    2015-03-15

    A compact focused gaseous ion beam system has been developed to form proton microbeams of a few hundreds of keV with a penetration depth of micrometer range in 3-dimensional proton beam writing. Proton microbeams with kinetic energies of 100-140 keV were experimentally formed on the same point at a constant ratio of the kinetic energy of the object side to that of the image side. The experimental results indicate that the beam diameters were measured to be almost constant at approximately 6 μm at the same point with the kinetic energy range. These characteristics of the system were experimentally and numerically demonstrated to be maintained as long as the ratio was constant.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks at Superplastic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Richard W.; Vetrano, John S.; Smith, Mark T.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2002-10-06

    This paper describes an investigation of the mechanical properties of weld material in aluminum tailor welded blanks (TWB) at superplastic temperatures and discusses the potential application of TWBs in superplastic forming operations. Aluminum TWBs consist of multiple sheet materials of different thickness or alloy that are butt-welded together into a single, variable thickness blank. To evaluate the performance of the weld material in TWBs, a series of tensile tests were conducted at superplastic temperatures with specimens that contained weld material in the gage area. The sheet material used in the study was Sky 5083 aluminum alloy, which was joined to produce the TWBs by gas tungsten arc welding using an AA5356 filler wire. The experimental results show that, in the temperature range of 500?C to 550?C and at strain rates ranging from 10-4 sec-1 to 10-2 sec-1, the weld material has a higher flow stress and lower ductility than the monolithic sheet material. The weld material exhibited elongations of 40% to 60% under these conditions, whereas the monolithic sheet achieved 220% to 360% elongation. At the same temperatures and strain rates, the weld material exhibited flow stresses 1.3 to 4 times greater than the flow stress in the monolithic sheet. However, the weld material did show a substantial increase in the strain rate sensitivity and ductility when compared to the same material formed at room temperature.

  17. Recent advances in SEMATECH's mask blank development program, the remaining technical challenges, and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Frank; Kearney, Patrick; Kadaksham, Arun J.; Wurm, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    The ability of optical lithography to steadily produce images at increasingly smaller dimension while maintaining pattern fidelity of devices with greater complexity has enabled the success of Moore's Law. Although 193 nm immersion and double patterning techniques have proven successful in extending optical lithography, the strategies proposed for further extension are too costly to support device manufacturing. As a result, greater focus has been shifted to resolving the challenges hindering extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) adoption as the mainstream lithography solution. While similar to conventional optical lithography, there are unique challenges to EUVL, one of which is the change from transmission masks to the reflective masks required for EUVL. The use of reflective reticles greatly increases complexity of EUV reticle structure when compared to the binary masks used with optical lithography. Maximizing the reflectance an EUV mask requires the use of a multilayer Bragg reflector deposited on a finely polished substrate with a thin absorber film on top used to define the device pattern. Although similar in form to the substrates used in optical lithography, the tolerances on figure, surface finish, and defects are significantly more stringent for EUV substrates. Control of aberrations and maintaining pattern fidelity places tight constraints on the flatness and roughness of the EUV substrate; imperfections and particles can result in printable defects. The Bragg reflector of the EUV mask consists of 40 to 50 Si/Mo bi-layers deposited using an ion beam deposition tool. This film stack must be deposited to meet the reflectivity and uniformity requirements of the exposure tool and must be completely free of defects. The absorber film is typically a tantalum-based nitride layer selected for its ability to absorb EUV radiation and maintain thermal stability. The thickness and morphology of this film must be tightly controlled to enable use as the patterning

  18. Finite element modeling of light propagation in turbid media under illumination of a continuous-wave beam

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spatially-resolved spectroscopy provides a means for measuring the optical properties of biological tissues, based on analytical solutions to diffusion approximation for semi-infinite media under the normal illumination of infinitely small size light beam. The method is, however, prone to error in m...

  19. Velocity Interferometer blanking due to preheating in a double pulse planar experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffite, S.; Baton, S. D.; Combis, P.; Clerouin, J.; Koenig, M.; Recoules, V.; Rousseaux, C.; Videau, L.

    2014-08-01

    Optical diagnostics, such as VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) or SOP (Streaked Optical Pyrometry), have become essential in shock timing experiments. Their high precision allows for accurate measurements of shock velocities, chronometry, and brightness temperature. However, in some instances, these measurements can be compromised. In planar shock coalescence experiments recently performed at the LULI facility [Baton et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 195002 (2012)], VISAR signal loss was observed. In these experiments, a strong shock launched by a high-intensity spike catches up with a previously shock launched by an earlier, low-intensity beam. The disappearance of the VISAR signal is attributed to a preheating of the coronal plasma by x-rays generated by the high intensity spike. The signal does not disappear if the high-intensity spike starts after VISAR probe beam begins to reflect off of the first shock. The VISAR diagnostic, modeled using an assessment of the optical index in quartz, compares favorably to experimental results. This provides evidence that x-ray preheating can cause blanking of the VISAR signal in quartz.

  20. Preparation and characterization of Ag nanoparticle-embedded blank and ligand-anchored silica gels.

    PubMed

    Im, Hee-Jung; Lee, Byung Cheol; Yeon, Jei-Won

    2013-11-01

    Ag nanoparticles, used for halogen (especially iodine) adsorption and an evaluation of halogen behavior, were embedded in synthesized inorganic-organic hybrid gels. In particular, an irradiation method using an electron beam plays a part in introducing Ag nanoparticles to the organofunctionalized silica gels from AgNO3 solutions in a simple way at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. For preparation of the Ag nanoparticle-embedded inorganic-organic hybrid gels, ligands of ethylenediamine (NH2CH2CH2NH-, TMSen) and mercapto (HS-) functionalized three-dimensional porous SiO2 sol-gels were first synthesized through hydrolysis and condensation reactions, and Ag nanoparticles were then embedded into the ethylenediamine- and mercapto-anchored silica gels each, through electron-beam irradiation. The addition of ligands yielded larger average pore sizes than the absence of any ligand. Moreover, the ethylenediamine ligand led to looser structures and better access of the Ag nanoparticles to the ethylenediamine-anchored gel. As a result, more Ag nanoparticles were introduced into the ethylenediamine-anchored gel. The preparation and characterization of Ag nanoparticle-embedded blank and ligand-anchored silica gels are discussed in detail.

  1. Velocity Interferometer blanking due to preheating in a double pulse planar experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Laffite, S.; Combis, P.; Clerouin, J.; Recoules, V.; Rousseaux, C.; Videau, L.; Baton, S. D.; Koenig, M.

    2014-08-15

    Optical diagnostics, such as VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) or SOP (Streaked Optical Pyrometry), have become essential in shock timing experiments. Their high precision allows for accurate measurements of shock velocities, chronometry, and brightness temperature. However, in some instances, these measurements can be compromised. In planar shock coalescence experiments recently performed at the LULI facility [Baton et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 195002 (2012)], VISAR signal loss was observed. In these experiments, a strong shock launched by a high-intensity spike catches up with a previously shock launched by an earlier, low-intensity beam. The disappearance of the VISAR signal is attributed to a preheating of the coronal plasma by x-rays generated by the high intensity spike. The signal does not disappear if the high-intensity spike starts after VISAR probe beam begins to reflect off of the first shock. The VISAR diagnostic, modeled using an assessment of the optical index in quartz, compares favorably to experimental results. This provides evidence that x-ray preheating can cause blanking of the VISAR signal in quartz.

  2. Efficient operation of a diode-pumped multi-watt continuous wave Yb:KYW laser with excellent beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjooran, S.; Major, A.

    2017-03-01

    A diode end-pumped Yb:KYW laser with 9 W of output power operating at 1045 nm wavelength with the highest slope efficiency of 77.9% when compared to all other diode-pumped Yb:KYW/KGW lasers is reported. The average beam quality (M 2) was 1.07 and the best optical-to-optical efficiency achieved was 36% with respect to the incident pump power.

  3. [Multiple firearm injury caused with a blank pistol].

    PubMed

    Nevická, Eva; Rozboril, Rastislav; Ťažký, Boris; Závodný, Ivan; Zdarílek, Martin; Šidlo, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    The authors present a case of a complex suicide of a 60-year-old woman found dead on her bed. A blank pistol Umarex caliber 9-mm, several blank cartridges and a lot of drug packages were discovered near the body. The woman suffered from a psychiatric depression. There were three gunshot wounds on the body: in the right temporal region, on the palatum of the mouth and on the left chest wall. The gunshot wounds in the right temporal region and in the mouth had central circle defects with the margins of stellate or star-like appearance and blackening. In the right temporal region the temporal muscle was contused but skull and intracranial tissues were without any injury. On the palatum of the mouth there was neither facial skeleton nor skull injury. The numerous small tears of lips and contusions of buccal mucosa were observed. On the left chest wall there was an abrasion with a bruise on the skin and contusion of thoracic muscles. Neither ribs nor intrathoracic organs were inflicted. At autopsy blood in the amount of 600 ml and a few tablets were found in the stomach as well as an insignificant blood aspiration into lungs. In spite of the fact that all the gunshot wounds were caused by shots fired at contact range they were not lethal. The woman died of lethal intoxication with tramadol and dibenzepin. Although this report differs from the ones published in literature, the authors believe that can contribute to the issue of gunshot wounds caused by gas weapons.

  4. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  5. A New Modelling of Blanking for Thin Sheet in Copper Alloys with Dynamic Recrystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Touache, A.; Thibaud, S.; Chambert, J.; Picart, P.

    2007-05-17

    Precision blanking process is widely used by electronic and micromechanical industries to produce small and thin components in large quantities. To take account of the influence of strain rate and temperature on precision blanking of thin sheet in copper alloys, we have proposed a thermo-elasto-visco-plastic modelling. In addition, dynamic recrystallization takes place in Cual copper alloy during the blanking process of thin sheet. A new modelling of dynamic recrystallization based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes is presented. Blanking simulations of Cual copper sheet are carried out in order to analyze the softening effect induced by dynamic recrystallization.

  6. Use of MV and kV imager correlation for maintaining continuous real-time 3D internal marker tracking during beam interruptions.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, R D; Riaz, N; Dieterich, Sonja; Suh, Yelin; Xing, L

    2009-01-07

    The integration of onboard kV imaging together with a MV electronic portal imaging device (EPID) on linear accelerators (LINAC) can provide an easy to implement real-time 3D organ position monitoring solution for treatment delivery. Currently, real-time MV-kV tracking has only been demonstrated by simultaneous imagining by both MV and kV imaging devices. However, modalities such as step-and-shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT), which inherently contain MV beam interruptions, can lead to loss of target information necessary for 3D localization. Additionally, continuous kV imaging throughout the treatment delivery can lead to high levels of imaging dose to the patient. This work demonstrates for the first time how full 3D target tracking can be maintained even in the presence of such beam interruption, or MV/kV beam interleave, by use of a relatively simple correlation model together with MV-kV tracking. A moving correlation model was constructed using both present and prior positions of the marker in the available MV or kV image to compute the position of the marker on the interrupted imager. A commercially available radiotherapy system, equipped with both MV and kV imaging devices, was used to deliver typical SS-IMRT lung treatment plans to a 4D phantom containing internally embedded metallic markers. To simulate actual lung tumor motion, previous recorded 4D lung patient motion data were used. Lung tumor motion data of five separate patients were inputted into the 4D phantom, and typical SS-IMRT lung plans were delivered to simulate actual clinical deliveries. Application of the correlation model to SS-IMRT lung treatment deliveries was found to be an effective solution for maintaining continuous 3D tracking during 'step' beam interruptions. For deliveries involving five or more gantry angles with 50 or more fields per plan, the positional errors were found to have < or =1 mm root mean squared error (RMSE) in all three spatial directions. In addition to increasing the robustness

  7. Use of MV and kV imager correlation for maintaining continuous real-time 3D internal marker tracking during beam interruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, R. D.; Riaz, N.; Dieterich, Sonja; Suh, Yelin; Xing, L.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of onboard kV imaging together with a MV electronic portal imaging device (EPID) on linear accelerators (LINAC) can provide an easy to implement real-time 3D organ position monitoring solution for treatment delivery. Currently, real-time MV-kV tracking has only been demonstrated by simultaneous imagining by both MV and kV imaging devices. However, modalities such as step-and-shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT), which inherently contain MV beam interruptions, can lead to loss of target information necessary for 3D localization. Additionally, continuous kV imaging throughout the treatment delivery can lead to high levels of imaging dose to the patient. This work demonstrates for the first time how full 3D target tracking can be maintained even in the presence of such beam interruption, or MV/kV beam interleave, by use of a relatively simple correlation model together with MV-kV tracking. A moving correlation model was constructed using both present and prior positions of the marker in the available MV or kV image to compute the position of the marker on the interrupted imager. A commercially available radiotherapy system, equipped with both MV and kV imaging devices, was used to deliver typical SS-IMRT lung treatment plans to a 4D phantom containing internally embedded metallic markers. To simulate actual lung tumor motion, previous recorded 4D lung patient motion data were used. Lung tumor motion data of five separate patients were inputted into the 4D phantom, and typical SS-IMRT lung plans were delivered to simulate actual clinical deliveries. Application of the correlation model to SS-IMRT lung treatment deliveries was found to be an effective solution for maintaining continuous 3D tracking during 'step' beam interruptions. For deliveries involving five or more gantry angles with 50 or more fields per plan, the positional errors were found to have <=1 mm root mean squared error (RMSE) in all three spatial directions. In addition to increasing the robustness of

  8. Change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and Free Electron Laser, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    In this environmental assessment (EA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from a proposed change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and operation of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility beyond the initial demonstration period. With this proposal, DOE intends to increase CEBAF operating range from its current operating maximum beam energy of 4.0 GeV [giga-(billion) electron volts] to 8.0 GeV at a beam power of no greater than 1,000 kW [1 megawatt (MW)], its maximum attainable level, based on current technology and knowledge, without significant, costly equipment modifications. DOE has prepared an EA for this action to determine the potential for adverse impacts from operation of CEBAF and the FEL at the proposed levels. Changing the operating parameters of CEBAF would require no new major construction and minor modifications to the accelerator, its support systems, the FEL, and onsite utility systems. Modifications and performance improvements would be made to (1) the accelerator housed in the underground tunnels, (2) its support systems located in the above ground service buildings, and (3) the water and equipment cooling systems both in the tunnel and at the ground surface. All work would be performed on previously disturbed land and in, on, or adjacent to existing buildings, structures, and equipment. With the proposed action, the recently constructed FEL facility at the Jefferson Lab would operate in concert with CEBAF beyond its demonstration period and up to its maximum effective electron beam power level of 210 kW. In this EA, DOE evaluates the impacts of the no-action alternative and the proposed action alternative. Alternatives considered, but dismissed from further evaluation, were the use of another accelerator facility and the use of another technology.

  9. ELF/VLF phased array generation via frequency-matched steering of a continuous HF ionospheric heating beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Morris Bernard

    The radio spectrum between 300 Hz and 10 kHz (ELF/VLF) has broad applications to global communication, remote sensing of the ionosphere and magnetosphere, and subterranean prospecting. While lightning is a dominant source of these radio waves, artificial generation of these waves has posed an enduring challenge to scientists and engineers, due to the extremely long wavelengths (30-1000 km) and the lossiness of the Earth's surface at these frequencies. Recently, ELF/VLF waves have been successfully generated by high frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) heating of the lower ionosphere (60-100 km altitude), which changes the atmospheric plasma conductivity. In the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, ON-OFF modulation of this HF energy can impose an ELF/VLF alternating current onto those natural currents. This technique turns the lower atmosphere into a large antenna, which radiates energy downward into the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and upward into the magnetosphere. While this technique remains one of the few means of reliable ELF/VLF wave generation, HF to ELF/VLF conversion efficiencies remain quite low. Utilizing the 3.6 MW HAARP HF heating facility in Alaska, we show that proper utilization of motion of the HF beam can boost the generated ELF/VLF wave power by as much as tenfold. Furthermore, as a result of having effectively created the world's first controllable large-element ELF/VLF phased array, directional launching of this energy becomes possible. We utilize theoretical models of the HF heating and cooling process, and of ELF/VLF wave propagation, to illuminate the observations and identify the physical mechanisms underlying the wave generation, particularly as it relates to motion of the HF beam.

  10. Microstructure evolution of nanostructured and submicrometric porous refractory ceramics induced by a continuous high-energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Bruetsch, Roland; Catherall, Richard; Groeschel, Friedrich; Guenther-Leopold, Ines; Lettry, Jacques; Manfrin, Enzo; Marzari, Stefano; Noah, Etam; Sgobba, Stefano; Stora, Thierry; Zanini, Luca

    2011-09-01

    The production of radioactive ion beams by the isotope mass separation online (ISOL) method requires a fast diffusion and effusion of nuclear products from thick refractory target materials under high-energy particle beam irradiation. A new generation of ISOL nanostructured and submicrometric porous materials have been developed, exhibiting enhanced release of exotic isotopes, compared to previously used conventional micrometric materials. A programme was developed at PSI within the framework sof the Design Study of EURISOL, the next generation European ISOL-type facility to study aging under irradiation on porous ceramic pellets and dense thin metal foils at high temperatures. Ceramic oxides and carbide samples underwent proton damage with fluence up to 3.0 × 10 20 and 1.3 × 10 21 cm -2 respectively. The post-irradiation examination on Al 2O 3, Y 2O 3 and SiC - C nanotube composite matrices show a proton-induced densification region in which a moderate grain growth occurred. The microstructural evolution effects were associated to the combination of radiation-enhanced diffusion and thermal diffusion. The irradiated Al 2O 3 shows higher sintering rates than in similar non-irradiation isothermal conditions, in particular at the lowest irradiation temperature, subjected to a proton fluence inferior to 1.1 × 10 15 cm -2. The apparent activation energy for its sintering controlling mechanism was found to be between 44 and 88 kJ mol -1. However, despite the enhanced sintering, shrinkage and increased grain growth, the selected nanostructured and submicrometric TARPIPE materials did not display an average grain diameter above 2 μm, which confirms that these materials are suited as production targets for present and next generation ISOL facilities.

  11. Thick silicon membranes as mask blank for SU-8 x-ray deep lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Izaque A.; Ferreira, Luis O. S.; Piazzetta, Maria Helena O.; Natal, Graziele C.

    2001-08-01

    Home made masks having thick (35-50 micrometers ) silicon membranes as blanks were used in deep X-ray lithography of SU8 - a negative tone photoresist. X-ray masks were fabricated by the following sequence of steps: (a) vacuum deposition of Ti and Au thin layers on a 220 micrometers thick (100) silicon wafer, (b) optical lithography of two different patterns in both negative (SU-8) or positive (AZ4620) photoresist (c) gold electroforming and (d) silicon substrate thinning with KOH etch to form the membrane. X-ray exposures was performed in the X-ray beam line of the LNLS synchrotron light source. The samples consisted of 125 micrometers thick layers of SU-8 supported on silicon and assorted substrates. The optimum dose for silicon substrates have been used in the remaining substrates, namely, metallic thin films (Cr, Cu, Au, Pt), printed circuit board (PCB), quartz, alumina ceramic and glass. The influence of mask defects, substrate type and X-ray dose values on the lithography of SU-8 is discussed. Criteria for defining upper and lower dose values for SU-8 X-ray deep lithography was proposed on the basis of characteristic defects. Advantages in using SU-8 rather than PMMA in the LIGA technology are commented.

  12. Journal Article: Average Method Blank Quantities of Dioxin ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA established a National Dioxin Air Monitoring Network (NDAMN) to determine the temporal and geographical variability of atmospheric CDDs, CDFs and coplanar PCBs throughout the United States. Currently operating at 33 stations, NDAMN has, as one of its tasks, the determination of atmospheric levels of dioxin-like compounds at rural and non-impacted locations of the U.S. At the extremely low levels of detection needed to achieve congener-specific detection limits of 0.1 fg/m3 for 2,3,7,8-TCDD and 10 fg/m3 for OCDD, a number of analytical issues have been raised. One of these issues is the quantity of congeners to be expected in the laboratory method blanks. This paper presents the average, standard deviation, median, range, and detects of the quantities of the congeners from 52 laboratory sample sets. These values enable the accurate determination of the dioxin-like compounds at extremely low levels.

  13. Application Of CO2 Lasers To High Speed Blanking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, L. E.

    1986-11-01

    While laser cutting of sheetmetal has attained wide acceptance in the automotive industry for the purposes of prototyping and very limited preproduction work, the production rates possible with currently available systems have precluded the use of this technique in a production environment. The device design to be described embodies a high speed X-Y positioner carrying a cutting head with limited Z-axis capability. This approach confers two main benefits, first, production rate is limited only by laser power, since the positioner technology selected will permit movement at rates up to 1.5 m/s (60 in/s), second, the use of a high speed non-contact surface follower to control the Z-axis movement reduces the need to clamp the workpiece rigidly to a precision reference surface. The realized reduction of the clamping requirement permits some latitude in the feed methods that can be employed, allowing the use of coil or sheet feeding as appropriate. The author will provide estimated production rates for the proposed design and demonstrate that a suitable choice of laser source and material feed will permit the production of parts at a rate and cost comparable to conventional blanking with the advantage of much greater flexibility and reduced retooling time.

  14. Numerical and experimental investigations into Tailored Welded Blanks formability

    SciTech Connect

    Gaied, Sadok; Balabane, Mikhael

    2007-05-17

    A Tailor welded blank (TWB) technology gives automotive designers the ability to selectively vary body panel thickness and alloy to optimize the use of material. TWBs offer several notable benefits including decreased part weight, reduced manufacturing costs, increased environmental friendliness, and improved dimensional consistency. In order to take advantage of these benefits, however, designers need to overcome the formability of TWBs and be able to accurately predict unique characteristics related to TWB forming early in the design process. In this paper, a numerical model to predict the forming height dome and a specific forming curve of TWBs is presented. Finite element analyses of standard TWB forming tests (Nakazima) were performed in Arcelor Mittal Auto Application Research Center to determine the interaction between the weaker and the stronger materials. To measure the critical strain at necking a numerical method is used. A comparison of numerical and experimental results highlights a good agreement. The numerical approach offers a considerable gain to obtain specific FLC for all configurations.

  15. Mind-blanking: when the mind goes away

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Adrian F.; Wegner, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    People often feel like their minds and their bodies are in different places. Far from an exotic experience, this phenomenon seems to be a ubiquitous facet of human life (e.g., Killingsworth and Gilbert, 2010). Many times, people's minds seem to go “somewhere else”—attention becomes disconnected from perception, and people's minds wander to times and places removed from the current environment (e.g., Schooler et al., 2004). At other times, however, people's minds may seem to go nowhere at all—they simply disappear. This mental state—mind-blanking—may represent an extreme decoupling of perception and attention, one in which attention fails to bring any stimuli into conscious awareness. In the present research, we outline the properties of mind-blanking, differentiating this mental state from other mental states in terms of phenomenological experience, behavioral outcomes, and underlying cognitive processes. Seven experiments suggest that when the mind seems to disappear, there are times when we have simply failed to monitor its whereabouts—and there are times when it is actually gone. PMID:24098287

  16. A new sensitivity model with blank space for layout optimization*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junping; Wu, Yao; Liu, Shigang; Xing, Runsen

    2017-06-01

    As the technology scales advancing into the nanometer region, the concept of yield has become an increasingly important design metric. To reduce the yield loss caused by local defects, layout optimization can play a critical role. In this paper, we propose a new open sensitivity-based model with consideration of the blank space around the net, and study the corresponding net optimization. The proposed new model not only has a high practicability in the selection of nets to be optimized but also solves the issue of the increase in short critical area brought during the open optimization,which means to reduce the open critical area with no new short critical area produced, and thereby this model can ensure the decrease of total critical area and finally achieves an integrative optimization. Compared with the models available, the experimental results show that our sensitivity model not only consumes less time with concise algorithm but also can deal with irregular layout, which is out of the scope of other models. At the end of this paper, the effectiveness of the new model is verified by the experiment on the randomly selected five metal layers from the synthesized OpenSparc circuit layout.

  17. Low-Cost Opportunity for Small-Scale Manufacture of Hardwood Blanks

    Treesearch

    Bruce G. Hansen; Philip A. Araman

    1985-01-01

    We analyzed the manufacture of standard-size hardwood blanks from lumber on a relatively small scale by conventional processing. Requiring an investment of just over $200,000, the conventional mill can process 500 M bf (thousand board feet) of kiln-dried lumber annually. The study focused on the economics associated with manufacture of blanks from four species -...

  18. Metal flow of a tailor-welded blank in deep drawing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi; Guo, Ruiquan

    2005-01-01

    Tailor welded blanks were used in the automotive industry to consolidate parts, reduce weight, and increase safety. In recent years, this technology was developing rapidly in China. In Chinese car models, tailor welded blanks had been applied in a lot of automobile parts such as rail, door inner, bumper, floor panel, etc. Concerns on the properties of tailor welded blanks had become more and more important for automobile industry. A lot of research had shown that the strength of the welded seam was higher than that of the base metal, such that the weld failure in the aspect of strength was not a critical issue. However, formability of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process was complex. Among them, the metal flow of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process must be investigated thoroughly in order to reduce the scrap rate during the stamping process in automobile factories. In this paper, the behavior of metal flow for tailor welded blanks made by the laser welding process with two types of different thickness combinations were studied in the deep drawing process. Simulations and experiment verification of the movement of weld line for tailor welded blanks were discussed in detail. Results showed that the control on the movement of welded seam during stamping process by taking some measures in the aspect of blank holder was effective.

  19. Exploring Valued-Added Options - Edge-Glued Panels and Blanks Offer Value-Added Opportunities

    Treesearch

    Bob Smith; Philip A. Araman

    1997-01-01

    As sawmills search for new opportunities to add value to rough sawn lumber, many consider producing dimension parts as one solution. Assembling dimension parts into edge-glued panels or standard blanks can add even further value. Blanks are defined as pieces of solid wood (which may be edge-glued) that are manufactured to a predetermined size. This article discusses...

  20. 76 FR 50537 - Regulatory Guidance Concerning Household Goods Carriers Requiring Shippers To Sign Blank or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Requiring Shippers To Sign Blank or Incomplete Documents AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration... documents under 49 CFR 375.501(d). Carriers may require shippers to sign incomplete, but not blank... clarifies that carriers may not require shippers to sign ``Revised Written Estimates,'' ``Rescissions of Old...

  1. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  2. Porcine skin damage thresholds for 0.6 to 9.5 cm beam diameters from 1070-nm continuous-wave infrared laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Vincelette, Rebecca; Noojin, Gary D; Harbert, Corey A; Schuster, Kurt J; Shingledecker, Aurora D; Stolarski, Dave; Kumru, Semih S; Oliver, Jeffrey W

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing use of high-power fiber lasers in manufacturing and telecommunications industries operating in the infrared spectrum between 1000 and 2000 nm, which are advertised to provide as much as 10 kW continuous output power at 1070 nm. Safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental and modeling investigations with scant data available for these wavelengths. A series of studies using 1070-nm infrared lasers to determine the minimum visible lesion damage thresholds in skin using the Yucatan miniature pig (Sus scrofa domestica) for a range of beam diameters (0.6, 1.1, 1.9, 2.4, 4.7, and 9.5 cm) and a range of exposure durations (10 ms to 10 s) is presented. Experimental peak temperatures associated with each damage threshold were measured using thermal imaging. Peak temperatures at damage threshold for the 10-s exposures were ∼10°C lower than those at shorter exposures. The lowest and highest experimental minimum visible lesion damage thresholds were found to have peak radiant exposures of 19 and 432  J/cm2 for the beam diameter-exposure duration pairs of 2.4 cm, 25 ms and 0.6 cm, 10 s, respectively. Thresholds for beam diameters >2.5  cm had a weak to no effect on threshold radiant exposure levels for exposure times ≤0.25  s, but may have a larger effect on thresholds for exposures ≥10  s.

  3. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the grant entitled, Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions. The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  4. 60 mW continuous-wave operation of InGaN laser diodes made by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Skierbiszewski, C.; Wisniewski, P.; Siekacz, M.; Perlin, P.; Feduniewicz-Zmuda, A.; Nowak, G.; Grzegory, I.; Leszczynski, M.; Porowski, S.

    2006-05-29

    We demonstrate continuous-wave operation at 411 nm of InGaN multi-quantum-well laser diodes (LDs) made by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The threshold current density and voltage for these LDs are 4.2 kA/cm{sup 2} and 5.3 V, respectively. High optical output power of 60 mW is achieved. The LDs are fabricated on low-dislocation-density bulk GaN substrates, at growth conditions which resemble liquid-phase epitaxy. We show that use of such substrates eliminates spiral growth, which is the dominant growth mechanism for PAMBE on high-dislocation-density substrates. Therefore, PAMBE opens new perspectives for next generation of InGaN LDs.

  5. High-performance poly-Si thin film transistors with highly biaxially oriented poly-Si thin films using double line beam continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Masayuki; Kuroki, Shin-Ichiro; Sato, Tadashi; Kotani, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Highly biaxially oriented poly-Si thin films were formed by double-line beam continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization (DLB-CLC). The crystallinities of the DLB-CLC poly-Si thin films were (110), (111), and (211) for the laser scan, transverse, and surface directions, respectively, and an energetically stable Σ3 grain boundary was observed to be dominant. All silicon grains were elongated in the laser scan direction and one-dimensionally very large silicon grains with lengths of more than 100 µm were fabricated. Using these biaxially oriented polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films, low-temperature poly-Si TFTs (LTPS-TFTs) were fabricated at low temperatures (≦550 °C) by a metal gate self-aligned process. As a result, a TFT with a high electron field effect mobility of μFE = 450 cm2 V-1 s-1 in a linear region was realized.

  6. Tunable beam displacer

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Serrano, Luis José; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-03-15

    We report the implementation of a tunable beam displacer, composed of a polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and two mirrors, that divides an initially polarized beam into two parallel beams whose separation can be continuously tuned. The two output beams are linearly polarized with either vertical or horizontal polarization and no optical path difference is introduced between them. The wavelength dependence of the device as well as the maximum separation between the beams achievable is limited mainly by the PBS characteristics.

  7. Detectability and printability of EUVL mask blank defects for the32 nm HP node

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Wonil; Han, Hak-Seung; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kearney,Patrick A.; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2007-08-01

    The readiness of a defect-free extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask blank infrastructure is one of the main enablers for the insertion of EUVL technology into production. It is essential to have sufficient defect detection capability and understanding of defect printability to develop a defect-free EUVL mask blank infrastructure. The SEMATECH Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC) has been developing EUVL mask blanks with low defect densities with the Lasertec M1350 and M7360, the 1st and 2nd generations, respectively, of visible light EUVL mask blank inspection tools. Although the M7360 represents a significant improvement in our defect detection capability, it is time to start developing a 3rd generation tool for EUVL mask blank inspection. The goal of this tool is to detect all printable defects; therefore, understanding defect printability criteria is critical to this tool development. In this paper, we will investigate the defect detectability of a 2nd generation blank inspection tool and a patterned EUVL mask inspection tool. We will also compare the ability of the inspection tools to detect programmed defects whose printability has been estimated from wafer printing results and actinic aerial images results.

  8. The Analog Blanking Period of Implantable Cardiac Rhythm Devices.

    PubMed

    Barold, S Serge; Kucher, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Analog blanking periods (BPs) that hold down the display of electrograms (EGMs) in cardiac rhythm devices have received much less attention than the well-known digital BPs which do not influence the EGM display. In Biotronik devices (Biotronik GmbH, Berlin, Germany), when a paced event initiates an analog BP in one chamber (right atrium, right ventricle [RV], or left ventricle [LV]), an identical cross-chamber analog BP starts in the other two chambers. All clinical observations were recorded from patients with Biotronik devices. The effect of the atrial cross-chamber analog BP initiated by a ventricular paced event on the atrial EGM was studied in the records of seven patients with frequent paroxysmal atrial flutter to determine the effect of critically timed RV paced event (RVp) or LV paced event (LVp) upon the atrial EGM. The effect of atrial pacing triggering cross-chamber analog BPs in the RV and LV channels on the RV and LV EGMs was also investigated in cases of conducted supraventricular beats and ventricular premature complexes. The effect of a triggered LVp initiating a cross-chamber analog BP in the RV channel on the EGM of a sensed RV sensed event was evaluated in 10 cases. Simulation studies were also performed to verify the clinical observations. Patients with atrial flutter showed intermittent truncation or deformity and even disappearance of the atrial signals due to an atrial cross-chamber analog BP initiated by RVp and/or LVp. Three patients demonstrated deformity of the signal shape of ventricular premature beats falling within a ventricular cross-chamber analog BP initiated by right atrial paced event (RAp). We found only one case of a supraventricular QRS complex trapped in a ventricular cross-chamber analog BP initiated by RAp. All the recordings of LVp triggering upon RVs revealed a variety of RV signal deformities occasionally with preservation of the terminal part of the RV signal. Simulation studies confirmed the effect of the analog BP on

  9. Foil Blanking Mechanism Research Using Rubber Tool by Finite Element Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang-Kai; Li, Xiao-Xing; Lang, Li-Hui; Xiao, Rui; Ge, Yu-Long

    2016-08-01

    For foil blanking process, the usage of flexible tool can effectively reduce the requirement of the manufacturing and assembling precision, compared with using conventional tool. However, the blanking mechanism using rubber tool is not clear. To investigate this question, the Finite Element (FE) model of rubber and process is established using ABAQUS package. The result of FE simulation affirm that the fracture emerges as a result of shear, not tensile. Then, for titanium foil with 0.08mm thickness, the cutting experiment is executed to verify the validity of blanking mechanism and FE simulation.

  10. Continuous 7-Days-A-Week External Beam Irradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Final Results of the Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Serkies, Krystyna; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of definitive continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation without breaks between external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1998 and December 1999, 30 patients with International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Stage IIB or IIIB cervical cancer were included in a prospective Phase I/II study of continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation, to the total Manchester point B dose of 40.0-57.6 Gy. The first 13 patients (Group A) were given a daily tumor dose of 1.6 Gy, and the remaining 17 patients (Group B) were given 1.8 Gy. One or two immediate brachytherapy applications (point A dose 10-20 Gy, each) were performed in 28 cases. Results: Two patients did not complete the irradiation because of apparent early progression of disease during the irradiation. Eleven of the 28 evaluable patients (39%; 45% and 35% in Groups A and B, respectively) completed their treatment within the prescribed overall treatment time. Acute toxicity (including severe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 and 4 effects in 40%) was experienced by 83% of patients and resulted in unplanned treatment interruptions in 40% of all patients (31% and 47% of patients in Groups A and B, respectively). Severe intestinal side effects occurred in 31% and 41% of Patients in Groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.71). The 5-year overall survival probability was 33%. Cancer recurrence occurred in 63% of patients: 20% inside and 57% outside the pelvis. Cumulative incidence of late severe bowel and urinary bladder toxicity at 24 months was 15%. Conclusion: Continuous irradiation in locally advanced cervical cancer is associated with a high incidence of severe acute toxicity, resulting in unplanned treatment interruptions. Late severe effects and survival after continuous radiotherapy do not substantially differ from

  11. 76 FR 14697 - Aleris Blanking and Rim Products, Inc., a Division of Aleris International, Inc., Terre Haute, IN...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... the Federal Register on March 2, 2010 (75 FR 9436-9437). The workers produce aluminum blanks and hoops... directly competitive with aluminum blanks and hoops produced by the subject firm have increased... customer regarding their purchases of aluminum blanks and hoops during the relevant period. The...

  12. The capability of high magnification review function for EUV actinic blank inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyai, Hiroki; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Takehisa, Kiwamu; Kusunose, Haruhiko; Yamane, Takeshi; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Mori, Ichiro

    2013-06-01

    One of the most challenging tasks to make EUVL (Extreme Ultra Violet Lithography) a reality is to achieve zero defects for mask blanks. However, since it is uncertain whether mask blanks can be made completely defect-free, defect mitigation schemes are considered crucial for realization of EUVL. One of the mitigation schemes, pattern shift, covers ML defects under absorber patterns by device pattern adjustment and prevents the defects from being printed onto wafers. This scheme, however, requires accurate defect locations, and blank inspection tools must be able to provide the locations within a margin of the error of tens of nanometers. In this paper we describe a high accuracy defect locating function of the EUV Actinic Blank Inspection (ABI) tool being developed for HVM hp16 nm and 11 nm nodes.

  13. Three-dimensional characterization of extreme ultraviolet mask blank defects by interference contrast photoemission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jingquan; Weber, Nils; Escher, Matthias; Maul, Jochen; Han, Hak-Seung; Merkel, Michael; Wurm, Stefan; Schönhense, Gerd; Kleineberg, Ulf

    2008-09-29

    A photoemission electron microscope based on a new contrast mechanism "interference contrast" is applied to characterize extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank defects. Inspection results show that positioning of interference destructive condition (node of standing wave field) on surface of multilayer in the local region of a phase defect is necessary to obtain best visibility of the defect on mask blank. A comparative experiment reveals superiority of the interference contrast photoemission electron microscope (Extreme UV illumination) over a topographic contrast one (UV illumination with Hg discharge lamp) in detecting extreme ultraviolet mask blank phase defects. A depth-resolved detection of a mask blank defect, either by measuring anti-node peak shift in the EUV-PEEM image under varying inspection wavelength condition or by counting interference fringes with a fixed illumination wavelength, is discussed.

  14. Corning 7972 ULE material for segmented and large monolithic mirror blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabia, Robert; Edwards, Mary J.; VanBrocklin, Randy; Wells, Bruce

    2006-06-01

    Ultra-Low Expansion (ULE ®) glass has been and continues to be a significant material for astronomical applications. With a nominal composition of 7 wt. %TiO II in SiO II, Corning Code 7972 ULE ® has a mean room temperature coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of 0 +/- 30 ppb/°C with a typical CTE range of less than 15 ppb/°C, properties vital to the manufacture of high resolution optics requiring extreme thermal stability. Combined with lightweighting techniques developed at Corning during the past 30 years, ULE ® has been successfully employed for numerous monolithic and lightweight mirror applications including the 2.4 meter Hubble Space Telescope lightweight primary mirror, the Airborne Laser (ABL) primary mirrors, and most recently the Discovery Channel Telescope 4 meter mirror blank. ULE ® maintains its strong candidacy for future ELT applications. Recent challenges in mirror surface specifications and the development of alternative material choices calls for a comparison with ULE ®. The objective of this article is to review ULE ® properties and manufacturing capabilities, and to compare relevant material properties to those of alternative material options, thus allowing designers to properly execute material selection. Finally, recent development efforts directed toward improving ULE ® will be discussed.

  15. Attenuated phase-shift mask (PSM) blanks for flat panel display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Kagehiro; Mochizuki, Satoru; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    The fine pattern exposure techniques are required for Flat Panel display applications as smart phone, tablet PC recently. The attenuated phase shift masks (PSM) are being used for ArF and KrF photomask lithography technique for high end pattern Semiconductor applications. We developed CrOx based large size PSM blanks that has good uniformity on optical characteristics for FPD applications. We report the basic optical characteristics and uniformity, stability data of large sized CrOx PSM blanks.

  16. Analysis of Proposed Solutions to the 5.56mm Blank Cartridge (M200) Malfunction Rate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    TO THE 5 . 56MM BLANK CARTRIDGE (M200 ) MALFUNCTION RATE. — 8 - TITLE CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED — 9 - DESCRIPTIVE NOTE: FINAL NOTE, —10...REGION DOES NOT ALWAYS STACK AS SHOWN by Rock Island in Sept 1975. The tested items consisted of 3 weapons (produced by Colt), 300 rounds of M200 blank...round (stubs were not recorded). Therefore, the testing of the 20-round magazine with that weapon was discontinued. Three 30- round magazines were

  17. Research on flow mechanism of material for spur gear in closed extruding fine blanking process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming; Liu, Lu-zhou

    2013-05-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is applied to analyze closed extruding fine blanking gear. The reason of engendering corner collapse is the friction between blank and die. Meanwhile, this paper analyzes effects of various counterpunch forces on the flow characteristics, obtains the fiber distribution on different sections of the gear. The effects of counterpunch forces on material flow characteristics in deformation zone and the swirling flow in scrap are also obtained.

  18. Prototyping 9-inch size PSM mask blanks for 450mm wafer process (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harashima, Noriyuki; Iso, Hiroyuki; Chishima, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    6-inch size (known as 6025QZ) binary Cr mask is widely used in the semiconductor lithography for over 20years. Recently for the 450mm wafer process, high grade 9-inch size mask is expected. For this application, we have studied and developed prototyping 9-inch size PSM KrF and ArF mask blanks. This time we will explain these PSM mask blanks status.

  19. The information gained from witnesses' responses to an initial "blank" lineup.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Matthew A; Brewer, Neil; Weber, Nathan

    2012-10-01

    Wells ("The psychology of lineup identifications," Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 1984, 14, 89-103) proposed that a blank lineup (an initial lineup of known-to-be-innocent foils) can be used to screen eyewitnesses; witnesses who chose from a blank lineup (initial choosers) were more likely to make an error on a second lineup that contained a suspect than were witnesses who rejected a blank lineup (initial nonchoosers). Recent technological advances (e.g., computer-administered lineups) may overcome many of the practical difficulties cited as a barrier to the use of blank lineups. Our research extended knowledge about the blank lineup procedure by investigating the underlying causes of the difference in identification performance between initial choosers and initial nonchoosers. Studies 1a and 1b (total, N = 303) demonstrated that initial choosers were more likely to reject a second lineup than initial nonchoosers and witnesses who did not view a blank lineup, implying that cognitive biases (e.g., confirmation bias and commitment effects) influenced initial choosers' identification decisions. In Study 2 (N = 200), responses on a forced-choice identification test provided evidence that initial choosers have, on average, poorer memories for the culprit than do initial nonchoosers. We also investigated the usefulness of blank lineups for interpreting identification evidence. Diagnosticity ratios suggested that suspect identifications made by initial nonchoosers (cf. initial choosers) should have a greater impact on estimates of the likely guilt of the suspect. Furthermore, for initial nonchoosers, higher confidence in blank lineup rejections was associated with higher diagnosticity for subsequent suspect identifications. These results have implications for policy to guide the collection and interpretation of identification evidence. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Continued improvement in reduced-mode (REM) diodes enable 272 W from 105 μm 0.15 NA beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanskar, M.; Bao, L.; Chen, Z.; Dawson, D.; DeVito, M.; Dong, W.; Grimshaw, M.; Guan, X.; Hemenway, M.; Martinsen, R.; Urbanek, W.; Zhang, S.

    2017-02-01

    High-power, high-brightness diode lasers from 8xx nm to 9xx nm have been pursued in many applications including fiber laser pumping, materials processing, solid-state laser pumping, and consumer electronics manufacturing. In particular, 915 nm - 976 nm diodes are of interest as diode pumps for the kilowatt CW fiber lasers. Thus, there have been many technical efforts on driving the diode lasers to have both high power and high brightness to achieve high-performance and reduced manufacturing costs. This paper presents our continued progress in the development of high brightness fiber-coupled product platform, elementTM. In the past decade, the amount of power coupled into a single 105 μm and 0.15 NA fiber has increased by over a factor of ten through improved diode laser brilliance and the development of techniques for efficiently coupling multiple emitters into a single fiber. In this paper, we demonstrate the further brightness improvement and power-scaling enabled by both the rise in chip brightness/power and the increase in number of chips coupled into a given numerical aperture. We report a new x-REM design with brightness as high as 4.3 W/mm-mrad at a BPP of 3 mm-mrad. We also report the record 272W from a 2×9 elementTM with 105 μm/0.15 NA beam using x-REM diodes and a new product introduction at 200W output power from 105 μm/0.15 NA beam at 915 nm.

  1. Reducing the cost (and increasing the availability) of low-expansion fused glass mirror blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Steven J.; Griffith, B.; Federico, Dan R.; Mehle, Gregory V.

    2003-12-01

    For many years, lightweighted sandwich-style mirror blanks made from Corning's Ultra-Low Expansion glass (ULE) have been used in space telescope systems that demand superior optical performance. Despite the superior performance of this technology, the historically high cost and long schedule to procure such a blank has limited their use to only the most elite missions. Future missions, such as JWST, will seek to dramatically reduce the historical cost/schedule paradigm for ULE blanks by capitalizing on economies-of-scale associated with a multi-segment design. However, for this blank technology to become accessible to a broader range of missions, fundamental changes in technical and business approaches are needed. Over the last four years, ATK COI has worked to develop the requisite technologies to produce ULE mirror blanks in-house, with an emphasis on reducing cost and schedule. Our focus has been in three areas: process development to enable reclamation of ULE glass residuals, glass fusion process qualification, and tooling cost reduction. The status of each of these areas is presented, and conclusions drawn about possible future costs of lightweight ULE mirror blanks.

  2. Blank Optimization For The Sheet Hydroforming Of A Frame-Shaped Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolazzi, M.; Geiger, M.

    2004-06-01

    Sheet hydroforming is an innovative technology for the production of sheet components with a high strength/weight ratio and is therefore particularly suitable for the automotive industry as an alternative to deep drawing. In the hydroforming process, where there is no solid punch to ensure a uniform material flow from the flange, the blank holder force and the initial blank shape are the only parameters which can influence the contact pressure distribution in the flange and thus the material draw-in. For this reason the precise definition of the blank shape is crucial for the success of the hydroforming process. In this work an analytical model and the FE-analysis have been used in the definition of the initial blank contour in case of frame-shaped structures. First an analytical model, developed for the stretch flanging, was successfully applied to the expansion of the inner hole during the hydroforming of a frame-shaped part. The model has been then applied to the definition of the initial blank shape for a more complex part and finally refined by FE-analysis. The optimized blank obtained in this way has been finally used in the hydroforming trials.

  3. Impact of the analytical blank in the uncertainty evaluation of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Elcio Cruz; Monteiro, Maria Inês Couto; Pontes, Fernanda Veronesi Marinho; de Almeida, Marcelo Dominguez; Carneiro, Manuel Castro; da Silva, Lílian Irene Dias; Alcover Neto, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    Chemical analysts use analytical blanks in their analyses, but seldom is this source of uncertainty evaluated. Generally, there is great confusion. Although the numerical value of the blank, in some situations, can be negligible, its source of uncertainty cannot be. This article discusses the uncertainty contribution of the analytical blank using a numerical example of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicate that the uncertainties of the analytical blank can contribute up to 50% when the blank sample is considered in this analysis, confirming its high impact. This effect can be primarily observed where the analyte concentration approaches the lower range of the analytical curve. Even so, the blank is not always computed. Therefore, the relevance of the analytical blank can be confirmed by uncertainty evaluation.

  4. Real-time particle size analysis using focused beam reflectance measurement as a process analytical technology tool for a continuous granulation-drying-milling process.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Taylor, Michael K; Mehrotra, Amit; Stagner, William C

    2013-06-01

    Focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) was used as a process analytical technology tool to perform inline real-time particle size analysis of a proprietary granulation manufactured using a continuous twin-screw granulation-drying-milling process. A significant relationship between D20, D50, and D80 length-weighted chord length and sieve particle size was observed with a p value of <0.0001 and R(2) of 0.886. A central composite response surface statistical design was used to evaluate the effect of granulator screw speed and Comil® impeller speed on the length-weighted chord length distribution (CLD) and particle size distribution (PSD) determined by FBRM and nested sieve analysis, respectively. The effect of granulator speed and mill speed on bulk density, tapped density, Compressibility Index, and Flowability Index were also investigated. An inline FBRM probe placed below the Comil-generated chord lengths and CLD data at designated times. The collection of the milled samples for sieve analysis and PSD evaluation were coordinated with the timing of the FBRM determinations. Both FBRM and sieve analysis resulted in similar bimodal distributions for all ten manufactured batches studied. Within the experimental space studied, the granulator screw speed (650-850 rpm) and Comil® impeller speed (1,000-2,000 rpm) did not have a significant effect on CLD, PSD, bulk density, tapped density, Compressibility Index, and Flowability Index (p value > 0.05).

  5. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R.; McPherron, Shannon P.

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  6. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility.

    PubMed

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R; McPherron, Shannon P

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  7. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  8. Deep blank-field catalogue for medium- and large-sized telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Esteban, F. M.; Cabrera Lavers, A.; Cardiel, N.; Alacid, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The observation of blank fields, defined as regions of the sky that are devoid of stars down to a given threshold magnitude, constitutes one of the most relevant calibration procedures required for the proper reduction of astronomical data obtained following typical observing strategies. In this work, we have used Delaunay triangulation to search for deep blank fields throughout the whole sky, with a minimum size of 10 arcmin in diameter and an increasing threshold magnitude from 15 to 18 in the R band of the USNO-B Catalog of the United States Naval Observatory. The result is a catalogue with the deepest blank fields known so far. A short sample of these regions has been tested with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias, and it has been shown to be extremely useful for medium- and large-sized telescopes. Because some of the regions found could also be suitable for new extragalactic studies, we have estimated the galactic extinction in the direction of each deep blank field. This catalogue is accessible through the virtual observatory tool TESELA, and the user can retrieve - and visualize using ALADIN - the deep blank fields available near a given position in the sky.

  9. Artifacts Induced by Selective Blanking of Time-Domain Data in Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Feng; Valeja, Santosh G.; Beu, Steve C.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-11-01

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) of the isolated isotopic distribution for a highly charged biomolecule produces time-domain signal containing large amplitude signal "beats" separated by extended periods of much lower signal magnitude. Signal-to-noise ratio for data sampled between beats is low because of destructive interference of the signals induced by members of the isotopic distribution. Selective blanking of the data between beats has been used to increase spectral signal-to-noise ratio. However, blanking also eliminates signal components and, thus, can potentially distort the resulting FT spectrum. Here, we simulate the time-domain signal from a truncated isotopic distribution for a single charge state of an antibody. Comparison of the FT spectra produced with or without blanking and with or without added noise clearly show that blanking does not improve mass accuracy and introduces spurious peaks at both ends of the isotopic distribution (thereby making it more difficult to identify posttranslational modifications and/or adducts). Although the artifacts are reduced by use of multiple Gaussian (rather than square wave) windowing, blanking appears to offer no advantages for identifying true peaks or for mass measurement.

  10. On the Determination of the Blank Shape Contour for Thin Precision Parts Obtained by Stamping

    SciTech Connect

    Azaouzi, M.; Delameziere, A.; Naceur, H.; Batoz, J. L.; Sibaud, D.; Belouettar, S.

    2007-05-17

    The present study deals with the 'automatic' determination of the initial blank shape contour for 3D thin metallic precision parts obtained by stamping, knowing the 3D CAD geometry of the final part (the desired product). The forming process can involve several steps presented in this paper that consists in applying a heuristic method of optimization to find out the initial blank shape of thin precision metallic part in order to obtain a final part, with a required 3D geometry (specified). The purpose of the present approach is to replace the experimental trial and error optimization method used currently, which is expensive and time consuming. The principle of the 'heuristic' optimization method is to first estimate the blank shape using the Inverse Approach, then to compensate the shape error calculated in each node of the blank contour. The 'heuristic' optimization loop is done using a precise incremental code (Abaqus Explicit or Stampack) and, the iterations loop is stopped when the shape errors are within some initially fixed tolerances. The method is tested in the case of a special stamping process where the parts are pressed in one or more steps using a manual press, without blank holder and by the mean of tools having complex shape. The sensitivities of the process parameters regarding the optimal solution are investigated.

  11. Numerical Simulation of the Deep Drawing Process: Modelling the Blank Holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Alves, J. L.; Menezes, L. F.; Santos, A. D.

    2004-06-01

    Nowaday s the use of the finite element approach is indispensable to save time and effort in the production and process design of deep drawn parts. The advances of commercial software developers and universities research teams have been focused in topics that can be divided into numerical and technological. The numerical simulation results are influenced by several numerical parameters and strategies, but also by the correct definition of the technological parameters. A very important process parameter is the blank holding force, since it controls the material inflow which has a large effect on the deformed shape. The correct definition of the blank holder force distribution involves the correct characterisation of the blank sheet mechanical behaviour and the friction conditions. This allows the prediction of the effective contact area and thickness update. The correct definition of the blank holder force distribution in the numerical simulation and its correlation with the real process conditions also depends of the adopted numerical parameters and strategies. In this paper a complex tool shape is simulated, with a high strength steel and a mild steel, in order to highlight the importance of a correct modelling of the blank holder force distribution in the prediction of the final deformed shape as well as on the springback prediction.

  12. Numerical simulation and experimental assessment for cold cylindrical deep drawing without blank-holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiorescu, D.; Chiorescu, E.; Filipov, F.

    2016-08-01

    The metal forming process through plastic deformation, represented by deep drawing, is an extremely vast research field. In this article we analyse the influence of the die punch clearance, the average velocity in the active phase as well as of the lubrication on the deep drawing quality revealed by the thickness evenness on the finished product surface. For thorough research and in order to minimize the number of experimental trials, a fractional factorial design of TAGUCHI type was developed attached to an orthogonal array, thus analysing the contribution of the three aforementioned parameters to the quality of cylindrical deep drawing without a blank holder. In order to compare the experimental results, a conceptual 3D model of the system punch-blank-die was made, which respects entirely the geometry of the active elements and of the blank, but schematizes/approximates the material properties of the blank. Thus, using these simulations, we can investigate the variation of the deformation parameters throughout the drawing process: from the initial blank form to the final drawn part. The numerical simulation of the drawing of cylindrical cups was made using the ANSYS V14 program, the Explicit Dynamic module. Using the signal-to-noise ratio suggested by TAGUCHI, we determined the influence of each of the three parameters under study on deep drawing quality, as well as their optimal values.

  13. The Exicor DUV birefringence measurement system and its application to measuring lithography-grade CaF2 lens blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoliang; Griffiths, C. O.; Rockwell, Rick R.; List, Jennifer; Mark, Doug

    2003-11-01

    Optical lithography continues its transition to shorter wavelengths to support the semiconductor industry"s production of faster microchips to meet evolving market demands. The next step for optical lithography is likely to use the F2 excimer laser at 157.63 nm (157 nm,according to the industry" s naming convention).At 157 nm, among the limited number of fluoride crystals with acceptable optical properties calcium fluoride is the only practical lens material for step and scan systems due to its readiness for mass production. Since the discovery of intrinsic birefringence in CaF2 at deep ultraviolet (DUV)wavelengths,the optical lithography industry has developed a critical interest in measuring birefringence at 157 nm. In response to this need, we have developed a DUV birefringence measurement system. In this article,we describe the working principle, system construction, technical performance and selected applications for measuring lithography grade calcium fluoride lens blanks at DUV wavelengths.

  14. Failure Analysis of a Sheet Metal Blanking Process Based on Damage Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Y.; Chen, Z. H.; Zang, Y.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, a blanking process of sheet metal is studied by the methods of numerical simulation and experimental observation. The effects of varying technological parameters related to the quality of products are investigated. An elastoplastic constitutive equation accounting for isotropic ductile damage is implemented into the finite element code ABAQUS with a user-defined material subroutine UMAT. The simulations of the damage evolution and ductile fracture in a sheet metal blanking process have been carried out by the FEM. In order to guarantee computation accuracy and avoid numerical divergence during large plastic deformation, a specified remeshing technique is successively applied when severe element distortion occurs. In the simulation, the evolutions of damage at different stage of the blanking process have been evaluated and the distributions of damage obtained from simulation are in proper agreement with the experimental results.

  15. A method for repairing amplitude defects in multilayer-coated EUV mask blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Hau-Riege, S; Stearns, D; Clift, M; Mirkarimi, P; Gullikson, E; Chapman, H; Sweeney, D

    2003-10-20

    EUV mask blanks are fabricated by depositing a reflective Mo/Si multilayer film onto super-polished substrates. Localized defects in this thin film coating can significantly perturb the reflected field and produce errors in the printed image. Ideally one would want to manufacture defect-free mask blanks; however, this may be very difficult to achieve in practice. One practical way to increase the yield of mask blanks is to be able to repair a significant number of the defects in the multilayer coating. In this paper we present a method for repairing defects that are near the top surface of the coating; we call these amplitude defects because they predominantly attenuate the amplitude of the reflected field. Although the discussion is targeted to the application of manufacturing masks for EUV lithography, the conclusions and results are also applicable to understanding the optical effects of multilayer erosion, including ion-induced multilayer erosion and condenser erosion in EUVL steppers.

  16. Fatalities caused by spherical bullets fired from blank cartridge guns in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzün, Ibrahim; Büyük, Yalçin; Erkol, Zerrin; Ağritmiş, Hasan; Kir, Ziya

    2009-09-01

    Blank cartridge guns are generally regarded as being harmless and are not considered to be firearms in the legal sense in most countries. To show the danger of these guns upon simple modifications, we report 59 fatalities resulting from these simply modified blank cartridge guns in Istanbul, Turkey. The great majority of the victims were males and the age of those ranged from 11 to 61 years. In 55.9% of these cases, homicide was the origin followed by suicide (39%). The right temporal region was detected to be the preferred region in suicidal shots by blank cartridge guns with a frequency of 56.5%. In trial shots, all these guns were detected to discharge steel or lead spherical objects, generally 4 or 5 mm in diameter, successfully. Our findings strongly suggest that these guns should also be considered as handguns in the legal sense.

  17. Control of Polishing Machine of Crystal Blank which Used Network Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Mitsuo

    Quartz crystal devices have become an essential factor in electronic equipment such as mobile communication equipment or PC. As prices of electronic equipment have lowered, the cost-down of quartz crystal devices has been strongly demanded. To achieve the cost-down of quartz crystal device manufacturing, which uses a complex manufacturing process, the yield of the quartz crystal blank lapping process, which is the preliminary process of the quartz crystal device manufacturing process, must be increased. By introducing the network analyzer to the quartz crystal blank lapping process, we have obtained real time lapping characteristics. By obtaining the new process characteristics in real-time and visualizing them when changing lapping conditions, the network analyzer can now optimize the conditions of the process. In addition, the network analyzer can now measure the optical quartz crystal blank polishing process, which was difficult to measure by using a conventional controller.

  18. ULE design considerations for a 3m class light weighted mirror blank for E-ELT M5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew; Hobbs, Tom; Edwards, Mary; Arnold, Matthew; Sawyer, Kent

    2016-07-01

    It is expected that the next generation of large ground based astronomical telescopes will need large fast-steering/tip-tilt mirrors made of ultra-lightweight construction. These fast-steering mirrors are used to continuously correct for atmospheric disturbances and telescope vibrations. An example of this is the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) M5 lightweight mirror, which is part of the Tip-Tilt/Field-Stabilization Unit. The baseline design for the E-ELT M5 mirror, as presented in the E-ELT Construction Proposal, is a closed-back ULE mirror with a lightweight core using square core cells. Corning Incorporated (Corning) has a long history of manufacturing lightweight mirror blanks using ULE in a closed-back construction, going back to the 1960's, and includes the Hubble Space Telescope primary mirror, Subaru Telescope secondary and tertiary mirrors, the Magellan I and II tertiary mirrors, and Kepler Space Telescope primary mirror, among many others. A parametric study of 1-meter class lightweight mirror designs showed that Corning's capability to seal a continuous back sheet to a light-weighted core structure provides superior mirror rigidity, in a near-zero thermal expansion material, relative to other existing technologies in this design space. Corning has investigated the parametric performance of several design characteristics for a 3-meter class lightweight mirror blank for the E-ELT M5. Finite Element Analysis was performed on several design scenarios to obtain weight, areal density, and first Eigen frequency. This paper presents an overview of Corning ULE and lightweight mirror manufacturing capabilities, the parametric performance of design characteristics for 1-meter class and 3-meter class lightweight mirrors, as well as the manufacturing advantages and disadvantages of those characteristics.

  19. Multiphysics modeling of the steel continuous casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbeler, Lance C.

    This work develops a macroscale, multiphysics model of the continuous casting of steel. The complete model accounts for the turbulent flow and nonuniform distribution of superheat in the molten steel, the elastic-viscoplastic thermal shrinkage of the solidifying shell, the heat transfer through the shell-mold interface with variable gap size, and the thermal distortion of the mold. These models are coupled together with carefully constructed boundary conditions with the aid of reduced-order models into a single tool to investigate behavior in the mold region, for practical applications such as predicting ideal tapers for a beam-blank mold. The thermal and mechanical behaviors of the mold are explored as part of the overall modeling effort, for funnel molds and for beam-blank molds. These models include high geometric detail and reveal temperature variations on the mold-shell interface that may be responsible for cracks in the shell. Specifically, the funnel mold has a column of mold bolts in the middle of the inside-curve region of the funnel that disturbs the uniformity of the hot face temperatures, which combined with the bending effect of the mold on the shell, can lead to longitudinal facial cracks. The shoulder region of the beam-blank mold shows a local hot spot that can be reduced with additional cooling in this region. The distorted shape of the funnel mold narrow face is validated with recent inclinometer measurements from an operating caster. The calculated hot face temperatures and distorted shapes of the mold are transferred into the multiphysics model of the solidifying shell. The boundary conditions for the first iteration of the multiphysics model come from reduced-order models of the process; one such model is derived in this work for mold heat transfer. The reduced-order model relies on the physics of the solution to the one-dimensional heat-conduction equation to maintain the relationships between inputs and outputs of the model. The geometric

  20. Evaluation of biomolecular distributions in rat brain tissues by means of ToF-SIMS using a continuous beam of Ar clusters.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shusuke; Yokoyama, Yuta; Aoyagi, Satoka; Himi, Naoyuki; Fletcher, John S; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Henderson, Alex; Vickerman, John C

    2016-06-08

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) provides detailed chemical structure information and high spatial resolution images. Therefore, ToF-SIMS is useful for studying biological phenomena such as ischemia. In this study, in order to evaluate cerebral microinfarction, the distribution of biomolecules generated by ischemia was measured with ToF-SIMS. ToF-SIMS data sets were analyzed by means of multivariate analysis for interpreting complex samples containing unknown information and to obtain biomolecular mapping indicated by fragment ions from the target biomolecules. Using conventional ToF-SIMS (primary ion source: Bi cluster ion), it is difficult to detect secondary ions beyond approximately 1000 u. Moreover, the intensity of secondary ions related to biomolecules is not always high enough for imaging because of low concentration even if the masses are lower than 1000 u. However, for the observation of biomolecular distributions in tissues, it is important to detect low amounts of biological molecules from a particular area of tissue. Rat brain tissue samples were measured with ToF-SIMS (J105, Ionoptika, Ltd., Chandlers Ford, UK), using a continuous beam of Ar clusters as a primary ion source. ToF-SIMS with Ar clusters efficiently detects secondary ions related to biomolecules and larger molecules. Molecules detected by ToF-SIMS were examined by analyzing ToF-SIMS data using multivariate analysis. Microspheres (45 μm diameter) were injected into the rat unilateral internal carotid artery (MS rat) to cause cerebral microinfarction. The rat brain was sliced and then measured with ToF-SIMS. The brain samples of a normal rat and the MS rat were examined to find specific secondary ions related to important biomolecules, and then the difference between them was investigated. Finally, specific secondary ions were found around vessels incorporating microspheres in the MS rat. The results suggest that important biomolecules related to cerebral

  1. Deep Drawing of High-Strength Tailored Blanks by Using Tailored Tools

    PubMed Central

    Mennecart, Thomas; ul Hassan, Hamad; Güner, Alper; Ben Khalifa, Noomane; Hosseini, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    In most forming processes based on tailored blanks, the tool material remains the same as that of sheet metal blanks without tailored properties. A novel concept of lightweight construction for deep drawing tools is presented in this work to improve the forming behavior of tailored blanks. The investigations presented here deal with the forming of tailored blanks of dissimilar strengths using tailored dies made of two different materials. In the area of the steel blank with higher strength, typical tool steel is used. In the area of the low-strength steel, a hybrid tool made out of a polymer and a fiber-reinforced surface replaces the steel half. Cylindrical cups of DP600/HX300LAD are formed and analyzed regarding their formability. The use of two different halves of tool materials shows improved blank thickness distribution, weld-line movement and pressure distribution compared to the use of two steel halves. An improvement in strain distribution is also observed by the inclusion of springs in the polymer side of tools, which is implemented to control the material flow in the die. Furthermore, a reduction in tool weight of approximately 75% can be achieved by using this technique. An accurate finite element modeling strategy is developed to analyze the problem numerically and is verified experimentally for the cylindrical cup. This strategy is then applied to investigate the thickness distribution and weld-line movement for a complex geometry, and its transferability is validated. The inclusion of springs in the hybrid tool leads to better material flow, which results in reduction of weld-line movement by around 60%, leading to more uniform thickness distribution. PMID:28787876

  2. Enhanced procedural blank control for organic geochemical studies of critical sample material.

    PubMed

    Leider, A; Schumacher, T C; Hallmann, C

    2016-09-01

    Organic contamination of sedimentary rocks can produce artefacts in studies of hydrocarbon composition, and this can have significant negative consequences for interpretations of the geobiological record. False positives - that is cases of non-syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarkers - are common in Precambrian studies, and significant challenges persist despite the intensive effort devoted to these studies. Efforts to standardize the 'burden of proof' for distinguishing between contamination and syngenetic material have to date failed to yield a simple or universal protocol, yet the need remains great, as both bitumen-lean rocks and bitumen-rich samples can be vulnerable to the accumulation of false-positive signals. In an effort to determine the best approach to quality control, we tested the capability of different blank materials to collect ambient contamination by assessing their capacity to adsorb hydrocarbons during storage in plastic bags and found that commonly used Quartz sand does not provide an adequate measure of storage- or laboratory-induced contamination. Brick blanks, having the advantage that they can parallel rock samples even during the sawing process, are characterized by similar poor adsorption properties. Primarily steered by mineralogy, organic carbon content and surface area, model-black shales can adsorb up to 20 times more contaminants than sand blanks and up to 200 times more contaminants than organic-free model-carbonates. This observation provides an explanation for reports and observations of seemingly systematic stratigraphic variation of contaminants, but mostly should raise awareness for the evaluation of procedural blanks, in particular of sample-to-blank ratios, when studying bitumen-lean rock samples of varying lithologies. Additionally, differences between the hydrocarbon profiles in plastic bags and the hydrocarbon signatures transferred to blank materials emphasize difficulties in the unequivocal detection of contamination sources

  3. Mercury Deposition Network Site Operator Training for the System Blank and Blind Audit Programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operates the external quality assurance project for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network. The project includes the system blank and blind audit programs for assessment of total mercury concentration data quality for wet-deposition samples. This presentation was prepared to train new site operators and to refresh experienced site operators to successfully process and submit system blank and blind audit samples for chemical analysis. Analytical results are used to estimate chemical stability and contamination levels of National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network samples and to evaluate laboratory variability and bias.

  4. The Quality Issue of the Parts Blanked from Thin Silicon Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Jacek; Jaworski, Jan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the wear mechanism of punches made of M3:2 and M2 steel sheet which are used in blanking process of the rotor part of the low-power asynchronous motor was presented. The influence of additional TiN coating on the punch flank surface degradation intensity was described. The punch wear influence on the hardness changes close the material intersection surface was determined. The research results indicate that the tool durability ensures the quality of parts blanked from electrotechnical steel. The results will allow for selection of new tools materials for this type of tools which are used in difficult tribological conditions.

  5. The Quality Issue of the Parts Blanked from Thin Silicon Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Jacek; Jaworski, Jan

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the wear mechanism of punches made of M3:2 and M2 steel sheet which are used in blanking process of the rotor part of the low-power asynchronous motor was presented. The influence of additional TiN coating on the punch flank surface degradation intensity was described. The punch wear influence on the hardness changes close the material intersection surface was determined. The research results indicate that the tool durability ensures the quality of parts blanked from electrotechnical steel. The results will allow for selection of new tools materials for this type of tools which are used in difficult tribological conditions.

  6. LANSCE beam current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, Floyd R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  7. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Use of Monocrystalline Silicon as Tool Material for Highly Accurate Blanking of Thin Metal Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Hildering, Sven; Engel, Ulf; Merklein, Marion

    2011-05-04

    The trend towards miniaturisation of metallic mass production components combined with increased component functionality is still unbroken. Manufacturing these components by forming and blanking offers economical and ecological advantages combined with the needed accuracy. The complexity of producing tools with geometries below 50 {mu}m by conventional manufacturing methods becomes disproportional higher. Expensive serial finishing operations are required to achieve an adequate surface roughness combined with accurate geometry details. A novel approach for producing such tools is the use of advanced etching technologies for monocrystalline silicon that are well-established in the microsystems technology. High-precision vertical geometries with a width down to 5 {mu}m are possible. The present study shows a novel concept using this potential for the blanking of thin copper foils with monocrystallline silicon as a tool material. A self-contained machine-tool with compact outer dimensions was designed to avoid tensile stresses in the brittle silicon punch by an accurate, careful alignment of the punch, die and metal foil. A microscopic analysis of the monocrystalline silicon punch shows appropriate properties regarding flank angle, edge geometry and surface quality for the blanking process. Using a monocrystalline silicon punch with a width of 70 {mu}m blanking experiments on as-rolled copper foils with a thickness of 20 {mu}m demonstrate the general applicability of this material for micro production processes.

  9. The MDT Innovation: Machine-Scoring of Fill-in-the-Blank Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Paul S.

    The Multi-Digit Technologies (MDT) testing technique is discussed as the first major advance in computer assisted testing in several decades. The MDT testing method uses fill-in-the-blank or completion-type questions, with an alphabetized long list of possible responses. An MDT answer sheet is used to record the code number of the answer. For…

  10. Sensitivity-Limiting Factors of at-Wavelength Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Blank Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Tomie, Toshihisa

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity-limiting factors of at-wavelength inspection for extreme UV lithography (EUVL) mask blanks have been analyzed. The sensitivity of the inspection tool is modeled on the basis of the inspection image of programmed multilayer defects and the characterized attributes of the tool components. The characterization includes point spread function (PSF) analysis of the imaging optics and the back-illuminated charge-coupled-device (BI-CCD) sensor as well as power spectral density (PSD) analysis of the mask blank surface. The statistical scaling of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in conjunction with the variables of optics, sensors, and mask blanks has predicted effective improvement paths of its sensitivity. Increasing the magnification of optics, reducing the total PSF, and improving the roughness of mask blanks will address the needs for its application in future generations. Signal intensity dependency on the geometrical attributes of defects is also studied by both experiment and electromagnetic simulation. It is revealed that the bottom height of defects and defect smoothing throughout the multilayer deposition significantly influence defect signal intensity. Comprehensive measures to accommodate a variety of defects and to mitigate associated risks are also discussed.

  11. Meeting the Solid Wood Needs of the Furniture and Cabinet Industries: Standard-Size Hardwood Blanks

    Treesearch

    Philip A. Araman; Charles J Gatchell; Hugh W. Reynolds

    1982-01-01

    Standard-size, kiln-dried hardwood blanks (panels) of specified lengths, widths, thicknesses, and qualities can be used instead of lumber to produce rough dimension furniture parts. Standard sizes were determined by analyzing thousands of part requirements from 20 furniture and 12 kitchen cabinet companies. The International Woodworking Machinery and Furniture Supply...

  12. Theoretical Analysis on Mechanical Deformation of Membrane-Based Photomask Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marumoto, Kenji; Aya, Sunao; Yabe, Hedeki; Okada, Tatsunori; Sumitani, Hiroaki

    2012-04-01

    Membrane-based photomask is used in proximity X-ray lithography including that in LIGA (Lithographie, Galvanoformung und Abformung) process, and near-field photolithography. In this article, out-of-plane deformation (OPD) and in-plane displacement (IPD) of membrane-based photomask blanks are theoretically analyzed to obtain the mask blanks with flat front surface and low stress absorber film. First, we derived the equations of OPD and IPD for the processing steps of membrane-based photomask such as film deposition, back-etching and bonding, using a theory of symmetrical bending of circular plates with a coaxial circular hole and that of deformation of cylinder under hydrostatic pressure. The validity of the equations was proved by comparing the calculation results with experimental ones. Using these equations, we investigated the relation between the geometry of the mask blanks and the distortions generally, and gave the criterion to attain the flat front surface. Moreover, the absorber stress-bias required to obtain zero-stress on finished mask blanks was also calculated and it has been found that only little stress-bias was required for adequate hole size of support plate.

  13. Analysis and control of thin film stresses during extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liang

    2010-11-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the leading candidate for Next-Generation Lithography (NGL) in the sub-45 nm regime. One of the critical technical problems to be solved before the commercialization of EUVL is the control of image placement errors during EUVL mask blank fabrication. This paper focuses on the characterization of image placement errors induced by the thin film stresses during EUVL mask blank fabrication. Firstly, the causes and classifications of the stresses in the thin films were discussed. Then an analytical analysis was developed to reveal the effects of the thin film stresses on the distortions of the EUVL mask. Lastly, finite element (FE) models were established to simulate each process step in EUVL mask blank fabrication. The out-of-plane distortions (OPD) and inplane distortions (IPD) were tracked for each process step. The numerical results are compared with the analytical results to validate the FE models. Comparison indicated that numerical results and theoretical results agree very well with each other. The research in this paper provides a solid support for EUVL mask blank fabrication, theoretically and numerically. Further mounting and chucking procedures can keep image placement errors within the allotted error budget as well as provide the necessary flatness.

  14. Evaluation of the Strong Vocational Interest Blank as a Screening Device for NESEP Applicants. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Norman M.; Neumann, Idell

    The Navy Enlisted Scientific Education Program (NESEP) provides qualified enlisted men with an opportunity to obtain a college degree while earning a commission as an officer in the naval service. In 1965, over 250 NESEP selectees completed Strong Vocational Interest Blanks (SVIBs). For the 166 who had received commissions by 1971, the SVIB mean…

  15. Avoiding the Blank Stare: Teacher Training with the Gradual Release of Responsibility in Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Most teachers have experienced the "blank stare" when after teaching a lesson implementing all their best strategies using their best language-learning English and at the moment of releasing responsibility--that is, moving from the teacher's responsibility to prepare students for the task to their responsibility to carry it out--the…

  16. Enabling high speed friction stir welding of aluminum tailor welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding (FSW) has traditionally been applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  17. Fill in the Blank: Culture Jamming and the Advertising of Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert-Beatty, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    This article is a review on billboard liberation and some other projects that develop the idea of talking back or over advertising in a playful and youthful way. In one of them, Ji Lee's Bubble Project, an artist places blank thought-bubble stickers on street advertisements and waits to see what people write on them, completing the work of art and…

  18. Ultrasonic detection of laminar-type defects in iridium alloy blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Simpson, W.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-07-01

    Encapsulated isotopic heat sources for use in generating electrical power for space applications require flight-quality hardware material. Iridium is the chosen material for such applications, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been the prime supplier of iridium alloy forming blanks 52 mm in diameter by 0.66 mm thick (1.0 by 0.026 in.). Prior to the work reported here, these blanks were ultrasonically examined by using 0.9-mm-diam (0.035-in.) simulated flaw standards. However, as a result of this effort, the sensitivity of our ultrasonic pulse-echo test system has been increased. The improved ultrasonic test system permits blank inspection at the 0.5-mm-diam (0.020-in.) simulated flaw detection level. This test system was successfully demonstrated on the initial blanks provided via an improved processing route (consumable arc-melting, extruding, and rolling). The equipment modification and/or selection and the specific focused search unit immersion technique developed to provide this capability are described. The improved flaw detection capability also provides data maps of a common type of defect in iridium (delaminations).

  19. A big blank white canvas? Mapping and modeling human impact in Antarctica

    Treesearch

    Steve Carver; Tina Tin

    2015-01-01

    Antarctica is certainly what most people would consider being the world's last great wilderness; largely untouched and undeveloped by humans. Yet it is not inviolate - there are scientific bases, tourist operations, expeditions, airstrips and even roads. Although these impacts are by and large limited in extent, their very presence in an otherwise "blank...

  20. Strong Vocational Interest Blank Scores for Junior College Students in Five Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stuart E.

    An investigation was conducted to determine if students in five junior college curricula could be differentiated by the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB) scores and if such differentiation could be improved by using several scores in combination rather than single scores separately. The SVIB was administered to 130 students at Alfred…

  1. Attentional Lapses in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Blank Rather Than Wandering Thoughts.

    PubMed

    Van den Driessche, Charlotte; Bastian, Mikaël; Peyre, Hugo; Stordeur, Coline; Acquaviva, Éric; Bahadori, Sara; Delorme, Richard; Sackur, Jérôme

    2017-10-01

    People with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have difficulties sustaining their attention on external tasks. Such attentional lapses have often been characterized as the simple opposite of external sustained attention, but the different types of attentional lapses, and the subjective experiences to which they correspond, remain unspecified. In this study, we showed that unmedicated children (ages 6-12) with ADHD, when probed during a standard go/no-go task, reported more mind blanking (a mental state characterized by the absence of reportable content) than did control participants. This increase in mind blanking happened at the expense of both focused and wandering thoughts. We also found that methylphenidate reverted the level of mind blanking to baseline (i.e., the level of mind blanking reported by control children without ADHD). However, this restoration led to mind wandering more than to focused attention. In a second experiment, we extended these findings to adults who had subclinical ADHD. These results suggest that executive functions impaired in ADHD are required not only to sustain external attention but also to maintain an internal train of thought.

  2. Validity Generalization of the Men's Form of the Strong Vocational Interest Blank with Academically Able Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgen, Fred H.; Helms, Janet E.

    1975-01-01

    The sample groups consisted of 570 women and 1,031 men who were National Merit Scholars in 1966. Differentiations of career groups from the SVIB-M were compared for men and women. Results suggest that a single form of the Strong Vocational Interest Blank is potentially feasible for predicting college major and career choices of women as well as…

  3. Is ''BLANK'' a Suitable Neutral Prime for Event-Related Potential Experiments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dien, Joseph; Franklin, Michael S.; May, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    We report an experiment that evaluates whether "BLANK" or an unrelated prime is a more suitable baseline for assessing priming for an ERP study. Sixteen subjects performed a lexical decision task with a 1 s prime-target stimulus onset asynchrony. Increased amplitude for the N400 was observed for targets in the unrelated prime condition whereas…

  4. Fill in the Blank: Culture Jamming and the Advertising of Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert-Beatty, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    This article is a review on billboard liberation and some other projects that develop the idea of talking back or over advertising in a playful and youthful way. In one of them, Ji Lee's Bubble Project, an artist places blank thought-bubble stickers on street advertisements and waits to see what people write on them, completing the work of art and…

  5. Seismic blanking zones in the deep-water Ullung Basin, East Sea of Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae; Riedel, Michael; Yoo, Dong-Geun

    2015-04-01

    A total 12366.395 L.km of 2D multichannel seismic data were acquired by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) for detecting and mapping seismic indicators for the presence of gas hydrate in the deep-water Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea. The seismic data were acquired using Trilogy System of Geco-Prakla, Bolt Air-gun System onboard the R/V TAMHAE II of KIGAM during the years of 2000 to 2004. The seismic faices of shallow sediments were also analyzed to understand the sedimentary strata developed in the basin. Seismic data were processed to define gas hydrate indicators such as bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) and seismic blank zones. The BSR was identified by (a) its polarity opposite to the seafloor, (b) its seafloor-parallel reflection behavior, and (c) its occurrence at a sub-bottom depth corresponding to the expected base of gas hydrate stability zone, on heat flow and other thermal data for the region and on seismic velocity data. The seismic velocity analysis was also conducted for determining the velocity deviation effect of high-velocity gas hydrate and underlying low-velocity free gas. The BSRs occur mainly in the southern part of the basin where mass transport deposits are widely occurring. A number of vertical to sub-vertical seismic blanking zones were identified in the basin. The blanking zones are near-vertical broad chimney-like structures of reduced seismic reflectivity. They may be formed by gas and/or fluid upwelling through fractures and faults. Many of the blanking zones show apparent velocity pull-up effects of sediment layering structures that are interpreted to be a result of higher velocity gas hydrate. The presence of substantial amounts of gas hydrate in the blank zones were first found by piston coring in 2007, and subsequently confirmed by two deep-drilling expeditions in 2007 and 2010. Most of the blanking zones occur in well-bedded turbidite/hemi-pelagic sediments in the northern deep basin. The

  6. Blank corrections for ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon dating of sedimentary and soil organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alvaro; Santos, Guaciara M; Williams, Elizabeth K; Pendergraft, Matthew A; Vetter, Lael; Rosenheim, Brad E

    2014-12-16

    Ramped pyrolysis (RP) targets distinct components of soil and sedimentary organic carbon based on their thermochemical stabilities and allows the determination of the full spectrum of radiocarbon ((14)C) ages present in a soil or sediment sample. Extending the method into realms where more precise ages are needed or where smaller samples need to be measured involves better understanding of the blank contamination associated with the method. Here, we use a compiled data set of RP measurements of samples of known age to evaluate the mass of the carbon blank and its associated (14)C signature, and to assess the performance of the RP system. We estimate blank contamination during RP using two methods, the modern-dead and the isotope dilution method. Our results indicate that during one complete RP run samples are contaminated by 8.8 ± 4.4 μg (time-dependent) of modern carbon (MC, fM ∼ 1) and 4.1 ± 5.5 μg (time-independent) of dead carbon (DC, fM ∼ 0). We find that the modern-dead method provides more accurate estimates of uncertainties in blank contamination; therefore, the isotope dilution method should be used with caution when the variability of the blank is high. Additionally, we show that RP can routinely produce accurate (14)C dates with precisions ∼100 (14)C years for materials deposited in the last 10,000 years and ∼300 (14)C years for carbon with (14)C ages of up to 20,000 years.

  7. 47 CFR 73.646 - Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal. 73.646 Section 73.646 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS....646 Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal....

  8. 47 CFR 73.646 - Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal. 73.646 Section 73.646 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS....646 Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal....

  9. Quartz sand as "blank" compound in rehabilitation experience of industrial barren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, T. T.; Ivanova, L. A.; Kikuchi, R.; Gerardo, R.

    2010-05-01

    During 2008 the field test was performed near the smelter complex Monchegorsk (67°51'N, 32°48'E) to estimate suitability of innovate method for site remediation in severe conditions such as in industrial barren. The method is based on cultivation of perennial grasses using hydroponics with thermally inflated vermiculite from local deposit (Kovdor) followed by rolled lawn placement on very contaminated sites near Monchegorsk. Growing in very contaminated ground resulted in 50% rolled lawn surface loss during first year but with biodiversity maintenance. Field experiment was carried out in three variants (1- mineral ground - flat site; 2- mineral ground- slope sites; 3- organogenic ground - flat site in depression in five replicates. More comprehensive results were received for mineral ground due to better natural washing compared to organogenic ground. In all variants we observed secondary roots formation. It seems obvious that plant roots choose the best zones of soils to grow, and that they avoided toxic zones. Observations continued during 2009 to follow freezing influence and nutrient loss rate. We observed grass survival of about 20-30% during second year of field test but grass roots proliferated very slowly in contaminated ground. Affinity to the ground is one of most important estimate of rolled lawn efficiency for grass cover creation. One of possible measure to improve rolled lawn affinity is to establish additional permeable barrier for grass roots isolation from toxic ground. Simultaneously with rolled lawn placement litterbag experiment was carried out with quartz sand as filling. Quartz was chosen as blank compound and as possible material for permeable barrier creation. Original quartz have some initial nutritional status: pH 6.87, available forms of K 1.9 mg g-1, Ca 9.5 mg g-1, Mg 2.8 mg g-1, P 0.4 mg g-1. There was both increasing and decreasing of quartz nutritional status during 2008-2009 period. Besides quartz is recognized to be some barrier

  10. Blank Slate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber-Thrush, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Ullysses Tucker likes a good challenge. After spending the first 20 years of his career working in media, he entered the development profession in 2000. He worked for the State University of New York Plattsburgh, New Jersey's Montclair State University, Louisiana's Grambling State University, and Western Illinois University before joining London…

  11. A Rapid and Portable DIC Analysis for Aquatic Systems: Rise of the Blanks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olack, G.; Pfister, C. A.; Wootton, J. T.; Colman, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon analysis, in both fresh water and marine systems, can help determine carbon sources, sinks and flows through an ecosystem (Apongwa et al. 2013). Methods to measure DIC with small quantities in situ are becoming more important as the need for DIC estimation increases across aquatic ecosystems. Recently a number of papers have measured both δ13CVPDB and concentrations by injecting a relatively small amount of sample, e.g. 1 to 2 mL, into prepared sample tubes and then analyzing the headspace gas (Spötl 2004, Torres et al. 2005, Assayag et al. 2006). The initial sampling can be done in the field and samples are stable for weeks to months (Capasso et al. 2005, Taipale and Sonninen 2009) prior to analysis. However, CO2 gas samples can have a contaminant interfering with measurements when concentrations are low, e.g. 0.04% CO2 (Knohl et al. 2004), though the effect can be negligible at higher concentrations, e.g. 1% (Spötl 2005). We investigate fitting a blank correction to a suite of standards to quantify the contamination and more accurately measure the DIC concentration and isotopic values. We examined 6 and 18 month time points, using the suite of standards with δ13CVPDB of 18.69, -2.69 and -16.86 ‰, 2 to 3 mM concentration range. Fitting the blank correction allows us to detect the blank in the 6 month time point. The blank only has a minor effect on the -2.69 and -16.86 ‰ standards, <0.1 ‰, but a significant one for the 18.69 ‰ standard, ~0.4 ‰. Samples run ca. 2 mM in the range of 0 ‰ only see a blank effect in the range of 0.15 ‰, but samples run at < 1 mM show potential shifts of up to 0.8 ‰. The 18 month test showed the tubes are under vacuum—apparently the He diffuses thru the chlorobutyl rubber septa. Those samples can still be analyzed, either by charging them with He so they will not be under vacuum, or running as is and letting the vacuum in the tubes draw in air during the analysis. After correcting for the

  12. Beam-Beam Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, Christopher

    2003-09-05

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea-Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. Finally, a study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam spotsizes.

  13. Evaluation of attenuated PSM photomask blanks with TF11 chrome and FEP-171 resist on a 248 nm DUV laser pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Kezhao; Björnborg, Charles; Karlsson, Henrik; Paulsson, Adisa; Rosendahl, Anna; Beiming, Peter; Vedenpää, Jukka; Walford, Jonathan; Newman, Tom

    2007-10-01

    Tighter requirements on mask resolution, CD and image positioning accuracy at and beyond the 45 nm technology node push the development of improved photomask blanks. One such blank for attenuated phase-shift masks (att-PSM) provides a thinner chrome film, named TF11, with higher chrome etch rate compared to the previous generation Att- PSM blank (NTAR5 chrome film) from the same supplier. Reduced stress in the chrome film also results in less image placement error induced by the material. FEP-171 is the positive chemically amplified resist (PCAR) that is most commonly used in advanced mask manufacturing with both 50 keV variable shaped e-beam (VSB) and DUV laser pattern generators. TF11 allows an FEP-171 resist film down to about 2000 Å thickness with sufficient etch resistance, while the standard resist thickness for NTAR5 is around 3000 Å. This work has experimentally evaluated the use of TF11 chrome and FEP-171 resist together with a 248 nm DUV laser pattern generator, the Sigma7500. First, patterning performance in resist with thicknesses from 2000 Å to 2600 Å, in steps of 100 Å, was tested with respect to swing curve and basic lithographic parameters including resolution, CD linearity, CD iso-dense bias and dose sensitivity. Patterning results on mask showed a swing minimum at around 2200 Å and a swing maximum at around 2500 Å, which correspond to reflectivity measurements for 248 nm wavelength performed by the blank supplier. It was concluded that the overall patterning performance was best close to the swing maximum. Thereafter the patterning performance using TF11 at two resist thicknesses, 2000 Å and 2550 Å, was studied in more detail and compared to performance using NTAR5 with 3200 Å resist. The evaluation showed that the Sigma7500-II offers good compatibility with TF11, especially using the optimized FEP-171 resist thickness of 2550 Å. It also showed that the patterning capability of the Sigma7500-II using TF11 and 2550 Å resist is improved

  14. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  15. Numerical simulation of fine blanking process using fully coupled advanced constitutive equations with ductile damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labergere, C.; Saanouni, K.; Benafia, S.; Galmiche, J.; Sulaiman, H.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the modelling and adaptive numerical simulation of the fine blanking process. Thermodynamically-consistent constitutive equations, strongly coupled with ductile damage, together with specific boundary conditions (particular command of forces on blank holder and counterpunch) are presented. This model is implemented into ABAQUS/EXPLICIT using the Vumat user subroutine and connected with an adaptive 2D remeshing procedure. The different material parameters are identified for the steel S600MC using experimental tensile tests conducted until the final fracture. A parametric study aiming to examine the sensitivity of the process parameters (die radius, clearance die/punch) to the punch force and fracture surfaces topology (convex zone, sheared zone, fracture zone and the burr).

  16. Method for fabricating an ultra-low expansion mask blank having a crystalline silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) using Ultra-Low Expansion (ULE) substrates and crystalline silicon. ULE substrates are required for the necessary thermal management in EUVL mask blanks, and defect detection and classification have been obtained using crystalline silicon substrate materials. Thus, this method provides the advantages for both the ULE substrate and the crystalline silicon in an Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) mask blank. The method is carried out by bonding a crystalline silicon wafer or member to a ULE wafer or substrate and thinning the silicon to produce a 5-10 .mu.m thick crystalline silicon layer on the surface of the ULE substrate. The thinning of the crystalline silicon may be carried out, for example, by chemical mechanical polishing and if necessary or desired, oxidizing the silicon followed by etching to the desired thickness of the silicon.

  17. A Grain Structure Model based on Voronoi polygon of Non- oriented Electrical Steel in Blanking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Shuhui; Dong, Liang; He, Ji

    2016-08-01

    World-wide there is a trend to develop higher permeability grades, thin thickness and coarse grain of non-oriented electrical steels, a core function material of motors. Blanking is the most popular technique for producing the motor laminations. However, the deformation of material is significantly influenced by grain size. In this paper, Voronoi polygon is used for generate the random microstructures of the studied non-oriented electrical steel. Finite Element (FE) model considering grain size is thus established to analysis the blanking process. The material behaviour of grains is derived from the widely accepted surface layer model. Compared to the conventional model without considering the grain size, the novel model shows good matching with the experimental results.

  18. Amplitude blanking related to the pore-filling of gas hydrate in sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Dillon, William P.

    2001-01-01

    Seismic indicators of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments include elevated interval velocities and amplitude reduction of seismic reflections owing to the presence of gas hydrate in the sediment's pore spaces. However, large amplitude blanking with relatively low interval velocities observed at the Blake Ridge has been enigmatic because realistic seismic models were absent to explain the observation. This study proposes models in which the gas hydrate concentrations vary in proportion to the porosity. Where gas hydrate concentrations are greater in more porous media, a significant amplitude blanking can be achieved with relatively low interval velocity. Depending on the amount of gas hydrate concentration in the pore space, reflection amplitudes from hydrate-bearing sediments can be much less, less or greater than those from corresponding non-hydrate-bearing sediments.

  19. Investigation on process parameters affecting blanking of AISI 1006 low carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Annibale, Antonello; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Panaccio, Lorenzo; Di Ilio, Antoniomaria; Gabrielli, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    A blanking apparatus was designed and built in order to study the effects of the process parameters on blanking low carbon steel disks, with particular reference to the study of punch-die gap influence and Brozzo's damage criterion by keeping punch and die fillet radii constant. The goal of the shearing tests was to optimize the gap between punch and die, according to the material damage and the force curves obtained by experimental tests. By using a 2D axis-symmetry FE model, the authors studied a set of parameters in order to reduce damage. After studying the material damage by a first simulation series, a second series was carried out in order to evaluate the punch-die gap effects on force-stroke trend; good results in term of external surface finish were obtained in the geometry of the final workpiece.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Constraint Effect on Deformation Behavior of Tailor-Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhua; Lin, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    Tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) have been considered as a productive sheet forming method in automotive industries. However, formability of TWBs is reduced due to different properties or thicknesses of the blanks and is a challenge for manufacturing designers. The plastic capacity of TWBs is decreased even when the material and thickness are the same. The constraint effect of the laser weld (including weld and heat-affected zone) material in the forming process of similar TWBs is a key problem to be solved in the research, development and application of thin-sheet TWBs. In this paper, uniaxial tensile tests with full-field strain measurement by digital image correlation and Erichsen tests are performed to investigate the constraint effect on deformation behavior and explore the mechanism of decreasing formability of similar TWBs. In addition, finite element models are conducted under ABAQUS code to further reveal the phenomenal behavior of the constraint effect. The results of the base material and welded blanks are compared for characterizing the differences. Furthermore, in order to better understand this mechanism, theoretical and numerical investigations are employed and compared to interpret the constraint effect of laser weld on the deformation behavior of TWBs. An index is proposed to quantify the constraint effect. Results show that the constraint effect of laser weld appears in both stretch forming and drawing of TWBs. Strain paths are approaching the plane strain condition as compared to the monolithic blank due to the constraint effect. Constraint effect is a major factor affecting the formability of TWBs when the failure occurs away from the weld seam.

  1. System 6: making frame-quality blanks from white oak thinnings

    Treesearch

    Hugh W. Reynolds; Philip A. Araman

    1983-01-01

    Low-grade white oak timber removed during a timber stand improvement cut on the Jefferson National Forest in Virginia was made into sawlogs, poles, 6-foot bolts, 4-foot bolts, pulpwood, and firewood. The 6-foot bolts were sawed to two cants per bolt; cants were resawed to 4/4 System 6 boards; boards were dried to 6 percent moisture content and made into frame blanks...

  2. Predetermined Flake Production at the Lower/Middle Paleolithic Boundary: Yabrudian Scraper-Blank Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shimelmitz, Ron; Kuhn, Steven L.; Ronen, Avraham; Weinstein-Evron, Mina

    2014-01-01

    While predetermined débitage technologies are recognized beginning with the middle Acheulian, the Middle Paleolithic is usually associated with a sharp increase in their use. A study of scraper-blank technology from three Yabrudian assemblages retrieved from the early part of the Acheulo-Yabrudian complex of Tabun Cave (ca. 415–320 kyr) demonstrates a calculated and preplanned production, even if it does not show the same complexity and elaboration as in the Levallois technology. These scraper dominated assemblages show an organization of production based on an intensive use of predetermination blank technology already in place at the end of the Lower Paleolithic of the Levant. These results provide a novel perspective on the differences and similarities between the Lower and Middle Paleolithic industries. We suggest that there was a change in the paradigm in the way hominins exploited stone tools: in many Middle Paleolithic assemblages the potential of the stone tools for hafting was a central feature, in the Lower Paleolithic ergonometric considerations of manual prehension were central to the design of blanks and tools. PMID:25192429

  3. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding To Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current joining technologies for automotive aluminum alloys are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum welded components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability utilizing a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  4. Development and characterization of advanced phase-shift mask blanks for 14nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Jun; Jang, Kyu-Jin; Choi, Min-Ki; Yang, Chul-Kyu; Lee, Jae-Chul; Lee, Jong-Keun; Kang, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Shin, Cheol; Nam, Kee-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the development of semiconductor process for 14nm node and beyond is in progress. The mask-making process demands higher resolution and CD accuracy to meet requirements. Current conventional ArF PSM has several problems such as higher 3D effect and higher loading effect due to the thicker film. These problems cause the CD performance degradation. This study is about the manufacturing of advance ArF PSM, which has thinner phase shift layer and higher etch rate Cr absorber film. The thickness of phase shift film is less than 60nm and the total etch-time for the Cr absorber film is reduced more than 30%. The mask CD performance of this new blank was evaluated in terms of CD uniformity, CD linearity, pattern resolution, and loading effect and so on. Adapting to this new blank, we can achieve better CD performance by reducing the loading effect. In addition, the chemical durability and ArF exposure durability were also improved. In conclusion, the mask-making process margin was extended by using this new blank, and it is expected that we can achieve the required specifications for 14nm node and beyond.

  5. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding to Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and they have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high volumes. While friction-stir welding (FSW) has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than 1 m/min, high-volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost-sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low-to-moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high-speed linear FSW. Therefore, to facilitate production of high-volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of 3 m/min. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for postweld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. An evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum TWBs, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory-scale tests.

  6. Atrial undersensing secondary to quiet timer blanking in pediatric and congenital heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    von Alvensleben, Johannes C; Schaffer, Michael; Brateng, Caitlin; Collins, Kathryn K

    2017-07-01

    Atrial undersensing despite normal atrial lead parameters and high amplitude electrograms has been described in adult patients as a consequence of atrial amplifier saturation. Repetitive inputs cause amplifier ringing and undersensing occurs as a consequence of quiet timer blanking. High amplitude ventricular electrograms can also result in atrial blanking secondary to cross-chamber effect. This has not been described in pediatric patients or epicardial pacing systems and specific risk factors are not known. We describe five cases of atrial undersensing in pediatric and congenital heart disease patients with epicardial dual-chamber systems and high ventricular lead outputs. This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients with dual-chamber pacing systems cared for at the Heart Institute at Children's Hospital Colorado. Five cases of atrial undersensing with normal atrial lead parameters were found. All were epicardial systems with acceptable lead parameters at implantation and Medtronic (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) generators with unipolar leads. Ventricular pacing outputs were elevated at presentation, median 5.5 V (5-7.5). Presenting symptoms were exercise intolerance (four) and detection on routine monitoring (one). Successful interventions included reduction in ventricular lead pacing output (one), programming of rate response (two), and implantation of an alternative generator manufacturer (two). Atrial undersensing secondary to amplifier ringing and quiet timer blanking is an uncommon presentation but may be clinically important in patients with unipolar epicardial atrial leads and high pacing outputs from ventricular leads. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Use of non-quadratic yield surfaces in design of optimal deep-draw blank geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.

    1995-12-01

    Planar anisotropy in the deep-drawing of sheet can lead to the formation of ears in cylindrical cups and to undesirable metal flow in the blankholder in the general case. For design analysis purposes in non-linear finite-element codes, this anisotropy is characterized by the use of an appropriate yield surface which is then implemented into codes such as DYNA3D . The quadratic Hill yield surface offers a relatively straightforward implementation and can be formulated to be invariant to the coordinate system. Non-quadratic yield surfaces can provide more realistic strength or strain increment ratios, but they may not provide invariance and thus demand certain approximations. Forms due to Hosford and Badat et al. have been shown to more accurately address the earning phenomenon. in this work, use is made of these non-quadratic yield surfaces in order to determine the optimal blank shape for cups and other shapes using ferrous and other metal blank materials with planar anisotropy. The analyses are compared to previous experimental studies on non-uniform blank motion due to anisotropy and asymmetric geometry.

  8. Process optimization for particle removal on blank chrome mask plates in preparation for resist application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Stephen; Smith, Eryn; Woster, Eric; Pelayo, Anthony

    2002-03-01

    As integrated circuits require smaller lines to provide the memory and processing capability for tomorrow's marketplace, the photomask industry is adopting higher contrast resists to improve photomask lithography. Photomask yield for several high-contrast resist recipes may be improved by coating masks at the mask shop. When coating at a mask shop, an effective method is available that uses coat/bake cluster tools to ensure blanks are clean prior to coating. Many high-contrast resists are available, and some are more susceptible to time-dependent performance factors than conventional resists. One of these factors is the time between coating and writing. Although future methods may reduce the impact of this factor, one current trend is to reduce this time by coating plates at the mask shop just prior to writing. Establishing an effective process to clean blanks prior to coating is necessary for product quality control and is a new task that is critical for maskmakers who previously purchased mask plates but have decided to begin coating them within their facility. This paper provides a strategy and method to be used within coat/bake cluster tools to remove particle contamination from mask blanks. The process uses excimer-UV ionizing radiation and ozone to remove organic contaminants, and then uses a wet process combined with megasonic agitation, surfactant, and spin forces. Megasonic agitation with surfactant lifts up particles, while the convective outflow of water enhances centripetal shear without accumulating harmful charge.

  9. Maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Patterson, David O.; Gough, Richard A.

    2005-05-03

    A maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system is a system for projecting patterns onto a resist layer on a wafer with feature size down to below 100 nm. The MMRL system operates without a stencil mask. The patterns are generated by switching beamlets on and off from a two electrode blanking system or pattern generator. The pattern generator controllably extracts the beamlet pattern from an ion source and is followed by a beam reduction and acceleration column.

  10. Beam-beam simulations for separated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-04-10

    We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong-strong gaussian code for separated beams for the LHC and RHIC. The frequency spectrum produced by the beam-beam collisions is readily obtained and offers a good opportunity for experimental comparisons. Although our results for the emittance blowup are preliminary, we conclude that, for nominal parameter values, there is no significant difference between separated beams and center-on-center collisions.

  11. Can we still dream when the mind is blank? Sleep and dream mentations in auto-activation deficit.

    PubMed

    Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Uguccioni, Ginevra; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Czernecki, Virginie; Yelnik, Jerome; Dubois, Bruno; Forgeot d'Arc, Baudouin; Grabli, David; Levy, Richard; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2013-10-01

    Bilateral damage to the basal ganglia causes auto-activation deficit, a neuropsychological syndrome characterized by striking apathy, with a loss of self-driven behaviour that is partially reversible with external stimulation. Some patients with auto-activation deficit also experience a mental emptiness, which is defined as an absence of any self-reported thoughts. We asked whether this deficit in spontaneous activation of mental processing may be reversed during REM sleep, when dreaming activity is potentially elicited by bottom-up brainstem stimulation on the cortex. Sleep and video monitoring over two nights and cognitive tests were performed on 13 patients with auto-activation deficit secondary to bilateral striato-pallidal lesions and 13 healthy subjects. Dream mentations were collected from home diaries and after forced awakenings in non-REM and REM sleep. The home diaries were blindly analysed for length, complexity and bizarreness. A mental blank during wakefulness was complete in six patients and partial in one patient. Four (31%) patients with auto-activation deficit (versus 92% of control subjects) reported mentations when awakened from REM sleep, even when they demonstrated a mental blank during the daytime (n = 2). However, the patients' dream reports were infrequent, short, devoid of any bizarre or emotional elements and tended to be less complex than the dream mentations of control subjects. The sleep duration, continuity and stages were similar between the groups, except for a striking absence of sleep spindles in 6 of 13 patients with auto-activation deficit, despite an intact thalamus. The presence of spontaneous dreams in REM sleep in the absence of thoughts during wakefulness in patients with auto-activation deficit supports the idea that simple dream imagery is generated by brainstem stimulation and is sent to the sensory cortex. However, the lack of complexity in these dream mentations suggests that the full dreaming process (scenario

  12. Two new DOSXYZnrc sources for 4D Monte Carlo simulations of continuously variable beam configurations, with applications to RapidArc, VMAT, TomoTherapy and CyberKnife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Julio; Antoniu Popescu, I.

    2010-08-01

    We present two new Monte Carlo sources for the DOSXYZnrc code, which can be used to compute dose distributions due to continuously variable beam configurations. These sources support a continuously rotating gantry and collimator, dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion, variable monitor unit (MU) rate, couch rotation and translation in any direction, arbitrary isocentre motion with respect to the patient and variable source-to-axis distance (SAD). These features make them applicable to Monte Carlo simulations for RapidArc™, Elekta VMAT, TomoTherapy™ and CyberKnife™. Unique to these sources is the synchronization between the motion in the DOSXYZnrc geometry and the motion within the linac head, represented by a shared library (either a BEAMnrc accelerator with dynamic component modules, or an external library). The simulations are achieved in single runs, with no intermediate phase space files.

  13. A numerical study on intended and unintended failure mechanisms in blanking of sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Soyarslan, C.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    Metal-polymer-metal sandwich plates are widely used in the automotive and aerospace industry. As for different applications the sandwich plates can be divided into two types. They are sound-damping laminates with a polymer core much thinner than the metallic faces and low-density laminates with a core thickness of approximately 40-60% of the total thickness. One frequent process step in production of parts made of these plates is the blanking process whose hereditary effects draw the limits of further forming stages or service performance and life; e.g. the failure of the adhesive in the thermoplastic polymer interface affects the sound-damping efficiency intensively. With this motivation, we present FE simulation of an axi-symmetric blanking process of steel/polyethylene/steel sound-damping laminates. The mechanical behavior of the metallic layers was characterized by finite strain rate independent elasto-plasticity where progressive material deterioration and fracture are given account for using continuum damage mechanics (CDM). This material model is made accessible via implementations as VUMAT subroutines for ABAQUS/Explicit. Possible failure of the thermoplastic polymer which may lead to delamination of the metallic layers is modeled using ABAQUS built-in cohesive zone elements. The results show that existing intended and unintended failure modes, e.g. blanking of the metallic and thermoplastic polymer constituents as well as failure of polymer layer under shear and compression, can be effectively studied with the proposed framework for process enhancement. As a future work, a damage coupled nonlinear visco-elastic constitutive model will be devised for the simulation of the thermoplastic layer in low-density laminates.

  14. Cone of Darkness: Finding Blank-sky Positions for Multi-object Wide-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.

    2014-05-01

    We present the Cone of Darkness, an application to automatically configure blank-sky positions for a series of stacked, wide-field observations, such as those carried out by the SAMI instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61 core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical plane at the telescope's prime focus. To make the most efficient use of each plug-plate, several observing fields are typically stacked to produce a single plate. When choosing blank-sky positions for the observations it is most effective to select these such that one set of 26 holes gives valid sky positions for all fields on the plate. However, when carried out manually this selection process is tedious and includes a significant risk of error. The Cone of Darkness software aims to provide uniform blank-sky position coverage over the field of observation, within the limits set by the distribution of target positions and the chosen input catalogs. This will then facilitate the production of the best representative median sky spectrum for use in sky subtraction. The application, written in C++, is configurable, making it usable for a range of instruments. Given the plate characteristics and the positions of target holes, the software segments the unallocated space on the plate and determines the position which best fits the uniform distribution requirement. This position is checked, for each field, against the selected catalog using a TAP ADQL search. The process is then repeated until the desired number of sky positions is attained.

  15. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  16. Aerosol Beam Focused-Laser Induced Plasma Spectrometer (ABF-LIPS) Continuous Emissions Multi-Metals Analyzer. Cost and Performance Report: WP-0213

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Process. ..................................................................... 5 Figure 1-3. Focusing Simulation by Computational Fluid Dynamic ( CFD ...21 Figure 2-8. Sampling location for ABF-LIPS and reference method during September 2005 test on platform prior to baghouse ...Unit CAA Clean Air Act CAAA Clean Air Act Amendments CCD Charge Coupled Device CEMS Continuous Emission Monitoring System CFD Computational Fluid

  17. Enhancing native defect sensitivity for EUV actinic blank inspection: optimized pupil engineering and photon noise study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yow-Gwo; Neureuther, Andrew; Naulleau, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss the impact of optimized pupil engineering and photon noise on native defect sensitivity in EUV actinic blank inspection. Native defects include phase-dominated defects, absorber defects, and defects with a combination of phase and absorption behavior. First, we extend the idea of the Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) method and study the impact of optimum phase shift in the pupil plane on native defect sensitivity, showing a 23% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement compare to bright field (BF) for a phase defect with 20% absorption. We also describe the possibility to increase target defect SNR on target defect sizes at the price of losing the sensitivity on smaller (non-critical) defects. Moreover, we show the advantage of the optimized phase contrast (OZPC) method over BF EUV actinic blank inspection. A single focus scan from OZPC has better inspection efficiency over BF. Second, we make a detailed comparison between the phase contrast with apodization (AZPC) method and dark field (DF) method based on defect sensitivity in the presence of both photon shot noise and camera noise. Performance is compared for a variety of photon levels, mask roughness conditions, and combinations of defect phase and absorption.

  18. Formability of Friction Stir-Welded Blanks with Different Thickness Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolahgar, Sina; Ghaffarpour, Morteza; Habibi, Niloufar; Kokabi, Amir Hossein; Akbarzadeh, Abbas

    2016-05-01

    Welded sheets with different thicknesses are one of the interesting types of tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) that are widely used in metal-forming industries. In the present work, the formability behavior of different 1100-aluminum TWBs was studied. In this regard, the TWBs were made with different thickness ratios by using friction stir welding (FSW) at different welding rotational speeds ( ω). The thickness ratios of 1.0, 1.3, and 1.7 were investigated where the thinner sheets had 1.5 mm thick for all conditions; i.e., the volume of welded material increased when the thickness ratio increased. Macrostructural observations, mechanical investigations, and sheet-forming limit tests were conducted. The results indicate that increasing ω leads to increasing the weld nugget size up to a maximum level and welding became impossible at higher ω. Furthermore, increasing heat input during FSW, the ultimate tensile strength of welds reduced in comparison with the initial cold-worked base metal. However, the ductility improved by increasing the heat input, which produced the sound welds. Formability studies of the friction stir-welded blanks with equal thicknesses have shown that the forming ratio improves up to 2.8 times the base metal. Forming limit curves also illustrate that increasing the thickness ratio of TWB causes the formability ratio to decrease steadily. Thus, when the thickness ratio becomes 1.7, the formability of TWB decreases approximately to the thinnest base metal.

  19. Recycled content sign blanks. Final research report, December 1994-September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Roschke, P.N.; Harrison, B.F.; Benson, F.

    1996-10-01

    This report documents a study of the feasibility of using sign blanks constructed of reclaimed materials instead of conventional high-grade plywood and aluminum. Traditional sign substrates constructed of wood and aluminum currently are not designed according to engineering formulas. Lack of design and analysis procedures integrated with a set of performance specifications has made it difficult to apply results to field tests conducted by various highway departments. This study presents the engineering techniques necessary for judicious use of recycled materials in roadside sign applications. Various types of recycled materials were solicited from commercial manufacturers and subjected to an array of laboratory tests and numerical simulations. Materials that were received were manufactured from variety of materials including high-density polyethylene, polycarbonate, polyvinyl chloride, and calcium carbonate. This study discusses analysis, performance, and properties of tested materials. A total of seven recycled materials are tested in flexure, uni-axial tension, creep, free vibration, and exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Corollaires of this study are development of performance-based specifications and a new design procedure for sign blanks.

  20. Non-specific interference in the measurement of plasma ammonia: importance of using a sample blank.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Daniel Juan; Hutchin, Tim; Fullerton, Donna; Gray, George

    2010-01-01

    Enzymatic assays using glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) to monitor the transformation of NAD(P)H to NAD(P)(+) by a spectrophotometric technique are the most common methods to measure plasma ammonia (PA) in routine laboratories worldwide. However, these assays can potentially be subject to interference by substances in plasma able to oxidize NAD(P)H at a substantial rate, thereby providing falsely high results. To study this potential interference, we spiked a plasma pool with a liver homogenate and measured the ammonia concentration using a dry chemistry system (Vitros 250, Ortho Clinical Diagnostic, Raritan, NJ, USA), an enzymatic assay without a sample blanking step (Infinity Ammonia Liquid Stable Reagent, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, USA) and an enzymatic assay that corrects for the non-specific oxidation of NADPH (Ammonia kit, RANDOX Laboratories Ltd, Crumlin, UK). This experiment shows that the Infinity ammonia reagent kit is subject to a clinically significant interference and explains the discrepancies previously reported between these methods in patients with acute liver failure (ALF). When using enzymatic methods for the assessment of PA, we recommend including a sample blanking correction and this should be mandatory when monitoring patients with ALF.

  1. Technique for rapid at-wavelength inspection of extreme ultraviolet mask blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, S. J.; White, D. L.; Tennant, D. M.; Ocola, L. E.; Novembre, A. E.; Peabody, M. L.; Wood, O. R. II

    1999-11-01

    We have developed two new methods for at-wavelength inspection of mask blanks for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In one method an EUV photoresist is applied directly to a mask blank which is then flood exposed with EUV light and partially developed. In the second method, the photoresist is applied to an EUV transparent membrane that is placed in close proximity to the mask and then exposed and developed. Both reflectivity defects and phase defects alter the exposure of the resist, resulting in mounds of resist at defect sites that can then be located by visual inspection. In the direct application method, a higher contrast resist was shown to increase the height of the mounds, thereby improving the sensitivity of the technique. In the membrane method, a holographic technique was used to reconstruct an image of the mask, revealing the presence of very small defects, approximately 0.2 {mu}m in size. The demonstrated clean transfer of phase and amplitude defects to resist features on a membrane will be important when flagging defects in an automatic inspection tool. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  2. Growth and Printability of Multilayer Phase Defects on EUV MaskBlanks

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ted; Ultanir, Erdem; Zhnag, Guojing; Park, Seh-Jin; Anderson, Erik; Gullikson, Eric; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mirkarimi, Paul; Spiller, Eberhard; Baker, Sherry

    2007-06-10

    The ability to fabricate defect-free mask blanks is a well-recognized challenge in enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) for semiconductor manufacturing. Both the specification and reduction of defects necessitate the understanding of their printability and how they are generated and grow during Mo-Si multilayer (ML) deposition. A ML phase defect can be depicted by its topographical profile on the surface as either a bump or pit, which is then characterized by height or depth and width. The complexity of such seemingly simple phase defects lies in the many ways they can be generated and the difficulties of measuring their physical shape/size and optical effects on printability. An effective way to study phase defects is to use a programmed defect mask (PDM) as 'model' test sample where the defects are produced with controlled growth on a ML blank and accurate placement in varying proximity to absorber patterns on the mask. This paper describes our recent study of ML phase defect printability with resist data from exposures of a ML PDM on the EUV micro-exposure tool (MET, 5X reduction with 0.3NA).

  3. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer warning diagnosis procedure using blank solution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoros, Christine; Salin, Eric D.

    1998-05-01

    Lines available while running a blank solution were used to monitor the analytical performance of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) system in real time. Using H and Ar lines and their signal-to-background ratios (SBRs), simple rules in the form of a prediction table were developed by inspection of the data. These rules could be used for predicting changes in radio-frequency power, carrier gas flow rates, and sample introduction rate. The performance of the prediction table was good but not excellent. Another set of rules in the form of a decision tree was developed in an automated fashion using the C4.5 induction engine. The performance of the decision tree was superior to that of the prediction table. It appears that blank spectral information can be used to predict with over 90% accuracy when an ICP-AES is breaking down. However this is not as definitive at identifying the exact fault as some more exhaustive approaches involving the use of standard solutions.

  4. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  5. A study on blank optimization for blow forming of Inconel 718 to secure formability at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Joon-Tae; Yoon, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Ho-Sung; Youn, Sung-Kie

    2013-12-01

    In this study, thickness profiled blank is designed using optimization technique to get high formability in blow forming of Inconel 718 by equivalent static loads method for non-linear static response structural optimization (ESLSO). When ESLSO is applied, optimization with wide design range is difficult because the effectiveness of equivalent static loads is not valid if there are wide changes in design values. To maximize the design range in ESLSO, move limit scheme is applied during non-linear iteration considering the effectiveness of equivalent static loads. Optimization results show increased formability within limited strain range and possibility of gas forming using non-SPF grade Inconel 718. Free bulging test using blank which has optimized profile is conducted to verify the optimization process. Result is compared with that of numerical analysis in bulged height, deformed shape and thickness and they show good agreement. Verified optimization process is applied to obtain profile of blank thickness for hemi-sphere forming and sandwich structure forming. In hemi-sphere forming, the maximum strain after forming is minimized. Flat blank could not be applied for hemi-sphere forming because of failure caused from local thinning. As a result of optimization, hemi-sphere could be formed without failure. In sandwich structure forming, blank is designed to minimize un-deformed area without failure. Its result shows that sandwich structure can be formed successfully using NON-SPF grade material.

  6. Cartesian beams.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2007-12-01

    A new and very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in Cartesian coordinates is presented. We call such a field a Cartesian beam. The complex amplitude of the Cartesian beams is described by either the parabolic cylinder functions or the confluent hypergeometric functions, and the beams are characterized by three parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integration are studied in detail. Applying the general expression of the Cartesian beams, we also derive two new and meaningful beam structures that, to our knowledge, have not yet been reported in the literature. Special cases of the Cartesian beams are the standard, elegant, and generalized Hermite-Gauss beams, the cosine-Gauss beams, the Lorentz beams, and the fractional order beams.

  7. Construct validity of the Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank with clinic-referred and nonreferred adolescents.

    PubMed

    Weis, Robert; Toolis, Erin E; Cerankosky, Brittany C

    2008-11-01

    We examined the construct validity of the Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank (RISB; Rotter, Lah, & Rafferty, 1992) as a measure of psychological maladjustment in adolescents. In Study 1, we investigated the reliability and convergent and discriminant validity of the RISB with adolescents referred to treatment. In Studies 2 and 3, we examined the RISB's ability to differentiate referred and nonreferred adolescents. The RISB showed adequate interrater reliability and converged with self-reported, parent-reported, and teacher-reported social-emotional and behavioral problems. Criterion-related evidence suggests that the RISB may be useful as a screening measure for adolescents using a 135 or 140 cut score. We provide normative data to facilitate the test's use with adolescents in clinical and research settings.

  8. Feasibility study of transmission of OTV camera control information in the video vertical blanking interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Preston A., III

    1994-01-01

    The Operational Television system at Kennedy Space Center operates hundreds of video cameras, many remotely controllable, in support of the operations at the center. This study was undertaken to determine if commercial NABTS (North American Basic Teletext System) teletext transmission in the vertical blanking interval of the genlock signals distributed to the cameras could be used to send remote control commands to the cameras and the associated pan and tilt platforms. Wavelength division multiplexed fiberoptic links are being installed in the OTV system to obtain RS-250 short-haul quality. It was demonstrated that the NABTS transmission could be sent over the fiberoptic cable plant without excessive video quality degradation and that video cameras could be controlled using NABTS transmissions over multimode fiberoptic paths as long as 1.2 km.

  9. A study of defects on EUV mask using blank inspection, patterned mask inspection, and wafer inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, S.; Ren, L.; Chan, D.; Wurm, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Nakajima, T.; Kishimoto, M.; Ahn, B.; Kang, I.; Park, J.-O.; Cho, K.; Han, S.-I.; Laursen, T.

    2010-03-12

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. yet link data is available for understanding native defects on real masks. In this paper, a full-field EUV mask is fabricated to investigate the printability of various defects on the mask. The printability of defects and identification of their source from mask fabrication to handling were studied using wafer inspection. The printable blank defect density excluding particles and patterns is 0.63 cm{sup 2}. Mask inspection is shown to have better sensitivity than wafer inspection. The sensitivity of wafer inspection must be improved using through-focus analysis and a different wafer stack.

  10. In vitro expansion of mouse primordial germ cell-like cells recapitulates an epigenetic blank slate.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Kazuki; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Nakamura, Tomonori; Yabuta, Yukihiro; Miyauchi, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Takuya; Okuno, Yukiko; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Shirane, Kenjiro; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Mitinori

    2017-07-03

    The expansion of primordial germ cells (PGCs), the precursors for the oocytes and spermatozoa, is a key challenge in reproductive biology/medicine. Using a chemical screening exploiting PGC-like cells (PGCLCs) induced from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we here identify key signaling pathways critical for PGCLC proliferation. We show that the combinatorial application of Forskolin and Rolipram, which stimulate cAMP signaling via different mechanisms, expands PGCLCs up to ~50-fold in culture. The expanded PGCLCs maintain robust capacity for spermatogenesis, rescuing the fertility of infertile mice. Strikingly, during expansion, PGCLCs comprehensively erase their DNA methylome, including parental imprints, in a manner that precisely recapitulates genome-wide DNA demethylation in gonadal germ cells, while essentially maintaining their identity as sexually uncommitted PGCs, apparently through appropriate histone modifications. By establishing a paradigm for PGCLC expansion, our system reconstitutes the epigenetic "blank slate" of the germ line, an immediate precursory state for sexually dimorphic differentiation. © 2017 The Authors.

  11. Metal pins fired from unmodified blank cartridge guns and very small calibre weapons--technical and wound ballistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Rabl, W; Riepert, T; Steinlechner, M

    1998-01-01

    Blank cartridge guns are generally regarded as being harmless and are not considered to be firearms in most countries. A comparison of the legal situations in Germany and Austria concerning weapons is given. There have been several reports of serious injuries and even fatalities due to these weapons. Ballistic experiments show that even unmodified blank cartridge guns and very small calibre weapons can fire wire nails and can inflict potentially fatal injuries even at distances of 50 cm. Two serious injuries inflicted by metal pins fired from a blank cartridge gun and a very small calibre weapon are reported. These cases suggest that such weapons should also be considered handguns in the legal sense.

  12. Seismic Characterization of a Gas Hydrate Chimney Associated with Acoustic Blanking: Pegasus Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrys, S. A.; Fraser, D. R. A.; Gorman, A. R.; Pecher, I. A.; Crutchley, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Pegasus Basin on the east coast of New Zealand's North Island in the southern part of the Hikurangi Margin is a frontier petroleum basin that is also expected to contain significant gas hydrate deposits. Extensive faulting in the basin has lead to the development of many interesting and unique focused accumulations of gas hydrates. A 2D seismic dataset acquired in 2009/2010 was reprocessed to examine the gas hydrate systems within the basin. Here, we present one of the more interesting hydrate features in the dataset: a presumed gas chimney within the regional gas hydrate stability zone at the centre of a roughly triangular (in 2D) region of low reflectivity, approximately 8 km wide, that is interpreted to be the result of acoustic blanking. Using automated high density velocity picking, the chimney structure is interpreted to be cored by a 200 m wide low-velocity zone which contains free gas and is flanked by high-velocity bands that are 200-400 m wide. The high-velocity zone is interpreted to correspond to concentrated hydrate deposits within the sedimentary pore spaces. Amplitude vs offset (AVO) and inversion techniques have been applied and the results of this work correspond well to the high-density velocity analyses. The analysis methods all indicate zones of free gas below the Bottom Simulating Reflection (BSR) and within the chimney. Areas of increased hydrate concentrations, including at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, were also identified. A model for fluid flow and how free gas within the chimney at the centre of the blanking zone is converted to hydrate is discussed. The potential size of the gas hydrate resource present in this feature can be estimated based on the seismic velocities and physical properties determined by inversion.

  13. Backside defect printability for contact layer with different reticle blank material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Holfeld, Christian; Fischer, Daniel; Ackmann, Paul; Holfeld, Andre; Kurth, Karin; Sczyrba, Martin; Hertzsch, Tino; Seltmann, Rolf; Ho, Angeline; GN, Fang H.

    2012-11-01

    Backside defects are out of focus during wafer exposure by the mask thickness and cannot be directly imaged on wafer. However, backside defects will induce transmission variation during wafer exposure. When the size of backside defect is larger than 200 microns, the shadow of such particles will locally change the illumination conditions of the mask patterns and may result in a long range critical dimension (CD) variation on wafer depending on numerical aperture (NA) and pupil shape. Backside defects will affect both wafer CD and critical dimension uniformity (CDU), especially for two-dimensional (2D) structures. This paper focuses on the printability of backside defects on contact layer using annular and quadrupole illumination mode, as well as using different reticle blank material. It also targets for gaining better understanding of critical sizes of backside defects on contact layer for different reticle blanks. We have designed and manufactured two test reticles with repeating patterns of 28nm and 40nm technology node of contact layers. Programmed chrome defects of varying size are placed on the backside opposite to the repeating front side patterns in order to measure the spatial variation of transmission and wafer CD. The test mask was printed on a bare silicon wafer, and the printed features measured for size by spatial sampling. We have investigated two contact layers with different illumination conditions. One is advance binary with single exposure; another is phase shift mask with double exposure. Wafer CD variation for different backside defect sizes are demonstrated for the two contact layers. The comparison between backside defect size with inter-field and intra-field CD variation is also discussed.

  14. Manufacture of Φ1.2m reaction bonded silicon carbide mirror blank CFID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ge; Zhao, Rucheng; Zhao, Wenxing; Bao, Jianxun

    2010-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a new type candidate material for large-scale lightweight space mirror. Its low thermal distortion, high stiffness, fine optical quality and dimensional stability, make SiC an ideal material for large space born telescope. Since ten years Changchun institute optics, fine mechanics and physics (CIOMP) has developed reaction bonded SiC (RB-SiC) technology for space application, and can fabricate RB-SiC mirror with scale less than 1.0 meter for telescope. The green body is prepared with gel-casting method which is an attractive new ceramic forming process for making high-quality, complex-shaped ceramic parts. And then unmolding, drying, binder burning out, reacting bonded, the RB-SiC can be obtained. But with the development of space-born or ground telescope, the scale of primary mirror has exceeded 1.0 meter. So CIOMP has developed an assembly technique which called novel reaction-formed joint technology for larger RB-SiC mirror blank. The steps include joining of green bodies with mixture comprised of SiC particles and phenolic resin etc, firing, machining and sintering. Joining the Φ1.2 meter RB-SiC mirror blank by the novel reaction-formed joint technology. And testing the welding layer's performance, the results show that the thickness of 54-77μm, the microstructure and thermal property can be comparable to the substrate and the mechanical property are excellent in bending strength of 307MPa.

  15. Effect of localized heat treatment on the weld line shift in deep drawing of tailor welded blanks (TWBs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satya Suresh V. V., N.; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash; Ratna Sudheer, G.

    2016-10-01

    This work relates to warm forming of a tailor welded blank (TWB) where in two or more material blanks are welded together and subjected to localized heating before forming to obtain a desired square cup shape. A novel method of selective heating is carried out by using a split punch and a die in which the high strength blank material is subjected to localized heating by the hot punch so as to induce tailored properties by selective heating to soften it thus reducing and controlling the movement of the weld line during forming. TWB sheets which has different thickness/strength need selective heating and cooling to control weld line shift. The stronger material is subjected to localized softening and thereby decreasing the flow stress thus allowing the blank material to flow into the die cavity. Care has been taken so that the heat is not transferred to the weaker blank material otherwise it will lead to further weakening of the part. For this, cooling mechanism is provided by circulating ice water/coolant to the weaker part. The present work is aimed at studying the weld line shift of TWB's of two different materials namely IFHS and DP 590. Cracks appeared in the weld during forming for drawing ratios greater than 1.7. From the results it was found that the weld line shift is considerably reduced as compared with the results using a single punch. Also it was noticed that there is considerable increase in cup height. Local softening increased the formability of the high strength blank material.

  16. Improved EPMA Trace Element Accuracy Using a Matrix Iterated Quantitative Blank Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, J. J.; Wark, D. A.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    At trace element levels below several hundred PPM, accuracy is more often the limiting factor for EPMA quantification rather than precision. Modern EPMA instruments equipped with low noise detectors, counting electronics and large area analyzing crystals can now routinely achieve sensitivities for most elements in the 10 to 100 PPM levels (or even lower). But due to various sample and instrumental artifacts in the x-ray continuum, absolute accuracy is often the limiting factor for ultra trace element quantification. These artifacts have various mechanisms, but are usually attributed to sample artifacts (e.g., sample matrix absorption edges)1, detector artifacts (e.g., Ar or Xe absorption edges) 2 and analyzing crystal artifacts (extended peak tails preventing accurate determination of the true background and ¡§negative peaks¡¨ or ¡§holes¡¨ in the x-ray continuum). The latter being first described3 by Self, et al. and recently documented for the Ti kÑ in quartz geo-thermometer. 4 Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Si () O () Total Average: -.00146 -.00031 -.00180 .00013 .00240 46.7430 53.2563 99.9983 Std Dev: .00069 .00075 .00036 .00190 .00117 .00000 .00168 .00419 The general magnitude of these artifacts can be seen in the above analyses of Ti ka in a synthetic quartz standard. The values for each spectrometer/crystal vary systematically from ¡V18 PPM to + 24 PPM. The exact mechanism for these continuum ¡§holes¡¨ is not known but may be related to secondary lattice diffraction occurring at certain Bragg angles depending on crystal mounting orientation for non-isometric analyzing crystals5. These x-ray continuum artifacts can produce systematic errors at levels up to 100 PPM or more depending on the particular analytical situation. In order to correct for these inaccuracies, a ¡§blank¡¨ correction has been developed that applies a quantitative correction to the measured x-ray intensities during the matrix iteration, by calculating the intensity

  17. Conventional Processing of Standard-Size Edge-Glued Blanks for Furniture and Cabinet Parts: a Feasibility Study

    Treesearch

    Philip A. Araman; Bruce G. Hansen

    1983-01-01

    Manufacturers of furniture and cabinets use more than 2 billion board feet of hardwood lumber annually. As demand intensifies, we will need to utilize more of the abundant lower grade hardwood resource to assure future supplies at reasonable prices. Conventional processing of standard-size hardwood blanks manufactured from log-run red oak lumber, a resource containing...

  18. Blank-Comparison Assessment of Stimulus-Stimulus Relations in Individuals with Mental Retardation: A Methodological Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Richard W.; Wilkinson, Krista M.; McIlvane, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments illustrate using blank-comparison matching to sample with adolescents with mental retardation. In the first experiment, the method was used to explore bases for emergent symbolic mapping performances. In the second, similarity judgments between form stimuli were assessed. Both experiments confirmed the feasibility and utility of…

  19. Production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR mirror blank for the Advanced Technology Solar telescope (ATST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Werner, Thomas; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope in the world. It is currently being built by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in a height of 3000 m above sea level on the mountain Haleakala of Maui, Hawaii. The primary mirror blank of diameter 4.26 m is made of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® of SCHOTT AG Advanced Optics. The DKIST primary mirror design is extremely challenging. With a mirror thickness of only 78 to 85 mm it is the smallest thickness ever machined on a mirror of 4.26 m in diameter. Additionally the glassy ZERODUR® casting is one of the largest in size ever produced for a 4 m class ZERODUR® mirror blank. The off axis aspherical mirror surface required sophisticated grinding procedures to achieve the specified geometrical tolerance. The small thickness of about 80 mm required special measures during processing, lifting and transport. Additionally acid etch treatment was applied to the convex back-surface and the conical shaped outer diameter surface to improve the strength of the blank. This paper reports on the challenging tasks and the achievements on the material property and dimensional specification parameter during the production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR® primary mirror blank for AURA.

  20. Testing the Reliability of Delay Discounting of Ten Commodities Using the Fill-in-the-Blank Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Derenne, Adam; Terrell, Heather K.

    2011-01-01

    Several measures of delay discounting have been shown to be reliable over periods of up to 3 months. In the present study, 115 participants completed a fill-in-the-blank (FITB) delay-discounting task on sets of 5 different commodities, 12 weeks apart. Results showed that discounting rates were not well described by a hyperbolic function but were…

  1. The Use of Application Blanks as Pre-Screening Devices in Employee Selection: An Assessment of Practices in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeson, Paul V.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a study of the use of employment application blanks as prescreening devices in public school employee selection. Findings suggest two major areas for further research. The first relates to legal compliance with Equal Opportunity Employment guidelines. The second concerns information relevancy to personnel selection. (JAM)

  2. Design of Channel Type Indirect Blank Holder for Prevention of Wrinkling and Fracture in Hot Stamping Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hong-seok; Ha, Se-yoon; Cha, Seung-hoon; kang, Chung-gil; Kim, Byung-min

    2011-08-01

    The hot stamping process has been used in the automotive industry to reduce the weight of the body-in-white and to increase passenger safety via improved crashworthiness. In this study, a new form die with a simple structure that can prevent defects such as wrinkle and fracture is proposed for the manufacture of hot stamped components. The wrinkling at the flange cannot be eliminated when using a conventional form die. It is known that the initiation of wrinkling is influenced by many factors such as the mechanical properties of the sheet material, geometry of the sheet and tool, and other process parameters, including the blank holding force (BHF) and the contact conditions. In this research, channel type indirect blank holder (CIBH) is introduced to replace general blank holder for manufacturing the hot stamped center pillar. First, we investigate the tension force acting on the blank according to the channel shapes. We determine the appropriate range by comparing the tension force with the upper and lower BHFs in a conventional stamping process. We then use FE-analysis to study the influence of the slope angle and corner radius of the channel on the formability. Finally, the center pillar is manufactured using the form die with the selected channel.

  3. Summary and evaluation of pesticides in field blanks collected for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Jeffrey D.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Schertz, Terry L.

    1999-01-01

    Field blanks did show evidence of contamination by some pesticides. Most of the pesticides detected in field blanks, however, were detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in environmental water samples. Two criteria were used to evaluate the need to consider contamination in water-quality assessments: (1) a ratio of the frequency of pesticide detection in environmental water samples to the frequency of detection in field blanks of 5.0 or less and (2) a ratio of the median concentration detected in environmental water samples to the maximum concentration detected in field blanks of 2.0 or less. These criteria indicate that contamination, for the majority of the pesticide data collected for the NAWQA Program, probably does not need to be considered in the analysis and interpretation of (1) the frequency of pesticide detection or (2) the median concentration of pesticides detected. Contamination must be considered, however, in detection frequency for cispermethrin, pronamide, p,p' -DDE, pebulate, propargite, ethalfluralin, and triallate in surface water and fenuron, benfluralin, pronamide, cis-permethrin, triallate, chlorpyrifos, trifluralin, propanil, p,p' -DDE, bromacil, dacthal, diazinon, and diuron in ground water. Contamination also must be considered in median concentrations detected for pronamide, p,p' -DDE, propargite, napropamide, and triallate in surface water and benfluralin, cis-permethrin, triallate, chlorpyrifos, trifluralin, p,p' -DDE, dacthal, and diazinon in ground water.

  4. Testing the Reliability of Delay Discounting of Ten Commodities Using the Fill-in-the-Blank Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Derenne, Adam; Terrell, Heather K.

    2011-01-01

    Several measures of delay discounting have been shown to be reliable over periods of up to 3 months. In the present study, 115 participants completed a fill-in-the-blank (FITB) delay-discounting task on sets of 5 different commodities, 12 weeks apart. Results showed that discounting rates were not well described by a hyperbolic function but were…

  5. Ion Beam Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Ion Beam Propulsion Study was a joint high-level study between the Applied Physics Laboratory operated by NASA and ASRC Aerospace at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Berkeley Scientific, Berkeley, California. The results were promising and suggested that work should continue if future funding becomes available. The application of ion thrusters for spacecraft propulsion is limited to quite modest ion sources with similarly modest ion beam parameters because of the mass penalty associated with the ion source and its power supply system. Also, the ion source technology has not been able to provide very high-power ion beams. Small ion beam propulsion systems were used with considerable success. Ion propulsion systems brought into practice use an onboard ion source to form an energetic ion beam, typically Xe+ ions, as the propellant. Such systems were used for steering and correction of telecommunication satellites and as the main thruster for the Deep Space 1 demonstration mission. In recent years, "giant" ion sources were developed for the controlled-fusion research effort worldwide, with beam parameters many orders of magnitude greater than the tiny ones of conventional space thruster application. The advent of such huge ion beam sources and the need for advanced propulsion systems for exploration of the solar system suggest a fresh look at ion beam propulsion, now with the giant fusion sources in mind.

  6. Delineating the construct network of the Personnel Reaction Blank: associations with externalizing tendencies and normal personality.

    PubMed

    Blonigen, Daniel M; Patrick, Christopher J; Gasperi, Marianna; Steffen, Benjamin; Ones, Deniz S; Arvey, Richard D; Baumgartl, Viviane de Oliveira; do Nascimento, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Integrity testing has long been utilized in personnel selection to screen for tendencies toward counterproductive workplace behaviors. The construct of externalizing from the psychopathology literature represents a coherent spectrum marked by disinhibitory traits and behaviors. The present study drew on a sample of male and female undergraduates to examine the construct network of the Personnel Reaction Blank (PRB; H. G. Gough, R. D. Arvey, & P. Bradley, 2004), a measure of integrity, in relation to externalizing as well as normal-range personality constructs assessed by the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ; A. Tellegen & N. G. Waller, 2008). Results revealed moderate to strong associations between several PRB scales and externalizing, which were largely accounted for by MPQ traits subsumed by Negative Emotionality and Constraint. After accounting for MPQ traits in the prediction of externalizing, a modest predictive increment was achieved when adding the PRB scales, particularly biographical indicators from the Prosocial Background subscale. The findings highlight externalizing as a focal criterion for scale development in the integrity testing literature and help delineate the construct network of the PRB within the domains of personality and psychopathology.

  7. Estimation of the noise contributions from blank, transmission and emission scans in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, S.; Jensen, M.; Toft, P.

    1996-08-01

    This work determines the relative importance of noise from blank (B), transmission (T) and emission (E) scans in PET using a GE Advance scanner on a 20 cm cylinder, a brain phantom, and a torso-like ellipse (18/35 cm) with examples of human scans (brain O-15 water and F-18 FDG, heart FDG). Phantom E scans were acquired in both 2D and 3D modes as decay series with C-11 or F-18 over 3--6 decades of Noise Equivalent Counts (NEC). B and T scans were made using two pin sources ({approx} 500 MBq total) over 64-32768 sec. In humans only a limited subset was available. In homogeneous phantoms normalized variance (var) was estimated from pixel distributions in single images. In other objects, including the human studies, calculations were performed on differences of paired images. In all cases a fit was made to a simple noise model. The cylinder data show expected relations of T to B noise proving the adequacy of B scan times {le} 20 min for most purposes. For the brain phantom, a contour plot is provided for var (E,T). In a typical 3D O-15 water study with 0.5 M counts per central slice, a 10 min T-scan adds less than 10% to the total noise level. An example shows how to split a total scan time between E and T scans, in order to minimize the variance.

  8. Delineating the Construct Network of the Personnel Reaction Blank: Associations with Externalizing Tendencies and Normal Personality

    PubMed Central

    Blonigen, Daniel M.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Gasperi, Marianna; Steffen, Benjamin; Ones, Deniz S.; Arvey, Richard D.; de Oliveira Baumgartl, Viviane; do Nascimento, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Integrity testing has long been utilized in personnel selection to screen for tendencies toward counterproductive workplace behaviors. The construct of externalizing from the psychopathology literature represents a coherent spectrum marked by disinhibitory traits and behaviors. The present study used a sample of male and female undergraduates to examine the construct network of the Personnel Reaction Blank (PRB; Gough, Arvey, & Bradley, 2004), a measure of integrity, in relation to externalizing as well as normal-range personality constructs assessed by the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ; Tellegen & Waller, 2008). Results revealed moderate to strong associations between several PRB scales and externalizing, which were largely accounted for by MPQ traits subsumed by Negative Emotionality and Constraint. After accounting for MPQ traits in the prediction of externalizing, a modest predictive increment was achieved when adding the PRB scales, particularly biographical indicators from the Prosocial Background subscale. The findings highlight externalizing as a focal criterion for scale development in the integrity testing literature, and help delineate the construct network of the PRB within the domains of personality and psychopathology. PMID:21171783

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigation of thickness ratio effect on the formability of tailor welded blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdarian Korouyeh, R.; Moslemi Naeini, H.; Torkamany, M. J.; Liaghat, Gh.

    2013-10-01

    The influence of thickness ratio (TR) on the formability and forming limit diagram (FLD) of tailor welded blanks (TWB) obtained by pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of St12 steel sheets are studied. Steel sheets with thicknesses of 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0 mm were combined to form TWBs of different thickness ratios of 2 (1.0/0.5 mm), 1.6 (0.8/0.5 mm) and 1.25 (1.0/0.8 mm). Limit thickness ratio (LTR) is introduced as a new useful factor for prediction of forming limit of TWB. Results of this research show that by increasing the difference of thickness ratio of TWB and LTR, formability and the level of FLD will decrease. In addition, effects of thickness ratio of TWB on the punch's load-displacement, limit dome height (LDH) and weld line movement are studied. By increasing the thickness ratio, the LDH decreases and some defects such as weld line movement and wrinkling increase. The experimental findings of this study show that the thickness ratio of TWB can effect on the position of fracture in TWB products.

  10. Engineering multiple biological functional motifs into a blank collagen-like protein template from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong Y; Stoichevska, Violet; Schacht, Kristin; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2014-07-01

    Bacterially derived triple-helical, collagen-like proteins are attractive as potential biomedical materials. The collagen-like domain of the Scl2 protein from S. pyogenes lacks any specific binding sites for mammalian cells yet possesses the inherent structural integrity of the collagen triple-helix of animal collagens. It can, therefore, be considered as a structurally-stable "blank slate" into which various defined, biological sequences, derived from animal collagens, can be added by substitutions or insertions, to enable production of novel designed materials to fit specific functional requirements. In the present study, we have used site directed mutagenesis to substitute two functional sequences, one for heparin binding and the other for integrin binding, into different locations in the triple-helical structure. This provided three new constructs, two containing the single substitutions and one containing both substitutions. The stability of these constructs was marginally reduced when compared to the unmodified sequence. When compared to the unmodified bacterial collagen, both the modified collagens that contain the heparin binding site showed marked binding of fluorescently labeled heparin. Similarly, the modified collagens from both constructs containing the integrin binding site showed significant adhesion of L929 cells that are known to possess the appropriate integrin receptor. C2C12 cells that lack any appropriate integrins did not bind. These data show that bacterial collagen-like sequences can be modified to act like natural extracellular matrix collagens by inserting one or more unique biological domains with defined function.

  11. Temperature Distribution in Teeth and Blanks of Ultra-High-Speed Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozaki, Yasuyoshi; Matsumoto, Susumu; Fukutomi, Masatoshi

    Currently in industries, high-speed turbo machineries such as compressors and steam or gas turbines are required to have increased power capacities. Due to this, a large gear size is required which leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. As the result of nonuniform temperature distribution, nonuniform thermal distortion occurs. Change in load distribution due to this thermal distortion is considered to be closely related to scoring and pitting failures. In order to ensure reliability of high-speed gear units, it is necessary to improve the following techniques. (1) The method of predicting the temperature rise of gears and thermal distortion. (2) Tooth correction against thermal distortion. In this paper, a three-dimensional model for calculating the temperature of teeth surfaces and blanks is presented. This model includes the effects of convective cooling by lubricating oil and the change in load distribution due to mechanical deformation. The calculated results of gear teeth temperature and bending stress are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. It is confirmed that the analytical method is practical and useful.

  12. Mars 2007 Phoenix Scout mission Organic Free Blank: Method to distinguish Mars organics from terrestrial organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Woida, R.; Sutter, B.; Lauer, H. V.; Shinohara, C.; Golden, D. C.; Boynton, W. V.; Arvidson, R. E.; Stewart, R. L.; Tamppari, L. K.; Gross, M.; Smith, P.

    2008-10-01

    The Organic Free Blank (OFB) for the Mars 2007 Phoenix Scout mission provides an organic carbon null sample to compare against possible Martian organic signatures obtained by the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA). Major OFB requirements are an organic carbon content of <=10 ng C g-1 of sample, a nonporous structure, and strength and integrity that permits machining by the Robotic Arm (RA) Icy Soil Acquisition Device (ISAD). A specially fabricated form of commercial Macor™ (a machinable glass ceramic), made with nitrate salts replacing carbonate salts, was selected as the OFB material. The OFB has a total inorganic carbon content of approximately 1.6 μg C g-1 after fabrication, cleaning, and heat treatment in oxygen gas at 550°C. The detection limit for organic carbon is ~100 ng C g-1 of sample, or about a factor of 10 higher than the design goal. One scenario for OFB use on Mars is subsequent to the first TEGA detection of organic carbon. The OFB sample, acquired by the RA ISAD and delivered to TEGA, would come in contact with all surfaces in the sample transfer chain, collecting residual terrestrial contamination that accompanied the spacecraft to Mars. A second sample of the putative Martian organic-bearing material would then be obtained and analyzed by TEGA. Different organic contents and/or different mass spectrometer fragmentation patterns between the OFB material and the two Martian samples would indicate that the detected organic carbon is indigenous to Mars.

  13. Spatial biases during mental arithmetic: evidence from eye movements on a blank screen.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Matthias; Mast, Fred W; Fischer, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    While the influence of spatial-numerical associations in number categorization tasks has been well established, their role in mental arithmetic is less clear. It has been hypothesized that mental addition leads to rightward and upward shifts of spatial attention (along the "mental number line"), whereas subtraction leads to leftward and downward shifts. We addressed this hypothesis by analyzing spontaneous eye movements during mental arithmetic. Participants solved verbally presented arithmetic problems (e.g., 2 + 7, 8-3) aloud while looking at a blank screen. We found that eye movements reflected spatial biases in the ongoing mental operation: Gaze position shifted more upward when participants solved addition compared to subtraction problems, and the horizontal gaze position was partly determined by the magnitude of the operands. Interestingly, the difference between addition and subtraction trials was driven by the operator (plus vs. minus) but was not influenced by the computational process. Thus, our results do not support the idea of a mental movement toward the solution during arithmetic but indicate a semantic association between operation and space.

  14. Spatial biases during mental arithmetic: evidence from eye movements on a blank screen

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Matthias; Mast, Fred W.; Fischer, Martin H.

    2014-01-01

    While the influence of spatial-numerical associations in number categorization tasks has been well established, their role in mental arithmetic is less clear. It has been hypothesized that mental addition leads to rightward and upward shifts of spatial attention (along the “mental number line”), whereas subtraction leads to leftward and downward shifts. We addressed this hypothesis by analyzing spontaneous eye movements during mental arithmetic. Participants solved verbally presented arithmetic problems (e.g., 2 + 7, 8–3) aloud while looking at a blank screen. We found that eye movements reflected spatial biases in the ongoing mental operation: Gaze position shifted more upward when participants solved addition compared to subtraction problems, and the horizontal gaze position was partly determined by the magnitude of the operands. Interestingly, the difference between addition and subtraction trials was driven by the operator (plus vs. minus) but was not influenced by the computational process. Thus, our results do not support the idea of a mental movement toward the solution during arithmetic but indicate a semantic association between operation and space. PMID:25657635

  15. Evaluation of the Capability of a Multibeam Confocal Inspection System for Inspection of EUVL Mask Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stivers, Alan R.; Liang, Ted; Penn, Michael J.; Lieberman, Barry; Shelden, Gilbert V.; Folta, James A.; Larson, Cindy C.; Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Walton, Christopher C.; Gulliksong, Eric M.; Yi, Moonsuk

    2002-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer defects (phase defects) are a defect type unique to extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) masks. A manufacturable inspection capability for these defects is key to the success of EUV lithography. Simulations of EUV scattering from multilayer defects suggest that defect printability is related to the phase error induced by the defect, which is in turn strongly coupled to the size of a multilayer surface protrusion or intrusion. We can adopt a strategy of measuring the multilayer surface to detect phase defects. During the past year a working group composed of members of Intel Corporation, Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and International Sematech searched for a commercial tool for EUVL mask substrate and blank inspection. This working group established the tool requirements, methodologies for tool evaluation, collected data and recommended a supplier for further development with International Sematech. We collected data from several vendors and found that a multibeam confocal inspection (MCI) system had a capability significantly better than the tools used today. We will present our strategy, requirements, methodologies and results. We will discuss in detail our unique programmed substrate and multilayer defect masks used to support the tool selection, including their actinic characterization. We will present data that quantifies the inspection capability of the MCI system.

  16. Microstructure-Texture-Mechanical Properties in Hot Rolling of a Centrifugal Casting Ring Blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fang-cheng; Li, Yong-tang; Qi, Hui-ping; Ju, Li

    2016-03-01

    Deformation characteristic of centrifugal casting 25Mn steel was investigated by compression tests, and then processing maps were established. According to the deformation parameters identified from the established processing maps and hot ring rolling (HRR) process, the industrial test for the 25Mn ring blank was performed. Optical microscope (OM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were used for detecting grain boundary features and textures of deformation structures. The morphologies and mechanisms of tensile and impact fracture were revealed. The results show that softening effect plays a dominant role in higher temperatures of 1050-1150 °C and strain rates lower than 0.1 s-1. The average grain size of the rolled 25Mn ring is about 28 μm, but the grains are more coarse and inhomogeneous on the middle layer than that on rest of the areas. The texture on the outer layer is characterized by strong {110} <112> and weak {112} <111>, followed by {001} <100> and {001} <110> on the inner layer and {110} <110> on the center layer, which is mainly associated with the shear deformation. The rolled ring with precise geometrical dimensions and sound mechanical properties is fabricated by HRR. Tensile fracture is composed of clear river-shaped pattern and a little dimple near the inner layer and outer layer, and the fracture mechanism is mainly quasi-cleavage fracture, accompanied by dimple fracture. The morphologies of impact fracture consist of tear ridge and cleavage platform.

  17. Measurement and analysis of internal loss and injection efficiency for continuous-wave blue semipolar ( 20 2 ¯ 1 ¯ ) III-nitride laser diodes with chemically assisted ion beam etched facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Daniel L.; Kuritzky, Leah Y.; Nedy, Joseph; Saud Abbas, Arwa; Pourhashemi, Arash; Farrell, Robert M.; Cohen, Daniel A.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji

    2016-02-01

    Continuous-wave blue semipolar ( 20 2 ¯ 1 ¯ ) III-nitride laser diodes were fabricated with highly vertical, smooth, and uniform mirror facets produced by chemically assisted ion beam etching. Uniform mirror facets are a requirement for accurate experimental determination of internal laser parameters, including internal loss and injection efficiency, which were determined to be 9 cm-1 and 73%, respectively, using the cavity length dependent method. The cavity length of the uncoated devices was varied from 900 μm to 1800 μm, with threshold current densities ranging from 3 kA/cm2 to 9 kA/cm2 and threshold voltages ranging from 5.5 V to 7 V. The experimentally determined internal loss was found to be in good agreement with a calculated value of 9.5 cm-1 using a 1D mode solver. The loss in each layer was calculated and in light of the analysis several modifications to the laser design are proposed.

  18. Technology and experiments of 42CrMo bearing ring forming based on casting ring blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongtang; Ju, Li; Qi, Huiping; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Guozhen; Wang, Mingli

    2014-03-01

    Bearing ring is the crucial component of bearing. With regard to such problems as material waste, low efficiency and high energy consumption in current process of producing large bearing ring, a new process named "casting-rolling compound forming technology" is researched by taking the typical 42CrMo slew bearing as object. Through theoretical analysis, the design criteria of the main casting-rolling forming parameters are put forward at first. Then the constitutive relationship model of as-cast 42CrMo steel and its mathematical model of dynamic recrystallization are obtained according to the results of the hot compression experiment. By a coupled thermal-mechanical finite element model for radial-axial rolling of bearing ring, the fraction of dynamic recrystallization is calculated and recrystallized grains size are predicated. Meanwhile, the effects of the initial rolling temperature and feed rate of idle roll on material microstructure evolution are analyzed. Finally, the industrial rolling experiment is designed and performed, based on the simulation results. In addition, mechanical and metallographic tests are conducted on rolled bearing ring to get the mechanical parameters and metallographic structure. The experimental data and results show that the mechanical properties of bearing ring produced by casting-rolling compound forming technology are up to industrial standard, and a qualified bearing ring can be successfully formed by employing this new technology. Through the study, a process of forming large bearing ring directly by using casting ring blank is obtained, which could provide an effective theoretical guidance for manufacturing large ring parts. It also has an edge in saving material, lowering energy and improving efficiency.

  19. Growth of BaSi2 continuous films on Ge(111) by molecular beam epitaxy and fabrication of p-BaSi2/n-Ge heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Ryota; Yachi, Suguru; Tsukahara, Daichi; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi

    2017-05-01

    We grew BaSi2 films on Ge(111) substrates by various growth methods based on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). First, we attempted to form BaSi2 films directly on Ge(111) by MBE without templates. We next formed BaSi2 films using BaGe2 templates as commonly used for MBE growth of BaSi2 on Si substrates. Contrary to our prediction, the lateral growth of BaSi2 was not promoted by these two methods; BaSi2 formed not into a continuous film but into islands. Although streaky patterns of reflection high-energy electron diffraction were observed inside the growth chamber, no X-ray diffraction lines of BaSi2 were observed in samples taken out from the growth chamber. Such BaSi2 islands were easily to get oxidized. We finally attempted to form a continuous BaSi2 template layer on Ge(111) by solid phase epitaxy, that is, the deposition of amorphous Ba-Si layers onto MBE-grown BaSi2 epitaxial islands, followed by post annealing. We achieved the formation of an approximately 5-nm-thick BaSi2 continuous layer by this method. Using this BaSi2 layer as a template, we succeeded in forming a-axis-oriented 520-nm-thick BaSi2 epitaxial films on Ge substrates, although (111)-oriented Si grains were included in the grown layer. We next formed a B-doped p-BaSi2(20 nm)/n-Ge(111) heterojunction solar cell. A wide-spectrum response from 400 to 2000 nm was achieved. At an external bias voltage of 1 V, the external quantum efficiency reached as high as 60%, demonstrating the great potential of BaSi2/Ge combination. However, the efficiency of a solar cell under AM1.5 illumination was quite low (0.1%). The origin of such a low efficiency was examined.

  20. Improved tumor targeting and antitumor activity of camptothecin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles by preinjection of blank solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong-Jin; Moon, Cheol; Oh, Euichaul

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to enhance the in vivo antitumor effects of camptothecin (CPT), a strong antitumor agent whose delivery is limited by poor aqueous solubility and instability of the active lactone form. CPT was loaded into sterically stabilized, solid lipid nanoparticles (CPT-SLNs) formulated for intravenous administration. The influence of preinjected blank SLNs on the tumor targeting, pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity of CPT-SLNs was investigated. The CPT-SLNs composed of trilaurin-based lipid matrix containing poloxamer188 and pegylated phospholipid as stabilizers were prepared by hot homogenization method and evaluated for in vitro characteristics and in vivo performance. The CPT-SLNs showed an in vitro long-term sustained release pattern and effectively protected the CPT lactone form from hydrolysis under physiological conditions. Notable tumor targeting and tumor growth inhibition were observed after intravenous administration of CPT-SLNs to mice with subcutaneous transplants of CT26 carcinoma cells. In pharmacokinetic studies in rats, CPT-SLNs markedly elevated plasma CPT level and prolonged blood circulation compared to free CPT. Nonetheless, high uptake of CPT-SLNs by reticuloendothelial system (RES)-rich tissues resulted in limited tumor targeting of CPT-SLNs and plasma CPT levels. Preinjection of blank SLNs before administration of CPT-SLNs to tumor-bearing mice substantially reduced the accumulation of CPT-SLNs in RES organs. This led to significantly enhanced tumor targeting, improved pharmacokinetic parameters and increased antitumor efficacy of CPT-SLNs. These results suggested that the in vivo antitumor effects of CPT-SLNs could be further enhanced by preinjection of blank SLNs. Therefore, CPT-SLNs with preinjected blank SLNs could be a potential approach for stable and effective CPT-based cancer therapy.

  1. Rapid, automated measurement of layer thicknesses on steel coin blanks using laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy depth profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Asimellis, George; Giannoudakos, Aggelos; Kompitsas, Michael

    2007-02-20

    We report application of a near-real-time method to determine layer thickness on electroplated coin blanks. The method was developed on a simple laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) arrangement by monitoring relative emission-line intensities from key probe elements via successive laser ablation shots. This is a unique LIBS application where no other current spectroscopic method (inductively coupled plasma or x-ray fluorescence) can be applied effectively. Method development is discussed, and results with precalibrated coins are presented.

  2. System 6 used to make kitchen cabinet C2F blanks from small-diameter, low-grade red oak

    Treesearch

    Hugh W. Reynolds; Philip A. Araman; Charles J. Gatchell; Bruce G. Hansen

    1983-01-01

    Hardwood dimension manufacturers can make profitable use of plentiful small-diameter, low-grade timber when System 6 technology is used. We describe a System 6 plant designed to make clear-two-face (C2F) blanks for the kitchen cabinet industry. Data for plant operation are taken from a study in which red oak bolts (from a reforestation clearcut) were used to make 33-,...

  3. Recycled Paper Beam Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Kristin; Tabacchi, Jo

    2011-01-01

    As art department budgets across the country continue to shrink, art teachers are increasingly on the lookout for inexpensive materials that can be used to teach a range of concepts. In this article, the authors describe a newspaper beam tower project inspired by the book, "The Wonderful Towers of Watts" by Patricia Zelver. There are many more…

  4. Recycled Paper Beam Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Kristin; Tabacchi, Jo

    2011-01-01

    As art department budgets across the country continue to shrink, art teachers are increasingly on the lookout for inexpensive materials that can be used to teach a range of concepts. In this article, the authors describe a newspaper beam tower project inspired by the book, "The Wonderful Towers of Watts" by Patricia Zelver. There are many more…

  5. Evaluating the blank contamination and recovery of sample pretreatment procedures for analyzing organophosphorus flame retardants in waters.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kang; Niu, Yumin; Yin, Yongguang; Liu, Jingfu

    2015-08-01

    Organophosphate esters (OPEs), used as flame retardants and plasticizers, are widely present in environmental waters. Development of accurate determination methods for trace OPEs in water is urgent for understanding the fate and risk of this class of emerging pollutants. However, the wide use of OPEs in experimental materials results in blank interference, which influences the accuracy of analytical results. In the present work, blank contamination and recovery of pretreatment procedures for analysis of OPEs in water samples were systematically examined for the first time. Blank contaminations were observed in filtration membranes, glass bottles, solid phase extraction cartridges, and nitrogen blowing instruments. These contaminations could be as high as 6.4-64ng/L per treatment. Different kinds of membranes were compared in terms of contamination levels left after common glassware cleaning, and a special wash procedure was proposed to eliminate the contamination from membranes. Meanwhile, adsorption of highly hydrophobic OPEs on the inside wall of glass bottles was found to be 42.4%-86.1%, which was the primary cause of low recoveries and was significantly reduced by an additional washing step with acetonitrile. This work is expected to provide guidelines for the establishment of analysis methods for OPEs in aqueous samples.

  6. Impact of the phase defect structure on an actinic dark-field blank inspection signal and wafer printability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Tsuyoshi; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Terasawa, Tsuneo

    2013-04-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography, reducing the number of phase defects (PDs) on mask blanks is a critical issue because the PDs cause degradation of the printed pattern quality. To minimize the number of printable PDs, covering PDs beneath an absorber pattern is an effective way of addressing the problem. Therefore it becomes necessary to detect the PDs and pinpoint their locations by a blank inspector. In this work, a three-dimensional analysis of PDs has revealed that some PDs can grow and propagate in an angular direction away from the normal to the substrate surface. The impact of the inclination angle on the printing performance was evaluated by calculating printed pattern images using a simulator. A PD with an inclination angle of 1 deg corresponds to a 1-nanometer positional shift compared with a position defined as surface topography of a defect as observed by an atomic force microscope or by some nonactinic defect inspector. However, an actinic blank inspection (ABI) tool with high-magnification optics can pinpoint the actual location of the PDs. Covering a PD under an absorber pattern, by a shifting of the pattern based on the information of the PD's location obtained by the ABI tool, works quite well.

  7. [The possibility of forensic medical assessment of the damage to clothes caused by a blank shots with the MP-79-9TM pistol].

    PubMed

    Kutsenko, K I; Makarov, I Iu

    2013-01-01

    The authors undertook an analysis of constructional features of standard blank and non-lethal cartridges for the MP-79-9TM pistol. The composition of gunshot products and the maximum distance over which they propagate have been determined. Special attention is given to the peculiarities of the damage caused to the target cloths (cotton and woolen) by blank rounds shot from different distances. A new chemical method was used for the first time to detect the particles of gunpowder on the victim's cloth; the possibility of its application for differential diagnostics of gunshot damages inflicted by blank and traumatic cartridges affected from different distances was estimated.

  8. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Electrostatic collection of a high resistivity aerosol using the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) collecting section was demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarter Five). Collection efficiency experiments were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. The reason for doing this was to attempt to improve upon the collection efficiency of the precipitator alone when testing with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. From the collector shakedown runs, a set of suitable operational parameters were determined for the downstream electrostatic collecting sections of the Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. These parameters, along with those for the MINACC electron beam, will generally be held constant while the numerous precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electrostatic collector experiments were part of a larger, comprehensive investigation on electron beam precharging of high resistivity aerosol particles performed during the period covered by Quarters Five, Six, and Seven. This body of work used the same experimental apparatus and procedures and the experimental run period lasted nearly continuously for six months. A summary of the Quarter Five work is presented in the following paragraphs. Section II-A of TPR 5 contains a report on the continuing effort which was expended on the modification and upgrade of the pulsed power supply and the monitoring systems prior to the initiation of the electron beam precharging experimental work.

  9. Beam-energy inequality in the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Siemann, R. )

    1990-03-01

    Conditions for energy transparency,'' unequal-energy beams having the same beam-beam behavior, are derived for round beams from a Hamiltonian model of the beam-beam interaction. These conditions are equal fractional betatron tunes, equal synchrotron tunes, equal beam-beam strength parameters, equal nominal sizes, equal {beta}{sup *}'s and equal bunch lengths. With these conditions the only way to compensate for unequal energies is with the number of particles per bunch.

  10. Electron Beam Diagnostics in Plasmas Based on Electron Beam Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Darrin; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Blackwell, David; Walton, Scott; Murphy, Donald; Fernsler, Richard; Meger, Robert

    2001-10-01

    Over the last few years, electron beam ionization has been shown to be a viable generator of high density plasmas with numerous applications in materials modification. To better understand these plasmas, we have fielded electron beam diagnostics to more clearly understand the propagation of the beam as it travels through the background gas and creates the plasma. These diagnostics vary greatly in sophistication, ranging from differentially pumped systems with energy selective elements to metal 'hockey pucks' covered with thin layers of insulation to electrically isolate the detector from the plasma but pass high energy beam electrons. Most importantly, absolute measurements of spatially resolved beam current densities are measured in a variety of pulsed and continuous beam sources. The energy distribution of the beam current(s) will be further discussed, through experiments incorporating various energy resolving elements such as simple grids and more sophisticated cylindrical lens geometries. The results are compared with other experiments of high energy electron beams through gases and appropriate disparities and caveats will be discussed. Finally, plasma parameters are correlated to the measured beam parameters for a more global picture of electron beam produced plasmas.

  11. Composite beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poveromo, L. M.; Muench, W. K.; Marx, W.; Lubin, G.

    1981-01-01

    The building block approach to large space structures is discussed, and the progress made in constructing aluminum beams is noted. It is pointed out that composites will also be required in space structures because they provide minimal distortion characteristics during thermal transients. A composite beam builder currently under development is discussed, with attention given to cap forming and the fastening of cross-braces. The various composite materials being considered are listed, along with certain of their properties. The need to develop continuous forming stock up to 300 m long is stressed.

  12. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device.

  13. Unraveling the Earthquake History of the Denali Fault System, Alaska: Filling a Blank Canvas With Paleoearthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. P.; Haeussler, P. J.; Seitz, G. G.; Dawson, T. E.; Stenner, H. D.; Matmon, A.; Crone, A. J.; Personius, S.; Burns, P. B.; Cadena, A.; Thoms, E.

    2005-12-01

    Developing accurate rupture histories of long, high-slip-rate strike-slip faults is is especially challenging where recurrence is relatively short (hundreds of years), adjacent segments may fail within decades of each other, and uncertainties in dating can be as large as, or larger than, the time between events. The Denali Fault system (DFS) is the major active structure of interior Alaska, but received little study since pioneering fault investigations in the early 1970s. Until the summer of 2003 essentially no data existed on the timing or spatial distribution of past ruptures on the DFS. This changed with the occurrence of the M7.9 2002 Denali fault earthquake, which has been a catalyst for present paleoseismic investigations. It provided a well-constrained rupture length and slip distribution. Strike-slip faulting occurred along 290 km of the Denali and Totschunda faults, leaving unruptured ?140km of the eastern Denali fault, ?180 km of the western Denali fault, and ?70 km of the eastern Totschunda fault. The DFS presents us with a blank canvas on which to fill a chronology of past earthquakes using modern paleoseismic techniques. Aware of correlation issues with potentially closely-timed earthquakes we have a) investigated 11 paleoseismic sites that allow a variety of dating techniques, b) measured paleo offsets, which provide insight into magnitude and rupture length of past events, at 18 locations, and c) developed late Pleistocene and Holocene slip rates using exposure age dating to constrain long-term fault behavior models. We are in the process of: 1) radiocarbon-dating peats involved in faulting and liquefaction, and especially short-lived forest floor vegetation that includes outer rings of trees, spruce needles, and blueberry leaves killed and buried during paleoearthquakes; 2) supporting development of a 700-900 year tree-ring time-series for precise dating of trees used in event timing; 3) employing Pb 210 for constraining the youngest ruptures in

  14. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  15. A New Method to Calculate Threshold Values of Ductile Fracture Criteria for Advanced High-Strength Sheet Blanking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changsheng; Chen, Jun; Xia, Cedric; Ren, Feng; Chen, Jieshi

    2014-04-01

    A new approach is presented in this paper to calculate the critical threshold value of fracture initiation. It is based on the experimental data for forming limit curves and fracture forming limit curves. The deformation path for finally a fractured material point is assumed as two-stage proportional loading: biaxial loading from the beginning to the onset of incipient necking, followed plane strain deformation within the incipient neck until the final fracture. The fracture threshold value is determined by analytical integration and validated by numerical simulation. Four phenomenological models for ductile fracture are selected in this study, i.e., Brozzo, McClintock, Rice-Tracey, and Oyane models. The threshold value for each model is obtained through best-fitting of experimental data. The results are compared with each other and test data. These fracture criteria are implemented in ABAQUS/EXPLICIT through user subroutine VUMAT to simulate the blanking process of advanced high-strength steels. The simulated fracture surfaces are examined to determine the initiation of ductile fracture during the process, and compared with experimental results for DP780 sheet steel blanking. The comparisons between FE simulated results coupled with different fracture models and experimental one show good agreements on punching edge quality. The study demonstrates that the proposed approach to calculate threshold values of fracture models is efficient and reliable. The results also suggest that the McClintock and Oyane fracture models are more accurate than the Rice-Tracey or Brozzo models in predicting load-stroke curves. However, the predicted blanking edge quality does not have appreciable differences.

  16. Estimation of organic carbon blank values and error structures of the speciation trends network data for source apportionment

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene Kim; Philip K. Hopke; Youjun Qin

    2005-08-01

    Because the particulate organic carbon (OC) concentrations reported in U.S. Environment Protection Agency Speciation Trends Network (STN) data were not blank corrected, the OC blank concentrations were estimated using the intercept in particulate matter {lt} 2.5 {mu}m in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) regression against OC concentrations. The estimated OC blank concentrations ranged from 1 to 2.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3} showing higher values in urban areas for the 13 monitoring sites in the northeastern United States. In the STN data, several different samplers and analyzers are used, and various instruments show different method detection limit (MDL) values, as well as errors. A comprehensive set of error structures that would be used for numerous source apportionment studies of STN data was estimated by comparing a limited set of measured concentrations and their associated uncertainties. To examine the estimated error structures and investigate the appropriate MDL values, PM2.5 samples collected at a STN site in Burlington, VT, were analyzed through the application of the positive matrix factorization. A total of 323 samples that were collected between December 2000 and December 2003 and 49 species based on several variable selection criteria were used, and eight sources were successfully identified in this study with the estimated error structures and min values among different MDL values from the five instruments: secondary sulfate aerosol (41%) identified as the result of emissions from coal-fired power plants, secondary nitrate aerosol (20%), airborne soil (15%), gasoline vehicle emissions (7%), diesel emissions (7%), aged sea salt (4%), copper smelting (3%), and ferrous smelting (2%). Time series plots of contributions from airborne soil indicate that the highly elevated impacts from this source were likely caused primarily by dust storms.

  17. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  18. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  19. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-02

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  20. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  1. Review of Trace-Element Field-Blank Data Collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program, May 2004-January 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Trace-element quality-control samples (for example, source-solution blanks, field blanks, and field replicates) were collected as part of a statewide investigation of groundwater quality in California, known as the Priority Basins Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basins Project is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supply and to improve public knowledge of groundwater quality in California. Trace-element field blanks were collected to evaluate potential bias in the corresponding environmental data. Bias in the environmental data could result from contamination in the field during sample collection, from the groundwater coming into contact with contaminants on equipment surfaces or from other sources, or from processing, shipping, or analyzing the samples. Bias affects the interpretation of environmental data, particularly if any constituents are present solely as a result of extrinsic contamination that would have otherwise been absent from the groundwater that was sampled. Field blanks were collected, analyzed, and reviewed to identify and quantify extrinsic contamination bias. Data derived from source-solution blanks and laboratory quality-control samples also were considered in evaluating potential contamination bias. Eighty-six field-blank samples collected from May 2004 to January 2008 were analyzed for the concentrations of 25 trace elements. Results from these field blanks were used to interpret the data for the 816 samples of untreated groundwater collected over the same period. Constituents analyzed were aluminum (Al), antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), molybdenum

  2. Foldable beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Coyner, J. V.; Crawford, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A foldable beam possessing superior qualities of light weight, compactness for transportation, quick deployment with minimum use of force, and high strength is described. These qualities are achieved through the use of a series of longitudinally rigid segments, hinged along one side and threaded by one or two cables along the opposite side. Tightening the cables holds the beam extended. Loosening the cables permits the segments to fold away from the threaded side. In one embodiment the segments are connected by canted hinges with the result that the beam may be folded in a helix-like configuration around a cylinder. In another embodiment the segments themselves may be hinged to fold flat laterally as the beam is folded, resulting in a configuration that may be helixed around a shorter cylinder.

  3. Beam-beam deflection and signature curves for elliptic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1990-10-22

    In this note we will present closed expressions for the beam-beam deflection angle for arbitrary elliptic beams including tilt. From these expressions signature curves, i.e., systematic deviations from the round beam deflection curve due to ellipticity or tilt are derived. In the course of the presentation we will prove that it is generally impossible to infer individual beam sizes from beam-beam deflection scans. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Terahertz circular Airy vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changming; Liu, Jinsong; Niu, Liting; Wei, Xuli; Wang, Kejia; Yang, Zhengang

    2017-06-20

    Vortex beams have received considerable research interests both in optical and millimeter-wave domain since its potential to be utilized in the wireless communications and novel imaging systems. Many well-known optical beams have been demonstrated to carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), such as Laguerre-Gaussian beams and high-order Bessel beams. Recently, the radially symmetric Airy beams that exhibit an abruptly autofocusing feature are also demonstrated to be capable of carrying OAM in the optical domain. However, due to the lack of efficient devices to manipulate terahertz (THz) beams, it could be a challenge to demonstrate the radially symmetric Airy beams in the THz domain. Here we demonstrate the THz circular Airy vortex beams (CAVBs) with a 0.3-THz continuous wave through 3D printing technology. Assisted by the rapidly 3D-printed phase plates, individual OAM states with topological charge l ranging from l = 0 to l = 3 and a multiplexed OAM state are successfully imposed into the radially symmetric Airy beams. We both numerically and experimentally investigate the propagation dynamics of the generated THz CAVBs, and the simulations agree well with the observations.

  5. Post Hyphen Blank: Poetic Canon in an Age of Genre-Fragging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ross

    2002-01-01

    Considers how in "Post-Something" times, misquotation has become a reading practice, or at least a strategy within certain practices of reading. Suggests that Post-Modernism needs a canon, a continuity of culture, in order to be Post-Anything. Describes how in making his own canon, the author posits certain genre qualities that appeal to…

  6. 40 CFR 53.58 - Operational field precision and blank test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of Reference Methods and Class I and Class II Equivalent... during a period of storage in the sampler. This procedure is applicable to both reference and equivalent...

  7. A study on using pre-forming blank in single point incremental forming process by finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abass, K. I.

    2016-11-01

    Single Point Incremental Forming process (SPIF) is a forming technique of sheet material based on layered manufacturing principles. The edges of sheet material are clamped while the forming tool is moved along the tool path. The CNC milling machine is used to manufacturing the product. SPIF involves extensive plastic deformation and the description of the process is more complicated by highly nonlinear boundary conditions, namely contact and frictional effects have been accomplished. However, due to the complex nature of these models, numerical approaches dominated by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) are now in widespread use. The paper presents the data and main results of a study on effect of using preforming blank in SPIF through FEA. The considered SPIF has been studied under certain process conditions referring to the test work piece, tool, etc., applying ANSYS 11. The results show that the simulation model can predict an ideal profile of processing track, the behaviour of contact tool-workpiece, the product accuracy by evaluation its thickness, surface strain and the stress distribution along the deformed blank section during the deformation stages.

  8. Blank-comparison matching-to-sample reveals a false positive symmetry test in a capuchin monkey

    PubMed Central

    de Faria Brino, Ana Leda; da Silva Campos, Rodolfo; de Faria Galvão, Olavo; McIlvane, William Jay

    2014-01-01

    A positive symmetry test result was obtained with a capuchin monkey that had previously exhibited virtually errorless AB and BA arbitrary matching-to-sample (MTS) with different stimuli. The symmetry test (BA) followed the acquisition of a new AB relation. It seemed possible, however, that the positive result could have occurred through the exclusion of previously defined comparison stimuli and not because the new AB and BA relations had the property of symmetry. To assess this possibility, a blank-comparison MTS procedure was implemented that permitted the separate assessment of select and reject (i.e., exclusion) control with both baseline and BA matching relations. In this assessment, the monkey did not exhibit reliable BA matching when exclusion was not possible, thus showing that the symmetry result was a false positive. However, the study demonstrated the feasibility of using a blank comparison MTS procedure with capuchins. The present results may set the stage for more successful methodology for establishing desired forms of relational stimulus control in capuchins and ultimately improving the assessment of relational learning capacity in that species, other nonhuman species, and nonverbal humans. PMID:25383161

  9. Design study of the geometry of the blanking tool to predict the burr formation of Zircaloy-4 sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Jisun Lee, Hyungyil Kim, Dongchul Kim, Naksoo

    2013-12-16

    In this work, we investigated factors that influence burr formation for zircaloy-4 sheet used for spacer grids of nuclear fuel roads. Factors we considered are geometric factors of punch. We changed clearance and velocity in order to consider the failure parameters, and we changed shearing angle and corner radius of L-shaped punch in order to consider geometric factors of punch. First, we carried out blanking test with failure parameter of GTN model using L-shaped punch. The tendency of failure parameters and geometric factors that affect burr formation by analyzing sheared edges is investigated. Consequently, geometric factor's influencing on the burr formation is also high as failure parameters. Then, the sheared edges and burr formation with failure parameters and geometric factors is investigated using FE analysis model. As a result of analyzing sheared edges with the variables, we checked geometric factors more affect burr formation than failure parameters. To check the reliability of the FE model, the blanking force and the sheared edges obtained from experiments are compared with the computations considering heat transfer.

  10. Accurate Die Design for Automotive Panel Stamping Considering the Compensation Related with Die Deflection and Blank Thinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Dongkai; Xia, Guodong; Li, Xifeng; Chen, Jieshi; Zhang, Jian; Yan, Wei; Li, Yue

    2011-08-01

    In order to improve assembly accuracy, automotive body panels have to be fabricated with higher dimensional and surface quality requirements, therefore the die faces should be designed more accurately to consider more relevant factors. In the presented study, we proposed algorithms to realize the following functions: through forming process simulation, the thinning distribution on the deformed blank was extracted as first kind of compensation; through die structural CAE analysis which automatically mapped the boundary contact forces onto the die surfaces from process simulation results, the die deflection was calculated as second kind of compensation. These two quantitative contributions were added together to compensate the die face. The proposed methodologies were programmed and integrated with LS-Dyna and HyperWorks, and also integrated with Autoform and CATIA linear CAE functionalities separately. In addition, a software toolkit to calculate the contacting ratio was also developed to evaluate the effectiveness of die face compensation. The second toolkit developed was verified by an automotive structural part forming die design, through die compensation and geometric optimization, the predicted contact ratio between the die face and formed blank was improved a lot, and the first toolkit was testified by a fender drawing die design. It shows that the die face compensation can be realized and integrated seamlessly between CAD model, process simulation model and die structural CAE model with the help of data I/O tools developed by the authors.

  11. Beam Propagation Experimental Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    and locating the camera next to the FX-100 output switch . The camera trigger was derived directly from the light emitted by the FX-100 output switch ...Instability 20 ASSTRPACT eContinue an reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) )A program of extensively diagnosed experiments to investigate ...primary objectives of this research were to measure the rate of erosion of the headIof the beam, and to investigate resistive instabilities, such as

  12. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric J.-M.

    2014-06-01

    Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  13. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  14. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  15. Filling the blanks in temporal intervals: the type of filling influences perceived duration and discrimination performance

    PubMed Central

    Horr, Ninja K.; Di Luca, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate how judgments of perceived duration are influenced by the properties of the signals that define the intervals. Participants compared two auditory intervals that could be any combination of the following four types: intervals filled with continuous tones (filled intervals), intervals filled with regularly-timed short tones (isochronous intervals), intervals filled with irregularly-timed short tones (anisochronous intervals), and intervals demarcated by two short tones (empty intervals). Results indicate that the type of intervals to be compared affects discrimination performance and induces distortions in perceived duration. In particular, we find that duration judgments are most precise when comparing two isochronous and two continuous intervals, while the comparison of two anisochronous intervals leads to the worst performance. Moreover, we determined that the magnitude of the distortions in perceived duration (an effect akin to the filled duration illusion) is higher for tone sequences (no matter whether isochronous or anisochronous) than for continuous tones. Further analysis of how duration distortions depend on the type of filling suggests that distortions are not only due to the perceived duration of the two individual intervals, but they may also be due to the comparison of two different filling types. PMID:25717310

  16. Coherent beam-beam interaction with four colliding beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, B.; Siemann, R. H.

    1995-09-01

    The coherent beam-beam interaction in the absence of Landau damping is studied with a computer simulation of four space-charge-compensated colliding beams. Results are presented for the modes, phase space structures, widths, and growth rates of coherent beam-beam resonances. These results are compared with solutions of the Vlasov equation, and with measurements made at the Dispositif de Collisions dans l'Igloo (DCI) storage ring in Orsay, France, which operated with space-charge-compensated colliding beams.

  17. Nutrient and pesticide contamination bias estimated from field blanks collected at surface-water sites in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Quality Networks, 2002–12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medalie, Laura; Martin, Jeffrey D.

    2017-08-14

    Potential contamination bias was estimated for 8 nutrient analytes and 40 pesticides in stream water collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at 147 stream sites from across the United States, and representing a variety of hydrologic conditions and site types, for water years 2002–12. This study updates previous U.S. Geological Survey evaluations of potential contamination bias for nutrients and pesticides. Contamination is potentially introduced to water samples by exposure to airborne gases and particulates, from inadequate cleaning of sampling or analytic equipment, and from inadvertent sources during sample collection, field processing, shipment, and laboratory analysis. Potential contamination bias, based on frequency and magnitude of detections in field blanks, is used to determine whether or under what conditions environmental data might need to be qualified for the interpretation of results in the context of comparisons with background levels, drinking-water standards, aquatic-life criteria or benchmarks, or human-health benchmarks. Environmental samples for which contamination bias as determined in this report applies are those from historical U.S. Geological Survey water-quality networks or programs that were collected during the same time frame and according to the same protocols and that were analyzed in the same laboratory as field blanks described in this report.Results from field blanks for ammonia, nitrite, nitrite plus nitrate, orthophosphate, and total phosphorus were partitioned by analytical method; results from the most commonly used analytical method for total phosphorus were further partitioned by date. Depending on the analytical method, 3.8, 9.2, or 26.9 percent of environmental samples, the last of these percentages pertaining to all results from 2007 through 2012, were potentially affected by ammonia contamination. Nitrite contamination potentially affected up to 2.6 percent of environmental samples collected between 2002 and 2006 and

  18. Ultrashort laser pulse beam shaping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyan; Ren, Yuhang; Lüpke, Gunter

    2003-02-01

    We calculated the temporal and spatial characteristics of an ultrashort laser pulse propagating through a diffractive beam-shaping system that converts a Gaussian beam into a beam with a uniform irradiance profile that was originally designed for continuous waves [Proc. SPIE 2863, 237(1996)]. The pulse front is found to be considerably curved for a 10-fs pulse, resulting in a temporal broadening of the pulse that increases with increasing radius. The spatial intensity distribution deviates significantly from a top-hat profile, whereas the fluence shows a homogeneous radial distribution.

  19. Production of negatively charged radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Stracener, D. W.; Stora, T.

    2017-08-01

    Beams of short-lived radioactive nuclei are needed for frontier experimental research in nuclear structure, reactions, and astrophysics. Negatively charged radioactive ion beams have unique advantages and allow for the use of a tandem accelerator for post-acceleration, which can provide the highest beam quality and continuously variable energies. Negative ion beams can be obtained with high intensity and some unique beam purification techniques based on differences in electronegativity and chemical reactivity can be used to provide beams with high purity. This article describes the production of negative radioactive ion beams at the former holifield radioactive ion beam facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the CERN ISOLDE facility with emphasis on the development of the negative ion sources employed at these two facilities. ).

  20. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  1. Continuation Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fremont Unified School District, CA.

    The Fremont, California Unified School District organized a continuing education program through a workshop held in the summer of 1968. This paper presents the results of that workshop. Following a statement of philosophy, an outline of the characteristics of the continuation student, and an outline of the functions of the program, an overview of…

  2. Patterning of membrane masks for projection e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetter, Linus A.; Biddick, Christopher J.; Blakey, Myrtle I.; Liddle, James A.; Peabody, Milton L., Jr.; Novembre, Anthony E.; Tennant, Donald M.

    1996-12-01

    A process for high-resolution patterning of the membrane- type masks used in the SCALPEL (SCattering with Angular Limitation in Projection Electron-beam Lithography) lithography system is described. SCALPEL is a 4X projection electron beam lithography tool with the potential to extend commercial lithographic capability well into the deep sub-micron range: the recently-completed SCALPEL proof- of-concept (SPOC) system has printed 0.08 micrometers lines in thick resist on Si. The details of the patterning process we currently employ and metrology results from the first series of masks are presented here. The SPOC mask blank consists of a segmented W-coated SiN (Si-rich) membrane, fabricated on a 4' Si wafer. The blank is patterned with 45 different test chips using a vector-scanned e-beam lithography tool. Metrology is performed on completed masks, and results from measurements of line-edge roughness, CD linearity, and pattern uniformity are presented. We examine the need for proximity effect correction of the pattern data, and compare the effect of correction on pattern data file size for a variety of mask technologies.

  3. Optical thickness measurement of mask blank glass plate by the excess fraction method using a wavelength-tuning interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yangjin; Hibino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2013-10-01

    The absolute optical thickness of a 140-mm2 mask blank glass plate 3.1 mm thickness was measured by three-surface interferometry using a wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometer. The interference order was determined by the excess fraction method. The wavelength of a tunable laser diode was scanned linearly from 632 to 642 nm, and a CCD detector recorded 2000 interference images. Two kinds of optical thicknesses measured by discrete Fourier analysis and phase-shifting were synthesized to obtain the optical thickness with respect to the ordinary refractive index. The optical thickness defined by the group refractive index at the 637 nm central wavelength was measured by wavelength scanning. The optical thickness deviation defined by the ordinary refractive index was measured using tunable phase-shifting. The systematic errors caused by nonlinearity in the wavelength tuning were corrected through correlation analysis between the theoretical and observed interference fringes.

  4. Radiocarbon Analysis of Individual Amino Acids: Carbon Blank Quantification for a Small-Sample High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography Purification Method.

    PubMed

    Bour, Amy L; Walker, Brett D; Broek, Taylor A B; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2016-04-05

    Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of amino acids (AAs) is of great interest as a proxy for organic nitrogen (N) cycling rates, dating archeological bone collagen, and investigating processes shaping the biogeochemistry of global N reservoirs. However, recoverable quantities of individual compounds from natural samples are often insufficient for radiocarbon ((14)C) analyses (<50 μg C). Constraining procedural carbon (C) blanks and their isotopic contributions is critical for reporting of accurate CSRA measurements. Here, we report the first detailed quantification of C blanks (including sources, magnitudes, and variability) for a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method designed to purify individual AAs from natural samples. We used pairs of AA standards with either modern (M) or dead (D) fraction modern (Fm) values to quantify MC and DC blanks within several chromatographic regions. Blanks were determined for both individual and mixed AA standard injections with peak loadings ranging from 10 to 85 μg C. We found 0.8 ± 0.4 μg of MC and 1.0 ± 0.5 μg of DC were introduced by downstream sample preparation (drying, combustion, and graphitization), which accounted for essentially the entire procedural blank for early eluting AAs. For late-eluting AAs, higher eluent organic content and fraction collected volumes contributed to total blanks of 1.5 ± 0.75 μg of MC and 3.0 ± 1.5 μg of DC. Our final measurement uncertainty for 20 μg of C of most AAs was ±0.02 Fm, although sample size requirements are larger for similar uncertainty in late-eluting AAs. These results demonstrate the first CSRA protocol for many protein AAs with uncertainties comparable to the lowest achieved in prior studies.

  5. Design and evaluation of a field study on the contamination of selected volatile organic compounds and wastewater-indicator compounds in blanks and groundwater samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiros, Susan A.; Bender, David A.; Mueller, David K.; Rose, Donna L.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Bernard, Bruce; Zogorski, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The Field Contamination Study (FCS) was designed to determine the field processes that tend to result in clean field blanks and to identify potential sources of contamination to blanks collected in the field from selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and wastewater-indicator compounds (WICs). The VOCs and WICs analyzed in the FCS were detected in blanks collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program during 1996-2008 and 2002-08, respectively. To minimize the number of variables, the study required ordering of supplies just before sampling, storage of supplies and equipment in clean areas, and use of adequate amounts of purge-and-trap volatile-grade methanol and volatile pesticide-grade blank water (VPBW) to clean sampling equipment and to collect field blanks. Blanks and groundwater samples were collected during 2008-09 at 16 sites, which were a mix of water-supply and monitoring wells, located in 9 States. Five different sample types were collected for the FCS at each site: (1) a source-solution blank collected at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) using laboratory-purged VPBW, (2) source-solution blanks collected in the field using laboratory-purged VPBW, (3) source-solution blanks collected in the field using field-purged VPBW, (4) a field blank collected using field-purged VPBW, and (5) a groundwater sample collected from a well. The source-solution blank and field-blank analyses were used to identify, quantify, and document extrinsic contamination and to help determine the sources and causes of data-quality problems that can affect groundwater samples. Concentrations of compounds detected in FCS analyses were quantified and results were stored in the USGS National Water Information System database after meeting rigorous identification and quantification criteria. The study also utilized information provided by laboratory analysts about evidence indicating the presence of selected compounds

  6. Continuous-variable quantum erasing

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, Radim

    2003-04-01

    We analyze continuous-variable (CV) quantum duality induced by entanglement between the system and the meter in two feasible CV back-action evading measurements and suggest a CV analog of the quantum erasing, previously observed in the atomic interference experiments. The suggested experiments employ only the standard quantum optical devices, such as beam splitters, parametric oscillators, and homodyne detectors.

  7. Coherent beam-beam effects, theory & observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri I Alexahin

    2003-07-16

    Current theoretical understanding of the coherent beam-beam effect as well as its experimental observations are discussed: conditions under which the coherent beambeam modes may appear, possibility of their resonant interaction (coherent resonances), stability of beam-beam oscillations in the presence of external impedances. A special attention is given to the coherent beam-beam modes of finite length bunches: the synchro-betatron coupling is shown to provide reduction in the coherent tuneshift and--at the synchrotron tune values smaller than the beam-beam parameter--Landau damping by overlapping synchrotron satellites.

  8. Blank-map orienteering for a mobile robot using certainty grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Timothy T.

    1993-05-01

    Certainty grids have been shown to be an effective method of generating accurate map data from incomplete sensor data. This is put to the test as we use a robot based certainty grid to maintain map information generated from eight fixed sonars to compare three robot navigators. Due to the low resolution and single sensor type, the certainty grid includes a variety of averaging and weighting techniques to improve sonar accuracy and reduce noise. The navigators are constrained by two design parameters: they should not use domain specific knowledge and the navigators and mapper are independent. Navigation decisions are based solely on the internal map. Each navigator uses a weighting function to determine a potential for each grid element and navigates by minimizing the potential over the robot's immediate surroundings. Local route selection is performed in real time while traveling as the local navigator continuously re-evaluates the path with new information from the certainty grid. The navigators differ in their methods of global route selection. One uses intermediate destinations and backtracking to handle dead ends. The other two incorporate dead end information directly into local route selection, one with intermediate destinations and the other without them.

  9. Section 1. Method of determining mode shapes and natural frequencies of the NASA unmodified test structure. Section 2. Continuous beam closed from solution to the NASA-LSS astromast torsional vibration, appendix E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The methods used to determine the lower natural frequencies and their corresponding mode shapes of the NASA-LSS Astromast (Unmodified Test Structure), and the mass integrals associated with the mode shapes are illustrated. The test structure is modeled as a cantilever beam with 91 lumped masses and without the tip mass on the free end of the bram. This uncouples the torsion and bending modes and allows for them to be determined separately. The frequency range was limited to an upper bound of 100 rad/sec (15.92 Hz.). In this range from 0.-100. rad/sec, three bending frequencies and one torsion frequency was found.

  10. Phase anomalies in Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Scharf, Toralf; Assafrao, Alberto da Costa; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Pereira, Silvania F; Urbach, H Paul; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2012-12-17

    Bessel-Gauss beams are known as non-diffracting beams. They can be obtained by focusing an annularly shaped collimated laser beam. Here, we report for the first time on the direct measurement of the phase evolution of such beams by relying on longitudinal-differential interferometry. We found that the characteristics of Bessel-Gauss beams cause a continuously increasing phase anomaly in the spatial domain where such beams do not diverge, i.e. there is a larger phase advance of the beam when compared to a referential plane wave. Simulations are in excellent agreement with measurements. We also provide an analytical treatment of the problem that matches both experimental and numerical results and provides an intuitive explanation.

  11. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    Use of a high power Yb:YAG laser is investigated for joining advanced high strength steel materials for use in tailor-welded blank (TWB) applications. TWB's are materials of different chemistry, coating or thicknesses that are joined before metal forming and other operations such as trimming, assembly and painting are carried out. TWB is becoming an important design tool in the automotive industry for reducing weight, improving fuel economy and passenger safety, while reducing the overall costs for the customer. Three advanced high strength steels, TRIP780, DP980 and USIBOR, which have many unique properties that are conducive to achieving these objectives, along with mild steel, are used in this work. The objective of this work is to ensure that high quality welds can be obtained using Yb:YAG lasers which are also becoming popular for metal joining operations, since they produce high quality laser beams that suffer minimal distortion when transported via fiber optic cables. Various power levels and speeds for the laser beam were used during the investigation. Argon gas was consistently used for shielding purposes during the welding process. After the samples were welded, metallographic examination of the fusion and heat-affected zones using optical and scanning electron microscopes were carried out to determine the microstructures as well as weld defects. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were also used to examine the top of welds as well as fracture surfaces. Additionally, cross-weld microhardness evaluations, tensile tests using Instron tester, limited fatigue tests as well as formability evaluations using OSU plane strain evaluation were carried out. The examinations included a 2-factor full factorial design of experiments to determine the impact of coatings on the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Tensile strengths of DP980, TRIP780 and mild steel materials as well as DP980 welded to TRIP780 and mild steel in the rolling direction as well as

  12. A Refined Zigzag Beam Theory for Composite and Sandwich Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Sciuva, Marco Di; Gherlone, Marco

    2009-01-01

    A new refined theory for laminated composite and sandwich beams that contains the kinematics of the Timoshenko Beam Theory as a proper baseline subset is presented. This variationally consistent theory is derived from the virtual work principle and employs a novel piecewise linear zigzag function that provides a more realistic representation of the deformation states of transverse-shear flexible beams than other similar theories. This new zigzag function is unique in that it vanishes at the top and bottom bounding surfaces of a beam. The formulation does not enforce continuity of the transverse shear stress across the beam s cross-section, yet is robust. Two major shortcomings that are inherent in the previous zigzag theories, shear-force inconsistency and difficulties in simulating clamped boundary conditions, and that have greatly limited the utility of these previous theories are discussed in detail. An approach that has successfully resolved these shortcomings is presented herein. Exact solutions for simply supported and cantilevered beams subjected to static loads are derived and the improved modelling capability of the new zigzag beam theory is demonstrated. In particular, extensive results for thick beams with highly heterogeneous material lay-ups are discussed and compared with corresponding results obtained from elasticity solutions, two other zigzag theories, and high-fidelity finite element analyses. Comparisons with the baseline Timoshenko Beam Theory are also presented. The comparisons clearly show the improved accuracy of the new, refined zigzag theory presented herein over similar existing theories. This new theory can be readily extended to plate and shell structures, and should be useful for obtaining relatively low-cost, accurate estimates of structural response needed to design an important class of high-performance aerospace structures.

  13. Pulsed laser beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, C.M.; Jones, R.W.

    1982-07-13

    A pulsed laser beam intensity monitor measures the peak power within a selectable cross section of a test laser beam and measures integrated energy of the beam during the pulse period of a test laser. A continuous wave laser and a pulsed ruby laser are coaxially arranged for simultaneously transmitting optical output energy through a crystal flat during the time a test laser pulse is transmitted through the flat. Due to stress birefringence in the crystal, the ruby laser pulse transmitted through the flat is recorded and analyzed to provide peak power information about the test laser output pulse, and the continuous wave laser output reflected from the crystal flat provides a measurement of energy during the test laser pulse.

  14. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  15. Blank Computer Floppy Disk Formatting Using the AppleWorks Program, Apple IIe or GS Computers and a Duodisk or Two Disk Drives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for formatting blank floppy disks in the AppleWorks program using an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer with Duodisk or two disk drives. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 11 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of the formatting sequence. (EW)

  16. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  17. High-power continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation generated by difference frequency mixing of diode-laser-seeded fiber amplifiers and its application to dual-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Goldberg, L.; Koplow, J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the generation of up to 0.7 mW of narrow-linewidth (<60-MHz) radiation at 3.3 micrometers by difference frequency mixing of a Nd:YAG-seeded 1.6-W Yb fiber amplifier and a 1.5-micrometers diode-laser-seeded 0.6-W Er/Yb fiber amplifier in periodically poled LiNbO3. A conversion efficiency of 0.09%/W (0.47 mWW-2 cm-1) was achieved. A room-air CH4 spectrum acquired with a compact 80-m multipass cell and a dual-beam spectroscopic configuration indicates an absorption sensitivity of +/-2.8 x 10(-5) (+/-1 sigma), corresponding to a sub-parts-in-10(9) (ppb) CH4 sensitivity (0.8 ppb).

  18. High-power continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation generated by difference frequency mixing of diode-laser-seeded fiber amplifiers and its application to dual-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Goldberg, L.; Koplow, J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the generation of up to 0.7 mW of narrow-linewidth (<60-MHz) radiation at 3.3 micrometers by difference frequency mixing of a Nd:YAG-seeded 1.6-W Yb fiber amplifier and a 1.5-micrometers diode-laser-seeded 0.6-W Er/Yb fiber amplifier in periodically poled LiNbO3. A conversion efficiency of 0.09%/W (0.47 mWW-2 cm-1) was achieved. A room-air CH4 spectrum acquired with a compact 80-m multipass cell and a dual-beam spectroscopic configuration indicates an absorption sensitivity of +/-2.8 x 10(-5) (+/-1 sigma), corresponding to a sub-parts-in-10(9) (ppb) CH4 sensitivity (0.8 ppb).

  19. Effects of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Similar- and Dissimilar-Alloy Friction Stir Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Sinke, Jos

    2011-01-17

    Friction stir welding is a solid state joining process with relatively low welding temperatures. Nevertheless, the mechanical properties of friction stir welded blanks are degraded after welding. Indeed, both strength and ductility of the welds are decreased after welding. Often, the resulting friction stir welded blanks need to be formed to their final structural shape. Therefore, the formability of friction stir welded blanks is of primary importance in the manufacturing of structural parts. This paper studies how the mechanical properties and particularly formability of friction stir welded blanks can be improved by applying a post weld heat treatment. Two aluminum alloys from 2000 and 7000 series, namely 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study. The sheet thickness of both materials is 2,0 mm. The selected alloys are welded in three configurations: 2024-T3 and 2024-T3, 7075-T6 and 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 and 7075-T6. The resulting welds are naturally aged for a few months. Three sets of standard dog bone shape tensile test specimens are then machined from the welds. The first set of the specimens is tested without any heat treatment. The second set of the specimens is solution heat treated and quenched before testing. The third set of the specimens is solution heat treated, quenched, and naturally aged for a week before testing. The mechanical properties of the three different sets of specimens are compared with each other. It is shown that careful selection of post weld heat-treatment can greatly improve the formability of friction stir welded blanks.

  20. Effects of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Similar- and Dissimilar-Alloy Friction Stir Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Sinke, Jos

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state joining process with relatively low welding temperatures. Nevertheless, the mechanical properties of friction stir welded blanks are degraded after welding. Indeed, both strength and ductility of the welds are decreased after welding. Often, the resulting friction stir welded blanks need to be formed to their final structural shape. Therefore, the formability of friction stir welded blanks is of primary importance in the manufacturing of structural parts. This paper studies how the mechanical properties and particularly formability of friction stir welded blanks can be improved by applying a post weld heat treatment. Two aluminum alloys from 2000 and 7000 series, namely 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study. The sheet thickness of both materials is 2,0 mm. The selected alloys are welded in three configurations: 2024-T3 and 2024-T3, 7075-T6 and 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 and 7075-T6. The resulting welds are naturally aged for a few months. Three sets of standard dog bone shape tensile test specimens are then machined from the welds. The first set of the specimens is tested without any heat treatment. The second set of the specimens is solution heat treated and quenched before testing. The third set of the specimens is solution heat treated, quenched, and naturally aged for a week before testing. The mechanical properties of the three different sets of specimens are compared with each other. It is shown that careful selection of post weld heat-treatment can greatly improve the formability of friction stir welded blanks.

  1. Beam-Bem interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

  2. Comparing delay discounting rates when using the fill-in-the-blank and multiple-choice methods.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N; Derenne, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Several methods have been devised to measure delay discounting. The present study recruited university students to complete a delay-discounting task involving five different outcomes (finding a dating partner, free cigarettes, winning $100,000, being owed $100,000, and obtaining one's ideal body image) that was administered using either the fill-in-the blank (FITB) or multiple-choice (MC) method. Results showed that the different administration methods sometimes produced significantly different rates of discounting, the direction of which differed by outcome. Hyperbolic discounting and the area under the discounting curve were nearly always significantly correlated when the FITB method was used but were never significantly correlated when the MC method was used. Discounting across the five outcomes produced a two-factor solution when the FITB data were factor analyzed. The MC data were described by a one-factor solution. The present results illustrate that procedural variables have a potentially profound impact on delay-discounting data, and generalizing from studies on delay discounting should be done with caution until those variables are fully understood.

  3. A Comparative Study of Hot Deformation Behaviors for Sand Casting and Centrifugal Casting Q235B Flange Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fangcheng; Li, Yongtang; Ju, Li

    2017-03-01

    Hot compression tests of sand casting and centrifugal casting Q235B flange blanks were performed at strain rate range of 0.01-5 s-1 and temperature range of 850-1,150 °C. The evolutions of microstructure and texture were revealed. The constitutive models based on Arrhenius constitutive modeling were proposed by considering the effects of strain on material constants. The results show that recrystallization in centrifugal casting Q235B is more apparent than that in sand casting, resulting in the finer grains and lower flow stress for centrifugal casting Q235B. The intensities of textures slightly weaken with the increase of temperature. At 1,050 °C and 5 s-1, the textures of sand casting are characterized by strong {001}<100> and {001}<110>, which are related with severe deformation, while the textures of centrifugal casting are composed of {110}<110> and {111}<112>, which are related with dynamic recovery and shear deformation. A good agreement between the predicted and experimental flow stress is achieved and demonstrates that the proposed constitutive models are reliable.

  4. Indications for laboratory tests in primary care: assessment of the most frequent indications and requests with blank clinical information

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva-Salinas, Maria; Esteban, Patricia; Ahumada, Miguel; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this work is twofold. Firstly, to study the temporal evolution in the number of laboratory requests from primary care without clinical indication, and to analyse the number of such requests before and after the implementation of an automated requesting procedure. Secondly, to investigate what are the most frequent clinical indications that prompted laboratory testing. Materials and methods This is a retrospective observational study conducted from January 2009 to December 2015. We counted the requests without clinical question, calculated the number of such requests per total number of requests and listed the most frequent indications. Results The number of tests requests with a blank clinical indication was significantly higher in 2009 when compared to 2015 (80% vs. 20%; P < 0.001). For every year in this 7-year period, dyslipidemia, essential hypertension and diabetes were the most prevalent diagnoses that prompted a laboratory test in primary care, accounting for more than 20% of all indications. Conclusions The number of primary care requests without patient clinical question has decreased after the implementation of an automated requesting procedure. Disorders of lipid metabolism, essential hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most prevalent diagnoses that prompted a laboratory test in primary care. PMID:27812310

  5. Contribution of the bees and combs to honey volatiles: blank-trial probe for chemical profiling of honey biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Jerković, Igor; Marijanović, Zvonimir; Ljubicić, I; Gugić, M

    2010-05-01

    This research is focused on the immediate contribution of the bees and combs to honey volatiles in order to exclude these compounds as botanical-origin biomarkers for honey authentification. Therefore, the bees were closed in a hive containing empty combs under controlled food-flow conditions (saccharose solution). The obtained 'saccharose honey' probe samples were subjected to ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE), followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses (GC and GC/MS). A total of 66 compounds were identified. Higher alcohols made up ca. 50% of the total volatiles, mainly (Z)-octadec-9-en-1-ol, hexadecan-1-ol, and octadecan-1-ol, with minor percentages of undecan-1-ol, dodecan-1-ol, tetradecan-1-ol, pentadecan-1-ol, and heptadecan-1-ol. Other abundant compounds were saturated long-chain linear hydrocarbons, C(10)-C(25), C(27), and C(28), particularly C(23), C(25), and C(27)). Identified chemical structures were related to the composition of combs and cuticular waxes, and less to the bee pheromones. In addition, the impact of two-hour heat treatment at 80 degrees and one-year storage at room temperature on the same probe was investigated in order to identify thermal and storage artefacts. These findings can be considered as blank-trial probe (no plant source) for honey chemical profiling and identification of reliable botanical origin biomarkers.

  6. The Mars Phoenix Thermal Evolved-Gas Analysis: The Role of an Organic Free Blank in the Search for Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, Douglas W.; Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Morris, Richard V.; Boynton, W. V.

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument onboard the 2007 Phoenix Lander will perform differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and evolved-gas analysis of soil samples collected from the surface. Data from the instrument will be compared with Mars analog mineral standards, collected under TEGA Mars-like conditions to identify the volatile-bearing mineral phases [1] (e.g., Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, and sulfates) found in the Martian soil. Concurrently, the instrument will be looking for indications of organics that might also be present in the soil. Organic molecules are necessary building blocks for life, although their presence in the ice or soil does not indicate life itself. The spacecraft will certainly bring organic contaminants to Mars even though numerous steps were taken to minimize contamination during the spacecraft assembly and testing. It will be essential to distinguish possible Mars organics from terrestrial contamination when TEGA instrument begins analyzing icy soils. To address the above, an Organic Free Blank (OFB) was designed, built, tested, and mounted on the Phoenix spacecraft providing a baseline for distinguishing Mars organics from terrestrial organic contamination. Our objective in this report is to describe some of the considerations used in selecting the OFB material and then report on the processing and analysis of the final candidate material

  7. [Change in the composition and structure of the metal in the zone of the welded seam of dental drill blanks].

    PubMed

    Altareva, G I; Bazhukhin, V I; Gerasev, G P; Matukhnov, V M; Shmyreva, T P

    1982-01-01

    Composition and structure of metals in the meld zone connecting a dental burr handpiece made of hard alloy BK-6 with a shank made of steel 20X13 are examined by the X-ary microanalyzer MS-46 and the X-ray diffractometer "dPOH-2". Representative interdiffusion processes of alloy components into steel and, converserly, iron from steel into hard alloy are found. After melding, the transition layer has been shown to represent the cobalt-iron solid solution with variable concentration of the components through the layer, tungsten carbid particles being uniformly spread all over the metallic matrix. The phasic composition change is analysed in the course of material welding. The enrichment of stell melt with carbon of tungsten carbid results in the formation of gamma-Fe phase in the meld zone. The failure of burr blanks is noted to occur at the interface of the second (10-20 micrometer) and the first (130-140 micrometer) zones. The increase in the concentration of both iron and iron-containing phases--alpha-Fe, gamma-Fe, Fe3W3C--at the surface of steel fracture is responsible for the failures.

  8. Simple beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  9. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aadhi, A.; Chaitanya, N. Apurv; Jabir, M. V.; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R. P.; Samanta, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51–1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond).

  10. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Aadhi, A.; Chaitanya, N. Apurv; Jabir, M. V.; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R. P.; Samanta, G. K.

    2016-01-01

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51–1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond). PMID:27143582

  11. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Aadhi, A; Chaitanya, N Apurv; Jabir, M V; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R P; Samanta, G K

    2016-05-04

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51-1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond).

  12. Demonstration of EDA flow for massively parallel e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, P.; Belledent, J.; Tranquillin, C.; Figueiro, T.; Meunier, S.; Bayle, S.; Fay, A.; Milléquant, M.; Icard, B.; Wieland, M.

    2014-03-01

    Today's soaring complexity in pushing the limits of 193nm immersion lithography drives the development of other technologies. One of these alternatives is mask-less massively parallel electron beam lithography, (MP-EBL), a promising candidate in which future resolution needs can be fulfilled at competitive cost. MAPPER Lithography's MATRIX MP-EBL platform has currently entered an advanced stage of development. The first tool in this platform, the FLX 1200, will operate using more than 1,300 beams, each one writing a stripe 2.2μm wide. 0.2μm overlap from stripe to stripe is allocated for stitching. Each beam is composed of 49 individual sub-beams that can be blanked independently in order to write in a raster scan pixels onto the wafer.

  13. Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John; Collins, Leland F.; Kuklo, Thomas C.; Micali, James V.

    1992-01-01

    A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

  14. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  15. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  16. FABRICATION OF BISMUTH NANOWIRE DEVICES USING FOCUSED ION BEAM MILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H. H.; Alkaisi, M. M.; Wu, S. E.; Liu, C. P.

    2009-07-23

    In this work, a focused ion beam (FIB) milling process has been developed to fabricate 50 nm Bi nanowire and transistor structures using FEI-200 dual beam FIB system. For the fabrication, 50 nm bismuth film was thermally evaporated through EBL patterned PMMA windows onto SiO{sub 2} substrates with pre-defined contact pads. Bi nanowire widths ranging from 30 nm to 100 nm have been successfully fabricated by milling out unwanted areas using 30 KeV Ga+ ion beam. A single-pixel-line ion beam blanking technique has been utilised to fabricate Bi nanowire as small as 30 nm in diameter and few micrometers long. In order to form good ohmic contacts for sub 50 nm bismuth nanowires, a drill-and-fill process has been developed using FIB to sputter away the surface oxide of bismuth after the in-situ platinum nanowire contacts deposition. To our knowledge, this is the first time a focused ion beam process has been used to fabricate bismuth nanowire. The fabricated Bi nanowires were electrically characterised using a semiconductor analyser that showed good ohmic contact to the electrodes. In this paper, the fabrication experiments and the characterisation results for Bi nanowires as small as 50 nm in diameter are presented. Several FIB issues involved in Bi device making and ohmic contacts to Bi nanowires will also be discussed.

  17. Zinc Finger Takes on a Whole New Meaning: Reducing and Monitoring Zinc Blanks in the Isotope Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, E. B.; Wasylenki, L. E.; Anbar, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    In terms of avoiding contamination, zinc is one of the most difficult elements to study isotopically. The reason for this is that zinc stearate is a very common mold release agent in the production of plastics, including those most often used in isotope geochemistry clean labs. While polyethylene bottles, polypropylene centrifuge tubes, pipette tips, and Kimwipes are all potential sources of contaminant zinc, by far the largest amount of zinc is introduced to the laboratory by gloves. Most items can be effectively rid of zinc by soaking in dilute hydrochloric acid, but gloves cannot be cleaned easily, and use of gloves can quickly lead to contamination on many surfaces throughout the lab. We recently conducted several experiments in which dissolved zinc was partly adsorbed onto synthetic Mn oxyhydroxide particles. The dissolved and adsorbed pools were separated by filtration, purified with ion exchange chemistry, and analyzed for isotope composition by MC-ICP-MS. We used a commercially purchased ICP standard solution both as our standard (delta66/64Zn = 0) and as the source of the zinc in the experiments. Whenever gloves were worn during purification, process blanks contained as much as 150 ng Zn, and both the dissolved and adsorbed pools of zinc came out enriched in heavy isotopes relative to the starting pool, contrary to our expectation of mass balance. When gloves were not worn, blanks were <10 ng, and, as expected, one pool of Zn was lighter and one heavier than the standard. Zinc leached from two different brands of vinyl gloves, including one brand recommended to us for being “low” in zinc, measured +10‰ relative to our standard. We therefore concluded that glove zinc contaminated most of our experimental samples. We were only able to see such clear evidence of contamination because (1) we were doing an experiment in which we expected one light and one heavy pool of zinc compared to our standard, and (2) we happened to use an ICP standard solution for

  18. A real-time intercepting beam-profile monitor for a medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Cameron, D.; Kellogg, S.; Gray, D.; Buckley, K.; Schaffer, P.; Verzilov, V.; Hoehr, C.

    2013-11-01

    There is a lack of real-time continuous beam-diagnostic tools for medical cyclotrons due to high power deposition during proton irradiation. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a profile monitor that is capable of providing continuous feedback about beam shape and current in real time while it is inserted in the beam path. This enables users to optimize the beam profile and observe fluctuations in the beam over time with periodic insertion of the monitor.

  19. Longitudinal Density Modulation and Energy Conversion in Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J; Neumann, J; Tian, K; O'Shea, P

    2006-02-17

    Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may under some circumstances be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams, and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams.

  20. Beam imaging sensor

    DOEpatents

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  1. Mask Fabrication Using Electron Beam Exposure System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watakabe, Y.; Shigetomi, A.; Morimoto, H.; Kato, T.

    1981-07-01

    This study describes the results of feature size distribution, pattern location accuracy and level to level registration error on chrominum master masks fabricated by EeBES-40. This system has the capability of high speed electron beam blanking at 40MHz, the capacity for large size masks (with 6 inch mask cassette), and the automatic cassette handling system. OEBR-100(PGMA), as the electron beam negative resist, is used for 5 inch and 6 inch chrominum masks. The chrominum etching process is used for both wet and dry plasma technology. Test patterns and 64 K bit memory TEG, as the practical pattern, are used in this study. More than 40 measurements are taken, uniformly distributed over 96 to 112mm square, and the feature size distribution is measured by a laser interferometer X-Y measuring system. Pattern location accuracy and level to level registration error are obtained using EeBES-40 quality assurance programs called MARKET/PLOTMARKET. This program operates by scanning over the resist image of the test pattern, utilizing the normal fiducial mark location hardware. The followinc results are obtained; (1) Feature size distribution within 6 inch mask : -/+0.1 μm (2) Level-to-level registration error2 : less than 0.1 pm High quality masks with about 0.02 defects/cm2 , and rapid throughput of 6 hr./10 masks using the auto-matic 10-cassette handling system are obtained.

  2. Propagation-invariant beams with quantum pendulum spectra: from Bessel beams to Gaussian beam-beams.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Mark R; Ring, James D

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new class of propagation-invariant light beams with Fourier transform given by an eigenfunction of the quantum mechanical pendulum. These beams, whose spectra (restricted to a circle) are doubly periodic Mathieu functions in azimuth, depend on a field strength parameter. When the parameter is zero, pendulum beams are Bessel beams, and as the parameter approaches infinity, they resemble transversely propagating one-dimensional Gaussian wave packets (Gaussian beam-beams). Pendulum beams are the eigenfunctions of an operator that interpolates between the squared angular momentum operator and the linear momentum operator. The analysis reveals connections with Mathieu beams, and insight into the paraxial approximation.

  3. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  4. Maskless Electron-Beam Lithography for Trusted Microchip Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    lithography has soared and continues to rise unabated. Multibeam has developed maskless electron-beam lithography ( EBL ) for producing advanced Rad-Hard...and other DoD microchips at lower cost. In addition to significant cost savings in mask and lithography equipment, Multibeam’s maskless EBL technology...maskless electron-beam lithography ( EBL ); e-beam direct write (EBDW); complementary e-beam lithography (CEBL); multiple patterning; cycle time

  5. Research of the process of axisymmetric forming of thin-walled flat blanks into the conical parts with minimal thickness variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyanenko, E. G.; Popov, I. P.; Menshikov, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the method based on the process of forming a flat blank into the thin-walled conical part is proposed. The forming method is based on two stages. At the first stage, forming of the free portion of the blank is carried out until it fully contacts the conical surface of the punch. During this stage, thickness unevenness is created, which can be compensated during the second stage by the action of active friction forces. The shaping of the workpiece during the forming of the conical part is performed by thinning. The thinning increases with the increase of the penetration depth of the punch, i.e. the final part will be thinner, but its thickness variation will be reduced. This method allows achieving minimal thickness variation in the walls of the part.

  6. Limit of blank and limit of detection of Plasmodium falciparum thick blood smear microscopy in a routine setting in Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Joanny, Fanny; Löhr, Sascha J Z; Engleitner, Thomas; Lell, Bertrand; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2014-06-14

    Proper malaria diagnosis depends on the detection of asexual forms of Plasmodium spp. in the blood. Thick blood smear microscopy is the accepted gold standard of malaria diagnosis and is widely implemented. Surprisingly, diagnostic performance of this method is not well investigated and many clinicians in African routine settings base treatment decisions independent of microscopy results. This leads to overtreatment and poor management of other febrile diseases. Implementation of quality control programmes is recommended, but requires sustained funding, external logistic support and constant training and supervision of the staff. This study describes an easily applicable method to assess the performance of thick blood smear microscopy by determining the limit of blank and limit of detection. These two values are representative of the diagnostic quality and allow the correct discrimination between positive and negative samples. Standard-conform methodology was applied and adapted to determine the limit of blank and the limit of detection of two thick blood smear microscopy methods (WHO and Lambaréné method) in a research centre in Lambaréné, Gabon. Duplicates of negative and low parasitaemia thick blood smears were read by several microscopists. The mean and standard deviation of the results were used to calculate the limit of blank and subsequently the limit of detection. The limit of blank was 0 parasites/μL for both methods. The limit of detection was 62 and 88 parasites/μL for the Lambaréné and WHO method, respectively. With a simple, back-of-the-envelope calculation, the performance of two malaria microscopy methods can be measured. These results are specific for each diagnostic unit and cannot be generalized but implementation of a system to control microscopy performance can improve confidence in parasitological results and thereby strengthen malaria control.

  7. Limit of blank and limit of detection of Plasmodium falciparum thick blood smear microscopy in a routine setting in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper malaria diagnosis depends on the detection of asexual forms of Plasmodium spp. in the blood. Thick blood smear microscopy is the accepted gold standard of malaria diagnosis and is widely implemented. Surprisingly, diagnostic performance of this method is not well investigated and many clinicians in African routine settings base treatment decisions independent of microscopy results. This leads to overtreatment and poor management of other febrile diseases. Implementation of quality control programmes is recommended, but requires sustained funding, external logistic support and constant training and supervision of the staff. This study describes an easily applicable method to assess the performance of thick blood smear microscopy by determining the limit of blank and limit of detection. These two values are representative of the diagnostic quality and allow the correct discrimination between positive and negative samples. Methods Standard-conform methodology was applied and adapted to determine the limit of blank and the limit of detection of two thick blood smear microscopy methods (WHO and Lambaréné method) in a research centre in Lambaréné, Gabon. Duplicates of negative and low parasitaemia thick blood smears were read by several microscopists. The mean and standard deviation of the results were used to calculate the limit of blank and subsequently the limit of detection. Results The limit of blank was 0 parasites/μL for both methods. The limit of detection was 62 and 88 parasites/μL for the Lambaréné and WHO method, respectively. Conclusion With a simple, back-of-the-envelope calculation, the performance of two malaria microscopy methods can be measured. These results are specific for each diagnostic unit and cannot be generalized but implementation of a system to control microscopy performance can improve confidence in parasitological results and thereby strengthen malaria control. PMID:24929248

  8. The Impact of Structure on Word Meaning and Fill-in-The-Blank Tests Procedures on Short-Term and Long-Term Retention of Vocabulary Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazeli, Seyed Hossein

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of research described in the current study to investigate the impact of structure knowing on two types of test, i.e. word-meaning test and fill-in-the-blank test, their correlation and procedures on both short-term and long-term retention of vocabulary items. The importance of the present study, to test the condition that learners are…

  9. Candidate isolated neutron stars and other optically blank x-ray fields identified from the rosat all-sky and sloan digital sky surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Agueros, Marcel A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Margon, Bruce; Haberl, Frank; Voges, Wolfgang; Annis, James; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-11-01

    Only seven radio-quiet isolated neutron stars (INSs) emitting thermal X rays are known, a sample that has yet to definitively address such fundamental issues as the equation of state of degenerate neutron matter. We describe a selection algorithm based on a cross-correlation of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that identifies X-ray error circles devoid of plausible optical counterparts to the SDSS g {approx} 22 magnitudes limit. We quantitatively characterize these error circles as optically blank; they may host INSs or other similarly exotic X-ray sources such as radio-quiet BL Lacs, obscured AGN, etc. Our search is an order of magnitude more selective than previous searches for optically blank RASS error circles, and excludes the 99.9% of error circles that contain more common X-ray-emitting subclasses. We find 11 candidates, nine of which are new. While our search is designed to find the best INS candidates and not to produce a complete list of INSs in the RASS, it is reassuring that our number of candidates is consistent with predictions from INS population models. Further X-ray observations will obtain pinpoint positions and determine whether these sources are entirely optically blank at g {approx} 22, supporting the presence of likely isolated neutron stars and perhaps enabling detailed follow-up studies of neutron star physics.

  10. Antenna Beam Coverage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The strawman Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) design calls for the use of a CONUS beam for transmission between the supplier and the satellite and for fixed beams for transmission between the basic personal terminal and the satellite. The satellite uses a 3 m main reflector for transmission at 20 GHz and a 2 m main reflector for reception at 30 GHz. There are several types of spot beams under consideration for the PASS system besides fixed beams. The beam pattern of a CONUS coverage switched beam is shown along with that of a scanning beam. A switched beam refers to one in which the signal from the satellite is connected alternatively to various feed horns. Scanning beams are taken to mean beams whose footprints are moved between contiguous regions in the beam's coverage area. The advantages and disadvantages of switched and/or scanning beams relative to fixed beams. The consequences of using switched/scanning in lieu of fixed beams in the PASS design and attempts are made to evaluate the listed advantages and disadvantages. Two uses of switched/scanning beams are examined. To illustrate the implications of switched beams use on PASS system design, operation at two beam scan rates is explored.

  11. Beam Stop for Electron Accelerator Beam Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Greg; Sharp, Vic; Tickner, James; Uher, Josef

    2009-08-01

    Electron linear accelerator applications involving the generation of hard X-rays frequently require accurate knowledge of the electron beam parameters. We developed a beam stop device which houses a tungsten Bremsstrahlung target and enables the electron beam current, energy and position to be monitored. The beam stop consisted of four plates. The first was a removable aluminium (Al) transmission plate. Then followed the tungsten target. Behind the target there were four Al quadrant plates for beam position measurement. The last plate was a thick Al back-stop block. Currents from the four quadrants and the back-stop were measured and the beam lateral position, energy and current were calculated. The beam stop device was optimised using Monte-Carlo simulation, manufactured (including custom-made electronics and software) in our laboratory and tested at the ARPANSA (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency) linear accelerator in Melbourne. The electron beam energy was determined with a precision of 60 keV at beam energies between 11 and 21 MeV and the lateral beam position was controlled with a precision of 200 mum. The relative changes of the beam current were monitored as well.

  12. A symplectic coherent beam-beam model

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1989-05-01

    We consider a simple one-dimensional model to study the effects of the beam-beam force on the coherent dynamics of colliding beams. The key ingredient is a linearized beam-beam kick. We study only the quadrupole modes, with the dynamical variables being the 2nd-order moments of the canonical variables q, p. Our model is self-consistent in the sense that no higher order moments are generated by the linearized beam-beam kicks, and that the only source of violation of symplecticity is the radiation. We discuss the round beam case only, in which vertical and horizontal quantities are assumed to be equal (though they may be different in the two beams). Depending on the values of the tune and beam intensity, we observe steady states in which otherwise identical bunches have sizes that are equal, or unequal, or periodic, or behave chaotically from turn to turn. Possible implications of luminosity saturation with increasing beam intensity are discussed. Finally, we present some preliminary applications to an asymmetric collider. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-04-24

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization.

  14. Electron beam control for barely separated beams

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method for achieving independent control of multiple beams in close proximity to one another, such as in a multi-pass accelerator where coaxial beams are at different energies, but moving on a common axis, and need to be split into spatially separated beams for efficient recirculation transport. The method for independent control includes placing a magnet arrangement in the path of the barely separated beams with the magnet arrangement including at least two multipole magnets spaced closely together and having a multipole distribution including at least one odd multipole and one even multipole. The magnetic fields are then tuned to cancel out for a first of the barely separated beams to allow independent control of the second beam with common magnets. The magnetic fields may be tuned to cancel out either the dipole component or tuned to cancel out the quadrupole component in order to independently control the separate beams.

  15. Printing results of a proof-of-concept 50keV electron multi-beam mask exposure tool (eMET POC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzgummer, Elmar; Klein, Christof; Loeschner, Hans

    2012-11-01

    Printing results as achieved with a proof-of-concept 50keV electron multi-beam mask exposure tool (eMET POC) within 1cm2 specification write fields on 6" mask blanks are reported. The eMET POC consists of a column with 200x reduction optics. Inserted into the column is a CMOS addressable (max. 12.8 Gbits/s) blanking device, providing 256k (k=1024) programmable beams within 82μm x 82μm beam array fields. Multi-beam exposures are done on 150mm Si monitor wafers and 6" mask blanks moved at constant speed (up to 1.23 mm/s) with a high precision (1nm 1sigma) laser-interferometer controlled stage in stripes of 82 μm width (2μm overlap between adjacent stripes). Detailed evaluation results with respect to resolution, CDU, linearity, distortion control and stability, as well as OPC and ILT exposure capabilities are presented. Exposures on 0.1nm address grid are demonstrated.

  16. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  17. Analysis of orthotropic beams

    Treesearch

    Jen Y. Liu; S. Cheng

    1979-01-01

    A plane-stress analysis of orthotropic or isotropic beams is presented. The loading conditions considered are: (1) a concentrated normal load arbitrarily located on the beam, and (2) a distributed normal load covering an arbitrary length of the beam. exhibit close agreement with existing experimental data from Sitka spruce beams. Other loading conditions can similarly...

  18. Marine Controlled Source Electromagnetics for Gas Hydrate Evaluation on the Cascadia Margin: Correlation Between Resistivity Anomalies and Seismic Blank Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalenberg, K.; Edwards, R. N.; Willoughby, E. C.; Mir, R.; Yuan, J.; Spence, G.

    2004-12-01

    The gas hydrate deposits on the Cascadia Margin have been the focus of a vast number of projects and marine experiments to investigate the distribution and concentration of this potential future energy resource. Gas hydrate or frozen gas consists mainly of methane and water molecules. It is stable at low temperatures and high pressures and forms in pore space within the hydrate stability zone in marine sediments. Hydrate itself is electrical insulating and replaces conductive pore fluid, which subsequently increases the bulk resistivity of a hydrate formation. Accurate measurements of the seafloor resistivity can be a useful tool for hydrate estimation, which is essential for resource and environmental hazard evaluation. The instrument - a development of the University of Toronto - is basically an inline dipole-dipole configuration dragged along the seafloor. It has been successfully applied in previous experiments on the Cascadia Margin and on the Chilean Margin. Here we present a promising new data set collected in summer 2004. Measurements have been conducted along three profiles. For the first time data have been collected with the marine controlled source electromagnetic method in water depths shallower than required for hydrate stability (i.e. below 500m). These data are important as a reference site for hydrate assessment. The second profile covers the bullseye, a vent site in vicinity of ODP site 889B that correlates with a region of seismic blanking and recovered hydrate outcrops. The 7km long profile also covers another series of seismically identified vent sites. The average amplitudes of the measured electric fields and thus the related apparent resistivities along the first profile (no hydrate) are smaller than along the second profile (vent sites). This is consistent with the idea of an increased resistivity in hydrate rich zones. Two pronounced anomalies occur along the second profile in spatial agreement with the bullseye and the other series of

  19. 47 CFR 73.646 - Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73... applicable to the particular service. (d) Television licensees are authorized to lease their VBI and...

  20. SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-19

    During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

  1. High-throughput NGL electron-beam direct-write lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, N. William; Brodie, Alan D.; McCoy, John H.

    2000-07-01

    Electron beam lithography systems have historically had low throughput. The only practical solution to this limitation is an approach using many beams writing simultaneously. For single-column multi-beam systems, including projection optics (SCALPELR and PREVAIL) and blanked aperture arrays, throughput and resolution are limited by space-charge effects. Multibeam micro-column (one beam per column) systems are limited by the need for low voltage operation, electrical connection density and fabrication complexities. In this paper, we discuss a new multi-beam concept employing multiple columns each with multiple beams to generate a very large total number of parallel writing beams. This overcomes the limitations of space-charge interactions and low voltage operation. We also discuss a rationale leading to the optimum number of columns and beams per column. Using this approach we show how production throughputs >= 60 wafers per hour can be achieved at CDs

  2. Partially coherent nonparaxial beams.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kailiang; Lü, Baida

    2004-04-15

    The concept of a partially coherent nonparaxial beam is proposed. A closed-form expression for the propagation of nonparaxial Gaussian Schell model (GSM) beams in free space is derived and applied to study the propagation properties of nonparaxial GSM beams. It is shown that for partially coherent nonparaxial beams a new parameter f(sigma) has to be introduced, which together with the parameter f, determines the beam nonparaxiality.

  3. Automated beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muench, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for the space fabrication of large space structures are considered with emphasis on the design, development, manufacture, and testing of a machine which automatically produces a basic building block aluminum beam. Particular problems discussed include those associated with beam cap forming; brace storage, dispensing, and transporting; beam component fastening; and beam cut-off. Various critical process tests conducted to develop technology for a machine to produce composite beams are also discussed.

  4. CONTINUOUS ABORT GAP CLEANING AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.FLILLER,R.III.FU,W.MICHNOFF,R.

    2004-07-05

    Since the RHIC Au-Au run in the year 2001 the 200 MHz cavity system was used at storage and a 28 MHz system during injection and acceleration. The rebucketing procedure potentially causes a higher debunching rate of heavy ion beams in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam can easily account for more than 50% of the total beam intensity. This effect is even stronger with the achieved high intensities of the RHIC Au-Au run in 2004. A beam abort at the presence of a lot of debunched beam bears the risk of magnet quenching and experimental detector damage due to uncontrolled beam losses. Thus it is desirable to avoid any accumulation of debunched beam from the beginning of each store, in particular to anticipate cases of unscheduled beam aborts due to a system failure. A combination of a fast transverse kickers and the new 2-stage copper collimator system are used to clean the abort gap continuously throughout the store with a repetition rate of 1 Hz. This report gives. an overview of the new gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.

  5. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatum, B. A.; Alton, G. D.; Auble, R. L.; Beene, J. R.; Dowling, D. T.; Haynes, D. L.; Juras, R. C.; Meigs, M. J.; Mills, G. D.; Mosko, S. W.; Mueller, P. E.; Olsen, D. K.; Shapira, D.; Sinclair, J. W.; Carter, H. K.; Welton, R. F.; Williams, C. E.; Bailey, J. D.; Stracener, D. W.

    1997-05-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility's radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. The HRIBF was formally dedicated on December 12, 1996, and approved for high intensity operation as a National User Facility, the first of its kind in North America. This paper describes facility development to date.

  6. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility`s radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. This paper details facility development to date.

  7. Soft beams: When capillarity induces axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, S.; Antkowiak, A.; Marigo, J.-J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the interaction of an elastic beam with a liquid drop in the case where bending and extensional effects are both present. We use a variational approach to derive equilibrium equations and constitutive relation for the beam. This relation is shown to include a term due to surface energy in addition to the classical Young's modulus term, leading to a modification of Hooke's law. At the triple point where solid, liquid, and vapor phases meet, we find that the external force applied on the beam is parallel to the liquid-vapor interface. Moreover, in the case where solid-vapor and solid-liquid interface energies do not depend on the extension state of the beam, we show that the extension in the beam is continuous at the triple point and that the wetting angle satisfies the classical Young-Dupré relation.

  8. Soft beams: when capillarity induces axial compression.

    PubMed

    Neukirch, S; Antkowiak, A; Marigo, J-J

    2014-01-01

    We study the interaction of an elastic beam with a liquid drop in the case where bending and extensional effects are both present. We use a variational approach to derive equilibrium equations and constitutive relation for the beam. This relation is shown to include a term due to surface energy in addition to the classical Young's modulus term, leading to a modification of Hooke's law. At the triple point where solid, liquid, and vapor phases meet, we find that the external force applied on the beam is parallel to the liquid-vapor interface. Moreover, in the case where solid-vapor and solid-liquid interface energies do not depend on the extension state of the beam, we show that the extension in the beam is continuous at the triple point and that the wetting angle satisfies the classical Young-Dupré relation.

  9. Disintegration of urinary calculi by laser beam: drilling experiment in extracted urinary stones.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Y; Orikasa, S; Chiba, R; Tahira, K; Fukatsu, T; Miyakawa, T

    1979-06-01

    Disintegration of urinary calculi was attempted by the use of laser beam. As a first step, drilling of extracted urinary stones was attempted using a continuous wave CO2 laser and a pulse ruby laser. Stones were drilled easily by either laser beam. The power around 10 W of continuous CO2 laser beam was sufficient to drill through the stone.

  10. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  11. Apparatus for laser beam profile measurements

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, N.P.; Gettemy, D.J.

    1985-01-30

    Apparatus for measuring the spatial intensity profile of the output beam from a continuous-wave laser oscillator. The rapid and repetitive passing of a small aperture through the otherwise totally blocked output beam of the laser under investigation provides an easily interpretable, real-time measure of the intensity characteristics thereof when detected by a single detector and the signal generated thereby displayed on an oscilloscope synthronized to the motion of the aperture.

  12. Continuous melting and ion chromatographic analyses of ice cores.

    PubMed

    Huber, T M; Schwikowski, M; Gäggele, H W

    2001-06-22

    A new method for determining concentrations of organic and inorganic ions in ice cores by continuous melting and contemporaneous ion chromatographic analyses was developed. A subcore is melted on a melting device and the meltwater produced is collected in two parallel sample loops and then analyzed simultaneously by two ion chromatographs, one for anions and one for cations. For most of the analyzed species, lower or equal blank values were achieved with the continuous melting and analysis technique compared to the conventional analysis. Comparison of the continuous melting and ion chromatographic analysis with the conventional analysis of a real ice core segment showed good agreement in concentration profiles and total amounts of ionic species. Thus, the newly developed method is well suited for ice core analysis and has the advantages of lower ice consumption, less time-consuming sample preparation and lower risk of contamination.

  13. Beam transport and bunch compression at TARLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Avni; Lehnert, Ulf

    2014-10-01

    The Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) will operate two InfraRed Free Electron Lasers (IR-FEL) covering the range of 3-250 μm. The facility will consist of an injector fed by a thermionic triode gun with two-stage RF bunch compression, two superconducting accelerating ELBE modules operating at continuous wave (CW) mode and two independent optical resonator systems with different undulator period lengths. The electron beam will also be used to generate Bremsstrahlung radiation. In this study, we present the electron beam transport including beam matching to the undulators and the shaping of the longitudinal phase space using magnetic dispersive sections.

  14. Linac Coherent Light Source Electron Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2007-04-27

    This paper describes the design and simulation of the electron beam collimation system in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Dark current is expected from the gun and some of the accelerating cavities. Particle tracking of the expected dark current through the entire LCLS linac, from gun through FEL undulator, is used to estimate final particle extent in the undulator as well as expected beam loss at each collimator or aperture restriction. A table of collimators and aperture restrictions is listed along with halo particle loss results, which includes an estimate of average continuous beam power lost. In addition, the transverse wakefield alignment tolerances are calculated for each collimator.

  15. 47 CFR 73.646 - Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73... applicable to the particular service. (d) Television licensees are authorized to lease their VBI and visual...

  16. Intelsat VI - A continuing evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. B.; Braverman, D. J.

    1984-11-01

    Design, launch, and performance features of the Intelsat VI satellite scheduled for 1986 launch are described. The spacecraft will operated with SS/TDMA techniques and six antenna beams, weigh 23 kg at the beginning of life, carry 80,000 half-circuits, and will be borne aloft by either the STS or Ariane 4. The communications equipment will include Cand K-band receivers, 14/11 GHz upconverters, traveling wave tube amplifiers, and 50 input and output filters. Total interconnectivity will be present for all uplinks and downlinks, which will issue spot and shaped beam coverage of the hemisphere. Satellite power is to be supplied by solar panels furnishing 2 kW continuously and eclipse power is to be drawn from two 44 Ah NiH batteries. Orbit maintenance and attitude control are assigned to six 22 N thrusters.

  17. Beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2003-07-22

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis. Where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in an a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  18. Beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2000-09-21

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  19. Pyramid beam splitter

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  20. Evaluation of volatile organic compound (VOC) blank data and application of study reporting levels to groundwater data collected for the California GAMA Priority Basin Project, May 2004 through September 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed in quality-control samples collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. From May 2004 through September 2010, a total of 2,026 groundwater samples, 211 field blanks, and 109 source-solution blanks were collected and analyzed for concentrations of 85 VOCs. Results from analyses of these field and source-solution blanks and of 2,411 laboratory instrument blanks during the same time period were used to assess the quality of data for the 2,026 groundwater samples. Eighteen VOCs were detected in field blanks or source-solution blanks: acetone, benzene, bromodichloromethane, 2-butanone, carbon disulfide, chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethene, styrene, tetrahydrofuran, toluene, trichloroethene, trichlorofluoromethane, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m- and p-xylenes, and o-xylene. The objective of the evaluation of the VOC-blank data was to determine if study reporting levels (SRLs) were needed for any of the VOCs detected in blanks to ensure the quality of the data from groundwater samples. An SRL is equivalent to a raised reporting level that is used in place of the reporting level used by the analyzing laboratory [long‑term method detection level (LT-MDL) or laboratory reporting level (LRL)] to reduce the probability of reporting false-positive detections. Evaluation of VOC-blank data was done in three stages: (1) identification of a set of representative quality‑control field blanks (QCFBs) to be used for calculation of SRLs and identification of VOCs amenable to the SRL approach, (2) evaluation of potential sources of contamination to blanks and groundwater samples by VOCs detected in field blanks, and (3) selection of appropriate SRLs from among four potential SRLs for VOCs detected in field blanks and application of those SRLs to the groundwater data. An important conclusion from this study is that to ensure the

  1. Beam transport with magnetic solenoids and plasma lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1988-10-01

    We examine the behavior of axisymmetric space-charge dominated beams in transport lines using numerical simulation. A typical transport line consisting of two axisymmetric linear lenses used to make a continuous beam from an ion source to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is considered. We compare the beam evolution when both lenses are magnetic solenoids or Gabor plasma lenses for beams with different initial density profiles. Emittance oscillations due to nonlinear space-charge forces by the action of plasma lenses in which space-charge fields are shielded, but beam mismatch at the RFQ entrance can be significant for both types of lens. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Analysis of RHIC beam dump pre-fires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Sandberg, J.; Tan, Y.

    2011-03-28

    It has been speculated that the beam may cause instability of the RHIC Beam Abort Kickers. In this study, we explore the available data of past beam operations, the device history of key modulator components, and the radiation patterns to examine the correlations. The RHIC beam abort kicker system was designed and built in the 90's. Over last decade, we have made many improvements to bring the RHIC beam abort kicker system to a stable operational state. However, the challenge continues. We present the analysis of the pre-fire, an unrequested discharge of kicker, issues which relates to the RHIC machine safety and operational stability.

  3. Fractionalization of optical beams: II. Elegant Laguerre Gaussian modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C.

    2007-05-01

    We apply the tools of fractional calculus to introduce new fractional-order solutions of the paraxial wave equation that smoothly connect the elegant Laguerre-Gaussian beams of integral-order. The solutions are characterized in general by two fractional indices and are obtained by fractionalizing the creation operators used to create elegant Laguerre-Gauss beams from the fundamental Gaussian beam. The physical and mathematical properties of the circular fractional beams are discussed in detail. The orbital angular momentum carried by the fractional beam is a continuous function of the angular mode index and it is not restricted to take only discrete values.

  4. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  5. Beam-Beam Experience at DAPHINE

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, Pantaleo

    2002-08-21

    This paper summarizes the results of experimental observations and measurements of beam-beam interactions in DAPHINE, the Frascati Phi-factory. The achieved results are reported with analysis of present limitations in both single and multibunch operation modes and compared with numerical simulations.

  6. Direct analysis for urinary protein with biuret reagent, with use of urine ultrafiltrate blanking: comparison with a manual biuret method involving trichloroacetic acid precipitation.

    PubMed

    Eckfeldt, J H; Kershaw, M J; Dahl, I I

    1984-03-01

    We describe a method for measuring urinary protein with a centrifugal analyzer. Biuret reagent is used, and blanking with an ultrafiltrate of urine eliminates interferences from the nonprotein, biuret-positive chromogens in urine. We compare results by this new method with those by a manual method in which trichloroacetic acid precipitation and biuret reagent are used. The new method shows good precision and excellent correlation (r = 0.997) with the manual method. The ease and convenience of this assay should make this a useful method for the routine clinical laboratory.

  7. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  8. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  9. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is a process by which NASA hopes to build metal parts in zero gravity environments. It's a layer-additive process that uses an electron beam and a solid wi...

  10. Interplanetary particle beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews observations of interplanetary particle beams of the kind that frequently accompany a solar flare. It is shown that the most frequently observed beams are beams of electrons which are associated with radio bursts of type III, but occasionally with flares and X-ray bursts. Although the main features of these beams and their associated plasma waves and radio bursts are known, uncertainties remain in terms of the correlation between electron beams and filamentary structures, the relative importance of the quasi-linear and the nonlinear wave emissions as the dominant process, and the mechanism of conversion of some of the Langmuir wave energy into radio emissions. Other particle beams discussed are those composed of protons, neutrons, He ions, or heavy ions. While most of these beams originate from sun flares, the source of some of particle beams may be the earth, Jupiter, or other planets as well as comets.

  11. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  12. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  13. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  14. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  15. Beam spreading of vortex beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lukin, Vladimir P; Konyaev, Peter A; Sennikov, Victor A

    2012-04-01

    We present some results obtained by numerical modeling of the propagation of vortex beams LG(0l) through a randomly inhomogeneous medium. The vortex beams are the lower order Laguerre-Gaussian modes. Such beams, if propagated under conditions of weak turbulence, also experience distortions, like a Gaussian beam. However, the statistically averaged vortex beams (LG(0l)) conserve the central intensity dip with a nonzero intensity on the beam axis. The beam broadening of vortex beams is analyzed. The average vortex beams are found to be broadened less than the Gaussian beam while propagated through a randomly inhomogeneous medium. The higher the topological charge l is, the smaller the beam broadening is.

  16. Status of RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E.; Bruno, D.; Gassner, D.M.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.C.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.K.; Lambiase, R.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Montag, C.; Oerter, B.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    Two electron lenses are under construction for RHIC to partially compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in order to increase both the peak and average luminosities. The final design of the overall system is reported as well as the status of the component design, acquisition, and manufacturing. An overview of the RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project is given in [1], and more details in [2]. With 2 head-on beam-beam interactions in IP6 and IP8, a third interaction with a low-energy electron beam is added near IP10 to partially compensate the the head-on beam-beam effect. Two electron lenses are under construction, one for each ring. Both will be located in a region common to both beams, but each lens will act only on one beam. With head-on beam-beam compensation up to a factor of two improvement in luminosity is expected together with a polarized source upgrade. The current RHIC polarized proton performance is documented in Ref. [4]. An electron lens (Fig. 1) consists of an DC electron gun, warm solenoids to focus the electron beam during transport, a superconducting main solenoid in which the interaction with the proton beam occurs, steering magnets, a collector, and instrumentation. The main developments in the last year are given below. The experimental program for polarized program at 100 GeV was expected to be finished by the time the electron lenses are commissioned. However, decadal plans by the RHIC experiments STAR and PHENIX show a continuing interest at both 100 GeV and 250 GeV, and a larger proton beam size has been accommodated in the design (Tab. 1). Over the last year beam and lattice parameters were optimized, and RHIC proton lattices are under development for optimized electron lens performance. The effect of the electron lens magnetic structure on the proton beam was evaluated, and found to be correctable. Experiments were done in RHIC and the Tevatron.

  17. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  18. Current monitors for intensity modulated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Mark; Hamilton, Brett

    1995-05-01

    A beam intensity modulation system (BIMPS), that works in conjunction with the beam splitting system to allow beams of different intensities to be sequentially delivered to two different areas, has already been in use for many years. The operators could not, however, tune the cyclotrons with the BIMPS in operation using the existing beam instrumentation systems in the cyclotron beamlines which consisted mostly of non-electron-suppressed stops. Since the BIMPS duty factor (e.g. as low as 1/100 when operating with a 100 μs high intensity (HI) pulse at 10 Hz) usually exceed the ratio of the HI to LOW beam intensities (varying in the range from 10 to 100), the stops would, to first order, merely read out the LOW beam intensity. Thus there existed no way to monitor the HI beam intensity and transmission efficiency unless operating continuously in the HI beam mode. To allow BIMPS operation at all times, a new system of intercepting and nonintercepting beam current monitors have been added to the cyclotron beamlines. The system consists of electron suppressed stops and nonintercepting beam pickups with high output bandwidth of (10 kHz) signal processors to allow accurate sampling of the short duration HI beam pulses. The electronics for the stops are straightforward; there are, however, important technical trade-off in the design of the nonintercepting system design. The amplifier input voltage noise and relatively low coupling impedance of the nonintercepting pickups cause the minimum detectable HI current to decrease with the square root of the HI beam pulse length; as the pulse length is shortened, the system timing constraints also become more critical. Although the BIMPS is capable of providing beam pulse durations as short at 10 μs, the minimum pulse length for operation was chosen to be 100 μs. The electronics have time constants of 200 μs allowing measurement accuracies of better than a percent. Since the most rapid modulation frequency used for filling the

  19. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  20. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.