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Sample records for beam current drive

  1. Power threshold for neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Politzer, P.A. ); Porter, G.D. )

    1989-10-02

    For fully noninductive current drive in tokamaks using neutral beams, there is a power and density threshold condition, setting a minimum value for P{sup 3/2}/n{sup 2}. If this condition is not met, stationary state cannot occur, and a tokamak discharge will collapse. This is a consequence of the coupling between current and electron temperature, or between current drive efficiency and energy confinement time. 4 figs.

  2. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    DOE PAGES

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CDmore » efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.« less

  3. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CD efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.

  4. The Bootstrap Current and Neutral Beam Current Drive in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Politzer, P.A.

    2005-10-15

    Noninductive current drive is an essential part of the implementation of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak program. For an efficient steady-state tokamak reactor, the plasma must provide close to 100% bootstrap fraction (f{sub bs}). For noninductive operation of DIII-D, current drive by injection of energetic neutral beams [neutral beam current drive (NBCD)] is also important. DIII-D experiments have reached {approx}80% bootstrap current in stationary discharges without inductive current drive. The remaining current is {approx}20% NBCD. This is achieved at {beta}{sub N} [approximately equal to] {beta}{sub p} > 3, but at relatively high q{sub 95} ({approx}10). In lower q{sub 95} Advanced Tokamak plasmas, f{sub bs} {approx} 0.6 has been reached in essentially noninductive plasmas. The phenomenology of high {beta}{sub p} and {beta}{sub N} plasmas without current control is being studied. These plasmas display a relaxation oscillation involving repetitive formation and collapse of an internal transport barrier. The frequency and severity of these events increase with increasing {beta}, limiting the achievable average {beta} and causing modulation of the total current as well as the pressure. Modeling of both bootstrap and NBCD currents is based on neoclassical theory. Measurements of the total bootstrap and NBCD current agree with calculations. A recent experiment based on the evolution of the transient voltage profile after an L-H transition shows that the more recent bootstrap current models accurately describe the plasma behavior. The profiles and the parametric dependences of the local neutral beam-driven current density have not yet been compared with theory.

  5. Calculations of tangential neutral beam injection current drive efficiency for present moderate flux FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifschitz, A. F.; Farengo, R.; Hoffman, A. L.

    2004-09-01

    A Monte Carlo code is employed to study tangential neutral beam injection into moderate flux field reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs). The dimensions of the FRC are similar to those obtained in the Translation, Confinement and Sustainment (TCS) experiment. Two injection geometries are considered. In one case the beam is injected through the ends, at a small angle to the FRC axis while in the other the beam is injected almost perpendicularly, at some point along the separatrix. The current drive efficiency and the deposited power are calculated employing plasma parameters that can be expected in future experiments on TCS. It is shown that, although the RMF degrades beam confinement, relatively high efficiencies can be obtained provided the RMF does not penetrate too deeply into the plasma. Since the torque deposited by the neutral beam can balance the torque deposited by the RMF, the simultaneous use of both methods appears to be a very attractive option.

  6. Off-axis Neutral Beam Current Drive for Advanced Scenario Development in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M; Park, J; Petty, C; Luce, T; Heidbrink, W; Osborne, T; Wade, M; Austin, M; Brooks, N; Budny, R; Challis, C; DeBoo, J; deGrassie, J; Ferron, J; Gohil, P; Hobirk, J; Holcomb, C; Hollmann, E; Hong, R; Hyatt, A; Lohr, J; Lanctot, M; Makowski, M; McCune, D; Politzer, P; Prater, R; John, H S; Suzuki, T; West, W; Unterberg, E; Van Zeeland, M; Yu, J

    2008-10-13

    Modification of the two existing DIII-D neutral beam lines is proposed to allow vertical steering to provide off-axis neutral beam current drive (NBCD) as far off-axis as half the plasma radius. New calculations indicate very good current drive with good localization off-axis as long as the toroidal magnetic field, B{sub T}, and the plasma current, I{sub p}, are in the same direction (for a beam steered downward). The effects of helicity can be large: e.g., ITER off-axis NBCD can be increased by more than 20% if the B{sub T} direction is reversed. This prediction has been tested by an off-axis NBCD experiment using reduced size plasmas that are vertically shifted with the existing NBI on DIII-D. The existence of off-axis NBCD is evident in sawtooth and internal inductance behavior. By shifting the plasma upward or downward, or by changing the sign of the toroidal field, measured off-axis NBCD profiles, determined from MSE data, are consistent with predicted differences (40%-45%) arising from the NBI orientation with respect to the magnetic field lines. Modification of the DIII-D NB system will strongly support scenario development for ITER and future tokamaks as well as providing flexible scientific tools for understanding transport, energetic particles and heating and current drive.

  7. Off-axis neutral beam current drive for advanced scenario development in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Masanori; Park, Jin Myung; Petty, C C.; Luce, T.C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Osborne, T.H.; Prater, R.; Wade, M R; Unterberg, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Modification of the two existing DIII-D neutral beamlines is planned to allow vertical steering to provide off-axis neutral beam current drive (NBCD) peaked as far off-axis as half the plasma minor radius. New calculations for a downward-steered beam indicate strong current drive with good localization off-axis so long as the toroidal magnetic field, B-T, and the plasma current, I-p, point in the same direction. This is due to good alignment of neutral beam injection (NBI) with the local pitch of the magnetic field lines. This model has been tested experimentally on DIII-D by injecting equatorially mounted NBs into reduced size plasmas that are vertically displaced with respect to the vessel midplane. The existence of off-axis NBCD is evident in the changes seen in sawtooth behaviour in the internal inductance. By shifting the plasma upwards or downwards, or by changing the sign of the toroidal field, off-axis NBCD profiles measured with motional Stark effect data and internal loop voltage show a difference in amplitude (40-45%) consistent with differences predicted by the changed NBI alignment with respect to the helicity of the magnetic field lines. The effects of NBI direction relative to field line helicity can be large even in ITER: off-axis NBCD can be increased by more than 30% if the B-T direction is reversed. Modification of the DIII-D NB system will strongly support scenario development for ITER and future tokamaks as well as provide flexible scientific tools for understanding transport, energetic particles and heating and current drive.

  8. Experimental Investigation and Validation of Neutral Beam Current Drive for ITER Through ITPA Joint Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Akers, R. J.; Gates, D.A.; Gunter, S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hobirk, J.; Luce, T.C.; Murakami, Masanori; Park, Jin Myung; Turnyanskiy, M.

    2011-01-01

    Joint experiments investigating the off-axis neutral beam current drive (NBCD) capability to be utilized for advanced operation scenario development in ITER were conducted in four tokamaks (ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), DIII-D, JT-60U and MAST) through the international tokamak physics activity (ITPA). The following results were obtained in the joint experiments, where the toroidal field, B(t), covered 0.4-3.7 T, the plasma current, I(p), 0.5-1.2 MA, and the beam energy, E(b), 65-350 keV. A current profile broadened by off-axis NBCD was observed in MAST. In DIII-D and JT-60U, the NB driven current profile has been evaluated using motional Stark effect diagnostics and good agreement between the measured and calculated NB driven current profile was observed. In AUG (at low delta similar to 0.2) and DIII-D, introduction of a fast-ion diffusion coefficient of D(b) similar to 0.3-0.5 m(2) s(-1) in the calculation gave better agreement at high heating power (5 MW and 7.2 MW, respectively), suggesting anomalous transport of fast ions by turbulence. It was found through these ITPA joint experiments that NBCD related physics quantities reasonably agree with calculations (with D(b) = 0-0.5 m(2) s(-1)) in all devices when there is no magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity except ELMs. Proximity of measured off-axis beam driven current to the corresponding calculation with D(b) = 0 has been discussed for ITER in terms of a theoretically predicted scaling of fast-ion diffusion that depends on E(b)/T(e) for electrostatic turbulence or beta(t) for electromagnetic turbulence.

  9. Optimization of Drive-Bunch Current Profile for Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Beam-Driven Acceleration Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C.R.; Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2012-07-08

    In recent years, wakefield acceleration has gained attention due to its high acceleration gradients and cost effectiveness. In beam-driven wakefield acceleration, a critical parameter to optimize is the transformer ratio. It has been shown that current shaping of electron beams allows for enhanced (> 2) transformer ratios. In this paper we present the optimization of the pulse shape of the drive bunch for dielectric-wakefield acceleration.

  10. Validation of on- and off-axis neutral beam current drive against experiment in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. M.; Murakami, M.; Petty, C. C.; Osborne, T. H.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Prater, R.; Luce, T. C.; Wade, M. R.; Brooks, N. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; DeGrassie, J. S.; Ferron, J. R.; Gohil, P.; Hong, R. M.; Hyatt, A. W.; Lohr, J.; Politzer, P. A.; St John, H. E.; West, W. P.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2009-09-15

    Neutral beam current drive (NBCD) experiments in DIII-D using vertically shifted plasmas to move the current drive away from the axis have clearly demonstrated robust off-axis NBCD. Time-dependent measurements of magnetic field pitch angles by the motional Stark effect diagnostic are used to obtain the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux, which indicates a broad off-axis NBCD profile with a peak at about half the plasma minor radius. In most cases, the measured off-axis NBCD profile is consistent with calculations using an orbit-following Monte Carlo code for the beam ion slowing down including finite-orbit effects provided there is no large-scale magnetohydrodynamic activity such as Alfven eigenmodes modes or sawteeth. An alternative analysis method shows good agreement between the measured pitch angles and those from simulations using transport-equilibrium codes. Two-dimensional image of Doppler-shifted fast ion D{sub {alpha}} light emitted by neutralized energetic ions shows clear evidence for a hollow profile of beam ion density, consistent with classical beam ion slowing down. The magnitude of off-axis NBCD is sensitive to the alignment of the beam injection relative to the helical pitch of the magnetic field lines. If the signs of toroidal magnetic field and plasma current yield the proper helicity, both measurement and calculation indicate that the efficiency is as good as on-axis NBCD because the increased fraction of trapped electrons reduces the electron shielding of the injected ion current, in contrast with electron current drive schemes where the trapping of electrons degrades the efficiency. The measured off-axis NBCD increases approximately linearly with the injection power, although a modest amount of fast ion diffusion is needed to explain an observed difference in the NBCD profile between the measurement and the calculation at high injection power.

  11. Compact antenna for two-dimensional beam scan in the JT-60U electron cyclotron heating/current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, S.; Kajiwara, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kasugai, A.; Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Fujii, T.

    2005-11-15

    A compact antenna system was designed and fabricated to enable millimeter-wave beam scanning in the toroidal and poloidal directions of the JT-60U tokamak for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments. The antenna consists of a fast movable flat mirror mounted on the tokamak vacuum vessel and a rotary focusing mirror attached at the end of the waveguide that is supported from outside the vacuum vessel. This separate support concept enables a compact structure inside a shallow port (0.68x0.54x0.2 m) that is shared with a subport for an independent diagnostic system. During a plasma shot, the flat mirror is driven by a servomotor with a 3-m-long drive shaft to reduce the influence of the high magnetic field on the motor. The focusing mirror is rotated by a simple mechanism utilizing a push rod and an air cylinder. The antenna has been operated reliably for 3 years after a small improvement to the rotary drive mechanism. It has made significant contributions to ECH and ECCD experiments, especially the current profile control in JT-60U.

  12. Turbulent current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Ohm's law is modified when turbulent processes are accounted for. Besides an hyper-resistivity, already well known, pinch terms appear in the electron momentum flux. Moreover it appears that turbulence is responsible for a source term in the Ohm's law, called here turbulent current drive. Two terms contribute to this source. The first term is a residual stress in the momentum flux, while the second contribution is an electro-motive force. A non zero average parallel wave number is needed to get a finite source term. Hence a symmetry breaking mechanism must be invoked, as for ion momentum transport. E × B shear flows and turbulence intensity gradients are shown to provide similar contributions. Moreover this source term has to compete with the collision friction term (resistivity). The effect is found to be significant for a large scale turbulence in spite of an unfavorable scaling with the ratio of the electron to ion mass. Turbulent current drive appears to be a weak effect in the plasma core, but could be substantial in the plasma edge where it may produce up to 10 % of the local current density.

  13. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  14. Electron Locking in Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, K. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Orvis, D. J.; Raman, R.; Redd, A. J.; Smith, R. J.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.

    2000-10-01

    The traveling n=1, m~= q_edge magnetic distortion observed in the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT-II) during coaxial helicity injection (CHI) is responsible for some current profile relaxation. A model for electromotive current drive, called the electron locking model, can account for the results of current drive experiments in both the HIT-II and the original HIT devices. The most relevant of these results involve the the frequencies and directions of the mode itself, the E× B drift, and the electric current drift. In spherical tokamaks with CHI, electrode and coil polarities can be changed to control the relative directions of these drifts. Results from HIT-II experiments with different polarities are shown. These point out the character n=1, m~= q_edge mode, and suggest its role in CHI current drive. The electron locking model is presented, and is also discussed in the context of mean field electrodynamics. This model might also be applied to other types of current drive, such as rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive, oscillating field current drive (OFCD), steady inductive helicity injection (SIHI), or Ohmic current drive in a reversed field pinch (RFP). These examples are discussed.

  15. Current drive, anticurrent drive, and balanced injection

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Cavallo, A.; Chu, T.K.; Fishman, H.; Hill, K.

    1987-08-01

    In lower hybrid (LH) discharges, the number of suprathermal electrons is limited by the upper bound on the current density from the q = 1 condition, which is caused by the onset of the m = 1 MHD instability. The stored energy of suprathermal electrons, measured in terms of a poloidal beta, scales with plasma current as I/sub p//sup -1/. Potentially, these bounds represent very restrictive conditions for heating in larger machines. Consequently, it seems necessary to perform experiments where the electrons are driven in both directions, parallel and antiparallel to the magnetic field, i.e., bidirectional scenarios like anticurrent drive or balanced injection. Data from PLT relevant to these ideas are discussed. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Heating and current drive systems for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.; Goranson, P.; Halle, A. von; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N.

    1994-05-24

    The heating and current drive (H and CD) system proposed for the TPX tokamak will consist of ion cyclotron, neutral beam, and lower hybrid systems. It will have 17.5 MW of installed H and CD power initially, and can be upgraded to 45 MW. It will be used to explore advanced confinement and fully current-driven plasma regimes with pulse lengths of up to 1,000 s.

  17. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  18. Beam current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  19. Beam current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kuchnir, Moyses; Mills, Frederick E.

    1987-01-01

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  20. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  1. Beam dynamics design of the Compact Linear Collider Drive Beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajari, Sh. Sanaye; Shaker, H.; Doebert, S.

    2015-11-01

    In the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the RF power for the acceleration of the Main Beam is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel to the main linac. The longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics of the Drive Beam injector has been studied in detail and optimized. The injector consists of a thermionic gun followed by a bunching system, some accelerating structures, and a magnetic chicane. The bunching system contains three sub-harmonic bunchers, a prebuncher, and a traveling wave buncher all embedded in a solenoidal magnetic field. The main characteristic of the Drive Beam injector is the phase coding process done by the sub-harmonic bunching system operating at half the acceleration frequency. This process is essential for the frequency multiplication of the Drive Beam. During the phase coding process the unwanted satellite bunches are produced that adversely affects the machine power efficiency. The main challenge is to reduce the population of particles in the satellite bunches in the presence of strong space-charge forces due to the high beam current. The simulation of the beam dynamics has been carried out with PARMELA with the goal of optimizing the injector performance compared to the existing model studied for the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The emphasis of the optimization was on decreasing the satellite population, the beam loss in the magnetic chicane and limiting the beam emittance growth in transverse plane.

  2. Steady State Tokamak Equilibria without Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Aydemir, A.Y.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-11-01

    Steady state tokamak equilibria without current drive are found. This is made possible by including the potato bootstrap current close to the magnetic axis. Tokamaks with this class of equilibria do not need seed current or current drive, and are intrinsically steady state. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Bootstrapped tokamak with oscillating field current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-07-01

    A magnetic helicity conserving mean-field Ohm's law is used to study bootstrapped tokamaks with oscillating field current drive. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the tokamak bootstrap effect can convert the largely alternating current of oscillating field current drive into a direct toroidal plasma current. This plasma current rectification is due to the intrinsically nonlinear nature of the tokamak bootstrap effect, and suggests that it may be possible to maintain the toroidal current of a tokamak reactor by supplementing the bootstrap current with oscillating field current drive. Steady-state tokamak fusion reactors operating with oscillating field current drive could provide an alternative to tokamak reactors operating with external current drive.

  4. Oscillatory nonhmic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method of the invention maintain a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  5. Oscillatory nonohomic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are described for maintaining a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  6. High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W.

    2012-12-21

    For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

  7. ITER equilibrium with bootstrap currents, lower hybrid current drive and fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A current drive system is proposed for the technology phase of ITER which relies on rf power and bootstrap currents. The rf/bootstrap system permits operation at high safety factor, and we consider the axial value to be q/sub a/ approx. = 1.9, which minimizes the need for seed current near the magnetic axis. Lower hybrid power (/approximately/30 MW) provides current density near the surface, ICRF (/approximately/65 MHz, /approximately/30 MW) fast waves generate current near the axis, and high frequency fast waves (/approximately/250 MHz, /approximately/74 MW) supply the remaining current density. The system is not yet optimized but appears to offer great flexibility (ion heating for ignition, current rampup, etc.) with relatively inexpensive and well developed technology. 29 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Current-Drive Efficiency in a Degenerate Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S. Son and N.J. Fisch

    2005-11-01

    a degenerate plasma, the rates of electron processes are much smaller than the classical model would predict, affecting the efficiencies of current generation by external non-inductive means, such as by electromagnetic radiation or intense ion beams. For electron-based mechanisms, the current-drive efficiency is higher than the classical prediction by more than a factor of 6 in a degenerate hydrogen plasma, mainly because the electron-electron collisions do not quickly slow down fast electrons. Moreover, electrons much faster than thermal speeds are more readily excited without exciting thermal electrons. In ion-based mechanisms of current drive, the efficiency is likewise enhanced due to the degeneracy effects, since the electron stopping power on slow ion beams is significantly reduced.

  9. Nondestructive synchronous beam current monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-12-15

    A fast current transformer is mounted after the deflectors of the Berkeley 88-Inch Cyclotron. The measured signal is amplified and connected to the input of a lock-in amplifier. The lock-in amplifier performs a synchronous detection of the signal at the cyclotron second harmonic frequency. The magnitude of the signal detected is calibrated against a Faraday cup and corresponds to the beam intensity. It has exceptional resolution, long term stability, and can measure the beam current leaving the cyclotron as low as 1 nA.

  10. Imposed-Dynamo Current Drive (IDCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Thomas; Victor, Brian; Nelson, Brian; Hansen, Chris; Akcay, Cihan; Ennis, David; Hossack, Aaron; Marklin, George; Smith, Roger

    2012-10-01

    A mechanism for Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI) current drive has been discovered where the current driving fluctuations are not generated by the plasma but rather are imposed by the injectors.[T.R. Jarboe et al., accepted for publication in Nuclear Fusion] Sheared flow of the electron fluid distorts the imposed fluctuations to drive current. The model accurately predicts the time dependent toroidal current, the injector impedance scaling, and the profile produced in the HIT-SI experiment. These results show that a stable equilibrium can be efficiently sustained with imposed fluctuations and the current profile can, in principle, be controlled. Both are large steps for controlled fusion. Some of the effects of the fluctuations on the confinement of tokamak and spheromak reactors are assessed and the degradation may be tolerable since the required fluctuations, in a reactor, are low (deltaB/B about 0.0001). A larger experiment (HIT-PoP) designed to test the confinement properties of a plasma sustained by IDCD is discussed. Since these very low fluctuation levels can provide current drive for the entire plasma the effect of random fluctuations on the plasma current profile is extremely important. The mechanism is also of interest to plasma self-organization, fast reconnection and plasma physics in general.

  11. Efficiency of current drive by fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    1984-08-01

    The Rosenbluth form for the collision operator for a weakly relativistic plasma is derived. The formalism adopted by Antonsen and Chu can then be used to calculate the efficiency of current drive by fast waves in a relativistic plasma. Accurate numerical results and analytic asymptotic limits for the efficiencies are given.

  12. Dynamic modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.; Valeo, E.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1993-10-01

    A computational model of lower hybrid current drive in the presence of an electric field is described and some results are given. Details of geometry, plasma profiles and circuit equations are treated carefully. Two-dimensional velocity space effects are approximated in a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck treatment.

  13. Theory of current drive in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1987-01-01

    The continuous operation of a tokamak fusion reactor requires, among other things, a means of providing continuously the toroidal current. Such operation is preferred to the conventional pulsed operation, where the plasma current is induced by a time-varying magnetic field. A variety of methods have been proposed to provide continuous current, including methods that utilize particle beams or radio-frequency waves in any of several frequency regimes. Currents as large as half a mega-amp have now been produced in the laboratory by such means, and experimentation in these techniques has now involved major tokamak facilities worldwide.

  14. Theory of current-drive in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.

    1986-12-01

    The continuous operation of a tokamak fusion reactor requires, among other things, a means of providing continuous toroidal current. Such operation is preferred to the conventional pulsed operation, where the plasma current is induced by a time-varying magnetic field. A variety of methods has been proposed to provide continuous current, including methods which utilize particle beams or radio frequency waves in any of several frequency regimes. Currents as large as half a mega-amp have now been produced in the laboratory by such means, and experimentation in these techniques has now involved major tokamak facilities worldwide.

  15. Current Sensor Fault Reconstruction for PMSM Drives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a current sensor fault reconstruction algorithm for the torque closed-loop drive system of an interior PMSM. First, sensor faults are equated to actuator ones by a new introduced state variable. Then, in αβ coordinates, based on the motor model with active flux linkage, a current observer is constructed with a specific sliding mode equivalent control methodology to eliminate the effects of unknown disturbances, and the phase current sensor faults are reconstructed by means of an adaptive method. Finally, an αβ axis current fault processing module is designed based on the reconstructed value. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are verified by simulation and experimental tests on the RT-LAB platform. PMID:26840317

  16. Current Sensor Fault Reconstruction for PMSM Drives

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a current sensor fault reconstruction algorithm for the torque closed-loop drive system of an interior PMSM. First, sensor faults are equated to actuator ones by a new introduced state variable. Then, in αβ coordinates, based on the motor model with active flux linkage, a current observer is constructed with a specific sliding mode equivalent control methodology to eliminate the effects of unknown disturbances, and the phase current sensor faults are reconstructed by means of an adaptive method. Finally, an αβ axis current fault processing module is designed based on the reconstructed value. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are verified by simulation and experimental tests on the RT-LAB platform. PMID:26840317

  17. Collisional current drive in two interpenetrating plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Kugland, N. L.; Park, H.-S.; Pollaine, S. M.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.

    2011-10-01

    The magnetic field generation in two interpenetrating, weakly collisional plasma streams produced by intense lasers is considered. The generation mechanism is very similar to the neutral beam injection current drive in toroidal fusion devices, with the differences related to the absence of the initial magnetic field, short interaction time, and different geometry. Spatial and temporal characteristics of the magnetic field produced in two counterstreaming jets are evaluated; it is shown that the magnetic field of order of 1 T can be generated for modest jet parameters. Conditions under which this mechanism dominates that of the ``Biermann battery'' are discussed. Other settings where the mechanism of the collisional current drive can be important for the generation of seed magnetic fields include astrophysics and interiors of hohlraums.

  18. Collisional current drive in two interpenetrating plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Kugland, N. L.; Park, H.-S.; Pollaine, S. M.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.

    2011-10-15

    The magnetic field generation in two interpenetrating, weakly collisional plasma streams produced by intense lasers is considered. The generation mechanism is very similar to the neutral beam injection current drive in toroidal fusion devices, with the differences related to the absence of the initial magnetic field, short interaction time, and different geometry. Spatial and temporal characteristics of the magnetic field produced in two counterstreaming jets are evaluated; it is shown that the magnetic field of order of 1 T can be generated for modest jet parameters. Conditions under which this mechanism dominates that of the ''Biermann battery'' are discussed. Other settings where the mechanism of the collisional current drive can be important for the generation of seed magnetic fields include astrophysics and interiors of hohlraums.

  19. Fast wave current drive on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1995-07-01

    The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as {gamma} = 0.4 {times} 10{sup 18} T{sub eo} (keV) [A/m{sup 2}W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with dear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. There is some experimental evidence for fast wave absorption by energetic beam ions at high cyclotron harmonic resonances.

  20. Fabrication of Beam-rotating Actuator for Multiple-beam Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Boung Jun; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kwak, Yoon Keun

    2002-05-01

    Current trends in computer and communication industries are towards increasingly higher resolution images and video processing techniques. However, such sophisticated processing tasks require massive storage systems such as a compact disk read only memory (CD-ROM) and digital versatile disc (DVD). Current demands in the development of such systems are higher data density storage media and an improved data transfer rate. The latter is discussed in this paper. A multiple-beam optical disk drive is presented as a method for improving the effective data transfer rate by increasing the beam spot number formed on an optical disk. The beam-rotating actuator is necessary for positioning the multiple-beam onto more than one track. Ray tracing was also employed for the real system setup. The beam-rotating actuator is made up of piezoelectric material, a high-stiffness wire hinge and a dove prism. The actuator has an approximately 1 kHz resonance frequency and a suitable operational range. The dynamic equation for the actuator is derived for the control of the real system.

  1. Noninductive current drive for INTOR: A comparison of four driver options

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Evans, K. Jr.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Ignat, D.W.; Mau, T.K.

    1987-01-01

    The current drive power and normalized efficiency are calculated for the INTOR tokamak, including spatial profiles of the plasma and current density. Current drive requirements are computed for purely steady state operation with no electromotive force and also in the presence of a reversed emf typical of start-up or transformer recharging. Results are obtained for lower-hybrid-waves, high frequency fast waves, low frequency fast waves and neutral beam injection.

  2. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  3. In-line beam current monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A. Jr.; Frost, C.A.

    1984-11-13

    An intense relativistic electron beam current monitor for a gas neutralized beam transport line includes a first foil for conducting plasma current to the wall where it is measured as it traverses an inductive loop formed by a cavity in the wall. An insulator foil separates the first foil from a second conducting foil which returns the current to the plasma environment.

  4. In-line beam current monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl A.; Frost, Charles A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense relativistic electron beam current monitor for a gas neutralized beam transport line includes a first foil for conducting plasma current to the wall where it is measured as it traverses an inductive loop formed by a cavity in the wall. An insulator foil separates the first foil from a second conducting foil which returns the current to the plasma environment.

  5. Plasma current profile shaping with rf-current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehst, D. A.; Evans, K., Jr.

    Calculations of RF current drive in a toroidal geometry are presented. The result is self-consistent in that the tokamak magnetic field generated by the RF-driven current is used to compute the wave trajectory and spatial damping in the plasma. In the next section we derive the quasilinear theory in an axisymmetric torus. In Section 3 we describe a numerical solution to this problem and investigate RF-generated equilibria in a reactor-relevant geometry (A = 6.0; major radius, R0 = 5.25 m; elongation k = 1.6; triangular boundary). By suitably adjusting the RF/plasma parameters a wide range of equilibria can be created. Although we have not optimized our RF-generated equilibria (in particular, we are limited at present to a narrow spectrum) we find evidence that equilibria can be sustained which should lead to attractive tokamak reactors.

  6. High current ion beam transport using solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Spaedtke, P.

    2008-02-15

    In the framework of the future project FAIR several upgrade programs and construction of new facilities are in progress such as the U{sup 4+} upgrade for the existing high current injector and the new 70 MeV proton injector. For both injectors solenoids in the low energy beam transport section are foreseen to inject the beam into the following rf accelerator. The paper presents beam quality measurements of high current ion beams behind a solenoid using a slit-grid emittance measurement device, viewing targets, and a pepper pot measurement device at the high current test bench at GSI.

  7. JINR test facility for studies FEL bunching technique for CLIC driving beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbilov, G.V.; Fateev, A.A.; Ivanov, I.N.

    1995-12-31

    SILUND-21 linear induction accelerator (energy up to 10 MeV, peak current about of 1 kA, pulse duration 50 - 70 ns) is constructed at JINR in the framework of experimental program to study free electron laser physics, a problem of two-beam acceleration and microwave electronics. In this paper we present project of an experiment to adopt the FEL bunching technique for generation of the CLIC driving beam.

  8. Crossed-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W; Edgell, D H; Michel, D T; Froula, D H; Goncharov, V N; Craxton, R S; Divol, L; Epstein, R; Follett, R; Kelly, J H; Kosc, T Z; Maximov, A V; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, P; Myatt, J F; Sangster, T C; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Stoeckl, C

    2012-05-22

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have showed discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicate the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10%-20%. This appears to be due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) that involves electromagnetic-seeded, low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  9. HHFW Current Drive and Heating for Spherical Tokamak Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, T. K.; Chiu, S. C.

    1997-11-01

    High-harmonic fast waves (HHFW) can play useful roles in various operating phases of a spherical tokamak (ST). At steady state, it provides current profile tailoring in the mid-plasma region with the launched N_||-spectrum as a control knob. In the lower-β startup phase, it penetrates the inner core of the plasma, and provides auxiliary heating and current ramp-up. In this paper, we report results of studies of the effectiveness of the HHFW in fulfilling these roles in ST plasmas ranging from present devices (e.g., NSTX) to power plant designs (e.g., ARIES-ST). Modeling is carried out using the CURRAY ray tracing code that was recently upgraded to address issues specific to ST plasmas(S. C. Chiu, et al., submitted to Nucl. Fusion) (1997).. Extending a previous study(T. K. Mau, S. C. Chiu, 12th Top. Conf. on Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas), Savannah, GA (1997)., HHFW current drive on reference NSTX equilibria will be studied, and the issues of thermal and beam ion damping will be addressed in detail. The use of HHFW power in the ARIES-ST power plant design is under investigation, and results on heating and current ramp-up during startup will be reported.

  10. The role of heating and current drive in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W.M.; Haney, S.

    1993-10-18

    This report discusses and summarize the role of heating and non-inductive current drive in ITER as: (1) ITER must have heating power sufficient for ignition. (2) The heating system must be capable of current drive. (3) Steady-state operation is an ``ultimate goal.`` It is recognized that additional heating and current drive power (beyond what is initially installed on ITER) may be required. (4) The ``Ultimate goal of steady-state operation`` means steady-state with Q{sub CD} {ge} 5. Unlike the ``Terms of Reference`` for the ITER CDA, the ``ITER Technical Objectives and Approaches`` for the EDA sets no goal for the neutron wall load during steady-state operation. (5) In addition to bulk current drive, the ITER heating and current drive system should be used for current profile control and for burn control.

  11. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  12. Heating and current drive on NSTX and HHFW experiments on CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.; Grisham, L.

    1998-07-01

    The NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) device to be built at Princeton is a low-aspect-ratio toroidal device that has the achievement of high toroidal beta ({approximately} 45%) and noninductive operation as two of its main research goals. To achieve these goals, significant auxiliary-heating and current-drive systems are required. Present plans include ECH (electron cyclotron heating) for preionized and start-up assist, HHFW (high harmonic fast wave) for heating and current drive, and, eventually, NBI (neutral-beam injection) for heating, current drive and plasma rotation. In support of the NSTX program, experimental tests of HHFW physics have been performed on the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U).

  13. K130 beam current measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, J.; Kotilainen, P.; Hänninen, V.; Liukkonen, E.; Kaski, K.

    1994-03-01

    A measurement system for very low currents, developed to be used in the K130 cyclotron at University of Jyväskylä, is described. The beam intensity measurement is implemented with a current preamplifier and signal multiplexor. The measurement is controlled and visualised with a commercial data acquisition card integrated in a PC.

  14. WAVEGUIDE COUPLER KICK TO BEAM BUNCH AND CURRENT DEPENDENCY ON SRF CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Genfa Wu; Haipeng Wang; Charles Reece; Robert Rimmer

    2008-02-11

    JLAB SRF cavities employ waveguide type fundamental power couplers (FPC). The FPC design for the 7-cell upgrade cavities was optimized to minimize the dipole field kick. For continuous wave (CW) operation, the forwarding RF power will be at different magnitude to drive the different beam current and cavity gradient. This introduces some deviation from optimized FPC field for varying beam loading. This article analyzes the beam behavior both in centroid kick and head-tail kick under different beam loading conditions.

  15. Achromatic beam transport of High Current Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-02-01

    The high current injector (HCI) provides intense ion beams of high charge state using a high temperature superconducting ECR ion source. The ion beam is accelerated upto a final energy of 1.8 MeV/u due to an electrostatic potential, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a drift tube linac (DTL). The ion beam has to be transported to superconducting LINAC which is around 50 m away from DTL. This section is termed as high energy beam transport section (HEBT) and is used to match the beam both in transverse and longitudinal phase space to the entrance of LINAC. The HEBT section is made up of four 90 deg. achromatic bends and interconnecting magnetic quadrupole triplets. Two RF bunchers have been used for longitudinal phase matching to the LINAC. The ion optical design of HEBT section has been simulated using different beam dynamics codes like TRACEWIN, GICOSY and TRACE 3D. The field computation code OPERA 3D has been utilized for hardware design of all the magnets. All the dipole and quadrupole magnets have been field mapped and their test results such as edge angles measurements, homogeneity and harmonic analysis etc. are reported. The whole design of HEBT section has been performed such that the most of the beam optical components share same hardware design and there is ample space for beam diagnostics as per geometry of the building. Many combination of achromatic bends have been simulated to transport the beam in HEBT section but finally the four 90 deg. achromatic bend configuration is found to be the best satisfying all the geometrical constraints with simplified beam tuning process in real time.

  16. Plasma heating and current drive using intense, pulsed microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1988-01-01

    The use of powerful new microwave sources, e.g., free-electron lasers and relativistic gyrotrons, provide unique opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes in the electron-cyclotron and lower-hybrid ranges of frequencies. These high-power, pulsed sources have a number of technical advantages over conventional, low-intensity sources; and their use can lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and better penetration into a reactor-grade plasma in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. This paper reports theoretical progress both in modeling absorption and current drive for intense pulses and in analyzing some of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities and nonlinear self-focusing. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Fast wave current drive: Experimental status and reactor prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    The fast wave is one of the two possible wave polarizations which propagate according to the basic theory of cold plasmas. It is distinguished from the other (slow wave) branch by having an electric field vector which is mainly orthogonal to the confining magnetic field of the plasma. The plasma and fast wave qualitatively assume different behavior depending on the frequency range of the launched wave. The high frequency fast wave (HFFW), with a frequency (..omega..2..pi.. )approximately) GHz) much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency (..cap omega../sub i/), suffers electron Landau damping and drives current by supplying parallel momentum to superthermal electrons in a fashion similar to lower hybrid (slow wave) current drive. In the simple theory the HFFW should be superior to the slow wave and can propagate to very high density and temperature without impediment. Experiments, however, have not conclusively shown that HFFW current drive can be achieved at densities above the slow wave current drive limit, possibly due to conversion of the launched fast waves into slow waves by density fluctuations. Alternatively, the low frequency fast wave (LFFW), with frequencies ()approxreverse arrowlt) 100 MHz) only a few times the ion cyclotron frequency, is damped by electron Landau damping and, in a hot plasma ()approxreverse arrowgt) 10 keV), by electron transit time magnetic pumping; current drive is achieved by pushing superthermal electrons, and efficiency is prediocted to be slightly better than for lower hybrid current drive. Most significantly, the slow wave does not propagate in high density plasma when ..omega.. )approximately) ..cap omega../sub i/, so parasitic coupling to the slow wave can be avoided, and no density and temperture limitations are foreseen. Experiments with fast wve current drive invariably find current drive efficiency as good as obtained in lower hybrid experiments at comparable, low temperatures. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Approximate quantitative relationships for rotating magnetic field current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugrass, W. N.; Ohnishi, M.

    1999-08-01

    A simplified model for the rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive in an infinitely long cylindrical plasma is used to obtain approximate relationships between the fluid flow velocities, collisionality and degree of nonlinearity. These approximate relationships provide simple quantitative estimates for the basic conditions required for the RMF current drive technique to be applied successfully. In particular, the condition required for the motion of the ion fluid not to be flux-preserving, is evaluated quantitatively for the first time.

  19. Key Aspects of EBW Heating and Current Drive in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jakub; Decker, Joan; Preinhaelter, Josef; Taylor, Gary; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2010-11-01

    Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating and current drive is modeled by coupled mode conversion, ray-tracing (AMR) and Fokker-Planck (LUKE) codes. Deposition and current drive profiles are determined for EBW with various injection parameters under realistic spherical tokamak conditions. There parameters are varied to investigate the robustness of the applied scenarios. The importance of relativistic corrections to EBW absorption is considered. The differences between various relativistic models are explored.

  20. Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.

    1992-09-01

    DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high {beta} VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

  1. Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D. ); Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J. ); Arnold, W.; Martin, S. )

    1992-09-01

    DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high [beta] VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

  2. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, John M.; Clifft, Benny E.; Bollinger, Lowell M.

    1995-01-01

    A beam current limiter for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity.

  3. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1995-08-08

    A beam current limiter is disclosed for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity. 6 figs.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Non-Inductive Current Driven Scenario in EAST Using Neutral Beam Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Wu, Bin; Wang, Jinfang; Wang, Ji; Hu, Chundong

    2015-01-01

    For achieving the scientific mission of long pulse and high performance operation, experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) applies fully superconducting magnet technology and is equiped with high power auxiliary heating system. Besides RF (Radio Frequency) wave heating, neutral beam injection (NBI) is an effective heating and current drive method in fusion research. NBCD (Neutral Beam Current Drive) as a viable non-inductive current drive source plays an important role in quasi-steady state operating scenario for tokamak. The non-inductive current driven scenario in EAST only by NBI is predicted using the TSC/NUBEAM code. At the condition of low plasma current and moderate plasma density, neutral beam injection heats the plasma effectively and NBCD plus bootstrap current accounts for a large proportion among the total plasma current for the flattop time.

  5. MHD Simulation of RF Current Drive in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. A.; Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2013-10-01

    Auxiliary current drive using the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) may advance the performance of the RFP. In prior computations, a hypothetical edge-localized current is shown to suppress tearing activity that governs transport in the RFP. Ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the current drive. To support MST EBW studies, an integrated modeling scheme incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ~ 104) agree with the previous work but at MST-like S (S ~ 3 × 106) show unexpected results. The effect on the current profile by the rf-driven force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as S increases. Simulations reproduce the experimentally observed periodic current profile relaxation events (sawteeth). With rf drive, reduction of tearing mode amplitudes is seen, but is limited to periods between each sawtooth, which persist with up to 10 MW of rf. Prolonged low tearing amplitudes are predicted with the combination of current drive and reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, these simulations show that the resistivity profile has a strong effect on the optimal current drive profile for mode stabilization. Work supported by US DoE.

  6. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed.

  7. Current density compression of intense ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, Adam Bennett

    Current density compression of intense ion beams in space and time is required for heavy ion fusion, in order to achieve the necessary intensities to implode an inertial confinement fusion target. Longitudinal compression to high current in a short pulse is achieved by imposing a velocity tilt upon the space-charge-dominated charge bunch, and a variety of means exist for simultaneous transverse focusing to a coincident focal plane. Compression to the desired levels requires sufficient neutralization of the beam by a pre-formed plasma during final transport. The physics of current density compression is studied in scaled experiments relevant for the operating regime of a heavy ion driver, and related theory and advanced particle-in-cell simulations provide valuable insight into the physical and technological limitations involved. A fast Faraday cup measures longitudinal compression ratios greater than 50 with pulse durations less than 5 ns, in excellent agreement with reduced models and sophisticated simulations, which account for many experimental parameters and effects. The detailed physics of achieving current density compression in the laboratory is reviewed. Quantitative examples explore the dependency of longitudinal compression on effects such as the finite-size acceleration gap, voltage waveform accuracy, variation in initial beam temperature, pulse length, intended fractional velocity tilt, and energy uncertainty, as well as aberration within focusing elements and plasma neutralization processes. In addition, plasma evolution in experimental sources responsible for the degree of beam neutralization is studied numerically, since compression stagnation occurs under inadequate neutralization conditions, which may excite nonlinear collective excitations due to beam-plasma interactions. The design of simultaneous focusing experiments using both existing and upgraded hardware is provided, and parametric variations important for compression physics are

  8. SNS Ring and RTBT Beam Current Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokland, W.; Armstrong, G.; Deibele, C.; Pogge, J.; Gaidash, V.

    2006-11-01

    The SNS Diagnostics Group has implemented Beam Current Monitors (BCM) for the Ring and RTBT (Ring to Target Beam Transferline). In the Ring, the BCM must handle a thousand-fold increase of intensity during the accumulation, and in the RTBT, the BCM must communicate the integrated charge of the beam pulse in real-time for every shot to the target division for correlation with the produced neutrons. This paper describes the development of a four channel solution for the Ring BCM and the use of FPGA for the RTBT BCM to deliver the total charge to the target over a fiber optic network. Both system versions are based on the same commercial digitizer board.

  9. Prospects for Ebw Heating and Current Drive on Spherical Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, J.; Preinhaelter, J.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Taylor, G.; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2011-02-01

    The electrostatic electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can provide localised on- and off-axis heating and current drive in typically overdense (high-β) spherical tori (ST) where the usual electromagnetic EC modes are cut-off. Hence, the EBW is a candidate for plasma control and stabilisation in such devices. We present here a modelling of EBW heating and current drive in realistic ST conditions, particularly in typical NSTX equilibria and in model equilibria for NHTX [1] and MAST Upgrade [2,3]. The EBW injection parameters are varied in order to find optimized scenarios and possible ways to control the deposition location and the driven current. It is shown that EBWs can be deposited and efficiently drive current at any radial location.

  10. Note: A real-time beam current density meter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Junliang; Yu Deyang; Ruan Fangfang; Xue Yingli; Wang Wei

    2013-03-15

    We have developed a real-time beam current density meter for charged particle beams. It measures the mean current density by collimating a uniform and large diameter primary beam. The suppression of the secondary electrons and the deflection of the beam were simulated, and it was tested with a 105 keV Ar{sup 7+} ion beam.

  11. Modeling of LH current drive in self-consistent elongated tokamak MHD equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D.T.; Devoto, R.S.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.; Yugo, J.

    1989-05-09

    Calculations of non-inductive current drive typically have been used with model MHD equilibria which are independently generated from an assumed toroidal current profile or from a fit to an experiment. Such a method can lead to serious errors since the driven current can dramatically alter the equilibrium and changes in the equilibrium B-fields can dramatically alter the current drive. The latter effect is quite pronounced in LH current drive where the ray trajectories are sensitive to the local values of the magnetic shear and the density gradient. In order to overcome these problems, we have modified a LH simulation code to accommodate elongated plasmas with numerically generated equilibria. The new LH module has been added to the ACCOME code which solves for current drive by neutral beams, electric fields, and bootstrap effects in a self-consistent 2-D equilibrium. We briefly describe the model in the next section and then present results of a study of LH current drive in ITER. 2 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Control of the current density profile with lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Chu, T.K.; Gettelfinger, G.; Greenough, N.; Hatcher, R.; Ignat, D.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kozub, T.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Sun, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; Valeo, E.; von Goeler, S.; Blush, L.; Doerner, R.; Schmitz, L.; Tynan, G.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Harris, J.; Hirshman, S.; Isler, R.; Lee, D.; Jones, S.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; Levinton, F.; Timini, F.

    1993-07-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is being explored as a means to control the current density profile on PBX-M with the goal of raising the central safety factor q(O) to values of 1.5-2 to facilitate access to a full-volume second stable regime. Initial experiments have been conducted with up to 400 kW of 4.6 GHz LH power in circular and indented plasmas with modest parameters. A tangential-viewing two-dimensional hard x-ray imaging diagnostic has been used to observe the bremsstrahlung emission from the suprathermal electrons generated during LHCD. Hollow hard x-ray images have indicated off-axis localization of the driven current. A serious obstacle to the control of the current density profile with LHCD is the concomitant generation of MHD activity, which can seriously degrade the confinement of suprathermal electrons. By combining neutral beam injection with LHCD, an MHD-free condition has been obtained where q(O) is raised above 1.

  13. Current drive experiments in the Helicity Injected Torus - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Mueller, D.

    2006-10-01

    The HIT-II spherical torus (ST) device has demonstrated four toroidal plasma current drive configurations to form and sustain a tokamak: 1) inductive (ohmic) current drive, 2) coaxial helicity injection (CHI) current drive, 3) CHI initiated plasmas with ohmic sustainment (CHI+OH), and 4) ohmically initiated plasmas with CHI edge current drive (OH+ECD). CHI discharges with a sufficiently high ratio of injector current to toroidal field current form a closed flux core, and amplify the injector poloidal flux through magnetic reconnection. CHI+OH plasmas are more robust than unassisted ohmic discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds. Finally, edge CHI can enhance the plasma current of an ohmic discharge without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT-II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings, applicable parametric operating spaces, and requirements to produce these discharges. Thomson scattering measurements and EFIT simulations are used to evaluate confinement in several representative plasmas. Finally, we outline extensions to the HIT-II CHI studies that could be performed with NSTX, SUNIST, or other ST devices.

  14. Current drive by coaxial helicity injection in a spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. Z.; Boozer, A. H.

    2004-05-01

    Noninductive current drive by coaxial helicity injection can be understood through the poloidal flux evolution of the toroidally averaged magnetic field B¯0. In the open flux region of B¯0, electrostatic biasing provides an effective loop voltage that overcomes the resistive decay and supports the dynamo loop voltage in the closed flux region via the primary nonaxisymmetric open field line kinks. The current gradient in the closed flux region of B¯0 drives secondary nonaxisymmetric closed flux magnetohydrodynamical modes that facilitate further current relaxation toward the magnetic axis. The decreasing parallel current gradient and high-q magnetic surfaces as one approaches the magnetic axis implies that the eventual current relaxation consistent with magnetic confinement must benefit from a cascade of weaker and comparatively short wavelength modes localized to the high-q resonant home flux surfaces.

  15. Numerical modeling of lower hybrid heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Valeo, E.J.; Eder, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    The generation of currents in toroidal plasma by application of waves in the lower hybrid frequency range involves the interplay of several physical phenomena which include: wave propagation in toroidal geometry, absorption via wave-particle resonances, the quasilinear generation of strongly nonequilibrium electron and ion distribution functions, and the self-consistent evolution of the current density in such a nonequilibrium plasma. We describe a code, LHMOD, which we have developed to treat these aspects of current drive and heating in tokamaks. We present results obtained by applying the code to a computation of current ramp-up and to an investigation of the possible importance of minority hydrogen absorption in a deuterium plasma as the ''density limit'' to current drive is approached.

  16. Current Control in ITER Steady State Plasmas With Neutral Beam Steering

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2009-09-10

    Predictions of quasi steady state DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The plasma temperatures, densities, boundary shape, and total current (9 - 10 MA) anticipated for ITER steady state plasmas are specified. Current drive by negative ion neutral beam injection, lower-hybrid, and electron cyclotron resonance are calculated. Four modes of operation with different combinations of current drive are studied. For each mode, scans with the NNBI aimed at differing heights in the plasma are performed to study effects of current control on the q profile. The timeevolution of the currents and q are calculated to evaluate long duration transients. Quasi steady state, strongly reversed q profiles are predicted for some beam injection angles if the current drive and bootstrap currents are sufficiently large.

  17. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ∼ 10{sup 4}) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ∼ 3×10{sup 6}) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  18. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Diem, S.; Forest, C. B.; Harvey, R. W.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2014-02-01

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ˜ 104) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ˜ 3×106) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  19. 53. Drive shaft, motors, eddie currents, brakes, and differential gears ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Drive shaft, motors, eddie currents, brakes, and differential gears in south machinery room (interior of both machinery rooms is identical). Facing east. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Alternating-Current Motor Drive for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauthamer, S.; Rippel, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    New electric drive controls speed of a polyphase as motor by varying frequency of inverter output. Closed-loop current-sensing circuit automatically adjusts frequency of voltage-controlled oscillator that controls inverter frequency, to limit starting and accelerating surges. Efficient inverter and ac motor would give electric vehicles extra miles per battery charge.

  1. Electric machine and current source inverter drive system

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S

    2014-06-24

    A drive system includes an electric machine and a current source inverter (CSI). This integration of an electric machine and an inverter uses the machine's field excitation coil for not only flux generation in the machine but also for the CSI inductor. This integration of the two technologies, namely the U machine motor and the CSI, opens a new chapter for the component function integration instead of the traditional integration by simply placing separate machine and inverter components in the same housing. Elimination of the CSI inductor adds to the CSI volumetric reduction of the capacitors and the elimination of PMs for the motor further improve the drive system cost, weight, and volume.

  2. Electron beam induced current in the high injection regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Paul M.; Yoon, Heayoung P.; Koirala, Prakash; Collins, Robert W.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2015-07-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful technique which measures the charge collection efficiency of photovoltaics with sub-micron spatial resolution. The exciting electron beam results in a high generation rate density of electron-hole pairs, which may drive the system into nonlinear regimes. An analytic model is presented which describes the EBIC response when the total electron-hole pair generation rate exceeds the rate at which carriers are extracted by the photovoltaic cell, and charge accumulation and screening occur. The model provides a simple estimate of the onset of the high injection regime in terms of the material resistivity and thickness, and provides a straightforward way to predict the EBIC lineshape in the high injection regime. The model is verified by comparing its predictions to numerical simulations in one- and two-dimensions. Features of the experimental data, such as the magnitude and position of maximum collection efficiency versus electron beam current, are consistent with the three-dimensional model.

  3. Electron beam induced current in the high injection regime.

    PubMed

    Haney, Paul M; Yoon, Heayoung P; Koirala, Prakash; Collins, Robert W; Zhitenev, Nikolai B

    2015-07-24

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful technique which measures the charge collection efficiency of photovoltaics with sub-micron spatial resolution. The exciting electron beam results in a high generation rate density of electron-hole pairs, which may drive the system into nonlinear regimes. An analytic model is presented which describes the EBIC response when the total electron-hole pair generation rate exceeds the rate at which carriers are extracted by the photovoltaic cell, and charge accumulation and screening occur. The model provides a simple estimate of the onset of the high injection regime in terms of the material resistivity and thickness, and provides a straightforward way to predict the EBIC lineshape in the high injection regime. The model is verified by comparing its predictions to numerical simulations in one- and two-dimensions. Features of the experimental data, such as the magnitude and position of maximum collection efficiency versus electron beam current, are consistent with the three-dimensional model.

  4. Current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Cesario, R; Amicucci, L; Cardinali, A; Castaldo, C; Marinucci, M; Panaccione, L; Santini, F; Tudisco, O; Apicella, M L; Calabrò, G; Cianfarani, C; Frigione, D; Galli, A; Mazzitelli, G; Mazzotta, C; Pericoli, V; Schettini, G; Tuccillo, A A

    2010-08-10

    Progress in thermonuclear fusion energy research based on deuterium plasmas magnetically confined in toroidal tokamak devices requires the development of efficient current drive methods. Previous experiments have shown that plasma current can be driven effectively by externally launched radio frequency power coupled to lower hybrid plasma waves. However, at the high plasma densities required for fusion power plants, the coupled radio frequency power does not penetrate into the plasma core, possibly because of strong wave interactions with the plasma edge. Here we show experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) based on theoretical predictions that nonlinear interactions diminish when the peripheral plasma electron temperature is high, allowing significant wave penetration at high density. The results show that the coupled radio frequency power can penetrate into high-density plasmas due to weaker plasma edge effects, thus extending the effective range of lower hybrid current drive towards the domain relevant for fusion reactors.

  5. PHYSICS OF ELCTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; PRATER,R; LUCE,TC; ELLIS,RA; HARVEY,RW; KINSEY,JE; LAO,LL; LOHR,J; MAKOWSKI,MA

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 PHYSICS OF ELCTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining the effect of trapped particles on the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency. The measured ECCD efficiency increases as the deposition location is moved towards the inboard midplane or towards smaller minor radius for both co and counter injection. The measured ECCD efficiency also increases with increasing electron density and/or temperature. The experimental ECCD is compared to both the linear theory (Toray-GA) as well as a quasilinear Fokker-Planck model (CQL3D). The experimental ECCD is found to be in better agreement with the more complete Fokker-Planck calculation, especially for cases of high rf power density and/or loop voltage. The narrow width of the measured ECCD profile is consistent with only low levels of radial transport for the current carrying electrons.

  6. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Jackson, G.L.; Lippmann, S.I.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M. . Plasma Fusion Center); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high {beta} target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n{sub {parallel}} value ({approx equal} 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90{degree}) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  7. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Jackson, G.L.; Lippmann, S.I.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high {beta} target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n{sub {parallel}} value ({approx_equal} 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90{degree}) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  8. An Imposed Dynamo Current Drive Experiment: Demonstration of Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Thomas; Hansen, Chris; Hossack, Aaron; Marklin, George; Morgan, Kyle; Nelson, Brian; Sutherland, Derek; Victor, Brian

    2014-10-01

    An experiment for studying and developing the efficient sustainment of a spheromak with sufficient confinement (current-drive power heats the plasma to its stability β-limit) and in the keV temperature range is discussed. A high- β spheromak sustained by imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) is justified because: previous transient experiments showed sufficient confinement in the keV range with no external toroidal field coil; recent results on HIT-SI show sustainment with sufficient confinement at low temperature; the potential of IDCD of solving other fusion issues; a very attractive reactor concept; and the general need for efficient current drive in magnetic fusion. The design of a 0.55 m minor radius machine with the required density control, wall loading, and neutral shielding for a 2 s pulse is presented. Peak temperatures of 1 keV and toroidal currents of 1.35 MA and 16% wall-normalized plasma beta are envisioned. The experiment is large enough to address the key issues yet small enough for rapid modification and for extended MHD modeling of startup and code validation.

  9. System studies of rf current drive for MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. K.; Burke, D. R.; Diem, S.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Harvey, R. W.; Hendries, E. R.; Kaufman, M. C.; Seltzman, A. H.; Thomas, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Two rf schemes are being studied on the MST reversed field pinch for their potential in current profile control experiments. MHD modeling has shown that a substantial externally-driven off axis parallel current can improve stability of the dominant core tearing modes. A radially localized axisymmetric population of fast electrons has been observed by SXR emission during LH injection ( 100kW at 800MHz), and is consistent with CQL3D modeling which predicts a small driven current. Computational work suggests that doubling the input power will statistically improve the LH-induced SXR signal to background ratio, and that about 2MW of injected power (an order of magnitude increase) will drive enough current for stabilization of tearing modes. Additionally, a 1 MW 5.5 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) experiment is under construction, which utilizes a very simple and compact antenna compatible with the demands of the RFP. EBW allows access to electron cyclotron heating and current drive in the overdense plasma. Coupling of the external electromagnetic wave to the EBW has been demonstrated, and initial tests at ˜100kW power have produced a small, localized xray flux consistent with rf heating and high diffusivity of fast electrons. Computational work is currently underway to answer the very important questions of how much power is required, and what level of electron diffusivity is tolerable, to generate a consequential amount of EBW current.

  10. Transient and quasisteady behavior with rotating magnetic field current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren C.

    2001-07-01

    The time-dependent behavior of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive is investigated using a two-fluid model. The important new factor is the addition of transverse ion mobility in contrast to rigid-ion models of the past. The equations simplify conveniently, allowing the behavior on each surface (r=const) to be isolated, which permits a quadrature solution for the ion fluid rotation. A rapid transient phase leads to quasisteady behavior that evolves on the relatively slow diffusion timescale. The fast transient timescale is set by the ion inertia. Unless there is an ion momentum source to balance the electron drag on the ion fluid, there is no quasisteady current drive effect. Collisions with neutrals offer such a momentum source in some experiments, notably rotamaks and the Star Thrust Experiment. Other sources of ion momentum are essential for RMF current drive in hotter, fusion-relevant plasmas. The properties of the quasisteady state are found, including the self-consistent ion fluid rotation rate and radial electric field, and RMF corrections on the pressure balance.

  11. Transient effects in rotating magnetic field current drive*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren

    2000-10-01

    The time-dependent behavior of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive is investigated using a two-fluid model. The time and radius dependence separates so that the time-dependent behavior can be found by quadrature. This leads to the prediction of transient behavior leading rapidly to a quasi-steady state that evolves on a diffusion timescale. During the transient phase the ions and electrons spin up together. The timescale of the transient phase is set by the ion inertia in balance with ion-electron friction. Unless there is an additional ion momentum source to balance the resistive friction with the electrons, the quasi-steady state has no current drive effect. Collisions with neutrals is a momentum source in some experiments, notably rotamaks and the STX experiment at the University of Washington. Other sources of ion momentum will be needed for effective RMF current drive in hotter, fusion-relevant plasmas. The properties of the quasi-steady state are found, including the self-consistent ion rotation rate and radial electric field, and RMF corrections on the pressure balance. *This research is supported by USDOE grant DE-FG0398ER54480.

  12. REX, a 5-MV pulsed-power source for driving high-brightness electron beam diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.L.; Kauppila, T.J.; Ridlon, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The Relativistic Electron-beam Experiment, or REX accelerator, is a pulsed-power source capable of driving a 100-ohm load at 5 MV, 50 kA, 45 ns (FWHM) with less than a 10-ns rise and 15-ns fall time. This paper describes the pulsed-power modifications, modelling, and extensive measurements on REX to allow it to drive high impedance (100s of ohms) diode loads with a shaped voltage pulse. A major component of REX is the 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick Lucite insulator with embedded grading rings that separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. A radially tailored, liquid-based resistor provides a stiff voltage source that is insensitive to small variations of the diode current and, in addition, optimizes the electric field stress across the vacuum side of the insulator. The high-current operation of REX employs both multichannel peaking and point-plane diverter switches. This mode reduces the prepulse to less than 2 kV and the postpulse to less than 5% of the energy delivered to the load. Pulse shaping for the present diode load is done through two L-C transmission line filters and a tapered, glycol-based line adjacent to the water PFL and output switch. This has allowed REX to drive a diode producing a 4-MV, 4.5-kA, 55-ns flat-top electron beam with a normalized Lapostolle emittance of 0.96 mm-rad corresponding to a beam brightness in excess of 4.4 {times} 10{sup 8} A/m{sup 2} {minus}rad{sup 2}. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  13. Direct Calculations of Current Drive with a Full Wave Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John C.; Phillips, Cynthia K.

    1997-11-01

    We have developed a current drive package that evaluates the current driven by fast magnetosonic waves in arbitrary flux geometry. An expression for the quasilinear flux has been derived which accounts for coupling between modes in the spectrum of waves launched from the antenna. The field amplitudes are calculated in the full wave code, FISIC, and the current response function, \\chi, also known as the Spitzer function, is determined with Charles Karney's Fokker-Planck code, adj.f. Both codes have been modified to incorporate the same numerical equilibria. To model the effects of a trapped particle population, the bounce averaged equations for current and power are used, and the bounce averaged flux is calculated. The computer model is benchmarked against the homogenous equations for a high aspect ratio case in which the expected agreement is confirmed. Results from cases for TFTR, NSTX and CDX-U are contrasted with the predictions of the Ehst-Karney parameterization of current drive for circular equilibria. For theoretical background, please see the authors' archive of papers. (http://w3.pppl.gov/ ~jwright/Publications)

  14. Current drive for stability of thermonuclear plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Galli, A.; Panaccione, L.; Paoletti, F.; Schettini, G.; Spigler, R.; Tuccillo, A.

    2016-01-01

    To produce in a thermonuclear fusion reactor based on the tokamak concept a sufficiently high fusion gain together stability necessary for operations represent a major challenge, which depends on the capability of driving non-inductive current in the hydrogen plasma. This request should be satisfied by radio-frequency (RF) power suitable for producing the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, recently demonstrated successfully occurring also at reactor-graded high plasma densities. An LHCD-based tool should be in principle capable of tailoring the plasma current density in the outer radial half of plasma column, where other methods are much less effective, in order to ensure operations in the presence of unpredictably changes of the plasma pressure profiles. In the presence of too high electron temperatures even at the periphery of the plasma column, as envisaged in DEMO reactor, the penetration of the coupled RF power into the plasma core was believed for long time problematic and, only recently, numerical modelling results based on standard plasma wave theory, have shown that this problem should be solved by using suitable parameter of the antenna power spectrum. We show here further information on the new understanding of the RF power deposition profile dependence on antenna parameters, which supports the conclusion that current can be actively driven over a broad layer of the outer radial half of plasma column, thus enabling current profile control necessary for the stability of a reactor.

  15. RF Current Drive and Heating Experiments on MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Hendries, E. R.; Kaufman, M. C.; Seltzman, A. H.; Diem, S. J.; Harvey, R. W.

    2011-10-01

    Two rf schemes are being studied on the MST reversed field pinch for possible use in current profile control experiments. MHD modeling has shown that externally driven off-axis parallel current can improve stability of the dominant core tearing modes. Coupling experiments at the 100 kW level with lower hybrid (LH) and electron Bernstein waves (EBW) both show soft x-ray emission consistent with rf heating of electrons, and a small driven current in the LH case. Computational work in both cases suggests that, for sufficiently low energetic electron diffusivity, between 2 and 5 MW should drive enough current for mode stabilization. A 1 MW EBW system is under construction, with a compact antenna allowing variable polarization. A decision on higher power LH development will follow tests of a repaired antenna. Status and results of power and coupling tests will be presented.

  16. Equilibrium evolution in oscillating-field current-drive experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, K. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Blair, A. P.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Stone, D. R.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2010-08-01

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a proposed method of steady-state toroidal plasma sustainment in which ac poloidal and toroidal loop voltages are applied to produce a dc plasma current. OFCD is added to standard, inductively sustained reversed-field pinch plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations during a single cycle are measured and analyzed for different relative phases between the two OFCD voltages and for OFCD off. For OFCD phases leading to the most added plasma current, the measured energy confinement is slightly better than that for OFCD off. By contrast, the phase of the maximum OFCD helicity-injection rate also has the maximum decay rate, which is ascribed to transport losses during discrete magnetic-fluctuation events induced by OFCD. Resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiments reproduce the observed phase dependence of the added current.

  17. Conceptual Design of the Drive Beam for a PWFA-LC

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, S.; Hogan, M.J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seryi, A.; Braun, H.H.; Corsini, R.; Delahaye, J.P.; /DESY

    2009-08-03

    Plasma Wake-Field Acceleration (PWFA) has demonstrated acceleration gradients above 50 GeV/m. Simulations have shown drive/witness bunch configurations that yield small energy spreads in the accelerated witness bunch and high energy transfer efficiency from the drive bunch to the witness bunch, ranging from 30% for a Gaussian drive bunch to 95% for bunch with triangular shaped longitudinal profile. These results open the opportunity for a linear collider that could be compact, efficient and more cost effective than the present microwave technologies. A concept of a PWFA-based Linear Collider (PWFA-LC) has been developed by the PWFA collaboration. Here we will describe the conceptual design and optimization of the drive beam, which includes the drive beam linac and distribution system. We apply experience of the CLIC drive beam design and demonstration in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) to this study. We discuss parameter optimization of the drive beam linac structure and evaluate the drive linac efficiency in terms of the drive beam distribution scheme and the klystron/modulator requirements.

  18. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.

    2013-11-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

  19. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.

    2013-11-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

  20. High frequency fast wave current drive for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Nightingale, M.

    2011-12-01

    A steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) requires a high efficiency current drive system, from plug to driven mega-amps. RF systems working in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have high efficiency from plug to antenna but a limited current drive (CD) efficiency and centrally peaked CD profiles. The latter feature is not adequate for a SSTR where the current should be sufficiently broad to keep the central safety factor (possibly significantly) above 1. In addition, the fact that the fast wave (FW) is evanescent at the edge limits coupling, requiring high voltage operation, which makes the system dependent on plasma edge properties and prone to arcing, reducing its reliability. A possible way to overcome these weaknesses is to operate at higher frequency (10 times or more the cyclotron frequency). The advantages are: (1) The coupling can be much better (waves propagate in vacuum) if the parallel refractive index n∥ is kept below one, (2) The FW group velocity tends to align to the magnetic field, so the power circumnavigates the magnetic axis and can drive off-axis current, (3) Due to the latter property, n∥ can be upshifted along the wave propagation path, allowing low n∥ launch (hence good coupling, large CD efficiency) with ultimately good electron absorption (which requires higher n∥). Note however that the n∥ upshift is a self-organized feature, that electron absorption is in competition with α-particle absorption and that uncoupling of the FW from the lower hybrid resonance at the edge requires n∥ slightly above one. The latter possibly counterproductive features might complicate the picture. The different aspects of this potentially attractive off-axis FWCD scheme are discussed.

  1. Lower hybrid heating and current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.E.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.

    1983-03-01

    800 MHz lower hybrid waves have been launched into PLT with a six waveguide coupler. Recent improvements have allowed powers up to 400 kW to be launched with good coupling (R approx. 10 to 25%). Experiments at low density (anti n/sub e/ < 7 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, i.e., ..omega../..omega../sub LH/ > 2) have demonstrated current drive and plasma heating. Experiments at higher densities have produced hot-ion tails, but so far have shown inefficient body heating. To date, only a limited parameters space has been investigated at high power.

  2. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. J. Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-10

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  3. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  4. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-05-11

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  5. A lower hybrid current drive system for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, G. T.; Bécoulet, A.; Jacquinot, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Bae, Y. S.; Beaumont, B.; Belo, J. H.; Berger-By, G.; Bizarro, João P. S.; Bonoli, P.; Cho, M. H.; Decker, J.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Garcia, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Goniche, M.; Gormezano, C.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Kazarian, F.; Kessel, C.; Kim, S. H.; Kwak, J. G.; Jeong, J. H.; Lister, J. B.; Litaudon, X.; Magne, R.; Milora, S.; Mirizzi, F.; Namkung, W.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Park, S. I.; Parker, R.; Peysson, Y.; Rasmussen, D.; Sharma, P. K.; Schneider, M.; Synakowski, E.; Tanga, A.; Tuccillo, A.; Wan, Y. X.

    2009-07-01

    A 20 MW/5 GHz lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system was initially due to be commissioned and used for the second mission of ITER, i.e. the Q = 5 steady state target. Though not part of the currently planned procurement phase, it is now under consideration for an earlier delivery. In this paper, both physics and technology conceptual designs are reviewed. Furthermore, an appropriate work plan is also developed. This work plan for design, R&D, procurement and installation of a 20 MW LHCD system on ITER follows the ITER Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) T13-05 task instructions. It gives more details on the various scientific and technical implications of the system, without presuming on any work or procurement sharing amongst the possible ITER partnersb The LHCD system of ITER is not part of the initial cost sharing.. This document does not commit the Institutions or Domestic Agencies of the various authors in that respect.

  6. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-05-16

    Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy-ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX inertial confinement fusion target physics code shows the ion range increasing fourfold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16% to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

  7. Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Strategy for Polar Drive at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Radha, P. B.; Marshall, F. J.; Seka, W.; Michel, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) causes two-beam energy exchange via stimulated Brillouin scattering, which reduces absorbed light and implosion velocity, alters time-resolved scattered-light spectra, and redistributes absorbed light. These effects reduce target performance in symmetric direct-drive and polar-drive (PD) experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The CBET package (Adaawam) incorporated into the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO is an integral part of the 3-D ray-trace package (Mazinisin). The CBET exchange occurs primarily over the equatorial region in PD, where successful mitigation strategies concentrate. Detuning the initial laser wavelength (dλ0) reduces the CBET interaction volume, which can be combined with spot-shape alterations. Employing opposed +/-dλ0 in each hemisphere offers the best single CBET mitigation option. The current NIF layout can be used to test detuning by altering the NIF PD repointing strategy while maintaining adequate symmetry. Simulations (2-D DRACO) predict measurable results: shell trajectory and shape and scattered-light spectrum and distribution. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Optimized calculation of the synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive and lower hybrid current drive on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Bo-Jiang, Ding; Y, Peysson; J, Decker; Miao-Hui, Li; Xin-Jun, Zhang; Xiao-Jie, Wang; Lei, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The optimized synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) with normal parameters of the EAST tokamak are studied by using the C3PO/LUKE code based on the understanding of the synergy mechanisms so as to obtain a higher synergistic current and provide theoretical reference for the synergistic effect in the EAST experiment. The dependences of the synergistic effect on the parameters of two waves (lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW)), including the radial position of the power deposition, the power value of the LH and EC waves, and the parallel refractive indices of the LHW (N∥) are presented and discussed. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011GB102000, 2012GB103000, and 2013GB106001), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175206 and 11305211), the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program in the Field of Plasma Physics (Grant No. 11261140328), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. JZ2015HGBZ0472).

  9. Summary and viewgraphs from the Q-121 US/Japan advanced current drive concepts workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bonoli, P.; Porkolab, M. ); Chan, V.; Pinsker, R.; Politzer, P. ); Darrow, D. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Ehst, D. ); Fukuyama, Atsushi ); Imai, Tsuyoshi; Watari, Tetsuo ); Itoh, Satoshi; Naka

    1990-03-09

    With the emphasis placed on current drive by ITER, which requires steady state operation in its engineering phase, it is important to bring theory and experiment in agreement for each of the schemes that could be used in that design. Both neutral beam and lower hybrid (LH) schemes are in excellent shape in that regard. Since the projected efficiency of all schemes is marginal it is also important to continue our search for more efficient processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each of these areas, that is, validation of theory and the search for better ideas. There were a number of notable results to report, the most striking again (as with last year) the long pulse operation of TRIAM-1M. A low current was sustained for over 1 hour with LH waves, using new hall-effect sensors in the equilibrium field circuit to maintain position control. In JT-60, by sharpening the wave spectrum the current drive efficiency was improved to 0.34 {times} 10{sup 20}m{sup -2}A/W and 1.5 MA of current was driven entirely by the lower hybrid system. Also in that machine, using two different LH frequencies, the H-mode was entered. Finally, by using the LH system for startup they saved 2.5 resistive volt-sec of flux, which if extrapolated to ITER would save 40 volt-sec there. For the first time, and experiment on ECH current drive showed reasonable agreement with theory. Those experiments are reported here by James (LLNL) on the D3-D machine. Substantially lower ECH current drive than expected theoretically was observed on WT-3, but if differed by being in a low absorption regime. Nonetheless, excellent physics results were achieved in the WT-3 experiments, notably in having careful measurements of the parallel velocity distributions.

  10. Modeling of RMF Current Drive in a FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, Richard D.

    1998-11-01

    A two-dimensional (r-theta) model has been developed to study the penetration of a rotating magnetic field into a plasma configuration. In this model, like previous models1,2 the ions are fixed and the vector potential is advanced in time using a generalized Ohm's law that includes both resistivity and the Hall term. This study concentrates on parameters of interest to the STX and TCS experiments at the University of Washington. The penetration rate has been parameterized for cases where the confining field is pre-formed (an existing FRC) and where the confining field is generated by the RMF. We have examined the possibility of using RMF to drive the edge current near the separatrix of the FRC for situations where the RMF drive field amplitude is not sufficient to allow full penetration. We have also examined the process and rate through which a fully penetrated field may be expelled from a plasma configuration when the driver magnitude drops below a critical value. 1. W.N. Hugrass and R.C. Grimm, J. Plasma Physics 26, (1981) 2. M. Ohnishi, Y. Yamamoto, K. Yoshikawa, J. Kitagaki, and A. Ishida, Proceedings of the U.S. Japan Physics of Fusion Concepts Suited for D3-He Burning Workshop (Monterey) (1995)

  11. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Adonin, A. A. Hollinger, R.

    2014-02-15

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  12. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  13. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kritz, A.H.

    1993-03-01

    The Principal Investigator has continued to work on problems associated both with the deposition and with the emission of electron cyclotron heating power electron cyclotron heating in toroidal plasmas. Inparticular, the work has focused on the use of electron cyclotron heating to stabilize q = 1 and q = 2 instabilities in tokamaks and on the use of electron cyclotron emission as a plasma diagnostic. The research described in this report has been carried out in collaboration with scientists at Princeton, MIT and Livermore. The Principal Investigator is now employed at Lehigh University, and a small group effort on electron cyclotron heating in plasmas has begun to evolve at Lehigh involving undergraduate and graduate students. Work has also been done in support of the electron cyclotron heating and current drive program at the Center for Research in Plasma Physics in Lausanne, Switzerland.

  14. D Helicity Injection Studies on the Current Drive Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrow, Douglass Sterling

    A tokamak-like plasma has been created and sustained in the CDX device solely by means of an electron beam. The poloidal field structure observed is that of a tokamak and the density and temperatures seen are larger than in previous types of plasmas generated in this device. A plasma current scaling consistent with the helicity balance equation is observed and about 40% of the injected helicity appears in the tokamak plasma. Rapid transport of current from the region of injection to the center produces a peaked current profile. Plasmas with beta in the neighborhood of the Troyon-Sykes limit may be generated by this technique. In high-beta plasmas, a coherent fluctuation is seen which has its largest amplitude in a region of unfavorable curvature. The mode is absent below a certain density and plasma current, corresponding to a threshold beta. When present, the mode has an m = 4 structure and it propagates in the ion diamagnetic direction. These properties identify it as a ballooning mode. A significant radial electric field alters the observed frequency and dispersion of the mode.

  15. Current Drive by Electron Bernstein Waves in Spherical Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, J.; Ram, A. K.; Bers, A.; Peysson, Y.

    2003-10-01

    Electron cyclotron waves (ECW) can be used to generate current in tokamaks by the Fisch-Boozer (FB) method in the plasma core and by the Ohkawa (OK) method off-axis. In spherical tori such as NSTX, low harmonic ECW cannot be used for current drive (CD) because they are cut-off in the highly overdense plasma. However, electron Bernstein waves (EBW) excited by mode conversion from quasi X- or O-mode ECWs have been proposed as an alternative for CD in the same range of frequencies.(A. K. Ram and S. D. Schultz, Phys. Plasmas 7), 4084 (2000). A kinetic description of the quasilinear interaction between EBW and electrons in NSTX-type plasmas is presented. This includes the role of electron trapping in such CD; in particular, the FB and OK methods for CD with EBW are compared. We also present a kinetic self-consistent calculation of EBW-CD with the bootstrap current and examine possible synergistic effects.

  16. Parametric assessments of current rampup by Lower Hybrid Current Drive in TFCX

    SciTech Connect

    Freije, S.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-01-01

    A lower hybrid current drive code has been developed from two previous existing codes which incorporates the eikonal (WKB) approximation in toroidal canonical variables and an analytic treatment of quasi-linear absorption. Ray-tracing is performed for a 5 to 9 ray spectrum in a nonuniform, circular plasma with the local warm plasma dispersion relation. A parameter study in n/sub e/, T/sub e/, n/sub parallel/, and frequency is being carried out for two startup scenarios (i.e., expanding radius at the outboard midplane and full radius startup on the toroidal axis) for the superconducting toroidal field coil TFCX device. Driven current profiles and current drive efficiencies for both a Maxwellian background plasma and an electron distribution with an rf-enhanced tail are presented.

  17. On Current Drive and Wave Induced Bootstrap Current in Toroidal Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T.

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive treatment of wave-particle interactions in toroidal plasmas including collisional relaxation, applicable to heating or anomalous wave induced transport, has been obtained by using Monte Carlo operators satisfying quasi-neutrality. This approach enables a self-consistent treatment of wave-particle interactions applicable to the banana regime in the neoclassical theory. It allows an extension into a regime with large temperature and density gradients, losses and transport of particles by wave-particle interactions making the method applicable to transport barriers. It is found that at large gradients the relationship between radial electric field, parallel velocity, temperature and density gradient in the neoclassical theory is modified such that coefficient in front of the logarithmic ion temperature gradient, which in the standard neoclassical theory is small and counteracts the electric field caused by the density gradient, now changes sign and contributes to the built up of the radial electric field. The possibility to drive current by absorbing the waves on trapped particles has been studied and how the wave-particle interactions affect the bootstrap current. Two new current drive mechanisms are studied: current drive by wave induced bootstrap current and selective detrapping into passing orbits by directed waves.

  18. Conditions for Lower Hybrid Current Drive in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Napoli, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Galli, A.; Schettini, G.

    2012-12-01

    To control the plasma current profile represents one of the most important problems of the research of nuclear fusion energy based on the tokamak concept, as in the plasma column the necessary conditions of stability and confinement should be satisfied. This problem can be solved by using the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, which was demonstrated to occur also at reactor grade high plasma densities provided that a proper method should be utilised, as assessed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade). This method, based on theoretical predictions confirmed by experiment, produces relatively high electron temperature at the plasma periphery and scrape-off layer (SOL), consequently reducing the broadening of the spectrum launched by the antenna produced by parasitic wave physics of the edge, namely parametric instability (PI). The new results presented here show that, for kinetic profiles now foreseen for the SOL of ITER, PI is expected to hugely broaden the antenna spectrum and prevent any penetration in the core of the coupled LH power. However, considering the FTU method and assuming higher electron temperature at the edge (which would be however reasonable for ITER) the PI-produced spectral broadening would be mitigated, and enable the penetration of the coupled LH power in the main plasma. By successful LHCD effect, the control of the plasma current profile at normalised minor radius of about 0.8 would be possible, with much higher efficiency than that obtainable by other tools. A very useful reinforce of bootstrap current effects would be thus possible by LHCD in ITER.

  19. Resistivity scaling of rotating magnetic field current drive in FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Guo, H. Y.; Milroy, R. D.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.

    2003-10-01

    Rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) have been used to both form and sustain low density, prolate FRCs in the translation confinement and sustainment (TCS) facility. The two most important factors governing performance are the plasma resistivity, which sets the maximum density for which toroidal current can be maintained, and the energy loss rate, which sets the plasma temperature. The plasma resistivity has been determined by carefully measuring the amount of RMF power absorbed by the FRC. When the ratio of RMF magnitude, Bohgr, to external poloidal confinement field, Be, is high, this resistivity is very adversely affected by the RMF drive process. However, when Bohgr/Be falls below about 0.3, the resistivity returns to values typical of non-driven FRCs. The observed scaling leads to a density dependence of ne ~ Bohgr/rsohgr1/2 where rs is the FRC separatrix radius and ohgr is the RMF frequency. Since the FRC contains little or no toroidal field, Be is proportional to (neTt)1/2 where Tt = Te + Ti is the sum of the electron and ion temperatures. In the present experiments, except for the initial start-up phase where Tt can exceed 100 eV, the plasma temperature is limited to about 40 eV by high oxygen impurity levels. Thus, low Bohgr/Be, low resistivity operation was only realized by operating at low values of Bohgr. The RMF drive sustains particles as well as flux, and resistive input powers can be in the MW range at higher values of Bohgr, so that high temperature, steady-state operation should be possible once impurity levels are reduced. Changes are being made to the present 'O-ring' sealed, quartz chambered TCS to provide bakable metal walls and wall conditioning as in other quasi-steady fusion facilities.

  20. Lower Hybrid Current Drive on Alcator C-MOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. R.; Bernabei, S.; Hosea, J.; Phillips, C. K.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Liptac, J.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wallace, G.

    2006-10-01

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokomak at MIT. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This should allow tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Initial results from this system will be presented. Power levels up to 800 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n||˜ 2-4. Driven currents up to ˜280 kA have been inferred from magnetic measurements, in reasonable agreement with modeling. Sawtooth oscillations vanish and central q is inferred to rise above unity, indicating off-axis CD as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electrons population that varies with phase and plasma density. This variation will be compared to that predicted by detailed propagation and absorption codes.

  1. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Wilson, S. Bernabei, P. Bonoli, A. Hubbard, R. Parker, A. Schmidt, G. Wallace, J. Wright, and the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2007-10-09

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokamak at MIT. Twelve klystrons at 4.6 GHz feed a 4x22 waveguide array. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This flexibility allows tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Power levels up to 900 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n|| ~ 1.6–4. Driven currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage and by direct comparison to Fisch-Karney theory, yielding an efficiency of n20IR/P ~ 0.3. Modeling using the CQL3D code supports these efficiencies. Sawtooth oscillations vanish, accompanied with peaking of the electron temperature (Te0 rises from 2.8 to 3.8 keV). Central q is inferred to rise above unity from the collapse of the sawtooth inversion radius, indicating off-axis cd as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with phase and plasma density. The x-ray emission is observed to be radialy broader than that predicted by simple ray tracing codes. Possible explanations for this broader emission include fast electron diffusion or broader deposition than simple ray tracing predictions (perhaps due to diffractive effects).

  2. High illumination uniformity scheme with 32 beams configuration for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Gu, Chun; Xu, Lixin; Zhou, Shenlei

    2016-04-01

    The self-adapting algorithms are improved to optimize a beam configuration in the direct drive laser fusion system with the solid state lasers. A configuration of 32 laser beams is proposed for achieving a high uniformity illumination, with a root-mean-square deviation at 10-4 level. In our optimization, the parameters such as beam number, beam arrangement, and beam intensity profile are taken into account. The illumination uniformity robustness versus the parameters such as intensity profile deviations, power imbalance, intensity profile noise, the pointing error, and the target position error is also discussed. In this study, the model is assumed a solid-sphere illumination, and refraction effects of incident light on the corona are not considered. Our results may have a potential application in the design of the direct-drive laser fusion of the Shen Guang-II Upgrading facility (SG-II-U, China).

  3. High-speed reference-beam-angle control technique for holographic memory drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ken-ichiro; Ogata, Takeshi; Hosaka, Makoto; Fujita, Koji; Okuyama, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    We developed a holographic memory drive for next-generation optical memory. In this study, we present the key technology for achieving a high-speed transfer rate for reproduction, that is, a high-speed control technique for the reference beam angle. In reproduction in a holographic memory drive, there is the issue that the optimum reference beam angle during reproduction varies owing to distortion of the medium. The distortion is caused by, for example, temperature variation, beam irradiation, and moisture absorption. Therefore, a reference-beam-angle control technique to position the reference beam at the optimum angle is crucial. We developed a new optical system that generates an angle-error-signal to detect the optimum reference beam angle. To achieve the high-speed control technique using the new optical system, we developed a new control technique called adaptive final-state control (AFSC) that adds a second control input to the first one derived from conventional final-state control (FSC) at the time of angle-error-signal detection. We established an actual experimental system employing AFSC to achieve moving control between each page (Page Seek) within 300 µs. In sequential multiple Page Seeks, we were able to realize positioning to the optimum angles of the reference beam that maximize the diffracted beam intensity. We expect that applying the new control technique to the holographic memory drive will enable a giga-bit/s-class transfer rate.

  4. Design study of longitudinal dynamics of the drive beam in 1 TeV relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Yu, S.S.; Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    In this paper the authors present a design study on the longitudinal dynamics of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) scheme which has been proposed as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV next linear collider (NLC). They address the issue of maintaining stable power output at desired level for a 300-m long TBA with 150 extraction cavities and present their simulation results to demonstrate that it can be achieved by inductively detuning the extraction cavities to counter the space charge debunching effect on the drive beam. They then carry out simulation study to show that the beam bunches desired by the RK-TBA can be efficiently obtained by first chopping an initially uniform beam of low energy into a train of beam bunches with modest longitudinal dimension and then using the {open_quotes}adiabatic capture{close_quotes} scheme to bunch and accelerate these beam bunches into tight bunches at the operating energy of the drive beam. The authors have also examined the {open_quotes}after burner{close_quotes} scheme which is implemented in their RK-TBA design for efficiency enhancement.

  5. THE ROTATING MAGNETIC FIELD OSCILLATOR SYSTEM FOR CURRENT DRIVE IN THE TRANSLATION, CONFINEMENT AND SUSTAINMENT EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    S. TOBIN; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The experimental setup and test results for the {approximately}125 MW rotating magnetic field current drive system of the Translation, Confinement and Sustainment Experiment at the University of Washington are described. The oscillator system, constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, drives two tank circuits (15 kV{sub peak} potential, 8.5 kA{sub peak} maximum circulating current in each tank to date) operated 90{degree} out of phase to produce a 54 G rotating magnetic field with a frequency of 163 kHz ({omega} = 1.02{sup x} 10{sup {minus}6} s{sup {minus}1}). Programmable waveform generators control ''hot deck'' totem pole drivers that are used to control the grid of 12 Machlett 8618 magnetically beamed triode tubes. This setup allows the current to be turned on or off in less than 100 ns ({approximately}6{degree}). Both tank circuits are isolated from the current source by a 1:1 air core, transmission line transformer. Each tank circuit contains two saddle coils (combined inductance of 1.6 {micro}H) and radio frequency capacitors (580 nF). Test results are presented for three conditions: no external load, a resistive external load and a plasma load. A SPICE model of the oscillator system was created. Comparisons between this model and experimental data are given.

  6. Correlation of ion and beam current densities in Kaufman thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    In the absence of direct impingement erosion, electrostatic thruster accelerator grid lifetime is defined by the charge exchange erosion that occurs at peak values of the ion beam current density. In order to maximize the thrust from an engine with a specified grid lifetime, the ion beam current density profile should therefore be as flat as possible. Knauer (1970) has suggested this can be achieved by establishing a radial plasma uniformity within the thruster discharge chamber; his tests with the radial field thruster provide an example of uniform plasma properties within the chamber and a flat ion beam profile occurring together. It is shown that, in particular, the ion density profile within the chamber determines the beam current density profile, and that a uniform ion density profile at the screen grid end of the discharge chamber should lead to a flat beam current density profile.

  7. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  8. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-15

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  9. Current ramp-up with lower hybrid current drive in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Li, J. G.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Gong, X. Z.; Shen, B.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Fisch, N. J.; Qin, H.; Wilson, J. R.; Collaboration: EAST Team

    2012-12-15

    More economical fusion reactors might be enabled through the cyclic operation of lower hybrid current drive. The first stage of cyclic operation would be to ramp up the plasma current with lower hybrid waves alone in low-density plasma. Such a current ramp-up was carried out successfully on the EAST tokamak. The plasma current was ramped up with a time-averaged rate of 18 kA/s with lower hybrid (LH) power. The average conversion efficiency P{sub el}/P{sub LH} was about 3%. Over a transient phase, faster ramp-up was obtained. These experiments feature a separate measurement of the L/R time at the time of current ramp up.

  10. Current ramp-up with lower hybrid current drive in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Fisch, N. J.; Qin, H.; Li, J. G.; Wilson, J. R.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Gong, X. Z.; Shen, B.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    More economical fusion reactors might be enabled through the cyclic operation of lower hybrid current drive. The first stage of cyclic operation would be to ramp up the plasma current with lower hybrid waves alone in low-density plasma. Such a current ramp-up was carried out successfully on the EAST tokamak. The plasma current was ramped up with a time-averaged rate of 18 kA/s with lower hybrid (LH) power. The average conversion efficiency Pel/PLH was about 3%. Over a transient phase, faster ramp-up was obtained. These experiments feature a separate measurement of the L/R time at the time of current ramp up.

  11. Rarefied flow diagnostics using pulsed high-current electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojcik, Radoslaw M.; Schilling, John H.; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high-current short-pulse electron beams in low-density gas flow diagnostics is introduced. Efficient beam propagation is demonstrated for pressure up to 300 microns. The beams, generated by low-pressure pseudospark discharges in helium, provide extremely high fluorescence levels, allowing time-resolved visualization in high-background environments. The fluorescence signal frequency is species-dependent, allowing instantaneous visualization of mixing flowfields.

  12. Simulation studies of FRC with rotating magnetic field current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, E. V.; Davidson, R. C.

    2007-11-01

    The HYM code has been modified to include the effects of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive. Initial 3D two-fluid and hybrid simulations have been performed for even-parity RMF and different plasma parameters. Simulations show that the RMF pushes the plasma radially inward, resulting in a reduced plasma density outside the separatrix. Lower plasma density and larger RMF amplitudes result in faster RMF field penetration, in agreement with previous studies [R. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2804 (2001)]. Effects of the applied RMF field on particle confinement have been studied using 3D test particle simulations. Simulations of stationary RMFs show that for relatively large ion Larmor radius (S^*<20), there is very little difference between even- and odd-parity RMFs in terms of the ion losses. The rate of particle losses is larger in larger FRCs, and increases with the RMF amplitude. In contrast, high-frequency RMF can reduce ion losses provided φrmfφci, and the RMF is of even-parity. The improved particle confinement is related to ponderomotive forces due to the rapidly oscillating, inhomogeneous electromagnetic field. It is also found that high-frequency, odd-parity RMFs force particles away from the midplane toward the FRC ends.

  13. Spectral effects on fast wave core heating and current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, R. E.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaeger, E. F.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilgen, J. B.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Yuh, H.; NSTX Team

    2009-07-01

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L-mode and H-mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit radio frequency (rf) power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of HHFW CD were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  14. Lower hybrid current drive in a high density diverted tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Reinke, M. L.; Schmidt, A. E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental observations of LHCD at high density (n¯e>1020m˜3) on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak are presented in this paper. Bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic fast electrons in the core plasma drops sharply in single null discharges well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks (ω/ωLH˜2). Modeling and experimental evidence suggest that the absence of LH driven fast electrons at high density may be due to collisional absorption in the scrape off layer. Experiments show that the expected current drive density dependence is recovered for inner wall limited discharges across the range of densities scanned (0.5×1020m-3

  15. Current drive generation based on autoresonance and intermittent trapping mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gell, Y; Nakach, R

    1999-09-01

    Two mechanisms for generating streams of high-velocity electrons are presented. One has its origin in auto resonance (AR) interaction, which takes place in the system after a trapping conditioning stage, the second being dominated by the trapping process itself. These mechanisms are revealed from the study of the relativistic motion of an electron in a configuration consisting of two counterpropagating electromagnetic waves along a constant magnetic field in a dispersive medium. Using a Hamiltonian formalism, we have numerically solved the equations of motion and presented the results in a set of figures showing the generation of streams of electrons having high parallel velocities. Insight into these numerical results is gained from a theoretical analysis, which consists of a reformulation of the equations of motion. The operation of these mechanisms was found to circumvent the deterioration of the electron acceleration process that is characteristic for a dispersive medium, thus allowing for an effective generation of a current drive. Discussion of the results follows.

  16. EBW Current Drive and Heating for Fusion/Fission Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jakub; Preinhaelter, Josef; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Decker, Joan; Ram, Abhay

    2011-10-01

    From the RF requirements for spherical tokamak and the need to reduce antenna exposure to neutron bombardment, EBW are an important source for both heating and current drive (CD). ICRF, LH, HHFW antennas are subject to significant neutron damage (as are NBI) because of their very large size and necessary proximity to the plasma. Recently Mahajan et. al. have studied other important uses of fusion neutrons - in particular their use in the efficient breeding of fission reactor fuel as well as in the ``rapid'' destruction of nuclear waste using their Compact High Power Density Fast Neutron Source (CFNS). For overdense plasmas the standard electromagnetic O- and X- mode experience cutoffs. EBW can propagate and be absorbed in such plasmas but its characteristics are strongly dependent on the plasma parameters with important variations in the parallel wave number. If the required temperatures in CFNS are around 35 KeV, then one will may need to revisit the electrostatic approximation and incorporate relativistic effects for EBW rays.

  17. The development of beam current monitors in the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Lenkszus, F.; Rotela, E.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third-generation 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source. The precision measurement of beam current is a challenging task in high energy accelerators, such as the APS, with a wide range of beam parameters and complicated noise, radiation, and thermal environments. The beam pulses in the APS injector and storage ring have charge ranging from 50pC to 25nC with pulse durations varying from 30ps to 30ns. A total of nine non- intercepting beam current monitors have been installed in the APS facility (excluding those in the linac) for general current measurement. In addition, several independent current monitors with specially designed redundant interlock electronics are installed for personnel safety and machine protection. This paper documents the design and development of current monitors in the APS,. discusses the commissioning experience in the past year, and presents the results of recent operations.

  18. Limiting current of intense electron beams in a decelerating gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Beaudoin, B. L.; Thompson, C.; Karakkad, J. A.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    For numerous applications, it is desirable to develop electron beam driven efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation that are capable of producing the required power at beam voltages as low as possible. This trend is limited by space charge effects that cause the reduction of electron kinetic energy and can lead to electron reflection. So far, this effect was analyzed for intense beams propagating in uniform metallic pipes. In the present study, the limiting currents of intense electron beams are analyzed for the case of beam propagation in the tubes with gaps. A general treatment is illustrated by an example evaluating the limiting current in a high-power, tunable 1-10 MHz inductive output tube (IOT), which is currently under development for ionospheric modification. Results of the analytical theory are compared to results of numerical simulations. The results obtained allow one to estimate the interaction efficiency of IOTs.

  19. Drift distance survey in DPIS for high current beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue,T.; Okamura, M.; Kondo, K.; Tamura, J.; Kashiwagi, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2009-09-20

    In a laser ion source, plasma drift distance is one of the most important design parameters. Ion current density and beam pulse width are defined by plasma drift distance between laser target and beam extraction position. In direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS), which uses a laser ion source and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac, we can apply relatively higher electric field at the beam extraction due to the unique shape of a positively biased electrode. However, when we aim at very high current acceleration like several tens of mA, we observed mismatched beam extraction conditions. We tested three different ion current at ion extraction region by changing plasma drift distance to study better extraction condition. In this experiment, C{sup 6+} beam was accelerated. We confirmed that the matching condition can be improved by controlling plasma drift distance.

  20. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. R.; Bernabei, S.; Bonoli, P.; Hubbard, A.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J.

    2007-09-01

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokamak at MIT. Twelve klystrons at 4.6 GHz feed a 4×22 waveguide array. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This flexibility allows tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Power levels up to 900 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n∥˜1.6-4. Driven currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage and by direct comparison to Fisch-Karney theory, yielding an efficiency of n20IR/P˜0.3. Modeling using the CQL3D code supports these efficiencies. Sawtooth oscillations vanish, accompanied with peaking of the electron temperature (Te0 rises from 2.8 to 3.8 keV). Central q is inferred to rise above unity from the collapse of the sawtooth inversion radius, indicating off-axis cd as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with phase and plasma density. The x-ray emission is observed to be radialy broader than that predicted by simple ray tracing codes. Possible explanations for this broader emission include fast electron diffusion or broader deposition than simple ray tracing predictions (perhaps due to diffractive effects).

  1. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J. R.; Bonoli, P.; Hubbard, A.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J.; Bernabei, S

    2007-09-28

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokamak at MIT. Twelve klystrons at 4.6 GHz feed a 4x22 waveguide array. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This flexibility allows tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Power levels up to 900 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n{sub parallel}{approx}1.6-4. Driven currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage and by direct comparison to Fisch-Karney theory, yielding an efficiency of n{sub 20}IR/P{approx}0.3. Modeling using the CQL3D code supports these efficiencies. Sawtooth oscillations vanish, accompanied with peaking of the electron temperature (T{sub e0} rises from 2.8 to 3.8 keV). Central q is inferred to rise above unity from the collapse of the sawtooth inversion radius, indicating off-axis cd as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with phase and plasma density. The x-ray emission is observed to be radialy broader than that predicted by simple ray tracing codes. Possible explanations for this broader emission include fast electron diffusion or broader deposition than simple ray tracing predictions (perhaps due to diffractive effects)

  2. RADLAC II high current electron beam propagation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Turman, B.N.; Crist, C.E.; Welch, D.R.; Struve, K.W.

    1992-08-01

    This resistive hose instability of an electron beam was observed to be convective in recent RADLAC II experiments for higher current shots. The effects of air scattering for these shots were minimal. These experiments and theory suggest low-frequency hose motion which does not appear convective may be due to rapid expansion and subsequent drifting of the beam nose.

  3. Method for measuring and controlling beam current in ion beam processing

    DOEpatents

    Kearney, Patrick A.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2003-04-29

    A method for producing film thickness control of ion beam sputter deposition films. Great improvements in film thickness control is accomplished by keeping the total current supplied to both the beam and suppressor grids of a radio frequency (RF) in beam source constant, rather than just the current supplied to the beam grid. By controlling both currents, using this method, deposition rates are more stable, and this allows the deposition of layers with extremely well controlled thicknesses to about 0.1%. The method is carried out by calculating deposition rates based on the total of the suppressor and beam currents and maintaining the total current constant by adjusting RF power which gives more consistent values.

  4. Low Impedance Bellows for High-current Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G; Nassiri, A; Waldschmidt, G J; Yang, Y; Feingold, J J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Jang, J; Kim, S H

    2012-07-01

    In particle accelerators, bellows are commonly used to connect beamline components. Such bellows are traditionally shielded to lower the beam impedance. Excessive beam impedance can cause overheating in the bellows, especially in high beam current operation. For an SRF-based accelerator, the bellows must also be particulate free. Many designs of shielded bellows incorporate rf slides or fingers that prevent convolutions from being exposed to wakefields. Unfortunately these mechanical structures tend to generate particulates that, if left in the SRF accelerator, can migrate into superconducting cavities, the accelerator's critical components. In this paper, we describe a prototype unshielded bellows that has low beam impedance and no risk of particulate generation.

  5. Dynamics of a high-current relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkov, P. S.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Ivanov, I. E. Shumeiko, D. V.

    2015-06-15

    The dynamics of a high-current relativistic electron beam is studied experimentally and by numerical simulation. The beam is formed in a magnetically insulated diode with a transverse-blade explosive-emission cathode. It is found experimentally that the radius of a 500-keV beam with a current of 2 kA and duration of 500 ns decreases with time during the beam current pulse. The same effect was observed in numerical simulations. This effect is explained by a change in the shape of the cathode plasma during the current pulse, which, according to calculations, leads to a change in the beam parameters, such as the electron pitch angle and the spread over the longitudinal electron momentum. These parameters are hard to measure experimentally; however, the time evolution of the radial profile of the beam current density, which can be measured reliably, coincides with the simulation results. This allows one to expect that the behavior of the other beam parameters also agrees with numerical simulations.

  6. A merging preaccelerator for high current H - ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Mizuno, M.; Okumura, Y.; Ohara, Y.; Ackerman, G. D.; Chan, C. F.; Cooper, W. S.; Kwan, J. W.; Vella, M. C.

    1995-07-01

    The high power ion beams used in the next generation thermonuclear fusion reactors require high current negative ion beams accelerated to high energy, with high efficiency. One way to meet these requirements is to merge multiple low current density H- beamlets into a single high current beam. The feasibility of a high current merging preaccelerator was demonstrated in this experiment by merging 19 beamlets of H- ions distributed over a circular area 80 mm in diameter from a Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute negative ion source. H- ions were extracted at a current density exceeding 10 mA/cm2 at the ion source which operates at 0.13 Pa (1 mTorr), with a low arc power density (70 V×250 A). Spherically curved grids (with built-in magnetic electron suppression) were used in the preaccelerator to focus the extracted beamlets into a single 104 mA, 100 keV beam. The merged beam has a diameter of 23 mm and a converging angle of ±30 mrad at the beam envelope. The rms emittance of the 104 mA merging beam was 1.00 π mrad cm, which is a condition acceptable to the electrostatic quadropole accelerator for further acceleration.

  7. Advances in modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Nilsson, E.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ding, B.; Li, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Madi, M.

    2016-04-01

    First principle modeling of the lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas is a longstanding activity, which is gradually gaining in accuracy thanks to quantitative comparisons with experimental observations. The ability to reproduce simulatenously the plasma current and the non-thermal bremsstrahlung radial profiles in the hard x-ray (HXR) photon energy range represents in this context a significant achievement. Though subject to limitations, ray tracing calculations are commonly used for describing wave propagation in conjunction with Fokker-Planck codes, as it can capture prominent features of the LH wave dynamics in a tokamak plasma-like toroidal refraction. This tool has been validated on several machines when the full absorption of the LH wave requires the transfer of a small fraction of power from the main lobes of the launched power spectrum to a tail at a higher parallel refractive index. Conversely, standard modeling based on toroidal refraction only becomes more challenging when the spectral gap is large, except if other physical mechanisms may dominate to bridge it, like parametric instabilities, as suggested for JET LH discharges (Cesario et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 175002), or fast fluctuations of the launched power spectrum or ‘tail’ LH model, as shown for Tore Supra (Decker et al 2014 Phys. Plasma 21 092504). The applicability of the heuristic ‘tail’ LH model is investigated for a broader range of plasma parameters as compared to the Tore Supra study and with different LH wave characteristics. Discrepancies and agreements between simulations and experiments depending upon the different models used are discussed. The existence of a ‘tail’ in the launched power spectrum significantly improves the agreement between modeling and experiments in plasma conditions for which the spectral gap is large in EAST and Alcator C-Mod tokamaks. For the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the experimental evolution of the HXR profiles with density suggests

  8. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Giruzzi, G.; Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.

    2014-02-12

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (T{sub e-periphery}). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (T{sub e-periphery}). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a∼0.8, f{sub 0}=144 GHz), an increase of T{sub e} in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a∼0.8) is

  9. Polymorphic beams and Nature inspired circuits for optical current

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Laser radiation pressure is a basis of numerous applications in science and technology such as atom cooling, particle manipulation, material processing, etc. This light force for the case of scalar beams is proportional to the intensity-weighted wavevector known as optical current. The ability to design the optical current according to the considered application brings new promising perspectives to exploit the radiation pressure. However, this is a challenging problem because it often requires confinement of the optical current within tight light curves (circuits) and adapting its local value for a particular task. Here, we present a formalism to handle this problem including its experimental demonstration. It consists of a Nature-inspired circuit shaping with independent control of the optical current provided by a new kind of beam referred to as polymorphic beam. This finding is highly relevant to diverse optical technologies and can be easily extended to electron and x-ray coherent beams. PMID:27734940

  10. Polymorphic beams and Nature inspired circuits for optical current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-10-01

    Laser radiation pressure is a basis of numerous applications in science and technology such as atom cooling, particle manipulation, material processing, etc. This light force for the case of scalar beams is proportional to the intensity-weighted wavevector known as optical current. The ability to design the optical current according to the considered application brings new promising perspectives to exploit the radiation pressure. However, this is a challenging problem because it often requires confinement of the optical current within tight light curves (circuits) and adapting its local value for a particular task. Here, we present a formalism to handle this problem including its experimental demonstration. It consists of a Nature-inspired circuit shaping with independent control of the optical current provided by a new kind of beam referred to as polymorphic beam. This finding is highly relevant to diverse optical technologies and can be easily extended to electron and x-ray coherent beams.

  11. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, H.; Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O.

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  12. New high-current Dynamitron accelerators for electron beam processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Thompson, C. C.; Saito, H.; Lisanti, T. F.; Burgess, R. G.; Malone, H. F.; Loby, R. J.; Galloway, R. A.

    1993-06-01

    The material throughput capabilities of RDI's new 550 keV and 800 keV Dynamitron R accelerators have been enhanced by increasing their beam current ratings from 100 mA to 160 mA. Future requirements up to 200 mA have been anticipated in the designs. The high-voltage power supply, beam scanner and beam window have all been modified to accommodate the higher current ratings. A new programmable control system has also been developed. The basic design concepts are described and performance data are presented in this paper.

  13. Low frequency RF current drive. Final report, January 1, 1988--May 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1999-05-01

    This report starts with a summary of research done on the Phaedrus Tandom Mirror concept and how this research led to the design and construction of the Phaedrus-T Tokamak. Next it gives a more detailed description of the results from the last four years of research, which include the following areas: (1) first experimental demonstration of AWCD (Alfven Wave Current Drive); (2) current drive location and loop voltage response; (3) trapping and current drive efficiency; and (4) reflectometry.

  14. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, E.; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ding, W. X.; Johnson, C. A.; Lin, L.

    2016-05-01

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm with neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q0 by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].

  15. Fokker-Planck modeling of current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, A.; Westerhof, E.; Schueller, F. C.

    2007-05-15

    The current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the resistive time scale is studied with a Fokker-Planck simulation, which includes a model for the magnetic diffusion that determines the parallel electric field evolution. The existence of the synergy between the inductive electric field and EC driven current complicates the process of the current penetration and invalidates the standard method of calculation in which Ohm's law is simply approximated by j-j{sub cd}={sigma}E. Here it is proposed to obtain at every time step a self-consistent approximation to the plasma resistivity from the Fokker-Planck code, which is then used in a concurrent calculation of the magnetic diffusion equation in order to obtain the inductive electric field at the next time step. A series of Fokker-Planck calculations including a self-consistent evolution of the inductive electric field has been performed. Both the ECCD power and the electron density have been varied, thus varying the well known nonlinearity parameter for ECCD P{sub rf}[MW/m{sup -3}]/n{sub e}{sup 2}[10{sup 19} m{sup -3}] [R. W. Harvey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 62, 426 (1989)]. This parameter turns out also to be a good predictor of the synergetic effects. The results are then compared with the standard method of calculations of the current penetration using a transport code. At low values of the Harvey parameter, the standard method is in quantitative agreement with Fokker-Planck calculations. However, at high values of the Harvey parameter, synergy between ECCD and E{sub parallel} is found. In the case of cocurrent drive, this synergy leads to the generation of large amounts of nonthermal electrons and a concomitant increase of the electrical conductivity and current penetration time. In the case of countercurrent drive, the ECCD efficiency is suppressed by the synergy with E{sub parallel} while only a small amount of nonthermal electrons is produced.

  16. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  17. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity by a helical current and an axial electron beam current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovich, M. V.; Bushuev, N. A.

    2013-07-01

    The explicit expressions (in the Vainshtein and Markov forms) are derived for the excitation of a cylindrical cavity with perfectly conducting walls and with impedance end faces. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity and a cylindrical waveguide with a preset nonuniform axial electron-beam current and a helical current with a variable pitch, which is excited by a concentrated voltage source and is loaded by a preset pointlike matched load, is considered. For the helical current, the integro-differential equation is formulated. The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is simulated in the preset beam current approximation taking into account the nonuniform winding of the spiral coil, nonuniform electron beam, and losses.

  18. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive by Radial Transport of Particles in the Continuous Current Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sanghyun

    In the Continuous Current Tokamak at the UCLA, electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments have been conducted in the absence of ohmic heating or any other power input. With X-band source of 30 kW lasting 1 mS launched from the high field side in X-mode, 240 A of plasma current has been generated at the neutral pressure corresponding to the critical density for the wave frequency. The Spitzer resistivity calculated from the L/R decay time of the current yielded an electron temperature of 100 eV. For the interest of mapping out radial profiles of wave and particle parameters, S-band sources at 2.45 GHz, 1.5 kW lasting 8 mS with duty cycle of 50% have been used for quasi-steady state current drive experiments. There are four launching structures; (1) Inside perpendicular, (2) Outside perpendicular, (3) Outside 60^circ, and (4) Outside -60^circ with respect to the toroidal magnetic field. It has been found that the four ways of microwaves give comparable results in plasma current driven. The plasma current measurements as a function of the radial location of the electron cyclotron resonance layer show a I_{rm p}~ -sin(pi r/a) where R_{res} = R_{0} + r for -a >=q r >=q O. The vertical field dependence has been shown to be I_{rm p}~ -x exp(-x^2) where x is a normalized vertical field for -inftycurrent is reversed as the applied vertical field is reversed for all four launch schemes. As a toroidal electric field is applied, the co(counter)-injection with cos^{-1}( k_0 cdot B_{t}) = +(-)60^circ give the same result in plasma current driven. The energy distribution of the current carrying electrons as determined by the biased, two-side Langmuir probe show that the current is carried by the bulk of the plasma electrons whose energy is comparable to the plasma electron temperature, and not by the high energy tail of the distribution as predicted by theories based on the Fokker-Planck equation. The vertical and toroidal field

  19. Examination of the CLIC drive beam pipe design for thermal distortion caused by distributed beam line

    SciTech Connect

    C. Johnson; K. Kloeppel

    1997-01-01

    Beam transport programs are widely used to estimate the distribution of power deposited in accelerator structures by particle beams, either intentionally as for targets or beam dumps or accidentally owing the beam loss incidents. While this is usually adequate for considerations of radiation safety, it does not reveal the expected temperature rise and its effect on structural integrity. To find this, thermal diffusion must be taken into account, requiring another step in the analysis. The method that has been proposed is to use the output of a transport program, perhaps modified, as input for a finite element analysis program that can solve the thermal diffusion equation. At Cern, the design of the CLIC beam pipe has been treated in this fashion. The power distribution produced in the walls by a distributed beam loss was found according to the widely-used electron shower code EGS4. The distribution of power density was then used to form the input for the finite element analysis pro gram ANSYS, which was able to find the expected temperature rise and the resulting thermal distortion. As a result of these studies, the beam pipe design can be modified to include features that will counteract such distortion.

  20. Plasma Charge Current for Controlling and Monitoring Electron Beam Welding with Beam Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process. PMID:23242276

  1. Plasma charge current for controlling and monitoring electron beam welding with beam oscillation.

    PubMed

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-12-14

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process.

  2. Current limiting mechanisms in electron and ion beam experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The emission and collection of current from satellites or rockets in the ionosphere is a process which, at equilibrium, requires a balance between inward and outward currents. In most active experiments in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, the emitted current exceeds the integrated thermal current by one or more orders of magnitude. The system response is typically for the emitted current to be limited by processes such as differential charging of insulating surfaces, interactions between an emitted beam and the local plasma, and interactions between the beam and local neutral gas. These current limiting mechanisms have been illustrated for 20 years in sounding rocket and satellite experiments, which are reviewed here. Detailed presentations of the Spacecraft Charging at High Altitude (SCATHA) electron and ion gun experiments are used to demonstrate the general range of observed phenomena.

  3. Improvements on Pulsed Current Sharing in Driving Parallel MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Hajime; Orihara, Masato; Yamada, Tsutomu; Yanagidaira, Takeshi

    To switch high-voltage and high-current pulses by using MOS (Metal Oxide Semiconductor) transistors, it is necessary to distribute evenly the voltage and current to each element connected in series and parallel. In parallel connection, the current flowing in each element is different depending on the series resistance and wiring inductance. We verified improvements on pulsed current sharing in parallel transistors which were arranged in line on a printed circuit board. Although Gate and Drain wirings are different in length, pulsed current was evenly distributed by using transmission line transformers. Dissipation in transistors were equalized and four transistors were driven simultaneously near the rated current.

  4. A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rebai, M.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Cavenago, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Croci, G.; Gervasini, G.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Murtas, F.; Gorini, G.

    2012-02-15

    A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams is proposed for installation on the spectral shear interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER, Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) test beam facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission on the beam dump surface by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses gas electron multiplier detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. The cathode is made of a thin polythene film and an aluminium film; it is designed for detection of neutrons of energy >2.2 MeV with an incidence angle < 45 deg. CNESM was designed on the basis of simulations of the different steps from the deuteron beam interaction with the beam dump to the neutron detection in the nGEM. Neutron scattering was simulated with the MCNPX code. CNESM on SPIDER is a first step towards the application of this diagnostic technique to the MITICA beam test facility, where it will be used to resolve the horizontal profile of the beam intensity.

  5. DPSS Laser Beam Quality Optimization Through Pump Current Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, Rob; Callen, Alice; Sukuta, Sydney; /San Jose City Coll.

    2012-03-30

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate how a DPSS laser beam's quality parameters can be simultaneously optimized through pump current tuning. Two DPSS lasers of the same make and model were used where the laser diode pump current was first varied to ascertain the lowest RMS noise region. The lowest noise was found to be 0.13% in this region and the best M{sup 2} value of 1.0 and highest laser output power were simultaneously attained at the same current point. The laser manufacturer reported a M{sup 2} value of 1.3 and RMS noise value of .14% for these lasers. This study therefore demonstrates that pump current tuning a DPSS laser can simultaneously optimize RMS Noise, Power and M{sup 2} values. Future studies will strive to broaden the scope of the beam quality parameters impacted by current tuning.

  6. Symmetry issues in a class of ion beam targets using sufficiently short direct drive pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.; Lindl, J.D.

    1986-10-23

    Controlling asymmetries in direct drive ion beam targets depends upon the ability to control the effects of residual target asymmetries after an appropriate illumination scheme has already been utilized. A class of modified ion beam targets where residual asymmetries are ameliorated is considered. The illumination scheme used is an axially symmetric one convenient for reactor designs. Residual asymmetries are controlled by limiting the radial motion of the radius R/sub dep/ of peak ion energy deposition. Limiting the motion of R/sub dep/ is achieved by lengthening the time scale t/sub s/ where changes in R/sub dep/ adversely affect asymmetries. In our example, t/sub s/ becomes longer than the duration ..delta..t/sub D/ of the entire direct drive pulse train (t/sub s/ > ..delta..t/sub D/).

  7. An EBIC equation for solar cells. [Electron Beam Induced Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, K. L.; Von Roos, O.

    1983-01-01

    When an electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) impinges on an N-P junction, the generation of electron-hole pairs by impact ionization causes a characteristic short circuit current I(sc) to flow. The I(sc), i.e., EBIC (electron beam induced current) depends strongly on the configuration used to investigate the cell's response. In this paper the case where the plane of the junction is perpendicular to the surface is considered. An EBIC equation amenable to numerical computations is derived as a function of cell thickness, source depth, surface recombination velocity, diffusion length, and distance of the junction to the beam-cell interaction point for a cell with an ohmic contact at its back surface. It is shown that the EBIC equation presented here is more general and easier to use than those previously reported. The effects of source depth, ohmic contact, and diffusion length on the normalized EBIC characteristic are discussed.

  8. Modeling Results for 28 GHz Heating and Current Drive in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Ellis, R. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Poli, F.; Raman, R.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is being planned to heat non-inductive (NI) start-up plasmas and to provide radially localized electron heating and current drive during H-mode discharges in NSTX-U. NSTX-U will operate at axial toroidal fields of up to 1 T and plasma currents, Ip, up to 2 MA. Development of fully NI plasmas is a critical long-term NSTX-U research goal that supports the design of a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility. 0.6 MW of 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating is predicted to increase the central electron temperature (Te(0)) of low density NI plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) in NSTX-U from 10 eV to 400 eV in about 20 ms. The increased Te(0) will significantly reduce the plasma current decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. Eventually 28 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating and current drive will be used during the Ip flat top in NSTX-U H-mode discharges when the plasma is overdense. This paper will present numerical RF simulation results for 28 GHz EC and EBW heating and current drive for NSTX-U discharges and a conceptual design for the 28 GHz heating system. Work supported by USDOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. High current density sheet-like electron beam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow-Miller, Cora; Korevaar, Eric; Schuster, John

    Sheet electron beams are very desirable for coupling to the evanescent waves in small millimeter wave slow-wave circuits to achieve higher powers. In particular, they are critical for operation of the free-electron-laser-like Orotron. The program was a systematic effort to establish a solid technology base for such a sheet-like electron emitter system that will facilitate the detailed studies of beam propagation stability. Specifically, the effort involved the design and test of a novel electron gun using Lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) as the thermionic cathode material. Three sets of experiments were performed to measure beam propagation as a function of collector current, beam voltage, and heating power. The design demonstrated its reliability by delivering 386.5 hours of operation throughout the weeks of experimentation. In addition, the cathode survived two venting and pump down cycles without being poisoned or losing its emission characteristics. A current density of 10.7 A/sq cm. was measured while operating at 50 W of ohmic heating power. Preliminary results indicate that the nearby presence of a metal plate can stabilize the beam.

  10. On neutral-beam injection counter to the plasma current

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Akers, R.J.; Eriksson, L.-G.

    2005-11-15

    It is well known that when neutral beams inject ions into trapped orbits in a tokamak, the transfer of momentum between the beam and the plasma occurs through the torque exerted by a radial return current. It is shown that this implies that the angular momentum transferred to the plasma can be larger than the angular momentum of the beam, if the injection is in the opposite direction to the plasma current and the beam ions suffer orbit losses. On the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) [R. J. Akers, J. W. Ahn, G. Y. Antar, L. C. Appel, D. Applegate, C. Brickley et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 45, A175 (2003)], this results in up to 30% larger momentum deposition with counterinjection than with co-injection, with substantially increased plasma rotation as a result. It is also shown that heating of the plasma (most probably of the ions) can occur even when the beam ions are lost before they have had time to slow down in the plasma. This is the dominant heating mechanism in the outer 40% of the MAST plasma during counterinjection.

  11. Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams.

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, A; Kholodnaya, G; Sazonov, R; Ponomarev, D

    2012-10-01

    The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm(2), the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm(2) (or with current density over 10 A/cm(2), pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time. PMID:23126757

  12. Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A.; Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D.

    2012-10-15

    The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm{sup 2}, the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} (or with current density over 10 A/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time.

  13. Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams.

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, A; Kholodnaya, G; Sazonov, R; Ponomarev, D

    2012-10-01

    The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm(2), the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm(2) (or with current density over 10 A/cm(2), pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time.

  14. Optimization of solenoid based low energy beam transport line for high current H+ beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, R.; Singh, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Roy, S.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2015-02-01

    A 20 MeV, 30 mA CW proton linac is being developed at BARC, Mumbai. This linac will consist of an ECR ion source followed by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and Drift tube Linac (DTL). The low energy beam transport (LEBT) line is used to match the beam from the ion source to the RFQ with minimum beam loss and increase in emittance. The LEBT is also used to eliminate the unwanted ions like H2+ and H3+ from entering the RFQ. In addition, space charge compensation is required for transportation of such high beam currents. All this requires careful design and optimization. Detailed beam dynamics simulations have been done to optimize the design of the LEBT using the Particle-in-cell code TRACEWIN. We find that with careful optimization it is possible to transport a 30 mA CW proton beam through the LEBT with 100% transmission and minimal emittance blow up, while at the same time suppressing unwanted species H2+ and H3+ to less than 3.3% of the total beam current.

  15. Novel current drive experiments on the CDX-U, HIT, and DIII-D Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Forest, C.B.; Hwang, Y.S.; Armstrong, R.J.; Choe, W.; Darrow, D.S.; Greene, G.; Jones, T.; Jarboe, T.R.; Martin, A.; Nelson, B.A.; Orvis, D.; Painter, C.; Zhou, L.; Rogers, J.A.; Schaffer, M.J.; Hyatt, A.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Staebler, G.M.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Strait, E.J.; Greene, K.L.; Leuer, J.A.; Lohr, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    Two types of novel, non-inductive current drive concepts for starting-up and maintaining tokamak discharges have been developed on the CDX-U, HIT, and DIII-D Tokamaks. On CDX-U, a new, non-inductive current drive technique utilizing fully internally generated pressure driven currents has been demonstrated. The measured current density profile shows a non-hollow profile which agrees with a modeling calculation including helicity conserving non-classical current transport providing the ``seed current``. Another current drive concept, dc-helicity injection, has been investigated on, CDX-U, HIT and DIII-D. This method utilizes injection of magnetic helicity via low energy electron currents, maintaining the plasma current through helicity conserving relaxiation. In these experiments, non-ohmic tokamak plasmas were formed and maintained in the tens of kA range.

  16. Novel current drive experiments on the CDX-U, HIT, and DIII-D Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Forest, C.B.; Hwang, Y.S.; Armstrong, R.J.; Choe, W.; Darrow, D.S.; Greene, G.; Jones, T. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Jarboe, T.R.; Martin, A.; Nelson, B.A.; Orvis, D.; Painter, C.; Zhou, L.; Rogers, J.A. ); Schaffer, M.J.; Hyatt, A.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Staebler, G.M.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Strait, E.J.; Greene, K.L.; Leuer, J.A.; Lohr, J.

    1992-01-01

    Two types of novel, non-inductive current drive concepts for starting-up and maintaining tokamak discharges have been developed on the CDX-U, HIT, and DIII-D Tokamaks. On CDX-U, a new, non-inductive current drive technique utilizing fully internally generated pressure driven currents has been demonstrated. The measured current density profile shows a non-hollow profile which agrees with a modeling calculation including helicity conserving non-classical current transport providing the seed current''. Another current drive concept, dc-helicity injection, has been investigated on, CDX-U, HIT and DIII-D. This method utilizes injection of magnetic helicity via low energy electron currents, maintaining the plasma current through helicity conserving relaxiation. In these experiments, non-ohmic tokamak plasmas were formed and maintained in the tens of kA range.

  17. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Suda, M.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Endo, S.; Hamano, T.; Arai, S.; Higashimata, A.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  18. Return Current Electron Beams and Their Generation of "Raman" Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.

    1998-11-01

    For some years, we(A. Simon and R. W. Short, Phys. Rev. Lett. 53), 1912 (1984). have proposed that the only reasonable explanation for many of the observations of "Raman" scattering is the presence of an electron beam in the plasma. (The beam creates a bump-on-tail instability.) Two major objections to this picture have been observation of Raman when no n_c/4 surface was present, with no likely source for the electron beam, and the necessity for the initially outward directed beam to bounce once to create the proper waves. Now new observations on LLE's OMEGA(R. Petrasso et al), this conference. and at LULI(C. Labaune et al)., Phys. Plasma 5, 234 (1998). have suggested a new origin for the electron beam. This new scenario answers the previous objections, maintains electron beams as the explanation of the older experiments, and may clear up puzzling observations that have remained unexplained. The new scenario is based on two assumptions: (1) High positive potentials develop in target plasmas during their creation. (2) A high-intensity laser beam initiates spark discharges from nearby surfaces to the target plasma. The resulting return current of electrons should be much more delta-like, is initially inwardly directed, and no longer requires the continued presence of a n_c/4 surface. Scattering of the interaction beam from the BOT waves yields the observed Raman signal. Experimental observations that support this picture will be cited. ``Pulsation'' of the scattering and broadband ``flashes'' are a natural part of this scenario. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  19. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.; Henderson, M.

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  20. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kajiwara, K; Oda, Y; Kasugai, A; Kobayashi, N; Sakamoto, K; Doane, J; Olstad, R; Henderson, M

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  1. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.; Henderson, M.

    2011-06-15

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20 deg. - 40 deg. from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  2. Modeling of Trapped Electron Effects on Electron Cyclotron Current Drive for Recent DIII-D Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Sauter, O.; Harvey, R.W.; Chan, V.S.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R.

    1999-08-01

    Owing to its potential capability of generating localized non-inductive current, especially off-axis, Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) is considered a leading candidate for current profile control in achieving Advanced Tokamak (AT) operation. In recent DIII-D proof-of-principle experiments [1], localized off-axis ECCD has been clearly demonstrated for first time. The measured current drive efficiency near the magnetic axis agrees well with predictions of the bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck theory [2,3]. However, the off-axis current drive efficiency was observed to exceed the theoretical results, which predict significant degradation of the current drive efficiency due to trapped electron effects. The theoretical calculations have been based on an assumption that the effective collision frequency is much smaller than the bounce frequency such that the trapped electrons are allowed to complete the banana orbit at all energies. The assumption might be justified in reactor-grade tokamak plasmas, in which the electron temperature is sufficiently high or the velocity of resonant electrons is much larger than the thermal velocity, so that the influence of collisionality on current drive efficiency can be neglected. For off-axis deposition in the present-day experiments, the effect of high density and low temperature is to reduce the current drive efficiency, but the increasing collisionality reduces the trapping of current-carrying electrons, leading to compensating increases in the current drive efficiency. In this work, we use the adjoint function formulation [4] to examine collisionality effects on the current drive efficiency.

  3. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Confinement improvement with rf poloidal current drive in the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hokin, S.; Sarff, J.; Sovinec, C.; Uchimoto, E.

    1994-03-08

    External control of the current profile in a reversed-field pinch (RFP), by means such as rf poloidal current drive, may have beneficial effects well beyond the direct reduction of Ohmic input power due to auxiliary heating. Reduction of magnetic turbulence associated with the dynamo, which drives poloidal current in a conventional RFP, may allow operation at lower density and higher electron temperature, for which rf current drive becomes efficient and the RFP operates in a more favorable regime on the n{tau} vs T diagram. Projected parameters for RFX at 2 MA axe studied as a concrete example. If rf current drive allows RFX to operate with {beta} = 10% (plasma energy/magnetic energy) at low density (3 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}) with classical resistivity (i.e. without dynamo-enhanced power input), 40 ms energy confinement times and 3 keV temperatures will result, matching the performance of tokamaks of similar size.

  5. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, D.L. Green, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2011-06-08

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat I{sub p} = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (P{sub RF}), achieved a noninductive current fraction, f{sub NI} {approx} 0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of I{sub p} = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with f{sub NI} {approx} 0.35, when P{sub RF} {ge} 2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW

  6. Electron beam current in high power cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Menon, R.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Singh, S. K.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-01-15

    Intense electron beam generation studies were carried out in high power cylindrical diode to investigate the effect of the accelerating gap and diode voltage on the electron beam current. The diode voltage has been varied from 130 to 356 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 87 to 391 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam current in the cylindrical diode has been compared with the Langmuir-Blodgett law. It was found that the diode current can be explained by a model of anode and cathode plasma expanding toward each other. However, the diode voltage and current do not follow the bipolar space-charge limited flow model. It was also found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 4.2 cm/mus for 1.7 cm anode-cathode gap and the plasma velocity decreases for smaller gaps. The electrode plasma expansion velocity of the cylindrical diode is much smaller as compared with the planar diode for the same accelerating gap and diode voltage. Therefore, much higher voltage can be obtained for the cylindrical diodes as compared with the planar diodes for the same accelerating gap.

  7. Determination of the Electron Cyclotron Current Drive Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Schuster, D.I.; Makowski, M.A.

    1999-11-01

    Evaluation of the profile of non-inductive current density driven by absorption of electron cyclotron waves (ECCD) using time evolution of the poloidal flux indicated a broader profile than predicted by theory. To determine the nature of this broadening, a 1-1/2 D transport calculation of current density evolution was used to generate the signals which the DIII-D motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic would measure in the event that the current density evolution followed the neoclassical Ohm's law with the theoretical ECCD profile. Comparison with the measured MSE data indicates the experimental data is consistent with the ECCD profile predicted by theory. The simulations yield a lower limit on the magnitude of the ECCD which is at or above the value found in Fokker-Planck calculations of the ECCD including quasilinear and parallel electric field effects.

  8. Current drive with the second ECR harmonic on T-10

    SciTech Connect

    Alikaev, V.V.; Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshegovskij, A.A.; Dremin, M.M.; Esipchuk, Y.V.; Gorelov, Y.A.; Ivanov, N.V.; Kislov, A.Y.; Kuznetsova, L.K.; Notkin, G.E.; Pavlov, Y.D.; Razumova, K.A.; Roy, I.N.; Vasin, N.L.; Vershkov, V.A. , Moscow ); Forest, C.B.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W. ); The T-10 Team

    1994-10-15

    The experiments on ECCD on the second harmonic were done. Current about 35 kA was generated. The efficiency of ECCD and its dependencies on plasma parameters were measured. Not all observed phenomena may be explained by the predictions of linear theory.

  9. Characterization of beam-driven instabilities and current redistribution in MST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, E.

    2015-11-01

    A unique, high-rep-rate (>10 kHz) Thomson scattering diagnostic and a high-bandwidth FIR interferometer-polarimeter on MST have enabled characterization of beam-driven instabilities and magnetic equilibrium changes observed during high power (1 MW) neutral beam injection (NBI). While NBI leads to negligible net current drive, an increase in on-axis current density observed through Faraday rotation is offset by a reduction in mid-radius current. Identification of the phase flip in temperature fluctuations associated with tearing modes provides a sensitive measure of rational surface locations. This technique strongly constrains the safety factor for equilibrium reconstruction and provides a powerful new tool for measuring the equilibrium magnetic field. For example, the n = 6 temperature structure is observed to shift inward 1.1 +/- 0.6 cm, with an estimated reduction of q0 by 5%. This is consistent with a mid-radius reduction in current, and together the Faraday rotation and Thomson scattering measurements corroborate an inductive redistribution of current that compares well with TRANSP/MSTFit predictions. Interpreting tearing mode temperature structures in the RFP remains challenging; the effects of multiple, closely-spaced tearing modes on the mode phase measurement require further verification. In addition to equilibrium changes, previous work has shown that the large fast ion population drives instabilities at higher frequencies near the Alfvén continuum. Recent observations reveal a new instability at much lower frequency (~7 kHz) with strongly chirping behavior. It participates in extensive avalanches of the higher frequency energetic particle and Alfvénic modes to drive enhanced fast ion transport. Internal structures measured from Te and ne fluctuations, their dependence on the safety factor, as well as frequency scaling motivate speculation about mode identity. Work supported by U.S. DOE.

  10. Isotopic effect in experiments on lower hybrid current drive in the FT-2 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkul, S. I. Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D. Gusakov, E. Z.; D’yachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Irzak, M. A. Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Saveliev, A. N.; Stepanov, A. Yu.; Shatalin, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    To analyze factors influencing the limiting value of the plasma density at which lower hybrid (LH) current drive terminates, the isotopic factor (the difference in the LH resonance densities in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas) was used for the first time in experiments carried out at the FT-2 tokamak. It is experimentally found that the efficiency of LH current drive in deuterium plasma is appreciably higher than that in hydrogen plasma. The significant role of the parametric decay of the LH pumping wave, which hampers the use of the LH range of RF waves for current drive at high plasma densities, is confirmed. It is demonstrated that the parameters characterizing LH current drive agree well with the earlier results obtained at large tokamaks.

  11. Simulations of EBW current drive and power deposition in the WEGA Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2009-11-26

    The WEGA stellarator is well suited for fundamental electron Bernstein wave (EBW) studies. Heating and current drive experiments at 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz, carried out in WEGA's low temperature, steady state overdense plasmas, were supported by intensive modelling. We employ our AMR (Antenna-Mode-conversion-Ray-tracing) code to calculate the O-X-EBW conversion efficiency with a full-wave equation solver, while the power deposition and current drive profiles using ray tracing. Several phenomena have been studied and understood. Particularly, EBW current drive was theoretically predicted and experimentally detected at 2.45 GHz. Simulations confirmed the presence of two (cold and hot) electron components and the resonant behaviour of the EBW power deposition and its dependence on the magnetic field configuration. Furthermore, the code is used to predict the 28 GHz heating and current drive performance and to simulate EBW emission spectra.

  12. Fast wave current drive modeling using the combined RANT3D and PICES Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Murakami, M.; Stallings, D. C.; Carter, M. D.; Wang, C. Y.; Galambos, J. D.; Batchelor, D. B.; Baity, F. W.; Bell, G. L.; Wilgen, J. B.; Chiu, S. C.; DeGrassie, J. S.; Forest, C. B.; Kupfer, K.; Petty, C. C.; Pinsker, R. T.; Prater, R.; Lohr, J.; Lee, K. M.

    1996-02-01

    Two numerical codes are combined to give a theoretical estimate of the current drive and direct electron heating by fast waves launched from phased antenna arrays on the DIII-D tokamak. Results are compared with experiment.

  13. Coupling of α-channeling to |k∥| upshift in lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-08-26

    Although lower hybrid waves have been shown to be effective in driving plasma current in present-day tokamaks, they are predicted to strongly interact with the energetic α particles born from fusion reactions in eventual tokamak reactors.

  14. HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE IN NSTX WITH ELECTRON BERNSTEIN WAVES AND HIGH HARMONIC FAST WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K

    2010-06-14

    A suitable theoretical and computational framework for studying heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment has been developed. This framework can also be used to study heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in spherical tori and other magnetic confinement devices. It is also useful in studying the propagation and damping of electron cyclotron waves in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  15. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio

    2006-04-15

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  16. High current heavy ion beam transport experiment at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, W.; Faltens, A.; Hartwig, E.C.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.H.; Pike, C.; Rosenblum, S.S.; Tiefenback, M.; Vanecek, D.; Warwick, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    Information on the current limit in a long quadrupole transport channel is required in designing an accelerator driver for an inertial confinement fusion system. Although a current transport limit was proposed by Maschke, quantitative estimates require a detailed knowledge of the stability of the beam. Analytic calculations based on the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (K-V) distribution function have identified transversely unstable modes, but particle simulations have shown that some of the K-V instabilities are benign, i.e., particles redistribute themselves in the 4-D transverse phase space, but the rms emittances do not grow. Some preliminary results of beam transport experiments were reported in the 1983 Particle Accelerator Conference in Santa Fe.

  17. Multipulsed edge-current drive in a spheromak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodestro, L. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Hooper, E. B.; McLean, H. S.; Stewart, T. L.; Wood, R. D.

    2008-11-01

    Flux amplification (A)--the ratio of poloidal magnetic flux enclosed by a spheromak's toroidal core-plasma to an applied edge flux--is a critical parameter for an economic spheromak-based fusion reactor. In [1], experimental measurements of A in SSPX found good agreement with numerical studies [2] carried out with the NIMROD code over a range of ``extended formation" discharge parameters. However, SPPX appeared to be limited to A ˜ 3 while the simulated A continued to rise with increasing gun-current (Igun). Early experiments with the SSPX modular capacitor bank, on the other hand, gave some indication that d/dt also played a role and that, perhaps, multiple pulses with faster current swings in both directions could build magnetic field more efficiently. Experiments to explore this were, however, limited by gun discharge circuit inductance. In this paper we investigate the effect numerically using multipulse scenarios in the SSPX geometry with NIMROD. [1] B. Hudson et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056112 (2008). [2] E.B. Hooper et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1064 (2007). Work performed by LLNL under the auspices of the U.S. DoE, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 {mu}s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within {plus_minus} 100 {mu}m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  19. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 [mu]s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within [plus minus] 100 [mu]m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  20. Current Research Activities in Drive System Technology in Support of the NASA Rotorcraft Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Drive system technology is a key area for improving rotorcraft performance, noise/vibration reduction, and reducing operational and manufacturing costs. An overview of current research areas that support the NASA Rotorcraft Program will be provided. Work in drive system technology is mainly focused within three research areas: advanced components, thermal behavior/emergency lubrication system operation, and diagnostics/prognostics (also known as Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS)). Current research activities in each of these activities will be presented. Also, an overview of the conceptual drive system requirements and possible arrangements for the Heavy Lift Rotorcraft program will be reviewed.

  1. Co-counter asymmetry in fast wave heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Forest, C.B.; Weitzner, H.

    1997-04-01

    Full wave ICRF coupling models show differences in plasma response when antenna arrays are phase to drive currents and counter to the plasma current. The source of this difference lies in the natural up- sown asymmetry of the antenna`s radiated power spectrum. This asymmetry is due to Hall terms in the wave equation, and occurs even without a poloidal magnetic field. When a poloidal field is included, the up-down asymmetry acquires a toroidal component. The result is that plasma absorption (i.e. antenna loading) is shifted or skewed toward the co-current drive direction, independent of the direction of the magnetic field. When wave are launched to drive current counter the plasma current , electron heating an current profiles are more peaked on axis, and this peaking becomes more pronounce a lower toroidal magnetic fields.

  2. Changing Chilean coastal currents could drive aquatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-01-01

    For invertebrate and fish species that spend most of their lives in rich coastal waters rather than migrating freely throughout the open ocean, the formation of island populations and the associated risk of genetic diversity loss are threats to long-term population health. Many species cope through a spawning mechanism whereby larvae are released en masse into near-shore ocean currents, like pollen adrift in the wind. The larvae are viable in open waters from days to months, but only those that find their way back to shore can settle and develop. To increase their chances, different species' larvae often use particular swimming behaviors, for example, varying their depth in the water column throughout the day.

  3. A microbeam slit system for high beam currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallentin, T.; Moser, M.; Eschbaumer, S.; Greubel, C.; Haase, T.; Reichart, P.; Rösch, T.; Dollinger, G.

    2015-04-01

    A new microbeam slit system for high beam currents of 10 μA was built up to improve the brightness transport of a proton beam with a kinetic energy of up to 25 MeV into the microprobe SNAKE. The new slit system features a position accuracy of less than 1 μm under normal operating conditions and less than 2 μm if the beam is switched on and off. The thermal management with a powerful watercooling and potential-free thermocouple feedback controlled heating cables is optimized for constant slit aperture at thermal power input of up to 250 W. The transparent zone is optimized to 0.7 μm due to the use of tungsten formed to a cylindrical surface with a radius r = 100 mm and mechanically lapped surface to minimize small angle scattering effects and to minimize the number of ions passing the slits with low energy loss. Electrical isolation of the slit tip enables slit current monitoring, e.g. for tandem accelerator feedback control. With the ability to transport up to 10 μA of protons with the new microslit system, the brightness Bexp transported into the microprobe was increased by a factor of 2 compared to low current injection using the old slit system.

  4. Conserved vector current test using low energy beta beams

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, A.B.; Jesus, J.H. de; Lazauskas, R.; Volpe, C.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss the possibility of testing the weak currents and, in particular, the weak magnetism term through the measurement of the {nu}{sub e}+p{yields}e{sup +}+n reaction at a low energy beta-beam facility. We analyze the sensitivity using both the total number of events and the angular distribution of the positrons emitted in a water Cerenkov detector. We show that the weak magnetism form factor might be determined with better than several percent accuracy using the angular distribution. This offers a new way of testing the conserved vector current hypothesis.

  5. The TCS Rotating Magnetic Field FRC Current-Drive Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Alan J.; Guo, Houyang Y.; Slough, John T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Schrank, Louis S.; Reass, William A.; Wurden, Glen A.

    2002-03-15

    Field-reversed configurations (FRCs) have extremely attractive reactor attributes because of their singly connected geometry. They have been created in theta-pinch devices, but being compact toroids and lacking a center hole, their toroidal current cannot be sustained by transformer action as in other toroidal configurations. A new device, the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment (TCS) facility has been constructed to use rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) to build up and sustain the flux of hot FRCs formed by the normal theta-pinch method. RMF formation and sustainment of similar, but cold, pure poloidal field configurations have been demonstrated in devices called rotamaks, and RMF formation, but not sustainment, has been achieved in a smaller FRC facility called the Star Thrust Experiment (STX). Initial formation and sustainment have now been achieved in TCS, albeit still with cold (T{sub e} {approx} 50 eV) plasmas. Both the formation and final steady-state conditions are found to agree with newly developed analytic and numerical models for RMF flux buildup and sustainment inside a standard cylindrical flux conserver. The required plasma conditions (mainly resistivity but also density) can now be determined for the planned hot FRC, RMF flux buildup experiments and for eventual reactor conditions.

  6. Hybrid monitor for both beam position and tilt of pulsed high-current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, J. He, X.; Ma, C.; Zhao, L.; Li, Q.; Dai, Z.

    2014-09-15

    A Hybrid beam monitor, integrated with both azimuthal and axial B-dot probes, was designed for simultaneous measurement of both beam position and beam angle for pulsed high-current beams at the same location in beam pipe. The output signals of axial B-dot probes were found to be mixed with signals caused by transverse position deviation. In order to eliminate the unwanted signals, an elimination method was developed and its feasibility tested on a 50-Ω coaxial line test stand. By this method, a waveform, shape-like to that of input current and proportional to the tilt angle, was simulated and processed by following integration step to achieve the tilt angle. The tests showed that the measurement error of displacement and tilt angle less than 0.3 mm and 1.5 mrad, respectively. The latter error could be reduced with improved probes by reducing the inductance of the axial B-dot probe, but the improvement reached a limit due to some unknown systemic mechanism.

  7. (Injection of compact toroids for tokamak fueling and current drive)

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.Q.; Rogers, J.H.; Thomas, J.C.; Evans, R.; Foley, R.; Hillyer, T.

    1991-01-01

    The experimental goals for the 1990--1991 period were the operation of the Davis Diverted Tokamak(DDT), the beat wave experiment, and the construction of the compact toroid injection experiment(CTIX). The experiment results from these areas are summarized in the posters given in the APS meeting past November. Here we shall describe the technical progress of the development of the diagnostic system for beat wave experiment, and CT injection especially in relation to the up coming injection experiments into DDT tokamak. The tokamak operation of DDT over the past year has been focused in two parameter ranges. The long pulse discharges (over 100 msec), and the low q short pulse discharges (about 10 msec). We found that the long pulse discharges required a position feedback more sophisticated than the simple passive program that we have. We are in the process of assembling this system. We also found an interesting low q(a) operating regime. Here an equilibrium can be established for a toroidal field between .5 and 1 kG. The typical plasma current is > 5kA. The density of the plasma is between 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}. The plasma condition in these discharge are sufficiently mild that diagnostic probes can be used to measure various plasma fluctuations. We believe that this will be the regime best suited to study the interaction between the tokamak plasma and the compact toroid. A sophisticated probe system of both electrostatic and electromagnetic types similar to those used in the beat wave experiment has been designed for the up coming experiments.

  8. Low temperature high current ion beams and laminar flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavenago, Marco

    2014-07-01

    Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson equilibria for the extraction of ions with low temperature Ti are discussed, with comparison to the laminar flow case Ti = 0, in two dimensional diodes. Curvilinear coordinates aligned with laminar beam flow lines are extended to the low ion temperature case, with a reduced current density jd, expressed with cathode integrals. This generalizes one-dimensional interpolation between rays along the cathode coordinate to multidimensional integrations, including also the momentum components, so that jd is free from the granularity defect and noise, typical of standard ray tracing approach. A robust numerical solution procedure is developed, which allows studying current saturated extraction and drift tube effects. A discussion of particle initial conditions determines the emission angles and shows that temperature effect at beam edge is partly balanced by the focus electrode inclination. Results for a typical diode are described, with detail about normalized emittance, here taken strictly proportional to the x - px phase space area, for a beam with non uniform velocities. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Vlasov Equation", edited by Francesco Pegoraro, Francesco Califano, Giovanni Manfredi and Philip J. Morrison.

  9. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y. Li, F. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.

    2015-10-15

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  10. Lower-hybrid poloidal current drive for fluctuation reduction in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Uchimoto, E.; Cekic, M.; Harvey, R.W.; Litwin, C.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1994-06-01

    Current drive using the lower-hybrid slow wave is shown to be a promising candidate for improving confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP). Ray-tracing calculations indicate that the wave will make a few poloidal turns while spiraling radially into a target zone inside the reversal layer. The poloidal antenna wavelength of the lower hybrid wave can be chosen so that efficient parallel current drive will occur mostly in the poloidal direction in this outer region. Three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computation demonstrates that an additive poloidal current in this region will reduce the magnetic fluctuations and magnetic stochasticity.

  11. Study of lower hybrid current drive towards long-pulse operation with high performance in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Wang, S. L.; Wei, W.; Xu, H. D.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Yang, Y.; Liu, L.; Xu, G. S.; Zang, Q.; Zhao, H. L.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Goniche, M.; Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Baek, G. S.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Yang, C.; Zhao, Y. P.; Qian, J. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Li, J. G.; Wan, B. N.

    2015-12-01

    High density experiments with 2.45 GHz lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in EAST are analyzed by means of simulation and modeling, showing that parametric instabilities (PI), collisional absorption and density fluctuations in the edge region could be responsible for the low CD efficiency at high density. In addition, recent LHCD results with 4.6 GHz are presented, showing that lower hybrid wave can be coupled to plasma with low reflection coefficient, drive plasma current and modify the current profile, and heat plasma effectively. The related results between two systems (2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz) are also compared, including CD efficiency and PI behavior.

  12. Cone beam CT: a current overview of devices

    PubMed Central

    Nemtoi, A; Czink, C; Haba, D; Gahleitner, A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review and compare the properties of all the available cone beam CT (CBCT) devices offered on the market, while focusing especially on Europe. In this study, we included all the different commonly used CBCT devices currently available on the European market. Information about the properties of each device was obtained from the manufacturers’ official available data, which was later confirmed by their representatives in cases where it was necessary. The main features of a total of 47 CBCT devices that are currently marketed by 20 companies were presented, compared and discussed in this study. All these CBCT devices differ in specific properties according to the companies that produce them. The summarized technical data from a large number of CBCT devices currently on the market offer a wide range of imaging possibilities in the oral and maxillofacial region. PMID:23818529

  13. Cone beam CT: a current overview of devices.

    PubMed

    Nemtoi, A; Czink, C; Haba, D; Gahleitner, A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review and compare the properties of all the available cone beam CT (CBCT) devices offered on the market, while focusing especially on Europe. In this study, we included all the different commonly used CBCT devices currently available on the European market. Information about the properties of each device was obtained from the manufacturers' official available data, which was later confirmed by their representatives in cases where it was necessary. The main features of a total of 47 CBCT devices that are currently marketed by 20 companies were presented, compared and discussed in this study. All these CBCT devices differ in specific properties according to the companies that produce them. The summarized technical data from a large number of CBCT devices currently on the market offer a wide range of imaging possibilities in the oral and maxillofacial region. PMID:23818529

  14. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemery, F.; Piot, P.

    2015-08-01

    Collinear high-gradient O (GV /m ) beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios >2 , a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting "drive" bunch to an accelerated "witness" bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative continuously differentiable (smooth) current profiles which support enhanced transformer ratios. We especially demonstrate that one of the devised shapes can be implemented in a photo-emission electron source by properly shaping the photocathode-laser pulse. We finally discuss a possible superconducting linear-accelerator concept that could produce shaped drive bunches at high-repetition rates to drive a dielectric-wakefield accelerator with accelerating fields on the order of ˜60 MV /m and a transformer ratio ˜5 consistent with a recently proposed multiuser free-electron laser facility.

  15. Modeling of the electron distribution based on bremsstrahlung emission during lower hybrid current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.E.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Jobes, F.

    1985-03-01

    Lower hybrid current drive requires the generation of a high energy electron tail anisotropic in velocity. Measurements of bremsstrahlung emission produced by this tail are compared with the calculated emission from reasonable model distributions. The physical basis and the sensitivity of this modeling process are described and the plasma properties of current driven discharges which can be derived from the model are discussed.

  16. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  17. Imaging of Electron Beam Induced Current in Epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Shin; Boeckl, John; Lu, Weijie; Park, J. H.; Mitchel, W. C.; Tetlak, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    It has been observed that there forms a Schottky junction between graphene and SiC in epitaxial graphene due to the work function difference. As a result, it is viable to apply the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique on epitaxial graphene due to the fact that it needs a built-in field and ample electron generation volume to generate EBIC. EBIC is an important characterization technique, which identifies electrically active impurities/defects, detects local built-in field, and measures minority carrier diffusion length. In this paper, we use a FEI SEM equipped with a current amplifier to investigate the spatial mapping of EBIC. The incident electron beam generates excited electron-hole pairs in SiC and the minority carriers are collected through the Schottky junction before flowing into graphene. EBIC imaging reveals mesoscopic domains of bright and dark contrast areas due to local EBIC polarity and magnitude, which is believed to be the result of spatial fluctuation in the carrier density in graphene. We also investigate the electron energy dependence, which modulates the EBIC magnitude. With an analytical drift-diffusion current model, we are able to extract the minority carrier diffusion length in the SiC, which is on the order of micro meter.

  18. Isotopic germanium targets for high beam current applications at GAMMASPHERE.

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J. P.; Lauritsen, T.

    2000-11-29

    The creation of a specific heavy ion residue via heavy ion fusion can usually be achieved through a number of beam and target combinations. Sometimes it is necessary to choose combinations with rare beams and/or difficult targets in order to achieve the physics goals of an experiment. A case in point was a recent experiment to produce {sup 152}Dy at very high spins and low excitation energy with detection of the residue in a recoil mass analyzer. Both to create the nucleus cold and with a small recoil-cone so that the efficiency of the mass analyzer would be high, it was necessary to use the {sup 80}Se on {sup 76}Ge reaction rather than the standard {sup 48}Ca on {sup 108}Pd reaction. Because the recoil velocity of the {sup 152}Dy residues was very high using this symmetric reaction (5% v/c), it was furthermore necessary to use a stack of two thin targets to reduce the Doppler broadening. Germanium targets are fragile and do not withstand high beam currents, therefore the {sup 76}Ge target stacks were mounted on a rotating target wheel. A description of the {sup 76}Ge target stack preparation will be presented and the target performance described.

  19. A Novel Current Angle Control Scheme in a Current Source Inverter Fed Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Drive for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lixin; Su, Gui-Jia

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel speed control scheme to operate a current source inverter (CSI) driven surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous machine (SPMSM) for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) applications. The idea is to use the angle of the current vector to regulate the rotor speed while keeping the two dc-dc converter power switches on all the time to boost system efficiency. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme was verified with a 3 kW CSI-SPMSM drive prototype.

  20. Modeling of rf-assisted helicity injection start-up and current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Ono, M.

    1994-10-01

    DC-helicity injection has been successfully applied to the tokamak start-up on CDX-U and CCT tokamaks. Furthermore, CDX-U achieved plasma current levels of up to 10 kA from zero without any ohmic drive. Helicity balance and scaling from CDX-U experiments indicate that plasma current scales with the electron temperature as Te3/2 and it is relatively insensitive to the plasma density. RF heating methods such as electron cyclotron and fast wave heating can be utilized to increase driven plasma current by reducing plasma resistivity. Zero-dimensional modeling has been attempted to design non-inductive start-up and current drive scenarios by combining helicity injection and various RF heating schemes. Plasma current can be driven from zero current by helicity injection and equilibrium field control, and then maintained by helicity injection and bootstrap current with the help of appropriate RF heating to reduce plasma resistivity. Non-inductive start-up and current drive for a 1 MA plasma current in a low-aspect-ratio geometry have been predicted with this model. In a reactor regime, 20 MA of plasma current can be driven and maintained non-inductively with a relatively high efficiency as well.

  1. Relaxed state for the coaxial helicity injection current drive in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Zhu, S.; Shen, L.

    1998-01-01

    The plasma relaxed state for the coaxial helicity injection current drive in toroidal configuration is investigated by applying the principle of minimum rate of energy dissipation. The comparison between theory and helicity injection current drive experiment on HIT (the Helicity Injected Tokamak) [T. R. Jarboe, Fusion Technol. {bold 15}, 7 (1989)] is presented. The calculation results indicate that the key features such as total toroidal driven current, current in closed field, current density profile, magnetic configuration, and j{sub t}/B{sub t} profile agree quite well with experiment. Analysis shows that plasma relaxes to a noncomplete relaxation state, and the toroidal current is effectively driven in this state. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Depletion region surface effects in electron beam induced current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Paul M.; Yoon, Heayoung P.; Gaury, Benoit; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2016-09-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Current models of EBIC assume that excitations in the p-n junction depletion region result in perfect charge collection efficiency. However, we find that in CdTe and Si samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, there is a reduced and nonuniform EBIC lineshape for excitations in the depletion region. Motivated by this, we present a model of the EBIC response for excitations in the depletion region which includes the effects of surface recombination from both charge-neutral and charged surfaces. For neutral surfaces, we present a simple analytical formula which describes the numerical data well, while the charged surface response depends qualitatively on the location of the surface Fermi level relative to the bulk Fermi level. We find that the experimental data on FIB-prepared Si solar cells are most consistent with a charged surface and discuss the implications for EBIC experiments on polycrystalline materials.

  3. Particle simulation of intense electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.

    1987-10-12

    High-power free-electron lasers make new methods possible for heating plasmas and driving current in toroidal plasmas with electromagnetic waves. We have undertaken particle simulation studies with one and two dimensional, relativistic particle simulation codes of intense pulsed electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive. The particle simulation methods here are conventional: the algorithms are time-centered, second-order-accurate, explicit, leap-frog difference schemes. The use of conventional methods restricts the range of space and time scales to be relatively compact in the problems addressed. Nevertheless, experimentally relevant simulations have been performed. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Design of long-pulse fast wave current drive antennas for DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.; Batchelor, D. B.; Bills, K. C.; Fogelman, C. H.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ping, J. L.; Riemer, B. W.; Ryan, P. M.; Stallings, D. C.; Taylor, D. J.; Yugo, J. J.

    1994-10-01

    Two new long-pulse fast wave current drive (FWCD) antennas will be installed on DIII-D in early 1994. These antennas will increase the available FWCD power from 2 MW to 6 MW for pulse lengths of up to 2 s, and to 4 MW for up to 10 s. Power for the new antennas is from two ASDEX-type 30- to 120-MHz transmitters. When operated at 90° phasing into a low-density plasma (˜4×1019m-3) with hot electrons (˜10 keV), these two new antennas are predicted to drive approximately 1 MA of plasma current.

  5. Effects of Magnetic Shear on Toroidal Rotation in Tokamak Plasmas with Lower Hybrid Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. E.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Reinke, M. L.; Mumgaard, R.; Scott, S. D.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Chouli, B.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Nave, M. F. F.; Diamond, P. H.; Gao, C.; Granetz, R. S.; Hughes, J. W.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giroud, C.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Irby, J. H.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Marmar, E. S.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Application of lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas can induce both co- and countercurrent directed changes in toroidal rotation, depending on the core q profile. For discharges with q0<1, rotation increments in the countercurrent direction are observed. If the LH-driven current is sufficient to suppress sawteeth and increase q0 above unity, the core toroidal rotation change is in the cocurrent direction. This change in sign of the rotation increment is consistent with a change in sign of the residual stress (the divergence of which constitutes an intrinsic torque that drives the flow) through its dependence on magnetic shear.

  6. Drive current enhancement in tunnel field-effect transistors by graded heterojunction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Nguyen Dang; Vinh, Luu The

    2013-09-01

    The heterostructure technique has recently demonstrated an excellent solution to resolve the trade-off between on- and off-state currents in tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). This paper shows the weakness of abrupt heterojunctions and explores the physics of drive current enhancement as well as generalizes the proposed graded heterojunction approach in both n-type and p-type TFETs. It is shown that the presence of thermal emission barriers formed by abrupt band offsets is the physical reason of the on-current lowering observed in abrupt heterojunction TFETs. By employing graded heterojunctions in TFETs, the thermal emission barriers for electrons and holes are completely eliminated to narrow the tunnel widths in n-type and p-type TFETs, respectively. With the significant improvement in on-current, this novel approach of graded heterojunctions provides an effective technique for enhancing the drive current in heterostructure-based TFET devices.

  7. Fivefold confinement time increase in the Madison Symmetric Torus using inductive poloidal current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.R.; Lanier, N.E.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Sinitsyn, D.

    1996-12-01

    Current profile control is employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch to reduce the magnetic fluctuations responsible for anomalous transport. An inductive poloidal electric field pulse is applied in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile, reducing the dynamo fluctuation amplitude required to sustain the equilibrium. This technique demonstrates a substantial reduction in fluctuation amplitude (as much as 50%), and improvement in energy confinement (from 1 ms to 5 ms); a record low fluctuation (0.8%) and record high temperature (615 eV) for this device were observed simultaneously during current drive experiments. Plasma beta increases by 50% and the Ohmic input power is three times lower. Particle confinement improves and plasma impurity contamination is reduced. The results of the transient current drive experiments provide motivation for continuing development of steady-state current profile control strategies for the reversed field pinch.

  8. A mechanism for the dynamo terms to sustain closed-flux current, including helicity balance, by driving current which crosses the magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sutherland, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) [T.R. Jarboe et al., Nucl. Fusion 52 083017 (2012)] reveals: (a) current drive on closed flux surfaces seems possible without relaxation, reconnection, or other flux-surface-breaking large events; (b) the scale size of the key physics may be smaller than is often computationally resolved; (c) helicity can be sustained across closed flux; and (d) IDCD current drive is parallel to the current which crosses the magnetic field to produce the current driving force. In addition to agreeing with spheromak data, IDCD agrees with selected tokamak data.

  9. Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wilson, R. Parker, M. Bitter, P.T. Bonoli, C. Fiore, R.W. Harvey, K. Hill, A.E. Hubbard, J.W. Hughes, A. Ince-Cushman, C. Kessel, J.S. Ko, O. Meneghini, C.K. Phillips, M. Porkolab, J. Rice, A.E. Schmidt, S. Scott,S. Shiraiwa, E. Valeo, G.Wallace, J.C. Wright and the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2009-11-20

    On the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is being used to modify the current profile with the aim of obtaining advanced tokamak (AT) performance in plasmas with parameters similar to those that would be required on ITER. To date, power levels in excess of 1 MW at a frequency of 4.6 GHz have been coupled into a variety of plasmas. Experiments have established that LHCD on C-Mod behaves globally as predicted by theory. Bulk current drive efficiencies, n20IlhR/Plh ~ 0.25, inferred from magnetics and MSE are in line with theory. Quantitative comparisons between local measurements, MSE, ECE and hard x-ray bremsstrahlung, and theory/simulation using the GENRAY, TORIC-LH CQL3D and TSC-LSC codes have been performed. These comparisons have demonstrated the off-axis localization of the current drive, its magnitude and location dependence on the launched n|| spectrum, and the use of LHCD during the current ramp to save volt-seconds and delay the peaking of the current profile. Broadening of the x-ray emission profile during ICRF heating indicates that the current drive location can be controlled by the electron temperature, as expected. In addition, an alteration in the plasma toroidal rotation profile during LHCD has been observed with a significant rotation in the counter current direction. Notably, the rotation is accompanied by peaking of the density and temperature profiles on a current diffusion time scale inside of the half radius where the LH absorption is taking place.

  10. Rapid measurement of charged particle beam profiles using a current flux grating

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Samit; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2015-02-15

    The principle and physics issues of charged particle beam diagnostics using a current flux grating are presented. Unidirectional array of conducting channels with interstitial insulating layers of spacing d is placed in the beam path to capture flux of charge and electronically reproduce an exact beam current profile with density variation. The role of secondary electrons due to the impinging particle beam (both electron and ion) on the probe is addressed and a correction factor is introduced. A 2-dimensional profile of the electron beam is obtained by rotating the probe about the beam axis. Finally, a comparison of measured beam profile with a Gaussian is presented.

  11. Rapid measurement of charged particle beam profiles using a current flux grating.

    PubMed

    Paul, Samit; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2015-02-01

    The principle and physics issues of charged particle beam diagnostics using a current flux grating are presented. Unidirectional array of conducting channels with interstitial insulating layers of spacing d is placed in the beam path to capture flux of charge and electronically reproduce an exact beam current profile with density variation. The role of secondary electrons due to the impinging particle beam (both electron and ion) on the probe is addressed and a correction factor is introduced. A 2-dimensional profile of the electron beam is obtained by rotating the probe about the beam axis. Finally, a comparison of measured beam profile with a Gaussian is presented.

  12. Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks by Radio Frequency Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2007-09-28

    Resistive neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) will be the principal limit on stability and performance in the ITER standard scenario as the resulting islands break up the magnetic surfaces that confine the plasma. Drag from rotating island-induced eddy current in the resistive wall can also slow the plasma rotation, produce locking to the wall, and cause loss of high confinement H-mode and disruption. The NTMs are maintained by helical perturbations to the pressure-gradient driven 'bootstrap' current. Thus, this is a high beta instability even at the modest beta for ITER. A major line of research on NTM stabilization is the use of radio frequency (rf) current drive at the island rational surface. While large, broad current drive from lower hybrid waves has been shown to be stabilizing (COMPASS-D), most research is directed to small, narrow current drive from electron cyclotron waves (ECCD); ECCD stabilization and/or preemptive prevention is successful in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JT-60U, for example, with as little as a few percent of the total plasma current if the ECCD is kept sufficiently narrow so that the peak off-axis ECCD is comparable to the local bootstrap current.

  13. Modeling of the influences of electron cyclotron current drive on neoclassical tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Long; Liu, Jinyuan; Sun, Jizhong; Sun, Guanglan; Duan, Ping

    2015-05-15

    Influences of external current drive on neoclassical tearing modes are studied numerically with a set of compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. By considering the effects of driven current parameters and its deposition timing, and by examining the relationship between driven current and the missing bootstrap current, the basic requirements of deposition width and external current density for effectively suppressing neoclassical tearing modes are investigated. When the driven current density is able to compensate the missing bootstrap current and the deposition region is comparable with the saturated island, the suppression results are notable. Meanwhile, the pre-emptive strategy of current deposition reported experimentally is also evaluated, and the results agree with the experimental ones that early current deposition can enhance suppression effectiveness greatly. In addition, the deficiencies of continuous driven current are discussed when the plasma rotation has been taken into account, and the application of modulated current drive, which is synchronized in phase with the rotating island, can restore the stabilizing role under some conditions. The favorable parameters of modulation such as duty cycle are also addressed.

  14. Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive for Maintaining Minimum q in Negative Central Shear Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T A; Kaiser, T B; Jong, R A; LoDestro, L L; Moller, J; Pearlstein, L D; Dodge, T

    2003-04-24

    Toroidal plasmas created with negative magnetic shear in the core region offer advantages in terms of MHD stability properties. These plasmas, transiently created in several tokamaks, have exhibited high performance as measured by normalized stored energy and neutron production rates. A critical issue with extending the duration of these plasmas is the need to maintain the off-axis-peaked current distribution required to support the minimum in the safety factor q at large radii. We present equilibrium and transport simulations that explore the use of electron cyclotron heating and current drive to maintain this negative shear configuration. Using parameters consistent with DIII-D tokamak operation, we find that with sufficiently high injected power, it is possible to achieve steady-state conditions employing well aligned electron cyclotron and bootstrap current drive in fully non-inductively current-driven configurations.

  15. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-15

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%–70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  16. Suppression of sawtooth oscillations by lower-hybrid current drive in the ASDEX tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söldner, F. X.; McCormick, K.; Eckhartt, D.; Kornherr, M.; Leuterer, F.; Bartiromo, R.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H. S.; Brocken, H.; Derfler, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. V.; Giuliana, A.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hesse, M.; Hofmann, J.; Izvozchikov, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Lackner, K.; Lenoci, M.; Lisitano, G.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Pietrzyk, A.; Poschenrieder, W.; Rapp, H.; Riedler, H.; Röhr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schmitter, K. H.; Schneider, F.; Setzensack, C.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Vien, T.; Vollmer, O.; Wagner, F.; Woyna, F. V.; Zasche, D.

    1986-09-01

    The sawtooth oscillations in tokamak discharges with Ohmic and neutral-beam heating could be suppressed when a large part of the plasma current was driven by lower-hybrid waves (IHF/Ip~=0.5). The stabilization is due to a flattening of the current profile j(r) and an increase of q(0) above 1. Higher central electron temperatures are obtained with neutral-beam heating if the sawteeth are stabilized. The increase in total energy content in this case was 30% higher than in the presence of sawteeth.

  17. Co- and counter-current rotation in Tore Supra lower hybrid current drive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouli, B.; Fenzi, C.; Garbet, X.; Bourdelle, C.; Decker, J.; Aniel, T.; Artaud, J.-F.; Basiuk, V.; Clairet, F.; Colledani, G.; Dumont, R.; Elbeze, D.; Gil, C.; Lotte, P.; Sarazin, Y.; the Tore Supra Team

    2014-09-01

    Observations of lower hybrid (LH) radio frequency heating effects on toroidal plasma rotation in L-mode Tore Supra plasmas are reported. A database of more than 50 plasma discharges has been analysed. Core rotation is found to increment in co- or counter-current direction depending on the plasma current (Ip). At low plasma current, the induced rotation is up to +15 km s-1 in the co-current direction, the rotation profile being affected over the whole plasma minor radius. At higher plasma current, an opposite trend is observed, the core plasma rotation incrementing up to -15 km s-1 in the counter-current direction, the profile being affected up to r/a < 0.6 only. At the zero crossing point, which is defined when the plasma rotation profile is not affected by LH power injection, Ip ˜ 0.95 MA. In both low and high Ip cases, rotation increments are found to increase with the injected power. Several mechanisms in competition which can induce co- or counter-current rotation in Tore Supra LHCD plasmas are investigated and typical order of magnitude are discussed. How those effects evolve with plasma parameters and how they compete are important issues addressed in this paper. Rotation increment increase with Ip at fixed LH power is consistent with a dominant standard momentum confinement mechanism related to Ip increase. The co-current change in rotation is consistent with a fast electron ripple loss mechanism, while thermal ripple induced neoclassical friction and absorbed LH wave momentum from resonant electrons are expected to influence the rotation in the counter-current direction. Finally, the numerical simulations show that the radial turbulent momentum transport does impact the rotation behaviour inducing increment in co- or counter-current directions, depending on the plasma current amplitude.

  18. Modeling of rf-assisted helicity injection start-up and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.S.; Ono, M. )

    1994-10-15

    DC-helicity injection has been successfully applied to the tokamak start-up on CDX-U and CCT tokamaks. Furthermore, CDX-U achieved plasma current levels of up to 10 kA from zero without any ohmic drive. Helicity balance and scaling from CDX-U experiments indicate that plasma current scales with the electron temperature as [ital T][sub [ital e

  19. [Design and Implementation of the Multi-Channel Meridian Impedance Detector Based on Current Driving].

    PubMed

    Cao, Chenghu; Chen, Xin

    2015-03-01

    A multi-channel meridian impedance detector used to the 3D meridian visualization positioning is presented. The detector is designed with the four-electrode method based on current driving according to low impedance of the meridian. The detector consists of power-supply module, sinusoidal signal generator, voltage-controlled current source, isolation amplifiers, filter circuit, amplitude detectors and so on. PMID:26204737

  20. Equipment for Beam Current and Electron Energy Monitoring During Industry Irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadtsev, A. A.

    1997-05-01

    The electron beam irradiation sterilization is placed first among all types of medical items sterilization. The quality of sterilization is determined by value of dose, which is in one's turn determined by beam current, electron energy and beam scanning system parameters. Therefore this parameters have to be controlled during the irradiation process. The equipment for beam current and electron energy monitoring allows to control beam current, electron energy spectrum and nominal deflection of electron beam when scanning during the irradiation process each scanning period or, for example, each tenth period by request.

  1. Current correlations in an interacting Cooper-pair beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, J.; Chevallier, D.; Jonckheere, T.; Martin, T.

    2012-01-01

    We propose an approach allowing the computation of currents and their correlations in interacting multiterminal mesoscopic systems involving quantum dots coupled to normal and/or superconducting leads. The formalism relies on the expression of branching currents and noise crossed correlations in terms of one- and two-particle Green's functions for the dots electrons, which are then evaluated self-consistently within a conserving approximation. We then apply this to the Cooper-pair beam-splitter setup recently proposed [L. Hofstetter , Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature08432 461, 960 (2009); Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.136801 107, 136801 (2011); L. G. Herrmann , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.026801 104, 026801 (2010)], which we model as a double quantum dot with weak interactions, connected to a superconducting lead and two normal ones. Our method not only enables us to take into account a local repulsive interaction on the dots, but also to study its competition with the direct tunneling between dots. Our results suggest that even a weak Coulomb repulsion tends to favor positive current cross correlations in the antisymmetric regime (where the dots have opposite energies with respect to the superconducting chemical potential).

  2. Experiments on Helicon Excitation and Off-Axis Current Drive on DIII-D: Status and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Moeller, C. P.; Degrassie, J. S.; Tooker, J. F.; Anderson, J. P.; Torreblanca, H.; Hansink, M.; Nagy, A.; Porkolab, M.

    2015-11-01

    Fast waves in the LHRF, also called ``whistlers'' or ``helicons,'' will be studied in experiments on the DIII-D tokamak beginning in autumn 2015. In the first stage, a 12-element traveling wave antenna (``comb-line'') is installed in the DIII-D vessel for operation at very low power (~ 0.1 kW) at 476 MHz, with a well-defined launched n| | spectrum peaked at 3.0. The goals of the low-power experiment include: (1) determining the efficiency with which the desired fast waves can be excited under a variety of plasma conditions in discharges relevant to the subsequent high-power current drive experiments and (2) proving that the radial and poloidal location at which the antenna will be mounted does not cause deleterious effects in the DIII-D discharges with high neutral beam power, and that the antenna is not damaged by fast ion losses, etc. Plans for 1 MW-level experiments with a single klystron beginning in FY17 are discussed. In addition to demonstrating off-axis current drive at an efficiency of ~ 60 kA/MW in high-performance plasmas, these experiments will explore non-linear aspects of wave excitation, propagation and absorption such as ponderomotive effects and parametric decay instabilities. Supported by US DOE DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FG02-94ER54084.

  3. Non-linear effects in electron cyclotron current drive applied for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayten, B.; Westerhof, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-07-01

    Due to the smallness of the volumes associated with the flux surfaces around the O-point of a magnetic island, the electron cyclotron power density applied inside the island for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can exceed the threshold for non-linear effects as derived previously by Harvey et al (1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 426). We study the non-linear electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency through bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck calculations in the magnetic geometry as created by the islands. The calculations are performed for the parameters of a typical NTM stabilization experiment on ASDEX Upgrade. A particular feature of these experiments is that the rays of the EC wave beam propagate tangential to the flux surfaces in the power deposition region. The calculations show significant non-linear effects on the ECCD efficiency, when the ECCD power is increased from its experimental value of 1 MW to a larger value of 4 MW. The nonlinear effects are largest in the case of locked islands or when the magnetic island rotation period is longer than the collisional time scale. The non-linear effects result in an overall reduction of the current drive efficiency for this case with absorption of the EC power on the low-field side of the electron cyclotron resonance layer. As a consequence of the non-linear effects, also the stabilizing effect of the ECCD on the island is reduced from linear expectations.

  4. Current understanding and issues on electron beam injection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1988-01-01

    The status of the physics understanding involved in electron beam injection in space is reviewed. The paper examines our understanding of beam plasma interactions and their associated wave and energized particle spectra of the processes involved in the beam plasma discharge, and of the vehicle charge neutralization. 'Strawman' models are presented for comparison with experimental observations.

  5. Direct-current proton-beam measurements at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Joseph; Stevens, Ralph R.; Schneider, J. David; Zaugg, Thomas

    1995-09-15

    Recently, a CW proton accelerator complex was moved from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to Los Alamos National Laboratory. This includes a 50-keV dc proton injector with a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system (LEBT) and a CW 1.25-MeV, 267-MHz radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The move was completed after CRL had achieved 55-mA CW operation at 1.25 MeV using 250-kW klystrode tubes to power the RFQ. These accelerator components are prototypes for the front end of a CW linac required for an accelerator-driven transmutation linac, and they provide early confirmation of some CW accelerator components. The injector (ion source and LEBT) and emittance measuring unit are installed and operational at Los Alamos. The dc microwave ion source has been operated routinely at 50-keV, 75-mA hydrogen-ion current. This ion source has demonstrated very good discharge and H2 gas efficiencies, and sufficient reliability to complete CW RFQ measurements at CRL. Proton fraction of 75% has been measured with 550-W discharge power. This high proton fraction removes the need for an analyzing magnet. Proton LEBT emittance measurements completed at Los Alamos suggest that improved transmission through the RFQ may be achieved by increasing the solenoid focusing current. Status of the final CW RFQ operation at CRL and the installation of the RFQ at Los Alamos will be given.

  6. Direct-current proton-beam measurements at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, J.; Stevens, R.R.; Schneider, J.D.; Zaugg, T.

    1994-08-01

    Recently, a CW proton accelerator complex was moved from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to Los Alamos National Laboratory. This includes a 50-keV dc proton injector with a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system (LEBT) and a CW 1.25-MeV, 267-MHz radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The move was completed after CRL had achieved 55-mA CW operation at 1.25 MeV using 250-kW klystrode tubes to power the RFQ. These accelerator components are prototypes for the front end of a CW linac required for an accelerator-driven transmutation linac, and they provide early confirmation of some CW accelerator components. The injector (ion source and LEBT) and emittance measuring unit are installed and operational at Los Alamos. The dc microwave ion source has been operated routinely at 50-keV, 75-mA hydrogen-ion current. This ion source has demonstrated very good discharge and H{sub 2} gas efficiencies, and sufficient reliability to complete CW RFQ measurements at CRL. Proton fraction of 75% has been measured with 550-W discharge power. This high proton fraction removes the need for an analyzing magnet. Proton LEBT emittance measurements completed at Los Alamos suggest that improved transmission through the RFQ may be achieved by increasing the solenoid focusing current. Status of the final CW RFQ operation at CRL and the installation of the RFQ at Los Alamos is given.

  7. Radial current density effects on rotating magnetic field current drive in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, R. A.; Gilli, M.; Farengo, R.

    2008-10-15

    Steady state solutions, suitable for field-reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) are obtained by properly including three-dimensional effects, in the limit of large FRC elongation, and the radial component of Ohm's law. The steady electrostatic potential, necessary to satisfy Ohm's law, is considered to be a surface function. The problem is analyzed at the midplane of the configuration and it is reduced to the solution of two coupled nonlinear differential equations for the real and imaginary parts of the phasor associated to the longitudinal component of the vector potential. Additional constraints are obtained by requesting that the steady radial current density and poloidal magnetic flux vanish at the plasma boundary which is set at the time-averaged separatrix. The results are presented in terms of the degree of synchronism of the electrons with the RMF and compared with those obtained when radial current effects are neglected. Three important differences are observed when compared with the case without radial current density. First, at low penetration of the RMF into the plasma there is a significant increase in the driven azimuthal current. Second, the RMF amplitude necessary to access the high synchronism regime, starting from low synchronism, is larger and the difference appears to increase as the separatrix to classical skin depth ratio increases. Third, the minimum RMF amplitude necessary to sustain almost full synchronism is reduced.

  8. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhof, E.; Pratt, J.; Ayten, B.

    2015-03-01

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is modified as E + v × B = η(J - JECCD). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation faithfully represents the nonlocal character of the EC driven current and its main origin in the Fisch-Boozer effect. The closure relation is validated on both an analytical solution of an approximated Fokker-Planck equation as well as on full bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck code simulations of ECCD inside rotating magnetic islands.

  9. High-harmonic ion cyclotron heating and current drive in ultra-small aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Berry, L.A.

    1996-11-01

    Ultra-small aspect ratio tokamaks present a totally new plasma environment for heating and current drive experiments and involve a number of physics issues that have not previously been explored. These devices operate at low magnetic field and relatively high density so that the effective dielectric constant of the plasma to high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), is quite high, and perpendicular wavelength of fast waves is very short. {lambda} {approximately} 2.0 cm compared with {lambda} - 10-20 cm. This makes possible strong electron absorption at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency, {Omega}{sub i}, and at fairly high phase velocity in relation to electron thermal velocity. If the antenna system can control the parallel wave spectrum, this offers the promise of high efficiency off-axis current drive and the possibility for current drive radial profile control. Antenna phasing is ineffective for profile control in conventional tokamaks because of central absorption. There are also challenges for antenna design in this regime because of the high dielectric constant and the large angle of the magnetic field with respect to the equatorial plane ({approximately}45{degrees}), which varies greatly during current ramp. Preliminary experiments in this HHFW regime are being carried out in CDX-U.

  10. Numerical study on the influence of electron cyclotron current drive on tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Long; Liu, Jinyuan; Mao, Aohua; Sun, Jizhong; Duan, Ping

    2014-10-15

    Controlling tearing modes by localized current drive is explored by using numerical simulation with a set of compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. By examining the effects of different characteristics of driven current, such as density distribution, duration time, and deposition location, it is found that a driven current with larger magnitude and more focused deposition region shows a better suppression effect on the tearing modes. Meanwhile destabilizing effects are also observed when a driven current over a certain magnitude is applied continuously. In comparison with those on the X-point of the magnetic island, the results are better when the current deposition is targeted on the O-point. In addition, the timing control of the current deposition will be also addressed.

  11. X-ray analysis of nonMaxwellian distributions (current drive)

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Stodiek, W.

    1983-06-01

    The plasma bremsstrahlung emission is utilized to determine the shape of the electron velocity distribution in situations where it deviates strongly from a Maxwellian distribution. The instrumentation used to measure the hard x-ray emission is briefly discussed. Model calculations show that polarization measurements give best results for unrelativistic tails with tail temperatures T/sub b/ < 50 keV, whereas measurements of the angular distribution of the x-ray emission based on the forward scattering of bremsstrahlung for relativistic electrons yields the best information for T/sub b/ > 50 keV. The techniques were originally developed in order to analyze runaway discharges. Recently, they found new interest because of the formation of energetic electron tails during current drive. The first x-ray results from the current drive during LH heating on PLT are discussed.

  12. Redundant drive current imbalance problem of the Automatic Radiator Inspection Device (ARID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latino, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The Automatic Radiator Inspection Device (ARID) is a 4 Degree of Freedom (DOF) robot with redundant drive motors at each joint. The device is intended to automate the labor intensive task of space shuttle radiator inspection. For safety and redundancy, each joint is driven by two independent motor systems. Motors driving the same joint, however, draw vastly different currents. The concern was that the robot joints could be subjected to undue stress. It was the objective of this summer's project to determine the cause of this current imbalance. In addition it was to determine, in a quantitative manner, what was the cause, how serious the problem was in terms of damage or undue wear to the robot and find solutions if possible. It was concluded that most problems could be resolved with a better motor control design. This document discusses problems encountered and possible solutions.

  13. Feedback stabilization of magnetic islands by rf heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.; Rutherford, P.H.; Hsuan, H.

    1985-11-01

    Feedback stabilization of the m = 2 mode in tokamaks would be advantageous for disruption-free operation at low q-values. Stabilization of the m = 1 mode and resulting ''sawteeth'' could lead to substantial increases in the stable ..beta..-value, as well as indirect stabilization of the m = 2 mode, by permitting q(0)-values below unity. Stabilization of these modes at acceptable amplitudes appears possible by feedback-modulated heating or current drive applied to the region within the mode-induced magnetic islands. Current drive offers by far the more efficient mechanism, and it can be accomplished using lower-hybrid or electron-cyclotron radio-frequency (rf) techniques. For the lower-hybrid case, ray-tracing calculations demonstrate the needed localization of the rf power, despite long ray paths in the toroidal direction. Top-launched lower-hybrid waves are favored for localized absorption.

  14. FED-A, an advanced performance FED based on low safety factor and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.H.

    1983-08-01

    The FED-A study aims to quantify the potential improvement in cost-effectiveness of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by assuming low safety factor q (less than 2 as opposed to about 3) at the plasma edge and noninductive current drive (as opposed to only inductive current drive). The FED-A performance objectives are set to be : (1) ignition assuming International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) plamsa confinement scaling, but still achieving a fusion power amplification Q greater than or equal to 5 when the confinement is degraded by a factor of 2; (2) neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m/sup 2/, with 0.5 MW/m/sup 2/ as a conservative lower bound; and (3) more clearly power-reactor-like operations, such as steady state.

  15. A high-resolution beam profile measuring system for high-current ion implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishita, N.; Noguchi, K.; Sasaki, S.; Yamamoto, H.

    1991-04-01

    A high-resolution beam profile measuring system (BPM) has been developed to analyze the correlation between charging damage and the ion beam profile for high-current ion implanters. With the increase of the ion beam current, insulators such as thin oxide layers of VLSI devices are subject to charging damage during ion implantation. To obtain accurate information on the local current density of the ion beam, 125 Faraday cups are placed in the BPM. This system has two measuring modes. One is a topographic mode that can detect the ion beam current density of 12500 sampling points in 30 s. A high-resolution contour map of the current density distribution is displayed on a CRT. The other is a real-time mode in which the current density distribution (125 sampling points) of the ion beam can be monitored every half second on the CRT. In this mode, fine adjustment of the ion beam profile is easily possible by visual control. The charging damage of insulating layers in the TEG (test element group) to the beam profile was investigated using this newly developed BPM. It has been proven that the damage probability increases rapidly above some threshold level of the beam current density. It is confirmed that for high-current implantation a uniform current density distribution of the ion beam is very effective to prevent charging damage. It is concluded that this measuring system is valuable not only for quick analysis of damage phenomena, but also for evaluating machine performance.

  16. Electron Energy Confinement for HHFW Heating and Current Drive Phasing on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Hosea; S. Bernabei; T. Biewer; B. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; J.R. Wilson; D. Stutman; P. Ryan; D.W. Swain

    2005-05-03

    Thomson scattering laser pulses are synchronized relative to modulated HHFW power to permit evaluation of the electron energy confinement time during and following HHFW pulses for both heating and current drive antenna phasing. Profile changes resulting from instabilities require that the total electron stored energy, evaluated by integrating the midplane electron pressure P(sub)e(R) over the magnetic surfaces prescribed by EFIT analysis, be used to derive the electron energy confinement time. Core confinement is reduced during a sawtooth instability but, although the electron energy is distributed outward by the sawtooth, the bulk electron energy confinement time is essentially unaffected. The radial deposition of energy into the electrons is noticeably more peaked for current drive phasing (longer wavelength excitation) relative to that for heating phasing (shorter wavelength excitation) as is expected theoretically. However, the power delivered to the core plasma is reduced consider ably for the current drive phasing, indicating that surface/peripheral damping processes play a more important role for this case.

  17. First principles fluid modelling of magnetic island stabilization by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Février, O.; Maget, P.; Lütjens, H.; Luciani, J. F.; Decker, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Reich, M.; Beyer, P.; Lazzaro, E.; Nowak, S.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-04-01

    Tearing modes are MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) instabilities that reduce the performance of fusion devices. They can however be controlled and suppressed using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) as demonstrated in various tokamaks. In this work, simulations of island stabilization by ECCD-driven current have been carried out using the toroidal nonlinear 3D full MHD code xtor-2f, in which a current source term modeling the ECCD has been implemented. The efficiency parameter, {η\\text{RF}} , has been computed and its variations with respect to source width and location were also computed. The influence of parameters such as current intensity, source width and position with respect to the island was evaluated and compared to the modified Rutherford equation. We retrieved a good agreement between the simulations and the analytical predictions concerning the variations of control efficiency with source width and position. We also show that the 3D nature of the current source term can lead to the onset of an island if the source term is precisely applied on a rational surface. We report the observation of a flip phenomenon in which the O- and X-points of the island rapidly switch their position in order for the island to take advantage of the current drive to grow.

  18. Heating and current drive requirements towards steady state operation in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Kessel, C. E.; Gorelenkova, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Batchelor, D. B.; Harvey, B.; Petrov, Y.

    2014-02-12

    Steady state scenarios envisaged for ITER aim at optimizing the bootstrap current, while maintaining sufficient confinement and stability to provide the necessary fusion yield. Non-inductive scenarios will need to operate with Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) in order to reach adequate fusion gain at typical currents of 9 MA. However, the large pressure gradients associated with ITBs in regions of weak or negative magnetic shear can be conducive to ideal MHD instabilities, reducing the no-wall limit. The E × B flow shear from toroidal plasma rotation is expected to be low in ITER, with a major role in the ITB dynamics being played by magnetic geometry. Combinations of H/CD sources that maintain weakly reversed magnetic shear profiles throughout the discharge are the focus of this work. Time-dependent transport simulations indicate that, with a trade-off of the EC equatorial and upper launcher, the formation and sustainment of quasi-steady state ITBs could be demonstrated in ITER with the baseline heating configuration. However, with proper constraints from peeling-ballooning theory on the pedestal width and height, the fusion gain and the maximum non-inductive current are below the ITER target. Upgrades of the heating and current drive system in ITER, like the use of Lower Hybrid current drive, could overcome these limitations, sustaining higher non-inductive current and confinement, more expanded ITBs which are ideal MHD stable.

  19. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H. )

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  20. Leakage current and commutation losses reduction in electric drives for Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miliani, El Hadj

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, leakage current and inverter losses, produced by adjustable-speed AC drive systems become one of the main interested subject for researchers on Electric Vehicle (EV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) technology. The continuous advancements in solid state device engineering have considerably minimized the switching transients for power switches but the high dv/dt and high switching frequency have caused many adverse effects such as shaft voltage, bearing current, leakage current and electromagnetic interference (EMI). The major objective of this paper is to investigate and suppress of the adverse effects of a PWM inverter feeding AC motor in EV and HEV. A technique to simultaneously reduce the leakage current and the switching losses is presented in this paper. Based on a discontinuous space vector pulse width modulation (DSVPWM) and a modular switches gate resistance, inverter losses and leakage current are reduced. Algorithms are presented and implemented on a DSP controller and experimental results are presented.

  1. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-15

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I{sub 2}-I{sub 1}), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current I{sub b} = (I{sub 2} + I{sub 1}). The values of I{sub 1} and I{sub 2} depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. Solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.

  2. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGES

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-06

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I2-I1), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current Ib = (I2 + I1). The values of I1more » and I2 depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. As a result, solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.« less

  3. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-06

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I2-I1), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current Ib = (I2 + I1). The values of I1 and I2 depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. As a result, solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.

  4. Physical derivation of resistive hose instabilities in electron beams with return current

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, J.E.

    1985-09-01

    The hose instability dispersion relation for electron beams with plasma return current is derived using simple physical models. The self-hose instability appears due to the repulsion between beam and plasma currents. The results of the derivation agree with those of more complicated models. The stabilizing effect of beam generated conductivity is examined using a simple model. Using this model, the stabilization of the effect of return currents at low frequency is demonstrated for the case of rapid conductivity generation.

  5. On the current drive capability of low dimensional semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-29

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Lastly, our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  6. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Appenzeller, J

    2015-12-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  7. Modeling Current Drive in Space Plasma with Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Papadopoulos, K.; Joyce, G.

    2006-05-01

    The interaction of rotating magnetic fields with plasmas is fundamental plasma physics problem with implications to fusion related Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) configurations, space propulsion, astronaut protection from cosmic rays in long interstellar travel, control of energetic population in the radiation belts and near zone processes in pulsar magnetospheres. Despite its importance the basic plasma physics understanding of the interaction of rotating magnetic fields with magneto-plasmas, the scaling laws that control it and the range of potential applications to space plasmas remains unexplored. In this study, we focus on studying current drive in Space Plasma with RMF rotation rates satisfying (electron gyro-frequency) > RMF rotation rate >> (ion gyro-frequency) so that ion dynamics can be neglected. The relevant physics in this regime can be described by the so-called EMHD equations. This description neglects displacement current and plasma oscillations by enforcing quasi-neutrality. An important ingredient of the description is the presence of the Hall current and retention of the electron inertia. A spherical-coordinate-based EMHD code is developed and applied to study current drive with rotating magnet in plasma with magnetic field strength B much larger than the ambient magnetic field Bo. The current will modify the B field dependence on the distance to B~1/r**n. This study will investigate the value of n and determine the resultant magnetic profile as a function of the rotating speed relatively to the particle gyro-frequencies and plasma parameters.

  8. Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regimea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Faust, I. C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Ma, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Schmidt, A. E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Wilson, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    Assessing the performance of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) at high density is critical for developing non-inductive current drive systems on future steady-state experiments. Excellent LHCD efficiency has been observed during fully non-inductive operation (η =2.0-2.5×1019 AW-1m-2 at n¯e=0.5×1020 m-3) on Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] under conditions (ne, magnetic field and topology, and LHCD frequency) relevant to ITER [S. Shiraiwa et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 103024 (2011)]. To extend these results to advanced tokamak regimes with higher bootstrap current fractions on C-Mod, it is necessary to increase n ¯e to 1.0-1.5×1020 m-3. However, the number of current-carrying, non-thermal electrons generated by LHCD drops sharply in diverted configurations at densities that are well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks. In these cases, changes in scrape off layer (SOL) ionization and density profiles are observed during LHCD, indicating that significant power is transferred from the LH waves to the SOL. Fokker-Planck simulations of these discharges utilizing ray tracing and full wave propagation codes indicate that LH waves in the high density, multi-pass absorption regime linger in the plasma edge, and SOL region, where absorption near or outside the LCFS results in the loss of current drive efficiency. Modeling predicts that non-thermal emission increases with stronger single-pass absorption. Experimental data show that increasing Te in high density LH discharges results in higher non-thermal electron emission, as predicted by the models.

  9. Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, G. M.; Faust, I. C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Ma, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Schmidt, A. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; and others

    2012-06-15

    Assessing the performance of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) at high density is critical for developing non-inductive current drive systems on future steady-state experiments. Excellent LHCD efficiency has been observed during fully non-inductive operation ({eta}=2.0-2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} AW{sup -1}m{sup -2} at n{sub e}=0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}) on Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] under conditions (n{sub e}, magnetic field and topology, and LHCD frequency) relevant to ITER [S. Shiraiwa et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 103024 (2011)]. To extend these results to advanced tokamak regimes with higher bootstrap current fractions on C-Mod, it is necessary to increase n{sub e} to 1.0-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. However, the number of current-carrying, non-thermal electrons generated by LHCD drops sharply in diverted configurations at densities that are well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks. In these cases, changes in scrape off layer (SOL) ionization and density profiles are observed during LHCD, indicating that significant power is transferred from the LH waves to the SOL. Fokker-Planck simulations of these discharges utilizing ray tracing and full wave propagation codes indicate that LH waves in the high density, multi-pass absorption regime linger in the plasma edge, and SOL region, where absorption near or outside the LCFS results in the loss of current drive efficiency. Modeling predicts that non-thermal emission increases with stronger single-pass absorption. Experimental data show that increasing T{sub e} in high density LH discharges results in higher non-thermal electron emission, as predicted by the models.

  10. Heavy ion linac as a high current proton beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Winfried; Adonin, Aleksey; Appel, Sabrina; Gerhard, Peter; Heilmann, Manuel; Heymach, Frank; Hollinger, Ralph; Vinzenz, Wolfgang; Vormann, Hartmut; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2015-05-01

    A significant part of the experimental program at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is dedicated to pbar physics requiring a high number of cooled pbars per hour. The primary proton beam has to be provided by a 70 MeV proton linac followed by two synchrotrons. The new FAIR proton linac will deliver a pulsed proton beam of up to 35 mA of 36 μ s duration at a repetition rate of 4 Hz (maximum). The GSI heavy ion linac (UNILAC) is able to deliver world record uranium beam intensities for injection into the synchrotrons, but it is not suitable for FAIR relevant proton beam operation. In an advanced machine investigation program it could be shown that the UNILAC is able to provide for sufficient high intensities of CH3 beam, cracked (and stripped) in a supersonic nitrogen gas jet into protons and carbon ions. This advanced operational approach will result in up to 3 mA of proton intensity at a maximum beam energy of 20 MeV, 1 0 0 μ s pulse duration and a repetition rate of up to 2.7 Hz delivered to the synchrotron SIS18. Recent linac beam measurements will be presented, showing that the UNILAC is able to serve as a proton FAIR injector for the first time, while the performance is limited to 25% of the FAIR requirements.

  11. Overview of Alcator C-Mod Contribution to the 2015 JRT on Off Axis Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Parker, R. R.; Rice, J. E.; Shirawia, S.; Scott, S. D.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Ebrahimi, F.; Poli, F.; Gerhardt, S.; Podesta, M.; Solomon, W.; Wilson, J. R.; Holcomb, C.

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy FES 2015 Joint Research Target (JRT) is to conduct experiments and analysis to quantify the impact of broadened current and pressure profiles on tokamak plasma confinement and stability. Broadened current profiles are achieved on Alcator C-Mod through the use of Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). C-Mod experiments from the recent run campaign have focused on several areas, such as MHD stability of discharges with broad current profiles, energy transport barriers and high-Z impurity transport in non-inductive discharges, momentum transport in discharges with altered safety factor profiles, and validation of LHCD actuator models. This work was conducted on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a DoE Office of Science user facility supported by US Department of Energy cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Investigation of the second harmonic electron cyclotron current drive efficiency on the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Razumova, K.A.; Alikaev, V.V.; Dremin, M.M.; Esipchuk, Y.V.; Kislov, A.Y.; Notkin, G.E.; Pavlov, Y.D. ); Forest, C.B.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W. )

    1994-05-01

    Experiments on second harmonic electron cyclotron current drive were done on the T-10 tokamak using four gyrotrons. Total powers up to 1.2 MW at a frequency of 140 GHz were injected. Current generation by electron cyclotron (EC) waves was demonstrated in the experiments. The efficiency [eta] of current generation and its dependence on plasma parameters were measured and it was shown that the efficiency is a nonlinear function of input power, more closely predicted by Fokker--Planck calculations than by linear theory. The interaction of EC waves with the tail of the electron distribution was shown to be important. It was also found that current density profile redistribution played an important role in the plasma behavior.

  13. Electron Cyclotron / Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive Experiments using Phased-array Antenna in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Hasegawa, M.; Yoshida, N.; Watanebe, H.; Tokunaga, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Sakamoto, M.; Ejiri, A.; Takase, Y.; Sakaguchi, M.; Kalinnikova, E.; Ishiguro, M.; Tashima, S.

    2011-12-23

    The phased-array antenna system for Electron Cyclotron/Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive experiments has been developed in the QUEST. The antenna was designed to excite a pure O-mode wave in the oblique injection for the O-X-B mode conversion experiments, and its good performances were confirmed at a low power level. The plasma current (<{approx}15 kA) with an aspect ratio of 1.5 was started up and sustained by only RF injection in the low-density operations. The long pulse discharge of 10 kA was also attained for 37 s. The new density window to sustain the plasma current was observed in the high-density plasmas. The single-null divertor configuration with the high plasma current (<{approx}25 kA) was attained in the 17 s plasma sustainment.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGES

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total forcemore » on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.« less

  15. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.

  16. Method for producing silicon thin-film transistors with enhanced forward current drive

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1998-01-01

    A method for fabricating amorphous silicon thin film transistors (TFTs) with a polycrystalline silicon surface channel region for enhanced forward current drive. The method is particularly adapted for producing top-gate silicon TFTs which have the advantages of both amorphous and polycrystalline silicon TFTs, but without problem of leakage current of polycrystalline silicon TFTs. This is accomplished by selectively crystallizing a selected region of the amorphous silicon, using a pulsed excimer laser, to create a thin polycrystalline silicon layer at the silicon/gate-insulator surface. The thus created polysilicon layer has an increased mobility compared to the amorphous silicon during forward device operation so that increased drive currents are achieved. In reverse operation the polysilicon layer is relatively thin compared to the amorphous silicon, so that the transistor exhibits the low leakage currents inherent to amorphous silicon. A device made by this method can be used, for example, as a pixel switch in an active-matrix liquid crystal display to improve display refresh rates.

  17. Modeling of HHFW Heating and Current Drive on NSTX with Ray Tracing and Adjoint Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, T. K.; Ryan, P. M.; Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Swain, D. W.; Phillips, C. K.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Rosenberg, A. L.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Bonoli, P.

    2003-12-01

    In recent HHFW current drive experiments on NSTX, relative phase shift of the antenna array was scanned from 30° to 90° to create k∥ spectral peaks between 3 and 8 m-1, for rf power in the 1.1-4.5 MW range. Typical plasma parameters were Ip ˜ 0.5 MA, BT ˜ 0.45 T, and neo ˜ 0.6-3×1019 m-3, and Teo ˜ 0.6-3 keV. In this paper, detailed results from the CURRAY ray tracing code at various time slices of some of the earlier discharges are presented. The complete antenna spectrum is modeled using up to 100 rays with different kφ, and kθ. The rf-driven current is calculated by invoking the adjoint technique that is applicable to toroidal plasmas of all aspect ratios and beta values. In these low β (˜2-3%) discharges, the rf-driven current is peaked on axis and minority ion absorption displays a tendency to increase at lower k∥. Reasonable agreement with inferred results from the voltage measurements has been obtained that points to evidence of current drive, while the calculated power deposition profiles agree very well with the HPRT ray code for these discharges. The use of the adjoint method will become more important in future high β NSTX discharges.

  18. Numerical studies of electron cyclotron wave current drive on HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Song, S. D.; Gao, Q. D.; Zheng, P. W.; Du, D.

    2015-06-15

    The electron cyclotron wave (ECW) current drive (CD) for the HL-2A tokamak is investigated numerically with a new ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck code. The code is benchmarked with other well-tested linear and quasilinear codes and is then used to study the electron cyclotron current drive on the HL-2A tokamak. The wave propagation, power deposition, and driven-current profiles are presented. The effect of electron trapping is also assessed. It is found that quasilinear effects are negligible at the present ECW power levels and that when both waves are injected at an angle of 20° on the plasma equatorial plane, the CD efficiency for the HL-2A saturates at ∼0.029 × 10{sup 20 }A/W/m{sup 2} and ∼0.020 × 10{sup 20 }A/W/m{sup 2} for the 0.5 MW/68 GHz first harmonic ordinary (O1) and 1 MW/140 GHz second harmonic extraordinary (X2) modes, respectively. The effects of the plasma density, temperature, and wave-launching position on the driven current are also investigated analytically and numerically.

  19. Method for producing silicon thin-film transistors with enhanced forward current drive

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1998-06-30

    A method is disclosed for fabricating amorphous silicon thin film transistors (TFTs) with a polycrystalline silicon surface channel region for enhanced forward current drive. The method is particularly adapted for producing top-gate silicon TFTs which have the advantages of both amorphous and polycrystalline silicon TFTs, but without problem of leakage current of polycrystalline silicon TFTs. This is accomplished by selectively crystallizing a selected region of the amorphous silicon, using a pulsed excimer laser, to create a thin polycrystalline silicon layer at the silicon/gate-insulator surface. The thus created polysilicon layer has an increased mobility compared to the amorphous silicon during forward device operation so that increased drive currents are achieved. In reverse operation the polysilicon layer is relatively thin compared to the amorphous silicon, so that the transistor exhibits the low leakage currents inherent to amorphous silicon. A device made by this method can be used, for example, as a pixel switch in an active-matrix liquid crystal display to improve display refresh rates. 1 fig.

  20. RAMPING UP THE SNS BEAM CURRENT WITH THE LBNL BASELINE H- SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Newland, Denny J; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two years the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has ramped up the repetition rate, pulse length, and the beam current to reach 540 kW, which has challenged many subsystems including the H- source designed and built by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This paper discusses the major modifications of the H- source implemented to consistently and routinely output the beam current required by the SNS beam power ramp up plan. At this time, 32 mA LINAC beam current are routinely produced, which meets the requirement for 690 kW planned for end of 2008. In June 2008, a 14-day production run used 37 mA, which is close to the 38 mA required for 1.44 MW. A medium energy beam transport (MEBT) beam current of 46 mA was demonstrated on September 2, 2008.

  1. Direct Measurement of Electron Beam Induced Currents in p-type Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Han, M.G.; Zhu, Y.; Sasaki, K.; Kato, T.; Fisher, C.A.J.; Hirayama, T.

    2010-08-01

    A new method for measuring electron beam induced currents (EBICs) in p-type silicon using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with a high-precision tungsten probe is presented. Current-voltage (I-V) curves obtained under various electron-beam illumination conditions are found to depend strongly on the current density of the incoming electron beam and the relative distance of the beam from the point of probe contact, consistent with a buildup of excess electrons around the contact. This setup provides a new experimental approach for studying minority carrier transport in semiconductors on the nanometer scale.

  2. Growth of the current modulation in an electron beam propagating through background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2007-11-26

    Amplitude oscillation of the current modulation in an electron beam propagating through background plasma is investigated. An analytical calculation of the beam current modulation indicates amplitude oscillation at the beginning of propagation due to the perturbed space-charge fluctuation of the beam. It was also found that the mode strength of the beam current modulation further downstream grows exponentially from half, a{sub 0}/2, of the initial perturbation instead of its value of a{sub 0}, in contrast with the conventional understanding of two-stream instability. The analytical results are in good agreement with earlier simulation data.

  3. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Westerhof, E. Pratt, J.

    2014-10-15

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics is modified as E + v × B = η(J – J{sub EC}). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation faithfully represents the nonlocal character of the EC driven current and its main origin in the Fisch-Boozer effect. The closure relation is validated on both an analytical solution of an approximated Fokker-Planck equation as well as on full bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck code simulations of ECCD inside rotating magnetic islands. The new model contains the model put forward by Giruzzi et al. [Nucl. Fusion 39, 107 (1999)] in one of its limits.

  4. Isolating and quantifying cross-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. K.; Cao, D.; Michel, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-05-01

    The angularly resolved mass ablation rates and ablation-front trajectories for Si-coated CH targets were measured in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments to quantify cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) while constraining the hydrodynamic coupling. A polar-direct-drive laser configuration, where the equatorial laser beams were dropped and the polar beams were repointed from a symmetric direct-drive configuration, was used to limit CBET at the pole while allowing it to persist at the equator. The combination of low- and high-CBET conditions observed in the same implosion allowed for the effects of CBET on the ablation rate and ablation pressure to be determined. Hydrodynamic simulations performed without CBET agreed with the measured ablation rate and ablation-front trajectory at the pole of the target, confirming that the CBET effects on the pole are small. The simulated mass ablation rates and ablation-front trajectories were in excellent agreement with the measurements at all angles when a CBET model based on Randall's equations [C. J. Randall et al., Phys. Fluids 24, 1474 (1981)] was included into the simulations with a multiplier on the CBET gain factor. These measurements were performed on OMEGA and at the National Ignition Facility to access a wide range of plasma conditions, laser intensities, and laser beam geometries. The presence of the CBET gain multiplier required to match the data in all of the configurations tested suggests that additional physics effects, such as intensity variations caused by diffraction, polarization effects, or shortcomings of extending the 1-D Randall model to 3-D, should be explored to explain the differences in observed and predicted drive.

  5. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-15

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}) with the injected beam current given by I{sub b} = I{sub 1} + I{sub 2}. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I{sub 2}−I{sub 1}) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to I{sub b}. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ε{sub RMS}) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ε{sub RMS} at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ∼5 times larger at the target, ε{sub RMS} is 2–3 times larger at the target.

  6. Thyristor-based current-fed drive with direct power control for permanent magnet-assisted synchronous reluctance generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, J.; Kwak, S.-S.; Toliyat, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a robust and simple direct power control (DPC) of a thyristor-based current-fed drive for generator applications. A current-fed drive and permanent magnet-assisted synchronous reluctance generator (PMa-SynRG) are investigated to deliver 3 kW power using a combustion engine. The current-fed drive utilises a thyristor-based three-phase rectifier to convert generator power to DC-link power and a single-phase current-fed inverter to supply a single-phase inductive load. In addition, a new control algorithm is developed based on DPC for the current-fed drive. The DC-link voltage-based DPC is proposed in order to directly control the output power. The goal of the DPC is to maintain the DC-link voltage at the required output power operating point. The DPC has advantages such as a simple algorithm for constant speed operation. Another feature of the developed current-fed drive is its inherent capability to provide generating action by making the PMa-SynRG operates as a generator, rectifying the phase voltages by means of the three-phase rectifier and feeding the power into the load. These features make the current-fed drive a good candidate for driving any type of synchronous generators including the proposed PMa-SynRG.

  7. Broadband sidebands generated by parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive experiments on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Ding, B. J.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Giovannozzi, E.; Li, M. H.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Modern research on nuclear fusion energy, based on the tokamak concept, has strong need of tools for actively driving non-inductive current especially at the periphery of plasma column, where tools available so far have poor efficiency. This is essential for solving one of the most critical problems for thermonuclear reactor, consisting in how to achieve the figure of fusion gain in the context of sufficient stability. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect has the potential capability of driving current at large radii of reactor plasma with high efficiency [1]. Experiments recently carried out on EAST showed that a strong activity of LH sideband waves (from the RF probe spectra), accompanied by weak core penetration of the coupled LH power, is present when operating at relatively high plasma densities. Previous theoretical results, confirmed by experiments on FTU, showed that the LH sideband phenomenon is produced by parametric instability (PI), which are mitigated by higher plasma edge temperatures. This condition is thus useful for enabling the LH power propagation when operating with profiles having high plasma densities even at the edge. In the present work, we show new PI modeling of EAST plasmas data, obtained in condition of higher plasma edge temperature due to chamber lithisation. The obtained trend of the PI frequencies and growth rates is consistent with data of RF probe spectra, available in different regimes of lithisated and not lithisated vessel. Moreover, these spectra are interpreted as PI effect occurring at the periphery of plasma column, however in the low field side where the LH power is coupled.

  8. Broadband sidebands generated by parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive experiments on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Amicucci, L. Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Giovannozzi, E.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.

    2015-12-10

    Modern research on nuclear fusion energy, based on the tokamak concept, has strong need of tools for actively driving non-inductive current especially at the periphery of plasma column, where tools available so far have poor efficiency. This is essential for solving one of the most critical problems for thermonuclear reactor, consisting in how to achieve the figure of fusion gain in the context of sufficient stability. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect has the potential capability of driving current at large radii of reactor plasma with high efficiency [1]. Experiments recently carried out on EAST showed that a strong activity of LH sideband waves (from the RF probe spectra), accompanied by weak core penetration of the coupled LH power, is present when operating at relatively high plasma densities. Previous theoretical results, confirmed by experiments on FTU, showed that the LH sideband phenomenon is produced by parametric instability (PI), which are mitigated by higher plasma edge temperatures. This condition is thus useful for enabling the LH power propagation when operating with profiles having high plasma densities even at the edge. In the present work, we show new PI modeling of EAST plasmas data, obtained in condition of higher plasma edge temperature due to chamber lithisation. The obtained trend of the PI frequencies and growth rates is consistent with data of RF probe spectra, available in different regimes of lithisated and not lithisated vessel. Moreover, these spectra are interpreted as PI effect occurring at the periphery of plasma column, however in the low field side where the LH power is coupled.

  9. Comparative modelling of lower hybrid current drive with two launcher designs in the Tore Supra tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Hillairet, J.; Aniel, T.; Basiuk, V.; Goniche, M.; Imbeaux, F.; Mazon, D.; Sharma, P.

    2013-08-01

    Fully non-inductive operation with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in the Tore Supra tokamak is achieved using either a fully active multijunction (FAM) launcher or a more recent ITER-relevant passive active multijunction (PAM) launcher, or both launchers simultaneously. While both antennas show comparable experimental efficiencies, the analysis of stability properties in long discharges suggest different current profiles. We present comparative modelling of LHCD with the two different launchers to characterize the effect of the respective antenna spectra on the driven current profile. The interpretative modelling of LHCD is carried out using a chain of codes calculating, respectively, the global discharge evolution (tokamak simulator METIS), the spectrum at the antenna mouth (LH coupling code ALOHA), the LH wave propagation (ray-tracing code C3PO), and the distribution function (3D Fokker-Planck code LUKE). Essential aspects of the fast electron dynamics in time, space and energy are obtained from hard x-ray measurements of fast electron bremsstrahlung emission using a dedicated tomographic system. LHCD simulations are validated by systematic comparisons between these experimental measurements and the reconstructed signal calculated by the code R5X2 from the LUKE electron distribution. An excellent agreement is obtained in the presence of strong Landau damping (found under low density and high-power conditions in Tore Supra) for which the ray-tracing model is valid for modelling the LH wave propagation. Two aspects of the antenna spectra are found to have a significant effect on LHCD. First, the driven current is found to be proportional to the directivity, which depends upon the respective weight of the main positive and main negative lobes and is particularly sensitive to the density in front of the antenna. Second, the position of the main negative lobe in the spectrum is different for the two launchers. As this lobe drives a counter-current, the resulting

  10. The targeted heating and current drive applications for the ITER electron cyclotron system

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.; Darbos, C.; Gandini, F.; Gassmann, T.; Loarte, A.; Omori, T.; Purohit, D.; Saibene, G.; Gagliardi, M.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Hanson, G.; Poli, E.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-02-15

    A 24 MW Electron Cyclotron (EC) system operating at 170 GHz and 3600 s pulse length is to be installed on ITER. The EC plant shall deliver 20 MW of this power to the plasma for Heating and Current Drive (H and CD) applications. The EC system is designed for plasma initiation, central heating, current drive, current profile tailoring, and Magneto-hydrodynamic control (in particular, sawteeth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode) in the flat-top phase of the plasma. A preliminary design review was performed in 2012, which identified a need for extended application of the EC system to the plasma ramp-up, flattop, and ramp down phases of ITER plasma pulse. The various functionalities are prioritized based on those applications, which can be uniquely addressed with the EC system in contrast to other H and CD systems. An initial attempt has been developed at prioritizing the allocated H and CD applications for the three scenarios envisioned: ELMy H-mode (15 MA), Hybrid (∼12 MA), and Advanced (∼9 MA) scenarios. This leads to the finalization of the design requirements for the EC sub-systems.

  11. Non-Inductive Current Drive with Lower Hybrid and Ion Bernstein Waves in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Paoletti, F

    1997-01-01

    The synergistic behavior of lower-hybrid wave (LHW) and an ion-Bernstein wave (IBW) on the PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification) tokamak is experimentally analyzed using a 2-D (two-dimensional) and hard X-ray (HXR) camera. The bremsstrahlung emission from suprathermal electrons, generated with lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD), is enhanced during ion-Bernstein waves injection. This enhancement is observed in limited regions of space suggesting the formation of localized current channels. The effects on plasma electrons, during combined application of these two type of waves are theoretically investigated on the basis of a quasilinear model. The numerical code solves, simultaneously, the 3-D (three-dimensional (R, Z, (capital) phi) toroidal wave equation for the electric field (in the WKBJ approximation) and the Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution function in two dimensions (v parallel, v perpendicular) with an added quasilinear diffusion coefficient. The beneficial effects of a combined utilization of both type of waves on the current drive are emphasized. The numerical results are compared with the experimental observations.

  12. On variational formulation of current drive problem in uniformly magnetized relativistic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. M.; Hu, Y. J.

    2016-01-01

    A fully relativistic extension of the variational principle with the modified test function for the Spitzer function with momentum conservation in the electron-electron collision is investigated in uniformly magnetized plasma. The term of the momentum conserving constraint in Hirshman’s variational calculation is studied. The model developed is extended for arbitrary temperatures and covers exactly the asymptotic for u\\gg 1 when {{Z}\\text{eff}}\\gg 1 , and the results obtained are suited to facilitate the development of a rigorous variational formulation of current drive efficiency in tokamak plasma.

  13. Angular distribution of the bremsstrahlung emission during lower-hybrid current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.

    1985-06-01

    The bremsstrahlung emission from the PLT tokamak during lower-hybrid current drive has been measured as a function of angle between the magnetic field and the emission direction. The emission is peaked strongly in the forward direction, indicating a strong anisotropy of the electron-velocity distribution. The data demonstrate the existence of a nearly flat tail of the velocity distribution, which extends out to approximately 500 keV and which is interpreted as the plateau created by Landau damping of the lower-hybrid waves.

  14. Beat wave current drive experiment on the Davis Diverted Tokamak (DDT). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.Q.; Horton, R.D.; Rogers, J.H. |

    1993-12-31

    The beatwave current drive experiment is summarized. The first phase of the experiment was the construction of the microwave sources and the diagnostics needed to demonstrate the beat wave effects, i.e. the measurement of the electrostatic plasma wave produced by the beating of two high intensity electromagnetic waves. In order to keep the cost of the experiments to a minimum, a low density filament plasma source (10{sup 8}) to (10{sup 10} particles cm{sup {minus}3}) was employed and the magnetic field in the toroidal plasma was produced by a dc power supply.

  15. Development of a prototype T-shaped fast switching device for electron cyclotron current drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nagashima, Koji; Honzu, Toshihiko; Saigusa, Mikio; Oda, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2016-09-01

    A T-shaped high-power switching device composed of circular corrugated waveguides with three ports and double dielectric disks made of sapphire was proposed as a fast switching device based on a new principle in electron cyclotron current drive systems. This switching device has the advantages of operating at a fixed frequency and being compact. The design of the prototype switch was obtained by numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The size of these components was optimized for the frequency band of 170 GHz. Low-power tests were carried out in a cross-shaped model.

  16. Effect of Alfvén resonance on low-frequency fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Stallings, D. C.

    1995-08-01

    The Alfvén resonances may occur on the low- and high-field sides for a low-frequency fast wave current drive scenario proposed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Nucl. Fusion 31, 1135 (1991)]. At the resonance on the low-field side, the fast wave may be mode converted into a short-wavelength slow wave, which can be absorbed by electrons at the plasma edge, before the fast wave propagates into the core area of the plasma. Such absorption may cause a significant parasitic power loss.

  17. Effects of electron cyclotron current drive on the evolution of double tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guanglan Dong, Chunying; Duan, Longfang

    2015-09-15

    The effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the double tearing mode (DTM) in slab geometry are investigated by using two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. It is found that, mainly, the double tearing mode is suppressed by the emergence of the secondary island, due to the deposition of driven current on the X-point of magnetic island at one rational surface, which forms a new non-complete symmetric magnetic topology structure (defined as a non-complete symmetric structure, NSS). The effects of driven current with different parameters (magnitude, initial time of deposition, duration time, and location of deposition) on the evolution of DTM are analyzed elaborately. The optimal magnitude or optimal deposition duration of driven current is the one which makes the duration of NSS the longest, which depends on the mutual effect between ECCD and the background plasma. Moreover, driven current introduced at the early Sweet-Parker phase has the best suppression effect; and the optimal moment also exists, depending on the duration of the NSS. Finally, the effects varied by the driven current disposition location are studied. It is verified that the favorable location of driven current is the X-point which is completely different from the result of single tearing mode.

  18. A NEW DIFFERENTIAL AND ERRANT BEAM CURRENT MONITOR FOR THE SNS* ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Peters, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    A new Differential and errant Beam Current Monitor (DBCM) is being implemented for both the Spallation Neutron Source's Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) and the Super Conducting Linac (SCL) accelerator sections. These new current monitors will abort the beam when the difference between two toroidal pickups exceeds a threshold. The MEBT DBCM will protect the MEBT chopper target, while the SCL DBCM will abort beam to minimize fast beam losses in the SCL cavities. The new DBCM will also record instances of errant beam, such as beam dropouts, to assist in further optimization of the SNS Accelerator. A software Errant Beam Monitor was implemented on the regular BCM hardware to study errant beam pulses. The new system will take over this functionality and will also be able to abort beam on pulse-to-pulse variations. Because the system is based on the FlexRIO hardware and programmed in LabVIEW FPGA, it will be able to abort beam in about 5 us. This paper describes the development, implementation, and initial test results of the DBCM, as well as errant beam examples.

  19. The use of a high-current electron beam in plasma relativistic microwave oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bekhovskaya, K. S. Bogdankevich, I. L.; Strelkov, P. S.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Ul'yanov, D. K.

    2011-12-15

    Relativistic microwave electronics faces the problem of using high currents of relativistic electron beams; i.e., it is possible to use beams the current of which is lower than that of actually existing high-current accelerators. We show the possibility of increasing the power of radiation generated in a plasma relativistic microwave oscillator (PRMO) due to an increase in the absolute value of current. For the beam currents close to the value of limiting vacuum current, the efficiency of microwave generation decreases; therefore, we study PRMO schemes with a high value of limiting vacuum current, i.e., schemes with a small gap between a hollow relativistic electron beam and the waveguide wall. The results of the experiment and numerical simulation are discussed.

  20. 4 MW upgrade to the DIII-D fast wave current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Cary, W.P.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D fast wave current drive (FWCD) system is being upgraded by an additional 4 MW in the 30 to 120 MHz frequency range. This capability adds to the existing 2 MW 30 to 60 MHz system. Two new ABB transmitters of the type that are in use on the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak in Garching will be used to drive two new water-cooled four-strap antennas to be installed in DIII-D in early 1994. The transmission and tuning system for each antenna will be similar to that now in use for the first 2 MW system on DIII-D, but with some significant improvements. One improvement consists of adding a decoupler element to counter the mutual coupling between the antenna straps which results in large imbalances in the power to a strap for the usual current drive intrastrap phasing of 90{degrees}. Another improvement is to utilize pressurized, ceramic-insulated transmission lines. The intrastrap phasing will again be controlled in pairs, with a pair of straps coupled in a resonant loop configuration, locking their phase difference at either 0 or 180{degrees}, depending upon the length of line installed. These resonant loops will incorporate a phase shifter so that they will be able to be tuned to resonance at several frequencies in the operating band of the transmitter. With the frequency change capability of the ABB generators, the FWCD frequency will thus be selectable on a shot-to-shot basis, from this preselected set of frequencies. The schedule is for experiments to begin with this added 4 MW capability in mid-1994. The details of the system are described.

  1. Experimental and modeling uncertainties in the validation of lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, F. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Chilenski, M.; Mumgaard, R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Andre, R.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu V.; Reinke, M.; Faust, I.; Granetz, R.; Hughes, J.; Rice, J.

    2016-09-01

    This work discusses sources of uncertainty in the validation of lower hybrid wave current drive simulations against experiments, by evolving self-consistently the magnetic equilibrium and the heating and current drive profiles, calculated with a combined toroidal ray tracing code and 3D Fokker–Planck solver. The simulations indicate a complex interplay of elements, where uncertainties in the input plasma parameters, in the models and in the transport solver combine and—in some cases—compensate each other. It is concluded that ray-tracing calculations should include a realistic representation of the density and temperature in the region between the confined plasma and the wall, which is especially important in regimes where the LH waves are weakly damped and undergo multiple reflections from the plasma boundary. Uncertainties introduced in the processing of diagnostic data as well as uncertainties introduced by model approximations are assessed. It is shown that, by comparing the evolution of the plasma parameters in self-consistent simulations with available data, inconsistencies can be identified and limitations in the models or in the experimental data assessed.

  2. Simulation study of proposed off-midplane lower hybrid current drive in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young-soon; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J. C.; Parker, R.; Kim, J. H.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M. H.; Park, B. H.; Yoon, S. W.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, H.

    2016-07-01

    A new proposal of lower hybrid (LH) wave launching is studied for efficient current drive aiming for high performance H-mode operation in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). This new concept is the off-midplane launch which results in a rapid up-shift of the parallel component of refractive index and hence simultaneously maintains good wave accessibility and efficient single pass absorption via Landau damping. In order to locate an optimal position of the launcher in the poloidal direction, the ray-tracing and Fokker–Planck codes were used. Based on a survey of the LH wave launch parameters and operation conditions including the compatibility issues with the existing in-vessel components, the LH wave launch from the top position near the upper X-point of the plasma separatrix provides the possibility to eliminate the accessibility problem and reduce parasitic edge loss for the KSTAR high performance H-mode operation scenario using 5 GHz lower hybrid current drive.

  3. Simulation study of proposed off-midplane lower hybrid current drive in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young-soon; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J. C.; Parker, R.; Kim, J. H.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M. H.; Park, B. H.; Yoon, S. W.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, H.

    2016-07-01

    A new proposal of lower hybrid (LH) wave launching is studied for efficient current drive aiming for high performance H-mode operation in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). This new concept is the off-midplane launch which results in a rapid up-shift of the parallel component of refractive index and hence simultaneously maintains good wave accessibility and efficient single pass absorption via Landau damping. In order to locate an optimal position of the launcher in the poloidal direction, the ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck codes were used. Based on a survey of the LH wave launch parameters and operation conditions including the compatibility issues with the existing in-vessel components, the LH wave launch from the top position near the upper X-point of the plasma separatrix provides the possibility to eliminate the accessibility problem and reduce parasitic edge loss for the KSTAR high performance H-mode operation scenario using 5 GHz lower hybrid current drive.

  4. Experimental and modeling uncertainties in the validation of lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, F. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Chilenski, M.; Mumgaard, R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Andre, R.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu V.; Reinke, M.; Faust, I.; Granetz, R.; Hughes, J.; Rice, J.

    2016-09-01

    This work discusses sources of uncertainty in the validation of lower hybrid wave current drive simulations against experiments, by evolving self-consistently the magnetic equilibrium and the heating and current drive profiles, calculated with a combined toroidal ray tracing code and 3D Fokker-Planck solver. The simulations indicate a complex interplay of elements, where uncertainties in the input plasma parameters, in the models and in the transport solver combine and—in some cases—compensate each other. It is concluded that ray-tracing calculations should include a realistic representation of the density and temperature in the region between the confined plasma and the wall, which is especially important in regimes where the LH waves are weakly damped and undergo multiple reflections from the plasma boundary. Uncertainties introduced in the processing of diagnostic data as well as uncertainties introduced by model approximations are assessed. It is shown that, by comparing the evolution of the plasma parameters in self-consistent simulations with available data, inconsistencies can be identified and limitations in the models or in the experimental data assessed.

  5. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive: Present experiments to ITER. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Nevins, W.M.; Smith, G.R.; Lloyd, B.; O`Brien, M.R.; Warrick, C.D.

    1995-08-01

    Electron cyclotron (EC) power has technological and physics advantages for heating and current drive in a tokamak reactor, and advances in source development make it credible for applications in ITER. Strong single pass absorption makes heating to ignition particularly simple. The optimized EC current drive (ECCD) efficiency ({l_angle}n{r_angle}IR/P) shows a linear temperature scaling at temperatures up to {approximately} 15 keV. For temperatures above 30 keV, the efficiency saturates at approximately 0.3{center_dot}10{sup 20} A/(m{sup 2}W) for a frequency of 220 GHz in an ITER target plasma with toroidal field of 6 T, due primarily to harmonic overlap [G.R. Smith et al., Phys. Fluids 30 3633 (1987)] and to a lesser extent due to limitations arising from relativistic effects [N.J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. A 24 3245 (1981)]. The same efficiency can also be obtained at 170 GHz for the same plasma equilibrium except that the magnetic field is reduced to (170/220) {times} 6 T = 4.6 T. The ECCD efficiencies are obtained with the comprehensive 3D, bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck CQL3D codes [R.W. Harvey and M.G. McCoy, Proc. IAEA TCM/Advances in Simulation and Modeling in Thermonuclear Plasmas 1992, Montreal], and BANDIT3D [M.R. O`Brien, M. Cox, C.D. Warrick, and F. S. Zaitsev, ibid.].

  6. Simulation Studies of Field-Reversed Configurations with Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, E. V.; Davidson, R. C.

    2008-11-01

    Results of 3D kinetic simulations of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive in field-reversed configuration (FRC) are presented. Self-consistent hybrid simulations have been performed using the HYM code for even- and odd-parity RMF and different FRC parameters and RMF frequencies. Simulations show that the RMF pushes the plasma radially inward, resulting in a reduced plasma density outside separatrix. Lower plasma density and larger RMF amplitudes result in faster RMF field penetration, in agreement with previous two-fluid studies. Generation of axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field during the RMF current drive has been observed. Numerical study of the effects of the applied RMF field on particle confinement shows that the rate of particle losses increases for RMF frequency close to the ion cyclotron frequency. It is also shown that high-frequency even-parity RMF reduces ion losses when it is fully penetrated. It is also found that fully-penetrated, odd-parity RMF forces particles away from the midplane toward the FRC ends. The observed changes in particle confinement are related to ponderomotive forces. Partially penetrated RMF results in mostly radial ponderomotive forces which improve particle confinement in both cases.

  7. Ignition and steady-state current drive capability of INTOR plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The confinement capability of the INTOR plasma for achieving ignition and noninductively driven, Q>5 steady-state operation has been assessed for various energy confinement scaling laws and current drive schemes by using a global power balance model. Plasma operation contours are used to illustrate the boundaries of the operating regimes in density-temperature (n-T) space. Results of the analysis indicate a very restricted capability (if any) for ignition and a limited flexibility in driven modes of operation in the INTOR (8-MA) design. Nearly a factor of two increase in plasma current (through stronger plasma shaping) could improve the feasibility of ignition in INTOR. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Ion cyclotron and lower hybrid arrays applicable to current drive in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosia, G.; Helou, W.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ragona, R.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents concepts for Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Current Drive arrays applicable to fusion reactors and based on periodically loaded line power division. It is shown that, in large arrays, such as the ones proposed for fusion reactor applications, these schemes can offer, in principle, a number of practical advantages, compared with currently adopted ones, such as in-blanket operation at significantly reduced power density, lay out suitable for water cooling, single ended or balanced power feed, simple and load independent impedance matching In addition, a remote and accurate real time measurement of the complex impedance of all array elements as well as detection, location, and measurement of the complex admittance of a single arc occurring anywhere in the structure is possible.

  9. Lower hybrid current drive at ITER-relevant high plasma densities

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Panaccione, L.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.

    2009-11-26

    Recent experiments indicated that a further non-inductive current, besides bootstrap, should be necessary for developing advanced scenario for ITER. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) should provide such tool, but its effectiveness was still not proved in operations with ITER-relevant density of the plasma column periphery. Progress of the LH deposition modelling is presented, performed considering the wave physics of the edge, and different ITER-relevant edge parameters. Operations with relatively high edge electron temperatures are expected to reduce the LH{sub ||} spectral broadening and, consequently, enabling the LH power to propagate also in high density plasmas ({sub ||} is the wavenumber component aligned to the confinement magnetic field). New results of FTU experiments are presented, performed by following the aforementioned modeling: they indicate that, for the first time, the LHCD conditions are established by operating at ITER-relevant high edge densities.

  10. A new method of rapid power measurement for MW-scale high-current particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongjian; Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Zhimin; Xie, Yahong; Liu, Sheng; Liang, Lizheng; Jiang, Caichao; Sheng, Peng; Yu, Ling

    2015-09-01

    MW-scale high current particle beams are widely applied for plasma heating in the magnetic confinement fusion devices, in which beam power is an important indicator for efficient heating. Generally, power measurement of MW-scale high current particle beam adopts water flow calorimetry (WFC). Limited by the principles of WFC, the beam power given by WFC is an averaged value. In this article a new method of beam power for MW-scale high-current particle beams is introduced: (1) the temperature data of thermocouples embedded in the beam stopping elements were obtained using high data acquire system, (2) the surface heat flux of the beam stopping elements are calculated using heat transfer, (3) the relationships between positions and heat flux were acquired using numerical simulation, (4) the real-time power deposited on the beam stopping elements can be calculated using surface integral. The principle of measurement was described in detail and applied to the EAST neutral beam injector for demonstration. The result is compared with that measured by WFC. Comparison of the results shows good accuracy and applicability of this measuring method.

  11. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  12. Controlling fluctuations and transport in the reversed field pinch with edge current drive and plasma biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.J.G.

    1998-09-01

    Two techniques are employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to test and control different aspects of fluctuation induced transport in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Auxiliary edge currents are driven along the magnetic field to modify magnetic fluctuations, and the particle and energy transport associated with them. In addition, strong edge flows are produced by plasma biasing. Their effect on electrostatic fluctuations and the associated particle losses is studied. Both techniques are accomplished using miniature insertable plasma sources that are biased negatively to inject electrons. This type of emissive electrode is shown to reliably produce intense, directional current without significant contamination by impurities. The two most important conclusions derived from these studies are that the collective modes resonant at the reversal surface play a role in global plasma confinement, and that these modes can be controlled by modifying the parallel current profile outside of the reversal surface. This confirms predictions based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that auxiliary current drive in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile can be successful in controlling magnetic fluctuations in the RFP. However, these studies expand the group of magnetic modes believed to cause transport in MST and suggest that current profile control efforts need to address both the core resonant magnetic modes and those resonant at the reversal surface. The core resonant modes are not significantly altered in these experiments; however, the distribution and/or amplitude of the injected current is probably not optimal for affecting these modes. Plasma biasing generates strong edge flows with shear and particle confinement likely improves in these discharges. These experiments resemble biased H modes in other magnetic configurations in many ways. The similarities are likely due to the common role of electrostatic fluctuations in edge transport.

  13. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  14. Recent Results using a 28 GHz EBW Heating and Current Drive System on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Tim; Caughman, John; Peng, Martin; Diem, Stephanie; Hawes, Julian; Gurl, Chris; Griffiths, Jonathan; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Finburg, Paul; Mailloux, Joelle; Taylor, Gary

    2013-10-01

    Improvements to a high power 28 GHz gyrotron system have been made to the MAST Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating, start up, and current drive system in the past few years as collaborative research between ORNL and CCFE. Recent EBW heating and CD experiments on MAST have improved upon previous RF generated plasma current levels. The goals of the research were to extend the initial EBW CD study by increasing substantially the power level and pulse length of the gyrotron hardware and improve transmission line efficiency used in initial experiments. A dummy-load power level of up to 200 kW and a pulse length approaching 0.5 s has been achieved. Arcing, localized to the launcher box, has been observed to limit the launched power level to ~80 kW for up to 450 ms. Several days of high power plasma operation have been recently completed with good progress in increasing the previously attainable solenoid-free plasma current levels. Up to 75 kA of plasma current was achieved at this injected power level. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  16. A single/two-phase, regenerative, variable speed, induction motor drive with sinusoidal input current

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M.F.; Zhong, L.

    1995-12-31

    The single phase induction motor with two windings, main and auxiliary, is probably the most widely used motor in the world. The mains operated single-phase motor usually operates at low power factor, low efficiency and at fixed speed. At most, two or three fixed speeds are provided when required, through manual intervention. Such fixed speed operation hinders product designers from incorporating many interesting and useful features in their products. The present concern on harmonic pollution of the supply and low power factor operation, as embodied in the recent IEC555-2 standard, also calls for power factor correction measures to be included in applications where a single phase motor is used. This paper presents a variable speed single-phase motor (with two windings) drive that utilizes just six switches as found in the emerging intelligent power modules (IPM). Just one integrated module with six switches serves to implement the input rectifier with sinusoidal input current, and the two-phase VSI or CSI inverter to drive the two phases of the motor with balanced ampere-turns. The input rectifier is also reversible, so that the motor can be braked with energy return to the mains, thus operating with high efficiency at all times.

  17. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-15

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O{sup 3+} ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  18. High-current fast electron beam propagation in a dielectric target

    SciTech Connect

    Klimo, Ondrej; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Debayle, A.

    2007-01-15

    Recent experiments demonstrate an efficient transformation of high intensity laser pulse into a relativistic electron beam with a very high current density exceeding 10{sup 12} A cm{sup -2}. The propagation of such a beam inside the target is possible if its current is neutralized. This phenomenon is not well understood, especially in dielectric targets. In this paper, we study the propagation of high current density electron beam in a plastic target using a particle-in-cell simulation code. The code includes both ionization of the plastic and collisions of newborn electrons. The numerical results are compared with a relatively simple analytical model and a reasonable agreement is found. The temporal evolution of the beam velocity distribution, the spatial density profile, and the propagation velocity of the ionization front are analyzed and their dependencies on the beam density and energy are discussed. The beam energy losses are mainly due to the target ionization induced by the self-generated electric field and the return current. For the highest beam density, a two-stream instability is observed to develop in the plasma behind the ionization front and it contributes to the beam energy losses.

  19. High-current fast electron beam propagation in a dielectric target.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Ondrej; Tikhonchuk, V T; Debayle, A

    2007-01-01

    Recent experiments demonstrate an efficient transformation of high intensity laser pulse into a relativistic electron beam with a very high current density exceeding 10(12) A cm(-2). The propagation of such a beam inside the target is possible if its current is neutralized. This phenomenon is not well understood, especially in dielectric targets. In this paper, we study the propagation of high current density electron beam in a plastic target using a particle-in-cell simulation code. The code includes both ionization of the plastic and collisions of newborn electrons. The numerical results are compared with a relatively simple analytical model and a reasonable agreement is found. The temporal evolution of the beam velocity distribution, the spatial density profile, and the propagation velocity of the ionization front are analyzed and their dependencies on the beam density and energy are discussed. The beam energy losses are mainly due to the target ionization induced by the self-generated electric field and the return current. For the highest beam density, a two-stream instability is observed to develop in the plasma behind the ionization front and it contributes to the beam energy losses.

  20. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive at High Electron Temperature on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, C. C.; Austin, M. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T. C.; Makowski, M. A.; Prater, R.

    2007-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have measured the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency for co- and counter-injection in low density plasmas with radiation temperatures from electron cyclotron emission (ECE) above 20 keV. The radiation temperature is generally higher than the Thomson scattering temperature, indicating that there is a significant population of non-thermal electrons. The experimental ECCD profile measured with motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry is found to agree with quasi-linear theory except for the highest power density cases (QEC/ne2≫1). Radial transport of the energetic electrons with diffusion coefficients of ˜0.4 m2/s is needed to model the broadened ECCD profile at high power density.

  1. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kritz, A.H.

    1993-03-01

    The Principal Investigator has continued to work on problems associated both with the deposition and with the emission of electron cyclotron heating power electron cyclotron heating in toroidal plasmas. Inparticular, the work has focused on the use of electron cyclotron heating to stabilize q = 1 and q = 2 instabilities in tokamaks and on the use of electron cyclotron emission as a plasma diagnostic. The research described in this report has been carried out in collaboration with scientists at Princeton, MIT and Livermore. The Principal Investigator is now employed at Lehigh University, and a small group effort on electron cyclotron heating in plasmas has begun to evolve at Lehigh involving undergraduate and graduate students. Work has also been done in support of the electron cyclotron heating and current drive program at the Center for Research in Plasma Physics in Lausanne, Switzerland.

  2. Status of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbos, Caroline; Albajar, Ferran; Bonicelli, Tullio; Carannante, Giuseppe; Cavinato, Mario; Cismondi, Fabio; Denisov, Grigory; Farina, Daniela; Gagliardi, Mario; Gandini, Franco; Gassmann, Thibault; Goodman, Timothy; Hanson, Gregory; Henderson, Mark A.; Kajiwara, Ken; McElhaney, Karen; Nousiainen, Risto; Oda, Yasuhisa; Omori, Toshimichi; Oustinov, Alexander; Parmar, Darshankumar; Popov, Vladimir L.; Purohit, Dharmesh; Rao, Shambhu Laxmikanth; Rasmussen, David; Rathod, Vipal; Ronden, Dennis M. S.; Saibene, Gabriella; Sakamoto, Keishi; Sartori, Filippo; Scherer, Theo; Singh, Narinder Pal; Strauß, Dirk; Takahashi, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive (H&CD) system developed for the ITER is made of 12 sets of high-voltage power supplies feeding 24 gyrotrons connected through 24 transmission lines (TL), to five launchers, four located in upper ports and one at the equatorial level. Nearly all procurements are in-kind, following general ITER philosophy, and will come from Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA. The full system is designed to couple to the plasma 20 MW among the 24 MW generated power, at the frequency of 170 GHz, for various physics applications such as plasma start-up, central H&CD and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity control. The design takes present day technology and extends toward high-power continuous operation, which represents a large step forward as compared to the present state of the art. The ITER EC system will be a stepping stone to future EC systems for DEMO and beyond.

  3. Traveling wave antenna for fast wave heating and current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ikezi, H.; Phelps, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    The traveling wave antenna for heating and current drive in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is shown theoretically to have loading and wavenumber spectrum which are largely independent of plasma conditions. These characteristics have been demonstrated in low power experiments on the DIII-D tokamak, in which a standard four-strap antenna was converted to a traveling wave antenna through use of external coupling elements. The experiments indicate that the array maintains good impedance matching without dynamic tuning during abrupt changes in the plasma, such as during L- to H-mode transitions, edge localized mode activity, and disruptions. An analytic model was developed which exhibits the features observed in the experiments. Guidelines for the design of traveling wave antennas are derived from the validated model.

  4. Influence of driving frequency on discharge modes in a dielectric-barrier discharge with multiple current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-07-15

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the effect of the driving frequency on the discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure argon discharge with multiple current pulses. The discharge mode was discussed in detail not only at current peaks but also between two adjacent peaks. The simulation results show that different transitions between the Townsend and glow modes during the discharge take place with the driving frequency increased. A complicated transition from the Townsend mode, through glow, Townsend, and glow, and finally back to the Townsend one is found in the discharge with the driving frequency of 8 kHz. There is a tendency of transition from the Townsend to glow mode for the discharge both at the current peaks and troughs with the increasing frequency. The discharge in the half period can all along operate in the glow mode with the driving frequency high enough. This is resulted from the preservation of more electrons in the gas gap and acquisition of more electron energy from the swiftly varying electric field with the increase in driving frequency. Comparison of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the electron density at different driving frequencies indicates that the increment of the driving frequency allows the plasma chemistry to be enhanced. This electrical characteristic is important for the applications, such as surface treatment and biomedical sterilization.

  5. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D. Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-10

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  6. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  7. Operating experience with high beam currents and transient beam loading in the SLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.G.; Akre, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.H.

    1995-06-01

    During the 1994 SLC run the nominal operating intensity in the damping rings was raised from 3.5 {times} 10{sup 10} to greater than 4 {times} 10{sup 10} particles per bunch (ppb). Stricter regulation of rf system parameters was required to maintain stability of the rf system and particle beam. Improvements were made in the feedback loops which control the cavity amplitude and loading angles. Compensation for beam loading was also required to prevent klystron saturation during repetition rate changes. To minimize the effects of transient loading on the rf system, the gain of the direct rf feedback loop and the loading angles were optimized.

  8. A merging preaccelerator for high current H{sup {minus}} ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Mizuno, M.; Okumura, Y.; Ohara, Y.; Ackerman, G.D.; Chan, C.F.; Cooper, W.S.; Kwan, J.W.; Vella, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    The high power ion beams used in the next generation thermonuclear fusion reactors require high current negative ion beams accelerated to high energy, with high efficiency. One way to meet these requirements is to merge multiple low current density H{sup {minus}} beamlets into a single high current beam. The feasibility of a high current merging preaccelerator was demonstrated in this experiment by merging 19 beamlets of H{sup {minus}} ions distributed over a circular area 80 mm in diameter from a Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute negative ion source. H{sup {minus}} ions were extracted at a current density exceeding 10 mA/cm{sup 2} at the ion source which operates at 0.13 Pa (1 mTorr), with a low arc power density (70 V{times}250 A). Spherically curved grids (with built-in magnetic electron suppression) were used in the preaccelerator to focus the extracted beamlets into a single 104 mA, 100 keV beam. The merged beam has a diameter of 23 mm and a converging angle of {plus_minus}30 mrad at the beam envelope. The rms emittance of the 104 mA merging beam was 1.00 {pi} mrad cm, which is a condition acceptable to the electrostatic quadropole accelerator for further acceleration. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Fault diagnosis of motor drives using stator current signal analysis based on dynamic time warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, D.; Wang, T.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Electrical motor stator current signals have been widely used to monitor the condition of induction machines and their downstream mechanical equipment. The key technique used for current signal analysis is based on Fourier transform (FT) to extract weak fault sideband components from signals predominated with supply frequency component and its higher order harmonics. However, the FT based method has limitations such as spectral leakage and aliasing, leading to significant errors in estimating the sideband components. Therefore, this paper presents the use of dynamic time warping (DTW) to process the motor current signals for detecting and quantifying common faults in a downstream two-stage reciprocating compressor. DTW is a time domain based method and its algorithm is simple and easy to be embedded into real-time devices. In this study DTW is used to suppress the supply frequency component and highlight the sideband components based on the introduction of a reference signal which has the same frequency component as that of the supply power. Moreover, a sliding window is designed to process the raw signal using DTW frame by frame for effective calculation. Based on the proposed method, the stator current signals measured from the compressor induced with different common faults and under different loads are analysed for fault diagnosis. Results show that DTW based on residual signal analysis through the introduction of a reference signal allows the supply components to be suppressed well so that the fault related sideband components are highlighted for obtaining accurate fault detection and diagnosis results. In particular, the root mean square (RMS) values of the residual signal can indicate the differences between the healthy case and different faults under varying discharge pressures. It provides an effective and easy approach to the analysis of motor current signals for better fault diagnosis of the downstream mechanical equipment of motor drives in the time

  10. Isolating and quantifying cross-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Davis, A. K.; Cao, D.; Michel, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marozas, J. A.; et al

    2016-04-20

    The angularly-resolved mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories for Si-coated CH targets were measured in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments to quantify crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) while constraining the hydrodynamic coupling. A polar-direct-drive laser configuration was used, where the equatorial laser beams were dropped from a symmetric direct-drive configuration to suppress CBET at the pole, while allowing it to persist at the equator. The combination of low- and high-CBET conditions in the same implosion allowed the effects of CBET on the ablation rate and ablation pressure to be decoupled from the other physics effects that influence laser-coupling. Hydrodynamic simulationsmore » performed without CBET reproduced the measured ablation rate and ablation front trajectory at the pole of the target, verifying that the other laser-coupling physics effects are well-modeled when CBET effects are negligible. The simulated mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories were in excellent agreement with the measurements at all angles when a CBET model based on Randall’s equations [C. J. Randall et al., Phys. Fluids 24, 1474 (1981)] was included into the simulations with an optimized multiplier on the CBET gain factor. These measurements were performed on both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility to access a wide range of plasma conditions, laser intensities, and laser beam geometries. Furthermore, the presence of the CBET gain multiplier required to match the data in all of the configurations tested suggests that additional physics effects, such as intensity variations due to diffraction, shortcomings of extending the 1-D Randall model to 3-D, or polarization effects, should be explored to explain the differences in observed and predicted drive.« less

  11. Electromagnetic and beam dynamics studies of a high current drift tube linac for LEHIPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, R.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2014-06-01

    We have performed detailed electromagnetic and beam dynamics studies of a 352.21 MHz drift-tube linac (DTL) that will accelerate a 30 mA CW proton beam from 3 to 20 MeV. At such high currents space charge effects are important, and therefore the effect of linear as well as non-linear space charge has been studied (corresponding to uniform and Gaussian initial beam distributions), in order to avoid space charge instabilities. To validate the electromagnetic simulations, a 1.2 m long prototype of the DTL was fabricated. RF measurements performed on the prototype were in good agreement with the simulations. A detailed simulation study of beam halos was also performed, which showed that beyond a current of 10 mA, significant longitudinal beam halos are excited even for a perfectly matched beam, whereas for a mis-matched beam transverse beam halos are also excited. However, these do not lead to any beam loss within the DTL.

  12. Limiting electron beam current for cyclic induction acceleration in a constant guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Kanunnikov, V.N.

    1982-09-01

    Theoretical relations are derived for the limiting beam current in a cyclic induction accelerator (CIA) with a constant guide field. The calculations are in agreement with the available experimental data. It is shown that the limiting average beam current in a CIA is of the order of 100 microamperes, i.e., the level attained in microtrons and linear accelerators. The CIA may find industrial applications.

  13. High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive Results for Deuterium H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillisp, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2012-07-25

    A critical research goal for the spherical torus (ST) program is to initiate, ramp-up, and sustain a discharge without using the central solenoid. Simulations of non-solenoidal plasma scenarios in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [1] predict that high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) [2] can play an important roll in enabling fully non-inductive (fNI {approx} 1) ST operation. The NSTX fNI {approx} 1 strategy requires 5-6 MW of HHFW power (PRF) to be coupled into a non-inductively generated discharge [3] with a plasma current, Ip {approx} 250-350 kA, driving the plasma into an HHFW H-mode with Ip {approx} 500 kA, a level where 90 keV deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) can heat the plasma and provide additional CD. The initial approach on NSTX has been to heat Ip {approx} 300 kA, inductively heated, deuterium plasmas with CD phased HHFW power [2], in order to drive the plasma into an H-mode with fNI {approx} 1.

  14. Instrument for spatially resolved simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Spethmann, A. Trottenberg, T. Kersten, H.

    2015-01-15

    The article presents a device for spatially resolved and simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams, especially in beams composed of ions and neutral atoms. The forces are exerted by the impinging beam particles on a plane circular conductive target plate of 20 mm diameter mounted on a pendulum with electromagnetic force compensation. The force measurement in the micronewton range is achieved by electromagnetic compensation by means of static Helmholtz coils and permanent magnets attached to the pendulum. Exemplary measurements are performed in the 1.2 keV beam of a broad beam ion source. The simultaneous measurements of forces and currents onto the same target are compared with each other and with Faraday cup measurements.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF ACCELERATOR DATA REPORTING SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION TO TREND ANALYSIS OF BEAM CURRENT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, M.J.; Blokland, W.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed ongoing information about the ion beam quality is crucial to the successful operation of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to provide the highest possible neutron production time, ion beam quality is monitored to isolate possible problems or performance-related issues throughout the accelerator and accumulator ring. For example, beam current monitor (BCM) data is used to determine the quality of the beam transport through the accelerator. In this study, a reporting system infrastructure was implemented and used to generate a trend analysis report of the BCM data. The BCM data was analyzed to facilitate the identifi cation of monitor calibration issues, beam trends, beam abnormalities, beam deviations and overall beam quality. A comparison between transformed BCM report data and accelerator log entries shows promising results which represent correlations between the data and changes made within the accelerator. The BCM analysis report is one of many reports within a system that assist in providing overall beam quality information to facilitate successful beam operation. In future reports, additional data manipulation functions and analysis can be implemented and applied. Built-in and user-defi ned analytic functions are available throughout the reporting system and can be reused with new data.

  16. Auroral electron beams - Electric currents and energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, R. L.

    1981-09-01

    The energy sources, electric equipotentials and electric currents associated with auroral electron acceleration observed during rocket flight 18:152 are discussed. Steep flow gradients at the interface between the convection boundary layer and the plasma sheet are considered as the probable source of energy for dayside and dawn and dusk auroras, while it is suggested that the cross tail potential drop may provide an energy source for some midnight auroras. Birkeland currents that flow along distorted field lines are shown possibly to be important in the mechanism that produces U-shaped equipotentials in the ionosphere, as well as unexpected jumps in ionospheric or magnetotail currents and unusual electric fields and plasma drift in the magnetotail. The production of equipotential structures under oppositely directed higher-altitude electric fields is discussed, and it is pointed out that cold ionospheric plasma can enter the structure in a cusp-shaped region where fields are weak. The rocket data reveals that the sudden change in conductivity at the edge of the bright arc and the constancy of the electric field produce sudden changes in the Hall and Pedersen currents. It is concluded that current continuity is satisfied primarily by east-west changes in the electric field or conductivity.

  17. Diagnosing Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Using Beamlets of Unabsorbed Light from Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    A new diagnostic is now being fielded to record the unabsorbed laser light from implosions on OMEGA. Unabsorbed light from each OMEGA beam is imaged as a distinct ``spot'' in time-integrated images. Each spot is, in essence, the end point of a beamlet of light that originates from a specific region of a beam profile and follows a path determined by refraction. The intensity of light in the beamlet varies along that path because of absorption and cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) with other beamlets. This diagnostic allows for the detailed investigation of the effects of CBET on specific locations of the beam profile. A pinhole can be used to isolate specific spots, allowing the time-resolved spectrum of the beamlet to be measured. A fully 3-D CBET hydrodynamics code postprocessor is used to model the intensity and wavelength of each beamlet as it traverses the coronal plasma to the diagnostic. The model predicts that if a single beam in a symmetric implosion is turned off, the recorded intensity of nearby spots will decrease by ~ 15% as a result of loss of CBET from the dropped beam. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Nano-electron beam induced current and hole charge dynamics through uncapped Ge nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, A.; El Hdiy, A.; Troyon, M.; Amiard, G.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I.

    2012-04-01

    Dynamics of hole storage in spherical Ge nanocrystals (NCs) formed by a two step dewetting/nucleation process on an oxide layer grown on an n-doped <001> silicon substrate is studied using a nano-electron beam induced current technique. Carrier generation is produced by an electron beam irradiation. The generated current is collected by an atomic force microscope—tip in contact mode at a fixed position away from the beam spot of about 0.5 µm. This distance represents the effective diffusion length of holes. The time constants of holes charging are determined and the effect of the NC size is underlined.

  19. Fast range switching of passively scattered proton beams using a modulation wheel and dynamic beam current modulation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D; Pourbaix, J C; Ainsley, C G; Dolney, D; Carabe, A

    2014-04-01

    In proton radiotherapy, the range of particles in the patient body is determined by the energy of the protons. For most systems, the energy selection time is on the order of a few seconds, which becomes a serious obstacle for continuous dose delivery techniques requiring adaptive range modulation. This work analyses the feasibility of using the range modulation wheel, an element in the beamline used to form the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), to produce near-instantaneous changes not only in the modulation, but also in the range of the beam. While delivering proton beams in double scattering mode, the beam current can be synchronized with the range modulation wheel rotation by defining a current modulation pattern. Different current modulation patterns were computed from Monte Carlo simulations of our double scattering nozzle to range shift an SOBP of initial range 15 cm by varying degrees of up to ∼9 cm. These patterns were passed to the treatment control system at our institution and the resulting measured depth-dose distributions were analysed in terms of flatness, distal penumbra and relative irradiation time per unit mid-SOBP dose. Suitable SOBPs were obtained in all cases, with the maximum range shift being limited only by the maximum thickness of the wheel. The distal dose fall-off (80% to 20%) of the shifted peaks was broadened to about 1 cm, from the original 0.5 cm, and the predicted overhead in delivery time showed a linear increase with the amount of the shift. By modulating the beam current in clinical scattered proton beams equipped with a modulation wheel, it is possible to dynamically modify the in-patient range of the SOBP without adding any specific hardware or compensators to the beamline. A compromise between sharper distal dose fall-off and lower delivery time can be achieved and is subject to optimization.

  20. Optimization of the ITER electron cyclotron equatorial launcher for improved heating and current drive functional capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2014-06-15

    The design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (EC H and CD) system has evolved in the last years both in goals and functionalities by considering an expanded range of applications. A large effort has been devoted to a better integration of the equatorial and the upper launchers, both from the point of view of the performance and of the design impact on the engineering constraints. However, from the analysis of the ECCD performance in two references H-mode scenarios at burn (the inductive H-mode and the advanced non-inductive scenario), it was clear that the EC power deposition was not optimal for steady-state applications in the plasma region around mid radius. An optimization study of the equatorial launcher is presented here aiming at removing this limitation of the EC system capabilities. Changing the steering of the equatorial launcher from toroidal to poloidal ensures EC power deposition out to the normalized toroidal radius ρ ≈ 0.6, and nearly doubles the EC driven current around mid radius, without significant performance degradation in the core plasma region. In addition to the improved performance, the proposed design change is able to relax some engineering design constraints on both launchers.

  1. Status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Jeong, J. H.; Park, S.; Kim, H. J.; Yang, H. L.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Doane, J.

    2011-12-23

    A 170 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH/CD) system on KSTAR is designed to launch total 2.4 MW of power for up to 300 sec into the plasma. At present the first 1 MW ECH/CD system is under installation and commissioning for 2011 KSTAR campaign. The 170 GHz, 1 MW, 300 sec gyrotron and the matching optics unit (MOU) will be provided from JAEA under collaboration between NFRI and JAEA. The transmission line consists of MOU and 70 m long 63.5 mm ID corrugated waveguides with the eight miter bends. The 1 MW, 10 sec launcher is developed based on the existing two-mirror front-end launcher in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Pohang University of Science and Technology, and is installed on the low field side in the KSTAR equatorial plane. The mirror pivot is located at 30 cm below from the equatorial plane. 3.6 MVA power supply system is manufactured and now is under commissioning to meet the triode gun operation of JAEA gyrotron. The power supply consists of 66 kV/55 A cathode power supply, mode-anode system, and 50 kV/160 mA body power supply. In this paper, the current status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW ECH/CD system will be presented as well as the experimental plan utilizing 170 GHz new ECH/CD system.

  2. A survey of electron Bernstein wave heating and current drive potential for spherical tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jakub; Decker, Joan; Peysson, Yves; Preinhaelter, Josef; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Taylor, Gary; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2011-08-01

    The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) is typically the only wave in the electron cyclotron (EC) range that can be applied in spherical tokamaks for heating and current drive (H&CD). Spherical tokamaks (STs) operate generally in high-β regimes, in which the usual EC O- and X-modes are cut off. In this case, EBWs seem to be the only option that can provide features similar to the EC waves—controllable localized H&CD that can be used for core plasma heating as well as for accurate plasma stabilization. The EBW is a quasi-electrostatic wave that can be excited by mode conversion from a suitably launched O- or X-mode; its propagation further inside the plasma is strongly influenced by the plasma parameters. These rather awkward properties make its application somewhat more difficult. In this paper we perform an extensive numerical study of EBW H&CD performance in four typical ST plasmas (NSTX L- and H-mode, MAST Upgrade, NHTX). Coupled ray-tracing (AMR) and Fokker-Planck (LUKE) codes are employed to simulate EBWs of varying frequencies and launch conditions, which are the fundamental EBW parameters that can be chosen and controlled. Our results indicate that an efficient and universal EBW H&CD system is indeed viable. In particular, power can be deposited and current reasonably efficiently driven across the whole plasma radius. Such a system could be controlled by a suitably chosen launching antenna vertical position and would also be sufficiently robust.

  3. Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks by Electron Cyclotron Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.

    2009-04-01

    Resistive neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are anticipated to be the principal limit on stability and performance in ITER as the resulting islands break up the magnetic surfaces confining the plasma. Drag from island-induced eddy currents in the resistive wall can slow plasma rotation, produce locking to the wall, and cause loss of the high-confinement H-mode and disruption. NTMs are destabilized by helical perturbations to the pressure-gradient-driven "bootstrap" current. NTMs can be stabilized by applying co-electron-cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the island rational surface. Such stabilization and/or preemption is successful in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, and JT-60U, if the peak off-axis current density is comparable to the local bootstrap current density and well-aligned. ASDEX Upgrade has used a feed-forward sweep of the toroidal field to get ECCD alignment on the island. JT-60U has used feed-forward sweeps of the launching mirror for the same purpose, followed up by real-time adjustment of the mirror using the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic to locate the island rational surface. In DIII-D, ECCD alignment techniques include applying "search and suppress" real-time control to find and lock onto optimum alignment (adjusting the field or shifting the plasma major radius in equivalent small steps). Most experimental work to date uses narrow, cw ECCD; the relatively wide ECCD in ITER may be less effective if it is also cw: the stabilization effect of replacing the "missing" bootstrap current on the island O-point could be nearly cancelled by the destabilization effect on the island X-point if the ECCD is very broad. Modulating the ECCD so that it is absorbed only on the m/n = 3/2 rotating island O-point is proving successful in recovering ECCD effectiveness in ASDEX Upgrade when the ECCD is configured for wider deposition. The ECCD in ITER is relatively broad, with current deposition full width half maximum almost twice the marginal island width. This

  4. Beam hosing instability in overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Gruener, F. J.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    Transverse stability of the drive beam is critical to plasma wakefield accelerators. A long, relativistic particle beam propagating in an overdense plasma is subject to beam envelope modulation and hosing (centroid displacement) instabilities. Coupled equations for the beam centroid and envelope are derived. The growth rate for beam hosing is examined including return current effects (where the beam radius is of order the plasma skin depth) in the long-beam, strongly-coupled, overdense regime.

  5. Application of radiofrequency superconductivity to accelerators for high-current ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-current, high-brightness ion beam. During the last few years, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam halo, cumulative beam breakup and alternating-phase focusing have also yielded important results. This paper su-summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of superconducting accelerator technology for high-current ion beams.

  6. Application of radiofrequency superconductivity to accelerators for high-current ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-12-31

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-current, high-brightness ion beam. During the last few years, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam halo, cumulative beam breakup and alternating-phase focusing have also yielded important results. This paper su-summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of superconducting accelerator technology for high-current ion beams.

  7. Influence of total beam current on HRTEM image resolution in differentially pumped ETEM with nitrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Bright, A N; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, N

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) enables the study of catalytic and other reaction processes as they occur with Angstrom-level resolution. The microscope used is a dedicated ETEM (Titan ETEM, FEI Company) with a differential pumping vacuum system and apertures, allowing aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging to be performed with gas pressures up to 20 mbar in the sample area and with significant advantages over membrane-type E-cell holders. The effect on image resolution of varying the nitrogen gas pressure, electron beam current density and total beam current were measured using information limit (Young's fringes) on a standard cross grating sample and from silicon crystal lattice imaging. As expected, increasing gas pressure causes a decrease in HRTEM image resolution. However, the total electron beam current also causes big changes in the image resolution (lower beam current giving better resolution), whereas varying the beam current density has almost no effect on resolution, a result that has not been reported previously. This behavior is seen even with zero-loss filtered imaging, which we believe shows that the drop in resolution is caused by elastic scattering at gas ions created by the incident electron beam. Suitable conditions for acquiring high resolution images in a gas environment are discussed. Lattice images at nitrogen pressures up to 16 mbar are shown, with 0.12 nm information transfer at 4 mbar.

  8. RESULTS OF BEAM TESTS ON A HIGH CURRENT EBIS TEST STAND.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE,E.; ALESSI,J.; BELLAVIA,S.; HERSHCOVITCH,A.; KPONOU,A.; LOCKEY,R.; PIKIN,A.; PRELEC,K.; KUZNETSOV,G.; TIUNOV,M.

    1999-03-29

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory there is an R&D program to design an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) for use in a compact ion injector to be developed for the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC). The BNL effort is directed at developing an EBIS with intensities of 3 x 10{sup 9} particles/pulse of ions such as Au{sup 35+} and U{sup 45+}, and requires an electron beam on the order of 10A. The construction of a test stand (EBTS) with the full electron beam power and 1/3 the length of the EBIS for RHIC is nearing completion. Initial commissioning of the EBTS was made with pulsed electron beams of duration < 1ms and current up to 13 A. Details of the EBTS construction, results of the pulse tests, and preparations for DC electron beam tests are presented.

  9. FED-A, an advanced performance FED based on low safety factor and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin; Rutherford, P. H.; Hogan, J.T.; Attenberger, S. E.; Holmes, J.A.; Borowski, S. K.; Brown, T. G.; Carreras, B. A.; Ehst, D. A.; Haines, J.R.; Hively, L. M.; Houlberg, Wayne A; Iida, H.; Lee, V. D.; Lynch, S.J.; Reid, R. L.; Rothe, K. E.; Strickler, Dennis J; Stewart, L. D.

    1983-08-01

    This document is one of four describing studies performed in FY 1982 within the context of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) Program for the Office of Fusion Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. The documents are: 1. FED Baseline Engineering Studies (ORNL/FEDC-82/2), 2. FED-A, An Advanced Performance FED Based on Low Safety Factor and Current Drive (this document), 3. FED-R, A Fusion Device Utilizing Resistive Magnets (ORNL/FEDC-82/1), and 4. Technology Demonstration Facility TDF. These studies extend the FED Baseline concept of FY 1981 and develop innovative and alternative concepts for the FED. The FED-A study project was carried out as part of the Innovative and Alternative Tokamak FED studies, under the direction of P. H. Rutherford, which were part of the national FED program during FY 1982. The studies were performed jointly by senior scientists in the magnetic fusion community and the staff of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC). Y-K. M. Peng of the FEDC, on assignment from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, served as the design manager.

  10. Extended magnetohydrodynamic simulations of field reversed configuration formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-06-15

    Three-dimensional simulations of field reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive have been performed with the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. The Hall term is a zeroth order effect with strong coupling between Fourier components, and recent enhancements to the NIMROD preconditioner allow much larger time steps than was previously possible. Boundary conditions to capture the effects of a finite length RMF antenna have been added, and simulations of FRC formation from a uniform background plasma have been performed with parameters relevant to the translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade experiment at the University of Washington [H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and R. D. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112502 (2007)]. The effects of both even-parity and odd-parity antennas have been investigated, and there is no evidence of a disruptive instability for either antenna type. It has been found that RMF effects extend considerably beyond the ends of the antenna, and that a large n=0 B{sub t}heta can develop in the open-field line region, producing a back torque opposing the RMF.

  11. Transient transport experiments in the current-drive experiment upgrade spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsat, T.; Efthimion, P. C.; Jones, B.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Stutman, D.; Taylor, G.

    2002-02-01

    Electron transport has been measured in the Current-Drive Experiment Upgrade (CDX-U) (T. Jones, Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, 1995) using two separate perturbative techniques. Sawteeth at the q=1 radius (r/a˜0.15) induced outward-propagating heat pulses, providing time-of-flight information leading to a determination of χe as a function of radius. Gas modulation at the plasma edge introduced inward-propagating cold pulses, providing a complementary time-of-flight based χe profile measurement. This work represents the first localized measurement of χe in a spherical torus. Core (r/a<1/3) χe values from the sawtooth study are 1-2 m2/s, and from the gas modulation study are 1-6 m2/s, increasing by an order of magnitude or more outside of the core region. Furthermore, the χe profile exhibits a sharp transition near r/a=1/3. Spectral and profile analyses of the soft x-rays, scanning interferometer, and edge probe data show no evidence of a significant magnetic island causing the high χe region. Comparisons are performed to several theoretical models, with measured χe≈5-10× neoclassical estimates in the core.

  12. RF Sources for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Brunkhorst, C.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R. H.; Goulding, R. H.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Wilson, J. R.

    2005-10-04

    The RF source requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive system are very challenging ? 20 MW CW power into an antenna load with a VSWR of up to 2 over the frequency range of 35-65 MHz. For the two present antenna designs under consideration, 8 sources providing 2.5 MW each are to be employed. For these sources, the outputs of two final power amplifiers (FPAs), using the high power CPI 4CM2500KG tube, are combined with a 180? hybrid combiner to easily meet the ITER IC source requirements ? 2.5 MW is supplied at a VSWR of 2 at ? 70% of the maximum tube power available in class B operation. The cylindrical cavity configuration for the FPAs is quite compact so that the 8 combined sources fit into the space allocated at the ITER site with room to spare. The source configuration is described in detail and its projected operating power curves are presented. Although the CPI tube has been shown to be stable under high power operating conditions on many facilities, a test of the combined FPA source arrangement is in preparation using existing high power 30 MHz amplifiers to assure that this configuration can be made robustly stable for all phases at a VSWR up to 2. The possibility of using 12 sources to feed a suitably modified antenna design is also discussed in the context of providing flexibility for specifying the final IC antenna design.

  13. Status of the ITER ion cyclotron heating and current drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamalle, P.; Beaumont, B.; Kazarian, F.; Gassmann, T.; Agarici, G.; Montemayor, T. Alonzo; Bamber, R.; Bernard, J.-M.; Boilson, D.; Cadinot, A.; Calarco, F.; Colas, L.; Courtois, X.; Deibele, C.; Durodié, F.; Fano, J.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R.; Greenough, N.; Hillairet, J.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A. S.; Kočan, M.; Labidi, H.; Leichtle, D.; Loarte, A.; McCarthy, M.; Messiaen, A.; Meunier, L.; Mukherjee, A.; Oberlin-Harris, C.; Patel, A. M.; Peters, B.; Rajnish, K.; Rasmussen, D.; Sanabria, R.; Sartori, R.; Singh, R.; Swain, D.; Trivedi, R. G.; Turner, A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on latest developments for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive system: imminent acceptance tests of a prototype power supply at full power; successful factory acceptance of candidate RF amplifier tubes which will be tested on dedicated facilities; further design integration and experimental validation of transmission line components under 6MW hour-long pulses. The antenna Faraday shield thermal design has been validated above requirements by cyclic high heat flux tests. R&D on ceramic brazing is under way for the RF vacuum windows. The antenna port plug RF design is stable but major evolution of the mechanical design is in preparation to achieve compliance with the load specification, warrant manufacturability and incorporate late interface change requests. The antenna power coupling capability predictions have been strengthened by showing that, if the plasma scrape-off layer turns out to be steep and the edge density low, the reference burning plasma can realistically be displaced to improve the coupling.

  14. The Star Thrust Experiment, rotating magnetic field current drive in the field reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth Elric

    2001-11-01

    The Star Thrust Experiment (STX) has formed and sustained the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) with a Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) operated at a strength of 25 G and a frequency of 350 kHz. The RMF was generated with two IGBT switched solid state power supplies capable of delivering 2 MW each. Plasmas were typically 2 m long by 0.2m in radius and consisted of fully ionized deuterium at temperatures of 60 eV and peak densities of 5 × 1018m- 3. The primary diagnostic was an extremely small 24 channel berylia jacketed internal magnetic probe that was used to make measurements as a function of time, radius, and axial position. These measurements when combined with the FRC's unique geometry and equilibrium relationships determined many other important plasma parameters. Axial confining fields of 100 G maintained a true vacuum boundary around the plasma and allowed for the study of FRC RMF equilibrium interactions. Key findings are that the RMF maintained a near zero separatrix pressure, penetrated only partially, and drove strong radial and axial flows. Issues discussed include the importance of the RMF driving an axial current distribution consistent with that of the FRC, possible benefits of varying the average beta condition, and potential RMF antenna length limits set by the tendency of driven axial flows to screen the RMF from the plasma.

  15. NTM stabilization by alternating O-point EC current drive using a high-power diplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparek, W.; Doelman, N.; Stober, J.; Maraschek, M.; Zohm, H.; Monaco, F.; Eixenberger, H.; Klop, W.; Wagner, D.; Schubert, M.; Schütz, H.; Grünwald, G.; Plaum, B.; Munk, R.; Schlüter, K. H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-12-01

    At the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade, experiments to stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by electron cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive in the O-points of the magnetic islands were performed. For the first time, injection into the O-points of the revolving islands was performed via a fast directional switch, which toggled the EC power between two launchers synchronously to the island rotation. The switching was performed by a resonant diplexer employing a sharp resonance in the transfer function, and a small frequency modulation of the feeding gyrotron around the slope of the resonance. Thus, toggling of the power between the two outputs of the diplexer connected to two articulating launchers was possible. Phasing and control of the modulation were performed via a set of Mirnov coils and appropriate signal processing. In the paper, technological issues, the design of the diplexer, the tracking of the diplexer resonance to the gyrotron frequency, the generation and processing of control signals for the gyrotron, and the typical performance concerning switching contrast and efficiency are discussed. The plasma scenario is described, and plasma experiments are presented, where the launchers scanned the region of the resonant surface continuously and also where the launchers were at a fixed position near to the q  =  1.5-surface. In the second case, complete stabilization of a 3/2 NTM could be reached. These experiments are also seen as a technical demonstration for the applicability of diplexers in large-scale ECRH systems.

  16. Detection and sizing of defects in control rod drive mechanism penetrations using eddy current and ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Light, G.M.; Fisher, J.L.; Tennis, R.F.; Stolte, J.S.; Hendrix, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last two years, concern has been generated about the capabilities of performing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the closure-head penetrations in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. These penetrations are primarily for instrumentation and control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and are usually thick-walled Inconel tubes, which are shrink-fitted into the steel closure head. The penetrations are then welded between the outside surface of the penetration and the inside surface of the closure head. Stress corrosion cracks initiating at the inner surface of the penetration have been reported at several plants. Through-wall cracks in the CRDM penetration or CRDM weld could lead to loss of coolant in the reactor vessel. The CRDM penetration presents a complex inspection geometry for conventional NDE techniques. A thermal sleeve, through which pass the mechanical linkages for operating the control rods, is inserted into the penetration in such a way that only a small annulus (nominally 3 mm) exists between the thermal sleeve and inside surface of the penetration. Ultrasonic (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) techniques that could be used to provide defect detection and sizing capability were investigated. This paper describes the ET and UT techniques, the probes developed, and the results obtained using these probes and techniques on CRDM penetration mock-ups.

  17. A camera for imaging hard x-rays from suprathermal electrons during lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Kaita, R.; Bernabei, S.; Davis, W.; Fishman, H.; Gettelfinger, G.; Ignat, D.; Roney, P.; Stevens, J.; Stodiek, W. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Jones, S.; Paoletti, F. . Plasma Fusion Center); Petravich, G. . Central Research Inst. for Physics); Rimini,

    1993-05-01

    During lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), suprathermal electrons are generated that emit hard X-ray bremsstrahlung. A pinhole camera has been installed on the PBX-M tokamak that records 128 [times] 128 pixel images of the bremsstrahlung with a 3 ms time resolution. This camera has identified hollow radiation profiles on PBX-M, indicating off-axis current drive. The detector is a 9in. dia. intensifier. A detailed account of the construction of the Hard X-ray Camera, its operation, and its performance is given.

  18. A camera for imaging hard x-rays from suprathermal electrons during lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Kaita, R.; Bernabei, S.; Davis, W.; Fishman, H.; Gettelfinger, G.; Ignat, D.; Roney, P.; Stevens, J.; Stodiek, W.; Jones, S.; Paoletti, F.; Petravich, G.; Rimini, F.

    1993-05-01

    During lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), suprathermal electrons are generated that emit hard X-ray bremsstrahlung. A pinhole camera has been installed on the PBX-M tokamak that records 128 {times} 128 pixel images of the bremsstrahlung with a 3 ms time resolution. This camera has identified hollow radiation profiles on PBX-M, indicating off-axis current drive. The detector is a 9in. dia. intensifier. A detailed account of the construction of the Hard X-ray Camera, its operation, and its performance is given.

  19. Quasi-linear modeling of lower hybrid current drive in ITER and DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A. Cesario, R.; Panaccione, L.; Santini, F.; Amicucci, L.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Mirizzi, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2015-12-10

    First pass absorption of the Lower Hybrid waves in thermonuclear devices like ITER and DEMO is modeled by coupling the ray tracing equations with the quasi-linear evolution of the electron distribution function in 2D velocity space. As usually assumed, the Lower Hybrid Current Drive is not effective in a plasma of a tokamak fusion reactor, owing to the accessibility condition which, depending on the density, restricts the parallel wavenumber to values greater than n{sub ∥crit} and, at the same time, to the high electron temperature that would enhance the wave absorption and then restricts the RF power deposition to the very periphery of the plasma column (near the separatrix). In this work, by extensively using the “ray{sup star}” code, a parametric study of the propagation and absorption of the LH wave as function of the coupled wave spectrum (as its width, and peak value), has been performed very accurately. Such a careful investigation aims at controlling the power deposition layer possibly in the external half radius of the plasma, thus providing a valuable aid to the solution of how to control the plasma current profile in a toroidal magnetic configuration, and how to help the suppression of MHD mode that can develop in the outer part of the plasma. This analysis is useful not only for exploring the possibility of profile control of a pulsed operation reactor as well as the tearing mode stabilization, but also in order to reconsider the feasibility of steady state regime for DEMO.

  20. Analysis of Longitudinal Beam Dynamics Behavior and RF System Operative Limits at High Beam Currents in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; Tytelman, D.; /Dimtel, Redwood City

    2008-07-07

    A dynamics simulation model is used to estimate limits of performance of the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II). The simulation captures the dynamics and technical limitations of the Low Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) system, the high-power RF components and the low-order mode coupled bunch longitudinal beam dynamics. Simulation results showing the effect of non-linearities on the LLRF loops, and studies of the effectiveness of technical component upgrades are reported, as well as a comparison of these results with PEP-II measurements. These studies have led to the estimation of limits and determining factors in the maximum stored current that the Low Energy Ring/High Energy Ring (LER/HER) can achieve, based on system stability for different RF station configurations and upgrades. In particular, the feasibility of the PEP-II plans to achieve the final goal in luminosity, which required an increase of the beam currents to 4A for LER and 2.2A for HER, is studied. These currents are challenging in part because they would push the longitudinal low-order beam mode stability to the limit, and the klystron forward power past a level of satisfactory margin. An acceptable margin is defined in this paper, which in turn determines the corresponding klystron forward power limitation.

  1. Reduction in Neutral Beam Driven Current in a Tokamak by Tearing Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, C.B.; Ferron, J.R.; Hyatt, A.W.; La Haye, R.J.; Politzer, P.A.; St. John, H.E.; Gianakon, T.; Harvey, R.W.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Murakami, M.

    1997-07-01

    Profiles of noninductive current driven by neutral beam injection into a tokamak have been measured and compared with theory. The driven current can be less than the theoretical prediction (by up to 80{percent}) in the presence of islands driven by tearing modes. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Mapping of ion beam induced current changes in FinFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, C. D.; Schuh, A.; Batra, A.; Persaud, A.; Rangelow, I. W.; Bokor, J.; Lo, C. C.; Cabrini, S.; Olynick, D.; Duhey, S.; Schenkel, T.

    2008-09-30

    We report on progress in ion placement into silicon devices with scanning probealignment. The device is imaged with a scanning force microscope (SFM) and an aligned argon beam (20 keV, 36 keV) is scanned over the transistor surface. Holes in the lever of the SFM tip collimate the argon beam to sizes of 1.6 mu m and 100 nm in diameter. Ion impacts upset the channel current due to formation of positive charges in the oxide areas. The induced changes in the source-drain current are recorded in dependence of the ion beam position in respect to the FinFET. Maps of local areas responding to the ion beam are obtained.

  3. HIGH AVERAGE CURRENT LOW EMITTANCE BEAM EMPLOYING CW NORMAL CONDUCTING GUN.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KEWISCH, J.; PAI, C.

    2007-06-25

    CW normal conducting guns usually do not achieve very high field gradient and waste much RF power at high field gradient compared to superconducting cavities. But they have less trapped modes and wakefields compared to the superconducting cavities due to their low Q. The external bucking coil can also be applied very close to the cathode to improve the beam quality. By using a low frequency gun with a recessed cathode and a carefully designed beam line we can get a high average current and a high quality beam with acceptable RF power loss on the cavity wall. This paper shows that the CW normal conducting gun can be a backup solution for those projects which need high peak and average current, low emittance electron beams such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) e-cooling project and Energy Recovery Linac (Em) project.

  4. The effect of beam-driven return current instability on solar hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, D.; Mcquillan, P.; Brown, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of electrostatic wave generation by a return current driven by a small area electron beam during solar hard X-ray bursts is discussed. The marginal stability method is used to solve numerically the electron and ion heating equations for a prescribed beam current evolution. When ion-acoustic waves are considered, the method appears satisfactory and, following an initial phase of Coulomb resistivity in which T sub e/T sub i rise, predicts a rapid heating of substantial plasma volumes by anomalous ohmic dissipation. This hot plasma emits so much thermal bremsstrahlung that, contrary to previous expectations, the unstable beam-plasma system actually emits more hard X-rays than does the beam in the purely collisional thick target regime relevant to larger injection areas. Inclusion of ion-cyclotron waves results in ion-acoustic wave onset at lower T sub e/T sub i and a marginal stability treatment yields unphysical results.

  5. PHYSICS OF THE HIGH CURRENT DENSITY ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE (EBIS).

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    Interest in upgrading present heavy particle accelerators has led to study of EBIS as a possible source of high Z ions, e.g,, Ar{sup +18}. The present work has been motivated primarily by the results reported by CRYEBIS, which indicate that a space charge neutralized, external electron gun can achieve current densities of 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}. Scaling relationships are developed as a basis for understanding CRYEBIS operation. The relevance of collective effects to beam equilibrium and stability is pointed out, Single electron impact ionization scaling and beam neutralization scaling indicate that higher beam voltage may be the easiest way of increasing both ionization rate and particle intensity. Consideration of radial ion confinement suggests that beam collapse to high current density may be related to the highest charge state which is energetically accessible.

  6. Laser-beam-induced current microscopy of electric fields in natural minerals caused by impurity zonation and structural defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Jamie S.; Johnson, Brett C.; Ryan, Chris G.

    2012-08-01

    Regions of band-bending in semiconducting sulfide minerals are thought to drive both electrochemical reactions with passing fluids resulting in precious metal ore genesis in undersaturated solutions, and bacterial oxidation by ferro-oxidans. Better understanding the role of these regions and their surface texturing on likely seeding spots and growth/dissolution rates requires large scale imaging of regions sustaining these fields. In this paper, we describe a system and methodology based on a scanning laser microscope technique called laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) for imaging fields in natural sulfides. The technique is illustrated on a synthetic junction fabricated using Au and Pt Schottky barriers on natural cubic pyrite, followed by an initial scope on a natural chalcopyrite assemblage. Different modes of LBIC imaging are discussed in light of complexity within real mineral assemblages. The remote contact mode is found to be ideal for natural samples and reasons for this conclusion are detailed.

  7. Characterization of the beam transmission improvements for p- and n-LDD implantations on a single wafer high current spot beam implanter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeide, Matthias; Kondratenko, Serguei; Deichler, Josef

    2012-11-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the biased beam guide option installed in the 200 mm Axcelis Optima HDx single wafer high current spot beam implanter and its use for energy contamination free, drift mode p-LDD and n-LDD implantations. Biased beam guide mode allows reduction of space charge potential and corresponding transmission loss from beam blow up, resulting in horizontally and vertically smaller ion beams. Smaller, highly focused beams have several advantages, such as improved beam transmission, higher dose rate, and require reduced overscan area. Higher beam transmission and higher beam current combined with reduced overscan are two factors that directly affect throughput and productivity. We demonstrate these improvements for several important logic processes. A characterization of the effects of beam guide bias voltage for a 90 nm CMOS logic is reported in detail. The p-LDD and n-LDD implantations investigated were BF2+, As+, and As2+ in the energy range between 3 keV and 5 keV, both with and without Germanium pre-amorphization. The presented and discussed results include beam parameters, throughput results, beam setup performance, and device data. The results have shown that the biased beam guide mode can significantly improve the throughput for the LDD implantations in the energy range of interest.

  8. On ray stochasticity during lower-hybrid current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, J.P.; Moreau, D. )

    1993-04-01

    Using a combined ray-tracing and Fokker--Planck code, a comprehensive and detailed analysis is presented on the importance of toroidally induced ray stochasticity for the modeling of lower-hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamaks and for the dynamics of the launched power spectrum. The injected LH power distribution in poloidal angle and in parallel wave index is accurately represented by taking into account the poloidal extent of the antenna and by efficiently covering the full range of its radiated spectrum. The influence of the balance between the wave damping and the exponential divergence of nearby ray trajectories in determining the shape and robustness of the predicted LH power deposition profiles is emphasized. When stochastic effects are important, code predictions are shown to be stable with respect to small changes in plasma parameters and initial conditions, and to be consistent with experimental data, provided a sufficiently large number of rays is used. Sensitivity studies indicate that the component of the launched power spectrum that is not affected by stochastic effects is well described by a grid in parallel wave index whose spacing may be as large as 10[sup [minus]1], whereas the component that is affected by such effects suffers strong randomization and needs a grid whose spacing must not exceed 10[sup [minus]3]. Ray stochasticity tends to broaden the launched power spectrum, to increase the LH power deposition in the inner half of the plasma, and to favor power deposition profiles that are spread over most of the plasma cross section and whose dependence on the injected LH power distribution in poloidal angle and in parallel wave index is weak. It is found that stochastic effects may be effectively reduced by using bottom launch schemes.

  9. Start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of double triangular current profile generation in Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, G.; Power, J.; Kim, S. H.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.

    2012-12-21

    Double triangular current profile (DT) gives a high transformer ratio which is the determining factor of the performance of collinear wakefield accelerator. This current profile can be generated using the emittance exchange (EEX) beam line. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility plans to generate DT using the EEX beam line. We conducted start-to-end simulation for the AWA beam line using PARMELA code. Also, we discuss requirements of beam parameters for the generation of DT.

  10. A Four Channel Beam Current Monitor Data Acquisition System Using Embedded Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, Jr., Robert Mitchell; Dalmas, Dale A.; Dale, Gregory E.

    2015-08-11

    Data acquisition from multiple beam current monitors is required for electron accelerator production of Mo-99. A two channel system capable of recording data from two beam current monitors has been developed, is currently in use, and is discussed below. The development of a cost-effective method of extending this system to more than two channels and integrating of these measurements into an accelerator control system is the main focus of this report. Data from these current monitors is digitized, processed, and stored by a digital data acquisition system. Limitations and drawbacks with the currently deployed digital data acquisition system have been identified as have been potential solutions, or at least improvements, to these problems. This report will discuss and document the efforts we've made in improving the flexibility and lowering the cost of the data acquisition system while maintaining the minimum requirements.

  11. Improved Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Strategy for Polar Direct Drive at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) reduces absorbed light and implosion velocity, alters time-resolved scattered-light spectra, and redistributes absorbed and scattered light. These effects reduce target performance in both symmetric direct-drive and polar-direct-drive (PDD) experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The CBET package (Adaawam) incorporated into the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO is an integral part of the 3-D ray-trace package (Mazinisin). The CBET exchange occurs primarily over the equatorial region in PDD, where successful mitigation strategies concentrate. Detuning the initial laser wavelength (dλ0) reduces the CBET interaction volume, which can be combined with other mitigation domains (e.g., spatial and temporal). By judiciously selecting the ring and/or port +/-dλ0 in each hemisphere, using new DRACO diagnostic abilities, improved wavelength detuning strategies trade-off overall energy absorption for improved hemispherical energy balance control. These balanced-wavelength detuning strategies improve performance for high-convergence implosions. Simulations (2-D DRACO) predict improved implosion performance and control in both the shell trajectory and morphology for planned intermediate PDD experiments on the NIF. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. A new method to calculate the beam charge for an integrating current transformer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuchi; Han, Dan; Zhu, Bin; Dong, Kegong; Tan, Fang; Gu, Yuqiu

    2012-09-01

    The integrating current transformer (ICT) is a magnetic sensor widely used to precisely measure the charge of an ultra-short-pulse charged particle beam generated by traditional accelerators and new laser-plasma particle accelerators. In this paper, we present a new method to calculate the beam charge in an ICT based on circuit analysis. The output transfer function shows an invariable signal profile for an ultra-short electron bunch, so the function can be used to evaluate the signal quality and calculate the beam charge through signal fitting. We obtain a set of parameters in the output function from a standard signal generated by an ultra-short electron bunch (about 1 ps in duration) at a radio frequency linear electron accelerator at Tsinghua University. These parameters can be used to obtain the beam charge by signal fitting with excellent accuracy. PMID:23020370

  13. Electron Beam-Induced Current (EBIC) in solution-processed solar cells.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Piet; Rath, Thomas; Fischereder, Achim; Trimmel, Gregor; Hadley, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Electron Beam-Induced Current (EBIC) measurements were used to produce 2D maps for investigating the homogeneity of solar cells. These maps are acquired by scanning the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope over a small area and using a programmable sample stage to move the solar cell under the scan area. The electron beam generates electron-hole pairs in the solar cell much like light does in normal solar cell operation. Solution-processed solar cells where the active layer consisted of purely inorganic or purely organic materials were measured. Since the electron beam irreversibly damages organic material, it was important to ensure that the measurements were made before the materials were altered.

  14. Modulation of auroral electrojet currents using dual HF beams with ELF phase offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The modulation of naturally occuring ionospheric currents with high power radio waves in the high frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) band is a well known technique for generation of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) and very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) waves. We use the heating facility of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to investigate the effect of using dual HF beams with an ELF/VLF phase offset between the modulation waveforms. Experiments with offset HF beams confirm the model of independent ELF/VLF sources. Experiments with co-located HF beams exhibit interaction between the first and second harmonics of the modulated tones when square and sine wave modulation waveforms are employed. Using ELF/VLF phase offsets for co-loacted beams is also shown to be a potential diagnostic for the D-region ionospheric profile.

  15. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  16. Application of lateral photovoltage towards contactless light beam induced current measurements and its dependence on the finite beam size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhale, Atul Prakash; Rao, K. S. R. Koteswara

    2014-07-01

    The nature of the signal due to light beam induced current (LBIC) at the remote contacts is verified as a lateral photovoltage for non-uniformly illuminated planar p-n junction devices; simulation and experimental results are presented. The limitations imposed by the ohmic contacts are successfully overcome by the introduction of capacitively coupled remote contacts, which yield similar results without any significant loss in the estimated material and device parameters. It is observed that the LBIC measurements introduce artefacts such as shift in peak position with increasing laser power. Simulation of LBIC signal as a function of characteristic length Lc of photo-generated carriers and for different beam diameters has resulted in the observed peak shifts, thus attributed to the finite size of the beam. Further, the idea of capacitively coupled contacts has been extended to contactless measurements using pressure contacts with an oxidized aluminium electrodes. This technique avoids the contagious sample processing steps, which may introduce unintentional defects and contaminants into the material and devices under observation. Thus, we present here, the remote contact LBIC as a practically non-destructive tool in the evaluation of device parameters and welcome its use during fabrication steps.

  17. Impact of beam smoothing method on direct drive target performance for the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, J.E.; Weber, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    The impact of smoothing method on the performance of a direct drive target is modeled and examined in terms of its 1-mode spectrum. In particular, two classes of smoothing methods are compared, smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and the induced spatial incoherence (ISI) method. It is found that SSD using sinusoidal phase modulation (FM) results in poor smoothing at low 1-modes and therefore inferior target performance at both peak velocity and ignition. This disparity is most notable if the effective imprinting integration time of the target is small. However, using SSD with more generalized phase modulation can result in smoothing at low l-modes which is identical to that obtained with ISI. For either smoothing method, the calculations indicate that at peak velocity the surface perturbations are about 100 times larger than that which leads to nonlinear hydrodynamics. Modeling of the hydrodynamic nonlinearity shows that saturation can reduce the amplified nonuniformities to the level required to achieve ignition for either smoothing method. The low l- mode behavior at ignition is found to be strongly dependent on the induced divergence of the smoothing method. For the NIF parameters the target performance asymptotes for smoothing divergence larger than {approximately}100 {mu}rad.

  18. Vacuum tube operation analysis under multi-harmonic driving and heavy beam loading effect in J-PARC RCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Nomura, M.; Shimada, T.; Tamura, F.; Hara, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Ohmori, C.; Toda, M.; Yoshii, M.; Schnase, A.

    2016-11-01

    An rf cavity in the J-PARC RCS not only covers the frequency range of a fundamental acceleration pattern but also generates multi-harmonic rf voltage because it has a broadband impedance. However, analyzing the vacuum tube operation in the case of multi-harmonics is very complicated because many variables must be solved in a self-consistent manner. We developed a method to analyze the vacuum tube operation using a well-known formula and which includes the dependence on anode current for some variables. The calculation method is verified with beam tests, and the results indicate that it is efficient under condition of multi-harmonics with a heavy beam loading effect.

  19. Investigation of nonthermal particle effects on ionization dynamics in high current density ion beam transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. K.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.; Moses, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Olson, C. L.; Welch, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Light ion inertial fusion experiments require the presence of a moderate density background gas in the transport region to provide charge and current neutralization for a high current density ion beam. In this article, we investigate the effects of nonthermal particles such as beam ions or non-Maxwellian electron distributions on the ionization dynamics of the background gas. In particular, we focus on the case of Li beams being transported in an argon gas. Nonthermal particles as well as thermal electrons are included in time-dependent collisional-radiative calculations to determine time-dependent atomic level populations and charge state distributions in a beam-produced plasma. We also briefly discuss the effects of beam ions and energetic electrons on the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral regions. It is found that the mean charge state of the gas, and hence the electron density, is significantly increased by collisions with energetic particles. This higher ionization significantly impacts the VUV spectral region, where numerous resonance lines occur. On the other hand, the visible spectrum tends to be less affected because the closely spaced excited states are populated by lower energy thermal electrons.

  20. Are Teens Driving Safer? Cross Currents Issue 4, October 2005. Publication # 2005-16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Pilar S.; Brown, Brett V.

    2005-01-01

    For many teens, learning to drive and obtaining a driver's license are exciting achievements,often allowing them more freedom to socialize, work at a job, or participate in other activities without being totally reliant on a parent or others for transportation. This brief provides an overview of relevant data including teen crash rates and trends,…

  1. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Boothe, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  2. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1996-01-23

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figs.

  3. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Boothe, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  4. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1994-02-15

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figures.

  5. Spatially-Resolved Beam Current and Charge-State Distributions for the NEXT Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, James E.; Diamant, Kevin D.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Plume characterization tests with the 36-cm NEXT ion engine are being performed at The Aerospace Corporation using engineering-model and prototype-model thrusters. We have examined the beam current density and xenon charge-state distribution as functions of position on the accel grid. To measure the current density ratio j++/j+, a collimated Eprobe was rotated through the plume with the probe oriented normal to the accel electrode surface at a distance of 82 cm. The beam current density jb versus radial position was measured with a miniature planar probe at 3 cm from the accel. Combining the j++/j+ and jb data yielded the ratio of total Xe+2 current to total Xe+1 current (J++/J+) at forty operating points in the standard throttle table. The production of Xe+2 and Xe+3 was measured as a function of propellant utilization to support performance and lifetime predictions for an extended throttle table. The angular dependence of jb was measured at intermediate and far-field distances to assist with plume modeling and to evaluate the thrust loss due to beam divergence. Thrust correction factors were derived from the total doubles-to-singles current ratio and from the far-field divergence data

  6. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10-3 mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  7. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  8. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, T. F.; Bonini, A. L.; Lima, R. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Malafronte, A. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Vanin, V. R.; Martins, M. N.

    2012-09-15

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  9. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Silva, T F; Bonini, A L; Lima, R R; Maidana, N L; Malafronte, A A; Pascholati, P R; Vanin, V R; Martins, M N

    2012-09-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  10. Calculations of Alfvén wave driving forces, plasma flow, and current drive in the Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén wave experiment in Brazil (TCABR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarante-Segundo, G.; Elfimov, A. G.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Ross, D. W.; Nascimento, I. C.

    2001-01-01

    The current and plasma flows driven by ponderomotive forces are calculated for tokamak plasmas, using a kinetic code in the Alfvén range of frequencies. The rf (radio frequency) ponderomotive force is expressed as a sum of a gradient part and of a wave momentum transfer force, which is proportional to wave dissipation (electron Landau damping and transit time magnetic pumping). Finally, the rf force is balanced by the viscous force in the fluid momentum response to the rf fields in the plasma. The relative magnitudes of the different forces for kinetic and global Alfvén waves with low phase velocities are explicitly calculated. It is shown that, dissipating in electrons, Alfvén waves can drive ion flow via the gradient force, which is dominated in m=0-sideband harmonic resonance induced by toroidal mode coupling. Estimates of power requirements to drive substantial poloidal flow in the Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén wave heating experiment in Brazil (TCABR) [L. Ruchko, M. C. Andrade, R. M. O. Galvão, Nucl. Fusion 30, 503 (1996)] are made.

  11. Lower hybrid current drive in experiments for transport barriers at high {beta}{sub N} of JET (Joint European Torus)

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R. C.; Castaldo, C.; De Angelis, R.; Smeulders, P.; Calabro, G.; Pericoli, V.; Ravera, G.

    2007-09-28

    LHCD has been used in JET experiments aimed at producing internal transport barriers (ITBs) in highly triangular plasmas ({delta}{approx_equal}0.4) at high {beta}{sub N} (up to 3) for steady-state application. The LHCD is a potentially valuable tool for (i) modifying the target q-profile, which can help avoid deleterious MHD modes and favour the formation of ITBs, and (ii) contributing to the non-inductive current drive required to prolong such plasma regimes. The q-profile evolution has been simulated during the current ramp-up phase for such a discharge (B{sub 0} = 2.3 T, I{sub P} = 1.5 MA) where 2 MW of LHCD has been coupled. The JETTO code was used taking measured plasma profiles, and the LHCD profile modeled by the LHstar code. The results are in agreement with MSE measurements and indicate the importance of the elevated electron temperature due to LHCD, as well as the driven current. During main heating with 18 MW of NBI and 3 MW of ICRH the bootstrap current density at the edge also becomes large, consistently with the observed reduction of the local turbulence and of the MHD activity. JETTO modelling suggests that the bootstrap current can reduce the magnetic shear (sh) at large radius, potentially affecting the MHD stability and turbulence behaviour in this region. Keywords: lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), bootstrap current, q (safety factor) and shear (sh) profile evolutions.

  12. Discharge current and current of supershort avalanche E-beam at volume nanosecond discharge in non-uniform electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Rybka, Dmitrii V.; Baksht, Evgenii H.; Kostyrya, Igor'D.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.

    2008-01-01

    The gas diode current-voltage characteristics at the voltage pulses applied from the RADAN and SM-3NS pulsers, and generation of an supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) have been studied experimentally in an inhomogeneous electric field upon a nanosecond breakdown in an air gap at atmospheric pressure. Displacement currents with amplitude over 1 kA have been observed and monitored. It is shown that the displacement current amplitude gets increased due to movement of the dense plasma front and charging of a "capacitor" formed between plasma and anode. The SAEB generation time relatively to the discharge current pulses and the gap voltage were determined in the experiments. It is shown that the SAEB current maximum at the pulser voltages of hundreds kV is registered on the discharge current pulse front, before the discharge current peak of the gas diode capacitance, and the delay time of these peaks is determined by the value of an interelectrode spacing. The delay time in case of a gap of 16 mm and air breakdown at atmospheric pressure was ~100 ps, and in case of 10 mm it was less than 50 ps.

  13. Improvements in the synthesis of highly focused ultrasonic beams using the negative-time part of the 0-order X-wave driving signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Luis; Ramos, Antonio; Calás, Hector; Bazán, Ivonne

    2015-05-01

    The classical 0-order X-wave is a limited-diffraction solution for the scalar wave equation and provides good beam focusing along a large depth, for instance, in high-resolution ultrasonic imaging. In this work, only the negative-time parts of 0-order X-waves are used like driving signals for a Bessel array in order to produce a highly focused acoustic field over a line. This approach maintains the advantages provided by the conventional 0-order X-waves, large depth of focused field with low lateral beam spreading, using only one emission shot. Some achievements obtained by using the proposed technique are a low energy and lower cost to drive the piezoelectric elements while maintaining a similar depth of field and beamwidth as those of the conventional method, a lower space extension of sidelobes, and easier control of the electrical driving system. Theoretical and experimental results support these hypotheses, and confirm the improvements obtained.

  14. Proton beam therapy: clinical utility and current status in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamoah, Kosj; Johnstone, Peter AS

    2016-01-01

    Proton beam therapy has recently become available to a broader population base. There remains much controversy about its routine use in prostate cancer. We provide an analysis of the existing literature regarding efficacy and toxicity of the technique. Currently, the use of proton beam therapy for prostate cancer is largely dependent on continued reimbursement for the practice. While there are potential benefits supporting the use of protons in prostate cancer, the low risk of toxicity using existing techniques and the high cost of protons contribute to lower the value of the technique. PMID:27695349

  15. Mapping of minority carrier lifetime distributions in multicrystalline silicon using transient electron-beam-induced current.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Takuya; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Morita, Chiaki; Tanji, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    We have used transient electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) to map minority carrier lifetime distributions in multicrystalline Silicon (mc-Si). In this technique, the electron beam from a scanning transmission electron microscope was on-off modulated while the sample was scanned. The resulting transient EBIC was analyzed to form a lifetime map. An analytical function was introduced as part of the analysis in determining this map. We have verified this approach using numerical simulations and have reproduced a lifetime map for an mc-Si wafer.

  16. Proton beam therapy: clinical utility and current status in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamoah, Kosj; Johnstone, Peter AS

    2016-01-01

    Proton beam therapy has recently become available to a broader population base. There remains much controversy about its routine use in prostate cancer. We provide an analysis of the existing literature regarding efficacy and toxicity of the technique. Currently, the use of proton beam therapy for prostate cancer is largely dependent on continued reimbursement for the practice. While there are potential benefits supporting the use of protons in prostate cancer, the low risk of toxicity using existing techniques and the high cost of protons contribute to lower the value of the technique.

  17. Analysis and measurements of Eddy current effects of a beam tube in a pulsed magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, S.

    1997-05-01

    The power supply design of the {gamma}{sub f} - jump system in FNAL Main Injector uses a resonant circuit. A critical design parameter is the ac losses of the beam tube in a pulsed quadrupole. This paper gives an analysis to this problem. An equivalent circuit model based on the impedance measurement was established. The measured and calculated losses are in agreement. Another effect of the eddy current is the distortion of the magnetic field inside the beam tube. A Morgan coil was used for field measurements up to 10 KHz. These results are presented in this paper.

  18. Electron beam induced current on carbon nanotubes measured through substrate electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. K.; Ahn, Y. H.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate substrate electron-beam-induced current (s-EBIC) measurements of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by measuring the current collected by the substrate electrode, which penetrates through the insulating oxide layer. We found that s-EBIC provided better image contrast than ordinary secondary electron imaging methods for locating SWNTs that are in contact with metal electrodes. The s-EBIC has been measured for different acceleration voltages and probe currents. We found that s-EBIC did not depend critically on the acceleration voltage when the e-beam irradiated an insulating layer as compared to the case when it irradiated metal electrodes. Importantly, s-EBIC signals were increased by more than 10%, when the SWNT part was irradiated, and this makes s-EBIC imaging a very useful tool for locating individual SWNTs efficiently.

  19. Measurements of beam pipe eddy current effects in Main Injector dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, D.G.C.; Bleadon, M.E.; Brown, B.C.; Glass, H.D.; Harding, D.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Sim, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    The dipole magnets for the proposed Main Injector project at Fermilab are designed to ramp to maximum field (1.7 T) at rates over 2.5 T/s. These ramp rates will produce eddy current effects which degrade overall field quality. A harmonics probe was constructed for the purpose of measuring eddy current field components during the ramp cycle. Three separate ramp rates were employed ranging from 1.3 T/s to 2.7 T/s. Tests were performed using beam pipes with two different resistivities. The dominant multipole contribution resulting from eddy current effects in each beam pipe was sextupole. The sextupole component closely matched the calculated prediction.

  20. High Accuracy Beam Current Monitor System for CEBAF'S Experimental Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    J. Denard; A. Saha; G. Lavessiere

    2001-07-01

    CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams to three experimental Halls. In Hall A, all experiments require continuous, non-invasive current measurements and a few experiments require an absolute accuracy of 0.2 % in the current range from 1 to 180 {micro}A. A Parametric Current Transformer (PCT), manufactured by Bergoz, has an accurate and stable sensitivity of 4 {micro}A/V but its offset drifts at the muA level over time preclude its direct use for continuous measurements. Two cavity monitors are calibrated against the PCT with at least 50 {micro}A of beam current. The calibration procedure suppresses the error due to PCT's offset drifts by turning the beam on and off, which is invasive to the experiment. One of the goals of the system is to minimize the calibration time without compromising the measurement's accuracy. The linearity of the cavity monitors is a critical parameter for transferring the accurate calibration done at high currents over the whole dynamic range. The method for measuring accurately the linearity is described.

  1. Issues concerning high current lower energy electron beams required for ion cooling between EBIS LINAC and booster

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2009-03-01

    Some issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that will be needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, are examined. Options for propagating such an electron beam, as well as the effect of neutralizing background plasma on electron and ion beam parameters are calculated. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper.

  2. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    SciTech Connect

    Ekedahl, Annika Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-10

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at I{sub P} = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at I{sub P} = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  3. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekedahl, Annika; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m2), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at IP = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at IP = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  4. A high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet and its beam emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zeen; Tan Xinjian; Du Hongxin; Luo Ben; Liu Zhanwen

    2008-07-15

    The progress of a 2.45 GHz high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet for T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction neutron generator is reported in this paper. At 600 W microwave power and 22 kV extraction voltage, 90 mA peak hydrogen ion beam is extracted from a single aperture of 6 mm diameter. The beam emittance is measured using a simplified pepper-pot method. The (x,x{sup '}) emittance and the (y,y{sup '}) emittance for 14 keV hydrogen ion beam are 55.3{pi} and 58.2{pi} mm mrad, respectively. The normalized emittances are 0.302{pi} and 0.317{pi} mm mrad, respectively.

  5. Electron beam induced current measurements on single-walled carbon nanotube devices.

    PubMed

    Park, J K; Ahn, Y H; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Soonil; Park, K H

    2010-03-19

    We report on electron beam induced current (EBIC) from individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which are in contact with metal electrodes. The EBIC signals originate from the diffusion of excess carriers induced by the electron beam bombardment. The EBIC image enables us to locate the individual CNTs efficiently. From the polarity of the EBIC signals we can identify the electrical contacts to the metal electrodes. More importantly, we demonstrate that the EBIC can be used to characterize the local electrical properties of CNT-based devices, such as asymmetry in metal contacts and the presence of defects. EBIC is also observed regardless of the presence of insulating surfaces, indicating that the EBIC is a result of the direct interaction between the CNTs and the electron beams.

  6. The detection of electron-beam-induced current in junctionless semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee Chin; Ong, Vincent K S

    2010-06-01

    The scanning electron microscope is a versatile tool and its electron beam techniques have been widely used in semiconductor material and device characterizations. One of these electron beam techniques is the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. One of the limitations of the conventional EBIC technique is that it requires charge collecting junctions which may not be readily available in junctionless samples such as bare substrates unless some special sample preparation procedure such as the fabrication of a diffused junction is done on the junctionless sample. In this paper, the technique of detecting EBIC current in junctionless samples with the use of a two-point probe is presented. It is found that the EBIC current is independent from its physical parameter when the sample thickness is greater than 4L; the width to the right of probe 2 and the width to the left of probe 1 are greater than 2L and 8L, respectively. The parameters affecting this technique of detecting the EBIC current such as the depth of the generation volume, probe spacing, and the applied bias are also discussed in this paper. A commercially available two-dimensional device simulator was used to verify this technique.

  7. A Framework for Applying Point Clouds Grabbed by Multi-Beam LIDAR in Perceiving the Driving Environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Liang, Huawei; Wang, Zhiling; Chen, Xiangcheng

    2015-08-31

    The quick and accurate understanding of the ambient environment, which is composed of road curbs, vehicles, pedestrians, etc., is critical for developing intelligent vehicles. The road elements included in this work are road curbs and dynamic road obstacles that directly affect the drivable area. A framework for the online modeling of the driving environment using a multi-beam LIDAR, i.e., a Velodyne HDL-64E LIDAR, which describes the 3D environment in the form of a point cloud, is reported in this article. First, ground segmentation is performed via multi-feature extraction of the raw data grabbed by the Velodyne LIDAR to satisfy the requirement of online environment modeling. Curbs and dynamic road obstacles are detected and tracked in different manners. Curves are fitted for curb points, and points are clustered into bundles whose form and kinematics parameters are calculated. The Kalman filter is used to track dynamic obstacles, whereas the snake model is employed for curbs. Results indicate that the proposed framework is robust under various environments and satisfies the requirements for online processing.

  8. A Framework for Applying Point Clouds Grabbed by Multi-Beam LIDAR in Perceiving the Driving Environment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Liang, Huawei; Wang, Zhiling; Chen, Xiangcheng

    2015-01-01

    The quick and accurate understanding of the ambient environment, which is composed of road curbs, vehicles, pedestrians, etc., is critical for developing intelligent vehicles. The road elements included in this work are road curbs and dynamic road obstacles that directly affect the drivable area. A framework for the online modeling of the driving environment using a multi-beam LIDAR, i.e., a Velodyne HDL-64E LIDAR, which describes the 3D environment in the form of a point cloud, is reported in this article. First, ground segmentation is performed via multi-feature extraction of the raw data grabbed by the Velodyne LIDAR to satisfy the requirement of online environment modeling. Curbs and dynamic road obstacles are detected and tracked in different manners. Curves are fitted for curb points, and points are clustered into bundles whose form and kinematics parameters are calculated. The Kalman filter is used to track dynamic obstacles, whereas the snake model is employed for curbs. Results indicate that the proposed framework is robust under various environments and satisfies the requirements for online processing. PMID:26404290

  9. Reduction of beam current noise in the FNAL magnetron ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S. Karns, P. R. Tan, C. Y.

    2015-04-08

    The new FNAL Injector Line with a circular dimple magnetron ion source has been operational since December of 2012. Since the new injector came on line there have been variations in the H- beam current flattop observed near the downstream end of the Linac. Several different cathode geometries including a hollow cathode suggested by Dudnikov [1] were tried. Previous studies also showed that different mixtures of hydrogen and nitrogen had an effect on beam current noise [2]. We expanded on those studies by trying mixtures ranging from (0.25% nitrogen, 99.75% hydrogen) to (3% nitrogen, 97% hydrogen). The results of these studies in our test stand will be presented in this paper.

  10. Microplastic deformation of polycrystalline iron and molybdenum subjected to high-current electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, E. F.; Pochivalova, G. P.; Proskurovskii, D. I.; Rotshtein, V. P.; Markov, A. B.

    1996-03-01

    A technique for determination of residual stresses at various distances from the irradiated surface is proposed. It is established for iron and molybdenum that compressive stresses are set up under irradiation by low-energy high-current electron beams and that their values decrease sharply with increasing distance from the surface. The residual stresses are much smaller in absolute magnitude than those operating during irradiation. It is shown that the change in resistance to microplastic deformation on irradiation with low-energy high-current electron beams is governed not only by formation of a gradient dislocation substructure in the surface layer, but also by the residual stresses and the appearance of the Bauschinger effect.

  11. Beam optics of a 10-cm diameter high current heavy ion diode

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.; Vay, J.L.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Halaxa, E.; Westenskow, G.; Haber, I.

    2003-05-01

    Typically a large diameter surface ionization source is used to produce > 0.5 A K{sup +} current with emittance < 1 {pi}-mm-mrad for heavy ion fusion experiments. So far we have observed aberrations that are slightly different from those predicted by computer simulations. We have now set up an experiment to study in detail the beam optics of such a large diameter ion diode and to benchmark the simulation code.

  12. Charged current disappearance measurements in the NuMI off-axis beam

    SciTech Connect

    R. H. Bernstein

    2003-09-25

    This article studies the potential of combining charged-current disappearance measurements of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} from MINOS and an off-axis beam. The author finds that the error on {Delta}m{sup 2} from a 100 kt-yr off-axis measurement is a few percent of itself. Further, the author found little improvement to an off-axis measurement by combining it with MINOS.

  13. Experiments on current-driven three-dimensional ion sound turbulence. I - Return-current limited electron beam injection. II - Wave dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Pulsed electron beam injection into a weakly collisional magnetized background plasma is investigated experimentally; properties of the electron beam and background plasma, as well as the low-frequency instabilities and wave dynamics, are discussed. The current of the injected beam closes via a field-aligned return current of background electrons. Through study of the frequency and wavenumber distribution, together with the electron distribution function, the low-frequency instabilities associated with the pulsed injection are identified as ion acoustic waves driven unstable by the return current. The frequency cut-off of the instabilities predicted from renormalized plasma turbulence theory, has been verified experimentally.

  14. Open-loop correction for an eddy current dominated beam-switching magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Koseki, K. Nakayama, H.; Tawada, M.

    2014-04-15

    A beam-switching magnet and the pulsed power supply it requires have been developed for the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. To switch bunched proton beams, the dipole magnetic field must reach its maximum value within 40 ms. In addition, the field flatness should be less than 5 × 10{sup −4} to guide each bunched beam to the designed orbit. From a magnetic field measurement by using a long search coil, it was found that an eddy current in the thick endplates and laminated core disturbs the rise of the magnetic field. The eddy current also deteriorates the field flatness over the required flat-top period. The measured field flatness was 5 × 10{sup −3}. By using a double-exponential equation to approximate the measured magnetic field, a compensation pattern for the eddy current was calculated. The integrated magnetic field was measured while using the newly developed open-loop compensation system. A field flatness of less than 5 × 10{sup −4}, which is an acceptable value, was achieved.

  15. Open-loop correction for an eddy current dominated beam-switching magnet.

    PubMed

    Koseki, K; Nakayama, H; Tawada, M

    2014-04-01

    A beam-switching magnet and the pulsed power supply it requires have been developed for the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. To switch bunched proton beams, the dipole magnetic field must reach its maximum value within 40 ms. In addition, the field flatness should be less than 5 × 10(-4) to guide each bunched beam to the designed orbit. From a magnetic field measurement by using a long search coil, it was found that an eddy current in the thick endplates and laminated core disturbs the rise of the magnetic field. The eddy current also deteriorates the field flatness over the required flat-top period. The measured field flatness was 5 × 10(-3). By using a double-exponential equation to approximate the measured magnetic field, a compensation pattern for the eddy current was calculated. The integrated magnetic field was measured while using the newly developed open-loop compensation system. A field flatness of less than 5 × 10(-4), which is an acceptable value, was achieved.

  16. Open-loop correction for an eddy current dominated beam-switching magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, K.; Nakayama, H.; Tawada, M.

    2014-04-01

    A beam-switching magnet and the pulsed power supply it requires have been developed for the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. To switch bunched proton beams, the dipole magnetic field must reach its maximum value within 40 ms. In addition, the field flatness should be less than 5 × 10-4 to guide each bunched beam to the designed orbit. From a magnetic field measurement by using a long search coil, it was found that an eddy current in the thick endplates and laminated core disturbs the rise of the magnetic field. The eddy current also deteriorates the field flatness over the required flat-top period. The measured field flatness was 5 × 10-3. By using a double-exponential equation to approximate the measured magnetic field, a compensation pattern for the eddy current was calculated. The integrated magnetic field was measured while using the newly developed open-loop compensation system. A field flatness of less than 5 × 10-4, which is an acceptable value, was achieved.

  17. High-power Čerenkov microwave oscillators utilizing High-Current nanosecond Electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, S. D.; Polevin, S. D.; Rostov, V. V.

    1996-12-01

    A short review is given of results obtained at the Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences on generating high-power microwave radiation. Most of the research was devoted to a study of stimulated Čerenkov radiation from relativistic electron beams. It is shown that the efficiency of a relativistic 3-cm backward wave tube with a nonuniform coupling resistance can reach 35%. High-frequency radiation was discovered in the emission spectrum of the Čerenkov oscillators and it was shown that the nature of the radiation was associated with the stimulated scattering of low-frequency radiation by the relativistic electrons. Radiation with a power of 500 MW was obtained in the 8-mm wavelength range using a two-beam Čerenkov oscillator. High-current pulse-periodic nanosecond accelerators with a charging device utilizing a Tesla transformer were used in the experiments. The possibility was demonstrated of generating high-power microwave radiation with a pulse-repetition frequency of up to 100 Hz. An average power of ˜500 W was achieved from the relativistic oscillators. A relativistic backward wave tube with a high-current electron beam was used to make a prototype nanosecond radar device. Some of the results presented were obtained jointly with the Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Applied Physics. Questions concerning multiwave Čerenkov interaction are not considered in this paper.

  18. Investigation of lower hybrid wave coupling and current drive experiments at different configurations in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Qin, Y. L.; Li, W. K.; Li, M. H.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Hu, H. C.; Xu, G. S.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Group, EAST

    2011-08-01

    Using a 2 MW 2.45 GHz lower hybrid wave (LHW) system installed in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak, we have systematically carried out LHW-plasma coupling and lower hybrid current drive experiments in both divertor (double null and lower single null) and limiter plasma configuration with plasma current (Ip) ˜ 250 kA and central line averaged density (ne) ˜ 1.0-1.3 × 1019 m-3 recently. Results show that the reflection coefficient (RC) first is flat up to some distance between plasma and LHW grill, and then increases with the distance. Studies indicate that with the same plasma parameters, the best coupling is obtained in the limiter case (with plasma leaning on the inner wall), followed by the lower single null, and the one with the worst coupling is the double null configuration, explained by different magnetic connection length. The RCs in the different poloidal rows show that they have different coupling characteristics, possibly due to local magnetic connection length. Current drive efficiency has been investigated by a least squares fit with N//peak=2.1, where N//peak is the peak value of parallel refractive index of the launched wave. Results show that there is no obvious difference in the current drive efficiency between double null and lower single null cases, whereas the efficiency is somewhat small in the limiter configuration. This is in agreement with the ray tracing/Fokker-Planck code simulation by LUKE/C3PO and can be interpreted by the power spectrum up-shift factor in different plasma configurations. A transformer recharge is realized with ˜0.8 MW LHW power and the energy conversion efficiency from LHW to poloidal field energy is about 2%.

  19. Comparison of the theory and the practice of rf current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.; Jobes, F.C.

    1984-10-01

    The theory of rf-driven plasma currents is applied to the lower-hybrid experiments on the PLT tokamak. Particular emphasis is placed on those experiments in which the plasma current was varying. The comparison between theory and experiment is made with respect to the efficiency with which rf energy was converted to poloidal magnetic field energy. Good agreement is found irrespective of whether the current was increasing, constant, or decreasing.

  20. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1987-12-01

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1 to 5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, has been consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approximately 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser type cathodes.

  1. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Saini, A.; Solyak, N.; Yostrikov, A.

    2012-09-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  2. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, Alexander; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Gonin, Ivan; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Lunin, Andrei; Saini, Arun; Solyak, Nikolay; Vostrikov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  3. Persistent Sodium Current Drives Conditional Pacemaking in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons under Muscarinic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are normally quiescent but can fire spontaneously when stimulated by muscarinic agonists. In brain slice recordings from mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, we examined the ionic basis of this activity using interleaved current-clamp and voltage-clamp experiments. Both in control and after muscarinic stimulation, the steady-state current–voltage curve was dominated by inward TTX-sensitive persistent sodium current (INaP) that activated near −75 mV and increased steeply with depolarization. In control, total membrane current was net outward (hyperpolarizing) near −70 mV so that cells had a stable resting potential. Muscarinic stimulation activated a small nonselective cation current so that total membrane current near −70 mV shifted to become barely net inward (depolarizing). The small depolarization triggers regenerative activation of INaP, which then depolarizes the cell from −70 mV to spike threshold. We quantified the relative contributions of INaP, hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), and calcium current to pacemaking by using the cell's own firing as a voltage command along with specific blockers. TTX-sensitive sodium current was substantial throughout the entire interspike interval, increasing as the membrane potential approached threshold, while both Ih and calcium current were minimal. Thus, spontaneous activity is driven primarily by activation of INaP in a positive feedback loop starting near −70 mV and providing increasing inward current to threshold. These results show that the pacemaking “engine” from INaP is an inherent property of CA1 pyramidal neurons that can be engaged or disengaged by small shifts in net membrane current near −70 mV, as by muscarinic stimulation. PMID:24048831

  4. Amplification of current density modulation in a FEL with an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.D.

    2011-03-28

    We show that the paraxial field equation for a free electron laser (FEL) in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-2 energy distribution can be reduced to a fourth ordinary differential equation (ODE). Its solution for arbitrary initial phase space density modulation has been derived in the wave-vector domain. For initial current modulation with Gaussian profile, close form solutions are obtained in space-time domain. In developing an analytical model for a FEL-based coherent electron cooling system, an infinite electron beam has been assumed for the modulation and correction processes. While the assumption has its limitation, it allows for an analytical close form solution to be obtained, which is essential for investigating the underlying scaling law, benchmarking the simulation codes and understanding the fundamental physics. 1D theory was previously applied to model a CeC FEL amplifier. However, the theory ignores diffraction effects and does not provide the transverse profile of the amplified electron density modulation. On the other hand, 3D theories developed for a finite electron beam usually have solutions expanded over infinite number of modes determined by the specific transverse boundary conditions. Unless the mode with the largest growth rate substantially dominates other modes, both evaluation and extracting scaling laws can be complicated. Furthermore, it is also preferable to have an analytical FEL model with assumptions consistent with the other two sections of a CeC system. Recently, we developed the FEL theory in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-1 (Lorentzian) energy distribution. Close form solutions have been obtained for the amplified current modulation initiated by an external electric field with various spatial-profiles. In this work, we extend the theory into {kappa}-2 energy distribution and study the evolution of current density induced by an initial density modulation.

  5. Measurement of inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Alcaraz-Aunion, J. L.; Brice, S. J.; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Cheng, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dore, U.; Finley, D. A.; Franke, A. J.; Giganti, C.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Guzowski, P.; Hanson, A.; Hayato, Y.; Hiraide, K.; Jover-Manas, G.; Karagiorgi, G.; Katori, T.; Kobayashi, Y. K.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kubo, H.; Kurimoto, Y.; Louis, W. C.; Loverre, P. F.; Ludovici, L.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mariani, C.; Masuike, S.; Matsuoka, K.; McGary, V. T.; Metcalf, W.; Mills, G. B.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyachi, Y.; Mizugashira, S.; Moore, C. D.; Nakaya, T.; Napora, R.; Nienaber, P.; Orme, D.; Otani, M.; Russell, A. D.; Sanchez, F.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shibata, T.-A.; Sorel, M.; Stefanski, R. J.; Takei, H.; Tanaka, H.-K.; Tanaka, M.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, I. J.; Tesarek, R. J.; Uchida, Y.; van de Water, R.; Walding, J. J.; Wascko, M. O.; White, H. B.; Yokoyama, M.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of inclusive charged current interactions of muon neutrinos on carbon with an average energy of 0.8 GeV using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. We compare our measurement with two neutrino interaction simulations: NEUT and NUANCE. The charged current interaction rates (product of flux and cross section) are extracted by fitting the muon kinematics, with a precision of 6%-15% for the energy dependent and 3% for the energy integrated analyses. We also extract charged current inclusive interaction cross sections from the observed rates, with a precision of 10%-30% for the energy dependent and 8% for the energy integrated analyses. This is the first measurement of the charged current inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. These results can be used to convert previous SciBooNE cross-section ratio measurements to absolute cross-section values.

  6. Investigations of LHW-plasma coupling and current drive at high density related to H-mode experiments in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, L.; Li, M. H.; Wei, W.; Kong, E. H.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Wang, S. L.; Xu, G. S.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Yang, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, H. L.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Goniche, M.; Amicucci, L.; Cesario, R.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Baek, S. G.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Paoletti, F.; Yang, C.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; the EAST Team

    2015-09-01

    Two important issues in achieving lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) high confinement plasma in EAST are to improve lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling and to drive the plasma current at a high density. Studies in different configurations with different directions of toroidal magnetic field (Bt) show that the density near the antenna is affected by both the radial electric field induced by plasma without a LHW (Er_plasma) in the scrape off layer (SOL), and the radial electric field induced by LHW power (Er_LH) near the grill. Investigations indicate that Er  ×  Bt in the SOL leads to a different effect of configuration on the LHW-plasma coupling and Er_LH  ×  Bt accounts for the asymmetric density behaviour in the SOL observed in the experiments, where Er is the total radial electric field in the SOL. Modelling of parametric instability (PI), collisional absorption (CA) and scattering from density fluctuations (SDF) in the edge region, performed considering the parameters of high density LHCD experiments in EAST, has shown that these mechanisms could be responsible for the low current drive (CD) efficiency at high density. Radiofrequency probe spectra, useful for documenting PI occurrence, show sidebands whose amplitude in the case of the lithiated vacuum chamber is smaller than in the case of poor lithiation, consistently with growth rates from PI modeling of the respective reference discharges. Since strong lithiation is also expected to diminish the parasitic effect on the LHCD of the remaining possible mechanisms, this appears to be a useful method for improving LHCD efficiency at a high density.

  7. On radio frequency current drive in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in DEMO and large ignited plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Marco; Bilato, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    To explore the possibility of efficient fast wave current drive in an ignited plasma in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequency in spite of competition from absorption by ions, we have added to the full-wave toroidal code TORIC a set of subroutines which evaluate absorption by these particles at IC harmonic resonances, using a realistic ‘slowing-down’ distribution function, and taking into account that their Larmor radius is comparable or even larger than the fast wave wavelength. The thermalized population of α-particles is not a serious competitor for power absorption as long as their number density is compatible with maintenance of ignition. By contrast, the energetic slowing down fraction, in spite of its even greater dilution, can absorb from the waves a substantial amount of power at the cyclotron resonance and its harmonics. An extensive exploration both in frequency and in toroidal wavenumbers using the parameters of one of the European versions of DEMO shows that three frequency windows exist in which damping is nevertheless predominantly on the electrons. Designing an antenna capable of shaping the launched spectrum to optimize current drive, however, will not be straightforward. Only in a narrow range when the first IC harmonic of tritium is deep inside the plasma on the high-field side of the magnetic axis, and that of deuterium and helium is still outside on the low-field side, it appears possible to achieve a satisfactory current drive efficiency with a conventional multi-strap antenna, preferentially located in the upper part of the vessel. Exploiting the other two windows at quite low and quite high frequencies is either impossible on first principles, or will demand novel ideas in antenna design.

  8. COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; LAHAYE,LA; LUCE,TC; HUMPHREYS,DA; HYATT,AW; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ; WADE,MR

    2003-03-01

    A271 COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. The first suppression of the important and deleterious m=2/n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is reported using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to replace the ''missing'' bootstrap current in the island O-point. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak verify the maximum shrinkage of the m=2/n=1 island occurs when the ECCD location coincides with the q = 2 surface. The DIII-D plasma control system is put into search and suppress mode to make small changes in the toroidal field to find and lock onto the optimum position, based on real time measurements of dB{sub {theta}}/dt, for complete m=2/n=1 NTM suppression by ECCD. The requirements on the ECCD for complete island suppression are well modeled by the modified Rutherford equation for the DIII-D plasma conditions.

  9. Electrical trimming of ion-beam-sputtered polysilicon resistors by high current pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Soumen; Lahiri, Samir K.

    1994-08-01

    Phosphorus doped polysilicon resistors have been fabricated from microcrystalline silicon films which were deposited by ion beam sputtering using an argon ion beam of diameter 3 cm, energy 1 keV and current density 7mA/cm(sup 2), with a deposition rate of 100-120 angstrom/min. The resistors, having a sheet resistance of 70 Omega /square and a carrier concentration of 7.5 x 10(sup 19)cm(sup - 3), were stressed with current pulses of width 10 mu s and duty cycle 0.6% for 5 min. There was a steady decrease of resistance with increasing pulse current density above a threshold value 5 x 10(sup 5)A/cm(sup 2). A maximum fall of 27% was observed for a 95 micron long resistor. The current-voltage characteristics were also recorded during the trimming process. The trimming characteristics were simulated using a small-signal resistivity model of Lu et al. (11) and the I-V characteristics by a large-bias conduction model (12) . A close fitting of the experimental data with the theoretical values needed an adjustment of some grain boundary parameters for the different pulse current densities used for stressing. The nature of variation of the grain boundary parameters indicates that the rapid Joule heating of the grain boundaries due to current pulses passivates the grain boundary interfaces, at lower currents above the threshold, and then, at higher values of currents, causes zone melting and gradual recrystallization of the disordered boundary layers and subsequent dopant segregation. It confirms the mechanism suggested in the physical model of Kato et al. (7) . The role played by the field-enhanced diffusivity and electromigration of dopant ions, due to the high instantaneous temperature of the grain boundaries, has also been discussed. The pulse trimming technique is simple and does not cause damage to the adjacent components on a monolithic chip.

  10. Flux Generation and Sustainment of a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) with Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slough, John

    1999-11-01

    The FRC is a unique closed field line configuration where the only confining field is the poloidal field generated by purely diamagnetic currents. With no transformer, the FRC could previously be observed only during decay. The confinement observed however showed encouraging transport and stability.(J.T. Slough et al. Phys. Plasmas 2, 2286 (1995).) Blevin and Thonemann(H.A. Blevin and P.C. Thonemann, Nucl. Fusion Suppl., Part I, 55 (1962).) first demonstrated current drive in a solenoidal magnetic field using a RMF. However in these and experiments at Flinders, the RMF was on the order or larger than the poloidal field generated, and the plasma was wall supported. For RMF current drive to be fusion relevant, the poloidal field generated >> the RMF, and the FRC separatrix must be in vacuum. Both of these requirements have been addressed and met in experiments in the recently constructed STX experiment. To generate the much larger diamagnetic currents, a much larger antenna was constructed (Ra = 0.35 m, and La = 2 m). To produce a 20 G RMF field at 350 kHz (> ion but >> electron gyrofrequency), a circulating power 50 MW was needed. This was accomplished by incorporating the antenna in high Q, LC tank circuit, powered through a step-up transformer, and driven by a solid-state switched power supply, which could deliver >2 MW of ohmic power to the plasma. At 20 G, the RMF generated a magnetic reversal of 400 G. The RMF was not observed to penetrate more than a few cm inside the FRC at any time. The increasing flux generated by the RMF changes the FRC equilibrium and these dynamical effects appear to cause the RMF to be pushed further out radially with reduced current drive efficiency. These edge currents sustained the FRC energy, but the closed flux was still observed to decay, although at a much-reduced rate. Careful control of the external field, as well as the proper match of driven current to the equilibrium FRC will be needed for long-term sustainment. The

  11. Development of a universal serial bus interface circuit for ion beam current integrators.

    PubMed

    Suresh, K; Panigrahi, B K; Nair, K G M

    2007-08-01

    A universal serial bus (USB) interface circuit has been developed to enable easy interfacing of commercial as well as custom-built ion beam current integrators to personal computer (PC) based automated experimental setups. Built using the popular PIC16F877A reduced instruction set computer and a USB-universal asynchronous receiver-transmitter/first in, first out controller, DLP2232, this USB interface circuit virtually emulates the ion beam current integrators on a host PC and uses USB 2.0 protocol to implement high speed bidirectional data transfer. Using this interface, many tedious and labor intensive ion beam irradiation and characterization experiments can be redesigned into PC based automated ones with advantages of improved accuracy, rapidity, and ease of use and control. This interface circuit was successfully used in carrying out online in situ resistivity measurement of 70 keV O(+) ion irradiated tin thin films using four probe method. In situ electrical resistance measurement showed the formation of SnO(2) phase during ion implantation.

  12. Development of a universal serial bus interface circuit for ion beam current integrators.

    PubMed

    Suresh, K; Panigrahi, B K; Nair, K G M

    2007-08-01

    A universal serial bus (USB) interface circuit has been developed to enable easy interfacing of commercial as well as custom-built ion beam current integrators to personal computer (PC) based automated experimental setups. Built using the popular PIC16F877A reduced instruction set computer and a USB-universal asynchronous receiver-transmitter/first in, first out controller, DLP2232, this USB interface circuit virtually emulates the ion beam current integrators on a host PC and uses USB 2.0 protocol to implement high speed bidirectional data transfer. Using this interface, many tedious and labor intensive ion beam irradiation and characterization experiments can be redesigned into PC based automated ones with advantages of improved accuracy, rapidity, and ease of use and control. This interface circuit was successfully used in carrying out online in situ resistivity measurement of 70 keV O(+) ion irradiated tin thin films using four probe method. In situ electrical resistance measurement showed the formation of SnO(2) phase during ion implantation. PMID:17764373

  13. Scalability of the drain-current drive of AlGaN/GaN HFETs with gate-length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikder, Md Jahirul; Valizadeh, Pouya

    2013-11-01

    The scaling-trend of the current-drive of AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure Field Effect Transistors (HFETs) with gate-length is studied with the application of a realistic steady-state drift transport characteristics and an approximate purely-saturating drift transport characteristics. Findings show that due to an overwhelming presence of a region of negative differential mobility in the transport characteristics of GaN, a scaling-trend different from the one observed in mainstream silicon MOSFETs should be expected for AlGaN/GaN HFETs. The role of improvement in Ohmic contact technology on this scaling trend is also investigated.

  14. Effect of resonant-to-bulk electron momentum transfer on the efficiency of electron-cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Y.; Smith, G.R.; Cohen, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Efficiency of current drive by electron-cyclotron waves is investigated numerically by a bounce-average Fokker-Planck code to elucidate the effects of momentum transfer from resonant to bulk electrons, finite bulk temperature relative to the energy of resonant electrons, and trapped electrons. Comparisons are made with existing theories to assess their validity and quantitative difference between theory and code results. Difference of nearly a factor of 2 was found in efficiency between some theory and code results. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas M; Lapierre, Alain; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg

    2014-07-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r(80%) = (212 ± 19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm(2) is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments. PMID:25085129

  16. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas M; Lapierre, Alain; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg

    2014-07-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r(80%) = (212 ± 19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm(2) is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  17. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Thomas M. Lapierre, Alain Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg

    2014-07-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r{sub 80%}=(212±19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm{sup 2} is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  18. Current-Sensing and Voltage-Feedback Driving Method for Large-Area High-Resolution Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Hai‑Jung; Choi, Byong‑Deok; Chung, Ho‑Kyoon; Kwon, Oh‑Kyong

    2006-05-01

    There is the problem of picture quality nonuniformity due to thin film transistor (TFT) characteristic variations throughout a panel of large-area high-resolution active matrix organic light emitting diodes. The current programming method could solve this issue, but it also requires very long charging time of a data line at low gray shades. Therefore, we propose a new driving method and a pixel circuit with emission-current sensing and feedback operation in order to resolve these problems. The proposed driving method and pixel circuit successfully compensate threshold voltage and mobility variations of TFTs and overcome the data line charging problem. Simulation results show that emission current deviations of the proposed driving method are less than 1.7% with ± 10.0% mobility and ± 0.3 V threshold voltage variations of pixel-driving TFTs, which means the proposed driving method is applicable to large-area high-resolution applications.

  19. Measurements of beam current density and proton fraction of a permanent-magnet microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2011-11-15

    A permanent-magnet microwave ion source has been built for use in a high-yield, compact neutron generator. The source has been designed to produce up to 100 mA of deuterium and tritium ions. The electron-cyclotron resonance condition is met at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz and a magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT. The source operates at a low hydrogen gas pressure of about 0.15 Pa. Hydrogen beams with a current density of 40 mA/cm{sup 2} have been extracted at a microwave power of 450 W. The dependence of the extracted proton beam fraction on wall materials and operating parameters was measured and found to vary from 45% for steel to 95% for boron nitride as a wall liner material.

  20. Investigations on CMOS photodiodes using scanning electron microscopy with electron beam induced current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraxner, A.; Roger, F.; Loeffler, B.; Faccinelli, M.; Kirnstoetter, S.; Minixhofer, R.; Hadley, P.

    2014-09-01

    In this work the characterization of CMOS diodes with Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) measurements in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) are presented. Three-dimensional Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulations of the EBIC measurement were performed for the first time to help interpret the experimental results. The TCAD simulations provide direct access to the spatial distribution of physical quantities (like mobility, lifetime etc.) which are very difficult to obtain experimentally. For the calibration of the simulation to the experiments, special designs of vertical p-n diodes were fabricated. These structures were investigated with respect to doping concentration, beam energy, and biasing. A strong influence of the surface preparation on the measurements and the extracted diffusion lengths are shown.

  1. Advanced semiconductor diagnosis by multidimensional electron-beam-induced current technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Yuan, X; Sekiguchi, T

    2008-01-01

    We present advanced semiconductor diagnosis by using electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. By varying the parameters such as temperature, accelerating voltage (V(acc)), bias voltage, and stressing time, it is possible to extend EBIC application from conventional defect characterization to advanced device diagnosis. As an electron beam can excite a certain volume even beneath the surface passive layer, EBIC can be effectively employed to diagnose complicated devices with hybrid structure. Three topics were selected to demonstrate EBIC applications. First, the recombination activities of grain boundaries and their interaction with Fe impurity in photovoltaic multicrystalline Si (mc-Si) are clarified by temperature-dependent EBIC. Second, the detection of dislocations between strained-Si and SiGe virtual substrate are shown to overcome the limitation of depletion region. Third, the observation of leakage sites in high-k gate dielectric is demonstrated for the characterization of advanced hybrid device structures.

  2. Basic Concepts in Opioid Prescribing and Current Concepts of Opioid-Mediated Effects on Driving

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan D.; Lofton, Elise C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic pain receive substandard analgesic therapy. Incomplete or inadequate care often stems from physician fears of patient addiction and/or drug toxicity. As a result, many chronic pain patients are undertreated and have unrelieved pain that tempts them to overuse or to abuse prescribed pharmacologic treatments. In the last few years, educational efforts have targeted physicians who treat chronic, nonmalignant pain with information to improve prescribing strategies and to appreciate side effects. Additionally, opioid prescribing guidelines and educational programs, including World Health Organization-published guidelines for the management of cancer pain in 1986 and the American Pain Society's promotion of pain as the 5th vital sign, have increased the propensity of pharmacists, physicians, and pain specialists to dispense pain treatments. Methods Controversial and evolving consequences from this explosion of prescription opioid use have emerged and are discussed in this review, including prescribing principles, opioid analgesic side effects, and driving concerns. Conclusion With additional appreciation for the untoward effects of chronic analgesia and a better understanding of opioid pharmacology, physicians can utilize pain management treatments in a safer and more effective manner. PMID:24358001

  3. Dynamics of Dirac strings and monopolelike excitations in chiral magnets under a current drive

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Shi -Zeng; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-02-10

    Skyrmion lines in metallic chiral magnets carry an emergent magnetic field experienced by the conduction electrons. The inflow and outflow of this field across a closed surface is not necessarily equal, thus it allows for the existence of emergent monopoles. One example is a segment of skyrmion line inside a crystal, where a monopole and antimonopole pair is connected by the emergent magnetic flux line. This is a realization of Dirac stringlike excitations. Here we study the dynamics of monopoles in chiral magnets under an electric current. We show that in the process of creation of skyrmion lines, skyrmion linemore » segments are first created via the proliferation of monopoles and antimonopoles. Then these line segments join and span the whole system through the annihilation of monopoles. The skyrmion lines are destroyed via the proliferation of monopoles and antimonopoles at high currents, resulting in a chiral liquid phase. We also propose to create the monopoles in a controlled way by applying an inhomogeneous current to a crystal. Remarkably, an electric field component in the magnetic field direction proportional to the current squared in the low current region is induced by the motion of distorted skyrmion lines, in addition to the Hall and longitudinal voltage. As a result, the existence of monopoles can be inferred from transport or imaging measurements.« less

  4. High-Speed Current dq PI Controller for Vector Controlled PMSM Drive

    PubMed Central

    Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Chang, Tae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    High-speed current controller for vector controlled permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is presented. The controller is developed based on modular design for faster calculation and uses fixed-point proportional-integral (PI) method for improved accuracy. Current dq controller is usually implemented in digital signal processor (DSP) based computer. However, DSP based solutions are reaching their physical limits, which are few microseconds. Besides, digital solutions suffer from high implementation cost. In this research, the overall controller is realizing in field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGA implementation of the overall controlling algorithm will certainly trim down the execution time significantly to guarantee the steadiness of the motor. Agilent 16821A Logic Analyzer is employed to validate the result of the implemented design in FPGA. Experimental results indicate that the proposed current dq PI controller needs only 50 ns of execution time in 40 MHz clock, which is the lowest computational cycle for the era. PMID:24574913

  5. Current harmonics elimination control method for six-phase PM synchronous motor drives.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Chen, Ming-liang; Shen, Jian-qing; Xiao, Fei

    2015-11-01

    To reduce the undesired 5th and 7th stator harmonic current in the six-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM), an improved vector control algorithm was proposed based on vector space decomposition (VSD) transformation method, which can control the fundamental and harmonic subspace separately. To improve the traditional VSD technology, a novel synchronous rotating coordinate transformation matrix was presented in this paper, and only using the traditional PI controller in d-q subspace can meet the non-static difference adjustment, the controller parameter design method is given by employing internal model principle. Moreover, the current PI controller parallel with resonant controller is employed in x-y subspace to realize the specific 5th and 7th harmonic component compensation. In addition, a new six-phase SVPWM algorithm based on VSD transformation theory is also proposed. Simulation and experimental results verify the effectiveness of current decoupling vector controller.

  6. Polar-Direct-Drive Experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk

    2006-06-28

    Polar direct drive (PDD), a promising ignition path for the NIF while the beams are in the indirect-drive configuration, is currently being investigated on the OMEGA laser system by using 40 beams in six rings repointed to more uniformly illuminate the target. The OMEGA experiments are being performed with standard, “warm” targets with and without the use of an equatorial “Saturn-like” toroidally shaped CH ring. Target implosion symmetry is diagnosed with framed x-ray backlighting using additional OMEGA beams and by time-integrated x-ray imaging of the stagnating core.

  7. Nonlinear MHD simulation of current drive by multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi; Kagei, Yasuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of structures of magnetic field, current density, and plasma flow generated during multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus is investigated by 3-D nonlinear MHD simulations. During the driven phase, the flux and current amplifications occur due to the merging and magnetic reconnection between the preexisting plasma in the confinement region and the ejected plasma from the gun region involving the n = 1 helical kink distortion of the central open flux column (COFC). Interestingly, the diamagnetic poloidal flow which tends toward the gun region is then observed due to the steep pressure gradients of the COFC generated by ohmic heating through an injection current winding around the inboard field lines, resulting in the formation of the strong poloidal flow shear at the interface between the COFC and the core region. This result is consistent with the flow shear observed in the HIST. During the decay phase, the configuration approaches the axisymmetric MHD equilibrium state without flow because of the dissipation of magnetic fluctuation energy to increase the closed flux surfaces, suggesting the generation of ordered magnetic field structure. The parallel current density λ concentrated in the COFC then diffuses to the core region so as to reduce the gradient in λ, relaxing in the direction of the Taylor state.

  8. Alfven resonance mode conversion in the Phaedrus-T current drive experiments: Modelling and density fluctuations measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, M.; Harper, M.; Breun, R.; Wukitch, S.

    1995-12-31

    Current drive experiments on the Phaedrus-T tokamak performed with a low field side two-strap fast wave antenna at frequencies below {omega}{sub cH} show loop volt drops of up to 30% with strap phasing (0, {pi}/2). RF induced density fluctuations in the plasma core have also been observed with a microwave reflectometer. It is believed that they are caused by kinetic Alfven waves generated by mode conversion of fast waves at the Alfven resonance. Correlation of the observed density fluctuations with the magnitude of the {Delta}V{sub loop} suggest that the {Delta}V{sub loop} is attributable to current drive/heating due to mode converted kinetic Alfven waves. The toroidal cold plasma wave code LION is used to model the Alfven resonance mode conversion surfaces in the experiments while the cylindrical hot plasma kinetic wave code ISMENE is used to model the behavior of kinetic Alfven waves at the Alfven resonance location. Initial results obtained from limited density, magnetic field, antenna phase, and impurity scans show good agreement between the RF induced density fluctuations and the predicted behavior of the kinetic Alfven waves. Detailed comparisons between the density fluctuations and the code predictions are presented.

  9. Non-Linear Effects on the LH Wave Coupling in Tore Supra and Impact on the LH Current Drive Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Ekedahl, A.; Frincu, B.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Petrzilka, V.

    2009-11-26

    A strong, non-linear degradation of the Lower Hybrid (LH) wave coupling in Tore Supra can be observed when the LH launcher is screened on both sides by additional side limiters, such as side protections of adjacent Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas. The power reflection coefficient (RC) at the LH grill mouth is estimated to increase from {approx}20% at low power density (<1 MW/m{sup 2}) up to >40% at high power density (>10 MW/m{sup 2}). Such large RC (>40%) is unacceptably high, in particular for long durations. The screening by the additional side limiters reduces the connection length in front of the LH grill, which results in lower {lambda}{sub n}, {lambda}{sub T}, n{sub e} and T{sub e} at the grill. However, the reduction in ne alone is not enough to explain the non-linear behaviour. Modelling with a code that takes into account a ponderomotive force potential [1], depleting the electron density in front of the grill, shows consistent results. In full non-inductive current drive scenarios, the observed degradation in LH coupling is measurable on the LH current drive efficiency, through the increase in coupled LH power required to maintain V{sub Loop} = 0. These results demonstrate thus the importance of being able to control the LH coupling conditions, in order to optimize the efficiency and power handling of LH systems.

  10. Study on lower hybrid current drive efficiency at high density towards long-pulse regimes in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. H.; Ding, B. J.; Zhang, J. Z.; Gan, K. F.; Wang, H. Q.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wu, Z. G.; Ma, W. D.; Jia, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Y.; Feng, J. Q.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.

    2014-06-01

    Significant progress on both L- and H-mode long-pulse discharges has been made recently in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) [J. Li et al., Nature Phys. 9, 817 (2013) And B. N. Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 104006 (2013).]. In this paper, LHCD experiments at high density in L-mode plasmas have been investigated in order to explore possible methods of improving current drive (CD) efficiency, thus to extend the operational space in long-pulse and high performance plasma regime. It is observed that the normalized bremsstrahlung emission falls much more steeply than 1/ne_av (line-averaged density) above ne_av = 2.2 × 1019 m-3 indicating anomalous loss of CD efficiency. A large broadening of the operating line frequency (f = 2.45 GHz), measured by a radio frequency (RF) probe located outside the EAST vacuum vessel, is generally observed during high density cases, which is found to be one of the physical mechanisms resulting in the unfavorable CD efficiency. Collisional absorption of lower hybrid wave in the scrape off layer (SOL) may be another cause, but this assertion needs more experimental evidence and numerical analysis. It is found that plasmas with strong lithiation can improve CD efficiency largely, which should be benefited from the changes of edge parameters. In addition, several possible methods are proposed to recover good efficiency in future experiments for EAST.

  11. The simulation of hard x-ray images obtained during lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Goeler, S. von; Fishman, H.; Ignat, D.

    1994-10-01

    During lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M suprathermal electrons in the 30 to 150 keV range are generated. These electrons emit hard X-ray bremsstrahlung in collisions with plasma ions; the radiation creates images in a hard X-ray pinhole camera. In order to interpret the hard X-ray images, a computer simulation code has been written, the PBXRAY code. It represents an extension of the STEVENS code that calculates the free-free and free-bound radiation for non-Maxwellian relativistic electron tail distributions. The PBXRAY code provides the chord integration in the bean-shaped plasma geometry on PBX-M and integrates over photon energy. The simulations show that the location of the suprathermal electrons can be determined with an accuracy of approximately two centimeters in the plasma. In particular, the authors analyzed discharges whose characteristic ``hollow`` images indicate off-axis LH current drive. A comparison of images taken with different absorber foils reveals that the suprathermal electrons have less than 150 keV parallel energy for the hollow discharges.

  12. Beam Effects from an Increase of LINAC Current from 40 ma to 49 Milliamperes

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Tomlin

    2002-06-05

    On March 25, 2002 the FNAL Linac had been running at a decreased 40 ma of beam current for some time. Both the 400 MeV Linac and the 8GeV Booster had been tuned to optimum running during that time. Optimum running for the Booster was at 4.1e12 per pulse. Losses at injection and at transition were limiting intensity at the time. By March 26, 2002 the Linac beam current had been increased to 49 ma. The optimum Booster intensity immediately jumped to 4.5e12 per pulse and increased in the next few days to 4.8e12 and 5e12 per pulse. Booster was not retuned until early April when a low-loss 5.0e12 was obtained for stacking operations. Linac current had sagged to 47 ma by then. Measurements were made on the 25th at 40 ma and the 26th and 27th at 49 ma. This is a report and discussion of those measurements.

  13. Electron beam induced current profiling of the p-ZnO:N/n-GaN heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Przeździecka, E. Stachowicz, M.; Chusnutdinow, S.; Jakieła, R.; Kozanecki, A.

    2015-02-09

    The high quality p-n structures studied consist of nitrogen doped ZnO:N films grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on n-type GaN templates. The nitrogen concentration, determined by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, is about 1 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. Temperature dependent photoluminescence studies confirm the presence of acceptor centers with an energy level lying approximately 130 meV above the valence band. The maximum forward-to-reverse current ratio I{sub F}/I{sub R} in the obtained p-n diodes is about 10{sup 7} at ±5 V, which is 2–5 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported for this type of heterojunctions. Electron-beam-induced current measurements confirm the presence of a p–n junction, located at the p-ZnO/n-GaN interface. The calculated diffusion length and activation energy of minority carriers are presented. The heterostructures exhibit strong absorption in the UV range with a four orders of magnitude high bright-to-dark current ratio.

  14. Electron beam energy and Ge nanocrystal size effects on the minority carrier diffusion length measured by the nano-electron beam induced current technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, Quang-Tri; El Hdiy, Abdelillah; Troyon, Michel

    2011-07-01

    The near-field electron beam induced current technique is used to study the minority carrier effective diffusion length versus electron beam energy on structures containing spherical Ge nanocrystals (NCs) with diameters of 50 nm and 70 nm formed by a two step dewetting/nucleation process. For both nanocrystal sizes, the effective diffusion length increases with the electron beam energy and then decreases from a threshold energy, which depends on the nanocrystal size. The effective diffusion length is smaller at low energy for NCs of larger size because of their larger surface recombination velocity, due to a better charge trapping efficiency.

  15. Nonlinear response of a neoclassical four-field magnetic reconnection model to localized current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaro, E.; Comisso, L.; Valdettaro, L.

    2010-05-15

    In tokamaks magnetic islands arise from an unstable process of tearing and reconnecting of helical field lines across rational surfaces. After a linear stage the magnetic instability develops through three characteristic nonlinear stages where increasingly complex topological alterations occur in the form of the magnetic islands. The problem of response of reconnection process to the injection of an external current suitably localized is addressed using a four-field model in a plane slab plasma, with a novel extension to account consistently of the relevant neoclassical effects, such as bootstrap current and pressure anisotropy. The results found have implications on the interpretation of the possible mechanism of present day experimental results on neoclassical tearing modes as well as on the concepts for their control or avoidance.

  16. Effect of high-frequency driving current on magnetization reversal in Co-rich amorphous microwires

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhik, A.; Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Blanco, J.M.

    2004-09-20

    Influence of high frequency electric current on the magnetization reversal in Co-rich glass covered amorphous microwires has been studied. The strong correlation between the coercivity and the circular magnetization in the outer shell of the wire has been found. The change of the mechanism of magnetization reversal in the presence of high-frequency circular magnetic field, which is related with the impedance properties, is presented.

  17. Electron beam induced current in InSb-InAs nanowire type-III heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; Shik, A.; Pitanti, A.; Tredicucci, A.; Ercolani, D.; Sorba, L.; Beltram, F.; Ruda, H. E.

    2012-08-01

    InSb-InAs nanowire heterostructure diodes investigated by electron beam induced current (EBIC) demonstrate an unusual spatial profile where the sign of the EBIC signal changes in the vicinity of the heterointerface. A qualitative explanation confirmed by theoretical calculations is based on the specific band diagram of the structure representing a type-III heterojunction with an accumulation layer in InAs. The sign of the EBIC signal depends on the specific parameters of this layer. In the course of measurements, the diffusion length of holes in InAs and its temperature dependence are also determined.

  18. Reduction of Beam Current Noise in the FNAL Magnetron Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S.; Karns, P. R.; Tan, C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    The new FNAL Injector Line with a circular dimple magnetron ion source has been operational since December of 2013. Since the new injector came on line there have been variations in the H- beam current flattop observed near the downstream end of the linac. Several different cathode geometries including a hollow cathode suggested by Dudnikov [1] were tried. We expanded on those studies by trying mixtures ranging from 0.25%N, 99.75%H to 3%N, 97%H. The results of these studies in our test stand will be presented in this paper.

  19. Driving toroidally asymmetric current through the tokamak scrape-off layer, Part I: Potential for ELM suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, I; Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D

    2009-03-31

    A potential technique for suppressing edge localized magnetohydrodynamic instabilities (ELMs) is theoretically analyzed. Recent experiments have shown that externally generated resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) can stabilize ELMs by modifying the density profile [T. E. Evans, et al., Nature Phys. 2, 419 (2006); Y. Liang, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265004 (2007)]. Driving toroidally asymmetric current internally, through the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma itself, can also generate RMPs that are close to the required threshold for ELM control. The limiting ion saturation current densities can be achieved by producing potential differences on the order of the electron temperature. Although the threshold is uncertain in future devices, if driven coherently though the SOL, the upper limit for the resulting field would exceed the present experimental threshold. This analysis provides the tools required for estimating the magnitude of the coherent SOL current and RMP generated via toroidally asymmetric biasing of the target. Flux expansion increases the RMP near the X-point, while phase interference due to the shearing of field lines near the X-point reduces the amplitude of the effective SOL perturbation and makes the result sensitive to both toroidal mode number n and the radial coherence width of the biasing region. If the limiting current density decays rapidly enough radially, both the width and the amplitude of the current density drawn from the target will be reduced. The RMP can still exceed the present threshold at low n if the radial location and width of the biasing region are optimally chosen.

  20. Feb2010 GHZ Ebw Heating, Current Drive and Emission Experiments at the Wega Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laqua, H. P.; Chlechowitz, E.; Glaubitz, M.; Marsen, S.; Stange, T.; Otte, M.; Zhang, D.; Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports on detailed investigation of a fully 28 GHz EBW (electron Bernstein wave) heated plasma in the WEGA stellarator. The plasma shows a fast transition into the "OXB-state" when the threshold density is reached. The profiles become peaked. The EBW emission diagnostic measures a radiation temperature of several keV, which origins from a supra-thermal electron population. The angular dependence of the mode conversion could be confirmed with a movable launching mirror. The toroidal current and the plasma conductivity were measured for different microwave launch positions.

  1. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2015-07-16

    An array of convergent acoustic Doppler velocimeters has been developed and tested for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use diverging acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using converging acoustic beams with a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. The array is also able to simultaneously measure three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and as such is referred to herein as a converging-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (CADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine. This proof-of-concept paper outlines system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of CADP to standard ADP velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm/s, standard deviation of 18 mm/s, and order-of-magnitude reduction in realizable length-scale. CADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the CADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved turbulence, resource and structural loading quantification and validation of numerical simulations. Alternative modes of operation have been implemented including noise-reducing bi-static sampling. Since waves are simultaneously measured it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in wave-current interaction studies.

  2. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-10

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the “tokamak” concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of “H-mode” and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the “missing” current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM “seeding” instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a “wild card” may be broadening of the localized

  3. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the "tokamak" concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of "H-mode" and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the "missing" current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM "seeding" instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a "wild card" may be broadening of the localized ECCD by the presence of

  4. Past climate change drives current genetic structure of an endangered freshwater mussel species.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kentaro; Lang, Brian K; Berg, David J

    2015-04-01

    Historical-to-recent climate change and anthropogenic disturbance affect species distributions and genetic structure. The Rio Grande watershed of the United States and Mexico encompasses ecosystems that are intensively exploited, resulting in substantial degradation of aquatic habitats. While significant anthropogenic disturbances in the Rio Grande are recent, inhospitable conditions for freshwater organisms likely existed prior to such disturbances. A combination of anthropogenic and past climate factors may contribute to current distributions of aquatic fauna in the Rio Grande basin. We used mitochondrial DNA and 18 microsatellite loci to infer evolutionary history and genetic structure of an endangered freshwater mussel, Popenaias popeii, throughout the Rio Grande drainage. We estimated spatial connectivity and gene flow across extant populations of P. popeii and used ecological niche models (ENMs) and approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to infer its evolutionary history during the Pleistocene. structure results recovered regional and local population clusters in the Rio Grande. ENMs predicted drastic reductions in suitable habitat during the last glacial maximum. ABC analyses suggested that regional population structure likely arose in this species during the mid-to-late Pleistocene and was followed by a late Pleistocene population bottleneck in New Mexico populations. The local population structure arose relatively recently, perhaps due to anthropogenic factors. Popenaias popeii, one of the few freshwater mussel species native to the Rio Grande basin, is a case study for understanding how both geological and anthropogenic factors shape current population genetic structure. Conservation strategies for this species should account for the fragmented nature of contemporary populations.

  5. Laser-driven Beat-Wave Current Drive in Dense Plasmas with Demo on CTIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Horton, Robert; Hwang, David; Zhu, Ben; Evans, Russell; Hong, Sean; Hsu, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas hanging freely in vacuum in voluminous amount without obstruction to diagnostics will greatly enhance our ability to study the physics of high energy density plasmas in strong magnetic fields. Plasma current can be generated through nonlinear beat-wave process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves into unmagnetized plasma. Beat-wave acceleration of electrons has been demonstrated in a low-density plasma using microwaves [1]. The proposed PLX experimental facility presently under construction at Los Alamos offers the opportunity to test the method at a density level scalable to the study of HED plasmas. For PLX beat-wave experiments, CO2 lasers will be used as pump waves due to their high power and tunability. For a typical PLX density ne=10^17cm-3, two CO2 lasers can be separately tuned to 9P(28) and 10P(20) to match the 2.84THz plasma frequency. The beat-wave demo experiment will be conducted on CTIX. The laser arrangement is being converted to two independent single lasers. Frequency-tuning methods, optics focusing system and diagnostics system will be discussed. The laser measurements and results of synchronization of two lasers will be presented, and scaling to PLX experiments will be given. [1] Rogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., PRL. v68 p3877 (1992).

  6. Effective variable switching point predictive current control for ac low-voltage drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolze, Peter; Karamanakos, Petros; Kennel, Ralph; Manias, Stefanos; Endisch, Christian

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an effective model predictive current control scheme for induction machines driven by a three-level neutral point clamped inverter, called variable switching point predictive current control. Despite the fact that direct, enumeration-based model predictive control (MPC) strategies are very popular in the field of power electronics due to their numerous advantages such as design simplicity and straightforward implementation procedure, they carry two major drawbacks. These are the increased computational effort and the high ripples on the controlled variables, resulting in a limited applicability of such methods. The high ripples occur because in direct MPC algorithms the actuating variable can only be changed at the beginning of a sampling interval. A possible remedy for this would be to change the applied control input within the sampling interval, and thus to apply it for a shorter time than one sample. However, since such a solution would lead to an additional overhead which is crucial especially for multilevel inverters, a heuristic preselection of the optimal control action is adopted to keep the computational complexity at bay. Experimental results are provided to verify the potential advantages of the proposed strategy.

  7. Obtaining a proton beam with 5-mA current in a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Kasatov, D. A.; Koshkarev, A. M.; Makarov, A. N.; Ostreinov, Yu. M.; Sorokin, I. N.; Taskaev, S. Yu.; Shchudlo, I. M.

    2016-06-01

    Suppression of parasitic electron flows and positive ions formed in the beam tract of a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation allowed a more than threefold increase (from 1.6 to 5 mA) in the current of accelerated 2-MeV protons. Details of the modification are described. Results of experimental investigation of the suppression of secondary charged particles and data on the characteristics of accelerated proton beam with increased current are presented.

  8. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y. E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  9. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  10. FPGA-based voltage and current dual drive system for high frame rate electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shadab; Manwaring, Preston; Borsic, Andrea; Halter, Ryan

    2015-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is used to image the electrical property distribution of a tissue under test. An EIT system comprises complex hardware and software modules, which are typically designed for a specific application. Upgrading these modules is a time-consuming process, and requires rigorous testing to ensure proper functioning of new modules with the existing ones. To this end, we developed a modular and reconfigurable data acquisition (DAQ) system using National Instruments' (NI) hardware and software modules, which offer inherent compatibility over generations of hardware and software revisions. The system can be configured to use up to 32-channels. This EIT system can be used to interchangeably apply current or voltage signal, and measure the tissue response in a semi-parallel fashion. A novel signal averaging algorithm, and 512-point fast Fourier transform (FFT) computation block was implemented on the FPGA. FFT output bins were classified as signal or noise. Signal bins constitute a tissue's response to a pure or mixed tone signal. Signal bins' data can be used for traditional applications, as well as synchronous frequency-difference imaging. Noise bins were used to compute noise power on the FPGA. Noise power represents a metric of signal quality, and can be used to ensure proper tissue-electrode contact. Allocation of these computationally expensive tasks to the FPGA reduced the required bandwidth between PC, and the FPGA for high frame rate EIT. In 16-channel configuration, with a signal-averaging factor of 8, the DAQ frame rate at 100 kHz exceeded 110 frames s (-1), and signal-to-noise ratio exceeded 90 dB across the spectrum. Reciprocity error was found to be for frequencies up to 1 MHz. Static imaging experiments were performed on a high-conductivity inclusion placed in a saline filled tank; the inclusion was clearly localized in the reconstructions obtained for both absolute current and voltage mode data. PMID:25376037

  11. FPGA-based voltage and current dual drive system for high frame rate electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shadab; Manwaring, Preston; Borsic, Andrea; Halter, Ryan

    2015-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is used to image the electrical property distribution of a tissue under test. An EIT system comprises complex hardware and software modules, which are typically designed for a specific application. Upgrading these modules is a time-consuming process, and requires rigorous testing to ensure proper functioning of new modules with the existing ones. To this end, we developed a modular and reconfigurable data acquisition (DAQ) system using National Instruments' (NI) hardware and software modules, which offer inherent compatibility over generations of hardware and software revisions. The system can be configured to use up to 32-channels. This EIT system can be used to interchangeably apply current or voltage signal, and measure the tissue response in a semi-parallel fashion. A novel signal averaging algorithm, and 512-point fast Fourier transform (FFT) computation block was implemented on the FPGA. FFT output bins were classified as signal or noise. Signal bins constitute a tissue's response to a pure or mixed tone signal. Signal bins' data can be used for traditional applications, as well as synchronous frequency-difference imaging. Noise bins were used to compute noise power on the FPGA. Noise power represents a metric of signal quality, and can be used to ensure proper tissue-electrode contact. Allocation of these computationally expensive tasks to the FPGA reduced the required bandwidth between PC, and the FPGA for high frame rate EIT. In 16-channel configuration, with a signal-averaging factor of 8, the DAQ frame rate at 100 kHz exceeded 110 frames s (-1), and signal-to-noise ratio exceeded 90 dB across the spectrum. Reciprocity error was found to be for frequencies up to 1 MHz. Static imaging experiments were performed on a high-conductivity inclusion placed in a saline filled tank; the inclusion was clearly localized in the reconstructions obtained for both absolute current and voltage mode data.

  12. Numerical simulation of wind-stress driving coastal currents in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, F.; Martinez, J.

    2013-05-01

    We used a numerical, tridimensional, hydrostatic ocean model to investigate the winter coastal dynamics due to strong wind events in Tropical Eastern Pacific and the effect by the shoreline shape and coastal shelf. The initial condition was set at rest with horizontal uniform distribution of temperature and salinity profiles varying only in vertical. The model was forcing by wind stress in two manners: in whole domain and in delimited area. As we focus in the Gulf of Tehuantepec the delimited wind, we make a mask to remove the wind outside the region of strong wind events, knowledge as Tehuanos. Numerical results using wind stress in entire domain, shows the typical response with westward coastal current entering to the head of the gulf from the east and turning to flow toward off-shore and the emergence of anticyclone mesoscale eddie that stretched cold water that upwelling under wind jet by presence of coastal boundary. In a similar experiment using flat bottom, we observe an important difference in ocean response. The sea surface temperature cooling under offshore wind jet and coastal current in eastern side have a strong influence by the eastern wide continental shelf. The simulations with delimited wind were used to study the ocean response by isolated offshore wind jet events of different time duration. In these cases, is possible to observe a coastal-trapped wave that was originated in the Gulf of Tehuantepec during wind events and travel to the East. For 2, 4 and 6 days wind events, the anticyclone and cyclone eddies are generated on the sides of the wind, having a significant wave generation for time events near local inertial period. Finally, we show the balance of terms for vertical integrated momentum equation in order to identify the principal contribution to ocean response in each case of study. This balance shows that Eastern wide continental shelf have an important influence to produce complicated dynamic and to avoid the emergence of cyclonic eddy.

  13. Sensitivities in the production of spread-out Bragg peak dose distributions by passive scattering with beam current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.-M.; Brett, Robert; Engelsman, Martijn; Slopsema, Roelf; Kooy, Hanne; Flanz, Jay

    2007-10-15

    A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used in proton beam therapy to create a longitudinal conformality of the required dose to the target. In order to create this effect in a passive beam scattering system, a variety of components must operate in conjunction to produce the desired beam parameters. We will describe how the SOBP is generated and will explore the tolerances of the various components and their subsequent effect on the dose distribution. A specific aspect of this investigation includes a case study involving the use of a beam current modulated system. In such a system, the intensity of the beam current can be varied in synchronization with the revolution of the range-modulator wheel. As a result, the weights of the pulled-back Bragg peaks can be individually controlled to produce uniform dose plateaus for a large range of treatment depths using only a small number of modulator wheels.

  14. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1988-04-01

    Large diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1-5-microsec electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, approximately 300,000 A/sq cm sq rad has been consistently measured. To obtain this high-current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between about 1600 and 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure 10 to the -6th to -10 to the -5th Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  15. Solar cell evaluation using electron beam induced current with the large chamber scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Tara; Kintzel, Edward; Marienhoff, Peter; Klein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    An initial study using electron beam induced current (EBIC) to evaluate solar cells has been carried out with the large chamber scanning electron microscope (LC-SEM) at the Western Kentucky University Nondestructive Analysis Center. EBIC is a scanning electron microscope technique used for the characterization of semiconductors. To facilitate our studies, we developed a Solar Amplification System (SASY) for analyzing current distribution and defects within a solar cell module. Preliminary qualitative results will be shown for a solar cell module that demonstrates the viability of the technique using the LC-SEM. Quantitative EBIC experiments will be carried out to analyze defects and minority carrier properties. Additionally, a well-focused spot of light from an LED mounted at the side of the SEM column will scan the same area of the solar cell using the LC-SEM positioning system. SASY will then output the solar efficiency to be compared with the minority carrier properties found using EBIC.

  16. 10 orders of magnitude current measurement digitisers for the CERN beam loss systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, W.; Alsdorf, M.; Dehning, B.; Kwiatkowski, M.; Venturini, G. G.; Zamantzas, C.

    2014-02-01

    A wide range current digitizer card is needed for the acquisition module of the beam loss monitoring systems in the CERN Injector Complex. The fully differential frequency converter allows measuring positive and negative input currents with a resolution of 31 nA in an integration window of 2 μs. Increasing the integration window, the dynamic range covers 21010 were the upper part of the range is converted by measuring directly the voltage drop on a resistor. The key elements of this design are the fully differential integrator and the switches operated by an FPGA. The circuit is designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and reliability and failsafe operational considerations are main design goals. The circuit will be discussed in detail and lab and field measurements will be shown.

  17. Measurement of inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; jima, Y.Naka; Alcaraz-Aunion, J.L.; Brice, S.J.; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Cheng, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dore, U.; Finley, D.A.; /Kyoto U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Fermilab /MIT /Valencia U. /Columbia U. /MIT /Columbia U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Fermilab /Columbia U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U.

    2010-11-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of inclusive charged current interactions of muon neutrinos on carbon with an average energy of 0.8 GeV using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. We compare our measurement with two neutrino interaction simulations: NEUT and NUANCE. The charged current interaction rates (product of flux and cross section) are extracted by fitting the muon kinematics, with a precision of 6-15% for the energy dependent and 3% for the energy integrated analyses. We also extract CC inclusive interaction cross sections from the observed rates, with a precision of 10-30% for the energy dependent and 8% for the energy integrated analyses. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. These results can be used to convert previous SciBooNE cross section ratio measurements to absolute cross section values.

  18. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Prokupek, J.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.; Rus, B.; Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Romano, F.; Picciotto, A.; Serra, E.; Giuffrida, L.; Mangione, A.; Rosinski, M.; Parys, P.; and others

    2012-02-15

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  19. Current-induced spin polarization on metal surfaces probed by spin-polarized positron beam

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H. J.; Yamamoto, S.; Fukaya, Y.; Maekawa, M.; Li, H.; Kawasuso, A.; Seki, T.; Saitoh, E.; Takanashi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Current-induced spin polarization (CISP) on the outermost surfaces of Au, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ta, and W nanoscaled films were studied using a spin-polarized positron beam. The Au and Cu surfaces showed no significant CISP. In contrast, the Pt, Pd, Ta, and W films exhibited large CISP (3~15% per input charge current of 105 A/cm2) and the CISP of Ta and W were opposite to those of Pt and Pd. The sign of the CISP obeys the same rule in spin Hall effect suggesting that the spin-orbit coupling is mainly responsible for the CISP. The magnitude of the CISP is explained by the Rashba-Edelstein mechanism rather than the diffusive spin Hall effect. This settles a controversy, that which of these two mechanisms dominates the large CISP on metal surfaces. PMID:24776781

  20. Progress and future developments of high current ion source for neutral beam injector in the ASIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao

    2015-04-08

    A high current hot cathode bucket ion source, which based on the US long pulse ion source is developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The ion source consists of a bucket plasma generator with multi-pole cusp fields and a set of tetrode accelerator with slit apertures. So far, four ion sources are developed and conditioned on the ion source test bed. 4 MW hydrogen beam with beam energy of 80 keV is extracted. In Aug. 2013, EAST NBI 1 with two ion source installed on the EAST, and achieved H-mode plasma with NBI injection for the first time. In order to achieve stable long pulse operation of high current ion source and negative ion source research, the RF ion source with 200 mm diameter and 120 mm depth driver is designed and developed. The first RF plasma generated with 2 kW power of 1 MHz frequency. More of the RF plasma tests and negative source relative research need to do in the future.

  1. An electron beam induced current study of gallium nitride and diamond materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cropper, A.D.; Moore, D.J.; Scott, C.S.; Green, R.

    1995-12-31

    The continual need for microelectronic devices that operate under severe electronic and environmental conditions (high temperature, high frequency, high power, and radiation tolerance) has sustained research in wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The properties suggest these wide-bandgap semiconductor materials have tremendous potential for military and commercial applications. High frequency bipolar transistors and field effect transistors, diodes, and short wavelength optical devices have been proposed using these materials. Although research efforts involving the study of transport properties in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Diamond have made significant advances, much work is still needed to improve the material quality so that the electrophysical behavior of device structures can be further understood and exploited. Electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements can provide a method of understanding the transport properties in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Diamond. This technique basically consists of measuring the current or voltage transient response to the drift and diffusion of carriers created by a short-duration pulse of radiation. This method differs from other experimental techniques because it is based on a fast transient electron beam probe created from a high speed, laser pulsed photoemission system.

  2. Rotating magnetic field current drive of high-temperature field reversed configurations with high ζ scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.

    2007-11-01

    Greatly reduced recycling and impurity ingestion in the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment—Upgrade (TCSU) device has allowed much higher plasma temperatures to be achieved in the field reversed configurations (FRC) under rotating magnetic field (RMF) formation and sustainment. The hotter plasmas have higher magnetic fields and much higher diamagnetic electron rotation rates so that the important ratio of average electron rotation frequency to RMF frequency, called ζ, approaches unity, for the first time, in TCSU. A large fraction of the RMF power is absorbed by an as yet unexplained (anomalous) mechanism directly proportional to the square of the RMF magnitude. It becomes of relatively lesser significance as the FRC current increases, and simple resistive heating begins to dominate, but the anomalous absorption is useful for initial plasma heating. Measurements of total absorbed power, and comparisons of applied RMF torque to torque on the electrons due to electron-ion friction under high-ζ operation, over a range of temperatures and fields, have allowed the separation of the classical Ohmic and anomalous heating to be inferred, and cross-field plasma resistivities to be calculated.

  3. Eyes wide shut: Transcranial alternating current stimulation drives alpha rhythm in a state dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Philipp; Neuling, Toralf; Fuscá, Marco; Herrmann, Christoph S.; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Weisz, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is used to modulate brain oscillations to measure changes in cognitive function. It is only since recently that brain activity in human subjects during tACS can be investigated. The present study aims to investigate the phase relationship between the external tACS signal and concurrent brain activity. Subjects were stimulated with tACS at individual alpha frequency during eyes open and eyes closed resting states. Electrodes were placed at Cz and Oz, which should affect parieto-occipital areas most strongly. Source space magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were used to estimate phase coherence between tACS and brain activity. Phase coherence was significantly increased in areas in the occipital pole in eyes open resting state only. The lag between tACS and brain responses showed considerable inter-individual variability. In conclusion, tACS at individual alpha frequency entrains brain activity in visual cortices. Interestingly, this effect is state dependent and is clearly observed with eyes open but only to a lesser extent with eyes closed. PMID:27252047

  4. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel; Richmond, Marshall

    2015-08-01

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1 MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of C-ADP to standard divergent ADP (D-ADP) velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm s-1, standard deviation of 18 mm s-1, and an order of magnitude reduction in realisable length scale. C-ADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the C-ADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved quantification of flow turbulence. Since waves are simultaneously measured via profiled velocities, pressure measurements and surface detection, it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in

  5. [Injection of compact toroids for tokamak fueling and current drive]. Progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.Q.; Rogers, J.H.; Thomas, J.C.; Evans, R.; Foley, R.; Hillyer, T.

    1991-12-31

    The experimental goals for the 1990--1991 period were the operation of the Davis Diverted Tokamak(DDT), the beat wave experiment, and the construction of the compact toroid injection experiment(CTIX). The experiment results from these areas are summarized in the posters given in the APS meeting past November. Here we shall describe the technical progress of the development of the diagnostic system for beat wave experiment, and CT injection especially in relation to the up coming injection experiments into DDT tokamak. The tokamak operation of DDT over the past year has been focused in two parameter ranges. The long pulse discharges (over 100 msec), and the low q short pulse discharges (about 10 msec). We found that the long pulse discharges required a position feedback more sophisticated than the simple passive program that we have. We are in the process of assembling this system. We also found an interesting low q(a) operating regime. Here an equilibrium can be established for a toroidal field between .5 and 1 kG. The typical plasma current is > 5kA. The density of the plasma is between 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}. The plasma condition in these discharge are sufficiently mild that diagnostic probes can be used to measure various plasma fluctuations. We believe that this will be the regime best suited to study the interaction between the tokamak plasma and the compact toroid. A sophisticated probe system of both electrostatic and electromagnetic types similar to those used in the beat wave experiment has been designed for the up coming experiments.

  6. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  7. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mccuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Williams, John; Hughes, Thomas; Anaya, Richard; Caporaso, George; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Yu - Jiuan; Falabella, Steve; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Richardson, Roger; Trainham, C; Weir, John; Genoni, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  8. Cathode performance during two beam operation of the high current high polarization electron gun for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, O.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D. M.; Lambiase, R.; Meng, W.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, E.; Pietz, J.; Ackeret, M.; Yeckel, C.; Miller, R.; Dobrin, E.; Thompson, K.

    2015-05-03

    Two electron beams from two activated bulk GaAs photocathodes were successfully combined during the recent beam test of the High Current High Polarization Electron gun for eRHIC. The beam test took place in Stangenes Industries in Palo Alto, CA, where the cathodes were placed in diagonally opposite locations inside the high voltage shroud. No significant cross talking between the cathodes was found for the pertinent vacuum and low average current operation, which is very promising towards combining multiple beams for higher average current. This paper describes the cathode preparation, transport and cathode performance in the gun for the combining test, including the QE and lifetimes of the photocathodes at various steps of the experiment.

  9. Two-stream stability properties of the return-current layer for intense ion beam propagation through background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail

    2009-09-15

    When an ion beam with sharp edge propagates through a background plasma, its current is neutralized by the plasma return current everywhere except at the beam edge over a characteristic transverse distance {delta}x{sub perpendicular}{approx}{delta}{sub pe}, where {delta}{sub pe}=c/{omega}{sub pe} is the collisionless skin depth and {omega}{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. Because the background plasma electrons neutralizing the ion beam current inside the beam are streaming relative to the background plasma electrons outside the beam, the background plasma can support a two-stream surface-mode excitation. Such surface modes have been studied previously assuming complete charge and current neutralization, and have been shown to be strongly unstable. In this paper we study the detailed stability properties of this two-stream surface mode for an electron flow velocity profile self-consistently driven by the ion beam. In particular, it is shown that the self-magnetic field generated inside the unneutralized current layer, which has not been taken into account previously, completely eliminates the instability.

  10. The Dynomak: An advanced spheromak reactor system with imposed-dynamo current drive and next-generation nuclear power technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, D. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Marklin, G.; Morgan, K. D.; Nelson, B. A.

    2013-10-01

    A high-beta spheromak reactor system has been designed with an overnight capital cost that is competitive with conventional power sources. This reactor system utilizes recently discovered imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) and a molten salt blanket system for first wall cooling, neutron moderation and tritium breeding. Currently available materials and ITER developed cryogenic pumping systems were implemented in this design on the basis of technological feasibility. A tritium breeding ratio of greater than 1.1 has been calculated using a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) neutron transport simulation. High-temperature superconducting tapes (YBCO) were used for the equilibrium coil set, substantially reducing the recirculating power fraction when compared to previous spheromak reactor studies. Using zirconium hydride for neutron shielding, a limiting equilibrium coil lifetime of at least thirty full-power years has been achieved. The primary FLiBe loop was coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle due to attractive economics and high thermal efficiencies. With these advancements, an electrical output of 1000 MW from a thermal output of 2486 MW was achieved, yielding an overall plant efficiency of approximately 40%. A paper concerning the Dynomak reactor design is currently being reviewed for publication.

  11. Variational full wave calculation of fast wave current drive in DIII-D using the ALCYON code

    SciTech Connect

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    Initial fast wave current drive simulations performed with the ALCYON code for the 60 MHz DIII-D experiment are presented. Two typical shots of the 1991 summer campaign were selected with magnetic field intensities of 1 and 2 teslas respectively. The results for the wave electromagnetic field in the plasma chamber are displayed. They exhibit a strong enrichment of the poloidal mode number m-spectrum which leads to the upshift of the parallel wavenumber, {kappa}{perpendicular}, and to the wave absorption. The m-spectrum is bounded when the local poloidal wavenumber reaches the Alfven wavenumber and the {kappa}{perpendicular} upshifts do not destroy the wave directionality. Linear estimations of the driven current are made. The current density profiles are found to be peaked and we find that about 88 kA can be driven in the 1 tesla/1.7 keV phase with 1.7 MW coupled to the electrons. In the 2 tesla/3.4 keV case, 47 kA are driven with a total power of 1.5 MW, 44% of which are absorbed on the hydrogen minority, through the second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance. The global efficiency is then 0.18 {times} 10{sup 19} A m{sup {minus}2}W{sup {minus}1} if one considers only the effective power going to the electrons.

  12. Beam envelope, injection, and acceleration in a compact, high-current, strong-focused recirculating accelerator scheme. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A.

    1988-12-01

    In order to meet the criterion of compactness in developing high-current, high-energy electron accelerators, it is advantageous to recirculate the electron beam through an accelerating module. Various such recirculating-accelerator concepts that use strong-focusing magnetic fields may be conveniently referred to as SFRA (Strong Focused Recirculating Accelerators). The strong-focusing field can be produced by external current-carrying stellarator or torsatron windings. SLIA, Stellatron, RIA and rebatron are examples of SFRA. High current electron beam transport in externally applied stellarator and longitudinal magnetic fields is analyzed. It is shown that a constant of motion exists for a matched beam of rotating elliptical cross section, with self-fields included. A differential equation for the beam envelope is derived and is shown to reduce to the familiar beam envelope equation for a beam of circular cross section when the stellarator field is turned off. A summary description of beam dynamics of acceleration in one SFRA, the rebatron, is given. Although a rebatron with major radius 100 cm and minor radius 10 cm can accelerate electrons to gamma about 65 with a fixed vertical (bending) magnetic field, the insensitivity to energy mismatch poses a problem for beam-trapping and injection. It is shown that a beam trapping scheme, in which a rapidly varying vertical magnetic field is applied before activating the rebatron acceleration gap, would work for a 10-kA beam of 1-cm radius injected near the wall of a rebatron of minor radius 16 cm.

  13. Relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Houck, T.L. )

    1994-10-01

    Relativistic klystrons (RKs) are being developed as an RF power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. In a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA), the drive beam passes through a large number of RF output structures. High conversion efficiency of electron beam energy to RF energy is achieved in this concept by reacceleration of the modulated drive beam between output structures. The authors have conducted experiments studying the RF power extracted from various RK structures driven by modulated induction accelerator current pulses; the studies include work on improving the transport dynamics of the drive beam. They have started a demonstration in which the modulated induction beam current is reaccelerated by passage through subsequent induction accelerator cells.

  14. High current pulsed electron beam treatment of AZ31 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Bo; Hao Shengzhi; Zou Jianxin; Grosdidier, Thierry; Jiang Limin; Zhou Jiyang; Dong Chuang

    2005-11-15

    This paper reports, for the first time, an analysis of the effect of High Current Pulsed Electron Beam (HCPEB) on a Mg alloy. The AZ31 alloy was HCPEB treated in order to see the potential of this fairly recent technique in modifying its wear resistance. For the 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} beam energy density used in the present work, the evaporation mode was operative and led to the formation of a ''wavy'' surface and the absence of eruptive microcraters. The selective evaporation of Mg over Al led to an Al-rich melted surface layer and precipitation hardening from the over saturated solid solution. Due to the increase in hardness of the top surface layer, the friction coefficient values were lowered by more than 20% after the HCPEB treatments, and the wear resistance was drastically (by a factor of 6) improved. The microhardness of the HCPEB samples was also increased significantly down to a depth of about 500 {mu}m, far exceeding the heat-affected zone (about 40 {mu}m). This is due to the effect of the propagation of the shockwave associated with this HCPEB treatment.

  15. A modified beam-to-earth transformation to measure short-wavelength internal waves with an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scotti, A.; Butman, B.; Beardsley, R.C.; Alexander, P.S.; Anderson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The algorithm used to transform velocity signals from beam coordinates to earth coordinates in an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) relies on the assumption that the currents are uniform over the horizontal distance separating the beams. This condition may be violated by (nonlinear) internal waves, which can have wavelengths as small as 100-200 m. In this case, the standard algorithm combines velocities measured at different phases of a wave and produces horizontal velocities that increasingly differ from true velocities with distance from the ADCP. Observations made in Massachusetts Bay show that currents measured with a bottom-mounted upward-looking ADCP during periods when short-wavelength internal waves are present differ significantly from currents measured by point current meters, except very close to the instrument. These periods are flagged with high error velocities by the standard ADCP algorithm. In this paper measurements from the four spatially diverging beams and the backscatter intensity signal are used to calculate the propagation direction and celerity of the internal waves. Once this information is known, a modified beam-to-earth transformation that combines appropriately lagged beam measurements can be used to obtain current estimates in earth coordinates that compare well with pointwise measurements. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  16. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Ahmad, Pauzi; Zulkafli, Hashim, Siti A'aisah

    2014-09-01

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD5, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  17. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Zulkafli,; Hashim, Siti A'aisah; Ahmad, Pauzi

    2014-09-03

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD{sub 5}, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  18. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, S. Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A.

    2014-02-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL’s reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT’s superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm{sup 2} has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  19. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LITHIUM BEAM EDGE PLASMA CURRENT DENSITY DIAGNOSTIC ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    PEAVY,J.J; CARY,W.P; THOMAS,D.M; KELLMAN,D.H; HOYT,D.M; DELAWARE,S.W; PRONKO,S.G.E; HARRIS,T.E

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 An edge plasma current density diagnostic employing a neutralized lithium ion beam system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The lithium beam control system is designed around a GE Fanuc 90-30 series PLC and Cimplicity{reg_sign} HMI (Human Machine Interface) software. The control system operates and supervises a collection of commercial and in-house designed high voltage power supplies for beam acceleration and focusing, filament and bias power supplies for ion creation, neutralization, vacuum, triggering, and safety interlocks. This paper provides an overview of the control system, while highlighting innovative aspects including its remote operation, pulsed source heating and pulsed neutralizer heating, optimizing beam regulation, and beam ramping, ending with a discussion of its performance.

  20. Low temperature cathodoluminecence and electron beam induced current studies of single GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Eunsoon; Woo Lee, Byoung; Shim, So-Jeong; Choi, Heon-Jin; Hee Son, Byoung; Hwan Ahn, Yeong; Dang, Le Si

    2012-04-01

    Single crystalline GaN nanowires, with 100 nm typical diameters, were grown by chemical vapor deposition method, using Pt catalyst, and characterized by cathodoluminescence and electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements at 5 K. The near band edge emission was found to be asymmetric and broad, with full width half maximum of around 150 meV, peaking at 3.55 eV, well above the GaN bulk band gap. This blueshift was ascribed to band filling effect resulting from unintentional n-type doping in the range 1019-1020 cm-3. Despite of this heavy doping, EBIC experiments showed that minority carriers can diffuse over 0.2 μm.