Science.gov

Sample records for beam facility conceptual

  1. THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-10-08

    After more than 40 years of operation, the AGS is still at the heart of the Brookhaven hadron accelerator complex. This system of accelerators presently comprises a 200 MeV linac for the pre-acceleration of high intensity and polarized protons, two Tandem Van der Graaffs for the pre-acceleration of heavy ion beams, a versatile Booster that allows for efficient injection of all three types of beams into the AGS and, most recently, the two RHIC collider rings that produce high luminosity heavy ion and polarized proton collisions. For several years now, the AGS has held the world intensity record with more than 7 x 10{sup 13} protons accelerated in a single pulse. The requirements for the proton beam for the super neutrino beam are summarized and a schematic of the upgraded AGS is shown. Since the present number of protons per fill is already close to the required number, the upgrade is based on increasing the repetition rate and reducing beam losses (to avoid excessive shielding requirements and to maintain activation of the machine components at workable level). It is also important to preserve all the present capabilities of the AGS, in particular its role as injector to RHIC. The AGS Booster was built not only to allow the injection of any species of heavy ion into the AGS but to allow a fourfold increase of the AGS intensity. It is one-quarter the circumference of the AGS with the same aperture. However, the accumulation of four Booster loads in the AGS takes about 0.6 s, and is therefore not well suited for high average beam power operation. To minimize the injection time to about 1 ms, a 1.2 GeV linac will be used instead. This linac consists of the existing warm linac of 200 MeV and a new superconducting linac of 1.0 GeV. The multi-turn H{sup -} injection from a source of 30 mA and 720 {micro}s pulse width is sufficient to accumulate 9 x 10{sup 13} particle per pulse in the AGS[10]. The minimum ramp time of the AGS to full energy is presently 0.5 s; this must

  2. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  3. Accelerator-driven subcritical facility:Conceptual design development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry; Bolshinsky, Igor; Naberezhnev, Dmitry; Duo, Jose; Belch, Henry; Bailey, James

    2006-06-01

    A conceptual design development of an accelerator-driven subcritical facility has been carried out in the preparation of a joint activity with Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine. The main functions of the facility are the medical isotope production and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. An electron accelerator is considered to drive the subcritical assembly. The neutron source intensity and spectrum have been studied. The energy deposition, spatial neutron generation, neutron utilization fraction, and target dimensions have been quantified to define the main target performance parameters, and to select the target material and beam parameters. Different target conceptual designs have been developed based the engineering requirements including heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux level with a Keff of 0.98. Different fuel materials, uranium enrichments, and reflector materials are considered in the design process. The possibility of using low enrichment uranium without penalizing the facility performance is carefully evaluated. The mechanical design of the facility has been developed to maximize its utility and minimize the time for replacing the target and the fuel assemblies. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements, upgrades, and new missions. In addition, it has large design margins to accommodate different operating conditions and parameters. In this paper, the conceptual design and the design analyses of the facility will be presented.

  4. ATA diagnostic beam dump conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    A diagnostic beam dump, able to withstand 72,000 pulses (10 kA, 50 MeV/pulse) per shift was designed and analyzed. The analysis shows that the conceptual beam dump design consisting of 80 vitreous carbon plate-foam elements is able to withstand the thermal and mechanical stresses generated. X-rays produced by bremsstrahlung are absorbed by a three element copper plate-foam x-ray absorber. Cooling between bursts of electron pulses is provided by pressurized helium.

  5. Conceptual design of the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Boyes, John D.; Kumpan, Steven A.; Lowdermilk, W. Howard; Sorem, Michael S.

    1995-12-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a conceptual design report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a key decision zero (KD0), justification of mission need. Motivated by the progress to date by the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova technical contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 micrometer) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a memorandum of agreement in August 1993, and established a project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, we completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE defense program's site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a facilities requirements document, a conceptual design scope and plan, a target physics design document, a laser design cost basis document, a functional requirements document, an experimental plan for indirect drive ignition, and a preliminary hazards analysis (PHA) document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. On October 21, 1994 the Secretary of Energy issued a key decision one (KD1) for the NIF, which approved the project and authorized DOE to request Office of Management and Budget-approval for congressional line-item FY 1996 NIF funding for preliminary engineering design and for National Environmental Policy Act activities. In addition, the Secretary declared Livermore as the preferred site for constructing the NIF. In February 1995, the NIF Project was

  6. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D{sup {minus}} source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus.

  7. Conceptual design report, Sodium Storage Facility, Fast Flux Test Facility, Project F-031

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, D.R.

    1995-02-14

    The Sodium Storage Facility Conceptual Design Report provides conceptual design for construction of a new facility for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium.

  8. Lunar base launch and landing facilities conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Paul G.; Simonds, Charles H.; Stump, William R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a first look at the requirements for launch and landing facilities for early lunar bases and to prepared conceptual designs for some of these facilities. The emphasis of the study is on the facilities needed from the first manned landing until permanent occupancy, the Phase 2 lunar base. Factors including surface characteristics, navigation system, engine blast effects, and expected surface operations are used to develop landing pad designs, and definitions fo various other elements of the launch and landing facilities. Finally, the dependence of the use of these elements and the evolution of the facilities are established.

  9. Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Machicoane, Guillaume Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry

    2014-02-15

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

  10. A conceptual design for an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-02-15

    This report is a brief description of a model electron beam, which is meant to serve as a pulsed heat source that vaporizes a metal fleck into an ''under-dense'' cloud. See Reference 1. The envelope of the electron beam is calculated from the paraxial ray equation, as stated in Reference 2. The examples shown here are for 5 A, 200 keV beams that focus to waists of under 0.4 mm diameter, within a cylindrical volume of 10 cm radius and length. The magnetic fields assumed in the examples are moderate, 0.11 T and 0.35 T, and can probably be created by permanent magnets.

  11. Relativistic-beam Pickup Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Simpson, J.; Konecny, R.; Suddeth, D.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical response of pickups and cavities to charged particle beams has been an area of considerable activity and concern for accelerator systems. With the advent of stochastic beam cooling, the position and frequency response of beam pickups has become a crucial parameter in determining the performance of these systems. The most frequently used method for measuring and calibrating beam pickups has been the use of current carrying wires to simulate relativistic beams. This method has sometimes led to incorrect predictions of the pickup response to particle beams. The reasons for the differences are not always obvious but could arise from: (1) wires are incapable of exciting or permitting many of the modes that beams excite or (2) the interaction of the wire with large arrays of pickups produce results which are not easily predicted. At Argonne these deficiencies are resolved by calibrating pickups with a relativistic electron beam. This facility is being used extensively by several groups to measure beam pickup devices and is the primary calibration facility for pickups to be used in the FNAL TEV-I Antiproton Source.

  12. High power target approaches for intense radioactive ion beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W.L. ||; Hodges, T.A.; Hsu, H.; Fikani, M.M.

    1997-02-01

    Development of conceptual approaches for targets to produce intense radioactive ion beams is needed in anticipation of activity for a next-generation, intense ISOL-type radioactive beams facility, strongly recommended in the NSAC 1995 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science. The production of isotopes in vapor form for subsequent mass separation and acceleration will depend on the ability to control target temperature profiles within the target resulting from interactions of the intense production beams with the target material. A number of earlier studies have identified promising approaches which need, however, to be carefully analyzed for specific target systems. A survey will be made of these earlier concepts employing various cooling techniques, including imposition of thermal barriers between the target materials and cooling systems. Some results of preliminary analyses are summarized. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Conceptual design of the MHD Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bents, D. J.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Rigo, H. S.; Pearson, C. V.; Warinner, D. K.; Hatch, A. M.; Borden, M.; Giza, D. A.

    The reference conceptual design of the MHD engineering test facility, a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commerical feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates are included and the engineering issues that should be reexamined are identified.

  14. Conceptual design of the MHD Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Rigo, H. S.; Pearson, C. V.; Warinner, D. K.; Hatch, A. M.; Borden, M.; Giza, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the MHD engineering test facility, a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commerical feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates are included and the engineering issues that should be reexamined are identified.

  15. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  16. Conceptual capital-cost estimate and facility design of the Mirror-Fusion Technology Demonstration Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    This report contains contributions by Bechtel Group, Inc. to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the final report on the conceptual design of the Mirror Fusion Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF). Included in this report are the following contributions: (1) conceptual capital cost estimate, (2) structural design, and (3) plot plan and plant arrangement drawings. The conceptual capital cost estimate is prepared in a format suitable for inclusion as a section in the TDF final report. The structural design and drawings are prepared as partial inputs to the TDF final report section on facilities design, which is being prepared by the FEDC.

  17. Cryogenic distribution for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect

    S. Jones, Dana Arenius, Adam Fila, P. Geutschow, Helmut Laumer, Matt Johnson, Cory S. Waltz, J. G. Weisend II

    2012-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new National User Facility for nuclear science funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science and operated by Michigan State University. The FRIB accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at 2 K and SC magnets operating at 4.5 K all cooled by a large scale cryogenic refrigeration system. A major subsystem of the cryogenic system will be the distribution system whose primary components will include a distribution box, the transfer lines and the interconnect valve boxes at each cryogenic device. An overview of the conceptual design of the distribution system including engineering details, capabilities and schedule is described.

  18. Conceptual design for the space station Freedom modular combustion facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A definition study and conceptual design for a combustion science facility that will be located in the Space Station Freedom's baseline U.S. Laboratory module is being performed. This modular, user-friendly facility, called the Modular Combustion Facility, will be available for use by industry, academic, and government research communities in the mid-1990's. The Facility will support research experiments dealing with the study of combustion and its byproducts. Because of the lack of gravity-induced convection, research into the mechanisms of combustion in the absence of gravity will help to provide a better understanding of the fundamentals of the combustion process. The background, current status, and future activities of the effort are covered.

  19. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-29

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  20. Concerning the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, James

    2009-01-01

    James Symons, Nuclear Science Division Director at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and Daniela Leitner, head of operations at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron, discuss major contributions to the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, including ion source, which will based on the VENUS source built for the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the GRETA gamma-ray detector now under construction there.

  1. Concerning the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    ScienceCinema

    Symons, James

    2016-07-12

    James Symons, Nuclear Science Division Director at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and Daniela Leitner, head of operations at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron, discuss major contributions to the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, including ion source, which will based on the VENUS source built for the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the GRETA gamma-ray detector now under construction there.

  2. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  3. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    1985-09-01

    In April 1985, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Clinch River site as its preferred site for the construction and operation of the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility (USDOE, 1985). In support of the DOE MRS conceptual design activity, available data describing the site have been gathered and analyzed. A composite geotechnical description of the Clinch River site has been developed and is presented herein. This report presents Clinch River site description data in the following sections: general site description, surface hydrologic characteristics, groundwater characteristics, geologic characteristics, vibratory ground motion, surface faulting, stability of subsurface materials, slope stability, and references. 48 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Lunar base launch and landing facility conceptual design, 2nd edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This report documents the Lunar Base Launch and Landing Facility Conceptual Design study. The purpose of this study was to examine the requirements for launch and landing facilities for early lunar bases and to prepare conceptual designs for some of these facilities. The emphasis of this study is on the facilities needed from the first manned landing until permanent occupancy. Surface characteristics and flight vehicle interactions are described, and various facility operations are related. Specific recommendations for equipment, facilities, and evolutionary planning are made, and effects of different aspects of lunar development scenarios on facilities and operations are detailed. Finally, for a given scenario, a specific conceptual design is developed and presented.

  5. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility`s radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. This paper details facility development to date.

  6. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatum, B. A.; Alton, G. D.; Auble, R. L.; Beene, J. R.; Dowling, D. T.; Haynes, D. L.; Juras, R. C.; Meigs, M. J.; Mills, G. D.; Mosko, S. W.; Mueller, P. E.; Olsen, D. K.; Shapira, D.; Sinclair, J. W.; Carter, H. K.; Welton, R. F.; Williams, C. E.; Bailey, J. D.; Stracener, D. W.

    1997-05-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility's radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. The HRIBF was formally dedicated on December 12, 1996, and approved for high intensity operation as a National User Facility, the first of its kind in North America. This paper describes facility development to date.

  7. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for

  8. 14. FACILITY IDENTIFICATION STENCILED ON ROOF BEAM, 'RIGGING LOFT' PORTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. FACILITY IDENTIFICATION STENCILED ON ROOF BEAM, 'RIGGING LOFT' PORTION OF BUILDING 4. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Public Works Shop, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  9. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  10. TFTR neutral-beam test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Turitzin, N.M.; Newman, R.A.

    1981-11-01

    TFTR Neutral Beam System will have thirteen discharge ion sources, each with its own power supply. Twelve of these will be utilized for supplemental heating of the TFTR tokamak plasma, while the thirteenth will be dedicated to an off-machine test chamber for source development and/or conditioning. A test installation for one source was set up using prototype equipment to discover and correct possible deficiencies, and to properly coordinate the equipment. This test facility represents the first opportunity for assembling an integrated system of hardware supplied by diverse vendors, each of whom designed and built his equipment to performance specifications. For the installation and coordination of the different portions of the total system, particular attention was given to personnel safety and safe equipment operation. This paper discusses various system components, their characteristics, interconnection and control. Results of the recently initiated test phase will be reported at a later date.

  11. A Dual-Beam Irradiation Facility for a Novel Hybrid Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabchevski, Svilen Petrov; Idehara, Toshitaka; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Miyoshi, Norio; Tatsukawa, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the main ideas and discuss both the feasibility and the conceptual design of a novel hybrid technique and equipment for an experimental cancer therapy based on the simultaneous and/or sequential application of two beams, namely a beam of neutrons and a CW (continuous wave) or intermittent sub-terahertz wave beam produced by a gyrotron for treatment of cancerous tumors. The main simulation tools for the development of the computer aided design (CAD) of the prospective experimental facility for clinical trials and study of such new medical technology are briefly reviewed. Some tasks for a further continuation of this feasibility analysis are formulated as well.

  12. Conceptual definition of a high voltage power supply test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biess, John J.; Chu, Teh-Ming; Stevens, N. John

    1989-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is presently developing a 60 GHz traveling wave tube for satellite cross-link communications. The operating voltage for this new tube is - 20 kV. There is concern about the high voltage insulation system and NASA is planning a space station high voltage experiment that will demonstrate both the 60 GHz communications and high voltage electronics technology. The experiment interfaces, requirements, conceptual design, technology issues and safety issues are determined. A block diagram of the high voltage power supply test facility was generated. It includes the high voltage power supply, the 60 GHz traveling wave tube, the communications package, the antenna package, a high voltage diagnostics package and a command and data processor system. The interfaces with the space station and the attached payload accommodations equipment were determined. A brief description of the different subsystems and a discussion of the technology development needs are presented.

  13. Economics of electron beam accelerator facilities: Concept vs actual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minbiole, Paul R.

    1995-02-01

    Electron beam accelerator facilities continue to demonstrate their ability to "add value" to a wide range of industrial products. The power, energy, and reliability of commercially available accelerators have increased steadily over the past several decades. The high throughput potential of modern electron beam facilities, together with the broad spectrum of commercial applications, result in the concept that an electron beam facility is an effective tool for adding economic value to industrial products. However, the high capital costs of such a facility (including hidden costs), together with practical limitations to high throughput (including several layers of inefficiencies), result in profit-and-loss economics which are more tenuous than expected after first analysis.

  14. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  15. Beam Physics in X-Ray Radiography Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y J; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Falabella, S; Goldin, F J; Guethlein, G; Lauer, E L; McCarrick, J F; Neurath, R; Richardson, R A; Sampayan, S; Weir, J T

    2002-12-02

    Performance of x-ray radiography facilities requires focusing the electron beams to sub-millimeter spots on the x-ray converters. Ions extracted from a converter by impact of a high intensity beam can partially neutralize the beam space charge and change the final focusing system. We will discuss these ion effects and mitigation.

  16. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gonzales, Fermin; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; Sedillo, James Daniel; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  17. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design. Final vesion

    SciTech Connect

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D{sup {minus}} source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus.

  18. The second generation Singapore high resolution proton beam writing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, J. A. van; Malar, P.; Baysic de Vera, Armin

    2012-02-15

    A new proton beam focusing facility, designed for proton beam writing (PBW) applications has been tested. PBW allows for proximity free structuring of high aspect ratio, high-density 3D nanostructures. The new facility is designed around OM52 compact quadrupole lenses capable of operating in a variety of high demagnification configurations. Performance tests show that proton beams can be focused down to 19.0 x 29.9 nm{sup 2} and single line scans show a beam width of 12.6 nm. The ultimate goal of sub 10 nm structuring with MeV protons will be discussed.

  19. Conceptual design of the beam source for the DEMO Neutral Beam Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonato, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Fantz, U.; Franke, T.; Furno, I.; Simonin, A.; Tran, M. Q.

    2016-12-01

    DEMO (DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant) is a proposed nuclear fusion power plant that is intended to follow the ITER experimental reactor. The main goal of DEMO will be to demonstrate the possibility to produce electric energy from the fusion reaction. The injection of high energy neutral beams is one of the main tools to heat the plasma up to fusion conditions. A conceptual design of the Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) for the DEMO fusion reactor, is currently being developed by Consorzio RFX in collaboration with other European research institutes. High efficiency and low recirculating power, which are fundamental requirements for the success of DEMO, have been taken into special consideration for the DEMO NBI. Moreover, particular attention has been paid to the issues related to reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability. A conceptual design of the beam source for the DEMO NBI is here presented featuring 20 sub-sources (two adjacent columns of 10 sub-sources each), following a modular design concept, with each sub-source featuring its radio frequency driver, capable of increasing the reliability and availability of the DEMO NBI. Copper grids with increasing size of the apertures have been adopted in the accelerator, with three main layouts of the apertures (circular apertures, slotted apertures and frame-like apertures for each sub-source). This design, permitting to significantly decrease the stripping losses in the accelerator without spoiling the beam optics, has been investigated with a self-consistent model able to study at the same time the magnetic field, the electrostatic field and the trajectory of the negative ions. Moreover, the status on the R&D carried out in Europe on the ion sources is presented.

  20. A button - type beam position monitor design for TARLA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündoǧan, M. Tural; Kaya, ć.; Yavaş, Ö.

    2016-03-01

    Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) facility is proposed as an IR FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility as the first facility of Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC). TARLA is essentially proposed to generate oscillator mode FEL in 3-250 microns wavelengths range, will consist of normal conducting injector system with 250 keV beam energy, two superconducting RF accelerating modules in order to accelerate the beam 15-40 MeV. The TARLA facility is expected to provide two modes, Continuous wave (CW) and pulsed mode. Longitudinal electron bunch length will be changed between 1 and 10 ps. The bunch charge will be limited by 77pC. The design of the Button-type Beam Position Monitor for TARLA IR FEL is studied to operate in 1.3 GHz. Mechanical antenna design and simulations are completed considering electron beam parameters of TARLA. Ansoft HFSS and CST Particle Studio is used to compare with results of simulations.

  1. Particle-beam fusion research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-31

    Sandia research in inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is based on pulse-power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron-beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF involves irradiating a deuterium-tritium pellet with either laser light or particle beams until the center of the pellet is compressed and heated to the point of nuclear fusion. This publication focuses on the use of particle beams to achieve fusion, and on the various facilities that are used in support of the particle-beam fusion (PBF) program.

  2. Plans for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoennessen, M.

    2010-03-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a new National User Facility for nuclear science, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) and operated by Michigan State University (MSU). FRIB will cost approximately $550 million to establish and take about a decade to design and build.

  3. Concept for an advanced exotic beam facility based on ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    The acceleration of beams of unstable nuclei has opened up new research frontiers. Experiments at existing accelerators, and particularly at the first generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, have demonstrated convincingly that unique information becomes accessible. Critical cross sections for astrophysical processes that were impossible to obtain previously, qualitatively new and unexpected nuclear structure effects in nuclei far from stability, completely new approaches to studies of nuclear decays, reactions and structure, all have triggered much excitement for this new dimension in nuclear research. To explore this new dimension, an extension of present technical capabilities and facilities is needed. This need and its scientific basis were discussed in various workshops and symposia and in the Isospin Laboratory (ISL) White Paper. A report by the European community was published recently on prospects of radioactive beam facilities in Europe, and some next-generation projects for such facilities are starting in both Europe and Japan.

  4. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  5. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  6. Overview of a conceptualized waste water treatment facility for the Consolidated Incinerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.J.

    1992-02-07

    The offgas system in the Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) will generate an aqueous waste stream which is expected to contain hazardous, nonhazardous, and radioactive components. The actual composition of this waste stream will not be identified until startup of the facility, and is expected to vary considerably. Wastewater treatment is being considered as a pretreatment to solidification in order to make a more stable final waste form and to reduce disposal costs. A potential treatment scenario has been defined which may allow disposition of this waste in compliance with all applicable regulations. The conceptualized wastewater treatment plant is based on literature evaluations for treating hazardous metals. Laboratory tests hwill be run to verify the design for its ability to remove the hazardous and radioactive components from this waste stream. The predominant mechanism employed for removal of the hazardous and radioactive metal ions is coprecipitation. The literature indicates that reasonably low quantities of hazardous metals can be achieved with this technique. The effect on the radioactive metal ions is not predictable and has not been tested. The quantity of radioactive metal ions predicted to be present in the waste is significantly less than the solubility limit of those ions, but is higher than the discharge guidelines established by DOE Order 5400.5.

  7. ECR Based Low Energy Ion Beam Facility at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, G. S.; Chakraborty, D. K.; Ghosh, Subhash; Majhi, S.; Pal, Gautam; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.; Krishna, J. B. M.; Dey, K.; Sinha, A. K.

    2012-11-01

    A low energy heavy ion irradiation/implantation facility has been developed at VECC, Kolkata for materials science and atomic physics research, utilizing indigenously developed 6.4 GHz ECR ion source. The facility provides high charge state ion beams of N, O, Ne, Ar, S, Kr, Xe, Fe, Ti, Hf etc. up to a few micro amperes to an energy of 10 keV per charge state.The beam energy can be further enhanced by floating the target at a negative potential (up to 25 kV). The ion beam is focused to a spot of about 2 mm diameter on the target using a set of glaser lenses. A x-y scanner is used to scan the beam over a target area of 10 mm x 10 mm to obtain uniform implantation. The recently commissioned multi facility sample chamber has provision for mounting multiple samples on indigenously developed disposable beam viewers for insitu beam viewing during implantation. The ionization chamber of ECR source is mainly pumped by ECR plasma. An additional pumping speed has been provided through extraction hole and pumping slots to obtain low base pressure. In the ion source, base pressure of 1x10-7 Torr in injector stage and ~5x10-8 Torr in extraction chamber have been routinely obtained. The ultra-high vacuum multi facility experimental chamber is generally kept at ~ 1x10-7 Torr during implantation on the targets. This facility is a unique tool for studying fundamental and technologically important problems of materials science and atomic physics research. High ion flux available from this machine is suitable for generating high defect densities i.e. high value of displacement-per-atom (dpa). Recently this facility has been used for studies like "Tunability of dielectric constant of conducting polymer Polyaniline (PANI) by low energy Ar9+ irradiation" and "Fe10+ implantation in ZnO for synthesis of dilute magnetic semiconductor".

  8. The SPES Radioactive-Ion Beam Facility of INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.; Calabretta, L.

    2015-11-01

    A new radioactive-ion beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using a UCx direct target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam will be provided by a high-current cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions will be produced by proton-induced fission on a uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes will be re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107-109 pps. The aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high-intensity radioactive-ion beams of neutron-rich nuclei for nuclear physics research, as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radioisotope production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  9. The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility of INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Spes Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-02-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 40 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  10. Beamed energy for space craft propulsion - Conceptual status and development potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel C.; Frisbee, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of a brief study that sought to identify and characterize beamed energy spacecraft propulsion concepts that may have positive impact on the economics of space industrialization. It is argued that the technology of beamed energy propulsion systems may significantly improve the prospects for near-term colonization of outer space. It is tentatively concluded that, for space industrialization purposes, the most attractive near-term beamed energy propulsion systems are based on microwave technology. This conclusion is reached based on consideration of the common features that exist between beamed microwave propulsion and the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) concept. Laser power beaming also continues to be an attractive option for spacecraft propulsion due to the reduced diffraction-induced beam spread afforded by laser radiation wavelengths. The conceptual status and development potential of a variety of beamed energy propulsion concepts are presented. Several alternative space transportation system concepts based on beamed energy propulsion are described.

  11. Shielding and Radiation Protection in Ion Beam Therapy Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroe, Andrew J.; Rightnar, Steven

    Radiation protection is a key aspect of any radiotherapy (RT) department and is made even more complex in ion beam therapy (IBT) by the large facility size, secondary particle spectra and intricate installation of these centers. In IBT, large and complex radiation producing devices are used and made available to the public for treatment. It is thus the responsibility of the facility to put in place measures to protect not only the patient but also the general public, occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed personnel working within the facility, and electronics installed within the department to ensure maximum safety while delivering maximum up-time.

  12. Conceptual Design Report for Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Harvego; David Duncan; Joan Connolly; Margaret Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz; Gary Mecham

    2010-10-01

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  13. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report. FY 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) operations are summarized for FY 2014. It is one of a series of publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  14. A conceptual design study for the secondary mirror drive of the shuttle infrared telescope facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, R. E.; Cox, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Various conceptual designs for the secondary mirror actuator system to be used in the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) were evaluated. In addition, a set of design concepts was developed to assist in the solution of problems crucial for optimum performance of the secondary mirror actuator system. A specific conceptual approach was presented along with a plan for developing that approach and identifying issues of critical importance in the developmental effort.

  15. Low energy beam transport for facility for rare isotope beams driver linear particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Leitner, D; Machicoane, G; Pozdeyev, E; Smirnov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Winklehner, D; Zhao, Q

    2012-02-01

    The driver linac for the facility for rare isotope beams (FRIB) will provide a wide range of primary ion beams for nuclear physics research. The linac will be capable of accelerating a uranium beam to an energy of up to 200 Mev∕u and delivering it to a fragmentation target with a maximum power of 400 kW. Stable ion beams will be produced by a high performance electron cyclotron resonance ion source operating at 28 GHz. The ion source will be located on a high voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 12 keV∕u. After extraction, the ion beam will be transported vertically down to the linac tunnel in a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system and injected into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) operating at a frequency of 80.5 MHz. To meet the beam power requirements, simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states will be used for heavier ions (≥Xe). This paper presents the layout of the FRIB LEBT and the beam dynamics in the LEBT. In particular, simulation and design of the beam line section before charge state selection will be detailed. The need to use an achromatic design for the charge state selection system and the advantage of an ion beam collimation system to limit the emittance of the beam injected into the RFQ will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Conceptualization and design of a variable-gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The goal is to provide facilities for the study of the effects of variable-gravity levels in reducing the physiological stresses upon the humans of long-term stay time in zero-g. The designs studied include: twin-tethered two module system with a central despun module with docking port and winch gear; and rigid arm tube facility using shuttle external tanks. Topics examined included: despun central capsule configuration, docking clearances, EVA requirements, crew selection, crew scheduling, food supply and preparation, waste handling, leisure use, biomedical issues, and psycho-social issues.

  17. Advanced ion beam calorimetry for the test facility ELISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocentini, R.; Bonomo, F.; Pimazzoni, A.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The negative ion source test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) is in operation since beginning of 2013 at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) in Garching bei München. The large radio frequency driven ion source of ELISE is about 1×1 m2 in size (1/2 the ITER source) and can produce a plasma for up to 1 h. Negative ions can be extracted and accelerated by an ITER-like extraction system made of 3 grids with an area of 0.1 m2, for 10 s every 3 minutes. A total accelerating voltage of up to 60 kV is available, i.e. a maximum ion beam power of about 1.2 MW can be produced. ELISE is equipped with several beam diagnostic tools for the evaluation of the beam characteristics. In order to evaluate the beam properties with a high level of detail, a sophisticated diagnostic calorimeter has been installed in the test facility at the end of 2013, starting operation in January 2014. The diagnostic calorimeter is split into 4 copper plates with separate water calorimetry for each of the plates. Each calorimeter plate is made of 15×15 copper blocks, which act as many separate inertial calorimeters and are attached to a copper plate with an embedded cooling circuit. The block geometry and the connection with the cooling plate are optimized to accurately measure the time-averaged power of the 10 s ion beam. The surface of the blocks is covered with a black coating that allows infrared (IR) thermography which provides a 2D profile of the beam power density. In order to calibrate the IR thermography, 48 thermocouples are installed in as many blocks, arranged in two vertical and two horizontal rows. The paper describes the beam calorimetry in ELISE, including the methods used for the IR thermography, the water calorimetry and the analytical methods for beam profile evaluation. It is shown how the maximum beam inhomogeneity amounts to 13% in average. The beam divergence derived by IR thermography ranges between 1° and 4° and correlates

  18. Advanced ion beam calorimetry for the test facility ELISE

    SciTech Connect

    Nocentini, R. Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.; Wünderlich, D.; Bonomo, F.; Pimazzoni, A.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2015-04-08

    The negative ion source test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) is in operation since beginning of 2013 at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) in Garching bei München. The large radio frequency driven ion source of ELISE is about 1×1 m{sup 2} in size (1/2 the ITER source) and can produce a plasma for up to 1 h. Negative ions can be extracted and accelerated by an ITER-like extraction system made of 3 grids with an area of 0.1 m{sup 2}, for 10 s every 3 minutes. A total accelerating voltage of up to 60 kV is available, i.e. a maximum ion beam power of about 1.2 MW can be produced. ELISE is equipped with several beam diagnostic tools for the evaluation of the beam characteristics. In order to evaluate the beam properties with a high level of detail, a sophisticated diagnostic calorimeter has been installed in the test facility at the end of 2013, starting operation in January 2014. The diagnostic calorimeter is split into 4 copper plates with separate water calorimetry for each of the plates. Each calorimeter plate is made of 15×15 copper blocks, which act as many separate inertial calorimeters and are attached to a copper plate with an embedded cooling circuit. The block geometry and the connection with the cooling plate are optimized to accurately measure the time-averaged power of the 10 s ion beam. The surface of the blocks is covered with a black coating that allows infrared (IR) thermography which provides a 2D profile of the beam power density. In order to calibrate the IR thermography, 48 thermocouples are installed in as many blocks, arranged in two vertical and two horizontal rows. The paper describes the beam calorimetry in ELISE, including the methods used for the IR thermography, the water calorimetry and the analytical methods for beam profile evaluation. It is shown how the maximum beam inhomogeneity amounts to 13% in average. The beam divergence derived by IR thermography ranges between 1° and 4° and

  19. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Xufei, X. Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-11-15

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes.

  20. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Conceptual design of an in-space cryogenic fluid management facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willen, G. S.; Riemer, D. H.; Hustvedt, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Spacelab experiment to develop the technology associated with low gravity propellant management is presented. The proposed facility consisting of a supply tank, receiver tank, pressurization system, instrumentation, and supporting hardware, is described. The experimental objectives, the receiver tank to be modeled, and constraints imposed on the design by the space shuttle, Spacelab, and scaling requirements, are described. The conceptual design, including the general configurations, flow schematics, insulation systems, instrumentation requirements, and internal tank configurations for the supply tank and the receiver tank, is described. Thermal, structural, fluid, and safety and reliability aspects of the facility are analyzed. The facility development plan, including schedule and cost estimates for the facility, is presented. A program work breakdown structure and master program schedule for a seven year program are included.

  2. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Martinez, Derwin; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Sedillo, James Daniel; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H{sup +} LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  3. Three-axis electron-beam test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Ebihara, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    An electron beam test facility, which consists of a precision multidimensional manipulator built into an ultra-high-vacuum bell jar, was designed, fabricated, and operated at Lewis Research Center. The position within the bell jar of a Faraday cup which samples current in the electron beam under test, is controlled by the manipulator. Three orthogonal axes of motion are controlled by stepping motors driven by digital indexers, and the positions are displayed on electronic totalizers. In the transverse directions, the limits of travel are approximately + or - 2.5 cm from the center with a precision of 2.54 micron (0.0001 in.); in the axial direction, approximately 15.0 cm of travel are permitted with an accuracy of 12.7 micron (0.0005 in.). In addition, two manually operated motions are provided, the pitch and yaw of the Faraday cup with respect to the electron beam can be adjusted to within a few degrees. The current is sensed by pulse transformers and the data are processed by a dual channel box car averager with a digital output. The beam tester can be operated manually or it can be programmed for automated operation. In the automated mode, the beam tester is controlled by a microcomputer (installed at the test site) which communicates with a minicomputer at the central computing facility. The data are recorded and later processed by computer to obtain the desired graphical presentations.

  4. Commissioning and first radioactive beam experiments at the CARIBU facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy; Baker, Sam; Caldwell, Shane; Clark, Jason; Davids, Cary; Lascar, Daniel; Levand, Anthony; Pardo, Richard; Peterson, Donald; Phillips, Don; Sternberg, Matthew; Sun, Tao; van Schelt, Jon; Vondrasek, Rick; Zabransky, Bruce

    2011-04-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS superconducting linac facility aims at providing low energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. These beams are obtained from fission fragments of a 1 Ci 252Cf source, thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge breed to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. The facility has ramped up with first operation with a weaker 2.5 mCi source and now a 100 mCi source. Low-energy mass separated radioactive beams have been extracted, charge bred with an efficiency of about 8%, and reaccelerated to 6 MeV/u. Commissioning results, together with the results from first astrophysics experiments at CARIBU using the beams from the 100 mCi source will be presented. The final 1 Ci source is expected to be available in the spring. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD, is summarized. Main elements of the design, systems, and plant facilities are illustrated. System design descriptions are included for closed cycle cooling water, industrial gas systems, fuel oil, boiler flue gas, coal management, seed management, slag management, plant industrial waste, fire service water, oxidant supply, MHD power ventilating

  6. Next Generation Laser-Compton Gamma-ray Beam Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying

    2014-09-01

    Since late 1970s, laser driven Compton gamma-ray beam facilities have been developed, contradicted and operated around the world for basic science research in nuclear physics and astrophysics, and for applied research in the areas of national security and industrial applications. Currently, TUNL's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) located at Duke University campus is the most intense Compton gamma-ray beam facility dedicated for scientific research. Driven by a high power storage ring Free-Electron Laser (FEL), HIGS produces nearly monochromatic, highly polarized gamma-ray beams from 1 to 100 MeV, with its peak performance of total flux up to few 1E10 g/s and a spectral flux of more than 1E3 g/s/eV in the few MeV to 10 MeV region. The next generation Compton gamma-ray sources will be developed using advanced laser technologies. This talk will provide an overview of new Compton gamma-beam projects, including the ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics) project in Romania and the HIGS upgrade project - HIGS2. Since late 1970s, laser driven Compton gamma-ray beam facilities have been developed, contradicted and operated around the world for basic science research in nuclear physics and astrophysics, and for applied research in the areas of national security and industrial applications. Currently, TUNL's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) located at Duke University campus is the most intense Compton gamma-ray beam facility dedicated for scientific research. Driven by a high power storage ring Free-Electron Laser (FEL), HIGS produces nearly monochromatic, highly polarized gamma-ray beams from 1 to 100 MeV, with its peak performance of total flux up to few 1E10 g/s and a spectral flux of more than 1E3 g/s/eV in the few MeV to 10 MeV region. The next generation Compton gamma-ray sources will be developed using advanced laser technologies. This talk will provide an overview of new Compton gamma-beam projects, including the ELI-NP (Extreme Light

  7. Development and Commissioning of an External Beam Facility in the Union College Ion Beam Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Joshua; Clark, Morgan; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an external beam facility for the 1.1-MV tandem Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion Beam Analysis Laboratory. The beam is extracted from an aluminum pipe through a 1 / 4 ' ' diameter window with a 7.5- μm thick Kapton foil. This external beam facility allows us to perform ion beam analysis on samples that cannot be put under vacuum, including wet samples and samples too large to fit into the scattering chamber. We have commissioned the new facility by performing proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of several samples of environmental interest. These include samples of artificial turf, running tracks, and a human tooth with an amalgam filling. A 1.7-MeV external proton beam was incident on the samples positioned 2 cm from the window. The resulting X-rays were measured using a silicon drift detector and were analyzed using GUPIX software to determine the concentrations of elements in the samples. The results on the human tooth indicate that while significant concentrations of Hg, Ag, and Sn are present in the amalgam filling, only trace amounts of Hg appear to have leached into the tooth. The artificial turf and running tracks show rather large concentrations of a broad range of elements and trace amounts of Pb in the turf infill.

  8. Engineering test facility conceptual design. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Because of the close relationship between the ETF design work conducted under this contract, and the design work of Potential Early Commercial MHD Power Plants (PSPEC) conducted under a separate and parallel DOE/NASA study contract, (DEN 3-51), the ETF design work reported on here was coordinated as far as possible with the design information developed in the above-mentioned separate PSPEC study. The reference power system configuration originally specified for the ETF considered the use of a high-temperature-air preheater, separately fired initially with oil and subsequently with a LBtu gas produced in a coal gasifier integrated with the power plant. The potential attractiveness of using oxygen enrichment in combustion of the coal for early commercial MHD power plant applications was indicated in our original ETF Conceptual Design Document. This eliminates the need for a high-temperature-air preheater and its associated gasifier. The results from our initial parametric design analysis in the separate study of Early Commercial MHD Power Plants reinforced the potential attractiveness of the use of oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Therefore, preliminary analysis of the use of oxygen enrichment for the ETF was included as part of the ETF contract amendment work reported on here.

  9. Progress report of the innovated KIST ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonkon; Eliades, John A.; Yu, Byung-Yong; Lim, Weon Cheol; Chae, Keun Hwa; Song, Jonghan

    2017-01-01

    The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST, Seoul, Republic of (S.) Korea) ion beam facility consists of three electrostatic accelerators: a 400 kV single ended ion implanter, a 2 MV tandem accelerator system and a 6 MV tandem accelerator system. The 400 kV and 6 MV systems were purchased from High Voltage Engineering Europa (HVEE, Netherlands) and commissioned in 2013, while the 2 MV system was purchased from National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC, USA) in 1995. These systems are used to provide traditional ion beam analysis (IBA), isotope ratio analysis (ex. accelerator mass spectrometry, AMS), and ion implantation/irradiation for domestic industrial and academic users. The main facility is the 6 MV HVEE Tandetron system that has an AMS line currently used for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36 Cl, 41Ca and 129I analyses, and three lines for IBA that are under construction. Here, these systems are introduced with their specifications and initial performance results.

  10. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    A study is done on the application of a tower-focus solar cogeneration facility at the US Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Solar-heated molten salt is to provide the steam for electricity and for room heating, room cooling, and domestic hot water. The proposed solar cogeneration system is expected to save the equivalent of approximately 10,500 barrels of fuel oil per year and to involve low development risks. The site and existing plant are described, including the climate and plant performance. The selection of the site-specific configuration is discussed, including: candidate system configurations; technology assessments, including risk assessments of system development, receiver fluids, and receiver configurations; system sizing; and the results of trade studies leading to the selection of the preferred system configuration. (LEW)

  11. Conceptual design report -- Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; House, L.S.; Duck, R.R.; Lisauskas, R.A.; Dixit, V.J.; Morgan, M.E.; Johnson, S.A.; Boni, A.A.

    1994-09-01

    The problems heretofore with coal gasification and IGCC concepts have been their high cost and historical poor performance of fixed-bed gasifiers, particularly on caking coals. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project is being developed to solve these problems through the development of a novel coal gasification invention which incorporates pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification (fixed-bed). It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration caused in the conventional process of gradually heating coal through the 400 F to 900 F range. In so doing, the coal is rapidly heated sufficiently such that the coal tar exists in gaseous form rather than as a liquid. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can become chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NH{sub 3} and HCN from fuel born nitrogen, steam injection is minimized, and residual nitrogen compounds are partially chemically reduced in the cracking stage in the upper gasifier region. Assuming testing confirms successful deployment of all these integrated processes, future IGCC applications will be much simplified, require significantly less mechanical components, and will likely achieve the $1,000/kWe commercialized system cost goal of the GPIF project. This report describes the process and its operation, design of the plant and equipment, site requirements, and the cost and schedule. 23 refs., 45 figs., 23 tabs.

  12. Conceptual design of a beam steering lens through transformation electromagnetics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianjia; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; de Lustrac, André

    2015-05-18

    In this paper, based on transformation electromagnetics, the design procedure of a lens antenna, which steers the radiated beam of a patch array, is presented. Laplace's equation is adopted to construct the mapping between the virtual space and the physical space. The two dimensional (2D) design method can be extended to a potential three-dimensional (3D) realization, and with a proper parameter simplification, the lens can be further realized by common metamaterials or isotropic graded refractive index (GRIN) materials. Full wave simulations are performed to validate the proposed concept. It is observed that by placing the lens on a feeding source, we are able to steer the radiation emitted by the latter source.

  13. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  14. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.E.

    1994-03-21

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design.

  15. Nuclear astrophysics at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Jeff C.

    1996-01-01

    Reactions involving radioactive nuclei play an important role in explosive stellar events such as novae, supernovae, and X-ray bursts. The development of accelerated, proton-rich radioactive ion beams provides a tool for directly studying many of the reactions that fuel explosive hydrogen burning. The experimental nuclear astrophysics program at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is centered on absolute cross section measurements of these reactions with radioactive ion beams. Beams of F-17 and F-18, important nuclei in the hot-CNO cycle, are currently under development at HRIBF. Progress in the production of intense radioactive fluorine beams is reported. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been installed at HRIBF as the primary experimental station for nuclear astrophysics experiments. The DRS will be used to measure reactions in inverse kinematics with the techniques of direct recoil detection, delayed-activity recoil detection, and recoil-gamma coincidence measurements. The first astrophysics experiments to be performed at HRIBF, mA the application of the recoil separator in these measurements, are discussed.

  16. Radioactive beams from Californium fission at the CARIBU facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy; Pardo, Richard; Baker, Sam; Davids, Cary; Peterson, Don; Phillips, Don; Vondrasek, Rick; Zabransky, Bruce; Zinkann, Gary

    2009-10-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS superconducting linac facility aims at providing low energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. These beams are obtained from fission fragments of a 1 Ci ^252Cf source, thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge breed to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. The method described is fast and universal and short-lived isotope yield scale essentially with Californium fission yields. Expected intensities of reaccelerated beams are up to ˜5x10^5 (10^7 at low energy) far-from-stability ions per second on target. Initial commissioning is being performed with weaker 2.5 and 80 mCi sources. Commissioning results, together with the nuclear physics and astrophysics program that will be pursued with the neutron-rich beams made available, will be presented. Plans for installation of the 1 Ci source will be discussed.

  17. Conceptual design for the Space Station Freedom fluid physics/dynamics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.; Chucksa, Ronald J.; Omalley, Terence F.; Oeftering, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    A study team at NASA's Lewis Research Center has been working on a definition study and conceptual design for a fluid physics and dynamics science facility that will be located in the Space Station Freedom's baseline U.S. Laboratory module. This modular, user-friendly facility, called the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, will be available for use by industry, academic, and government research communities in the late 1990's. The Facility will support research experiments dealing with the study of fluid physics and dynamics phenomena. Because of the lack of gravity-induced convection, research into the mechanisms of fluids in the absence of gravity will help to provide a better understanding of the fundamentals of fluid processes. This document has been prepared as a final version of the handout for reviewers at the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility Assessment Workshop held at Lewis on January 24 and 25, 1990. It covers the background, current status, and future activities of the Lewis Project Study Team effort. It is a revised and updated version of a document entitled 'Status Report on the Conceptual Design for the Space Station Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility', dated January 1990.

  18. The Neutral Beam Test Facility and Radiation Effects Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie-Wilson, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has constructed a Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) and a Radiation Effects Facility (REF). These two facilities use the surplus capacity of the 200-MeV Linac injector for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The REF can be used to simulate radiation damage effects in space from both natural and man made radiation sources. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy, current and dimensions can be varied over a wide range leading to a broad field of application. The NBTF has been designed to carry out high precision experiments and contains an absolute reference target system for the on-line calibration of measurements carried out in the experimental hall. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy, current and dimensions can also be varied over a wide range but with tradeoffs depending on the required accuracy. Both facilities are fully operational and will be described together with details of the associated experimental programs.

  19. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM; Menasce, Dario; ...

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100 × 150 μm2 pixelmore » cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.« less

  20. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Prosser, Alan; Rivera, Ryan; Terzo, Stefano; Turqueti, Marcos; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vigani, Luigi; Dinardo, Mauro E.

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100 × 150 μm2 pixel cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.

  1. Aifira: An ion beam facility for multidisciplinary research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorieul, S.; Alfaurt, Ph.; Daudin, L.; Serani, L.; Moretto, Ph.

    2014-08-01

    During the last decade, the CENBG (Centre d'Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan) commissioned a new facility called AIFIRA (Applications Interdisciplinaires des Faisceaux d'ions en Région Aquitaine). It allowed the development of a multidisciplinary activity based on the "in-house" expertise of CENBG in ion beam analysis. The great flexibility offered by the five beam lines confers a lot of possibilities for chemical analysis and nuclear physics. Indeed, not only the macrobeam and the external beam lines provide the full set of IBA techniques for routine sample analysis but an additional beam line is devoted to the production of monoenergetic neutrons through the interaction of the incoming ion with selected targets. In addition, the two high-resolution microbeam lines are used for chemical analyses, 2D/3D imaging, and targeted cell irradiation. Besides, the combination of the nanobeam line flexibility, the uniqueness of the micro-irradiation design completed by the internal CENBG expertise confers a great specificity to AIFIRA in biomedical field. After a detailed technical overview of the platform, the article focuses on the two high-resolution lines as they tap most of the activity. Thus a quick overview of the most significant results concerning biomedical samples is proposed in order to highlight the analytical possibilities of AIFIRA microbeam lines. A summary of the development status of the micro-irradiation line is also done.

  2. Centrifuge facility conceptual system study. Volume 2: Facility systems and study summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synnestvedt, Robert (Editor); Blair, Patricia; Cartledge, Alan; Garces-Porcile, Jorge; Garin, Vladimir; Guerrero, Mike; Haddeland, Peter; Horkachuck, Mike; Kuebler, Ulrich; Nguyen, Frank

    1991-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility is a major element of the biological research facility for the implementation of NASA's Life Science Research Program on Space Station Freedom using nonhuman species (small primates, rodents, plants, insects, cell tissues, etc.). The Centrifuge Facility consists of a variable gravity Centrifuge to provide artificial gravity up to 2 earth G's' a Holding System to maintain specimens at microgravity levels, a Glovebox, and a Service Unit for servicing specimen chambers. The following subject areas are covered: (1) Holding System; (2) Centrifuge System; (3) Glovebox System; (4) Service System; and (5) system study summary.

  3. Conceptual design and programmatics studies of space station accommodations for Life Sciences Research Facilities (LSRF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Conceptual designs and programmatics of the space station accommodations for the Life Sciences Research Facilities (LSRF) are presented. The animal ECLSS system for the LSRF provides temperature-humidity control, air circulation, and life support functions for experimental subjects. Three ECLSS were studied. All configurations presented satisfy the science requirements for: animal holding facilities with bioisolation; facilities interchangeable to hold rodents, small primates, and plants; metabolic cages interchangeable with standard holding cages; holding facilities adaptable to restrained large primates and rodent breeding/nesting cages; volume for the specified instruments; enclosed ferm-free workbench for manipulation of animals and chemical procedures; freezers for specimen storage until return; and centrifuge to maintain animals and plants at fractional g to 1 g or more, with potential for accommodating humans for short time intervals.

  4. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

  5. Space Station Furnace Facility. Volume 2: Requirements definition and conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Furnace (SSFF) Project is divided into two phases: phase 1, a definition study phase, and phase 2, a design and development phase. TBE was awarded a research study entitled, 'Space Station Furnace Facility Requirements Definition and Conceptual Design Study' on June 2, 1989. This report addresses the definition study phase only. Phase 2 is to be complete after completion of phase 1. The contract encompassed a requirements definition study and culminated in hardware/facility conceptual designs and hardware demonstration development models to test these conceptual designs. The study was divided into two parts. Part 1 (the basic part of the effort) encompassed preliminary requirements definition and assessment; conceptional design of the SSFF Core; fabrication of mockups; and preparation for the support of a conceptional design review (CoDR). Part 2 (the optional part of the effort) included detailed definition of the engineering and design requirements, as derived from the science requirements; refinement of the conceptual design of the SSFF Core; fabrication and testing of the 'breadboards' or development models; and preparation for and support of a requirements definition review.

  6. Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

  7. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Previtali, Valentina; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  8. ISOL science at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beene, J. R.; Bardayan, D. W.; Galindo Uribarri, A.; Gross, C. J.; Jones, K. L.; Liang, J. F.; Nazarewicz, W.; Stracener, D. W.; Tatum, B. A.; Varner, R. L.

    2011-02-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) provides high-quality Isotope Separator Online beams of short-lived, radioactive nuclei for nuclear structure and reaction studies, astrophysics research, and interdisciplinary applications. The primary driver, the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, produces rare isotopes by bombarding highly refractory targets with light ions. The radioactive isotopes are ionized, formed into a beam, mass selected, injected into the 25 MV tandem, accelerated, and used in experiments. This paper reviews the HRIBF and its users' science. Note that this manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of the manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  9. Investigation of plasma-surface interaction at plasma beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnaev, V.; Vizgalov, I.; Gutorov, K.; Tulenbergenov, T.; Sokolov, I.; Kolodeshnikov, A.; Ignashev, V.; Zuev, V.; Bogomolova, I.; Klimov, N.

    2015-08-01

    The new Plasma Beam Facility (PBF) has been put into operation for assistance in testing of plasma faced components at Material Science Kazakhstan Tokamak (KTM). PBF includes a powerful electron gun (up to 30 kV, 1 A) and a high vacuum chamber with longitudinal magnetic field coils (up to 0.2 T). The regime of high vacuum electron beam transportation is used for thermal tests with power density at the target surface up to 10 GW/m2. The beam plasma discharge (BPD) regime with a gas-puff is used for generation of intensive ion fluxes up to 3 ṡ 1022 m-2 s-1. Initial tests of the KTM PBF's capabilities were carried out: various discharge regimes, carbon deposits cleaning, simultaneous thermal and ion impacts on radiation cooled refractory targets. With a water-cooled target the KTM PBF could be used for high heat flux tests of materials (validated by the experiment with W mock-up at the PR-2 PBF).

  10. Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility at Pioneer Mill Co. , Ltd

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Results are reported of a conceptual design study of the retrofit of a solar central receiver system to an existing cogeneration facility at a Hawaii raw sugar factory. Background information on the site, the existing facility, and the project organization is given. Then the results are presented o the work to select the site specific configuration, including the working fluid, receiver concept, heliostat field site, and the determination of the solar facility size and of the role of thermal storage. The system selected would use water-steam as its working fluid in a twin-cavity receiver collecting sunlight from 41,420 m/sup 2/ of heliostat mirrors. The lates version of the system specification is appended, as are descriptions of work to measure site insolation and a site insolation mathematical model and interface data for the local utility. (LEW)

  11. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-05-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  12. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-02-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  13. Conceptual design for an electron-beam heated hypersonic wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; Kensek, R.P.

    1997-07-01

    There is a need for hypersonic wind-tunnel testing at about mach 10 and above using natural air and simulating temperatures and pressures which are prototypic of flight at 50 km altitude or below. With traditional wind-tunnel techniques, gas cooling during expansion results in exit temperatures which are too low. Miles, et al., have proposed overcoming this difficulty by heating the air with a laser beam as it expands in the wind-tunnel nozzle. This report discusses an alternative option of using a high-power electron beam to heat the air as it expands. In the e-beam heating concept, the electron beam is injected into the wind-tunnel nozzle near the exit and then is guided upstream toward the nozzle throat by a strong axial magnetic field. The beam deposits most of its power in the dense air near the throat where the expansion rate is greatest. A conceptual design is presented for a large-scale system which achieves Mach 14 for 0.1 seconds with an exit diameter of 2.8 meters. It requires 450 MW of electron beam power (5 MeV at 90 A). The guiding field is 500 G for most of the transport length and increases to 100 kG near the throat to converge the beam to a 1.0-cm diameter. The beam generator is a DC accelerator using a Marx bank (of capacitors) and a diode stack with a hot cathode. 14 refs. 38 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. SECONDARY WASTE/ETF (EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY) PRELIMINARY PRE-CONCEPTUAL ENGINEERING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    MAY TH; GEHNER PD; STEGEN GARY; HYMAS JAY; PAJUNEN AL; SEXTON RICH; RAMSEY AMY

    2009-12-28

    This pre-conceptual engineering study is intended to assist in supporting the critical decision (CD) 0 milestone by providing a basis for the justification of mission need (JMN) for the handling and disposal of liquid effluents. The ETF baseline strategy, to accommodate (WTP) requirements, calls for a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the ETF to provide the needed additional processing capability. This STU is to process the ETF evaporator concentrate into a cement-based waste form. The cementitious waste will be cast into blocks for curing, storage, and disposal. Tis pre-conceptual engineering study explores this baseline strategy, in addition to other potential alternatives, for meeting the ETF future mission needs. Within each reviewed case study, a technical and facility description is outlined, along with a preliminary cost analysis and the associated risks and benefits.

  15. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF). Volume 2: Conceptual design definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamel, James M.

    1993-01-01

    This document is Volume 2 of the Final Report for the Phase A Study of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF), and presents the GGSF Conceptual Design. It is a follow-on to the Volume 1 Facility Definition Study, NASA report CR 177606. The development of a conceptual design for a Space Station Freedom (SSF) facility that will be used for investigating particle interactions in varying environments, including various gas mixtures, pressures, and temperatures is delineated. It's not possible to study these experiments on earth due to the long reaction times associated with this type of phenomena, hence the need for extended periods of microgravity. The particle types will vary in composition (solids and liquids), sizes (from submicrons to centimeters), and concentrations (from single particles to 10(exp 10) per cubic centimeter). The results of the experiments pursued in the GGSF will benefit a variety of scientific inquiries. These investigations span such diverse topics as the formation of planets and planetary rings, cloud and haze processes in planetary atmospheres, the composition and structure of astrophysical objects, and the viability of airborne microbes (e.g., in a manned spacecraft).

  16. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 3: Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, James; McCluskey, Elaine; Lundin, Tracy; Willhite, Joshua; Hamernik, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Marchionni, Alberto; Kim, Min Jeong; Nessi, Marzio; Montanari, David; Heavey, Anne

    2016-01-21

    This volume of the LBNF/DUNE Conceptual Design Report covers the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE and describes the LBNF Project, which includes design and construction of the beamline at Fermilab, the conventional facilities at both Fermilab and SURF, and the cryostat and cryogenics infrastructure required for the DUNE far detector.

  17. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.

    2016-01-22

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  18. Positron beam facility at Kyoto University Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2014-04-01

    A positron beam facility is presently under construction at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A cadmium (Cd) - tungsten (W) source similar to that used in NEPOMUC was chosen in the KUR because Cd is very efficient at producing γ-rays when exposed to thermal neutron flux, and W is a widely used in converter and moderator materials. High-energy positrons are moderated by a W moderator with a mesh structure. Electrical lenses and a solenoid magnetic field are used to extract the moderated positrons and guide them to a platform outside of the reactor, respectively. Since Japan is an earthquake-prone country, a special attention is paid for the design of the in-pile positron source so as not to damage the reactor in the severe earthquake.

  19. Programmable beam spatial shaping system for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heebner, John; Borden, Michael; Miller, Phil; Hunter, Steve; Christensen, Kim; Scanlan, Michael; Haynam, Chris; Wegner, Paul; Hermann, Mark; Brunton, Gordon; Tse, Eddy; Awwal, Abdul; Wong, Nan; Seppala, Lynn; Franks, Mark; Marley, Ed; Williams, Kevin; Budge, Tracy; Henesian, Mark; Stolz, Christopher; Suratwala, Tayyab; Monticelli, Marcus; Walmer, Dan; Dixit, Sham; Widmayer, Clay; Wolfe, Justin; Bude, Jeff; McCarty, Kelly; DiNicola, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-01

    A system of customized spatial light modulators has been installed onto the front end of the laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The devices are capable of shaping the beam profile at a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain. Their primary function is to introduce "blocker" obscurations at programmed locations within the beam profile. These obscurations are positioned to shadow small, isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. The modulators were designed to enable a drop-in retrofit of each of the 48 existing Pre Amplifier Modules (PAMs) without compromising their original performance specifications. This was accomplished by use of transmissive Optically Addressable Light Valves (OALV) based on a Bismuth Silicon Oxide photoconductive layer in series with a twisted nematic liquid crystal (LC) layer. These Programmable Spatial Shaper packages in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy have provided a robust approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics on NIF.

  20. Programmable Beam Spatial Shaping System for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Scanlan, M; Haynam, C; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Budge, T; Henesian, M; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J M

    2011-01-21

    A system of customized spatial light modulators has been installed onto the front end of the laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The devices are capable of shaping the beam profile at a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain. Their primary function is to introduce 'blocker' obscurations at programmed locations within the beam profile. These obscurations are positioned to shadow small, isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. The modulators were designed to enable a drop-in retrofit of each of the 48 existing Pre Amplifier Modules (PAMs) without compromising their original performance specifications. This was accomplished by use of transmissive Optically Addressable Light Valves (OALV) based on a Bismuth Silicon Oxide photoconductive layer in series with a twisted nematic liquid crystal (LC) layer. These Programmable Spatial Shaper packages in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy have provided a robust approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics on NIF.

  1. Conceptual design of two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, B. F.; Hill, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Five specific experiments were analyzed to provide definition of experiments designed to evaluate two phase fluid behavior in low gravity. The conceptual design represents a fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for a double rack in Spacelab. The five experiments are two phase flow patterns and pressure drop, flow boiling, liquid reorientation, and interface bubble dynamics. Hardware was sized, instrumentation and data recording requirements defined, and the five experiments were installed as an integrated experimental package. Applicable available hardware was selected in the experiment design and total experiment program costs were defined.

  2. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J.F.; Rose, C.R.; Shurter, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design.

  3. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J.F.; Rose, C.R.; Shurter, R.B.

    1995-05-05

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. Space Station Furnace Facility. Volume 1: Requirements definition and conceptual design study, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Furnace (SSFF) Study was awarded on June 2, 1989, to Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE) to define an advanced facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of Space Station Freedom (SSF). The SSFF will be designed for research in the solidification of metals and alloys, the crystal growth of electronic and electro-optical materials, and research in glasses and ceramics. The SSFF is one of the first 'facility' class payloads planned by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) of the Office of Space Science and Applications of NASA Headquarters. This facility is planned for early deployment during man-tended operations of the SSF with continuing operations through the Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC). The SSFF will be built around a general 'Core' facility which provides common support functions not provided by SSF, common subsystems which are best centralized, and common subsystems which are best distributed with each experiment module. The intent of the facility approach is to reduce the overall cost associated with implementing and operating a variety of experiments. This is achieved by reducing the launch mass and simplifying the hardware development and qualification processes associated with each experiment. The Core will remain on orbit and will require only periodic maintenance and upgrading while new Furnace Modules, samples, and consumables are developed, qualified, and transported to the SSF. The SSFF Study was divided into two phases: phase 1, a definition study phase, and phase 2, a design and development phase. The definition phase 1 is addressed. Phase 1 was divided into two parts. In the first part, the basic part of the effort, covered the preliminary definition and assessment of requirements; conceptual design of the SSFF; fabrication of mockups; and the preparation for and support of the Conceptual Design Review (CoDR). The second part, the option part, covered requirements update and

  5. Characterization of a 5-eV neutral atomic oxygen beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Linton, R. C.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Whitaker, A. F.; Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental effort to characterize an existing 5-eV neutral atomic oxygen beam facility being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is described. This characterization effort includes atomic oxygen flux and flux distribution measurements using a catalytic probe, energy determination using a commercially designed quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and the exposure of oxygen-sensitive materials in this beam facility. Also, comparisons were drawn between the reaction efficiencies of materials exposed in plasma ashers, and the reaction efficiencies previously estimated from space flight experiments. The results of this study show that the beam facility is capable of producing a directional beam of neutral atomic oxygen atoms with the needed flux and energy to simulate low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions for real time accelerated testing. The flux distribution in this facility is uniform to +/- 6 percent of the peak flux over a beam diameter of 6 cm.

  6. Beam line shielding calculations for an Electron Accelerator Mo-99 production facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2016-05-03

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the photon and neutron fields in and around the latest beam line design for the Mo-99 production facility. The radiation dose to the beam line components (quadrupoles, dipoles, beam stops and the linear accelerator) are calculated in the present report. The beam line design assumes placement of two cameras: infra red (IR) and optical transition radiation (OTR) for continuous monitoring of the beam spot on target during irradiation. The cameras will be placed off the beam axis offset in vertical direction. We explored typical shielding arrangements for the cameras and report the resulting neutron and photon dose fields.

  7. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

  8. HiRadMat: A high-energy, pulsed beam, material irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, N.; Fabich, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    HiRadMat is a recently constructed facility designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where different material samples or accelerator components can be tested. The facility, located at the CERN SPS accelerator complex, uses a 440 GeV proton beam with a pulse length up to 7.2 μs and a maximum intensity up to 10{sup 13} protons / pulse. The facility, a unique place for performing state-of-the art beam-to-material experiments, operates under transnational access and welcomes and financially supports, under certain conditions, experimental teams to perform their experiments. (authors)

  9. A High Count Rate Neutron Beam Monitor for Neutron Scattering Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Amanda; Crow, Lowell; Diawara, Yacouba; Hayward, J P; Hayward, Jason P; Menhard, Kocsis; Sedov, Vladislav N; Funk, Loren L

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low intrinsic efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor. This beam monitor offers good timing with an intrinsic efficiency of 10-3 and a counting rate capability of over 1,000,000 cps without saturation.

  10. Conceptual design of a biological specimen holding facility. [Life Science Laboratory for Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. K.; Yakut, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    An all-important first step in the development of the Spacelab Life Science Laboratory is the design of the Biological Specimen Holding Facility (BSHF) which will provide accommodation for living specimens for life science research in orbit. As a useful tool in the understanding of physiological and biomedical changes produced in the weightless environment, the BSHF will enable biomedical researchers to conduct in-orbit investigations utilizing techniques that may be impossible to perform on human subjects. The results of a comprehensive study for defining the BSHF, description of its experiment support capabilities, and the planning required for its development are presented. Conceptual designs of the facility, its subsystems and interfaces with the Orbiter and Spacelab are included. Environmental control, life support and data management systems are provided. Interface and support equipment required for specimen transfer, surgical research, and food, water and waste storage is defined. New and optimized concepts are presented for waste collection, feces and urine separation and sampling, environmental control, feeding and watering, lighting, data management and other support subsystems.

  11. IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

  12. Design-only conceptual design report for pit disassembly and conversion facility. Rev 0

    SciTech Connect

    Zygmunt, S.; Christensen, L.; Richardson, C.

    1997-12-12

    This design-only conceptual design report (DOCDR) was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Fissile Material Disposition (OFMD) for engineering design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project No. 99-D-141. The PDCF will be used to disassemble the nation`s inventory of surplus nuclear weapons pits and convert the plutonium recovered from those pits into a form suitable for storage, international inspection, and final disposition. The PDCF is a complex consisting of a hardened building that will contain the plutonium processes in a safe and secure manner, and conventional buildings and structures that will house support personnel, systems, and equipment. The PDCF uses the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES), a low waste, modular pyroprocessing system to convert pits to plutonium oxide. The PDCF project consists of engineering and design, and construction of the buildings and structures, and engineering and design, procurement, installation, testing and start-up of equipment to disassemble pits and convert plutonium in pits to oxide form. The facility is planned to operate for 10 years, averaging 3.5 metric tons (3.86 tons) of plutonium metal per year. On conclusion of operations, the PDCF will be decontaminated and decommissioned.

  13. Solid-State Laser, Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (Rilis) and Laser Beam Transport at Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, J.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Izdebski, F.; Lavoie, J. P.; Gillner, M.; Gottwald, T.; Hellbusch, F.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2009-03-01

    The inception of laser resonance ionization spectroscopy and its application as a resonant ionization laser ion source (RILIS) took place merely 20 years ago with pulsed dye lasers [1-5]. By now next generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities are being planned or built. Understanding and considering the unique RILIS requirements in the layout of next generation RIB facilities will allow for cost-effective implementation of this versatile ion source. This discussion touches on laser beam transport and RILIS requirements not necessarily obvious to experts in conventional ion sources.

  14. Demonstration of the importance of a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system for BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Chao, Der-Sheng; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The neutron beam monitoring system is indispensable to BNCT facility in order to achieve an accurate patient dose delivery. The neutron beam monitoring of a reactor-based BNCT (RB-BNCT) facility can be implemented through the instrumentation and control system of a reactor provided that the reactor power level remains constant during reactor operation. However, since the neutron flux in reactor core is highly correlative to complicated reactor kinetics resulting from such as fuel depletion, poison production, and control blade movement, some extent of variation may occur in the spatial distribution of neutron flux in reactor core. Therefore, a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system is needed to be installed in the vicinity of the beam path close to the beam exit of the RB-BNCT facility, where it can measure the BNCT beam intensity as closely as possible and be free from the influence of the objects present around the beam exit. In this study, in order to demonstrate the importance of a dedicated BNCT neutron beam monitoring system, the signals originating from the two in-core neutron detectors installed at THOR were extracted and compared with the three dedicated neutron beam monitors of the THOR BNCT facility. The correlation of the readings between the in-core neutron detectors and the BNCT neutron beam monitors was established to evaluate the improvable quality of the beam intensity measurement inferred by the in-core neutron detectors. In 29 sampled intervals within 16 days of measurement, the fluctuations in the mean value of the normalized ratios between readings of the three BNCT neutron beam monitors lay within 0.2%. However, the normalized ratios of readings of the two in-core neutron detectors to one of the BNCT neutron beam monitors show great fluctuations of 5.9% and 17.5%, respectively.

  15. Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.V.; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.

  16. Unbunched beam electron-proton instability in the PSR and advanced hadron facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tai-Sen; Pisent, A.; Neuffer, D.V.

    1989-01-01

    We studied the possibility of the occurrence of transverse instability induced by trapped electrons in unbunched beams in the Proton Storage Ring and the proposed Advance Hadron Facility (AHF) at Los Alamos, as well as in the proposed Kaon Factory at TRIUMF. We found that the e-p instability may be possible for unbunched beams in the PSR but is unlikely to occur in the advanced hadron facilities. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  17. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H.; Akiba, M.

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  18. Beam dynamics activities at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab)

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has been funded by the US Navy to build an infra-red FEL driven by an energy-recovering compact SRF-based linear accelerator. The machine is to produce a 1 kW IR photon beam. The Jefferson Lab Accelerator Division is presently engaged in detailed design and beam dynamics studies for the driver accelerator. Principle beam dynamics and beam transport considerations include: (1) generation and transport of a high-quality, high-current, space-charge dominated beam; (2) the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) during beam recirculation transport; (3) low-loss transport of a large momentum spread, high-current beam; (4) beam break up (BBU) instabilities in the recirculating accelerator; (5) impedance policing of transport system components; and (6) RF drive system control during energy recovery and FEL operation.

  19. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L. R.

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  20. 3w Transmitted Beam Diagnostic at the Omega Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Rekow, V; Sorce, C; Piston, K; Knight, R; Alvarez, S; Griffith, R; Hargrove, D; Ross, J S; Dixit, S; Pollock, B; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Armstrong, W; Bahr, R; Thorp, K; Pien, G

    2006-04-24

    A 3{omega} transmitted beam diagnostic has been commissioned on the Omega Laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester [Soures et.al., Laser Part. Beams 11 (1993)]. Transmitted light from one beam is collected by a large focusing mirror and directed onto a diagnostic platform. The near field of the transmitted light is imaged; the system collects information from twice the original f-cone of the beam. Two gated optical cameras capture the near field image of the transmitted light. Thirteen spatial positions around the measurement region are temporally resolved using fast photodiodes to allow a measure of the beam spray evolution. The Forward stimulated Raman scattering and forward simulated Brillion scattering are spectrally and temporally resolved at 5 independent locations within twice the original f-cone. The total transmitted energy is measured in two spectral bands ({delta}{lambda} < 400 nm and {delta}{lambda} > 400 nm).

  1. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The status of the new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is slated to start its scientific program late this year is discussed, as is the new experimental equipment which is being constructed at this facility. Information on the early scientific program also is given.

  2. The latest from the new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    The status of new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is slated to start its scientific program late in 1996 is discussed, as is the new experimental equipment which is being constructed at this facility. Information on the early scientific program is also given.

  3. A multipurpose fast neutron beam capability at the MASURCA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dioni, Luca; Stout, Brian

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the possible future use of the CEA Cadarache MASURCA experimental fast reactor to generate a fairly high-intensity continuous beam of fast neutrons, having energies distributed in the 1 KeV to 5 MeV range. Such an extracted beam of fast neutrons, tailorable in intensity, size and energy, would be rather unique; it would be of interest to neutron-based research and could open a range of new applications at MASURCA. We report the results of numerical simulations which have been performed to evaluate the feasibility of such a beam port and to characterize it spectrally. (authors)

  4. Diagnostics of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Agostini, M.; Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Gazza, E.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Spolaore, M.; Zaniol, B.; Sonato, P.; De Muri, M.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G.

    2012-02-15

    The ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) injector, based on negative ions accelerated at 1 MV, will be tested and optimized in the SPIDER source and MITICA full injector prototypes, using a set of diagnostics not available on the ITER HNB. The RF source, where the H{sup -}/D{sup -} production is enhanced by cesium evaporation, will be monitored with thermocouples, electrostatic probes, optical emission spectroscopy, cavity ring down, and laser absorption spectroscopy. The beam is analyzed by cooling water calorimetry, a short pulse instrumented calorimeter, beam emission spectroscopy, visible tomography, and neutron imaging. Design of the diagnostic systems is presented.

  5. BEAM LOSS ESTIMATES AND CONTROL FOR THE BNL NEUTRINO FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    WENG, W.-T.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPARIA, D.; TSOUPAS, N.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.

    2005-05-16

    The requirement for low beam loss is very important both to protect the beam component, and to make the hands-on maintenance possible. In this report, the design considerations to achieving high intensity and low loss will be presented. We start by specifying the beam loss limit at every physical process followed by the proper design and parameters for realizing the required goals. The process considered in this paper include the emittance growth in the linac, the H{sup -} injection, the transition crossing, the coherent instabilities and the extraction losses.

  6. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schietinger, T.; Pedrozzi, M.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, B.; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  7. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.

    2014-11-15

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide “burn-averaged” observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%–5% can be achieved in the range of 2–25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10{sup 14} DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm{sup 2}); 2 × 10{sup 15} DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10{sup −5} γ/n); and 1 × 10{sup 16} DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm{sup 2})

  8. Performance of the (n,{gamma})-Based Positron Beam Facility NEPOMUC

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckenbach, K.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Piochacz, C.; Stadlbauer, M.; Loewe, B.; Maier, J.; Pikart, P.

    2009-01-28

    The in-pile positron source of NEPOMUC at the neutron source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) provides at the experimental site an intense beam of monoenergetic positrons with selectable energy between 15 eV and 3 keV. The principle of the source is based on neutron capture gamma rays produced by cadmium in a beam tube tip close to the reactor core. The gamma ray absorption in platinum produces positrons which are moderated and formed to the beam. An unprecedented beam intensity of 9.10{sup 8} e{sup +}/s is achieved (1 keV). The performance and applications of the facility are presented.

  9. A low Earth orbit molecular beam space simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A brief synopsis of the low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite environment is presented including neutral and ionic species. Two ground based atomic and molecular beam instruments are described which are capable of simulating the interaction of spacecraft surfaces with the LEO environment and detecting the results of these interactions. The first detects mass spectrometrically low level fluxes of reactively and nonreactively surface scattered species as a function of scattering angle and velocity while the second ultrahigh velocity (UHV) molecular beam, laser induced fluorescence apparatus is capable of measuring chemiluminescence produced by either gas phase or gas-surface interactions. A number of proposed experiments are described.

  10. Facility for intense diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) development

    SciTech Connect

    Kasik, R.J.; Hinckley, W.B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J.B.

    1993-08-01

    An intense, pulsed neutral beam source is under development for use as a probe beam on hot, burning plasmas such as in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) which is presently in the planning stage. A pulsed, neutral hydrogen beam of 10s of kilo amperes of current can have an alpha particle, charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy (alpha-CHERS) signal-to-noise ratio of {approximately} 10. This beam would allow the measurement, on a single pulse of a few hundred nanoseconds duration, of the local alpha particle distribution function as well as other features of the tokamak plasma such as current density profile, impurity density, and microturbulence spectrum. The cross-sections for the CHERS diagnostic dictate operation with proton energies greater than {approximately}50keV. A pulsed neutral hydrogen source of this voltage and intensity can be achieved by neutralizing the ion flux from a magnetized ion-diode. The cross-sections for attachment and stripping, when coupled with scaling from Child-Langmiur, space-charge-limited, ion-current flow imply operation below - 100keV for maximum neutral fluence. The development of a flashover-anode, ion source for forthcoming evaluation of a neutralizing section is described below. This source operates in the accelerator voltage range 70 to 100keV. Eventually, the flashover-anode, magnetized ion-diode will be replaced with a plasma-anode, magnetized ion-diode.

  11. Conceptual design of initial opacity experiments on the national ignition facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, R. F.; Bailey, J. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Devolder, B. G.; Dodd, E. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Huffman, E. J.; Iglesias, C. A.; King, J. A.; Kline, J. L.; Liedahl, D. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Opachich, Y. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Ross, P. W.; Schneider, M. B.; Sherrill, M. E.; Wilson, B. G.; Zhang, R.; Perry, T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate models of X-ray absorption and re-emission in partly stripped ions are necessary to calculate the structure of stars, the performance of hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion and many other systems in high-energy-density plasma physics. Despite theoretical progress, a persistent discrepancy exists with recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility studying iron in conditions characteristic of the solar radiative-convective transition region. The increased iron opacity measured at Z could help resolve a longstanding issue with the standard solar model, but requires a radical departure for opacity theory. To replicate the Z measurements, an opacity experiment has been designed for the National Facility (NIF). The design uses established techniques scaled to NIF. A laser-heated hohlraum will produce X-ray-heated uniform iron plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at temperatures eV and electron densities 21~\\text{cm}-3$ . The iron will be probed using continuum X-rays emitted in a ps, diameter source from a 2 mm diameter polystyrene (CH) capsule implosion. In this design, of the NIF beams deliver 500 kJ to the mm diameter hohlraum, and the remaining directly drive the CH capsule with 200 kJ. Calculations indicate this capsule backlighter should outshine the iron sample, delivering a point-projection transmission opacity measurement to a time-integrated X-ray spectrometer viewing down the hohlraum axis. Preliminary experiments to develop the backlighter and hohlraum are underway, informing simulated measurements to guide the final design.

  12. Project Title: Nuclear Astrophysics Data from Radioactive Beam Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alan A. Chen

    2008-03-27

    The scientific aims of this project have been the evaluation and dissemination of key nuclear reactions in nuclear astrophysics, with a focus on ones to be studied at new radioactive beam facilities worldwide. These aims were maintained during the entire funding period from 2003 - 2006. In the following, a summary of the reactions evaluated during this period is provided. Year 1 (2003-04): {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg and {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na - The importance of the {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg and the {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na reactions in models of exploding stars has been well documented: the first is connected to the production of the radioisotope {sup 22}Na in nova nucleosynthesis, while the second is a key bridge between the Hot-CNO cycles and the rp-process in X-ray bursts. By the end of Summer 2004, our group had updated these reaction rates to include all published data up to September 2004, and cast the reaction rates into standard analytical and tabular formats with the assistance of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's computational infrastructure for reaction rates. Since September 2004, ongoing experiments on these two reactions have been completed, with our group's participation in both: {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory (DRAGON collaboration), and 18Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na at Argonne National Laboratory (collaboration with Ernst Rehm, Argonne). The data from the former was subsequently published and included in our evaluation. Publication from the latter still awaits independent confirmation of the experimental results. Year 2 (2004-05): The 25Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si and {sup 13}N(p,{gamma})14O reactions - For Year 2, we worked on evaluations of the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si and {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reactions, in accordance with our proposed deliverables and following similar standard procedures to those used in Year 1. The {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction is a key uncertainty in

  13. Compact Photon Source Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyarenko, Pavel V.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2016-04-01

    We describe options for the production of an intense photon beam at the CEBAF Hall D Tagger facility, needed for creating a high-quality secondary K 0 L delivered to the Hall D detector. The conceptual design for the Compact Photon Source apparatus is presented.

  14. Gas-grain simulation experiment module conceptual design and gas-grain simulation facility breadboard development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamel, James M.; Petach, Michael; Gat, Nahum; Kropp, Jack; Luong, Christina; Wolff, Michael

    1993-01-01

    This report delineates the Option portion of the Phase A Gas-Grain Simulation Facility study. The conceptual design of a Gas-Grain Simulation Experiment Module (GGSEM) for Space Shuttle Middeck is discussed. In addition, a laboratory breadboard was developed during this study to develop a key function for the GGSEM and the GGSF, specifically, a solid particle cloud generating device. The breadboard design and test results are discussed and recommendations for further studies are included. The GGSEM is intended to fly on board a low earth orbit (LEO), manned platform. It will be used to perform a subset of the experiments planned for the GGSF for Space Station Freedom, as it can partially accommodate a number of the science experiments. The outcome of the experiments performed will provide an increased understanding of the operational requirements for the GGSF. The GGSEM will also act as a platform to accomplish technology development and proof-of-principle experiments for GGSF hardware, and to verify concepts and designs of hardware for GGSF. The GGSEM will allow assembled subsystems to be tested to verify facility level operation. The technology development that can be accommodated by the GGSEM includes: GGSF sample generation techniques, GGSF on-line diagnostics techniques, sample collection techniques, performance of various types of sensors for environmental monitoring, and some off-line diagnostics. Advantages and disadvantages of several LEO platforms available for GGSEM applications are identified and discussed. Several of the anticipated GGSF experiments require the deagglomeration and dispensing of dry solid particles into an experiment chamber. During the GGSF Phase A study, various techniques and devices available for the solid particle aerosol generator were reviewed. As a result of this review, solid particle deagglomeration and dispensing were identified as key undeveloped technologies in the GGSF design. A laboratory breadboard version of a solid

  15. The E-beam resist test facility: performance testing and benchmarking of E-beam resists for advanced mask writers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Jang, Il Yong; Mellish, Mac; Litt, Lloyd C.; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Hartley, John

    2012-11-01

    With each new generation of e-beam mask writers comes the ability to write leading edge photomasks with improved patterning performance and increased throughput. However, these cutting-edge e-beam tools are often used with older generation resists, preventing the end-user from taking full advantage of the tool's potential. The generation gap between tool and resist will become even more apparent with the commercialization of multi-beam mask writers, which are expected to be available for pilot line use around 2015. The mask industry needs resists capable of meeting the resolution, roughness, and sensitivity requirements of these advanced tools and applications. The E-beam Resist Test Facility (ERTF) has been established to fill the need for consortium-based testing of e-beam resists for mask writing applications on advanced mask writers out to the 11nm half-pitch node and beyond. SEMATECH and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) began establishing the ERTF in early 2012 to test e-beam resist samples from commercial suppliers and university labs against the required performance metrics for each application at the target node. Operations officially began on June 12, 2012, at which time the first e-beam resist samples were tested. The ERTF uses the process and metrology infrastructure available at CNSE, including a Vistec VB300 Vectorscan e-beam tool adjusted to operate at 50kv. Initial testing results show that multiple resists already meet, or are close to meeting, the resolution requirements for mask writing at the 11nm node, but other metrics such as line width roughness still need improvement. An overview of the ERTF and its capabilities is provided here. Tools, baseline processes, and operation strategy details are discussed, and resist testing and benchmarking results are shown. The long-term outlook for the ERTF and plans to expand capability and testing capacity, including resist testing for e-beam direct write lithography, are also

  16. Construction of the SCRIT electron scattering facility at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasugi, M.; Ohnishi, T.; Wang, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Amagai, T.; Enokizono, A.; Enomoto, A.; Haraguchi, Y.; Hara, M.; Hori, T.; Ichikawa, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Kitazawa, R.; Koizumi, K.; Kurita, K.; Miyamoto, T.; Ogawara, R.; Shimakura, Y.; Takehara, H.; Tamae, T.; Tamaki, S.; Togasaki, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yanagi, K.; Suda, T.

    2013-12-01

    The SCRIT electron scattering facility, aiming at electron scattering off short-lived unstable nuclei, has been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. This facility consists of a racetrack microtron (RTM), an electron storage ring (SR2) equipped with the SCRIT system, and a low-energy RI separator (ERIS). SCRIT (self-confining radioactive isotope ion targeting) is a novel technique to form internal targets in an electron storage ring. Experiments for evaluating performance of the SCRIT system have been carried out using the stable 133Cs1+ beam and the 132Xe1+ beam supplied from ERIS. Target ions were successfully trapped in the SCRIT system with 90% efficiency at a 250 mA electron beam current, and luminosity exceeding 1026/(cm2 s) was maintained for more than 1 s. Electrons elastically scattered from the target ions were successfully measured. Applicability of the SCRIT system to electron scattering for unstable nuclei has been established in experiments.

  17. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-08-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances.

  18. Beam dynamics studies in the driver LINAC pre-Stripper section of the RIA facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E. S.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2003-07-10

    The RIA facility driver linac consists of about 400 superconducting (SC) independently phased rf cavities. The linac is designed to accelerate simultaneously several-charge-state beams to generate as much as 400 kW of uranium beam power. The linac beam dynamics is most sensitive to the focusing and accelerating-structure parameters of the prestripper section, where the uranium beam is accelerated from 0.17 keV/u to 9.4 MeV/u. This section is designed to accept and accelerate 2 charge states (28 and 29) of uranium beam from an ECR ion source. The prestripper section must be designed to minimize the beam emittance distortion of this two-charge-state beam. In particular, the inter-cryostat spaces must be minimized and beam parameters near transitions of the accelerating and focusing lattices must be matched carefully. Several sources of possible effective emittance growth are considered in the design of the prestripper section and a tolerance budget is established. Numerical beam dynamics studies include realistic electric and magnetic 3-dimensional field distributions in the SC rf cavities and SC solenoids. Error effects in the longitudinal beam parameters are studied.

  19. Flux and Instrumentation Upgrade for the Epithermal Neutron Beam Facility at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; J.R. Venhuizen; C.E. Wemple; G. E. Tripard; S. Sharp; K. Fox

    2004-11-01

    An epithermal neutron beam facility for preclinical neutron capture therapy research has been constructed at the Washington State University TRIGA research reactor installation. Subsequent to a recent upgrade, this new facility offers a high-purity epithermal beam with intensity on the order of 1.2×109 n/cm2 s. Key features include a fluoride-based design for the neutron filtering and moderating components as well as a novel collimator design that allows ease of assembly and disassembly of the beamline components.

  20. Design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R.P.

    1981-10-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility will test Neutral Beam Sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam-on times. For this application actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles will be required. The dumps will be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/ anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on a prototype panel. The prototype tests were performed on two different panel designs, one manufactured by Mc Donnell Douglas (MDAC) the other by United Technologies (UT). The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  1. Space Station Furnace Facility Core. Requirements definition and conceptual design study. Volume 2: Technical report. Appendix 6: Technical summary reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is a modular facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The SSFF is designed for crystal growth and solidification research in the fields of electronic and photonic materials, metals and alloys, and glasses and ceramics and will allow for experimental determination of the role of gravitational forces in the solidification process. The facility will provide a capability for basic scientific research and will evaluate the commercial viability of low-gravity processing of selected technologically important materials. The facility is designed to support a complement of furnace modules as outlined in the Science Capabilities Requirements Document (SCRD). The SSFF is a three rack facility that provides the functions, interfaces, and equipment necessary for the processing of the furnaces and consists of two main parts: the SSFF Core Rack and the two Experiment Racks. The facility is designed to accommodate two experimenter-provided furnace modules housed within the two experiment racks, and is designed to operate these two furnace modules simultaneously. The SCRD specifies a wide range of furnace requirements and serves as the basis for the SSFF conceptual design. SSFF will support automated processing during the man-tended operations and is also designed for crew interface during the permanently manned configuration. The facility is modular in design and facilitates changes as required, so the SSFF is adept to modifications, maintenance, reconfiguration, and technology evolution.

  2. Characterization of Dosimetry of the BMRR Horizontal Thimble Tubes and Broad Beam Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Hu,J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Holden, N.E.

    2008-05-05

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was a 5 mega-watt, light-water cooled and heavy-graphite moderated research facility. It has two shutter-equipped treatment rooms, three horizontally extended thimble tubes, and an ex-core broad beam facility. The three experimental thimbles, or activation ports, external to the reactor tank were designed for several uses, including the investigations on diagnostic and therapeutic methods using radioactive isotopes of very short half-life, the analysis of radiation exposure on tissue-equivalent materials using a collimated neutron beam, and the evaluation of dose effects on biological cells to improve medical treatment. At the broad beam facility where the distribution of thermal neutrons was essential uniform, a wide variety of mammalian whole-body exposures were studied using animals such as burros or mice. Also studied at the broad beam were whole-body phantom experiments, involving the use of a neutron or photon beam streaming through a screen to obtain the flux spectrum suitable for dose analysis on the sugar-urea-water mixture, a tissue-equivalent material. Calculations of the flux and the dose at beam ports based on Monte Carlo particle-transport code were performed, and measurements conducted at the same tally locations were made using bare or cadmium-covered gold foils. Analytical results, which show good agreement with measurement data, are presented in the paper.

  3. Facile electron-beam lithography technique for irregular and fragile substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex

    2014-10-01

    A facile technique is presented which enables high-resolution electron beam lithography on irregularly-shaped, non-planar or fragile substrates such as the edges of a silicon chip, thin and narrow suspended beams and bridges, or small cylindrical wires. The method involves a spin-free dry-transfer of pre-formed uniform-thickness polymethyl methacrylate, followed by conventional electron beam writing, metal deposition, and lift-off. High-resolution patterning is demonstrated for challenging target substrates. The technique should find broad application in micro- and nano-technology research arenas.

  4. Facile electron-beam lithography technique for irregular and fragile substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiyoung; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex

    2014-10-27

    A facile technique is presented which enables high-resolution electron beam lithography on irregularly-shaped, non-planar or fragile substrates such as the edges of a silicon chip, thin and narrow suspended beams and bridges, or small cylindrical wires. The method involves a spin-free dry-transfer of pre-formed uniform-thickness polymethyl methacrylate, followed by conventional electron beam writing, metal deposition, and lift-off. High-resolution patterning is demonstrated for challenging target substrates. The technique should find broad application in micro- and nano-technology research arenas.

  5. Production rate calculations for a secondary beam facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.L.; Back, B.B.; Rehm, K.E.

    1995-08-01

    In order to select the most cost-effective method for the production of secondary ion beams, yield calculations for a variety of primary beams were performed ranging in mass from protons to {sup 18}O with energies of 100-200 MeV/u. For comparison, production yields for 600-1000 MeV protons were also calculated. For light ion-(A < {sup 4}He) induced reactions at energies above 50 MeV/u the LAHET code was used while the low energy calculations were performed with LPACE. Heavy-ion-induced production rates were calculated with the ISAPACE program. The results of these codes were checked against each other and wherever possible a comparison with experimental data was performed. These comparisons extended to very exotic reaction channels, such as the production of {sup 100}Sn from {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Xe induced fragmentation reactions. These comparisons indicate that the codes are able to predict production rates to within one order of magnitude.

  6. Development of a machine protection system for the Superconducting Beam Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, A.; Carmichael, L.; Church, M.; Neswold, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Fermilab's Superconducting RF Beam Test Facility currently under construction will produce electron beams capable of damaging the acceleration structures and the beam line vacuum chambers in the event of an aberrant accelerator pulse. The accelerator is being designed with the capability to operate with up to 3000 bunches per macro-pulse, 5Hz repetition rate and 1.5 GeV beam energy. It will be able to sustain an average beam power of 72 KW at the bunch charge of 3.2 nC. Operation at full intensity will deposit enough energy in niobium material to approach the melting point of 2500 C. In the early phase with only 3 cryomodules installed the facility will be capable of generating electron beam energies of 810 MeV and an average beam power that approaches 40 KW. In either case a robust Machine Protection System (MPS) is required to mitigate effects due to such large damage potentials. This paper will describe the MPS system being developed, the system requirements and the controls issues under consideration.

  7. A new ion beam facility based on a 3 MV Tandetron™ at IFIN-HH, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Ghiță, D. G.; Moșu, D. V.; Călinescu, C. I.; Podaru, N. C.; Mous, D. J. W.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    A 3 MV Tandetron™ accelerator system has been installed and commissioned at the "Horia Hulubei" National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, Măgurele, Romania. The main purpose of this machine is to strengthen applied nuclear physics research ongoing in our institute for more than four decades. The accelerator system was developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V. (HVE) and comprises three high energy beam lines. The first beam line is dedicated to ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques: Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry - RBS, Nuclear Reaction Analysis - NRA, Particle Induced X-ray and γ-ray Emission - PIXE and PIGE and micro-beam experiments - μ-PIXE. The second beam line is dedicated to high energy ion implantation experiments and the third beam line was designed mainly for nuclear cross-sections measurements used in nuclear astrophysics. A unique feature, the first time in operation at an accelerator facility is the Na charge exchange canal (CEC), which is used to obtain high intensity beams of He- of at least 3 μA. The results of the acceptance tests demonstrate the huge potential of this new facility in various fields, from IBA to radiation hardness studies and from medical or environmental applications to astrophysics. The main features of the accelerator are presented in this paper.

  8. Development of picoseconds Time of Flight systems in Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Albrow, M.; Demarteau, M.; Los, S.; Malik, S.; Pronko, S.; Ramberg, E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

    2010-11-01

    The goal of the work is to develop time of flight (TOF) system with about 10 picosecond time resolution in real beam line when start and stop counters separated by some distance. We name the distance as 'base' for the TOF. This 'real' TOF setup is different from another one when start and stop counters located next to each other. The real TOF is sensitive to beam momentum spread, beam divergence, etc. Anyway some preliminary measurements are useful with close placement of start and stop counter. We name it 'close geometry'. The work started about 2 years ago at Fermilab Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF). The devices tested in 'close geometry' were Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers (MCP PMT) with Cherenkov radiators. TOF counters based on Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPms) with Cherenkov radiators also in 'close geometry' were tested. We report here new results obtained with the counters in the MTBF at Fermilab, including beam line data.

  9. A MATLAB-based interface for the beam-transport system of an AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Guzmán, J. M.; Gómez-Morilla, I.; Enamorado-Báez, S. M.; Moreno-Suárez, A. I.; Pinto-Gómez, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facility located at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA, Seville, Spain). We determine the beam transport through the optical system using the transfer matrix formalism in two different approaches (ray tracing and the beam-envelope approach) and describe it in terms of cross section size and emittance. The beam size results given by MATLAB are compared with the measured beam size in three of the four image points that the system has, obtaining a good agreement between them. This suggests that the first-order transfer matrix formalism is enough to simulate the optical behavior of the system.

  10. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion acceleratora)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  11. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Marconato, N; Marcuzzi, D; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Sonato, P

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  12. Beam and target alignment at the National Ignition Facility using the Target Alignment Sensor (TAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nicola, P.; Kalantar, D.; McCarville, T.; Klingmann, J.; Alvarez, S.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Lawson, J.; Datte, P.; Danforth, P.; Schneider, M.; Di Nicola, J.-M.; Jackson, J.; Orth, C.; Azevedo, S.; Tommasini, R.; Manuel, A.; Wallace, R.

    2012-10-01

    The requirements for beam and target alignment for successful ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are stringent: the average of beams to the target must be within 25 μm. Beam and target alignment are achieved with the Target Alignment Sensor (TAS). The TAS is a precision optical device that is inserted into target chamber center to facilitate both beam and target alignment. It incorporates two camera views (upper/lower and side) mounted on each of two stage assemblies (jaws) to view and align the target. It also incorporates a large mirror on each of the two assemblies to reflect the alignment beams onto the upper/lower cameras for beam alignment. The TAS is located in the chamber using reference features by viewing it with two external telescope views. The two jaws are adjusted in elevation to match the desired beam and target alignment locations. For some shot setups, a sequence of TAS positions is required to achieve the full setup and alignment. In this paper we describe the TAS, the characterization of the TAS coordinates for beam and target alignment, and summarize pointing shots that demonstrate the accuracy of beam-target alignment.

  13. Producing National Ignition Facility (NIF)-quality beams on the Nova and Beamlet lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Widmayer, C.C.; Auerbach, J.M.; Ehrlich, R.B.

    1996-08-01

    The Nova and Beamlet lasers were used to simulate the beam propagation conditions that will be encountered during the National Ignition Facility operation. Perturbation theory predicts that there is a 5mm scale length propagation mode that experiences large nonlinear power growth. This mode was observed in the tests. Further tests have confirmed that this mode can be suppressed with improved spatial filtering.

  14. Lessons from shielding retrofits at the LAMPF/LANSCE/PSR accelerator, beam lines and target facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    The experience in the past 7 years to improve the shielding and radiation control systems at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) provides important lessons for the design of radiation control systems at future, high beam power proton accelerator facilities. Major issues confronted and insight gained in developing shielding criteria and in the use of radiation interlocks are discussed. For accelerators and beam lines requiring hands-on-maintenance, our experience suggests that shielding criteria based on accident scenarios will be more demanding than criteria based on routinely encountered beam losses. Specification and analysis of the appropriate design basis accident become all important. Mitigation by active protection systems of the consequences of potential, but severe, prompt radiation accidents has been advocated as an alternate choice to shielding retrofits for risk management at both facilities. Acceptance of active protection systems has proven elusive primarily because of the difficulty in providing convincing proof that failure of active systems (to mitigate the accident) is incredible. Results from extensive shielding assessment studies are presented including data from experimental beam spill tests, comparisons with model estimates, and evidence bearing on the limitations of line-of-sight attenuation models in complex geometries. The scope and significant characteristics of major shielding retrofit projects at the LAMPF site are illustrated by the project to improve the shielding beneath a road over a multiuse, high-intensity beam line (Line D).

  15. Design, fabrication and operation of the mechanical systems for the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Biagi, L.A.; Fong, M.; Koehler, G.W.; Low, W.; Purgalis, P.; Wells, R.P.

    1983-12-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a National Test Facility used to develop long pulse Neutral Beam Sources. The Facility will test sources up to 120 keV, 50 A, with 30 s beam-on times with a 10% duty factor. For this application, an actively cooled beam dump is required and one has been constructed capable of dissipating a wide range of power density profiles. The flexibility of the design is achieved by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure comprised of eight separately controllable manipulator assemblies. A unique neutralizer design has been installed into the NBETF beamline. This is a gun-drilled moveable brazed assembly which provides continuous armoring of the beamline near the source. The unit penetrates the source mounting valve during operation and retracts to permit the valve to close as needed. The beamline is also equpped with many beam scraper plates of differing detail design and dissipation capabilities.

  16. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  17. Target diagnostics for commissioning the AWE HELEN Laser Facility 100 TW chirped pulse amplification beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagleton, R. T.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, H. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Gales, S.; Girling, M. T.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hopps, N. W.; James, S. F.; Kopec, M. F.; Nolan, J. R.; Ryder, K.

    2006-10-01

    The capability of the HELEN laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment Aldermaston has been enhanced by the addition of a short-pulse laser beam to augment the twin opposing nanosecond time scale beams. The short-pulse beam utilizes the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique and is capable of delivering up to 60J on target in a 500fs pulse, around 100TW, at the fundamental laser wavelength of 1.054μm. During the commissioning phase a number of diagnostic systems have been fielded, these include: x-ray pinhole imaging of the laser heated spot, charged particle time of flight, thermoluminescent dosimeter array, calibrated radiochromic film, and CR39 nuclear track detector. These diagnostic systems have been used to verify the performance of the CPA beam to achieve a focused intensity of around 1019Wcm-2 and to underwrite the facility radiological safety system.

  18. An experimental 20/30 GHz communications satellite conceptual design employing multiple-beam paraboloid reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental 20/30 GHz communications satellite conceptual design is described which employs multiple-beam paraboloid reflector antennas coupled to a TDMA transponder. It is shown that the satellite employs solid state GaAs FET power amplifiers and low noise amplifiers while signal processing and switching takes place on-board the spacecraft. The proposed areas to be served by this satellite would be the continental U.S. plus Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, as well as southern Canada and Mexico City. Finally, attention is given to the earth stations which are designed to be low cost.

  19. Conceptual Design for a High-Temperature Gas Loop Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    James B. Kesseli

    2006-08-01

    This report documents an early-stage conceptual design for a high-temperature gas test loop. The objectives accomplished by the study include, (1) investigation of existing gas test loops to determine ther capabilities and how the proposed system might best complement them, (2) development of a preliminary test plan to help identify the performance characteristics required of the test unit, (3) development of test loop requirements, (4) development of a conceptual design including process flow sheet, mechanical layout, and equipment specifications and costs, and (5) development of a preliminary test loop safety plan.

  20. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 4: Supplementary engineering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    The reference conceptual design of the Magnetohydrodynamic Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates, and identification of engineering issues that should be reexamined are also given. The latest (1980-1981) information from the MHD technology program are integrated with the elements of a conventional steam power electric generating plant. Supplementary Engineering Data (Issues, Background, Performance Assurance Plan, Design Details, System Design Descriptions and Related Drawings) is presented.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 4: Supplementary engineering data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the Magnetohydrodynamic Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates, and identification of engineering issues that should be reexamined are also given. The latest (1980-1981) information from the MHD technology program are integrated with the elements of a conventional steam power electric generating plant. Supplementary Engineering Data (Issues, Background, Performance Assurance Plan, Design Details, System Design Descriptions and Related Drawings) is presented.

  3. Application of an atomic oxygen beam facility to the investigation of shuttle glow chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, G. S.; Peplinski, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    A facility for the investigation of the interactions of energetic atomic oxygen with solids is described. The facility is comprised of a four chambered, differentially pumped molecular beam apparatus which can be equipped with one of a variety of sources of atomic oxygen. The primary source is a dc arc heated supersonic nozzle source which produces a flux of atomic oxygen in excess of 10 to the 15th power sq cm/sec at the target, at a velocity of 3.5 km/sec. Results of applications of this facility to the study of the reactions of atomic oxygen with carbon and polyimide films are briefly reviewed and compared to data obtained on various flights of the space shuttle. A brief discussion of possible application of this facility to investigation of chemical reactions which might contribute to atmosphere induced vehicle glow is presented.

  4. Wavefront control of high power laser beams for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E; Feldman, M; Grey, A; Koch, J; Lund, L; Sacks, R; Smith, D; Stolz, C; Van Atta, L; Winters, S; Woods, B; Zacharias, R

    1999-09-22

    The use of lasers as the driver for inertial confinement fusion and weapons physics experiments is based on their ability to produce high-energy short pulses in a beam with low divergence. Indeed, the focus ability of high quality laser beams far exceeds alternate technologies and is a major factor in the rationale for building high power lasers for such applications. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large, 192-beam, high-power laser facility under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fusion and weapons physics experiments. Its uncorrected minimum focal spot size is limited by laser system aberrations. The NIF includes a Wavefront Control System to correct these aberrations to yield a focal spot small enough for its applications. Sources of aberrations to be corrected include prompt pump-induced distortions in the laser amplifiers, previous-shot thermal distortions, beam off-axis effects, and gravity, mounting, and coating-induced optic distortions. Aberrations from gas density variations and optic manufacturing figure errors are also partially corrected. This paper provides an overview of the NIF Wavefront Control System and describes the target spot size performance improvement it affords. It describes provisions made to accommodate the NIF's high fluence (laser beam and flashlamp), large wavefront correction range, wavefront temporal bandwidth, temperature and humidity variations, cleanliness requirements, and exception handling requirements (e.g. wavefront out-of-limits conditions).

  5. Ion traps for precision experiments at rare-isotope-beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Ion traps first entered experimental nuclear physics when the ISOLTRAP team demonstrated Penning trap mass spectrometry of radionuclides. From then on, the demand for ion traps has grown at radioactive-ion-beam (RIB) facilities since beams can be tailored for the desired experiment. Ion traps have been deployed for beam preparation, from bunching (thereby allowing time coincidences) to beam purification. Isomerically pure beams needed for nuclear-structure investigations can be prepared for trap-assisted or in-trap decay spectroscopy. The latter permits studies of highly charged ions for stellar evolution, which would be impossible with traditional experimental nuclear-physics methods. Moreover, the textbook-like conditions and advanced ion manipulation - even of a single ion - permit high-precision experiments. Consequently, the most accurate and precise mass measurements are now performed in Penning traps. After a brief introduction to ion trapping, I will focus on examples which showcase the versatility and utility of the technique at RIB facilities. I will demonstrate how this atomic-physics technique has been integrated into nuclear science, accelerator physics, and chemistry. DOE.

  6. Development of Advanced Beam Halo Diagnostics at the Jefferson Lab Free-Electron-Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang, Stephen Benson, Dave Douglas, Frederick Wilson, Hao Zhang, Anatoly Shkvarunets, Ralph Fiorito

    2011-03-01

    High average current and high brightness electron beams are needed for many applications. At the Jefferson Lab FEL facility, the search for dark matter with the FEL laser beam has produced some interesting results, and a second very promising experiment called DarkLight, using the JLab Energy-recovery-linac (ERL) machine has been put forward. Although the required beam current has been achieved on this machine, one key challenge is the management of beam halo. At the University of Md. (UMD) we have demonstrated a high dynamic range halo measurement method using a digital micro-mirror array device (DMD). A similar system has been established at the JLab FEL facility as a joint effort by UMD and JLab to measure the beam halo on the high current ERL machine. Preliminary experiments to characterize the halo were performed on the new UV FEL. In this paper, the limitations of the present system will be analyzed and a discussion of other approaches (such as an optimized coronagraph) for further extending the dynamic range will be presented. We will also discuss the possibility of performing both longitudinal and transverse (3D) halo measurements together on a single system.

  7. NA61/SHINE facility at the CERN SPS: beams and detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Andreeva, O.; Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Anticic, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Blumer, J.; Bogomilov, M.; Bogusz, M.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Christakoglou, P.; Cirkovic, M.; Czopowicz, T.; Davis, N.; Debieux, S.; Dembinski, H.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Ereditato, A.; Fabich, A.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Fulop, A.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Idczak, R.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Jokovic, D.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kielczewska, D.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kiss, T.; Kleinfelder, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Koversarski, P.; Kowalski, S.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; Laszlo, A.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Majka, Z.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Maletic, D.; Manglunki, D.; Manic, D.; Marchionni, A.; Marcinek, A.; Marin, V.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Messina, M.; Mrówczyński, St.; Murphy, S.; Nakadaira, T.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Palczewski, T.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Paul, T.; Peryt, W.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Płaneta, R.; Pluta, J.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadala, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzovic, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczyński, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Savic, M.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Sipos, R.; Skrzypczak, E.; Słodkowski, M.; Sosin, Z.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Stroebele, H.; Susa, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tolyhi, T.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberic, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarz, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.; Zipper, W.

    2014-06-01

    NA61/SHINE (SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) is a multi-purpose experimental facility to study hadron production in hadron-proton, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. It recorded the first physics data with hadron beams in 2009 and with ion beams (secondary 7Be beams) in 2011. NA61/SHINE has greatly profited from the long development of the CERN proton and ion sources and the accelerator chain as well as the H2 beamline of the CERN North Area. The latter has recently been modified to also serve as a fragment separator as needed to produce the Be beams for NA61/SHINE. Numerous components of the NA61/SHINE set-up were inherited from its predecessors, in particular, the last one, the NA49 experiment. Important new detectors and upgrades of the legacy equipment were introduced by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration. This paper describes the state of the NA61/SHINE facility — the beams and the detector system — before the CERN Long Shutdown I, which started in March 2013.

  8. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  9. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  10. Laser beam smoothing and backscatter saturation processes in plasmas relevant to National Ignition Facility hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R L; Cohen, B I; Decker, C D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Hinkel, D E; Kirkwood, R K; Langdon, A B; Lefebvre, E; MacGowan, B J; Moody, J D; Rothenberg, J E; Rousseuax, C; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1998-10-01

    We have used gas-filled targets irradiated at the Nova laser to simulate National Ignition Facility (NlF) hohlraum plasmas and to study the dependence of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) Scattering on beam smoothing at a range of laser intensities (3{omega}, 2 - 4 10{sup 15}Wcm{sup -2}) and plasma conditions. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of polarization smoothing as a potential upgrade to the NIF. Experiments with higher intensities and higher densities characteristic of 350eV hohlraum designs indicate that with appropriate beam smoothing the backscatter from such hohlraums may be tolerable.

  11. Future carbon beams at SPIRAL1 facility: which method is the most efficient?

    PubMed

    Maunoury, L; Delahaye, P; Angot, J; Dubois, M; Dupuis, M; Frigot, R; Grinyer, J; Jardin, P; Leboucher, C; Lamy, T

    2014-02-01

    Compared to in-flight facilities, Isotope Separator On-Line ones can in principle produce significantly higher radioactive ion beam intensities. On the other hand, they have to cope with delays for the release and ionization which make the production of short-lived isotopes ion beams of reactive and refractory elements particularly difficult. Many efforts are focused on extending the capabilities of ISOL facilities to those challenging beams. In this context, the development of carbon beams is triggering interest [H. Frånberg, M. Ammann, H. W. Gäggeler, and U. Köster, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A708 (2006); M. Kronberger, A. Gottberg, T. M. Mendonca, J. P. Ramos, C. Seiffert, P. Suominen, and T. Stora, in Proceedings of the EMIS 2012 [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source (to be published)]: despite its refractory nature, radioactive carbon beams can be produced from molecules (CO or CO2), which can subsequently be broken up and multi-ionized to the required charge state in charge breeders or ECR sources. This contribution will present results of experiments conducted at LPSC with the Phoenix charge breeder and at GANIL with the Nanogan ECR ion source for the ionization of carbon beams in the frame of the ENSAR and EMILIE projects. Carbon is to date the lightest condensable element charge bred with an ECR ion source. Charge breeding efficiencies will be compared with those obtained using Nanogan ECRIS and charge breeding times will be presented as well.

  12. Future carbon beams at SPIRAL1 facility: Which method is the most efficient?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunoury, L.; Delahaye, P.; Angot, J.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Frigot, R.; Grinyer, J.; Jardin, P.; Leboucher, C.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    Compared to in-flight facilities, Isotope Separator On-Line ones can in principle produce significantly higher radioactive ion beam intensities. On the other hand, they have to cope with delays for the release and ionization which make the production of short-lived isotopes ion beams of reactive and refractory elements particularly difficult. Many efforts are focused on extending the capabilities of ISOL facilities to those challenging beams. In this context, the development of carbon beams is triggering interest [H. Frånberg, M. Ammann, H. W. Gäggeler, and U. Köster, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A708 (2006); M. Kronberger, A. Gottberg, T. M. Mendonca, J. P. Ramos, C. Seiffert, P. Suominen, and T. Stora, in Proceedings of the EMIS 2012 [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source (to be published)]: despite its refractory nature, radioactive carbon beams can be produced from molecules (CO or CO2), which can subsequently be broken up and multi-ionized to the required charge state in charge breeders or ECR sources. This contribution will present results of experiments conducted at LPSC with the Phoenix charge breeder and at GANIL with the Nanogan ECR ion source for the ionization of carbon beams in the frame of the ENSAR and EMILIE projects. Carbon is to date the lightest condensable element charge bred with an ECR ion source. Charge breeding efficiencies will be compared with those obtained using Nanogan ECRIS and charge breeding times will be presented as well.

  13. Future carbon beams at SPIRAL1 facility: Which method is the most efficient?

    SciTech Connect

    Maunoury, L. Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Frigot, R.; Grinyer, J.; Jardin, P.; Leboucher, C.

    2014-02-15

    Compared to in-flight facilities, Isotope Separator On-Line ones can in principle produce significantly higher radioactive ion beam intensities. On the other hand, they have to cope with delays for the release and ionization which make the production of short-lived isotopes ion beams of reactive and refractory elements particularly difficult. Many efforts are focused on extending the capabilities of ISOL facilities to those challenging beams. In this context, the development of carbon beams is triggering interest [H. Frånberg, M. Ammann, H. W. Gäggeler, and U. Köster, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A708 (2006); M. Kronberger, A. Gottberg, T. M. Mendonca, J. P. Ramos, C. Seiffert, P. Suominen, and T. Stora, in Proceedings of the EMIS 2012 [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source (to be published)]: despite its refractory nature, radioactive carbon beams can be produced from molecules (CO or CO{sub 2}), which can subsequently be broken up and multi-ionized to the required charge state in charge breeders or ECR sources. This contribution will present results of experiments conducted at LPSC with the Phoenix charge breeder and at GANIL with the Nanogan ECR ion source for the ionization of carbon beams in the frame of the ENSAR and EMILIE projects. Carbon is to date the lightest condensable element charge bred with an ECR ion source. Charge breeding efficiencies will be compared with those obtained using Nanogan ECRIS and charge breeding times will be presented as well.

  14. Thermal shock tests with beryllium coupons in the electron beam facility JUDITH

    SciTech Connect

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Schuster, J.L.A.

    1995-09-01

    Several grades of American and Russian beryllium have been tested in high heat flux tests by means of an electron beam facility. For safety reasons, major modifications of the facility had to be fulfilled in advance to the tests. The influence of energy densities has been investigated in the range between 1 and 7 MJ/m{sup 2}. In addition the influence of an increasing number of shots at constant energy density has been studied. For all samples, surface profiles have been measured before and after the experiments. Additional information has been gained from scanning electron microscopy, and from metallography.

  15. Status of ECR ion sources for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machicoane, Guillaume; Felice, Helene; Fogleman, Jesse; Hafalia, Ray; Morgan, Glenn; Pan, Heng; Prestemon, Soren; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Rao, Xing; Ren, Haitao; Tobos, Larry

    2016-02-01

    Ahead of the commissioning schedule, installation of the first Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source in the front end area of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam (FRIB) is planned for the end of 2015. Operating at 14 GHz, this first ECR will be used for the commissioning and initial operation of the facility. In parallel, a superconducting magnet structure compatible with operation at 28 GHz for a new ECR ion source is in development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The paper reviews the overall work in progress and development done with ECR ion sources for FRIB.

  16. Status of ECR ion sources for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Machicoane, Guillaume Morgan, Glenn; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Rao, Xing; Ren, Haitao; Felice, Helene; Hafalia, Ray; Pan, Heng; Prestemon, Soren; Fogleman, Jesse; Tobos, Larry

    2016-02-15

    Ahead of the commissioning schedule, installation of the first Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source in the front end area of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam (FRIB) is planned for the end of 2015. Operating at 14 GHz, this first ECR will be used for the commissioning and initial operation of the facility. In parallel, a superconducting magnet structure compatible with operation at 28 GHz for a new ECR ion source is in development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The paper reviews the overall work in progress and development done with ECR ion sources for FRIB.

  17. Design progress for the National Ignition Facility laser alignment and beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S W; Bliss, E S; Boege, S J; Boyd, R D; Bronisz, L; Bruker, J; C W Lauman, McCarville, T J; Chocol, C; Davis, D T; Demaret, R D; Feldman, M; Gates, A J; Holdener, F R; Hollis, J; Knopp, C F; Kyker, R; Miller, J L; Miller-Kamm, V J; Rivera, W E; Salmon, J T; Severyn, J R; Sheem, S K; Sheridan, T; Thompson, D Y; Wang, M F; Witaker, D; Yoeman, M F; Zacharias, R A

    1998-09-09

    Earlier papers have described approaches to NIF alignment and laser diagnostics tasks. 1,2,3 Now, detailed design of alignment and diagnostic systems for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is in its last year. Specifications are more detailed, additional analyses have been completed, Pro-E models have been developed, and prototypes of specific items have been built. In this paper we update top level concepts, illustrate specific areas of progress, and show design implementations as represented by prototype hardware. The alignment light source network has been fully defined. It utilizes an optimized number of lasers combined with fiber optic distribution to provide the chain alignment beams, system centering references, final spatial filter pinhole references, target alignment beams, and wavefront reference beams. The input and output sensors are being prototyped. They are located respectively in the front end just before beam injection into the full aperture chain and at the transport spatial filter, where the full energy infrared beam leaves the laser. The modularity of the input sensor is improved, and each output sensor mechanical package now incorporates instrumentation for four beams. Additional prototype hardware has been tested for function, and lifetime tests are underway. We report some initial results.

  18. Electron beam-plasma interaction experiments with the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.M.; Lee, M.C.; Moriarty, D.T.; Riddolls, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The laboratory investigation of electron beam-plasma interactions is motivated by the recent space shuttle experiments. Interesting but puzzling phenomena were observed in the shuttle experiments such as the bulk heating of background ionospheric plasmas by the injected electron beams and the excitation of plasma waves in the frequency range of ELF waves. The plasma machine, the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) can generate a large magnetized plasma with the electron plasma frequency greater than the electron gyrofrequency by a factor of 3--5 similar to the plasma condition in the ionosphere. Short pulses of electron beams are injected into the VTF plasmas in order to simulate the beam injection from spacecrafts in the ionosphere. A Langmuir probe installed at a bottom port of VTF monitors the spatial variation of electron beams emitted from LaB6 filaments. An energy analyzer has been used to determine the particle energy distribution in the VTF plasmas. Several mechanisms will be tested as potential causes of the bulk heating of background plasmas by the injected electron beams as seen in the space shuttle experiments. It is speculated that the observed ELF emissions result from the excitation of purely growing modes detected by the space shuttle-borne detectors. Results of the laboratory experiments will be reported to corroborate this speculation.

  19. Beam Position Monitor and Energy Analysis at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David Juarez

    2015-08-01

    Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility has produced its first beam with an energy of 20 MeV. This energy is obtained by the acceleration at the Electron Gun and the Capture Cavity 2 (CC2). When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one International Liner Collider (ILC)-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We calculated the total energy of the beam and the corresponding energy to the Electron Gun and CC2. Subsequently, a Beam Position Monitors (BPM) error analysis was done, to calculate the device actual resolution.

  20. First Operating Experiences of Beam Position Monitors in the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R.; Sachwitz, M.; Schreiber, H. J.; Tonisch, F.; Castellano, M.; Patteri, P.; Tazzioli, F.; Catani, L.

    1997-05-01

    Different types of monitors where installed in the TESLA Test Facility Linac to measure the beam position. At each superconducting quadrupole, the transverse beam position will be measured with a resolution of better than 10 μm, using a cylindrical cavity excited in the TM_110-mode by an off-center beam. In addition, two 'warm' cavities working at room temperature were built for the Injector I and the Bunch Compressor. The amplitude of the TM_110-mode and its phase are measured in a homodyne receiver. For the experimental area, stripline monitors having a resolution of better than 100 μm were built, tested and installed. The averaged position of the whole bunch train of Injector I is measured in a narrowband receiver using the amplitude-to-phase conversion. This paper summarizes the designs, cold tests and first operating experiences of both monitor types.

  1. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year.

  2. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  3. Effective NOx remediation from a surrogate flue gas using the US NRL Electra electron beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tz. B.; Petrov, G. M.; Wolford, M. F.; Giuliani, J. L.; Ladouceur, H. D.; Hegeler, F.; Myers, M. C.; Sethian, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NOx) emission is under restrictive federal regulations because of its negative impact on atmosphere, biosphere, and human health. Therefore, its removal has been a subject of extensive research to develop new efficient and cost effective techniques that can be applied on an industrial scale. In this work, we study both experimentally and theoretically an effective removal of NOx pollutants from a surrogate flue gas (SFG) using high power electron beam (e-beam) pulses. SFG is a simulant for exhaust from coal combustion power plants (82% N2, 6% O2, 12% CO2, and ˜100 ppm of NOx). The pulsed electron beam is generated using the United States Naval Research Laboratory Electra facility, which delivers e-beams with energies of ˜500 keV and a power pulse duration of ˜140 ns. During the e-beam irradiation, the energetic electrons generate a non-equilibrium plasma containing chemically active species, which then react with NOx to form harmless substances. A non-equilibrium time-dependent model is developed to describe NOx remediation from SFG. The model combines e-beam deposition rates obtained by solving the electron Boltzmann equation and extensive plasma chemistry modeling, which follows the species on a time scale from sub-nanoseconds to a few seconds. NOx decomposition as a function of electron beam parameters is studied. It is demonstrated experimentally that short (ns) pulses are the most efficient for NOx removal. A sharp reduction of NOx was measured with e-beam power deposition increasing, following the trend predicted by the model, achieving a 20 fold reduction to ˜5 ppm at energy deposition ˜20 J/l.

  4. Development of a low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the MARA separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, Philippos; Moore, Iain; Pohjalainen, Ilkka; Sarén, Jan; Uusitalo, Juha

    2016-12-01

    A low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the production and study of nuclei produced close to the proton drip line is under development at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The facility will take advantage of the mass selectivity of the recently commissioned MARA vacuum-mode mass separator. The ions selected by MARA will be stopped and thermalised in a small-volume gas cell prior to extraction and further mass separation. The gas cell design allows for resonance laser ionisation/spectroscopy both in-gas-cell and in-gas-jet. The facility will include experimental setups allowing ion counting, mass measurement and decay spectroscopy.

  5. Experiments, conceptual design, preliminary cost estimates and schedules for an underground research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Korbin, G.; Wollenberg, H.; Wilson, C.; Strisower, B.; Chan, T.; Wedge, D.

    1981-09-01

    Plans for an underground research facility are presented, incorporating techniques to assess the hydrological and thermomechanical response of a rock mass to the introduction and long-term isolation of radioactive waste, and to assess the effects of excavation on the hydrologic integrity of a repository and its subsequent backfill, plugging, and sealing. The project is designed to utilize existing mine or civil works for access to experimental areas and is estimated to last 8 years at a total cost for contruction and operation of $39.0 million (1981 dollars). Performing the same experiments in an existing underground research facility would reduce the duration to 7-1/2 years and cost $27.7 million as a lower-bound estimate. These preliminary plans and estimates should be revised after specific sites are identified which would accommodate the facility.

  6. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This volume presents the Total Estimated Cost (TEC) for the WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) 2A facility. The TEC is $81.9 million, including an overall project contingency of 25% and escalation of 13%, based on a 1997 construction midpoint. (The mission of WRAP 2A is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage, and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford site from about 20 DOE sites.)

  7. System analysis study of space platform and station accommodations for life sciences research facilities. Volume 2: Study results, attachment 2. Phase A: Conceptual design and programmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Lowell F.

    1985-01-01

    The study results from the conceptual design and programmatics segment of the Space Platform and Station Accommodation for Life Sciences Research Facilities. The results and significant findings of the conceptual design and programmatics were generated by these tasks: (1) the review and update engineering and science requirements; (2) analysis of life sciences mission transition scenario; (3) the review and update of key trade issues; (4) the development of conceptual definition and designs; and (5) the development of the work breakdown schedule and its dictionary, program schedule, and estimated costs.

  8. ATTO SECOND ELECTRON BEAMS GENERATION AND CHARACTERIZATION EXPERIMENT AT THE ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZOLOTOREV, M.; ZHOLENTS, A.; WANG, X.J.; BABZIEN, M.; SKARITKA, J.; RAKOWSKY, G.; YAKIMENKO, V.

    2002-02-01

    We are proposing an Atto-second electron beam generation and diagnostics experiment at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test facility (ATF) using 1 {micro}m Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). The proposed experiment will be carried out by an BNL/LBNL collaboration, and it will be installed at the ATF beam line II. The proposed experiment will employ a one-meter long undulator with 1.8 cm period (VISA undulator). The electron beam energy will be 63 MeV with emittance less than 2 mm-mrad and energy spread less than 0.05%. The ATF photocathode injector driving laser will be used for energy modulation by Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). With 10 MW laser peak power, about 2% total energy modulation is expected. The energy modulated electron beam will be further bunched through either a drift space or a three magnet chicane into atto-second electron bunches. The attosecond electron beam bunches will be analyzed using the coherent transition radiation (CTR).

  9. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility: CEBAF at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Chrisoph; Douglas, David R; Krafft, Geoffrey A

    2001-08-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory's superconducting radiofrequency (srf) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) provides multi-GeV continuous-wave (cw) beams for experiments at the nuclear and particle physics interface. CEBAF comprises two antiparallel linacs linked by nine recirculation beam lines for up to five passes. By the early 1990s, accelerator installation was proceeding in parallel with commissioning. By the mid-1990s, CEBAF was providing simultaneous beams at different but correlated energies up to 4 GeV to three experimental halls. By 2000, with srf development having raised the average cavity gradient up to 7.5 MV/m, energies up to nearly 6 GeV were routine, at 1-150 muA for two halls and 1-100 nA for the other. Also routine are beams of >75% polarization. Physics results have led to new questions about the quark structure of nuclei, and therefore to user demand for a planned 12 GeV upgrade. CEBAF's enabling srf technology is also being applied in other projects.

  10. Development of an external beam nuclear microprobe on the Aglae facility of the Louvre museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.; Ioannidou, E.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Salomon, J.

    2000-03-01

    The external beam line of our facility has been recently equipped with the focusing system previously mounted on a classical nuclear microprobe. When using a 0.1 μm thick Si 3N 4 foil for the exit window and flowing helium on the sample under analysis, a beam spot as small as 10 μm is attainable at a distance of 3 mm from the window. Elemental micromapping is performed by mechanical scanning. An electronic device has been designed which allows XY scanning by moving the sample under the beam by steps down to 0.1 μm. Beam monitoring is carried out by means of the weak X-ray signal emitted by the exit foil and detected by a specially designed Si(Li) detector cooled by Peltier effect. The characteristics of external beams of protons and alpha particles are evaluated by means of resonance scanning and elemental mapping of a grid. An example of application is presented, dealing with elemental micro-mapping of inclusions in gemstones.

  11. Potential applications of fusion neutral beam facilities for advanced material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Whealton, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    Surface processing techniques involving high energy ion implantation have achieved commercial success for semiconductors and biomaterials. However, wider use has been limited in good part by economic factors, some of which are related to the line-of-sight nature of the beam implantation process. Plasma source ion implantation is intended to remove some of the limitations imposed by directionality of beam systems and also to help provide economies of scale. The present paper will outline relevant technologies and areas of expertise that exist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in relation to possible future needs in materials processing. Experience in generation of plasmas, control of ionization states, pulsed extraction, and sheath physics exists. Contributions to future technology can be made either for the immersion mode or for the extracted beam mode. Existing facilities include the High Power Test Facility, which could conservatively operate at 1 A of continuous current at 100 kV delivered to areas of about 1 m{sup 2}. Higher instantaneous voltages and currents are available with a reduced duty cycle. Another facility, the High Heat Flux Facility can supply a maximum of 60 kV and currents of up to 60 A for 2 s on a 10% duty cycle. Plasmas may be generated by use of microwaves, radio-frequency induction or other methods and plasma properties may be tailored to suit specific needs. In addition to ion implantation of large steel components, foreseeable applications include ion implantation of polymers, ion implantation of Ti alloys, Al alloys, or other reactive surfaces.

  12. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Tianhuan

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  13. The new vertical neutron beam line at the CERN n_TOF facility design and outlook on the performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, C.; Chiaveri, E.; Girod, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Aberle, O.; Barros, S.; Bergström, I.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Guerrero, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Tsinganis, A.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Beinrucker, C.; Belloni, F.; Bečvář, F.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cerutti, F.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L.; Deo, K.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Dressler, R.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frost, R.; Furman, V.; Ganesan, S.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Göbel, K.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui, J.; Licata, M.; Lo Meo, S.; López, D.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Palomo Pinto, R.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M. S.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Steinegger, P.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2015-11-01

    At the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN a new vertical beam line was constructed in 2014, in order to extend the experimental possibilities at this facility to an even wider range of challenging cross-section measurements of interest in astrophysics, nuclear technology and medical physics. The design of the beam line and the experimental hall was based on FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, aiming at maximizing the neutron flux, reducing the beam halo and minimizing the background from neutrons interacting with the collimator or back-scattered in the beam dump. The present paper gives an overview on the design of the beam line and the relevant elements and provides an outlook on the expected performance regarding the neutron beam intensity, shape and energy resolution, as well as the neutron and photon backgrounds.

  14. Cost estimates and economic evaluations for conceptual LLRW disposal facility designs

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, R.D.; Chau, N.; Breeds, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    Total life-cycle costs were estimated in support of the New York LLRW Siting Commission`s project to select a disposal method from four near-surface LLRW disposal methods (namely, uncovered above-grade vaults, covered above-grade vaults, below-grade vaults, and augered holes) and two mined methods (namely, vertical shaft mines and drift mines). Conceptual designs for the disposal methods were prepared and used as the basis for the cost estimates. Typical economic performance of each disposal method was assessed. Life-cycle costs expressed in 1994 dollars ranged from $ 1,100 million (for below-grade vaults and both mined disposal methods) to $2,000 million (for augered holes). Present values ranged from $620 million (for below-grade vaults) to $ 1,100 million (for augered holes).

  15. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 7, Estimate data

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment III-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VII - Estimate Data, contains the project cost estimate information.

  16. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 3, Supplemental information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. It is organized into seven parts. Part I - Design Concept describes the selected solution. Part III - Supplemental Information contains calculations for the various disciplines as well as other supporting information and analyses.

  17. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

  18. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 6, Alternatives study

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for material and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment 111-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VI - Alternatives Study, presents a study of the different storage/containment options considered for NMSF.

  19. Upgrade of the facility EXOTIC for the in-flight production of light Radioactive Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, M.; Torresi, D.; Strano, E.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Costa, L.; Glodariu, T.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Stroe, L.

    2013-12-01

    The facility EXOTIC for the in-flight production of light weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) has been operating at INFN-LNL since 2004. RIBs are produced via two-body reactions induced by high intensity heavy-ion beams impinging on light gas targets and selected by means of a 30°-dipole bending magnet and a 1-m long Wien filter. The facility has been recently upgraded (i) by developing a cryogenic gas target, (ii) by replacing the power supplies of the middle lenses of the two quadrupole triplets, (iii) by installing two y-steerers and (iv) by placing two Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters upstream the secondary target to provide an event-by-event reconstruction of the position hit on the target. So far, RIBs of 7Be, 8B and 17F in the energy range 3-5 MeV/u have been produced with intensities about 3 × 105, 1.6 × 103 and 105 pps, respectively. Possible light RIBs (up to Z = 10) deliverable by the facility EXOTIC are also reviewed.

  20. Progress in the realization of the PRIMA neutral beam test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toigo, V.; Boilson, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Piovan, R.; Hanada, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Agarici, G.; Antoni, V.; Baruah, U.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hemsworth, R.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, H.; Pomaro, N.; Rotti, C.; Serianni, G.; Simon, M.; Singh, M.; Singh, N. P.; Svensson, L.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Andreani, R.; Aprile, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Bettini, P.; Blatchford, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bonomo, F.; Bragulat, E.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chuilon, B.; Coniglio, A.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Dave, R.; De Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Muri, M.; Delogu, R.; Dhola, H.; Fantz, U.; Fellin, F.; Fellin, L.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Gaio, E.; Gambetta, G.; Gomez, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Gorini, G.; Grando, L.; Gupta, V.; Gutierrez, D.; Hanke, S.; Hardie, C.; Heinemann, B.; Kojima, A.; Kraus, W.; Maeshima, T.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J. F.; Moresco, M.; Muraro, A.; Muvvala, V.; Nocentini, R.; Ocello, E.; Ochoa, S.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pilard, V.; Recchia, M.; Riedl, R.; Rizzolo, A.; Roopesh, G.; Rostagni, G.; Sandri, S.; Sartori, E.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Thakkar, A.; Umeda, N.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Yadav, A.; Yamanaka, H.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1 MV a 40 A beam of negative deuterium ions, to deliver to the plasma a power of about 17 MW for one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was recognized as necessary to setup a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. This realization is made with the main contribution of the European Union, through the Joint Undertaking for ITER (F4E), the ITER Organization and Consorzio RFX which hosts the Test Facility. The Japanese and the Indian ITER Domestic Agencies (JADA and INDA) participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as IPP-Garching, KIT-Karlsruhe, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. Presently, the assembly of SPIDER is on-going and the MITICA design is being completed. The paper gives a general overview of the test facility and of the status of development of the MITICA and SPIDER main components at this important stage of the overall development; then it focuses on the latest and most critical issues, regarding both physics and technology, describing the identified solutions.

  1. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  2. A High Rigidity Spectrometer for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, Remco

    2017-01-01

    The High Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) will be the centerpiece experimental tool of the Facility for Rare-Isotope Beams (FRIB) fast-beam program. The fast-beam program has tremendous discovery potential, enabling experiments with beam intensities of a few ions per second or less through the luminosity afforded by thick targets. The high magnetic rigidity of the HRS (up to 8 Tm) will match the rigidities at which rare-isotope production yields at the FRIB fragment separator are maximum across the entire chart of nuclei and enable experiments with the most neutron-rich nuclei available at FRIB. Gain factors in luminosity of ten or more are achievable compared to running with existing spectrometers, which have a maximum rigidity of 4 Tm, with the highest gains for the most neutron-rich unstable isotopes. To enable a broad spectrum of experiments, the HRS will accommodate different ion-optical modes and provide the flexibility to run in coincidence with a diverse set of other detector systems, such as the Gamma Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA) and the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA-LISA). In the presentation, an overview of the scientific opportunities with the HRS and the present layout, based on ion-optical and magnet-feasibility studies, will be given. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office for Nuclear Physics, under Award Number DE-SC0014554.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron noise effects on beam position determination at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Leach, Richard R.; Datte, Philip; Manuel, Anastacia

    2013-09-01

    Images obtained through charged coupled device (CCD) cameras in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are crucial to precise alignment of the 192 laser beams to the NIF target-chamber center (TCC). Cameras in and around the target chamber are increasingly exposed to the effects of neutron radiation as the laser power is increased for high energy fusion experiments. NIF was carefully designed to operate under these conditions. The present work examines the degradation of the measured TCC camera position accuracy resulting from the effects of neutron radiation on the sensor and verifies operation within design specifications. Both synthetic and real beam images are used for measuring position degradation. Monte Carlo simulations based on camera performance models are used to create images with added neutron noise. These models predict neutron induced camera noise based on exposure estimates of the cumulative single-shot fluence in the NIF environment. The neutron induced noise images are used to measure beam positions on a target calculated from the alignment images with the added noise. The effects of this noise are also determined using noise artifacts from real camera images viewing TCC to estimate beam position uncertainty.

  4. Upgrade of the Drive LINAC for the AWA Facility Dielectric Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Power, John; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Li, Zenghai; Mihalcea, Daniel; /Northern Illinois U.

    2012-07-02

    We report on the design of a seven-cell, standing-wave, 1.3-GHz rf cavity and the associated beam dynamics studies for the upgrade of the drive beamline LINAC at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. The LINAC design is a compromise between single-bunch operation (100 nC {at} 75 MeV) and minimization of the energy droop along the bunch train during bunch-train operation. The 1.3-GHz drive bunch-train target parameters are 75 MeV, 10-20-ns macropulse duration, and 16 x 60 nC microbunches; this is equivalent to a macropulse current and beam power of 80 A and 6 GW, respectively. Each LINAC structure accelerates approximately 1000 nC in 10 ns by a voltage of 11 MV at an rf power of 10 MW. Due to the short bunch-train duration desired ({approx}10 ns) and the existing frequency (1.3 GHz), compensation of the energy droop along the bunch train is difficult to accomplish by means of the two standard techniques: time-domain or frequency-domain beam loading compensation. Therefore, to minimize the energy droop, our design is based on a large stored energy rf cavity. In this paper, we present our rf cavity optimization method, detailed rf cavity design, and beam dynamics studies of the drive beamline.

  5. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawabata, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS

  6. Beam line 4: A dedicated surface science facility at Daresbury Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanak, V.R. IRC in Surface Science, Liverpool University, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX ); Robinson, A.W.; van der Laan, G. ); Thornton, G. )

    1992-01-01

    We describe a beam line currently under construction at the Daresbury Laboratory which forms part of a surface science research facility for the Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Surface Science. The beam line has three branches, two of which are described here. The first branch covers the high-energy range 640 eV{le}{ital h}{nu}{le}10 keV, being equipped with a double-crystal monochromator and a novel multicoated premirror system. The second branch line is optimized for the energy range 15{le}{ital h}{nu}{le}250 eV, using cylindrical focusing mirrors, a spherical diffraction grating and an ellipsoidal refocusing mirror to achieve high resolution with a small spot size.

  7. Effects On Beam Alignment Due To Neutron-Irradiated CCD Images At The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A; Manuel, A; Datte, P; Burkhart, S

    2011-02-28

    The 192 laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are automatically aligned to the target-chamber center using images obtained through charged coupled device (CCD) cameras. Several of these cameras are in and around the target chamber during an experiment. Current experiments for the National Ignition Campaign are attempting to achieve nuclear fusion. Neutron yields from these high energy fusion shots expose the alignment cameras to neutron radiation. The present work explores modeling and predicting laser alignment performance degradation due to neutron radiation effects, and demonstrates techniques to mitigate performance degradation. Camera performance models have been created based on the measured camera noise from the cumulative single-shot fluence at the camera location. We have found that the effect of the neutron-generated noise for all shots to date have been well within the alignment tolerance of half a pixel, and image processing techniques can be utilized to reduce the effect even further on the beam alignment.

  8. Numerical analysis of the beam position monitor pickup for the Iranian light source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiee, M.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Rahighi, J.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a button type Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the low emittance storage ring of the Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF). First, we calculate sensitivities, induced power and intrinsic resolution based on solving Laplace equation numerically by finite element method (FEM), in order to find the potential at each point of BPM's electrode surface. After the optimization of the designed BPM, trapped high order modes (HOM), wakefield and thermal loss effects are calculated. Finally, after fabrication of BPM, it is experimentally tested by using a test-stand. The results depict that the designed BPM has a linear response in the area of 2×4 mm2 inside the beam pipe and the sensitivity of 0.080 and 0.087 mm-1 in horizontal and vertical directions. Experimental results also depict that they are in a good agreement with numerical analysis.

  9. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-01

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  10. Status of PRIMA, the test facility for ITER neutral beam injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonato, P.; Antoni, V.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N.; Serianni, G.; Toigo, V.; Zaccaria, P.; ITER International Team

    2013-02-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1MV a 40A beam of negative deuterons, delivering to the plasma about 17MW up to one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was decided to build a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. The Japan and the India Domestic Agencies participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as KIT-Karlsruhe, IPP-Garching, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. In the paper the main requirements are discussed and the design of the main components and systems are described.

  11. Letter Report. Defense Waste Processing Facility Pour Spout Heaters - Conceptual Designs and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    SK Sundaram; JM Perez, Jr.

    2000-09-06

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) identified a major task to address performance limitations and deficiencies of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) now in its sixth year of operation. Design, installation, testing, monitoring, operability, and a number of other characteristics were studied by research personnel collaboratively at a number of facilities: Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Because the potential limiting feature to the DWPF was identified as the pour spout/riser heater, researches on alternative design concepts originally proposed in the past were revisited. In the original works, finite element modeling was performed to evaluate temperature distribution and stress of the design currently used at the DWPF. Studies were also made to define the requirements of the design and to consider the approaches for remote removal/replacement. Their heater type/location, their remotely replaceable thermocouples, and their capabilities for remote handling characterized the five alternative designs proposed. Review comments on the alternative designs indicated a relatively wide range of advantages and disadvantages of the designs. The present report provides an overview of the design criteria, modeling results, and alternative designs. Based on a review of the past design optimization activities and an assessment of recent experience, recommendations are proposed for future consideration and improvement.

  12. Onboard Experiment Data Support Facility (OEDSF): Conceptual design study. [for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Onboard Experimental Data Support Facility (OEDSF) is an inflight data processor based on a totally new architecture specifically developed to cost-effectively process the data of Shuttle payloads sensors. Processing data onboard fills the following needs: (1) reduction of data bulk by conversion to information (2)quick-look for evaluation, interactive operation, etc. (3) real-time computation of engineering representation of sensed phenomena. For example: Value of backscatter coefficient (sigma) of a scatterometer as a function of latitude and longitude (4) exploitation of the real-time availability of ancillary data, thereby obviating the need for time-tagging, recording, and recorrelation and (5) providing data or information immediately usable by the experimenter or user. The OEDSF is made up of modular and cascadable matrix processors. Each matrix has been sized to process the data of a full typical shuttle payload. Cost analyses indicate that significant savings are realized by processing data with the OEDSF compared with conventional ground facilities.

  13. Empirical validation of the conceptual design of the LLNL 60-kg contained-firing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-02-24

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is proposing to modify an existing facility to add a 60-kg firing chamber and related support areas. This modification will provide blast-effects containment for most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the hazardous waste generated. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of its long-term ability to contain all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility outside the firing chamber must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation while the chamber door is open. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was engineered, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured to provide information for the final design.

  14. Positron annihilation spectroscopy on a beam of positrons the LEPTA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmanova, E. V.; Eseev, M. K.; Kobets, A. G.; Meshkov, I. N.; Orlov, O. S.; Sidorin, A. A.; Siemek, K.; Horodek, P.

    2016-12-01

    The results and possibilities of the samples surfaces research by the Doppler method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) for a monochromatic beam of positrons at the LEPTA facility are presented in this paper. Method with high-resolution sensitivity to defects like vacancies and dislocations allows scanning of the surface and near-surface sample layers to a depth of several micrometers by the method of Doppler broadening of annihilation lines. The opportunities for the development of a PAS method based on the measurement of the positron lifetime in the sample irradiated by ordered flow of positrons from the injector of accelerator complex LEPTA at JINR are discussed.

  15. Selection of targets and ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    In this report, the authors describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications. A brief review of present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect fast and efficient diffusion release of the short-lived species is also given.

  16. Overview of the Conceptual Design of the Future VENUS Neutron Imaging Beam Line at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilheux, Hassina; Herwig, Ken; Keener, Scott; Davis, Larry

    VENUS (Versatile Neutron Imaging Beam line at the Spallation Neutron Source) will be a world-class neutron-imaging instrument that will uniquely utilize the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) time-of-flight (TOF) capabilities to measure and characterize objects across several length scales (mm to μm). When completed, VENUS will provide academia, industry and government laboratories with the opportunity to advance scientific research in areas such as energy, materials, additive manufacturing, geosciences, transportation, engineering, plant physiology, biology, etc. It is anticipated that a good portion of the VENUS user community will have a strong engineering/industrial research focus. Installed at Beam line 10 (BL10), VENUS will be a 25-m neutron imaging facility with the capability to fully illuminate (i.e., umbra illumination) a 20 cm x 20 cm detector area. The design allows for a 28 cm x 28 cm field of view when using the penumbra to 80% of the full illumination flux. A sample position at 20 m will be implemented for magnification measurements. The optical components are comprised of a series of selected apertures, T0 and bandwidth choppers, beam scrapers, a fast shutter to limit sample activation, and flight tubes filled with Helium. Techniques such as energy selective, Bragg edge and epithermal imaging will be available at VENUS.

  17. IFMIF - International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity/Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Environmental acceptability, safety, and economic viability win ultimately be the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power. This will entail the development of radiation- resistant and low- activation materials. These low-activation materials must also survive exposure to damage from neutrons having an energy spectrum peaked near 14 MeV with annual radiation doses in the range of 20 displacements per atom (dpa). Testing of candidate materials, therefore, requires a high-flux source of high energy neutrons. The problem is that there is currently no high-flux source of neutrons in the energy range above a few MeV. The goal, is therefore, to provide an irradiation facility for use by fusion material scientists in the search for low-activation and damage-resistant materials. An accellerator-based neutron source has been established through a number of international studies and workshops` as an essential step for materials development and testing. The mission of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is to provide an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium (D-Li) neutron source to produce high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials up to about a full lifetime of anticipated use in fusion energy reactors. would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator-based irradiation tests. It would generate material- specific activation and radiological properties data, and support the analysis of materials for use in safety, maintenance, recycling, decommissioning, and waste disposal systems.

  18. Beam Homogeneity Dependence on the Magnetic Filter Field at the IPP Test Facility MANITU

    SciTech Connect

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-26

    The homogeneity of the extracted current density from the large RF driven negative hydrogen ion sources of the ITER neutral beam system is a critical issue for the transmission of the negative ion beam through the accelerator and the beamline components. As a first test, the beam homogeneity at the IPP long pulse test facility MANITU is measured by means of the divergence and the stripping profiles obtained with a spatially resolved Doppler-shift spectroscopy system. Since MANITU is typically operating below the optimum perveance, an increase in the divergence corresponds to a lower local extracted negative ion current density if the extraction voltage is constant. The beam H{sub {alpha}} Doppler-shift spectroscopy is a rather simple tool, as no absolute calibration - both for the wavelength and the emission - is necessary. Even no relative calibration of the different used lines of sight is necessary for divergence and stripping profiles as these quantities can be obtained by the line broadening of the Doppler-shifted peak and the ratio of the integral of the stripping peak to the integral of the Doppler-shifted peak, respectively. The paper describes the H{sub {alpha}} MANITU Doppler-shift spectroscopy system which is now operating routinely and the evaluation methods of the divergence and the stripping profiles. Beam homogeneity measurements are presented for different extraction areas and magnetic filter field configurations both for Hydrogen and Deuterium operation; the results are compared with homogeneity measurements of the source plasma. The stripping loss measurements are compared with model calculations.

  19. On-shot laser beam diagnostics for high-power laser facility with phase modulation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X.; Veetil, S. P.; Liu, C.; Tao, H.; Jiang, Y.; Lin, Q.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.

    2016-05-01

    A coherent-modulation-imaging-based (CMI) algorithm has been employed for on-shot laser beam diagnostics in high-power laser facilities, where high-intensity short-pulsed lasers from terawatt to petawatt are designed to realize inertial confinement fusion (ICF). A single-shot intensity measurement is sufficient for wave-front reconstruction, both for the near-field and far-field at the same time. The iterative reconstruction process is computationally very efficient and was completed in dozens of seconds by the additional use of a GPU device to speed it up. The compact measurement unit—including a CCD and a piece of pre-characterized phase plate—makes it convenient for focal-spot intensity prediction in the target chamber. It can be placed almost anywhere in high-power laser facilities to achieve near-field wave-front diagnostics. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated by conducting a series of experiments with diagnostic beams and seed pulses with deactivated amplifiers in our high-power laser system.

  20. Space Station Furnace Facility. Volume 2: Requirements definition and conceptual design study. Appendix 3: Environment analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A Preliminary Safety Analysis (PSA) is being accomplished as part of the Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) contract. This analysis is intended to support SSFF activities by analyzing concepts and designs as they mature to develop essential safety requirements for inclusion in the appropriate specifications, and designs, as early as possible. In addition, the analysis identifies significant safety concerns that may warrant specific trade studies or design definition, etc. The analysis activity to date concentrated on hazard and hazard cause identification and requirements development with the goal of developing a baseline set of detailed requirements to support trade study, specifications development, and preliminary design activities. The analysis activity will continue as the design and concepts mature. Section 2 defines what was analyzed, but it is likely that the SSFF definitions will undergo further changes. The safety analysis activity will reflect these changes as they occur. The analysis provides the foundation for later safety activities. The hazards identified will in most cases have Preliminary Design Review (PDR) applicability. The requirements and recommendations developed for each hazard will be tracked to ensure proper and early resolution of safety concerns.

  1. Conceptual design and optimization for JET water detritiation system cryo-distillation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, X.; Hollingsworth, A.; Parracho, A.; Dalgliesh, P.; Butler, B.; Smith, R.

    2015-03-15

    The aim of the Exhaust Detritiation System (EDS) of the JET Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) is to convert all Q-based species (Q{sub 2}, Q-hydrocarbons) into Q{sub 2}O (Q being indifferently H, D or T) which is then trapped on molecular sieve beds (MSB). Regenerating the saturated MSBs leads to the production of tritiated water which is stored in Briggs drums. An alternative disposal solution to offsite shipping, is to process the tritiated water onsite via the implementation of a Water Detritiation System (WDS) based, in part, on the combination of an electrolyser and a cryo-distillation (CD) facility. The CD system will separate a Q{sub 2} mixture into a de-tritiated hydrogen stream for safe release and a tritiated stream for further processing on existing AGHS subsystems. A sensitivity study of the Souers' model using the simulation program ProSimPlus (edited by ProSim S.A.) has then been undertaken in order to perform an optimised dimensioning of the cryo-distillation system in terms of available cooling technologies, cost of investment, cost of operations, process performance and safety. (authors)

  2. Efficient time-independent method for conceptual design optimization of the national ignition facility primary shield

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Annese, C.E.; Miller, W.F. Jr.; Watkins, E.F.; Tobin, M.L.; Latkowski, J.F.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.

    1995-07-01

    Minimum-cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National (laser fusion) Ignition Facility are sought with the help of the SWAN optimization code. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables the time-dependent problem to be addressed using time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying and accelerating the design process. The search for constituents that will minimize the shield cost is guided by the newly defined equal cost replacement effectiveness functions. The minimum-cost shield design concept consists of a mixture of polyethylene and low-cost, low-activation materials, such as CaCO{sub 3} or silicon carbide, with boron added near the shield boundaries. An alternative approach to the target chamber design is analyzed. It involves placing the shield interior, rather than exterior to the main aluminum structural wall of the target chamber. The resulting inner shield design approach was found to be more expensive but inherently safer; the overall inventory of radioactive activation product it contains is one to two orders of magnitude lower than in the conventional design approach. 21 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Letter report: Pre-conceptual design study for a pilot-scale Non-Radioactive Low-Level Waste Vitrification Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.A.; Morrissey, M.F.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents a pre-conceptual design study for a Non-Radioactive Low-Level Waste, Pilot-Scale Vitrification System. This pilot plant would support the development of a full-scale LLW Vitrification Facility and would ensure that the full-scale facility can meet its programmatic objectives. Use of the pilot facility will allow verification of process flowsheets, provide data for ensuring product quality, assist in scaling to full scale, and support full-scale start-up. The facility will vitrify simulated non-radioactive LLW in a manner functionally prototypic to the full-scale facility. This pre-conceptual design study does not fully define the LLW Pilot-Scale Vitrification System; rather, it estimates the funding required to build such a facility. This study includes identifying all equipment necessary. to prepare feed, deliver it into the melter, convert the feed to glass, prepare emissions for atmospheric release, and discharge and handle the glass. The conceived pilot facility includes support services and a structure to contain process equipment.

  4. Heavy-ion driver linac for the RIA facility and the feasibility of producing multi-megawatt beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Nolen, J. A.; Shepard, K. W.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility is a top priority project in the U.S. RIA is a next generation facility for basic research with radioactive beams that utilizes both standard isotope-separator on-line and in-flight fragmentation methods with novel approaches to handle high primary-beam power and remove existing limitations in the extraction of short-lived isotopes. A versatile primary accelerator, a 1.4-GV, CW superconducting linac, will provide beams from protons at 1 GeV to uranium at 400 MeV/u at power levels of 400 kW. Novel features include the acceptance of two charge states of heavy ions from the ion source and the acceleration of five charge states following the stripper foils. To achieve these goals, comprehensive beam dynamics studies have been performed to optimize the design of the driver linac. Recently we have investigated the feasibility of increasing the currents of light ions to deliver megawatts of beam power. This option is entirely possible from the beam dynamics point of view. It would require higher power from the rf system, as well as, increased shielding at the beam loss points with respect to the existing baseline design. Preliminary indications of the limitations of beam power for this class of CW superconducting linac for light ion beams will be presented.

  5. Heavy-Ion Driver Linac for the RIA Facility and the Feasibility of Producing Multi-Megawatt Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Nolen, J.A.; Shepard, K.W.

    2005-06-08

    The Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility is a top priority project in the U.S. RIA is a next generation facility for basic research with radioactive beams that utilizes both standard isotope-separator on-line and in-flight fragmentation methods with novel approaches to handle high primary-beam power and remove existing limitations in the extraction of short-lived isotopes. A versatile primary accelerator, a 1.4-GV, CW superconducting linac, will provide beams from protons at 1 GeV to uranium at 400 MeV/u at power levels of 400 kW. Novel features include the acceptance of two charge states of heavy ions from the ion source and the acceleration of five charge states following the stripper foils. To achieve these goals, comprehensive beam dynamics studies have been performed to optimize the design of the driver linac. Recently we have investigated the feasibility of increasing the currents of light ions to deliver megawatts of beam power. This option is entirely possible from the beam dynamics point of view. It would require higher power from the rf system, as well as, increased shielding at the beam loss points with respect to the existing baseline design. Preliminary indications of the limitations of beam power for this class of CW superconducting linac for light ion beams will be presented.

  6. Sub-micron resolution rf cavity beam position monitor system at the SACLA XFEL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maesaka, H.; Ego, H.; Inoue, S.; Matsubara, S.; Ohshima, T.; Shintake, T.; Otake, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed and constructed a C-band (4.760 GHz) rf cavity beam position monitor (RF-BPM) system for the XFEL facility at SPring-8, SACLA. The demanded position resolution of the RF-BPM is less than 1 μm, because an electron beam and x-rays must be overlapped within 4 μm precision in the undulator section for sufficient FEL interaction between the electrons and x-rays. In total, 57 RF-BPMs, including IQ demodulators and high-speed waveform digitizers for signal processing, were produced and installed into SACLA. We evaluated the position resolutions of 20 RF-BPMs in the undulator section by using a 7 GeV electron beam having a 0.1 nC bunch charge. The position resolution was measured to be less than 0.6 μm, which was sufficient for the XFEL lasing in the wavelength region of 0.1 nm, or shorter.

  7. Early hot electrons generation and beaming in ICF gas filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, Eduard; Michel, Pierre; Hartemann, Fred; Milovich, Jose; Hohenberger, Matthias; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Pak, Arthur; Thomas, Cliff; Doeppner, Tilo; Bachmann, Benjamin; Meezan, Nathan; MacKinnon, Andrew; Hurricane, Omar; Callahan, Debbie; Hinkel, Denise; Edwards, John

    2015-11-01

    In laser driven hohlraum capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility, supra-thermal hot electrons generated by laser plasma instabilities can preheat the capsule. Time resolved hot electron Bremsstrahlung spectra combined with 30 keV x-ray imaging uncover for the first time the directionality of hot electrons onto a high-Z surrogate capsule located at the hohlraum center. In the most extreme case, we observed a collimated beaming of hot electrons onto the capsule poles, reaching 50x higher localized energy deposition than for isotropic electrons. A collective SRS model where all laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave provides a physical interpretation for the observed beaming. Imaging data are used to distinguish between this mechanism and 2ωp instability. The amount of hot electrons generated can be controlled by the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma conditions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Targets for ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is based on the use of the well-known on-line isotope separator (ISOL) technique in which radioactive nuclei are produced by fusion type reactions in selectively chosen target materials by high-energy proton, deuteron, or He ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of radioactive ion beams (RIBs), selection of the most appropriate target material for production of the species of interest is, perhaps, the most difficult. In this report, we briefly review present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect maximum diffusion release rates of the short-lived species that can be realized at the temperature limits of specific target materials. We also describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the HRIBF as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications.

  9. The construction of the Fiber-SiPM beam monitor system of the R484 and R582 experiments at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.; Bertoni, R.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Cervi, T.; de Bari, A.; Menegolli, A.; Prata, M. C.; Rossella, M.; Tortora, L.; Carbone, R.; Mocchiutti, E.; Vacchi, A.; Vallazza, E.; Zampa, G.

    2017-03-01

    The scintillating fiber-SiPM beam monitor detectors, designed to deliver beam informations for the R484 and R582 experiments at the high intensity, low energy pulsed muon beam at the RIKEN-RAL facility, have been successfully constructed and operated. Details on their construction and first performances in beam are reported.

  10. Beta-Decay Study of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb: Candidates for a Monoenergetic Neutrino Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Estevez Aguado, M. E.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Bernabeu, J.; Nacher, E.; Tain, J. L.; Gadea, A.; Agramunt, J.; Burkard, K.; Hueller, W.; Doring, J.; Kirchner, R.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Roeckl, E.; Grawe, H.; Collatz, R.; Hellstrom, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Karny, M.; Janas, Z.; Gierlik, M.; Plochocki, A.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Batist, L.; Moroz, F.; Wittman, V.; Blazhev, A.; Valiente, J. J.; Espinoza, C.

    2011-01-01

    The beta decays of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb nuclei are investigated using the total absorption spectroscopy technique. These nuclei can be considered possible candidates for forming the beam of a monoenergetic neutrino beam facility based on the electron capture (EC) decay of radioactive nuclei. Our measurements confirm that for the cases studied, the EC decay proceeds mainly to a single state in the daughter nucleus.

  11. RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Cullerton, E.; Hocker, A.; Jensen, C.; Joireman, P.; Klebaner, A.; Kubicki, T.; Kucera, M.; Legan, A.; /Fermilab /DESY

    2011-07-26

    Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab. Since November 2010 Cryomodule 1 has been operating at 2 Kelvin. After evaluating each of the eight cavities while individually powered, the entire module has recently been powered and peak operation determined as shown in Figure 4. Several more weeks of measurements are planned before the module is warmed up, removed and replaced with Cryomodule 2 now under assembly at Fermilab.

  12. Report on selected concerns regarding property accountability at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-24

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a federally funded research and development center at Newport News, Virginia, At the time of our review, Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) was operating CEBAF for the Department of Energy (DOE) under a management and operating (M&O) contract administered by DOE`s Oak Ridge Operations Office. SURA is currently operating CEBAF under a performance based management contract, The purpose of our inspection was to evaluate selected management issues regarding property accountability at CEBAF that we identified as a result of a complaint received by the Office of Inspector General. The complainant alleged a lack of accountability for Government equipment at CEBAF and the lack of an equipment inventory. Specifically, the complainant alleged, among other things, that after a named supervisor departed, CEBAF personnel had no idea what equipment had been assigned to the supervisor and could not account for any missing materials.

  13. Laboratory Facilities and Measurement Techniques for Beamed-Energy-Propulsion Experiments in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos; Chanes Júnior, José Brosler; Cordeiro Marcos, Thiago Victor; Pinto, David Romanelli; Santos Vilela, Renan Guilherme; Barros Galvão, Victor Alves; Mantovani, Arthur Freire; da Costa, Felipe Jean; dos Santos Assenção, José Adeildo; dos Santos, Alberto Monteiro; de Paula Toro, Paulo Gilberto; Sala Minucci, Marco Antonio; da Silveira Rêgo, Israel; Salvador, Israel Irone; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2011-11-01

    Laser propulsion is an innovative concept of accessing the space easier and cheaper where the propulsive energy is beamed to the aerospace vehicle in flight from ground—or even satellite-based high-power laser sources. In order to be realistic about laser propulsion, the Institute for Advanced Studies of the Brazilian Air Force in cooperation with the United States Air Force and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are seriously investigating its basic physics mechanisms and engineering aspects at the Henry T. Hamamatsu Laboratory of Hypersonic and Aerothermodynamics in São José dos Campos, Brazil. This paper describes in details the existing facilities and measuring systems such as high-power laser devices, pulsed-hypersonic wind tunnels and high-speed flow visualization system currently utilized in the laboratory for experimentation on laser propulsion.

  14. Nuclear theory and science of the facility for rare isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balantekin, A. B.; Carlson, J.; Dean, D. J.; Fuller, G. M.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Li, Bao-An; Nazarewicz, W.; Nunes, F. M.; Ormand, W. E.; Reddy, S.; Sherrill, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a world-leading laboratory for the study of nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics. Experiments with intense beams of rare isotopes produced at FRIB will guide us toward a comprehensive description of nuclei, elucidate the origin of the elements in the cosmos, help provide an understanding of matter in neutron stars and establish the scientific foundation for innovative applications of nuclear science to society. FRIB will be essential for gaining access to key regions of the nuclear chart, where the measured nuclear properties will challenge established concepts, and highlight shortcomings and needed modifications to current theory. Conversely, nuclear theory will play a critical role in providing the intellectual framework for the science at FRIB, and will provide invaluable guidance to FRIB's experimental programs. This review overviews the broad scope of the FRIB theory effort, which reaches beyond the traditional fields of nuclear structure and reactions, and nuclear astrophysics, to explore exciting interdisciplinary boundaries with other areas.

  15. SRF test facility for the superconducting LINAC ``RAON'' — RRR property and e-beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joo, Jongdae; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-02-01

    Equipment, such as a vacuum furnace, high pressure rinse (HPR), eddy current test (ECT) and buffered chemical polishing (BCP), are installed in the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) test facility. Three different sizes of cryostats (diameters of 600 mm for a quarter wave resonator (QWR), 900 mm for a half wave resonator (HWR), and 1200 mm for single spoke resonator 1&2 (SSR 1&2)) for vertical RF tests are installed for testing cavities. We confirmed that as-received niobium sheets (ASTM B393, RRR300) good electrical properties because they showed average residual resistance ratio (RRR) values higher than 300. However, serious RRR degradation occurred after joining two pieces of Nb by e-beam welding because the average RRR values of the samples were ˜179, which was only ˜60% of as-received RRR value. From various e-beam welding experiments in which the welding current and a speed at a fixed welding voltage were changed, we confirmed that good welding results were obtained at a 53 mA welding current and a 20-mm/s welding speed at a fixed welding voltage of 150 kV.

  16. Ion Beam Facility at the University of Chile; Applications and Basic Research

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, P. A.; Morales, J. R.; Cancino, S.; Dinator, M. I.; Donoso, N.; Sepulveda, A.; Ortiz, P.; Rojas, S.

    2010-08-04

    The main characteristics of the ion beam facility based on a 3.75 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Chile are described at this work. Current activities are mainly focused on the application of the Ion Beam Analysis techniques for environmental, archaeological, and material science analysis. For instance, Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is applied to measure thin gold film thickness which are used to determine their resistivity and other electrical properties. At this laboratory the Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis (PESA) methodologies are extensively used for trace element analysis of urban aerosols (Santiago, Ciudad de Mexico). A similar study is being carried out at the Antarctica Peninsula. Characterization studies on obsidian and vitreous dacite samples using PIXE has been also perform allowing to match some of these artifacts with geological source sites in Chile.Basic physics research is being carried out by measuring low-energy cross section values for the reactions {sup 63}Cu(d,p){sup 64}Cu and {sup Nat}Zn(p,x){sup 67}Ga. Both radionuclide {sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Ga are required for applications in medicine. Ongoing stopping power cross section measurements of proton and alphas on Pd, Cu, Bi and Mylar are briefly discussed.

  17. Ion Beam Facility at the University of Chile; Applications and Basic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. A.; Morales, J. R.; Cancino, S.; Dinator, M. I.; Donoso, N.; Sepúlveda, A.; Ortiz, P.; Rojas, S.

    2010-08-01

    The main characteristics of the ion beam facility based on a 3.75 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Chile are described at this work. Current activities are mainly focused on the application of the Ion Beam Analysis techniques for environmental, archaeological, and material science analysis. For instance, Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is applied to measure thin gold film thickness which are used to determine their resistivity and other electrical properties. At this laboratory the Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis (PESA) methodologies are extensively used for trace element analysis of urban aerosols (Santiago, Ciudad de Mexico). A similar study is being carried out at the Antarctica Peninsula. Characterization studies on obsidian and vitreous dacite samples using PIXE has been also perform allowing to match some of these artifacts with geological source sites in Chile. Basic physics research is being carried out by measuring low-energy cross section values for the reactions 63Cu(d,p)64Cu and NatZn(p,x)67Ga. Both radionuclide 64Cu and 67Ga are required for applications in medicine. Ongoing stopping power cross section measurements of proton and alphas on Pd, Cu, Bi and Mylar are briefly discussed.

  18. The National Ignition Facility: Laser System, Beam Line Design and Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicki, R H

    2004-01-05

    The construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) building and laser beampaths at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been completed. This 8-year design/construction effort has successfully erected a 450,000 sq ft building and filled its interior with a complex of large-scale optical benches. These benches support all of the large-aperture optic elements of the NIF and the environmentally controlled enclosures that protect each of the 192 laser beamlines as they propagate from the injection laser system, through large aperture amplification stages, and into the target chamber. Even though this facility is very large, nearly 200 m long, 100 m wide, and 30 m tall, stringent mechanical performance requirements have been achieved throughout including temperature control <0.3 C, laser-beam pointing stability on target < 50 {micro}rms, and level 100 surface cleanliness on internal components. This presentation will provide an historical perspective explaining the basis of the design, technical details describing the techniques of construction and a chronological progression of the construction activities from ground breaking to beampath completion.

  19. Conceptual design for a receiving station for the nondestructive assay of PuO/sub 2/ at the fuels and materials examination facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.; Speir, L.G.; Ensslin, N.; Hsue, S.T.; Johnson, S.S.; Bourret, S.; Parker, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    We propose a conceptual design for a receiving station for input accountability measurements on PuO/sub 2/ received at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. Nondestructive assay techniques are proposed, including neutron coincidence counting, calorimetry, and isotopic determination by gamma-ray spectroscopy, in a versatile data acquisition system to perform input accountability measurements with precisions better than 1% at throughputs of up to 2 M.T./yr of PuO/sub 2/.

  20. Rare Isotope Accelerator - Conceptual Design of Target Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, Georg; Baek, Inseok; Blideanu, Valentin; Lawton, Don; Mantica, Paul F.; Morrissey, David J.; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Sherrill, Bradley S.; Zeller, Albert; Beene, James R; Burgess, Tom; Carter, Kenneth; Carrol, Adam; Conner, David; Gabriel, Tony A; Mansur, Louis K; Remec, Igor; Rennich, Mark J; Stracener, Daniel W; Wendel, Mark W; Ahle, Larry; Boles, Jason; Reyes, Susana; Stein, Werner; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    The planned rare isotope accelerator facility RIA in the US would become the most powerful radioactive beam facility in the world. RIA s driver accelerator will be a device capable of providing beams from protons to uranium at energies of at least 400MeV per nucleon, with beam power up to 400 kW. Radioactive beam production relies on both the in-flight separation of fast beam fragments and on the ISOL technique. In both cases the high beam power poses major challenges for target technology and handling and on the design of the beam production areas. This paper will give a brief overview of RIA and discuss aspects of ongoing conceptual design work for the RIA target areas.

  1. In vacuum diamond sensor scanner for beam halo measurements in the beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Bogard, F.; Cornebise, P.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Fuster-Martínez, N.; Griesmayer, E.; Guler, H.; Kubytskyi, V.; Sylvia, C.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Bambade, P.

    2016-10-01

    The investigation of beam halo transverse distributions is important for the understanding of beam losses and the control of backgrounds in Future Linear Colliders (FLC). A novel in vacuum diamond sensor (DSv) scanner with four strips has been designed and developed for the investigation of the beam halo transverse distributions and also for the diagnostics of Compton recoil electrons after the interaction point (IP) of ATF2, a low energy (1.3 GeV) prototype of the final focus system for the ILC and CLIC linear collider projects. Using the DSv, a dynamic range of ∼106 has been successfully demonstrated and confirmed for the first time in simultaneous beam core (∼109 electrons) and beam halo (∼103 electrons) measurements at ATF2. This report presents the characterization, performance studies and tests of diamond sensors using an α source, as well as using the electron beams at PHIL, a low energy < 5 MeV photo-injector at LAL, and at ATF2. First beam halo measurement results using the DSv at ATF2 with different beam intensities and vacuum levels are also presented. Such measurements not only allow one to evaluate the different sources of beam halo generation but also to define the requirements for a suitable collimation system to be installed at ATF2, as well as to optimize its performance during future operation.

  2. Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources

  3. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    ROBINSON,K.

    2006-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has prepared a conceptual design for a world class user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. This facility, called the ''National Synchrotron Light Source II'' (NSLS-II), will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. The overall objective of the NSLS-II project is to deliver a research facility to advance fundamental science and have the capability to characterize and understand physical properties at the nanoscale, the processes by which nanomaterials can be manipulated and assembled into more complex hierarchical structures, and the new phenomena resulting from such assemblages. It will also be a user facility made available to researchers engaged in a broad spectrum of disciplines from universities, industries, and other laboratories.

  4. Change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and Free Electron Laser, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    In this environmental assessment (EA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from a proposed change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and operation of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility beyond the initial demonstration period. With this proposal, DOE intends to increase CEBAF operating range from its current operating maximum beam energy of 4.0 GeV [giga-(billion) electron volts] to 8.0 GeV at a beam power of no greater than 1,000 kW [1 megawatt (MW)], its maximum attainable level, based on current technology and knowledge, without significant, costly equipment modifications. DOE has prepared an EA for this action to determine the potential for adverse impacts from operation of CEBAF and the FEL at the proposed levels. Changing the operating parameters of CEBAF would require no new major construction and minor modifications to the accelerator, its support systems, the FEL, and onsite utility systems. Modifications and performance improvements would be made to (1) the accelerator housed in the underground tunnels, (2) its support systems located in the above ground service buildings, and (3) the water and equipment cooling systems both in the tunnel and at the ground surface. All work would be performed on previously disturbed land and in, on, or adjacent to existing buildings, structures, and equipment. With the proposed action, the recently constructed FEL facility at the Jefferson Lab would operate in concert with CEBAF beyond its demonstration period and up to its maximum effective electron beam power level of 210 kW. In this EA, DOE evaluates the impacts of the no-action alternative and the proposed action alternative. Alternatives considered, but dismissed from further evaluation, were the use of another accelerator facility and the use of another technology.

  5. An external milli-beam for archaeometric applications on the AGLAE IBA facility of the Louvre museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.; Hamon, H.; Moignard, B.; Salomon, J.

    1998-03-01

    External beam lines have been built on numerous IBA facilities for the analysis of works of art to avoid sampling and vacuum potentially detrimental to the integrity of such precious objects. On the other hand, growing interest lies on microprobe systems which provide a high lateral resolution but which usually work under vacuum. Until recently, the AGLAE facility was equipped with separate external beam and microprobe lines. The need of a better spatial resolution in the external beam mode has led us to combine them into a single system which exhibits numerous advantages and allows the analysis of small heterogeneities like inclusions in gemstones or tiny components of composite samples. The triplet of quadrupole lenses bought from Oxford is used to focus the beam. By using a 0.75 μm thick Al foil as the exit window, blowing a helium flow around the beam spot and reducing the window-sample distance below 3 mm, a beam size of about 30 μm can be reached. The experimental setup includes two Si(Li), a HPGe and a Si surface barrier detectors for the simultaneous implementation of PIXE, NRA and RBS. The full description of this device is given as well as a few applications to highlight its capability.

  6. A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy based on deuterium-tritium neutron generators.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guido; Abrahantes, Arian

    2004-05-01

    A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy using deuterium-tritium accelerator based neutrons source is developed. Calculations based on a simple geometry model for the radiation transport are initially performed to estimate the assembly materials and their linear dimensions. Afterward, the assembly geometry is produced, optimized and verified. In order to perform these calculations the general-purpose MCNP code is used. Irradiation time and therapeutic gain are utilized as beam assessment parameters. Metallic uranium and manganese are successfully tested for fast-to-epithermal neutron moderation. In the present beam-shaping assembly proposal, the therapeutic gain is improved by 23% and the accelerator current required for a fixed irradiation period is reduced by six times compared to previous proposals based on the same D-T reaction.

  7. Space station accommodations for life sciences research facilities: Phase A conceptual design and programmatics studies for Missions SAAX0307, SAAX0302 and the transition from SAAX0307 to SAAX0302. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The conceptual designs and programmatics for a Space Station Nonhuman Life Sciences Research Facility (LSRF) are highlighted. Conceptual designs and programmatics encompass an Initial Orbital Capability (IOC) LSRF, a growth or Follow-on Orbital Capability (FOC), and the transitional process required to modify the IOC LSRF to the FOC LSRF.

  8. Silicon detectors for the neutron flux and beam profile measurements of the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumarra, Agatino; Cosentino, Luigi; Barbagallo, Massimo; Colonna, Nicola; Damone, Lucia; Pappalardo, Alfio; Piscopo, Massimo; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The demand of new and high precision cross section data for neutron-induced reactions is continuously growing, driven by the requirements from several fields of fundamental physics, as well as from nuclear technology, medicine, etc. Several neutron facilities are operational worldwide, and new ones are being built. In the coming years, neutron beam intensities never reached up to now will be available, thus opening new scientific and technological frontiers. Among existing facilities, n_TOF at CERN provides a high intensity pulsed neutron beam in a wide energy range (thermal to GeV) and with an extremely competitive energy resolution that also allows spectroscopy studies. In order to ensure high quality measurements, the neutron beams must be fully characterized as a function of the neutron energy, in particular by measuring the neutron flux and the beam transverse profile with high accuracy. In 2014 a new experimental area (EAR2), with a much higher neutron flux, has been completed and commissioned at n_TOF. In order to characterize the neutron beam in the newly built experimental area at n_TOF, two suitable diagnostics devices have been built by the INFN-LNS group. Both are based on silicon detectors coupled with 6Li converter foils, in particular Single Pad for the flux measurement and Position Sensitive (strips and others) for the beam profile. The devices have been completely characterized with radioactive sources and with the n_TOF neutron beam, fulfilling all the specifications and hence becoming immediately operational. The performances of these devices and their high versatility, in terms of neutron beam intensity, make them suitable to be used in both n_TOF experimental areas. A description of the devices and the main results obtained so far will be presented.

  9. HiRadMat at CERN SPS - A test facility with high intensity beam pulses to material samples

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, N.; Fabich, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a 10{sup 16} maximum number of protons per year, in order to limit the activation to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and showing examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2014/2015. (authors)

  10. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER) supplement. Magnet system special investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The results of magnet system special investigations listed below are summarized: 4 Tesla Magnet Alternate Design Study; 6 Tesla Magnet Manufacturability Study. The conceptual design for a 4 Tesla superconducting magnet system for use with an alternate (supersonic) ETF power train is described, and estimated schedule and cost are identified. The magnet design is scaled from the ETF 6 T Tesla design. Results of a manufacturability study and a revised schedule and cost estimate for the ETF 6 T magnet are reported. Both investigations are extensions of the conceptual design of a 6 T magnet system performed earlier as a part of the overall MED-ETF conceptual design described in Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER) Vol. V, System Design Description (SDD) 503 dated September, 1981, DOE/NASA/0224-1; NASA CR-165/52.

  11. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-15

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 4}{sup +}, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl{sub 4} doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He){sub n}C{sup +}, (He){sub n}Cl{sup +}, and (He){sub n}CCl{sup +}. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  12. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  13. New x-ray parallel beam facility XPBF 2.0 for the characterization of silicon pore optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumrey, Michael; Müller, Peter; Cibik, Levent; Collon, Max; Barrière, Nicolas; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric

    2016-07-01

    A new X-ray parallel beam facility (XPBF 2.0) has been installed in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin to characterize silicon pore optics (SPOs) for the future X-ray observatory ATHENA. As the existing XPBF which is operated since 2005, the new beamline provides a pencil beam of very low divergence, a vacuum chamber with a hexapod system for accurate positioning of the SPO to be investigated, and a vertically movable CCD-based camera system to register the direct and the reflected beam. In contrast to the existing beamline, a multilayer-coated toroidal mirror is used for beam monochromatization at 1.6 keV and collimation, enabling the use of beam sizes between about 100 μm and at least 5 mm. Thus the quality of individual pores as well as the focusing properties of large groups of pores can be investigated. The new beamline also features increased travel ranges for the hexapod to cope with larger SPOs and a sample to detector distance of 12 m corresponding to the envisaged focal length of ATHENA.

  14. Ion-beam analysis for cultural heritage on the AGLAE facility: impact of PIXE/RBS combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, J.; Dran, J.-C.; Guillou, T.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Walter, P.; Mathis, F.

    2008-07-01

    The combination of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) is particularly fruitful for the study of cultural heritage objects. Several set-ups have been developed at the AGLAE facility of the Louvre Laboratory to implement these techniques with an external beam. Successively have been tested the simultaneous use of PIXE and RBS with a single beam of protons, the sequential application of PIXE with protons and RBS with 4He2+ ions and finally the simultaneous implementation of PIXE and RBS with high-energy 4He2+ ions. Several examples illustrate the benefits of these combinations of techniques.

  15. Ongoing characterization of the forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source for the selective production of exotic species facility

    SciTech Connect

    Manzolaro, M. Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Vasquez, J.; Corradetti, S.; Calderolla, M.; Prete, G.; Meneghetti, G.

    2014-02-15

    An intense research and development activity to finalize the design of the target ion source system for the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility (operating according to the isotope separation on line technique) is at present ongoing at Legnaro National Laboratories. In particular, the characterization of ion sources in terms of ionization efficiency and transversal emittance is currently in progress, and a preliminary set of data is already available. In this work, the off-line ionization efficiency and emittance measurements for the SPES forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source in the case of a stable Ar beam are presented in detail.

  16. New target solution for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility: The granular waterfall target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Han-Jie; Yang, Guanghui; Vassilopoulos, Nikos; Zhang, Sheng; Fu, Fen; Yuan, Ye; Yang, Lei

    2017-02-01

    A new target solution, the granular waterfall target, is proposed here for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility, especially for the moment which adopts a 15 MW continuous-wave (cw) superconducting linac. Compared to the mercury jet target, the granular waterfall target works by a much simpler mechanism which can operate with a much more powerful beam, which are indicated by the detailed investigations into the heat depositions and the evaluations of the temperature increases for different target concepts. By varying proton beam kinetic energy and the geometrical parameters of the waterfall target, an overall understanding of the figure of merit concerning muon production for this target concept as the target solutions of the long-baseline neutrino factory and the medium-baseline moment is obtained. With 8 GeV beam energy and the optimal geometrical parameters, the influence on muon yield by adopting different beam-target interaction parameters is explored. Studies and discussions of the design details concerning beam dumping are also presented.

  17. An X-ray calibration facility with a dynamical pencil beam for the post-Astro-E2 telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshitomo; Itoh, Akiharu; Itoh, Kei; Kunieda, Hideyo; Haba, Yoshito; Hayakawa, Akira; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Chiaki; Ishida, Manabu; Misaki, Kazutami; Mori, Hideyuki; Shibata, Ryo

    2003-03-01

    We report a new calibration system for large size X-ray optics at ISAS. We adapted a 'dynamical' pencil beam collimated from an X-ray generator, the maximum voltage for which is 50 kV. By combining two stage systems for the X-ray generator and a collimator, the pencil beam dynamically sweeps across a circular region of a telescope with the radius of 60 cm at maximum. In this case, the X-ray telescope and the focal plane detector are both statically fixed. A 4.4~m long rail for detector stage and two positions of the telescope stage provide focal lengths from 4.5 to 12 m, while the previous system can accommodate 4.5 or 4.75 m focal length. The preliminary performance of this system is summarized in this paper. For the post-Astro-EII satellite, a hard X-ray multi-layer supermirror with an unprecedented sensitivity up to 80~keV is strongly expected. This beam facility is of importance because the hard X-ray mirrors always require a long focal length of 8-12 m due to the small reflection angle (about 0.3 degree). Focal length and diameter of future telescopes are always decided by the boundary conditions of the mission at the last moment of the design freeze. Our new X-ray beam facility is designed to match with any kind of X-ray telescope parameters.

  18. THE MECHANICAL AND SHIELDING DESIGN OF A PORTABLE SPECTROMETER AND BEAM DUMP ASSEMBLY AT BNLS ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; CASEY,W.R.; HARDER,D.A.; PJEROV,S.; RAKOWSKY,G.; SKARITKA,J.R.

    2002-09-05

    A portable assembly containing a vertical-bend dipole magnet has been designed and installed immediately down-beam of the Compton electron-laser interaction chamber on beamline 1 of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The water-cooled magnet designed with field strength of up to 0.7 Tesla will be used as a spectrometer in the Thompson scattering and vacuum acceleration experiments, where field-dependent electron scattering, beam focusing and energy spread will be analyzed. This magnet will deflect the ATF's 60 MeV electron-beam 90{sup o} downward, as a vertical beam dump for the Compton scattering experiment. The dipole magnet assembly is portable, and can be relocated to other beamlines at the ATF or other accelerator facilities to be used as a spectrometer or a beam dump. The mechanical and shielding calculations are presented in this paper. The structural rigidity and stability of the assembly were studied. A square lead shield surrounding the assembly's Faraday Cup was designed to attenuate the radiation emerging from the 1 inch-copper beam stop. All photons produced were assumed to be sufficiently energetic to generate photoneutrons. A safety evaluation of groundwater tritium contamination due to the thermal neutron capturing by the deuterium in water was performed, using updated Monte Carlo neutron-photon coupled transport code (MCNP). High-energy neutron spallation, which is a potential source to directly generate radioactive tritium and sodium-22 in soil, was conservatively assessed in verifying personal and environmental safety.

  19. Use of thermal barriers in conceptual studies of high-temperature, high-intensity targets for producing radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W.L. |; Hodges, T.A.; Hsu, H.; Fikani, M.M.

    1997-08-01

    Thermal analyses are presented of a cylindrical target concept for the production of radioactive beams by intense, high-energy proton production beams. The basic principle is to extract heat generated internally by the production beam interactions with the target material through appropriate thermal barriers. This approach allows the target material to be operated at an elevated temperature to enhance the release of radioactivities produced by the production beam bombardment, yet remove the heat generated initially. Three classes of targets are considered: high temperature and moderate heat generation; moderate temperature and low heat generation; and low temperature and high heat generation. Various thermal barriers approaches appropriate to the combined temperature and heat removal constraints are included, such as contact thermal resistance, refractory material interfaces, and porous metal interfaces. It is shown that suitable thermal barrier approaches exist to encompass the range of target conditions expected for the production of intense beams of radioactive ions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Conceptual Design of a 50--100 MW Electron Beam Accelerator System for the National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Program

    SciTech Connect

    SCHNEIDER,LARRY X.

    2000-06-01

    The National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel program requires an unprecedented electron beam source capable of 1--2 MeV at a beam power level of 50--100 MW. Direct-current electron accelerator technology can readily generate high average power beams to approximately 5 MeV at output efficiencies greater than 90%. However, due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 50--100 MW module is a two-order extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components appears reasonable. This paper presents an evaluation of component and system issues involved in the design of a 50--100 MW electron beam accelerator system with precision beam transport into a high pressure flowing air environment.

  1. Conceptual design of a high precision dual directional beam position monitoring system for beam crosstalk cancellation and improved output pulse shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger P.; Dawson, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Hulsart, R.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.

    2012-04-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ions Collider (RHIC) would benefit from improved beam position measurements near the interaction points that see both beams, especially as the tolerances become tighter when reducing the beam sizes to obtain increased luminosity. Two limitations of the present beam position monitors (BPMs) would be mitigated if the proposed approach is successful. The small but unavoidable cross-talk between signals from bunches traveling in opposite directions when using conventional BPMs will be reduced by adopting directional BPMs. Further improvements will be achieved by cancelling residual cross-talk using pairs of such BPMs. Appropriately delayed addition and integration of the signals will also provide pulses with relatively flat maxima that will be easier to digitize by relaxing the presently very stringent timing requirements.

  2. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  3. Filtered epithermal quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at research reactor facilities.

    PubMed

    Mansy, M S; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Habib, N; Adib, M

    2015-03-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-133keV at research reactors. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The filtered beams were characterized in terms of the optimal thickness of the main and additive components. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity, with low contamination from the accompanying thermal emission, fast neutrons and γ-rays. A computer code named "QMNB" was developed in the "MATLAB" programming language to perform the required calculations.

  4. Design and advancement status of the Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility (BEaTriX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Pelliciari, C.; Salmaso, B.; Arcangeli, L.; Bianucci, G.; Ferrari, C.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Rossi, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Valsecchi, G.; Vecchi, G.; Zappettini, A.

    2016-09-01

    The BEaTriX (Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility) project is an X-ray apparatus under construction at INAF/OAB to generate a broad (200´60 mm2), uniform and low-divergent X-ray beam within a small lab (6´15 m2). BEaTriX will consist of an X-ray source in the focus a grazing incidence paraboloidal mirror to obtain a parallel beam, followed by a crystal monochromation system and by an asymmetrically-cut diffracting crystal to perform the beam expansion to the desired size. Once completed, BEaTriX will be used to directly perform the quality control of focusing modules of large X-ray optics such as those for the ATHENA X-ray observatory, based on either Silicon Pore Optics (baseline) or Slumped Glass Optics (alternative), and will thereby enable a direct quality control of angular resolution and effective area on a number of mirror modules in a short time, in full X-ray illumination and without being affected by the finite distance of the X-ray source. However, since the individual mirror modules for ATHENA will have an optical quality of 3-4 arcsec HEW or better, BEaTriX is required to produce a broad beam with divergence below 1-2 arcsec, and sufficient flux to quickly characterize the PSF of the module without being significantly affected by statistical uncertainties. Therefore, the optical components of BEaTriX have to be selected and/or manufactured with excellent optical properties in order to guarantee the final performance of the system. In this paper we report the final design of the facility and a detailed performance simulation.

  5. Conceptual aspects of fiscal interactions between local governments and federally-owned, high-level radioactive waste-isolation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, D.J.; Johnson, K.E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines a number of ways to transfer revenues between a federally-owned high level radioactive waste isolation facility (hereafter simply, facility) and local governments. Such payments could be used to lessen fiscal disincentives or to provide fiscal incentives for communities to host waste isolation facilities. Two facility characteristics which necessitate these actions are singled out for attention. First, because the facility is federally owned, it is not liable for state and local taxes and may be viewed by communities as a fiscal liability. Several types of payment plans to correct this deficiency are examined. The major conclusion is that while removal of disincentives or creation of incentives is possible, plans based on cost compensation that fail to consider opportunity costs cannot create incentives and are likely to create disincentives. Second, communities other than that in which the facility is sited may experience costs due to the siting and may, therefore, oppose it. These costs (which also accrue to the host community) arise due to the element of risk which the public generally associates with proximity to the transport and storage of radioactive materials. It is concluded that under certain circumstances compensatory payments are possible, but that measuring these costs will pose difficulty.

  6. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  7. INJECTION ACCELERATION AND EXTRACTION OF HIGH INTENSITY PROTON BEAM FOR THE NEUTRINO FACILITY PROJECT AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N; Barton, D; Ganetis, G; Jain, A; Lee, Y; Marneris, I; Meng, W; Raparia, D; Roser, T; Ruggiero, A; Tuozzolo, J; Wanderer, P; Weng, W

    2003-05-12

    The proposed ''neutrino-production'' project [1.2] to be built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) requires that the neutrino-production target be bombarded by a high intensity proton beam-pulse of {approx} 90 x 10{sup 12} protons of 28 GeV in energy and at a rate of 2.5 Hz, resulting in a 1 MW power of proton beam deposited on the target for the production of the neutrinos. In this paper we investigate the possibility of producing this high intensity proton beam, using as the main accelerator the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The following aspects of the project are reported in this paper: (a) The beam injection into the AGS synchrotron of 1.2 GeV H{sup -} beam produced by a super-conducting LINAC[3]; (b) The effect of the eddy currents induced on the vacuum chamber of the circulating beam during the ''ramping'' of the main magnets of the AGS; (c) The method of the beam extraction from the AGS and the optics of the 28 GeV beam extracted from the AGS.

  8. Space station accommodations for life sciences research facilities. Phase 1: Conceptual design and programmatics studies for Missions SAAX0307, SAAX0302 and the transition from SAAX0307 to SAAX0302. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Lockheed Missiles and Space Company's conceptual designs and programmatics for a Space Station Nonhuman Life Sciences Research Facility (LSRF) are presented. Conceptual designs and programmatics encompass an Initial Orbital Capability (IOC) LSRF, a growth or follow-on Orbital Capability (FOC), and the transitional process required to modify the IOC LSFR to the FOC LSFR. The IOC and FOC LSFRs correspond to missions SAAX0307 and SAAX0302 of the Space Station Mission Requirements Database, respectively.

  9. Admittance Test and Conceptual Study of a CW Positron Source for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Hyde, Charles E.; Freyberger, Arne

    2009-09-02

    A conceptual study of a Continuous Wave (CW) positron production is presented in this paper. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) operates with a CW electron beam with a well-defined emittance, time structure and energy spread. Positrons created via bremsstrahlung photons in a high-Z target emerge with a large emittance compared to incoming electron beam. An admittance study has been performed at CEBAF to estimate the maximum beam phase space area that can be transported in the LINAC and in the Arcs. A positron source is described utilizing the CEBAF injector electron beam, and directly injecting the positrons into the CEBAF LINAC.

  10. OTR Measurements and Modeling of the Electron Beam Optics at the E-Cooling Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, A.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Kazakevich, G.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-03-01

    Optics of the electron beam accelerated in the Pelletron, intended for the electron cooling of 8.9 GeV antiprotons in the Fermilab recycler storage ring, has been studied. The beam profile parameters were measured under the accelerating section using Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) monitor. The monitor employs a highly-reflective 2 inch-diameter aluminum OTR-screen with a thickness of 5 μm and a digital CCD camera. The measurements were done in a pulse-signal mode in the beam current range of 0.03-0.8 A and at pulse durations ranging from 1 μs to 4 μs. Differential profiles measured in pulsed mode are compared with results obtained by modeling of the DC beam dynamics from the Pelletron cathode to the OTR monitor. The modeling was done with SAM, ULTRASAM and BEAM programs. An adjustment of the magnetic fields in the lenses of the accelerating section was done in the simulations. The simulated electron beam optics downstream of the accelerating section was in good agreement with the measurements made with pulsed beam.

  11. National Ignition Facility, subsystem design requirements beam control {ampersand} laser diagnostics SSDR 1.7

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E.

    1996-11-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Alignment subsystem (WBS 1.7.1), Beam Diagnostics (WBS 1.7.2), and the Wavefront Control subsystem (WBS 1.7. 3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). These three subsystems are collectively referred to as the Beam Control & Laser Diagnostics Subsystem. The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Studies on Nuclear Astrophysics and Exotic Structure at the Low-Energy RI Beam Facility CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kubono, S.; Cherubini, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Gulino, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Torresi, D.; Lee, P. S.; Lee, C. S.; Komatsubara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Okoda, Y.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; La Commara, M.; Strano, E.; Boiano, C.; Boiano, A.; Manea, C.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Miyatake, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Yan, L.; Yang, Y. Y.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, resonant structure, and nuclear reaction are going on at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), a low-energy RI beam separator operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Two major methods used at CRIB to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical relevance are the resonant scattering, and direct measurements of (α,p) reactions using a thick-gas target. Several experiments for decay measurements and reaction mechanism are also performed using low-energy RI beams at CRIB. Some of the results from recent experiments at CRIB are discussed.

  13. A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.; Erickson, R.; Frisch, J.; Hast, C.; Jobe, R.K.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, T.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nelson, T.; Phinney, N.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Seryi, A.; Smith, S.; Szalata, Z.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Beard, C.; /Daresbury /CERN /DESY /KEK, Tsukuba /LLNL, Livermore /Lancaster U. /Manchester U. /Notre Dame U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /Birmingham U. /Bristol U. /UC, Berkeley /Cambridge U. /University Coll. London /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Oregon U.

    2005-05-23

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

  14. Maximum dose angle for oblique incidence on primary beam protective barriers in the design of medical radiation therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fondevila, Damian; Arbiser, Silvio; Sansogne, Rosana; Brunetto, Monica; Dosoretz, Bernardo

    2008-05-15

    Primary barrier determinations for the shielding of medical radiation therapy facilities are generally made assuming normal beam incidence on the barrier, since this is geometrically the most unfavorable condition for that shielding barrier whenever the occupation line is allowed to run along the barrier. However, when the occupation line (for example, the wall of an adjacent building) runs perpendicular to the barrier (especially roof barrier), then two opposing factors come in to play: increasing obliquity angle with respect to the barrier increases the attenuation, while the distance to the calculation point decreases, hence, increasing the dose. As a result, there exists an angle ({alpha}{sub max}) for which the equivalent dose results in a maximum, constituting the most unfavorable geometric condition for that shielding barrier. Based on the usual NCRP Report No. 151 model, this article presents a simple formula for obtaining {alpha}{sub max}, which is a function of the thickness of the barrier (t{sub E}) and the equilibrium tenth-value layer (TVL{sub e}) of the shielding material for the nominal energy of the beam. It can be seen that {alpha}{sub max} increases for increasing TVL{sub e} (hence, beam energy) and decreases for increasing t{sub E}, with a range of variation that goes from 13 to 40 deg for concrete barriers thicknesses in the range of 50-300 cm and most commercially available teletherapy machines. This parameter has not been calculated in the existing literature for radiotherapy facilities design and has practical applications, as in calculating the required unoccupied roof shielding for the protection of a nearby building located in the plane of the primary beam rotation.

  15. Maximum dose angle for oblique incidence on primary beam protective barriers in the design of medical radiation therapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Fondevila, Damián; Arbiser, Silvio; Sansogne, Rosana; Brunetto, Mónica; Dosoretz, Bernardo

    2008-05-01

    Primary barrier determinations for the shielding of medical radiation therapy facilities are generally made assuming normal beam incidence on the barrier, since this is geometrically the most unfavorable condition for that shielding barrier whenever the occupation line is allowed to run along the barrier. However, when the occupation line (for example, the wall of an adjacent building) runs perpendicular to the barrier (especially roof barrier), then two opposing factors come in to play: increasing obliquity angle with respect to the barrier increases the attenuation, while the distance to the calculation point decreases, hence, increasing the dose. As a result, there exists an angle (alpha(max)) for which the equivalent dose results in a maximum, constituting the most unfavorable geometric condition for that shielding barrier. Based on the usual NCRP Report No. 151 model, this article presents a simple formula for obtaining alpha(max), which is a function of the thickness of the barrier (t(E)) and the equilibrium tenth-value layer (TVL(e)) of the shielding material for the nominal energy of the beam. It can be seen that alpha(max) increases for increasing TVL(e) (hence, beam energy) and decreases for increasing t(E), with a range of variation that goes from 13 to 40 deg for concrete barriers thicknesses in the range of 50-300 cm and most commercially available teletherapy machines. This parameter has not been calculated in the existing literature for radiotherapy facilities design and has practical applications, as in calculating the required unoccupied roof shielding for the protection of a nearby building located in the plane of the primary beam rotation.

  16. In-vacuum sensors for the beamline components of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sartori, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Veltri, P.

    2016-11-01

    Embedded sensors have been designed for installation on the components of the MITICA beamline, the prototype ITER neutral beam injector (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), to derive characteristics of the particle beam and to monitor the component conditions during operation for protection and thermal control. Along the beamline, the components interacting with the particle beam are the neutralizer, the residual ion dump, and the calorimeter. The design and the positioning of sensors on each component have been developed considering the expected beam-surface interaction including non-ideal and off-normal conditions. The arrangement of the following instrumentation is presented: thermal sensors, strain gages, electrostatic probes including secondary emission detectors, grounding shunt for electrical currents, and accelerometers.

  17. JINR test facility for studies FEL bunching technique for CLIC driving beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbilov, G.V.; Fateev, A.A.; Ivanov, I.N.

    1995-12-31

    SILUND-21 linear induction accelerator (energy up to 10 MeV, peak current about of 1 kA, pulse duration 50 - 70 ns) is constructed at JINR in the framework of experimental program to study free electron laser physics, a problem of two-beam acceleration and microwave electronics. In this paper we present project of an experiment to adopt the FEL bunching technique for generation of the CLIC driving beam.

  18. Facilities for in situ ion beam studies in transmission electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.W.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and electron diffraction from very small regions to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are ten such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the USA. General specifications of facilities which are operational in 1993 are summarized, and additional facilities which are planned or being proposed are briefly described.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them was reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates are presented, and the engineering issues that should be reexamined are identified. The latest (1980-1981) information from the MHD technology program is integrated with the elements of a conventional steam power electric generating plant.

  20. Investigation of properties of the TIARA neutron beam facility of importance for calibration applications.

    PubMed

    Shikaze, Y; Tanimura, Y; Saegusa, J; Tsutsumi, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Uchita, Y

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of the properties for quasi-monoenergetic neutron calibration fields of high energies more than 20 MeV at TIARA is proceeding for development of the field. Among the properties needed for the development as the standard calibration field, we report on measurement of the neutron beam profile using an imaging plate with a polyethylene converter and on estimation of the contribution of scattered neutrons into the irradiation field based on pulse height distribution at various off-beam positions measured using an organic liquid scintillation detector.

  1. Conceptual design report for facilities capability assurance program (FCAP) roads and parking lot replacements FY 1994 line item

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-06

    Mound, located in Montgomery County, Miamisburg, Ohio, on the east bank of the Great Miami River, was established in 1948 by the Atomic Energy Commission to develop and manufacture explosive devices for the United States Government. Mound occupies 305 acres and at present the facility is operated by EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. It is devoted to research, development, testing and manufacturing of components for nuclear weapons systems under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The complex employs approximately 2,200 people generating an annual payroll in excess of $75 million. Whereas Government sponsors have traditionally placed great emphasis on new technological concepts and manufacturing processes for weapons, unfortunately, such has not been the case in the maintenance of the roadway infrastructure. The roadway system which, for the most part is 40 years old, must be restored to a condition which will ensure smooth transportation of weapon component production, safe access for emergency and fire vehicles and safe ingress and egress for pedestrian personnel. This Facilities Capability Assurance Program (FCAP) project will provide this much needed restoration.

  2. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  3. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 2: with Beam Shutdown Only

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. This report documents the results of simulations of a Loss-of-Flow Accident (LOFA) where power is lost to all of the pumps that circulate water in the blanket region, the accelerator beam is shut off and neither the residual heat removal nor cavity flood systems operate.

  4. 1000 MeV Proton beam therapy facility at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute Synchrocyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimov, N. K.; Gavrikov, Yu A.; Ivanov, E. M.; Karlin, D. L.; Khanzadeev, A. V.; Yalynych, N. N.; Riabov, G. A.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Vinogradov, V. M.

    2006-05-01

    Since 1975 proton beam of PNPI synchrocyclotron with fixed energy of 1000 MeV is used for the stereotaxic proton therapy of different head brain diseases. 1300 patients have been treated during this time. The advantage of high energy beam (1000 MeV) is low scattering of protons in the irradiated tissue. This factor allows to form the dose field with high edge gradients (20%/mm) that is especially important for the irradiation of the intra-cranium targets placed in immediate proximity to the life critical parts of the brain. Fixation of the 6 0mm diameter proton beam at the isodose centre with accuracy of ±1.0 mm, two-dimensional rotation technique of the irradiation provide a very high ratio of the dose in the irradiation zone to the dose at the object's surface equal to 200:1. The absorbed doses are: 120-150 Gy for normal hypophysis, 100-120 Gy for pituitary adenomas and 40-70 Gy for arterio-venous malformation at the rate of absorbed dose up to 50 Gy/min. In the paper the dynamics and the efficiency of 1000 MeV proton therapy treatment of the brain deceases are given. At present time the feasibility study is in progress with the goal to create a proton therapy on Bragg peak by means of the moderation of 1000 MeV proton beam in the absorber down to 200 MeV, energy required for radiotherapy of deep seated tumors.

  5. Facile fabrication of nanogap electrodes for suspended graphene characterization using direct ion beam patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhengqing John; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms with exceptional electronic and mechanical properties, giving it tremendous potential in nanoelectromechanical system devices. Here, we present a method to easily and reproducibly fabricate suspended graphene nanoribbons across nanogap electrodes of various separation lengths, demonstrating a technique with aggressive gap scalability and device geometry control. Fabrication is based on using a focused gallium ion beam to create a slit between joined electrodes prepatterened on a 100 nm thick silicon nitride membrane. The transparency of the nitride membrane provides reduced ion backscattering and adds milling resolution. Large-area monolayer graphene grown by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was transferred onto the silicon nitride chip and patterned into a free-standing ribbon geometry via electron beam lithography on organic ebeam resist followed by an O2 plasma etch. We find that commonly used inorganic negative tone resist that requires a buffered oxide etch for resist removal will attack the adhesion layer (Cr2O3) between the electrode and nitride membrane, which is exposed immediately after milling, so an organic resist was selected to avoid this. Using this technique, we fabricate freestanding graphene devices contacted by electrodes of sub-100 nm separation length and preform a comparative study on the effects of current annealing on device resistance. The gap resolution of this technique is limited by the gallium ion beam, which allows for sub-100 nm gaps. Sub-10 nm gaps are feasible with He ion beams, proving direct applications in probing the high field transport properties of graphene nanoribbons at post-CMOS length scales.

  6. Scattering correction algorithm for neutron radiography and tomography tested at facilities with different beam characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanein, René; de Beer, Frikkie; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Lehmann, Eberhard

    2006-11-01

    A precise quantitative analysis with the neutron radiography technique of materials with a high-neutron scattering cross section, imaged at small distances from the detector, is impossible if the scattering contribution from the investigated material onto the detector is not eliminated in the right way. Samples with a high-neutron scattering cross section, e.g. hydrogenous materials such as water, cause a significant scattering component in their radiographs. Background scattering, spectral effects and detector characteristics are identified as additional causes for disturbances. A scattering correction algorithm based on Monte Carlo simulations has been developed and implemented to take these effects into account. The corrected radiographs can be used for a subsequent tomographic reconstruction. From the results one can obtain quantitative information, in order to detect e.g. inhomogeneity patterns within materials, or to measure differences of the mass thickness in these materials. Within an IAEA-CRP collaboration the algorithms have been tested for applicability on results obtained at the South African SANRAD facility at Necsa, the Swiss NEUTRA facilities at PSI as well as the German CONRAD facility at HMI, all with different initial neutron spectra. Results of a set of dedicated neutron radiography experiments are being reported.

  7. Conceptual Model for Reducing Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance in Skilled Nursing Facilities: Focusing on Residents with Indwelling Devices

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Suzanne F.; Galecki, Andrzej; Olmsted, Russell N.; Fitzgerald, James T.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L.

    2011-01-01

    Infections in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) are common and result in frequent hospital transfers, functional decline, and death. Colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) – including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli (R-GNB) – is also increasingly prevalent in SNFs. Antimicrobial resistance among common bacteria can adversely affect clinical outcomes and increase health care costs. Recognizing a need for action, legislators, policy-makers, and consumer groups are advocating for surveillance cultures to identify asymptomatic patients with MDROs, particularly MRSA in hospitals and SNFs. Implementing this policy for all SNF residents may be costly, impractical, and ineffective. Such a policy may result in a large increase in the number of SNF residents placed in isolation precautions with the potential for reduced attention by health care workers, isolation, and functional decline. Detection of colonization and subsequent attempts to eradicate selected MDROs can also lead to more strains with drug resistance. We propose an alternative strategy that uses a focused multicomponent bundle approach that targets residents at a higher risk of colonization and infection with MDROs, specifically those who have an indwelling device. If this strategy is effective, similar strategies can be studied and implemented for other high-risk groups. PMID:21292670

  8. Recent developments of ion beam induced luminescence at the external scanning microbeam facility of the LABEC laboratory in Florence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, E.; Calusi, S.; Cossio, R.; Giuntini, L.; Giudice, A. Lo; Mandò, P. A.; Manfredotti, C.; Massi, M.; Mirto, F. A.; Vittone, E.

    2008-04-01

    A new ionoluminescence (IL) apparatus has been successfully installed at the external scanning microbeam facility of the 3 MV Tandetron accelerator of the INFN LABEC in Firenze; the apparatus for photon detection has been fully integrated in the existing ion beam analysis (IBA) set-up, for the simultaneous acquisition of IL and PIXE/PIGE/BS spectra and maps. The potential of the new set-up is illustrated in this paper by some results extracted by the analysis of art objects and advanced semiconductor materials. In particular, the adequacy of the new IBA set-up in the field of cultural heritage is pointed out by the coupled PIXE/IL micro-analysis of a lapis lazuli stone; concerning applications in material science, IL spectra from a N doped diamond sample were acquired and compared with CL analyses to evaluate the relevant sensitivities and the effect of ion damage.

  9. Conceptual design of the FRIB cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Weisend II, J G; Bull, Brad; Burns, Chris; Fila, Adam; Kelley, Patrick; Laumer, Helmut; Mann, Thomas; McCartney, Allyn; Jones, S; Zeller, A

    2012-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new nuclear science facility funded by the DOE Office of Science and Michigan State University (MSU). FRIB is currently under design and will be located on the MSU campus. The centerpiece of FRIB is a heavy ion linac utilizing superconducting RF cavities and magnets which in turn requires a large cryogenic system. The cryogenic system consists of a commercially produced helium refrigeration plant and an extensive distribution system. Superconducting components will operate at both 4.5 K and 2 K. This paper describes the conceptual design of the system including the expected heat loads and operating modes. The strategy for procuring a custom turnkey helium refrigeration plant from industry, an overview of the distribution system, the interface of the cryogenic system to the conventional facilities and the project schedule are also described.

  10. New facility for ion beam materials characterization and modification at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, J.R.; Maggiore, C.J.; Parkin, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a new Los Alamos laboratory devoted to the characterization and modification of the near surfaces of materials. The primary instruments of the IBML are a tandem electrostatic accelerator, a National Electrostatics Corp. Model 9SDH, coupled with a Varian CF-3000 ion implanter. The unique organizational structure of the IBML as well as the operational characteristics of the 9SDH (after approximately 3000 h of operation) and the laboratories' research capabilities will be discussed. Examples of current research results will also be presented. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Absolute Beam Energy Measurement using Elastic ep Scattering at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Alexandre

    1999-10-01

    The Jefferson Lab beam energy measurement in Hall A using the elastic ep scattering will be described. This new, non-magnetic, energy measurement method allows a ( triangle E/E=10-4 ) precision. First-order corrections are canceled by the measurements of the electron and proton scattering angles for two symmetric kinematics. The measurement principle will be presented as well as the device and measurement results. Comparison with independent magnetic energy measurements of the same accuracy will be shown. This project is the result of a collaboration between the LPC: université Blaise Pascal/in2p3), Saclay and Jefferson Lab.

  12. Dosimetric impact of the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams at a ProBeam facility: comparison of measurements with TPS and MC calculations.

    PubMed

    Würl, M; Englbrecht, F; Parodi, K; Hillbrand, M

    2016-01-21

    Due to the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams, the dose output depends on the size of the irradiated field or volume. While this field size dependence has already been extensively investigated by measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for single pencil beams or monoenergetic fields, reports on the relevance of this effect for analytical dose calculation models are limited. Previous studies on this topic only exist for specific beamline designs. However, the amount of large-angle scattered primary and long-range secondary particles and thus the relevance of the low-dose envelope can considerably be influenced by the particular design of the treatment nozzle. In this work, we therefore addressed the field size dependence of the dose output at the commercially available ProBeam(®) beamline, which is being built in several facilities worldwide. We compared treatment planning dose calculations with ionization chamber (IC) measurements and MC simulations, using an experimentally validated FLUKA MC model of the scanning beamline. To this aim, monoenergetic square fields of three energies, as well as spherical target volumes were studied, including the investigation on the influence of the lateral spot spacing on the field size dependence. For the spherical target volumes, MC as well as analytical dose calculation were found in excellent agreement with the measurements in the center of the spread-out Bragg peak. In the plateau region, the treatment planning system (TPS) tended to overestimate the dose compared to MC calculations and IC measurements by up to almost 5% for the smallest investigated sphere and for small monoenergetic square fields. Narrower spot spacing slightly enhanced the field size dependence of the dose output. The deviations in the plateau dose were found to go in the clinically safe direction, i.e. the actual deposited dose outside the target was found to be lower than predicted by the TPS. Thus, the moderate overestimation of dose to

  13. Low energy highly charged ion beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre: Measurement of the plasma potential and ion energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sairam, T. Bhatt, Pragya; Safvan, C. P.; Kumar, Ajit; Kumar, Herendra

    2015-11-15

    A deceleration lens coupled to one of the beam lines of the electron cyclotron resonance based low energy beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre is reported. This system is capable of delivering low energy (2.5 eV/q–1 keV/q) highly charged ion beams. The presence of plasma potential hinders the measurements of low energies (<50 eV), therefore, plasma potential measurements have been undertaken using a retarding plate analyzer in unison with the deceleration assembly. The distributions of the ion energies have been obtained and the effect of different source parameters on these distributions is studied.

  14. Neutronics analysis of three beam-filter assemblies for an accelerator-based BNCT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Costes, S.V.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Three moderator materials, AlF{sub 3}/Al, D{sub 2}O and LiF, have been analyzed for clinical usefulness using the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n) as an accelerator driven neutron source. Proton energies between 2.1 MeV and 2.6 MeV have been investigated. Radiation transport in the reflector/moderator assembly is simulated using the MCNP program. Depth-dose distributions in a head phanton are calculated with the BNCT-RTPE patient treatment planning program from INEEL using the MCNP generated neutron and photon spectra as the subsequent source. Clinical efficacy is compared using the current BMRR protocol for all designs. Depth-dose distributions are compared for a fixed normal tissue tolerance dose of 12.5 Gy-Eq. Radiation analyses also include a complete anthropomorphic phantom. Results of organ and whole body dose components are presented for several designs. Results indicate that high quality accelerator beams may produce clinically favorable treatments to deep-seated tumors when compared to the BMRR beam. Also discussed are problems identified in comparing accelerator and reactor based designs using in-air figures of merit as well as some results of spectrum-averaged RBE`s.

  15. The use of beam propagation modeling of Beamlet and Nova to ensure a ``safe`` National Ignition Facility laser system design

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Renard, P.; Auerbach, J.

    1997-03-17

    An exhaustive set of Beamlet and Nova laser system simulations were performed over a wide range of power levels in order to gain understanding about the statistical trends in Nova and Beamlet`s experimental data sets, and to provide critical validation of propagation tools and design ``rules`` applied to the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The experiments considered for modeling were at 220-ps FWHM duration with unpumped booster slabs on Beamlet, and 100-ps FWHM with pumped 31.5-cm and 46-cm disk amplifiers on Nova. Simulations indicated that on Beamlet, the AB (the intensity pendent phase shift parameter characterizing the tendency towards beam filamentation) for the booster amplifier stage without pumping, would be nearly identical to the AB expected on NIF at the peak of a typical 20-ns long shaped pulse intended for ICF target irradiation. Therefore, with energies less than I kJ in short-pulses, we examined on Beamlet the comparable AB-driven filamentation conditions predicted for long ICF pulseshapes in the 18 kJ regime on the NIF, while avoiding fluence dependent surface damage. Various spatial filter pinhole configurations were examined on Nova and Beamlet. Open transport spatial filter pinholes were used in some experiments to allow the direct measurement of the onset of beam filamentation. Schlieren images on Beamlet of the far field irradiance measuring the scattered light fraction outside of 33-{micro}radians were also obtained and compared to modeled results.

  16. Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF: New Insights and Conceptual Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Derbenev; Andrei Afanasev; Kevin Beard; Lawrence Cardman; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Pavel Degtiarenko; Jean Delayen; Rolf Ent; Andrew Hutton; Geoffrey Krafft; Rui Li; Nikolitsa Merminga; Benard Poelker; Byung Yunn; Petr Ostroumov

    2004-07-01

    We report on progress in the conceptual development of the proposed high luminosity (up to 1035 cm-2s-1) and efficient spin manipulation (using ''figure 8'' boosters and collider rings) Electron-Ion Collider at the CEBAF. This facility would use a polarized 5-7 GeV electron beam from a superconducting energy recovering linac with a kicker-operated circulator ring, and a 30-150 GeV ion beam in a storage ring (for polarized p, d, 3He, Li and unpolarized totally stripped nuclei up to Ar). Ultra-high luminosity is envisioned to be achieved with very short crab-crossing bunches at 1.5 GHz repetition rate. Our recent studies were concentrated on understanding beam-beam interaction, ion beam instabilities, luminosity lifetime due to intrabeam scatterings, ERL-ring synchronization, and ion spin control. We also proposed a preliminary conceptual design of the interaction region.

  17. The National Ignition Facility: laser system, beam line design, and construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Richard H.

    2004-05-01

    The construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) building and laser beampaths at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been completed. This 8-year design/construction effort has successfully erected a 450,000 sq ft building and filled its interior with a complex of large-scale optical benches. These benches support all of the largeaperture optic elements of the NIF and the environmentally controlled enclosures that protect each of the 192 laser beamlines as they propagate from the injection laser system, through large aperture amplification stages, and into the target chamber. Even though this facility is very large, nearly 200 m long, 100 m wide, and 30 m tall, stringent mechanical performance requirements have been achieved throughout including temperature control <0.3°C, laserbeam pointing stability on target <50 μrms, and level 100 surface cleanliness on internal components. This presentation will provide an historical perspective explaining the basis of the design, technical details describing the techniques of construction and a chronological progression of the construction activities from ground breaking to beampath completion.

  18. Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas

    SciTech Connect

    C.A.Gentile, W.R.Blanchard, T.Kozub, C.Priniski, I.Zatz, S.Obenschain

    2009-09-21

    It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (~ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a "gas shield" may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering metmethods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

  19. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  20. Resolution Studies at Beam Position Monitors at the FLASH Facility at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, N.; Lund-Nielsen, J.; Noelle, D.; Traber, T.; Kruse, J.; Riesch, W.; Wendt, M.

    2006-11-20

    More than 60 beam position monitors (BPM) are installed along about 350m of beamline of the Free Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) at DESY. The room-temperature part of the accelerator is equipped mainly with stripline position monitors. In the accelerating cryo-modules there are cavity and re-entrant cavity BPMs, which will not be discussed here. In the undulator part of the machine button BPMs are used. This area requires a single bunch resolution of 10{mu}m. The electronics is based on the AM/PM normalization principle and is externally triggered. Single-bunch position is measured. This paper presents the methods used to determine the resolution of the BPMs. The results based on correlations between different BPMs along the machine are compared to noise measurements in the RF lab. The performance and difficulties with the BPM design and the current electronics as well as its development are discussed.

  1. Status and Perspectives for a Slow Positron Beam Facility at the HH--NIPNE Bucharest

    SciTech Connect

    Straticiuc, Mihai; Craciun, Liviu Stefan; Constantinescu, Olimpiu; Ghita, Ionica Alina; Ionescu, Cristina; Racolta, Petru Mihai; Vasilescu, Angela; Braic, Viorel; Zoita, Catalin; Kiss, Adrian; Bojin, Dionezie

    2009-03-10

    The development of a positron annihilation spectroscopy laboratory at the HH-NIPNE Bucharest-to be used for material studies and applications was started in the last 10 years. In the framework of a national research project extended over the last 3 years, was designed a low energy positron accelerator, as a high-vacuum dedicated beam line with two options: a 25 mCi {sup 22}NaCl source and in line with the NIPNE-cyclotron or a new intense compact cyclotron. The construction of the beam line was planned as a sequence of modules: source- moderator system; magnetical filter for fast positrons in order to select the positrons energies in the range 0.8-1 keV; a modular system for focusing, transport and acceleration of monoenergetic positrons in the energy range 0.8-50 keV and a CDBS analysis chamber. The moderator proposed--is tungsten as a foil of about 3 {mu}m prepared at the Optoelectronics Institute were put into a thermal treatment vacuum chamber and bombarded with electrons from a 100 W electron gun After the treatment, they were tested for changes of elemental composition of the surface and structure at the Polytechnic University. The structure tests were performed on a DRON 3 M diffractometer, with a Co tube ({lambda}{sub K{alpha}} = 1.7903 A) - the angular regions studied were around 34 deg. (1 0 0) and 69 deg. (2 0 0). In the present time, the trajectories of the positron are going to be simulated with dedicated software (an ion and electron optics simulator). For the coincidence measurements (CDBS) set-up we used a home-made {sup 22}NaCl source, by separation without carrier from a metallic Mg target irradiated with 12 MeV protons and separated by columnar cation exchange. A home-made biparametric system for CDBS measurements will be reported, also.

  2. Status and Perspectives for a Slow Positron Beam Facility at the HH—NIPNE Bucharest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Florin; Craciun, Liviu Stefan; Constantinescu, Olimpiu; Ghita, Ionica Alina; Ionescu, Cristina; Racolta, Petru Mihai; Straticiuc, Mihai; Vasilescu, Angela; Braic, Viorel; Zoita, Catalin; Kiss, Adrian; Bojin, Dionezie

    2009-03-01

    The development of a positron annihilation spectroscopy laboratory at the HH-NIPNE Bucharest-to be used for material studies and applications was started in the last 10 years. In the framework of a national research project extended over the last 3 years, was designed a low energy positron accelerator, as a high-vacuum dedicated beam line with two options: a 25 mCi 22NaCl source and in line with the NIPNE-cyclotron or a new intense compact cyclotron. The construction of the beam line was planned as a sequence of modules: source- moderator system; magnetical filter for fast positrons in order to select the positrons energies in the range 0.8-1 keV; a modular system for focusing, transport and acceleration of monoenergetic positrons in the energy range 0.8-50 keV and a CDBS analysis chamber. The moderator proposed—is tungsten as a foil of about 3 μm prepared at the Optoelectronics Institute were put into a thermal treatment vacuum chamber and bombarded with electrons from a 100 W electron gun After the treatment, they were tested for changes of elemental composition of the surface and structure at the Polytechnic University. The structure tests were performed on a DRON 3 M diffractometer, with a Co tube (λKα = 1.7903 A)—the angular regions studied were around 34° (1 0 0) and 69° (2 0 0). In the present time, the trajectories of the positron are going to be simulated with dedicated software (an ion and electron optics simulator). For the coincidence measurements (CDBS) set-up we used a home-made 22NaCl source, by separation without carrier from a metallic Mg target irradiated with 12 MeV protons and separated by columnar cation exchange. A home- made biparametric system for CDBS measurements will be reported, also.

  3. Status and Perspectives for a Slow Positron Beam Facility at the HH-NIPNE Bucharest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straticiuc, Mihai; Craciun, Liviu Stefan; Constantinescu, Olimpiu; Ghita, Ionica Alina; Ionescu, Cristina; Racolta, Petru Mihai; Vasilescu, Angela; Braic, Viorel; Zoita, Catalin; Kiss, Adrian; Bojin, Dionezie

    2009-03-01

    The development of a positron annihilation spectroscopy laboratory at the HH-NIPNE Bucharest-to be used for material studies and applications was started in the last 10 years. In the framework of a national research project extended over the last 3 years, was designed a low energy positron accelerator, as a high-vacuum dedicated beam line with two options: a 25 mCi 22NaCl source and in line with the NIPNE-cyclotron or a new intense compact cyclotron. The construction of the beam line was planned as a sequence of modules: source- moderator system; magnetical filter for fast positrons in order to select the positrons energies in the range 0.8-1 keV; a modular system for focusing, transport and acceleration of monoenergetic positrons in the energy range 0.8-50 keV and a CDBS analysis chamber. The moderator proposed-is tungsten as a foil of about 3 μm prepared at the Optoelectronics Institute were put into a thermal treatment vacuum chamber and bombarded with electrons from a 100 W electron gun After the treatment, they were tested for changes of elemental composition of the surface and structure at the Polytechnic University. The structure tests were performed on a DRON 3 M diffractometer, with a Co tube (λKα = 1.7903 A)-the angular regions studied were around 34° (1 0 0) and 69° (2 0 0). In the present time, the trajectories of the positron are going to be simulated with dedicated software (an ion and electron optics simulator). For the coincidence measurements (CDBS) set-up we used a home-made 22NaCl source, by separation without carrier from a metallic Mg target irradiated with 12 MeV protons and separated by columnar cation exchange. A home- made biparametric system for CDBS measurements will be reported, also.

  4. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densam, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L. J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J. S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-01

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  5. The rare isotope accelerator (RIA) facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Christoph Leemann

    2000-08-01

    The envisioned Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility would add substantially to research opportunities for nuclear physics and astrophysics by combining increased intensities with a greatly expanded variety of high-quality rare-isotope beams. A flexible superconducting driver linac would provide 100 kW, 400 MeV/nucleon beams of any stable isotope from hydrogen to uranium onto production targets. Combinations of projectile fragmentation, target fragmentation, fission, and spallation would produce the needed broad assortment of short-lived secondary beams. This paper describes the project's background, purpose, and status, the envisioned facility, and the key subsystem, the driver linac. RIA's scientific purposes are to advance current theoretical models, reveal new manifestations of nuclear behavior, and probe the limits of nuclear existence [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show, respectively, examples of RIA research opportunities and the yields projected for pursuing them. Figure 3 outlines a conceptual approach for delivering the needed beams.

  6. Characterization of the microbunch time structure of proton pencil beams at a clinical treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, J; Roemer, K E; Enghardt, W; Fiedler, F; Golnik, C; Hueso-González, F; Helmbrecht, S; Kormoll, T; Rohling, H; Smeets, J; Werner, T; Pausch, G

    2016-03-21

    Proton therapy is an advantageous treatment modality compared to conventional radiotherapy. In contrast to photons, charged particles have a finite range and can thus spare organs at risk. Additionally, the increased ionization density in the so-called Bragg peak close to the particle range can be utilized for maximum dose deposition in the tumour volume. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the therapy can be affected by range uncertainties, which have to be covered by additional safety margins around the treatment volume. A real-time range and dose verification is therefore highly desired and would be key to exploit the major advantages of proton therapy. Prompt gamma rays, produced in nuclear reactions between projectile and target nuclei, can be used to measure the proton's range. The prompt gamma-ray timing (PGT) method aims at obtaining this information by determining the gamma-ray emission time along the proton path using a conventional time-of-flight detector setup. First tests at a clinical accelerator have shown the feasibility to observe range shifts of about 5 mm at clinically relevant doses. However, PGT spectra are smeared out by the bunch time spread. Additionally, accelerator related proton bunch drifts against the radio frequency have been detected, preventing a potential range verification. At OncoRay, first experiments using a proton bunch monitor (PBM) at a clinical pencil beam have been conducted. Elastic proton scattering at a hydrogen-containing foil could be utilized to create a coincident proton-proton signal in two identical PBMs. The selection of coincident events helped to suppress uncorrelated background. The PBM setup was used as time reference for a PGT detector to correct for potential bunch drifts. Furthermore, the corrected PGT data were used to image an inhomogeneous phantom. In a further systematic measurement campaign, the bunch time spread and the proton transmission rate were measured for several beam energies between 69 and 225 Me

  7. Characterization of the microbunch time structure of proton pencil beams at a clinical treatment facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzoldt, J.; Roemer, K. E.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Golnik, C.; Hueso-González, F.; Helmbrecht, S.; Kormoll, T.; Rohling, H.; Smeets, J.; Werner, T.; Pausch, G.

    2016-03-01

    Proton therapy is an advantageous treatment modality compared to conventional radiotherapy. In contrast to photons, charged particles have a finite range and can thus spare organs at risk. Additionally, the increased ionization density in the so-called Bragg peak close to the particle range can be utilized for maximum dose deposition in the tumour volume. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the therapy can be affected by range uncertainties, which have to be covered by additional safety margins around the treatment volume. A real-time range and dose verification is therefore highly desired and would be key to exploit the major advantages of proton therapy. Prompt gamma rays, produced in nuclear reactions between projectile and target nuclei, can be used to measure the proton’s range. The prompt gamma-ray timing (PGT) method aims at obtaining this information by determining the gamma-ray emission time along the proton path using a conventional time-of-flight detector setup. First tests at a clinical accelerator have shown the feasibility to observe range shifts of about 5 mm at clinically relevant doses. However, PGT spectra are smeared out by the bunch time spread. Additionally, accelerator related proton bunch drifts against the radio frequency have been detected, preventing a potential range verification. At OncoRay, first experiments using a proton bunch monitor (PBM) at a clinical pencil beam have been conducted. Elastic proton scattering at a hydrogen-containing foil could be utilized to create a coincident proton-proton signal in two identical PBMs. The selection of coincident events helped to suppress uncorrelated background. The PBM setup was used as time reference for a PGT detector to correct for potential bunch drifts. Furthermore, the corrected PGT data were used to image an inhomogeneous phantom. In a further systematic measurement campaign, the bunch time spread and the proton transmission rate were measured for several beam energies between 69 and 225

  8. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  9. Initial Experimental Verification of the Neutron Beam Modeling for the LBNL BNCT Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.; McDonald, R.J.; Smith, A.R.; Stone, N.A.; Vuji, J.

    1999-01-19

    In preparation for future clinical BNCT trials, neutron production via the 7Li(p,n) reaction as well as subsequent moderation to produce epithermal neutrons have been studied. Proper design of a moderator and filter assembly is crucial in producing an optimal epithermal neutron spectrum for brain tumor treatments. Based on in-phantom figures-of-merit,desirable assemblies have been identified. Experiments were performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron to characterize epithermal neutron beams created using several microampere of 2.5 MeV protons on a lithium target. The neutron moderating assembly consisted of Al/AlF3 and Teflon, with a lead reflector to produce an epithermal spectrum strongly peaked at 10-20 keV. The thermal neutron fluence was measured as a function of depth in a cubic lucite head phantom by neutron activation in gold foils. Portions of the neutron spectrum were measured by in-air activation of six cadmium-covered materials (Au, Mn, In, Cu, Co, W) with high epithermal neutron absorption resonances. The results are reasonably reproduced in Monte Carlo computational models, confirming their validity.

  10. Design of carbon therapy facility based on 10 years experience at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, K.; Furukawa, T.; Iwata, Y.; Kanai, T.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Kitagawa, A.; Komori, M.; Minohara, S.; Murakami, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, Y.; Shibuya, S.; Torikoshi, M.; Yamada, S.

    2006-06-01

    Since 1994, the clinical trial for cancer therapy with HIMAC has successfully progressed, and more than 2100 cancer patients have been treated with a carbon beam. Based on the development of the accelerator and irradiation technologies for 10 years, we have designed a new carbon-therapy facility for widespread use in Japan, and key technologies for the new facility have been developed. We describe the conceptual design of the new facility and the status of development for the key technologies.

  11. Isolating and quantifying cross-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A. K.; Cao, D.; Michel, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-04-20

    The angularly-resolved mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories for Si-coated CH targets were measured in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments to quantify crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) while constraining the hydrodynamic coupling. A polar-direct-drive laser configuration was used, where the equatorial laser beams were dropped from a symmetric direct-drive configuration to suppress CBET at the pole, while allowing it to persist at the equator. The combination of low- and high-CBET conditions in the same implosion allowed the effects of CBET on the ablation rate and ablation pressure to be decoupled from the other physics effects that influence laser-coupling. Hydrodynamic simulations performed without CBET reproduced the measured ablation rate and ablation front trajectory at the pole of the target, verifying that the other laser-coupling physics effects are well-modeled when CBET effects are negligible. The simulated mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories were in excellent agreement with the measurements at all angles when a CBET model based on Randall’s equations [C. J. Randall et al., Phys. Fluids 24, 1474 (1981)] was included into the simulations with an optimized multiplier on the CBET gain factor. These measurements were performed on both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility to access a wide range of plasma conditions, laser intensities, and laser beam geometries. Furthermore, the presence of the CBET gain multiplier required to match the data in all of the configurations tested suggests that additional physics effects, such as intensity variations due to diffraction, shortcomings of extending the 1-D Randall model to 3-D, or polarization effects, should be explored to explain the differences in observed and predicted drive.

  12. Isolating and quantifying cross-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Davis, A. K.; Cao, D.; Michel, D. T.; ...

    2016-04-20

    The angularly-resolved mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories for Si-coated CH targets were measured in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments to quantify crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) while constraining the hydrodynamic coupling. A polar-direct-drive laser configuration was used, where the equatorial laser beams were dropped from a symmetric direct-drive configuration to suppress CBET at the pole, while allowing it to persist at the equator. The combination of low- and high-CBET conditions in the same implosion allowed the effects of CBET on the ablation rate and ablation pressure to be decoupled from the other physics effects that influence laser-coupling. Hydrodynamic simulationsmore » performed without CBET reproduced the measured ablation rate and ablation front trajectory at the pole of the target, verifying that the other laser-coupling physics effects are well-modeled when CBET effects are negligible. The simulated mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories were in excellent agreement with the measurements at all angles when a CBET model based on Randall’s equations [C. J. Randall et al., Phys. Fluids 24, 1474 (1981)] was included into the simulations with an optimized multiplier on the CBET gain factor. These measurements were performed on both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility to access a wide range of plasma conditions, laser intensities, and laser beam geometries. Furthermore, the presence of the CBET gain multiplier required to match the data in all of the configurations tested suggests that additional physics effects, such as intensity variations due to diffraction, shortcomings of extending the 1-D Randall model to 3-D, or polarization effects, should be explored to explain the differences in observed and predicted drive.« less

  13. Production Facility System Reliability Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Crystal Buchanan; Klein, Steven Karl

    2015-10-06

    This document describes the reliability, maintainability, and availability (RMA) modeling of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) design for the Closed Loop Helium Cooling System (CLHCS) planned for the NorthStar accelerator-based 99Mo production facility. The current analysis incorporates a conceptual helium recovery system, beam diagnostics, and prototype control system into the reliability analysis. The results from the 1000 hr blower test are addressed.

  14. Improved Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Strategy for Polar Direct Drive at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) reduces absorbed light and implosion velocity, alters time-resolved scattered-light spectra, and redistributes absorbed and scattered light. These effects reduce target performance in both symmetric direct-drive and polar-direct-drive (PDD) experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The CBET package (Adaawam) incorporated into the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO is an integral part of the 3-D ray-trace package (Mazinisin). The CBET exchange occurs primarily over the equatorial region in PDD, where successful mitigation strategies concentrate. Detuning the initial laser wavelength (dλ0) reduces the CBET interaction volume, which can be combined with other mitigation domains (e.g., spatial and temporal). By judiciously selecting the ring and/or port +/-dλ0 in each hemisphere, using new DRACO diagnostic abilities, improved wavelength detuning strategies trade-off overall energy absorption for improved hemispherical energy balance control. These balanced-wavelength detuning strategies improve performance for high-convergence implosions. Simulations (2-D DRACO) predict improved implosion performance and control in both the shell trajectory and morphology for planned intermediate PDD experiments on the NIF. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  16. An overview of the planned advanced neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), now in the conceptual design stage, will be a new user facility for neutron research, including neutron beam experiments, materials irradiation testing and materials analysis capabilities, and production facilities for transuranic and lighter isotopes. The neutron source is to be the world's highest flux beam reactor and is based on existing reactor technology to minimize safety issues. The preferred fuel, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, has been tested in operating reactors in the United States, Japan, and Europe. The core is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water, common practice for research reactors. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. A facility to produce an energetic, ground state atomic oxygen beam for the simulation of the Low-Earth Orbit environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Weaver, David P.; Muntz, E. P.

    1994-01-01

    Because of the continuing commitment to activity in low-Earth orbit (LEO), a facility is under development to produce energetic atmospheric species, particularly atomic oxygen, with energies ranging from 5 to 80 eV. This relatively high flux facility incorporates an ion engine to produce the corresponding specie ion which is charge exchanged to produce a neutral atomic beam. Ion fluxes of around 10(exp 15) sec(exp -1) with energies of 20-70 eV have been achieved. A geometrically augmented inertially tethered charge exchanger (GAITCE) was designed to provide a large column depth of charge exchange gas while reducing the gas load to the low pressure portion of the atomic beam facility. This is accomplished using opposed containment jets which act as collisional barriers to the escape of the dense gas region formed between the jets. Leak rate gains to the pumping system on the order of 10 were achieved for moderate jet mass flows. This system provides an attractive means for the charge exchange of atomic ions with a variety of gases to produce energetic atomic beams.

  18. Combined electron-beam and coagulation purification of molasses distillery slops. Features of the method, technical and economic evaluation of large-scale facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikaev, A. K.; Ponomarev, A. V.; Bludenko, A. V.; Minin, V. N.; Elizar'eva, L. M.

    2001-04-01

    The paper summarizes the results obtained from the study on combined electron-beam and coagulation method for purification of molasses distillery slops from distillery produced ethyl alcohol by fermentation of grain, potato, beet and some other plant materials. The method consists in preliminary mixing of industrial wastewater with municipal wastewater, electron-beam treatment of the mixture and subsequent coagulation. Technical and economic evaluation of large-scale facility (output of 7000 m 3 day -1) with two powerful cascade electron accelerators (total maximum beam power of 400 kW) for treatment of the wastewater by the above method was carried out. It was calculated that the cost of purification of the wastes is equal to 0.25 US$ m -3 that is noticeably less than in the case of the existing method.

  19. Conceptual Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ram, Ashwin, Ed.; Nersessian, Nancy J., Ed.; Keil, Frank C., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue includes four articles that address issues concerning conceptual change. Topics include analogical reasoning and a case study of Johannes Kepler; conceptual change and wine expertise; the role of extreme case reasoning in instruction for conceptual change; and dynamic science assessment: a new approach for investigating…

  20. Interim measure conceptual design for remediation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas : pilot test and remedy implementation.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-09

    This document presents an Interim Measure Work Plan/Design for the short-term, field-scale pilot testing and subsequent implementation of a non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Centralia, Kansas. The IM is recommended to mitigate both (1) localized carbon tetrachloride contamination in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and (2) present (and potentially future) carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the shallow groundwater beneath and in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Investigations conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated that groundwater at the Centralia site is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride at levels that exceed the Kansas Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. Groundwater sampling and analyses conducted by Argonne under a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) indicated that the carbon tetrachloride levels at several locations in the groundwater plume have increased since twice yearly monitoring of the site began in September 2005. The identified groundwater contamination currently poses no unacceptable health risks, in view of the absence of potential human receptors in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride contamination has also been identified at Centralia in subsurface soils at concentrations on the order of the Kansas Tier 2 RBSL of 200 {micro}g/kg in soil for the soil-to-groundwater protection pathway. Soils contaminated at this level might pose some risk as a potential source of carbon tetrachloride contamination to groundwater. To mitigate the existing contaminant levels and decrease the potential future concentrations of

  1. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Interaction of a smoothed laser beam with supercritical-density porous targets on the ABC facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangio, C.; Caruso, A.; Gus'kov, Sergei Yu; Rozanov, Vladislav B.; Rupasov, A. A.

    2006-05-01

    We present the results of experiments on the interaction of laser radiation with low-density porous targets performed on the ABC facility at the ENEA Research Centre (Frascati, Italy). Porous plastic targets with densities of 5 and 20 mg cm-3 were irradiated by a focused neodymium-laser beam at the fundamental frequency (λ = 1.054 μm) at a radiation intensity of 1013 W cm-2 at the target. The beam was preliminarily allowed to pass through an optical system intended to spatially smooth the radiation intensity over the beam cross section. The use a smoothed beam was important to discover in the plasma and in the accelerated dense material the features related to the porous structure of the target under conditions which rule out the effect of the inhomogeneities of the heating beam itself. The spatial plasma structure in the laser beam—target interaction region and at the rear side of the target were investigated by using optical schlieren plasma photography. The time dependent transmission of the laser radiation through the target was also investigated by imaging the target in transmitted radiation to a properly masked photodiode.

  2. Formation of a spatial laser-beam profile in a channel of high-power neodymium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'kov, S A; Voronich, I N; Garanin, S G; Zimalin, B G; Savkin, A V; Sharov, O A

    2015-06-30

    A system for one-dimensional spatial profiling of a laser beam is suggested, capable of compensating for the spatial laserbeam distortions that arise due to a nonuniform gain distribution over the aperture in the amplifying channel of high-power Nd:glass lasers with wide-aperture stages on disk active elements. The principle of operation, the approach to calculation of the key element parameters, and calculation and experimental results of studying the formation of spatial profiles of the laser beam intensity at the output from the system in question are described. Possible applications of the system both in single-beam and multi-beam optical schemes are considered. (lasers)

  3. An overview of the facilities, activities, and developments at the University of North Texas Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Poudel, Prakash R.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pandey, Bimal; Deoli, Naresh T.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Mulware, Stephen J.; Baxley, Jacob; Manuel, Jack E.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Szilasi, Szabolcs; Weathers, Duncan L.; Reinert, Tilo; Glass, Gary A.; Duggan, Jerry L.; McDaniel, Floyd D.

    2013-07-01

    The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at the University of North Texas includes several accelerator facilities with capabilities of producing a variety of ion beams from tens of keV to several MeV in energy. The four accelerators are used for research, graduate and undergraduate education, and industrial applications. The NEC 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has three ion sources for negative ions: He Alphatross and two different SNICS-type sputter ion sources. Presently, the tandem accelerator has four high-energy beam transport lines and one low-energy beam transport line directly taken from the negative ion sources for different research experiments. For the low-energy beam line, the ion energy can be varied from ˜20 to 80 keV for ion implantation/modification of materials. The four post-acceleration beam lines include a heavy-ion nuclear microprobe; multi-purpose PIXE, RBS, ERD, NRA, and broad-beam single-event upset; high-energy ion implantation line; and trace-element accelerator mass spectrometry. The NEC 3MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator has an RF ion source mainly for hydrogen, helium and heavier inert gases. We recently installed a capacitive liner to the terminal potential stabilization system for high terminal voltage stability and high-resolution microprobe analysis. The accelerator serves a beam line for standard RBS and RBS/C. Another beamline for high energy focused ion beam application using a magnetic quadrupole lens system is currently under construction. This beam line will also serve for developmental work on an electrostatic lens system. The third accelerator is a 200 kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator with an RF ion source. The fourth accelerator is a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which was in operation for last several decades is currently planned to be used mainly for educational purpose. Research projects that will be briefly discussed include materials synthesis/modification for photonic, electronic, and

  4. An overview of the facilities, activities, and developments at the University of North Texas Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Poudel, Prakash R.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pandey, Bimal; Deoli, Naresh T.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Mulware, Stephen J.; Baxley, Jacob; Manuel, Jack E.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Szilasi, Szabolcs; Weathers, Duncan L.; Reinert, Tilo; Glass, Gary A.; Duggan, Jerry L.; McDaniel, Floyd D.

    2013-07-03

    The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at the University of North Texas includes several accelerator facilities with capabilities of producing a variety of ion beams from tens of keV to several MeV in energy. The four accelerators are used for research, graduate and undergraduate education, and industrial applications. The NEC 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has three ion sources for negative ions: He Alphatross and two different SNICS-type sputter ion sources. Presently, the tandem accelerator has four high-energy beam transport lines and one low-energy beam transport line directly taken from the negative ion sources for different research experiments. For the low-energy beam line, the ion energy can be varied from {approx}20 to 80 keV for ion implantation/modification of materials. The four post-acceleration beam lines include a heavy-ion nuclear microprobe; multi-purpose PIXE, RBS, ERD, NRA, and broad-beam single-event upset; high-energy ion implantation line; and trace-element accelerator mass spectrometry. The NEC 3MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator has an RF ion source mainly for hydrogen, helium and heavier inert gases. We recently installed a capacitive liner to the terminal potential stabilization system for high terminal voltage stability and high-resolution microprobe analysis. The accelerator serves a beam line for standard RBS and RBS/C. Another beamline for high energy focused ion beam application using a magnetic quadrupole lens system is currently under construction. This beam line will also serve for developmental work on an electrostatic lens system. The third accelerator is a 200 kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator with an RF ion source. The fourth accelerator is a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which was in operation for last several decades is currently planned to be used mainly for educational purpose. Research projects that will be briefly discussed include materials synthesis/modification for photonic, electronic, and

  5. System analysis study of space platform and station accommodations for life sciences research facilities. Volume 1: Executive summary. Phase A: Conceptual design and programmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The study was conducted in 3 parts over a 3 year period. The study schedule and the documentation associated with each study part is given. This document summarized selected study results from the conceptual design and programmatics segment of the effort. The objectives were: (1) to update requirements and tradeoffs and develop a detailed design and mission requirements document; (2) to develop conceptual designs and mission descriptions; and (3) to develop programmatic, i.e., work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary, estimated cost, and implementing plans and schedules.

  6. An irradiation facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application based on a radio frequency driven D-T neutron source and a new beam shaping assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, Nicola; Esposito, Juan; Leung, Ka Ngo; Custodero, Salvatore

    2002-10-01

    A line of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research program aimed at the treatment of brain tumors, carried on at the Nuclear Departments of Pisa and Genova Universities (DIMNP and DITEC), is being focused on a new, 3H(d,n)4He (D-T), accelerator-based neutron source concept, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Simple and compact accelerator designs, using mixed D+ T+ ion beam with relatively low energy, ˜100 keV, have been developed which, in turn, can generate high neutron yields. New approaches have thus been started to design an epithermal neutron irradiation facility able to selectively slow the 14.1 MeV D-T neutrons down to the epithermal (1 eV-10 KeV) energy range. New neutron spectrum shifter and filtering materials, as well as different facility layout approaches have been tested. Possible beam shaping assembly models have also been designed. The research demonstrates that a D-T neutron source could be successfully implemented to provide a ˜1×109 n/cm2 s epithermal neutron flux, in spite of its hard spectrum, although a generator device, able to yield ˜1014 n/s is, at present, not yet available. The latest Monte Carlo simulation of an accelerator-based facility, which relies on a single or multiple rf driven DT fusion neutron generator, is presented.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation via Wavelength Detuning in Directly Driven Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.; Marozas, J. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Radha, P. B.; Cao, D.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) affects directly driven, inertial confinement fusion implosions by reducing the absorbed light and the coupling of driver energy to the target. A mitigation strategy is to detune the laser wavelength of interacting beams (Δλ ≠ 0 ) to reduce the CBET interaction volume. In polar-direct-drive (PDD) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) the CBET-imposed energy losses occur predominantly in the equatorial region. The NIF does not support a hemispheric wavelength detuning but does have Δλ capabilities between inner and outer quads. Using a north-south asymmetric beam pointing, it is therefore possible to introduce a hemispheric wavelength difference of up to Δλ = 4.6 Å in the UV. We report on experiments to test this CBET mitigation scheme in PDD experiments on the NIF. Using this asymmetric beam pointing, we have completed experiments with both Δλ = 0 and 4.6 Å. The effect of CBET on the driver-target coupling is diagnosed via implosion velocities, implosion shape, and scattered-light spectra and by comparing experimental data to 2-D DRACO simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Simulations of beam-matter interaction experiments at the CERN HiRadMat facility and prospects of high-energy-density physics research.

    PubMed

    Tahir, N A; Burkart, F; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Wollmann, D; Piriz, A R

    2014-12-01

    In a recent publication [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we reported results on beam-target interaction experiments that have been carried out at the CERN HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials) facility using extended solid copper cylindrical targets that were irradiated with a 440-GeV proton beam delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). On the one hand, these experiments confirmed the existence of hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons that leads to substantial increase in the range of the protons and the corresponding hadron shower in the target, a phenomenon predicted by our previous theoretical investigations [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 25, 051003 (2012)]. On the other hand, these experiments demonstrated that the beam heated part of the target is severely damaged and is converted into different phases of high energy density (HED) matter, as suggested by our previous theoretical studies [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 79, 046410 (2009)]. The latter confirms that the HiRadMat facility can be used to study HED physics. In the present paper, we give details of the numerical simulations carried out to understand the experimental measurements. These include the evolution of the physical parameters, for example, density, temperature, pressure, and the internal energy in the target, during and after the irradiation. This information is important in order to determine the region of the HED phase diagram that can be accessed in such experiments. These simulations have been done using the energy deposition code fluka and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, big2, iteratively.

  9. Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS) 0.1- to 15-keV Synchrotron Radiation Facility beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhez, Pierre; Jourdain, Erick; Hainaut, Olivier; Hochedez, Jean-Francois E.; Labeque, Alain; Salvetat, Philippe; Song, Xue Yan

    1997-10-01

    Two beam lines have been built at the Institute d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS) d'Orsay to perform absolute calibration of the EPIC (European photon imaging camera). EPIC consists of three x-ray charge coupled device (CCD) cameras having imaging and spectroscopic performances set at the Wolter telescope focal planes on board the x-ray multi mirror mission (XMM) planned to be launched by ESA in August 1999. To cover the desired 0.1 - 15 keV range a dedicated beam line has been built on each synchrotron sources of the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation du Rayonnement Synchrotron (LURE): SACO (0.8 GeV) and DCI (1.5 GeV). Both beam lines are merging in a clean 23 m(superscript 3) vacuum tank containing the camera to calibrate. (1) The SACO windowless beam line is equipped with a grating monochromator. Four plane VLS gratings are used to cover the low energy range (0.1 - 1.2 keV). A triple grazing incidence mirror system set in front of the entrance slit removes the overlapping orders. (2) The high energy beam line on DCI has a 50 micrometer beryllium window and a double flat crystals monochromator equipped with four different crystal pairs. A double grazing incidence mirror system set close to the source absorbs the high energy photon spectra. CCD calibrations will be performed during 1997 second semester and years 1998.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 2: Engineering. Volume 3: Costs and schedules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Engineering design details for the principal systems, system operating modes, site facilities, and structures of an engineering test facility (ETF) of a 200 MWE power plant are presented. The ETF resembles a coal-fired steam power plant in many ways. It is analogous to a conventional plant which has had the coal combustor replaced with the MHD power train. Most of the ETF components are conventional. They can, however, be sized or configured differently or perform additional functions from those in a conventional coal power plant. The boiler not only generates steam, but also performs the functions of heating the MHD oxidant, recovering seed, and controlling emissions.

  11. Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Results from Tasks 8 and 9 are presented. Task 8 addressed the cost of materials and manufacturing of the Downhole Methanator and the cost of drilling and completing the vertical cased well and two horizontal drain holes in the West Sak reservoir. Task 9 addressed the preliminary design of surface facilities to support the enhanced recovery of heavy oil. Auxiliary facilities include steam reformers for carbon dioxide-rich natural gas reforming, emergency electric generators, nitrogen gas generators, and an ammonia synthesis unit. The ammonia is needed to stabilize the swelling of clays in the reservoir. Cost estimations and a description of how they were obtained are given.

  12. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-04-15

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  13. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-04-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  14. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R

    2014-04-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  15. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  16. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-11-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  17. Linear Collider Test Facility: Twiss Parameter Analysis at the IP/Post-IP Location of the ATF2 Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Bolzon, Benoit; Jeremie, Andrea; Bai, Sha; Bambade, Philip; White, Glen; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    At the first stage of the ATF2 beam tuning, vertical beam size is usually bigger than 3 {micro}m at the IP. Beam waist measurements using wire scanners and a laser wire are usually performed to check the initial matching of the beam through to the IP. These measurements are described in this paper for the optics currently used ({beta}{sub x} = 4cm and {beta}{sub y} = 1mm). Software implemented in the control room to automate these measurements with integrated analysis is also described. Measurements showed that {beta} functions and emittances were within errors of measurements when no rematching and coupling corrections were done. However, it was observed that the waist in the horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane was abnormally shifted and simulations were performed to try to understand these shifts. They also showed that multiknobs are needed in the current optics to correct simultaneously {alpha}{sub x}, {alpha}{sub y} and the horizontal dispersion (D{sub x}). Such multiknobs were found and their linearity and orthogonality were successfully checked using MAD optics code. The software for these multiknobs was implemented in the control room and waist scan measurements using the {alpha}{sub y} knob were successfully performed.

  18. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  19. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 5, Structural/seismic investigation. Section B, Renovation calculations/supporting data

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part V, Section B - Structural/Seismic Information provides a description of the seismic and structural analyses performed on the NMSF and their results.

  20. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 5, Structural/seismic investigation. Section A report, existing conditions calculations/supporting information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. Based upon US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations (DOE/Al) Office and LANL projections, storage space limitations/restrictions will begin to affect LANL`s ability to meet its missions between 1998 and 2002.

  1. Numerical simulations and theoretical analysis of High Energy Density experiments at the next generation of ion beam facilities at Darmstadt: The HEDgeHOB collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Piriz, A. R.; Wouchuk, G.; Deutsch, C.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Fortov, V. E.

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents detailed numerical simulations and theoretical analysis of different possible experimental schemes to study the thermophysical and transport properties of High Energy Density ( HED) matter generated by the interaction of intense heavy ion beams. The considered beam parameters are those which will be available at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research ( FAIR) at Darmstadt [W.F. Henneing, Nucl. Instrum. Methods, B214, (2004) 211]. This work has shown that an intense heavy ion beam can be used employing two very different configurations to study HED states in matter. In the first scheme, a sample material is uniformly and isochorically heated by the beam and the heated material is subsequently allowed to expand isentropically. Depending on the specific energy deposited in the material, one may access all the interesting physical states, including that of an expanded hot liquid ( EHL), two-phase liquid-gas ( 2PLG) region, critical point ( CP) parameters as well as strongly coupled plasma ( SCP) states during the expansion. This scheme is named HIHEX ( Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion). We have considered a 1 GeV/u uranium beam with an intensity, N = 10 10-10 12 ions that are delivered in a single bunch, 50 ns long. The particle intensity distribution in the transverse direction is assumed to be Gaussian with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the range of 1-4 mm. We note that the estimated critical temperatures for many metals are very high which are very difficult to access using traditional techniques of shock compression of matter. Employing the proposed HIHEX scheme, one can easily achieve the required temperature by depositing corresponding specific energy in the sample. Solid as well as porous targets have been used in our study. In the second scheme, a sample material like frozen hydrogen that is enclosed in a cylindrical shell of a high- Z material like gold or lead, is imploded by the ion beam. This scheme is specially

  2. ERHIC Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn,V.; Beebe-Wang,J.; Ben-Zvi,I.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; MacKay, W.W.; Montag, C.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2008-08-25

    The conceptual design of the high luminosity electron-ion collider, eRHIC, is presented. The goal of eRHIC is to provide collisions of electrons (and possibly positrons) with ions and protons at the center-of-mass energy range from 25 to 140 GeV, and with luminosities exceeding 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. A considerable part of the physics program is based on polarized electrons, protons and He3 ions with high degree of polarization. In eRHIC electron beam will be accelerated in an energy recovery linac. Major R&D items for eRHIC include the development of a high intensity polarized electron source, studies of various aspects of energy recovery technology for high power beams and the development of compact magnets for recirculating passes. In eRHIC scheme the beam-beam interaction has several specific features, which have to be thoroughly studied. In order to maximize the collider luminosity, several upgrades of the existing RHIC accelerator are required. Those upgrades may include the increase of intensity as well as transverse and longitudinal cooling of ion and proton beams.

  3. Operation of beam line facilities for real-time x-ray studies at Sector 7 of the advanced photon source. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Roy

    2003-09-10

    This Final Report documents the research accomplishments achieved in the first phase of operations of a new Advanced Photon Source beam line (7-ID MHATT-CAT) dedicated to real-time x-ray studies. The period covered by this report covers the establishment of a world-class facility for time-dependent x-ray studies of materials. During this period many new and innovative research programs were initiated at Sector 7 with support of this grant, most notably using a combination of ultrafast lasers and pulsed synchrotron radiation. This work initiated a new frontier of materials research: namely, the study of the dynamics of materials under extreme conditions of high intensity impulsive laser irradiation.

  4. Early-Time Symmetry Tuning in the Presence of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in ICF Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Michel, P.; Landen, O. L.; Kline, J. L.; Glenn, S.; Jones, O.; Kalantar, D. H.; Pak, A.; Robey, H. F.; Kyrala, G. A.; Divol, L.; Benedetti, L. R.; Holder, J.; Widmann, K.; Moore, A.; Schneider, M. B.; Döppner, T.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Ehrlich, B.; Thomas, C. A.; Shaw, M.; Widmayer, C.; Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hamza, A.; Dzenitis, B.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2013-12-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we have successfully tuned the early time (~2 ns) lowest order Legendre mode (P2) of the incoming radiation drive asymmetry of indirectly driven ignition capsule implosions by varying the inner power cone fraction. The measured P2/P0 sensitivity vs come fraction is similar to calculations, but a significant -15 to -20% P2/P0 offset was observed. This can be explained by a considerable early time laser energy transfer from the outer to the inner beams during the laser burn-through of the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) windows and hohlraum fill gas when the LEH plasma is still dense and relatively cold.

  5. Early-Time Symmetry Tuning in the Presence of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in ICF Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Michel, P.; ...

    2013-12-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we have successfully tuned the early time (~2 ns) lowest order Legendre mode (P2) of the incoming radiation drive asymmetry of indirectly driven ignition capsule implosions by varying the inner power cone fraction. The measured P2/P0 sensitivity vs come fraction is similar to calculations, but a significant -15 to -20% P2/P0 offset was observed. This can be explained by a considerable early time laser energy transfer from the outer to the inner beams during the laser burn-through of the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) windows and hohlraum fill gas when the LEH plasma is stillmore » dense and relatively cold.« less

  6. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I.; Gidley, David W.

    2013-04-19

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  7. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Chrysalidis, K.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into autoionizing states of atomic chromium, in the service of the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS): the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility based at CERN. The multi-step resonance photo-ionization process enables element selective ionization which, in combination with mass separation, allows isotope specific selectivity in the production of radioactive ion beams at ISOLDE. The element selective nature of the process requires a multi-step "ionization scheme" to be developed for each element. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme originating from the 3d5(6S)4s a7S3 atomic ground state has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 15 newly observed autoionizing states reported here. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized.

  8. Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gondouin, M.

    1991-10-31

    The West Sak (Upper Cretaceous) sands, overlaying the Kuparuk field, would rank among the largest known oil fields in the US, but technical difficulties have so far prevented its commercial exploitation. Steam injection is the most successful and the most commonly-used method of heavy oil recovery, but its application to the West Sak presents major problems. Such difficulties may be overcome by using a novel approach, in which steam is generated downhole in a catalytic Methanator, from Syngas made at the surface from endothermic reactions (Table 1). The Methanator effluent, containing steam and soluble gases resulting from exothermic reactions (Table 1), is cyclically injected into the reservoir by means of a horizontal drainhole while hot produced fluids flow form a second drainhole into a central production tubing. The downhole reactor feed and BFW flow downward to two concentric tubings. The large-diameter casing required to house the downhole reactor assembly is filled above it with Arctic Pack mud, or crude oil, to further reduce heat leaks. A quantitative analysis of this production scheme for the West Sak required a preliminary engineering of the downhole and surface facilities and a tentative forecast of well production rates. The results, based on published information on the West Sak, have been used to estimate the cost of these facilities, per daily barrel of oil produced. A preliminary economic analysis and conclusions are presented together with an outline of future work. Economic and regulatory conditions which would make this approach viable are discussed. 28 figs.

  9. Performance assessment of the Greater Confinement Disposal facility on the Nevada Test Site: Comparing the performance of two conceptual site models

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.A.; Price, L.L.; Gallegos, D.P.

    1993-12-31

    A small amount of transuranic (TRU) waste has been disposed of at the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) site located on the Nevada Test Site`s (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The waste has been buried in several deep (37 m) boreholes dug into the floor of an alluvial basin. For the waste to remain in its current configuration, the DOE must demonstrate compliance of the site with the TRU disposal requirements, 40 CFR 191. Sandia`s approach to process modelling in performance assessment is to use demonstrably conservative models of the site. Choosing the most conservative model, however, can be uncertain. As an example, diffusion of contaminants upward from the buried waste in the vadose zone water is the primary mechanism of release. This process can be modelled as straight upward planar diffusion or as spherical diffusion in all directions. The former has high fluxes but low release areas, the latter has lower fluxes but is spread over a greater area. We have developed analytic solutions to a simple test problem for both models and compared the total integrated discharges. The spherical diffusion conceptual model results in at least five times greater release to the accessible environment than the planar model at all diffusivities. Modifying the planar model to allow for a larger release, however, compensated for the smaller original planar discharge and resulted in a new planar model that was more conservative that the spherical model except at low diffusivities.

  10. Preliminary conceptual design for geothermal space heating conversion of school district 50 joint facilities at Pagosa Springs, Colorado. GTA report no. 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engen, I. A.

    1981-11-01

    This feasibility study and preliminary conceptual design effect assesses the conversion of a high school and gym, and a middle school building to geothermal space heating is assessed. A preliminary cost benefit assessment made on the basis of estimated costs for conversion, system maintenance, debt service, resource development, electricity to power pumps, and savings from from reduced natural gas consumption concluded that an economic conversion depended on development of an adequate geothermal resource (approximately 1500F, 400 gpm). Material selection assumed that the geothermal water to the main supply system was isolated to minimize effects of corrosion and deposition, and that system compatible components are used for the building modifications. Asbestos cement distribution pipe, a stainless steel heat exchanger, and stainless steel lined valves were recommended for the supply, heat transfer, and disposal mechanisms, respectively. A comparison of the calculated average gas consumption cost, escalated at 10% per year, with conversion project cost, both in 1977 dollars, showed that the project could be amortized over less than 20 years at current interest rates.

  11. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, Mikhail; Mokhov, Nikolai; Niita, Koji

    2013-09-25

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  12. Validation of an optical model applied to the beam down CSP facility at the Masdar Institute Solar Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grange, Benjamin; Kumar, Vikas; Torres, Juliana Beltran; Perez, Victor G.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Slocum, Alexander; Calvet, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of the CSPonD Demo project, the optical characterization of the Beam Down Optical Experiment (BDOE) heliostats field is an important step to certify the required power is provided. To achieve this goal, an experiment involving a single heliostat is carried out. The results of the experiment and the comparison with simulated results are presented in this paper. Only the reflection on the heliostat is observed in order to have a better assessment of its optical performance. The heliostat reflectance is modified and the experimental and simulated concentration distribution are confronted. Results indicate that the shapes of the concentration distributions are quite similar, hence validating the optical model respects the geometry of the BDOE. Moreover these results lead to an increase of the optimized heliostat reflectance when the incident angle on the heliostat decreases. Further investigation is required to validate this method with all the individual heliostats of the BDOE solar field.

  13. Conceptual Metaphor Meets Conceptual Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amin, Tamer G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that the metaphorical representation of concepts and the appropriation of language-based construals can be hypothesized as additional sources of conceptual change alongside those previously proposed. Analyses of construals implicit in the lay and scientific use of the noun "energy" from the perspective of the theory of conceptual…

  14. Real-time respiration monitoring using the radiotherapy treatment beam and four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)--a conceptual study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiguo; Ruchala, Kenneth J; Chen, Ming-Li; Chen, Quan; Olivera, Gustavo H

    2006-09-21

    Real-time knowledge of intra-fraction motion, such as respiration, is essential for four-dimensional (4D) radiotherapy. Surrogate-based and internal-fiducial-based methods may suffer from one or many drawbacks such as false correlation, being invasive, delivering extra patient radiation, and requiring complicated hardware and software development and implementation. In this paper we develop a simple non-surrogate, non-invasive method to monitor respiratory motion during radiotherapy treatments in real time. This method directly utilizes the treatment beam and thus imposes no additional radiation to the patient. The method requires a pre-treatment 4DCT and a real-time detector system. The method combines off-line processes with on-line processes. The off-line processes include 4DCT imaging and pre-calculating detector signals at each phase of the 4DCT based on the planned fluence map and the detector response function. The on-line processes include measuring detector signal from the treatment beam, and correlating the measured detector signal with the pre-calculated signals. The respiration phase is determined as the position of peak correlation. We tested our method with extensive simulations based on a TomoTherapy machine and a 4DCT of a lung cancer patient. Three types of simulations were implemented to mimic the clinical situations. Each type of simulation used three different TomoTherapy delivery sinograms, each with 800 to 1000 projections, as input fluences. Three arbitrary breathing patterns were simulated and two dose levels, 2 Gy/fraction and 2 cGy/fraction, were used for simulations to study the robustness of this method against detector quantum noise. The algorithm was used to determine the breathing phases and this result was compared with the simulated breathing patterns. For the 2 Gy/fraction simulations, the respiration phases were accurately determined within one phase error in real time for most projections of the treatment, except for a few

  15. Towards 20 A negative hydrogen ion beams for up to 1 h: Achievements of the ELISE test facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U. Heinemann, B.; Wünderlich, D.; Riedl, R.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Bonomo, F.

    2016-02-15

    The large-scale RF-driven ion source of the test facility extraction from a large ion source experiment is aimed to deliver an accelerated ion current of 20 A D{sup −} (23 A H{sup −}) with an extracted electron-to-ion ratio below one for up to 1 h. Since the first plasma pulses for 20 s in volume operation in early 2013, followed by caesiation of the ion source, substantial progress has been achieved in extending the pulse length and the RF power. The record pulses in hydrogen are stable 400 s pulses with an extracted ion current of 18.3 A at 180 kW total RF power and 9.3 A at 80 kW stable for 1 h. For deuterium pulse, length and RF power are limited by the amount of co-extracted electrons.

  16. Conceptual design summary

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.

    1992-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides beams of neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux for these experiments will be at least five times, and in some cases twenty times, more than is available at the world`s best existing facilities. In addition, ANS will provide irradiation capabilities for the production of radioisotopes for medical applications, research, and industry and facilities for materials irradiation testing. The need for a new steady-state neutron research facility in the United States was emphasized by the 1984 National Academy Report and confirmed by the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Energy Research Advisory Board in 1985. These studies defined a minimum thermal neutron flux requirement of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2} {center_dot} s{sup {minus}1}. The National Steering Committee for an Advanced Neutron Source, with representation from the major fields of science that will use the facility, was established in 1986 and has continued to define the performance requirements and instrument layouts needed by the user community. To minimize technical risks and safety issues, the project adopted a policy of not relying upon new inventions to meet the minimum performance criteria, and the design presented in this report is built on technologies already used in other facilities and development programs: for example, the involute aluminum-clad fuel plates common to HFIR and ILL and the uranium silicide fuel developed in DOE`s Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program and tested in reactors worldwide. At the same time, every state-of-the-art technique has been implemented to optimize neutron beam delivery at the experiments.

  17. Conceptual design summary

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.

    1992-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides beams of neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux for these experiments will be at least five times, and in some cases twenty times, more than is available at the world's best existing facilities. In addition, ANS will provide irradiation capabilities for the production of radioisotopes for medical applications, research, and industry and facilities for materials irradiation testing. The need for a new steady-state neutron research facility in the United States was emphasized by the 1984 National Academy Report and confirmed by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Research Advisory Board in 1985. These studies defined a minimum thermal neutron flux requirement of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2} {center dot} s{sup {minus}1}. The National Steering Committee for an Advanced Neutron Source, with representation from the major fields of science that will use the facility, was established in 1986 and has continued to define the performance requirements and instrument layouts needed by the user community. To minimize technical risks and safety issues, the project adopted a policy of not relying upon new inventions to meet the minimum performance criteria, and the design presented in this report is built on technologies already used in other facilities and development programs: for example, the involute aluminum-clad fuel plates common to HFIR and ILL and the uranium silicide fuel developed in DOE's Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program and tested in reactors worldwide. At the same time, every state-of-the-art technique has been implemented to optimize neutron beam delivery at the experiments.

  18. ANEM: A rotating composite target to produce an atmospheric-like neutron beam at the LNL SPES facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta Urdaneta, Gabriela Carolina; Bisello, Dario; Esposito, Juan; Mastinu, Pierfrancesco; Prete, Gianfranco; Silvestrin, Luca; Wyss, Jeffery

    2016-09-01

    A fast neutron (E> MeV) irradiation facility is under development at the 70 MeV SPES proton cyclotron at LNL (Legnaro, Italy) to investigate neutron-induced Single Event Effects (SEE) in microelectronic devices and systems. After an overview on neutron-induced SEE in electronics, we report on the progress in the design of ANEM (Atmospheric Neutron EMulator), a water-cooled rotating target made of Be and W to produce neutrons with an energy spectrum similar to that of neutrons produced by cosmic rays at sea-level. In ANEM, the protons from the cyclotron alternatively impinge on two circular sectors of Be and W of different areas; the effective neutron spectrum is a weighted combination of the spectra from the two sectors. In this contribution, we present the results of thermal-mechanical Finite Element Analysis (ANSYS) calculations of the performance of the ANEM prototype. The calculations at this stage indicate that ANEM can deliver fast neutrons with an atmospheric-like energy spectrum and with an integral flux Φn(1-70 MeV) ˜107 n cm-2s-1 that is 3×109 more intense than the natural one at sea-level: a very competitive flux for SEE testing.

  19. A tailored 200 parameter VME based data acquisition system for IBA at the Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility - Hardware and software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfman, Mikael; Ros, Linus; Kristiansson, Per; Nilsson, E. J. Charlotta; Pallon, Jan

    2016-03-01

    With the recent advances towards modern Ion Beam Analysis (IBA), going from one- or few-parameter detector systems to multi-parameter systems, it has been necessary to expand and replace the more than twenty years old CAMAC based system. A new VME multi-parameter (presently up to 200 channels) data acquisition and control system has been developed and implemented at the Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility (LIBAF). The system is based on the VX-511 Single Board Computer (SBC), acting as master with arbiter functionality and consists of standard VME modules like Analog to Digital Converters (ADC's), Charge to Digital Converters (QDC's), Time to Digital Converters (TDC's), scaler's, IO-cards, high voltage and waveform units. The modules have been specially selected to support all of the present detector systems in the laboratory, with the option of future expansion. Typically, the detector systems consist of silicon strip detectors, silicon drift detectors and scintillator detectors, for detection of charged particles, X-rays and γ-rays. The data flow of the raw data buffers out from the VME bus to the final storage place on a 16 terabyte network attached storage disc (NAS-disc) is described. The acquisition process, remotely controlled over one of the SBCs ethernet channels, is also discussed. The user interface is written in the Kmax software package, and is used to control the acquisition process as well as for advanced online and offline data analysis through a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). In this work the system implementation, layout and performance are presented. The user interface and possibilities for advanced offline analysis are also discussed and illustrated.

  20. P-23 Highlights 6/10/12: Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility Refurbishment completed at U1A tunnel in Nevada NNSS meeting Level 2 milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Deyoung, Anemarie; Smith, John R.

    2012-05-03

    A moratorium was placed on U.S. underground nuclear testing in 1992. In response, the Stockpile Stewardship Program was created to maintain readiness of the existing nuclear inventory through several efforts such as computer modeling, material analysis, and subcritical nuclear experiments (SCEs). As in the underground test era, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site, provides a safe and secure environment for SCEs by the nature of its isolated and secure facilities. A major tool for SCE diagnosis installed in the 05 drift laboratory is a high energy x-ray source used for time resolved imaging. This tool consists of two identical sources (Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2) and is called the Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility (Figs. 2-6). Each Cygnus machine has 5 major elements: Marx Generator, Pulse Forming Line (PFL), Coaxial Transmission Line (CTL), 3-cell Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA), and Rod Pinch Diode. Each machine is independently triggered and may be fired in separate tests (staggered mode), or in a single test where there is submicrosecond separation between the pulses (dual mode). Cygnus must operate as a single shot machine since on each pulse the diode electrodes are destroyed. The diode is vented to atmosphere, cleaned, and new electrodes are inserted for each shot. There is normally two shots per day on each machine. Since its installation in 2003, Cygnus has participated in: 4 Subcritical Experiments (Armando, Bacchus, Barolo A, and Barolo B), a 12 shot plutonium physics series (Thermos), and 2 plutonium step wedge calibration series (2005, 2011), resulting in well over 1000 shots. Currently the Facility is in preparation for 2 SCEs scheduled for this calendar year - Castor and Pollux. Cygnus has performed well during 8 years of operations at NNSS. Many improvements in operations and performance have been implemented during this time. Throughout its service at U1a, major maintenance and replacement of many hardware items

  1. A proposed proton therapy facility at the SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prichard, B. A.

    1993-06-01

    A conceptual design study of a proton therapy facility at the SSC has been performed. Participants included Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Particle Accelerator Corporation, Aguirre Associates Inc., and the SSCL. The effort was conducted in two phases. The first phase involved a series of trade studies where three alternative approaches to beam formation were examined. They were: 1) using the SSC linac beam directly with intensity reduction techniques; 2) using a pulse stretcher ring attached to the linac; and 3) using a small synchrotron attached to the linac. The relative costs of the three approaches were evaluated and the program flexibility of each was examined. Such factors as implications on nozzle design, dose rate adjustability, perturbation on the linac operation, potential radioisotope production, possibilities for BN capture therapy, and proton radiography were weighed. Additionally, such features as gantries, vertical and horizontal beams, and variable collimators were reviewed. The second phase of the study focused in detail on using the linac beam directly, one fixed beam room with intersecting vertical and horizontal beams, one gantry room, and a radioisotope production facility. The results of these studies are presented.

  2. Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R

    2012-04-05

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain

  3. Test beams and polarized fixed target beams at the NLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lewis; Pitthan, Rainer; Rokni, Sayed; Thompson, Kathleen; Kolomensky, Yury

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics running. A list of physics topics is given; one topic (Mo/ller Scattering) is treated in more depth.

  4. Test Beams and Polarized Fixed Target Beams at the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Pitthan, Rainer

    2001-01-17

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics running. A list of physics topics is given; one topic (Moeller Scattering) is treated in more depth.

  5. Electron-beam-pinch experiment at Harry Diamond Laboratories: Providing for a high-dose-rate flash x-ray facility for transient radiation effects on electronics (TREE) testing of pieceparts. Final report, May-Jul 90

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.N.; Litz, M.S.; Blomquist, S.M.; Blackburn, J.C.; Ovrebo, G.K.

    1991-08-01

    The peak photon-radiation dose rate of the High-Intensity Flash X-Ray facility has been increased by at least a factor of five through the use of custom beam-pinching hardware. With this hardware, the facility can now routinely provide a dose rate of 2.7 times 10 to the 11th power rads(Si)/s, at a distance of 1/4 in. from the drift-tube face, while providing excellent radial drop-off to minimized irradiation of items surrounding the device under test. The experimental results show the optimum operating parameters of the beam-pinching hardware to be a drift-tube length equal to 6 cm with an internal nitrogen gas pressure of 0.1 Torr.

  6. Annex to 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Annex to the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report updates the Conceptual Design Report of 1987 (CDR-87) to include the results of further optimization and changes of the design during the past year. The design changes can be summarized as affecting three areas: the accelerator system, conventional facilities, and experimental systems. Most of the changes in the accelerator system result from inclusion of a positron accumulator ring (PAR), which was added at the suggestion of the 1987 DOE Review Committee, to speed up the filling rate of the storage ring. The addition of the PAR necessitates many minor changes in the linac system, the injector synchrotron, and the low-energy beam transport lines. 63 figs., 18 tabs.

  7. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R.; Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. |; Castro, J.R. ||

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  8. Batten augmented triangular beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Louis R.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The BAT (Batten-Augmented Triangular) BEAM is characterized by battens which are buckled in the deployed state, thus preloading the truss. The preload distribution is determined, and the effects of various external loading conditions are investigated. The conceptual design of a deployer is described and loads are predicted. The influence of joint imperfections on effective member stiffness is investigated. The beam is assessed structurally.

  9. Advanced conceptual design report for the Z-Beamlet laser backlighter

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J

    1999-05-31

    The Z-accelerator facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico, performs critical experiments on the physics of matter at extremely high energy density as part of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship Program. In order to augment and enhance the value of experiments performed at this facility, the construction of a new x-ray backlighting diagnostic system is required. New information would be obtained by recording images and/or spectra of x-ray radiation transmitted through target materials as they evolve during Z-accelerator-driven experiments (or ''shots''). In this application, we generally think of the diagnostic x-rays as illumination produced behind the target materials and detected after passing through the Z-target. Hence the x-ray source is commonly called a ''backlighter.'' The methodology is a specific implementation of the general science known as x-ray radiography and/or x-ray spectroscopy. X-ray backlighter experiments have been performed in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities in many countries. On Nova, experience with backlighters has been obtained since about 1986. An intense source of x-rays is produced by focusing one of its beams on a backlighter target nearby, while the other beams are used to create the high-energy-density conditions to be studied in the experiment. This conceptual design report describes how a laser-backlighter similar to one beam of Nova could be constructed for use at Sandia's Z-accelerator facility. The development of such a facility at Sandia is timely for two major reasons. First, at LLNL the Beamlet laser was decommissioned in FY98, and the Nova laser will be decommissioned in FY99, in preparation for activation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This will provide several million dollars worth of subsystems and components from which to construct other lasers, such as the Z-backlighter. Second, the new diagnostic capability at Sandia will provide a

  10. Proceedings of the international workshop on hadron facility technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1987-12-01

    The conference included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, accelerator hardware, and experimental facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for 43 papers in the conference proceedings. (LEW)

  11. Conceptualizing Programme Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Salochana

    2013-01-01

    The main thrust of this paper deals with the conceptualization of theory-driven evaluation pertaining to a tutor training programme. Conceptualization of evaluation, in this case, is an integration between a conceptualization model as well as a theoretical framework in the form of activity theory. Existing examples of frameworks of programme…

  12. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  13. Accelerator Facilities for Radiation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    HSRP Goals in Accelerator Use and Development are: 1.Need for ground-based heavy ion and proton facility to understand space radiation effects discussed most recently by NAS/NRC Report (1996). 2. Strategic Program Goals in facility usage and development: -(1) operation of AGS for approximately 600 beam hours/year; (2) operation of Loma Linda University (LLU) proton facility for approximately 400 beam hours/year; (3) construction of BAF facility; and (4) collaborative research at HIMAC in Japan and with other existing or potential international facilities. 3. MOA with LLU has been established to provide proton beams with energies of 40-250 important for trapped protons and solar proton events. 4. Limited number of beam hours available at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS).

  14. Beam director design report

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  15. Neutral Beam Power System for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Bowen, O.N.; O`Conner, T.; Edwards, J.; Fromm, N.; Hatcher, R.; Newman, R.; Rossi, G.; Stevenson, T.; von Halle, A.

    1993-11-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will utilize to the maximum extent the existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) equipment and facilities. This is particularly true for the TFTR Neutral Beam (NB) system. Most of the NB hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, power systems, service infrastructure, and control systems can be used as is. The major changes in the NB hardware are driven by the new operating duty cycle. The TFTR Neutral Beam was designed for operation of the Sources for 2 seconds every 150 seconds. The TPX requires operation for 1000 seconds every 4500 seconds. During the Conceptual Design Phase of TPX every component of the TFTR NB Electrical Power System was analyzed to verify whether the equipment can meet the new operational requirements with our without modifications. The Power System converts 13.8 kV prime power to controlled pulsed power required at the NB sources. The major equipment involved are circuit breakers, auto and rectifier transformers surge suppression components, power tetrodes, HV Decks, and HVDC power transmission to sources. Thermal models were developed for the power transformers to simulate the new operational requirements. Heat runs were conducted for the power tetrodes to verify capability. Other components were analyzed to verify their thermal limitations. This paper describes the details of the evaluation and redesign of the electrical power system components to meet the TPX operational requirements.

  16. Radioactive Ion Beams and Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Morton, A. C.; Schaffer, P.

    2014-02-01

    Experiments performed at radioactive ion beam facilities shed new light on nuclear physics and nuclear structure, as well as nuclear astrophysics, materials science and medical science. The many existing facilities, as well as the new generation of facilities being built and those proposed for the future, are a testament to the high interest in this rapidly expanding field. The opportunities inherent in radioactive beam facilities have enabled the search for radioisotopes suitable for medical diagnosis or therapy. In this article, an overview of the production techniques and the current status of RIB facilities and proposals will be presented. In addition, accelerator-generated radiopharmaceuticals will be reviewed.

  17. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Bogacz, S. Alex

    2015-12-01

    The LHeC is envisioned as a natural upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multipass superconducting energy-recovery linac (ERL) operating in a continuous wave mode. The unprecedently high energy of the multipass ERL combined with a stringent emittance dilution budget poses new challenges for the beam optics. Here, we investigate the performances of a novel arc architecture based on a flexible momentum compaction lattice that mitigates the effects of synchrotron radiation while containing the bunch lengthening. Extensive beam-dynamics investigations have been performed with placet2, a recently developed tracking code for recirculating machines. They include the first end-to-end tracking and a simulation of the machine operation with a continuous beam. This paper briefly describes the Conceptual Design Report lattice, with an emphasis on possible and proposed improvements that emerged from the beam-dynamics studies. The detector bypass section has been integrated in the lattice, and its design choices are presented here. The stable operation of the ERL with a current up to ˜150 mA in the linacs has been validated in the presence of single- and multibunch wakefields, synchrotron radiation, and beam-beam effects.

  18. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  19. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation CU Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Boles, J L; Ahle, L E; Stein, W; Wirth, B D

    2005-05-20

    Within the scope of conceptual research and development (R&D) activities in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be insignificant. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (in displacements per atom, DPA) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of the uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 DPA, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 400 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks of continuous operation and He embrittlement may be a concern. Recommendations are made for further investigation of Cu irradiation effects for RIA-relevant conditions.

  20. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation CU Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Boles, J L; Ahle, L E; Stein, W; Wirth, B D

    2005-05-09

    Within the scope of conceptual research and development (R&D) activities in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be insignificant. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (in displacements per atom, DPA) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of the uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 DPA, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 400 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks of continuous operation and He embrittlement may be a concern. Recommendations are made for further investigation of Cu irradiation effects for RIA-relevant conditions.

  1. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Conceptual Design Report, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  2. Facility Focus: Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design and architectural features of two new science facilities at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida, and a new graduate research tower the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Notes the important convenience associated with interior windows in these facilities, which allow researchers, faculty, and students to see…

  3. Detection of radioactive isotopes by using laser Compton scattered γ-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajima, R.; Kikuzawa, N.; Nishimori, N.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kando, M.; Minehara, E.; Toyokawa, H.; Ohgaki, H.

    2009-09-01

    Non-destructive detection and assay of nuclear materials is one of the most critical issues for both the management of nuclear waste and the non-proliferation of nuclear materials. We use laser Compton scattered (LCS) γ-ray beams and the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) for the non-destructive detection of radioactive materials. Quasi-monochromatic and energy-tunable LCS γ-ray beams help improve the signal-to-noise ratio during NRF measurements. We developed the conceptual design of a high-flux γ-ray source with an energy-recovery linac, which produces a γ-ray beam at the flux of 1013 photons/s. In this paper, we discuss the execution of simulation studies using a Monte Carlo code, results of a proof-of-principle experiment for isotope detection, and the status of the development of LCS X-ray and γ-ray facilities.

  4. Future User Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Lee

    2002-10-01

    The southeastern part of the U.S. is blessed with an array of national user facilities that are accessible to scientists in the region. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates 17 officially designated user facilities for the Department of Energy, the Jefferson Lab operates the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and a number of universities have forefront experimental facilities that are widely accessible. The long lead time necessary to originate and construct new user facilities makes it imperative to consider the needs of the physical sciences 10 to 20 years in the future. The construction of the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL positions the southeast to lead in neutron science. Upgrades are desired for CEBAF and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (ORNL). The more future possibilities are less clear, but are becoming a focus of strategic planning among the national laboratories. Possibilities may arise in the U.S. for next-generation light sources, large computational centers, advanced fusion devices, nanotechnology centers, and perhaps facilities that are not yet contemplated. A regional discussion of the needs for large-scale user facilities in the southeast is important.

  5. Space power distribution system technology. Volume 3: Test facility design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Cannady, M. D.; Cassinelli, J. E.; Farber, B. F.; Lurie, C.; Fleck, G. W.; Lepisto, J. W.; Messner, A.; Ritterman, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The AMPS test facility is a major tool in the attainment of more economical space power. The ultimate goals of the test facility, its primary functional requirements and conceptual design, and the major equipment it contains are discussed.

  6. Automaticity of Conceptual Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Gliksman, Yarden; Itamar, Shai; Leibovich, Tali; Melman, Yonatan; Henik, Avishai

    2016-02-16

    What is bigger, an elephant or a mouse? This question can be answered without seeing the two animals, since these objects elicit conceptual magnitude. How is an object's conceptual magnitude processed? It was suggested that conceptual magnitude is automatically processed; namely, irrelevant conceptual magnitude can affect performance when comparing physical magnitudes. The current study further examined this question and aimed to expand the understanding of automaticity of conceptual magnitude. Two different objects were presented and participants were asked to decide which object was larger on the screen (physical magnitude) or in the real world (conceptual magnitude), in separate blocks. By creating congruent (the conceptually larger object was physically larger) and incongruent (the conceptually larger object was physically smaller) pairs of stimuli it was possible to examine the automatic processing of each magnitude. A significant congruity effect was found for both magnitudes. Furthermore, quartile analysis revealed that the congruity was affected similarly by processing time for both magnitudes. These results suggest that the processing of conceptual and physical magnitudes is automatic to the same extent. The results support recent theories suggested that different types of magnitude processing and representation share the same core system.

  7. Automaticity of Conceptual Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Gliksman, Yarden; Itamar, Shai; Leibovich, Tali; Melman, Yonatan; Henik, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    What is bigger, an elephant or a mouse? This question can be answered without seeing the two animals, since these objects elicit conceptual magnitude. How is an object’s conceptual magnitude processed? It was suggested that conceptual magnitude is automatically processed; namely, irrelevant conceptual magnitude can affect performance when comparing physical magnitudes. The current study further examined this question and aimed to expand the understanding of automaticity of conceptual magnitude. Two different objects were presented and participants were asked to decide which object was larger on the screen (physical magnitude) or in the real world (conceptual magnitude), in separate blocks. By creating congruent (the conceptually larger object was physically larger) and incongruent (the conceptually larger object was physically smaller) pairs of stimuli it was possible to examine the automatic processing of each magnitude. A significant congruity effect was found for both magnitudes. Furthermore, quartile analysis revealed that the congruity was affected similarly by processing time for both magnitudes. These results suggest that the processing of conceptual and physical magnitudes is automatic to the same extent. The results support recent theories suggested that different types of magnitude processing and representation share the same core system. PMID:26879153

  8. Neutrino Factories and Beta Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2006-06-21

    In this paper we briefly review the concepts of Neutrino Factories and Beta Beam facilities, and indicate the main challenges in terms of beam performance and technological developments. We also describe the worldwide organizations that have embarked on defining and carrying out the necessary R&D on component design, beam simulations of facility performance, and benchmarking of key subsystems via actual beam tests. Currently approved subsystem tests include the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, and the Mercury Intense Target (MERIT) experiment, to be carried out at CERN. These experiments are briefly described, and their schedules are indicated.

  9. Plans for an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Erik; Bruning, O S; Calaga, Buchi Rama Rao; Schirm, Karl-Martin; Torres-Sanchez, R; Valloni, Alessandra; Aulenbacher, Kurt; Bogacz, Slawomir; Hutton, Andrew; Klein, M

    2014-12-01

    The baseline electron accelerator for LHeC and one option for FCC-he is an Energy Recovery Linac. To prepare and study the necessary key technologies, CERNhas started – in collaboration with JLAB and Mainz University – the conceptual design of an ERL Test Facility (ERL-TF). Staged construction will allow the study under different conditions with up to 3 passes, beam energies of up to about 1 GeV and currents of up to 50 mA. The design and development of superconducting cavity modules, including coupler and HOM damper designs, are also of central importance for other existing and future accelerators and their tests are at the heart of the current ERL-TF goals. However, the ERL-TF could also provide a unique infrastructure for several applications that go beyond developing and testing the ERL technology at CERN. In addition to experimental studies of beam dynamics, operational and reliability issues in an ERL, it could equally serve for quench tests of superconducting magnets, as physics experimental facility on its own right or as test stand for detector developments. This contribution will describe the goals and the concept of the facility and the status of the R&D.

  10. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  11. Preliminary conceptual design of DEMO EC system

    SciTech Connect

    Garavaglia, S. Bin, W.; Bruschi, A.; Granucci, G.; Moro, A.; Rispoli, N.; Grossetti, G.; Strauss, D.; Jelonnek, J.; Tran, Q. M.; Franke, T.

    2015-12-10

    In the framework of EUROfusion Consortium the Work Package Heating and Current Drive addresses the engineering design and R&D for the electron cyclotron, ion cyclotron and neutral beam systems. This paper reports the activities performed in 2014, focusing on the work done regarding the input for the conceptual design of the EC system, particularly for the gyrotron, the transmission line and the launchers.

  12. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  13. Communication, Conceptualization and Articulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed, Adel; Hartley, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Learning can be viewed as a communication process that puts the learner in contact with concepts created by others. A result of communication is that an act of interpretation starts, which invokes a process of conceptualization. According to Mayes, successful conceptualization will need the support of learning activities. Hence, machine mediated…

  14. Overlooking the Conceptual Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leshem, Shosh; Trafford, Vernon

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual framework is alluded to in most serious texts on research, described in some and fully explained in few. However, examiners of doctoral theses devote considerable attention to exploring its function within social science doctoral vivas. A literature survey explores how the conceptual framework is itself conceptualised and explained.…

  15. Beam-beam simulations for separated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-04-10

    We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong-strong gaussian code for separated beams for the LHC and RHIC. The frequency spectrum produced by the beam-beam collisions is readily obtained and offers a good opportunity for experimental comparisons. Although our results for the emittance blowup are preliminary, we conclude that, for nominal parameter values, there is no significant difference between separated beams and center-on-center collisions.

  16. Model Building for Conceptual Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David; Strobel, Johannes; Gottdenker, Joshua

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual change is a popular, contemporary conception of meaningful learning. Conceptual change describes changes in conceptual frameworks (mental models or personal theories) that learners construct to comprehend phenomena. Different theories of conceptual change describe the reorganization of conceptual frameworks that results from different…

  17. Resolving two beams in beam splitters with a beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.

    2002-01-01

    The beam transport system for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) anticipates multiple beam splitters. Monitoring two separated beams in a common beam pipe in the splitter sections imposes certain requirements on diagnostics for these sections. In this note we explore a two-beam system in a generic beam monitor and study the feasibility of resolving the positions of the two beams with a single diagnostic device. In the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF), 20-ns beam pulses (bunches) are extracted from the 50-GeV main proton synchrotron and then are transported to the target by an elaborated transport system. The beam transport system splits the beam bunches into equal parts in its splitting sections so that up to 12 synchronous beam pulses can be delivered to the target for the multi-axis proton radiography. Information about the transverse positions of the beams in the splitters, and possibly the bunch longitudinal profile, should be delivered by some diagnostic devices. Possible candidates are the circular wall current monitors in the circular pipes connecting the splitter elements, or the conventional stripline BPMs. In any case, we need some estimates on how well the transverse positions of the two beams can be resolved by these monitors.

  18. Low energy antiproton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapisch, R.

    1992-04-01

    It was the invention of stochastic cooling by S. Van Meer that has allowed antiproton beams to become a powerful tool for the physicist. As a byproduct of the high energy proton-antiproton collider, a versatile low-energy facility, LEAR has been operating at CERN since 1984. The facility and its characteristics will be described as well as examples of its use for studying fundamental properties of the antiproton and for topics in atomic, nuclear and particle Physics.

  19. Ion beam analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    A new ion beam analysis facility has recently been installed at a Van de Graaff accelerator. Its use is expected to support many energy and environmental research projects. Material composition and spatial distribution analyses at the facility are based upon Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, particle-induced X-ray emission, and particle-induced gamma-ray emission analysis. An overview of these three techniques is presented in this article.

  20. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  1. Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adli, E.; Gessner, S. J.; Corde, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Bjerke, H. H.

    2015-02-09

    We describe a beam profile monitor design based on Cherenkov light emitted from a charged particle beam in an air gap. The main components of the profile monitor are silicon wafers used to reflect Cherenkov light onto a camera lens system. The design allows for measuring large beam sizes, with large photon yield per beam charge and excellent signal linearity with beam charge. Furthermore, the profile monitor signal is independent of the particle energy for ultrarelativistic particles. Different design and parameter considerations are discussed. A Cherenkov light-based profile monitor has been installed at the FACET User Facility at SLAC. Finally, we report on the measured performance of this profile monitor.

  2. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-05-13

    'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

  3. Embodied conceptual combination.

    PubMed

    Lynott, Dermot; Connell, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual combination research investigates the processes involved in creating new meaning from old referents. It is therefore essential that embodied theories of cognition are able to explain this constructive ability and predict the resultant behavior. However, by failing to take an embodied or grounded view of the conceptual system, existing theories of conceptual combination cannot account for the role of perceptual, motor, and affective information in conceptual combination. In the present paper, we propose the embodied conceptual combination (ECCo) model to address this oversight. In ECCo, conceptual combination is the result of the interaction of the linguistic and simulation systems, such that linguistic distributional information guides or facilitates the combination process, but the new concept is fundamentally a situated, simulated entity. So, for example, a cactus beetle is represented as a multimodal simulation that includes visual (e.g., the shiny appearance of a beetle) and haptic (e.g., the prickliness of the cactus) information, all situated in the broader location of a desert environment under a hot sun, and with (at least for some people) an element of creepy-crawly revulsion. The ECCo theory differentiates interpretations according to whether the constituent concepts are destructively, or non-destructively, combined in the situated simulation. We compare ECCo to other theories of conceptual combination, and discuss how it accounts for classic effects in the literature.

  4. Embodied Conceptual Combination

    PubMed Central

    Lynott, Dermot; Connell, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual combination research investigates the processes involved in creating new meaning from old referents. It is therefore essential that embodied theories of cognition are able to explain this constructive ability and predict the resultant behavior. However, by failing to take an embodied or grounded view of the conceptual system, existing theories of conceptual combination cannot account for the role of perceptual, motor, and affective information in conceptual combination. In the present paper, we propose the embodied conceptual combination (ECCo) model to address this oversight. In ECCo, conceptual combination is the result of the interaction of the linguistic and simulation systems, such that linguistic distributional information guides or facilitates the combination process, but the new concept is fundamentally a situated, simulated entity. So, for example, a cactus beetle is represented as a multimodal simulation that includes visual (e.g., the shiny appearance of a beetle) and haptic (e.g., the prickliness of the cactus) information, all situated in the broader location of a desert environment under a hot sun, and with (at least for some people) an element of creepy-crawly revulsion. The ECCo theory differentiates interpretations according to whether the constituent concepts are destructively, or non-destructively, combined in the situated simulation. We compare ECCo to other theories of conceptual combination, and discuss how it accounts for classic effects in the literature. PMID:21833267

  5. Mars ultraviolet simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Zill, L P; Mack, R; DeVincenzi, D L

    1979-12-01

    A facility was established for long-duration ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure of natural and synthetic materials in order to test hypotheses concerning Martian soil chemistry observed by the Viking Mars landers. The system utilized a 2500 watt xenon lamp as the radiation source, with the beam passing through a heat-dissipating water filter before impinging upon an exposure chamber containing the samples to be irradiated. The chamber was designed to allow for continuous tumbling of the samples, maintenance of temperatures below 0 degrees C during exposure, and monitoring of beam intensity. The facility also provided for sample preparation under a variety of atmospheric conditions, in addition to the Mars nominal. As many as 33 sealed sample ampules have been irradiated in a single exposure. Over 100 samples have been irradiated for approximately 100 to 700 h. The facility has performed well in providing continuous UV irradiation of multiple samples for long periods of time under simulated Mars atmospheric and thermal conditions.

  6. Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Conceptual Design Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, James M.

    1992-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  7. Quantifying the Growth of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in Polar-Direct-Drive Implosions at the Omega Laser and National Ignition Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires multiple overlapping laser beams that can drive the cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) instability. This instability is of primary concern because it can reduce the laser energy coupling and can affect the symmetry in a polar-direct-drive (PDD) configuration. An experiment was designed to determine the CBET growth by measuring the angularly resolved mass ablation rate and ablation-front trajectory in a PDD configuration. Adding a thin layer of Si over a CH shell generates two peaks in x-ray self-emission images that are measured with a time-resolved pinhole imager. The inner peak is related to the position of the ablation front and the outer peak corresponds to the position of the interface of the two layers in the plasma. The emergence of the second peak is used to measure the time for the laser to burn through the outer layer, giving the average mass ablation rate of the material. The mass ablation rate was measured by varying the thickness of the outer silicon layer. The shell trajectory and mass ablation rate measured in PDD on the pole, where CBET has little effect, were compared with simulations to validate the electron thermal-transport model. Excellent agreement was obtained when using a 2-D nonlocal transport model, and these observables could not be reproduced with flux-limited models. A similar comparison was performed on the equator where the CBET growth is large. Without the CBET model, the shell velocity and mass ablation rate were significantly overestimated by the simulation. Adding the CBET model reduced the drive on the equator and reproduced the experimental results. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. In collaboration with, D. Cao, D. T. Michel, M. Hohenberger, R. Epstein, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, I. V. Igumenshchev, J. A. Marozas, D. D. Meyerhofer, P. B. Radha, S. P. Regan, T. C

  8. Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of theories of the transition to young adulthood. It sets out the argument for conceptual renewal and discusses some implications of new patterns of transition for adult education.

  9. Conceptualizing and experiencing compassion.

    PubMed

    Condon, Paul; Feldman Barrett, Lisa

    2013-10-01

    Does compassion feel pleasant or unpleasant? Westerners tend to categorize compassion as a pleasant or positive emotion, but laboratory compassion inductions, which present another's suffering, may elicit unpleasant feelings. Across two studies, we examined whether prototypical conceptualizations of compassion (as pleasant) differ from experiences of compassion (as unpleasant). After laboratory-based neutral or compassion inductions, participants made abstract judgments about compassion relative to various emotion-related adjectives, thereby providing a prototypical conceptualization of compassion. Participants also rated their own affective states, thereby indicating experiences of compassion. Conceptualizations of compassion were pleasant across neutral and compassion inductions. After exposure to others' suffering, however, participants felt increased levels of compassion and unpleasant affect, but not pleasant affect. After neutral inductions, participants reported more pleasant than unpleasant affect, with moderate levels of compassion. Thus, prototypical conceptualizations of compassion are pleasant, but experiences of compassion can feel pleasant or unpleasant. The implications for emotion theory in general are discussed.

  10. Conceptual design optimization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollowell, S. J.; Beeman, E. R., II; Hiyama, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of applying multilevel functional decomposition and optimization techniques to conceptual design of advanced fighter aircraft was investigated. Applying the functional decomposition techniques to the conceptual design phase appears to be feasible. The initial implementation of the modified design process will optimize wing design variables. A hybrid approach, combining functional decomposition techniques for generation of aerodynamic and mass properties linear sensitivity derivatives with existing techniques for sizing mission performance and optimization, is proposed.

  11. Laboratory astrophysics and atomic physics using the NASA/GSFC microcalorimeter spectrometers at the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap and Radiation Properties Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K; Chen, H; Gu, M F; Kahn, S; Kelley, R; Kilbourne, C; May, M; Porter, F S; Szymkowiak, A; Thorn, D; Widmann, K

    2005-08-18

    The 32 pixel laboratory microcalorimeter spectrometer built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center is now an integral part of the spectroscopy suite used routinely by the electron beam ion trap and radiative properties group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The second generation laboratory instrument, dubbed the XRS/EBIT, is nearly identical to the XRS instrument on the Suzaku X-ray Observatory, formerly Astro-E2. The detector array is from the same processed wafer and uses the same HgTe absorbers. it is being used to measure the photon emission from a variety of radiation sources. These include x-ray emission from laboratory simulated celestial sources, x-ray emission from highly charged ions of Au, and x-ray emission following charge exchange and radiative electron capture. The wide range of applications demonstrates the versatility of a high-resolution, high-efficiency low temperature detector that is able to collect data continually with minimal operator servicing.

  12. Conceptual frameworks in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pundak, David

    2016-06-01

    How to evaluate students' astronomy understanding is still an open question. Even though some methods and tools to help students have already been developed, the sources of students' difficulties and misunderstanding in astronomy is still unclear. This paper presents an investigation of the development of conceptual systems in astronomy by 50 engineering students, as a result of learning a general course on astronomy. A special tool called Conceptual Frameworks in Astronomy (CFA) that was initially used in 1989, was adapted to gather data for the present research. In its new version, the tool included 23 questions, and five to six optional answers were given for each question. Each of the answers was characterized by one of the four conceptual astronomical frameworks: pre-scientific, geocentric, heliocentric and sidereal or scientific. The paper describes the development of the tool and discusses its validity and reliability. Using the CFA we were able to identify the conceptual frameworks of the students at the beginning of the course and at its end. CFA enabled us to evaluate the paradigmatic change of students following the course and also the extent of the general improvement in astronomical knowledge. It was found that the measure of the students’ improvement (gain index) was g = 0.37. Approximately 45% of the students in the course improved their understanding of conceptual frameworks in astronomy and 26% deepened their understanding of the heliocentric or sidereal conceptual frameworks.

  13. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  14. Laser-based characterization and decontamination of contaminated facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Hunter, B.V.; Grace, J.E.; Pellin, M.J.; Leidich, H.F.; Kugler, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    This study examines the application of laser ablation to the characterization and decontamination of painted and unpainted concrete and metal surfaces that are typical of many facilities within the US Department of Energy complex. The utility of this promising technology is reviewed and the essential requirements for efficient ablation extracted. Recent data obtained on the ablation of painted steel surfaces and concrete are presented. The affects of beam irradiance, ablation speed and efficiency, and characteristics of the aerosol effluent are discussed. Characterization of the ablated components of the surface offers the ability of concurrent determination of the level of contamination. This concept can be applied online where the ablation endpoint can be determined. A conceptual system for the characterization and decontamination of surfaces is proposed.

  15. Conceptual design report, TWRS Privatization Phase I, site development and roads, subproject W-505

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, G.

    1997-06-05

    This document includes Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the site development, construction of new roads and improvements at existing road intersections, habitat mitigation, roadway lighting, and construction power needed for the construction of two Private Contractor (PC) Facilities. Approximately 50 hectare (124 acres) land parcel, east of the Grout Facility, is planned for the PC facilities.

  16. Cartesian beams.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2007-12-01

    A new and very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in Cartesian coordinates is presented. We call such a field a Cartesian beam. The complex amplitude of the Cartesian beams is described by either the parabolic cylinder functions or the confluent hypergeometric functions, and the beams are characterized by three parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integration are studied in detail. Applying the general expression of the Cartesian beams, we also derive two new and meaningful beam structures that, to our knowledge, have not yet been reported in the literature. Special cases of the Cartesian beams are the standard, elegant, and generalized Hermite-Gauss beams, the cosine-Gauss beams, the Lorentz beams, and the fractional order beams.

  17. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grames, Joseph; Higinbotham, Douglas; Montgomery, Hugh

    2010-09-08

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  18. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  19. Spatial characterization of BNCT beams.

    PubMed

    Marek, M; Viererbl, L

    2004-11-01

    The space distribution of the epithermal neutron flux was determined for the epithermal neutron beams of several NCT facilities in USA (FCB at MIT), Europe (HFR at JRC, Petten; FiR at VTT, Espoo; LVR-15 at NRI, Rez) and Japan (JRR-4 at JAERI, Tokai). Using p-n diodes with (6)Li radiator and the set of Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) the beams were quantified in-air. Axial beam profiles along the beam axes and the radial distributions at two distances from the beam aperture were measured. Except for the well-collimated HFR beam, the spatial characteristics of the other studied beams were found generally similar, which results from their similar designs.

  20. Photon and dilepton production at the Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research and beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider using coarse-grained microscopic transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Stephan; van Hees, Hendrik; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    We present calculations of dilepton and photon spectra for the energy range Elab=2 A to35 A GeV which will be available for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research (FAIR). The same energy regime will also be covered by phase II of the beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC-BES). Coarse-grained dynamics from microscopic transport calculations of the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model is used to determine temperature and chemical potentials, which allows for the use of dilepton and photon-emission rates from equilibrium quantum-field-theory calculations. The results indicate that nonequilibrium effects, the presence of baryonic matter, and the creation of a deconfined phase might show up in specific manners in the measurable dilepton invariant-mass spectra and in the photon transverse-momentum spectra. However, as the many influences are difficult to disentangle, we argue that the challenge for future measurements of electromagnetic probes will be to provide a high precision with uncertainties much lower than in previous experiments. Furthermore, a systematic study of the whole energy range covered by CBM at FAIR and RHIC-BES is necessary to discriminate between different effects, which influence the spectra, and to identify possible signatures of a phase transition.

  1. Radiation protection at synchrotron radiation facilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Vylet, V

    2001-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation (SR) facility typically consists of an injector, a storage ring, and SR beamlines. The latter two features are unique to SR facilities, when compared to other types of accelerator facilities. The SR facilities have the characteristics of low injection beam power, but high stored beam power. The storage ring is generally above ground with people occupying the experimental floor around a normally thin concrete ring wall. This paper addresses the radiation issues, in particular the shielding design, associated with the storage ring and SR beamlines. Normal and abnormal beam losses for injection and stored beams, as well as typical storage ring operation, are described. Ring shielding design for photons and neutrons from beam losses in the ring is discussed. Radiation safety issues and shielding design for SR beamlines, considering gas bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, are reviewed. Radiation source terms and the methodologies for shielding calculations are presented.

  2. Betatrons with kiloampere beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Although the magnetic-induction method of acceleration used in the betatron is inherently capable of accelerating intense particle beams to high energy, many beam-instability questions arise when beams in the kilo-ampere range are considered. The intense electromagnetic fields produced by the beam, and by the image currents and charges induced in the surrounding walls, can produce very disruptive effects. Several unstable modes of collective oscillation are possible; the suppression of any one of them usually involves energy spread for Landau damping and careful design of the electrical character of the vacuum chamber. The various design criteria are often mutually incompatible. Space-charge detuning can be severe unless large beam apertures and high-energy injection are used. In order to have an acceptably low degree of space-charge detuning in the acceleration of a 10-kilo-ampere electron beam, for example, an injection energy on the order of 50 MeV seems necessary, in which case the forces due to nearby wall images can have a larger effect than the internal forces of the beam. A method of image compensation was invented for reducing the net image forces; it serves also to decrease the longitudinal beam impedance and thus helps alleviate the longitudinal instability as well. In order to avoid the ion-electron collective instability a vacuum in the range of 10/sup -8/ torr is required for an acceleration time of 1 millisecond. A multi-ring betatron system using the 50-MeV Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL as an injector was conceptually designed.

  3. Conceptual design report, CEBAF basic experimental equipment

    SciTech Connect

    1990-04-13

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will be dedicated to basic research in Nuclear Physics using electrons and photons as projectiles. The accelerator configuration allows three nearly continuous beams to be delivered simultaneously in three experimental halls, which will be equipped with complementary sets of instruments: Hall A--two high resolution magnetic spectrometers; Hall B--a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer; Hall C--a high-momentum, moderate resolution, magnetic spectrometer and a variety of more dedicated instruments. This report contains a short description of the initial complement of experimental equipment to be installed in each of the three halls.

  4. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Facilities at NIST.

    PubMed

    Nico, J S; Arif, M; Dewey, M S; Gentile, T R; Gilliam, D M; Huffman, P R; Jacobson, D L; Thompson, A K

    2005-01-01

    The program in fundamental neutron physics at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) began nearly two decades ago. The Neutron Interactions and Dosimetry Group currently maintains four neutron beam lines dedicated to studies of fundamental neutron interactions. The neutrons are provided by the NIST Center for Neutron Research, a national user facility for studies that include condensed matter physics, materials science, nuclear chemistry, and biological science. The beam lines for fundamental physics experiments include a high-intensity polychromatic beam, a 0.496 nm monochromatic beam, a 0.89 nm monochromatic beam, and a neutron interferometer and optics facility. This paper discusses some of the parameters of the beam lines along with brief presentations of some of the experiments performed at the facilities.

  5. Changing Conceptual Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    diSessa, Andrea A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews Giyoo Hatano's ground-breaking theoretical, empirical, and methodological contributions to conceptual change research. In particular, his discovery of "vitalism" as part of children's legitimate and distinctive biology at early ages stands as a landmark. In addition, his work reinterpreted childhood "personification," changing…

  6. Evaluating Conceptual Metaphor Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Raymond W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    A major revolution in the study of metaphor occurred 30 years ago with the introduction of "conceptual metaphor theory" (CMT). Unlike previous theories of metaphor and metaphorical meaning, CMT proposed that metaphor is not just an aspect of language, but a fundamental part of human thought. Indeed, most metaphorical language arises from…

  7. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  8. Conceptual Distinctions amongst Generics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasada, Sandeep; Khemlani, Sangeet; Leslie, Sarah-Jane; Glucksberg, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Generic sentences (e.g., bare plural sentences such as "dogs have four legs" and "mosquitoes carry malaria") are used to talk about "kinds" of things. Three experiments investigated the conceptual foundations of generics as well as claims within the formal semantic approaches to generics concerning the roles of prevalence, cue validity and…

  9. Conceptualizing Functional Neuroplasticity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grafman, Jordan

    2000-01-01

    This article introduces a framework for conceptualizing four forms of cognitive neuroplasticity. The concepts include: (1) homologous area adaptivity; (2) cross-modal reassignment; (3) map expansion; and (4) compensatory masquerade. The limitations of each form of plasticity are presented. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  10. Conceptualizing an Information Commons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagle, Donald

    1999-01-01

    Concepts from Strategic Alignment, a technology-management theory, are used to discuss the Information Commons as a new service-delivery model in academic libraries. The Information Commons, as a conceptual, physical, and instructional space, involves an organizational realignment from print to the digital environment. (Author)

  11. Developing a Conceptual Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenner, Kathleen

    1979-01-01

    As a screening tool for curriculum priorities, a pattern of curriculum design and redevelopment for the associate degree technical nursing program was explored. Curriculum developers examined three components: student, setting, and subject. The evolved conceptual framework, based on Orem's self-care theory, of a continuum of nursing assistance is…

  12. Beam-beam studies for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    We present a summary of beam-beam dynamics studies that have been carried out to date for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B Factory. Most of the material presented here is contained in the proposal's Conceptual Design Report, although post-CDR studies are also presented. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Light Ion FacilityUpgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael B.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Gimpel, Thomas L.; Tiffany, William S.

    2006-07-07

    The BASE Light Ion Facility upgrades have been completed. All proton beams are now delivered to Cave 4A. New control software, a larger diameter beam window, and improved quality assurance measures have been added.

  14. The Jefferson Lab High Power THz User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    John Klopf; Amelia Greer; Joseph Gubeli; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn; Timothy Siggins; David W. Waldman; Gwyn Williams; Alan Todd; Vincent Christina; Oleg Chubar

    2007-04-27

    We describe here, a high power (100 Watt average, 10 MW peak) broadband THz facility based on emission from sub-picosecond bunches of relativistic electrons and the beam transport system that delivers this beam in to a user laboratory.

  15. Rendezvous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

    1988-11-01

    The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

  16. Dealing with megawatt beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The next generation of accelerators for MegaWatt proton, electron and heavy-ion beams puts unprecedented requirements on the accuracy of particle production predictions, the capability and reliability of the codes used in planning new accelerator facilities and experiments, the design of machine, target and collimation systems, detectors and radiation shielding and minimization of their impact on environment. Recent advances in code developments are described for the critical modules related to these challenges. Examples are given for the most demanding areas: targets, collimators, beam absorbers, radiation shielding, induced radioactivity and radiation damage.

  17. The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-02-06

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5-ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  18. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-09-11

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles. At Fermilab, we are planning to install an electron lens in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA, a 40-m ring for 150-MeV electrons) as one of the proof-of-principle implementations of nonlinear integrable optics to achieve large tune spreads and more stable beams without loss of dynamic aperture.

  19. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  20. Conceptual design of a Disk Chopper Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Copley, J.R.D.

    1997-09-01

    We describe methods that we have used for the conceptual design of the Disk Chopper Spectrometer at the Cold Neutron Research Facility, National Institute of Standards and Technology. Most of the discussion concerns the multiple chopper system. No single design method is best in every situation. We believe that an analytical approach is preferable, whenever possible. Graphical methods of expressing problems have been very instructive. We have also found it useful, and occasionally invaluable, to cross-check results obtained using different methods, such as analytical integration and ray-tracing.

  1. Conceptual design report for the ICPP spent nuclear fuel dry storage project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a facility to transfer spent nuclear fuel from shipping casks to dry storage containers, and to safely store those containers at ICPP at INEL. The spent fuels to be handled at the new facility are identified and overall design and operating criteria established. Physical configuration of the facility and the systems used to handle the SNF are described. Detailed cost estimate for design and construction of the facility is presented.

  2. Conceptual IT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaoudova, Kristina; Stanchev, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The business processes are the key asset for every organization. The design of the business process models is the foremost concern and target among an organization's functions. Business processes and their proper management are intensely dependent on the performance of software applications and technology solutions. The paper is attempt for definition of new Conceptual model of IT service provider, it could be examined as IT focused Enterprise model, part of Enterprise Architecture (EA) school.

  3. The state of the art in hadron beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Derwent, P.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Cooling of hadron beams (including heavy-ions) is a powerful technique by which accelerator facilities around the world achieve the necessary beam brightness for their physics research. In this paper, we will give an overview of the latest developments in hadron beam cooling, for which high energy electron cooling at Fermilab's Recycler ring and bunched beam stochastic cooling at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC facility represent two recent major accomplishments. Novel ideas in the field will also be introduced.

  4. National Ignition Facility system alignment.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, S C; Bliss, E; Di Nicola, P; Kalantar, D; Lowe-Webb, R; McCarville, T; Nelson, D; Salmon, T; Schindler, T; Villanueva, J; Wilhelmsen, K

    2011-03-10

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest optical instrument, comprising 192 37 cm square beams, each generating up to 9.6 kJ of 351 nm laser light in a 20 ns beam precisely tailored in time and spectrum. The Facility houses a massive (10 m diameter) target chamber within which the beams converge onto an ∼1 cm size target for the purpose of creating the conditions needed for deuterium/tritium nuclear fusion in a laboratory setting. A formidable challenge was building NIF to the precise requirements for beam propagation, commissioning the beam lines, and engineering systems to reliably and safely align 192 beams within the confines of a multihour shot cycle. Designing the facility to minimize drift and vibration, placing the optical components in their design locations, commissioning beam alignment, and performing precise system alignment are the key alignment accomplishments over the decade of work described herein. The design and positioning phases placed more than 3000 large (2.5 m×2 m×1 m) line-replaceable optics assemblies to within ±1 mm of design requirement. The commissioning and alignment phases validated clear apertures (no clipping) for all beam lines, and demonstrated automated laser alignment within 10 min and alignment to target chamber center within 44 min. Pointing validation system shots to flat gold-plated x-ray emitting targets showed NIF met its design requirement of ±50 μm rms beam pointing to target chamber. Finally, this paper describes the major alignment challenges faced by the NIF Project from inception to present, and how these challenges were met and solved by the NIF design and commissioning teams.

  5. LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments:Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, J.; Boutet, S.; Castagna, J-C.; Chapman, H.; Feng, Y.; Foyt, W.; Fritz, D.M.; Gaffney, K.J.; Gr|bel, G.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.B.; Kurita, N.; Larsson, J.; Ludwig, K.; Messerschmidt, M.; Miao, J.; Reis, D.A.; Robert, A.; Stephenson, G.B.; Tschentscher, Th.; van Bakel, N.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /DESY /Lund Inst. Tech. /Boston U. /UCLA /Michigan U. /Argonne

    2007-10-16

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), along with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility, which will operate in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This FEL, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac will be used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons will be transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which will house a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons will be bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength will be tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS will include two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing three X-ray instruments in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of this new LCLS facility. The technical objective of the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) project is to design, build, and install at the LCLS three hard X-ray instruments that will complement the initial instrument included in the LCLS construction. As the science programs advance and new technological challenges appear, instrumentation needs to be developed and ready to conquer these new opportunities. The LCLS instrument concepts have been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a

  6. PRA and Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMott, Diana; Fuqua, Bryan; Wilson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Once a project obtains approval, decision makers have to consider a variety of alternative paths for completing the project and meeting the project objectives. How decisions are made involves a variety of elements including: cost, experience, current technology, ideologies, politics, future needs and desires, capabilities, manpower, timing, available information, and for many ventures management needs to assess the elements of risk versus reward. The use of high level Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Models during conceptual design phases provides management with additional information during the decision making process regarding the risk potential for proposed operations and design prototypes. The methodology can be used as a tool to: 1) allow trade studies to compare alternatives based on risk, 2) determine which elements (equipment, process or operational parameters) drives the risk, and 3) provide information to mitigate or eliminate risks early in the conceptual design to lower costs. Creating system models using conceptual design proposals and generic key systems based on what is known today can provide an understanding of the magnitudes of proposed systems and operational risks and facilitates trade study comparisons early in the decision making process. Identifying the "best" way to achieve the desired results is difficult, and generally occurs based on limited information. PRA provides a tool for decision makers to explore how some decisions will affect risk before the project is committed to that path, which can ultimately save time and money.

  7. Physics opportunities with meson beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, William J.; Döring, Michael; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D. Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I.; Swanson, Eric S.

    2015-10-01

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electroproduction data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even non-existent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state-of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  8. Physics opportunities with meson beams

    SciTech Connect

    Briscoe, William J.; Doring, Michael; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D. Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I.; Swanson, Eric S.

    2015-10-20

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. Furthermore, the present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  9. Dark matter beams at LBNF

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Frugiuele, Claudia; Harnik, Roni

    2016-04-08

    High-intensity neutrino beam facilities may produce a beam of light dark matter when protons strike the target. Searches for such a dark matter beam using its scattering in a nearby detector must overcome the large neutrino background. We characterize the spatial and energy distributions of the dark matter and neutrino beams, focusing on their differences to enhance the sensitivity to dark matter. We find that a dark matter beam produced by a Z$^{'}$ boson in the GeV mass range is both broader and more energetic than the neutrino beam. The reach for dark matter is maximized for a detector sensitive to hard neutral-current scatterings, placed at a sizable angle off the neutrino beam axis. In the case of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a detector placed at roughly 6 degrees off axis and at a distance of about 200 m from the target would be sensitive to Z$^{'}$ couplings as low as 0.05. This search can proceed symbiotically with neutrino measurements. We also show that the MiniBooNE and MicroBooNE detectors, which are on Fermilab’s Booster beamline, happen to be at an optimal angle from the NuMI beam and could perform searches with existing data. As a result, this illustrates potential synergies between LBNF and the short-baseline neutrino program if the detectors are positioned appropriately.

  10. Dark matter beams at LBNF

    DOE PAGES

    Coloma, Pilar; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Frugiuele, Claudia; ...

    2016-04-08

    High-intensity neutrino beam facilities may produce a beam of light dark matter when protons strike the target. Searches for such a dark matter beam using its scattering in a nearby detector must overcome the large neutrino background. We characterize the spatial and energy distributions of the dark matter and neutrino beams, focusing on their differences to enhance the sensitivity to dark matter. We find that a dark matter beam produced by a Zmore » $$^{'}$$ boson in the GeV mass range is both broader and more energetic than the neutrino beam. The reach for dark matter is maximized for a detector sensitive to hard neutral-current scatterings, placed at a sizable angle off the neutrino beam axis. In the case of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a detector placed at roughly 6 degrees off axis and at a distance of about 200 m from the target would be sensitive to Z$$^{'}$$ couplings as low as 0.05. This search can proceed symbiotically with neutrino measurements. We also show that the MiniBooNE and MicroBooNE detectors, which are on Fermilab’s Booster beamline, happen to be at an optimal angle from the NuMI beam and could perform searches with existing data. As a result, this illustrates potential synergies between LBNF and the short-baseline neutrino program if the detectors are positioned appropriately.« less

  11. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    D. BARR; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  12. Conceptual design report for site drainage control

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    The Mound Plant (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc. (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety & Health (ES&H) Upgrades Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by facility activities. The first project of this multiphase program is now in the final stages of construction, and the second project is currently under design. Four additional projects, one of which is presented in this report, are in the conceptual design stage. At Mound, 22 soil zones have become contaminated with radioactive material. These zones cover approximately 20 percent of the total area of developed property at the site. During a storm event, the rainwater washes contaminated soil from these zones into the storm sewer system. These radioactive contaminants may then be discharged along with the stormwater into the Great Miami River via the Miami Erie Canal. This conceptual design report (CDR), Site Drainage Control, the fourth project in the ES&H program, describes a project that will provide improvements and much needed repairs to inadequate and deteriorating portions of the storm drainage system on the developed property. The project also will provide a stormwater retention facility capable of storing the stormwater runoff, from the developed property, resulting from a 100-year storm event. These improvements will permit the effective control and monitoring of stormwater to prevent the spread of radioactive contaminants from contaminated soil zones and will provide a means to collect and contain accidental spills of hazardous substances.

  13. The ATLAS Facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is a superconducting low-energy heavy ion accelerator. Its primary purpose is to provide beams for research in nuclear structure physics. This report begins with a brief history of ATLAS and then describes the current design of the facility. Also summarized are the experimental equipment and research programs. It concludes with a proposal for turning ATLAS into a radioactive beam facility.

  14. Practical beam transport for PFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozurkewich, David; Young, John; Ireland, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) is a future kilometric-baseline infrared interferometer to image the complex physical processes of planet formation. Technologies that could be used to transport starlight to a central beam-combining laboratory in PFI include free-space propagation in air or vacuum, and optical fibres. This paper addresses the design and cost issues associated with free-space propagation in vacuum pipes. The signal losses due to diffraction over long differential paths are evaluated, and conceptual beam transport designs employing pupil management to ameliorate these losses are presented and discussed.

  15. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  16. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  17. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haitao Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-15

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  18. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  19. Rotorcraft Conceptual Design Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Sinsay, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Requirements for a rotorcraft conceptual design environment are discussed, from the perspective of a government laboratory. Rotorcraft design work in a government laboratory must support research, by producing technology impact assessments and defining the context for research and development; and must support the acquisition process, including capability assessments and quantitative evaluation of designs, concepts, and alternatives. An information manager that will enable increased fidelity of analysis early in the design effort is described. This manager will be a framework to organize information that describes the aircraft, and enable movement of that information to and from analyses. Finally, a recently developed rotorcraft system analysis tool is described.

  20. Rotorcraft Conceptual Design Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Sinsay, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Requirements for a rotorcraft conceptual design environment are discussed, from the perspective of a government laboratory. Rotorcraft design work in a government laboratory must support research, by producing technology impact assessments and defining the context for research and development; and must support the acquisition process, including capability assessments and quantitative evaluation of designs, concepts, and alternatives. An information manager that will enable increased fidelity of analysis early in the design effort is described. This manager will be a framework to organize information that describes the aircraft, and enable movement of that information to and from analyses. Finally, a recently developed rotorcraft system analysis tool is described.

  1. The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H

    2003-12-19

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10'' bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5 ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper discusses NIF's current and future experimental capability, plans for diagnostics, cryogenic target systems, specialized optics for experiments, and potential enhancements to NIF such as multi-color laser operation and high-energy short pulse operation.

  2. Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams

    DOE PAGES

    Adli, E.; Gessner, S. J.; Corde, S.; ...

    2015-02-09

    We describe a beam profile monitor design based on Cherenkov light emitted from a charged particle beam in an air gap. The main components of the profile monitor are silicon wafers used to reflect Cherenkov light onto a camera lens system. The design allows for measuring large beam sizes, with large photon yield per beam charge and excellent signal linearity with beam charge. Furthermore, the profile monitor signal is independent of the particle energy for ultrarelativistic particles. Different design and parameter considerations are discussed. A Cherenkov light-based profile monitor has been installed at the FACET User Facility at SLAC. Finally,more » we report on the measured performance of this profile monitor.« less

  3. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  4. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP CONCEPTUAL DESIGN CONTROL DECISION REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    CARRO CA

    2010-03-09

    This control decision addresses the Knock-Out Pot (KOP) Disposition KOP Processing System (KPS) conceptual design. The KPS functions to (1) retrieve KOP material from canisters, (2) remove particles less than 600 {micro}m in size and low density materials from the KOP material, (3) load the KOP material into Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) baskets, and (4) stage the MCO baskets for subsequent loading into MCOs. Hazard and accident analyses of the KPS conceptual design have been performed to incorporate safety into the design process. The hazard analysis is documented in PRC-STP-00098, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Project Conceptual Design Hazard Analysis. The accident analysis is documented in PRC-STP-CN-N-00167, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Sub-Project Canister Over Lift Accident Analysis. Based on the results of these analyses, and analyses performed in support of MCO transportation and MCO processing and storage activities at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and Canister Storage Building (CSB), control decision meetings were held to determine the controls required to protect onsite and offsite receptors and facility workers. At the conceptual design stage, these controls are primarily defined by their safety functions. Safety significant structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that could provide the identified safety functions have been selected for the conceptual design. It is anticipated that some safety SSCs identified herein will be reclassified based on hazard and accident analyses performed in support of preliminary and detailed design.

  5. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  6. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and poor

  7. Analysis of the TREAT LEU Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Connaway, H. M.; Kontogeorgakos, D. C.; Papadias, D. D.; Brunett, A. J.; Mo, K.; Strons, P. S.; Fei, T.; Wright, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Analyses were performed to evaluate the performance of the low enriched uranium (LEU) conceptual design fuel for the conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) from its current highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. TREAT is an experimental nuclear reactor designed to produce high neutron flux transients for the testing of reactor fuels and other materials. TREAT is currently in non-operational standby, but is being restarted under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Resumption of Transient Testing Program. The conversion of TREAT is being pursued in keeping with the mission of the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program. The focus of this study was to demonstrate that the converted LEU core is capable of maintaining the performance of the existing HEU core, while continuing to operate safely. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic simulations have been performed to evaluate the performance of the LEU conceptual-design core under both steady-state and transient conditions, for both normal operation and reactivity insertion accident scenarios. In addition, ancillary safety analyses which were performed for previous LEU design concepts have been reviewed and updated as-needed, in order to evaluate if the converted LEU core will function safely with all existing facility systems. Simulations were also performed to evaluate the detailed behavior of the UO2-graphite fuel, to support future fuel manufacturing decisions regarding particle size specifications. The results of these analyses will be used in conjunction with work being performed at Idaho National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, in order to develop the Conceptual Design Report project deliverable.

  8. FFAG Beam Line for nuPIL - Neutrinos from PIon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste; Pasternak, Jaroslaw; Bross, Alan; Liu, Ao; Appleby, Robert; Tygier, Sam

    2016-06-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facilities (LBNF) program aims to deliver a neutrino beam for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). The current baseline for LBNF is a conventional magnetic horn and decay pipe system. Neutrinos from PIon beam Line (nuPIL) is a part of the optimization effort to optimize the LBNF. It consists of a pion beam line after the horn to clean the beam of high energy protons and wrong-sign pions before transporting them into a decay beam line, where instrumentation could be implemented. This paper focuses on the FFAG solution for this pion beam line. The resulting neutrino flux is also presented.

  9. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  10. Overview of the LBNE Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.D.; He, Yun; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Lundberg, Byron; McGee, Mike; Misek, Joel; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Plunkett, Rob; Schultz, Ryan; /Fermilab

    2011-03-22

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab. The facility is designed to aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined by an amalgam of the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW.

  11. WRAP 2A advanced conceptual design report comments

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberd, D.L.

    1994-10-04

    This report contains the compilation of the 393 comments that were submitted during the review of the Advanced Conceptual Design Report for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A. The report was prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc. of Englewood, Colorado for the United States Department of Energy. The review was performed by a variety of organizations identified in the report. The comments were addressed first by the Westinghouse cognizant engineers and then by the Raytheon cognizant engineers, and incorporated into the final issue of the Advanced Conceptual Design Report.

  12. Photographic Processing Interpretation Facility Wastewater Conceptual Treatment Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    COPIES OWY K PO,#D F"-. OiaItA IEO*icAL Iww~~ ioN SkftcE 5W FmkYYAL lOAD SPRMGIELD, VIWIftIA 2]61 REGISTERED WITH Umw1G TEovicAL ltsopmTO C~wnA 9*.D...biological treatment and conventional silver recovery by iron exchanqe or electrolytic regeneration, reverse osmosis (R.O.), ion exchange, and...considered a practical or cost-effective application for the total wa~ta- since the seoaration of the concentrated fix and developer solutions from the

  13. Variable-Gravity Research Facility conceptualization and design study summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    It is proposed that three six-month missions be performed at different gravity levels (0.255, 0.39, and 0.64 g) with crews of three individuals to obtain the first approximation of the curves for physiological responses to different levels of gravity. The result data will permit preliminary evaluation of the appropriateness of artificial gravity as a countermeasure for the deconditioning that occurs in 0 g.

  14. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  15. Advanced Light Source beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.

    1991-10-28

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a synchrotron radiation facility nearing completion at LBL. As a third-generation machine, the ALS is designed to produce intense light from bend magnets, wigglers, and undulators (insertion devices). The facility will include a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator, a 1.5 GeV booster synchrotron, beam transport lines, a 1--2 GeV storage ring, insertion devices, and photon beam lines. Currently, the beam injection systems are being commissioned, and the storage ring is being installed. Electron beam position monitors (BPM) are installed throughout the accelerator and constitute the major part of accelerator beam diagnostics. The design of the BPM instruments is complete, and 50 units have been constructed for use in the injector systems. We are currently fabricating 100 additional instruments for the storage ring. In this paper I discuss engineering fabrication, testing and performance of the beam pickup electrodes and the BPM electronics.

  16. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  17. Tactical missile conceptual design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmon, D. R.

    1980-09-01

    This thesis presents the theory necessary for the conceptual design of a tactical missile. The design process begins with the well known linear aerodynamic theory for initial sizing and later includes nonlinear effects to determine the final design of the missile. Where theory does not apply, empirical methods are presented which are known to give accurate results. An air-to-air missile is designed for a specific threat as an example which immediately follows the development of the theory for each section. Several small digital computer programs are presented and used for analysis of specific areas of the design. One large program (AEROL) is used for determining the aerodynamic coefficients of the final design.

  18. Shuttle freezer conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, B. W.; Russell, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design for a kit freezer for operation onboard shuttle was developed. The freezer features a self-contained unit which can be mounted in the orbiter crew compartment and is capable of storing food at launch and returning with medical samples. Packaging schemes were investigated to provide the optimum storage capacity with a minimum weight and volume penalty. Several types of refrigeration systems were evaluated to select one which would offer the most efficient performance and lowest hazard of safety to the crew. Detailed performance data on the selected, Stirling cycle principled refrigeration unit were developed to validate the feasibility of its application to this freezer. Thermal analyses were performed to determine the adequacy of the thermal insulation to maintain the desired storage temperature with the design cooling capacity. Stress analyses were made to insure the design structure integrity could be maintained over the shuttle flight regime. A proposed prototype freezer development plan is presented.

  19. Lunar lander conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Joo Ahn; Carini, John; Choi, Andrew; Dillman, Robert; Griffin, Sean J.; Hanneman, Susan; Mamplata, Caesar; Stanton, Edward

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented of a Lunar Lander, which can be the primary vehicle to transport the equipment necessary to establish a surface lunar base, the crew that will man the base, and the raw materials which the Lunar Station will process. A Lunar Lander will be needed to operate in the regime between the lunar surface and low lunar orbit (LLO), up to 200 km. This lander is intended for the establishment and operation of a manned surface base on the moon and for the support of the Lunar Space Station. The lander will be able to fulfill the requirements of 3 basic missions: A mission dedicated to delivering maximum payload for setting up the initial lunar base; Multiple missions between LLO and lunar surface dedicated to crew rotation; and Multiple missions dedicated to cargo shipments within the regime of lunar surface and LLO. A complete set of structural specifications is given.

  20. A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-10-01

    A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

  1. Beam handling and transport solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Carpinelli, M.; Tramontana, A.

    2013-07-26

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the possibility to characterize the particle beams produced by the laser-target interaction in terms of collection, focusing and energy selection in order to evaluate the feasibility of a laser-driven facility in the field of medical application and, in particular, for hadrontherapy.

  2. Beam handling and transport solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiore, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Carpinelli, M.; Cuttone, G.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.

    2013-07-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the possibility to characterize the particle beams produced by the laser-target interaction in terms of collection, focusing and energy selection in order to evaluate the feasibility of a laser-driven facility in the field of medical application and, in particular, for hadrontherapy.

  3. Development of neutral beams for fusion plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Haselton, H.H.; Pyle, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    A state-of-the-art account of neutral beam technology at the LBL/LLNL and ORNL facilities is given with emphasis on positive-ion-based systems. The advances made in the last few years are elaborated and problem areas are identified. The ORNL program has successfully completed the neutral injection systems for PLT, ISX-B, and most recently, PDX and the ISX-B upgrade. All of these are high current (60 to 100 A), medium energy (40 to 50 keV) systems. This program is also engaged in the development of a reactor-grade advanced positive ion system (150 to 200 kV/100 A/5 to 10 s) and a multimegawatt, long pulse (30 s) heating system for ISX-C. In a joint program, LBL and LLNL are developing and testing neutral beam injection systems based on the acceleration of positive ions for application in the 80- to 160-keV range on MFTF-B, D-III, TFTR/TFM, ETF, MNS, etc. A conceptual design of a 160-keV injection system for the German ZEPHYR project is in progress at LBL/LLNL and independently at ORNL. The laboratories are also engaged in the development of negative-ion-based systems for future applications at higher energies.

  4. Beam-energy inequality in the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Siemann, R. )

    1990-03-01

    Conditions for energy transparency,'' unequal-energy beams having the same beam-beam behavior, are derived for round beams from a Hamiltonian model of the beam-beam interaction. These conditions are equal fractional betatron tunes, equal synchrotron tunes, equal beam-beam strength parameters, equal nominal sizes, equal {beta}{sup *}'s and equal bunch lengths. With these conditions the only way to compensate for unequal energies is with the number of particles per bunch.

  5. The National Ignition Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Boyes, J.D.; Kumpan, S.A.; Sorem, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KD0), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 {mu}m) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, the authors completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program`s site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. This article presents an overview of the NIF project.

  6. Attentional Factors in Conceptual Congruency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Julio; Ouellet, Marc; Roman, Antonio; Valenzuela, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual congruency effects are biases induced by an irrelevant conceptual dimension of a task (e.g., location in vertical space) on the processing of another, relevant dimension (e.g., judging words' emotional evaluation). Such effects are a central empirical pillar for recent views about how the mind/brain represents concepts. In the present…

  7. Further Conceptualization of Treatment Acceptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.

    2008-01-01

    A review and extension of previous conceptualizations of treatment acceptability is provided in light of progress within the area of behavior treatment development and implementation. Factors including legislation, advances in research, and service delivery models are examined as to their relationship with a comprehensive conceptualization of…

  8. What Does Conceptual Understanding Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Florence S.; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2006-01-01

    All advocates of curriculum reform talk about an increased emphasis on conceptual understanding in mathematics. In this article, the authors use many examples to address the following issues: What does conceptual understanding mean, especially in introductory courses such as college algebra, precalculus, or calculus? How do we recognize its…

  9. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  10. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  11. Ion Beam Therapy in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Gerhard

    2009-03-01

    At present, seven facilities in Europe treat deep-seated tumors with particle beams, six with proton beams and one with carbon ions. Three of these facilities are in Moscow, St. Petersburg and Dubna, Russia. Other facilities include the TSL Uppsala, Sweden, CPO Orsay, France, and PSI Villigen, Switzerland, all for proton therapy, and GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, which utilizes carbon ions only. But only two of these facilities irradiate with scanned ion beams: the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI), Villigen (protons) and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt. These two facilities are experimental units within physics laboratories and have developed the technique of intensity-modulated beam scanning in order to produce irradiation conforming to a 3-D target. There are three proton centers presently under construction in Munich, Essen and Orsay, and the proton facility at PSI has added a superconducting accelerator connected to an isocentric gantry in order to become independent of the accelerator shared with the physics research program. The excellent clinical results using carbon ions at National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in Chiba and GSI have triggered the construction of four new heavy-ion therapy projects (carbon ions and protons), located in Heidelberg, Pavia, Marburg and Kiel. The projects in Heidelberg and Pavia will begin patient treatment in 2009, and the Marburg and Kiel projects will begin in 2010 and 2011, respectively. These centers use different accelerator designs but have the same kind of treatment planning system and use the same approach for the calculation of the biological effectiveness of the carbon ions as developed at GSI [1]. There are many other planned projects in the works. Do not replace the word "abstract," but do replace the rest of this text. If you must insert a hard line break, please use Shift+Enter rather than just tapping your "Enter" key. You may want to print this page and refer to it as a style

  12. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  13. Operation of the NuMI beam monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, Robert M.; Indurthy, Dharma; Keisler, Ryan; Kopp, Sacha; Mendoza, Steven; Pavlovich, Zarko; Proga, Marek; Bishai, Mary; Diwan, Milind; Viren, Brett; Harris, Deborah A.; Marchionni, Alberto; Morfin, Jorge; McDonald, Jeffrey; Naples, Donna; Northacker, David; Erwin, Albert; Ping, Huican; Velissaris, Cristos; /Texas U. /Brookhaven /Fermilab /Pittsburgh U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-06-01

    The NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) facility produces an intense neutrino beam for experiments. The NuMI Beam Monitoring system is four arrays of ion chambers that measure the intensity and distribution of the remnant hadron and tertiary muon beams produced in association with the neutrinos. The ion chambers operate in an environment of high particle fluxes and high radiation.

  14. Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-07-20

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne's AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

  15. The National Ignition Facility: Transition to a User Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Lagin, L.; Larson, D.; Keane, C.; MacGowan, B.; Patterson, R.; Spaeth, M.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Wegner, P.; Kauffman, R.

    2016-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been operational since March 2009 and has been transitioning to a user facility supporting ignition science, high energy density science (HEDS), national security applications, and fundamental science. The facility has achieved its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The facility is on track to perform over 200 target shots this year in support of all of its user communities. The facility has nearly 60 diagnostic systems operational and has shown flexibility in laser pulse shape and performance to meet the requirements of its multiple users. Progress continues on its goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. It has performed over 40 indirect-drive experiments with cryogenic-layered capsules. New platforms are being developed for HEDS and fundamental science. Equation-of-state and material strength experiments have been done on a number of materials with pressures of over 50 MBars obtained in diamond, conditions never previously encountered in the laboratory and similar to those found in planetary interiors. Experiments are also in progress investigating radiation transport, hydrodynamic instabilities, and direct drive implosions. NIF continues to develop as an experimental facility. Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) is now being installed on NIF for producing high-energy radiographs of the imploded cores of ignition targets and for short pulse laser-plasma interaction experiments. One NIF beam is planned for conversion to two picosecond beams in 2014. Other new diagnostics such as x-ray Thomson scattering, low energy neutron spectrometer, and multi-layer reflecting x-ray optics are also planned. Incremental improvements in laser performance such as improved optics damage performance, beam balance, and back reflection control are being pursued.

  16. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e[mu] coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study [pi][sup 0] and [eta] production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the [phi] meson (via K[sup +]K[sup [minus

  17. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  18. From models to performance assessment: the conceptualization problem.

    PubMed

    Bredehoeft, John D

    2003-01-01

    Today, models are ubiquitous tools for ground water analyses. The intent of this paper is to explore philosophically the role of the conceptual model in analysis. Selection of the appropriate conceptual model is an a priori decision by the analyst. Calibration is an integral part of the modeling process. Unfortunately a wrong or incomplete conceptual model can often be adequately calibrated; good calibration of a model does not ensure a correct conceptual model. Petroleum engineers have another term for calibration; they refer to it as history matching. A caveat to the idea of history matching is that we can make a prediction with some confidence equal to the period of the history match. In other words, if we have matched a 10-year history, we can predict for 10 years with reasonable confidence; beyond 10 years the confidence in the prediction diminishes rapidly. The same rule of thumb applies to ground water model analyses. Nuclear waste disposal poses a difficult problem because the time horizon, 1000 years or longer, is well beyond the possibility of the history match (or period of calibration) in the traditional analysis. Nonetheless, numerical models appear to be the tool of choice for analyzing the safety of waste facilities. Models have a well-recognized inherent uncertainty. Performance assessment, the technique for assessing the safety of nuclear waste facilities, involves an ensemble of cascading models. Performance assessment with its ensemble of models multiplies the inherent uncertainty of the single model. The closer we can approach the idea of a long history with which to match the models, even models of nuclear waste facilities, the more confidence we will have in the analysis (and the models, including performance assessment). This thesis argues for prolonged periods of observation (perhaps as long as 300 to 1000 years) before a nuclear waste facility is finally closed.

  19. Technical design of hadron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  20. Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).