Science.gov

Sample records for beam fusion progress

  1. Particle beam fusion progress report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the pulsed power approach to inertial confinement fusion. In 1989, the authors achieved a proton focal intensity of 5 TW/cm{sup 2} on PBFA-II in a 15-cm-radius applied magnetic-field (applied-B) ion diode. This is an improvement by a factor of 4 compared to previous PBFA-II experiments. They completed development of the three-dimensional (3-D), electromagnetic, particle-in-cell code QUICKSILVER and obtained the first 3-D simulations of an applied-B ion diode. The simulations, together with analytic theory, suggest that control of electromagnetic instabilities could reduce ion divergence. In experiments using a lithium fluoride source, they delivered 26 kJ of lithium energy to the diode axis. Rutherford-scattered ion diagnostics have been developed and tested using a conical foil located inside the diode. They can now obtain energy density profiles by using range filters and recording ion images on nuclear track recording film. Timing uncertainties in power flow experiments on PBFA-II have been reduced by a factor of 5. They are investigating three plasma opening switches that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. These new switches provide better power flow than the standard plasma erosion switch. Advanced pulsed-power fusion drivers will require extraction-geometry applied-B ion diodes. During this reporting period, progress was made in evaluating the generation, transport, and focus of multiple ion beams in an extraction geometry and in assessing the probable damage to a target chamber first wall.

  2. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-05-31

    Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams for industry, radiation therapy and inertial fusion applications were discussed. The highlights include ion beam lithography, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers using multiple linacs.

  3. Particle-beam-fusion progress report, July 1979 through December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The following chapters are included in this semi-annual progress report: (1) fusion target studies, (2) target experiments, (3) particle-beam source developments, (4) particle beam experiments, (5) pulsed power, (6) pulsed power applications, and (7) electron beam fusion accelerator project. (MOW)

  4. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pulsed power offers and efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. We are pursuing two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. This paper describes recent progress in each approach and plans for future development.

  5. Particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-31

    Today, in keeping with Sandia Laboratories` designation by the Department of Energy as the lead laboratory for the pulsed power approach to fusion, its efforts include major research activities and the construction of new facilities at its Albuquerque site. Additionally, in its capacity as lead laboratory, Sandia coordinates DOE-supported pulsed power fusion work at other government operated laboratories, with industrial contractors, and universities. The beginning of Sandia`s involvement in developing fusion power was an outgrowth of its contributions to the nation`s nuclear weapon program. The Laboratories` work in the early 1960`s emphasized the use of pulsed radiation environments to test the resistance of US nuclear weapons to enemy nuclear bursts. A careful study of options for fusion power indicated that Sandia`s expertise in the pulsed power field could provide a powerful match to ignite fusion fuel. Although creating test environments is an achieved goal of Sandia`s overall program, this work and other military tasks protected by appropriate security regulations will continue, making full use of the same pulsed power technology and accelerators as the fusion-for-energy program. Major goals of Sandia`s fusion program including the following: (1) complete a particle accelerator to deliver sufficient beam energy for igniting fusion targets; (2) obtain net energy gain, this goal would provide fusion energy output in excess of energy stored in the accelerator; (3) develop a technology base for the repetitive ignition of pellets in a power reactor. After accomplishing these goals, the technology will be introduced to the nation`s commercial sector.

  6. Progress toward fusion with light ions

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    New results in target design, beam generation and transport, and pulse power technology have led to a program shift stressing light ion-driven inertial confinement fusion. According to present estimates, a gain ten fusion pellet will require at least one megajoule and approx. 100 TW power input. Progress in ion sources has resulted in beam power density of approx. 1 TW/cm/sup 2/, a factor of ten increase over the last year, and cylindrical implosion experiments have been performed. Other experiments have demonstrated the ability to transport ion and electron beams with high efficiency and have confirmed numerical predictions on the properties of beam transport channels converging at a target. These developments together with improvements in pulse power technology allow us to project that the 72 beam, 100 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator, PBFA-II will attain target output energy equal to stored energy in the accelerator.

  7. Summary of progress in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, S.M.

    1992-12-31

    Progress in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been very rapid over the past two years. Significant advances have been made in the production of smooth laser beams, the focusing of light ions beams, and the development of heavy ion accelerators. The availability of advanced target diagnostics on several major drivers has resulted in an extensive database of target performance over a wide range of conditions. Theoretical models of ICF targets are approaching the predictive level with two and even three dimensional calculations becoming routine. Within the next several years information should be available to allow confident extrapolation to ignition on the next generation driver.

  8. Summary of progress in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been very rapid over the past two years. Significant advances have been made in the production of smooth laser beams, the focusing of light ions beams, and the development of heavy ion accelerators. The availability of advanced target diagnostics on several major drivers has resulted in an extensive database of target performance over a wide range of conditions. Theoretical models of ICF targets are approaching the predictive level with two and even three dimensional calculations becoming routine. Within the next several years information should be available to allow confident extrapolation to ignition on the next generation driver.

  9. World progress toward fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, J. F.

    1989-09-01

    This paper will describe the progress in fusion science and technology from a world perspective. The paper will cover the current technical status, including the understanding of fusion's economic, environmental, and safety characteristics. Fusion experiments are approaching the energy breakeven condition. An energy gain (Q) of 30 percent has been achieved in magnetic confinement experiments. In addition, temperatures required for an ignited plasma (Ti = 32 KeV) and energy confinements (about 75 percent of that required for ignition) have been achieved in separate experiments. Two major facilities have started the experimental campaign to extend these results and achieve or exceed Q = 1 plasma conditions by 1990. Inertial confinement fusion experiments are also approaching thermonuclear conditions and have achieved a compression factor 100-200 times liquid D-T. Because of this progress, the emphasis in fusion research is turning toward questions of engineering feasibility. Leaders of the major fusion R and D programs in the European Community (EC), Japan, the United States, and the U.S.S.R. have agreed on the major steps that are needed to reach the point at which a practical fusion system can be designed. The United States is preparing for an experiment to address the last unexplored scientific issue, the physics of an ignited plasma, during the late 1990's. The EC, Japan, U.S.S.R., and the United States have joined together under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to jointly design and prepare the validating R&D for an international facility, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), to address all the remaining scientific issues and to explore the engineering technology of fusion around the turn of the century.

  10. Progress in Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    The progress of the field of Heavy Ion Fusion has been documented in the proceedings of the series of International Symposia that, in recent years, have occurred every second year. The latest of these conferences was hosted by Gesellshaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (GSI) in Darmstadt, West Germany, June 28-30, 1988. For this report, a few highlights from the conference are selected, stressing experimental progress and prospects for future advances. A little extra time is devoted to report on the developments at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is the center for most of the HIFAR program. The Director of the HIFAR program at LBL is Denis Keefe, who presented the HIF report at the last two of the meetings in this series, and in whose place the author is appearing now. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  12. MEMS based ion beams for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Ji, Q.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Ardanuc, S.; Vinayakumar, K. B.; Schaffer, Z. A.; Lal, A.

    2016-10-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication provides an exciting opportunity to shrink existing accelerator concepts to smaller sizes and to reduce cost by orders of magnitude. We revisit the concept of a Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator (MEQALAC) and show how, with current technologies, the concept can be downsized from gap distances of several cm to distances in the sub-mm regime. The basic concept implements acceleration gaps using radio frequency (RF) fields and electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQ) on silicon wafers. First results from proof-of-concept experiments using printed circuit boards to realize the MEQALAC structures are presented. We show results from accelerating structures that were used in an array of nine (3x3) parallel beamlets with He ions at 15 keV. We will also present results from an ESQ focusing lattice using the same beamlet layout showing beam transport and matching. We also will discuss our progress in fabricating MEMS devices in silicon wafers for both the RF and ESQ structures and integration of necessary RF-circuits on-chip. The concept can be scaled up to thousands of beamlets providing high power beams at low cost and can be used to form and compress a plasma for the development of magnetized target fusion approaches. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy through the ARPA-e ALPHA program under contracts DE-AC0205CH11231 (LBNL).

  13. Beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.

    1995-04-01

    A standard design for heavy ion fusion drivers under study in the US is an induction linac with electrostatic focusing at low energy and magnetic focusing at higher energy. The need to focus the intense beam to a few-millimeter size spot at the deuterium-tritium target establishes the emittance budget for the accelerator. Economic and technological considerations favor a larger number of beams in the low-energy, electrostatic-focusing section than in the high-energy, magnetic-focusing section. Combining four beams into a single focusing channel is a viable option, depending on the growth in emittance due to the combining process. Several significant beam dynamics issues that are, or have been, under active study are discussed: large space charge and image forces, beam wall clearances, halos, alignment, longitudinal instability, and bunch length control.

  14. Modified betatron for ion beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rostoker, N.; Fisher, A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense neutralized ion beam can be injected and trapped in magnetic mirror or tokamak geometry. The details of the process involve beam polarization so that the beam crosses the fringing fields without deflection and draining the polarization when the beam reaches the plasma. Equilibrium requires that a large betatron field be added in tokamak geometry. In mirror geometry a toroidal field must be added by means of a current along the mirror axis. In either case, the geometry becomes that of the modified betatron which has been studied experimentally and theoretically in recent years. We consider beams of d and t ions with a mean energy of 500 kev and a temperature of about 50 kev. The plasma may be a proton plasma with cold ions. It is only necessary for beam trapping or to carry currents. The ion energy for slowing down is initially 500 kev and thermonuclear reactions depend only on the beam temperature of 50 kev which changes very slowly. This new configuration for magnetic confinement fusion leads to an energy gain of 10--20 for d-t reactions whereas previous studies of beam target interaction predicted a maximum energy gain of 3--4. The high beam energy available with pulsed ion diode technology is also essential for advanced fuels. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  16. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that {approx}10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit {approx}1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm{sup 3}), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described.

  17. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.B.

    1980-11-01

    Progress at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements to LASL's two-beam system, Gemini, are outlined and experimental results are discussed. Our eight-beam system, Helios, was fired successfully on target for the first time, and became the world's most powerful gas laser for laser fusion studies. Work on Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is summarized, indicating that design work and building construction are 70 and 48% complete, respectively. A baseline design for automatic centering of laser beams onto the various relay mirrors and the optical design of the Antares front end are discussed. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, as well as investigations of synthetic-fuel production through application of fusion energy to hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting. Studies on increased efficiency of energy extraction in CO/sub 2/ lasers and on lifetimes of cryogenic pellets in a reactor environment are summarized, as well as the results of studies on pellet injection, tracking, and beam synchronization.

  18. Particle-beam fusion research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-31

    Sandia research in inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is based on pulse-power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron-beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF involves irradiating a deuterium-tritium pellet with either laser light or particle beams until the center of the pellet is compressed and heated to the point of nuclear fusion. This publication focuses on the use of particle beams to achieve fusion, and on the various facilities that are used in support of the particle-beam fusion (PBF) program.

  19. Overview of US heavy-ion fusion progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    2004-06-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators seek to provide the scientific and technical basis for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), an integrated source-to-target physics experiment recently included in the list of future facilities planned by the U.S. Department of Energy. To optimize the design of IBX and future inertial fusion energy drivers, current HIF-VNL research is addressing several key issues (representative, not inclusive): gas and electron cloud effects which can exacerbate beam loss at high beam perveance and magnet aperture fill factors; ballistic neutralized and assisted-pinch focusing of neutralized heavy ion beams; limits on longitudinal compression of both neutralized and un-neutralized heavy ion bunches; and tailoring heavy ion beams for uniform target energy deposition for high energy density physics (HEDP) studies.

  20. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Skoberne, F.

    1981-10-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements in the Los Alamos National Laboratory eight-beam Helios system are described. These improvements increased the reliability of the laser and permitted the firing of 290 shots, most of which delivered energies of approximately 8 kJ to the target. Modifications to Gemini are outlined, including the installation of a new target-insertion mechanism. The redirection of the Antares program is discussed in detail, which will achieve a total energy of approximatey 40 kJ with two beams. This redirection will bring Antares on-line almost two years earlier than was possible with the full six-beam system, although at a lower energy. Experiments with isentropically imploded Sirius-B targets are discussed, and x-ray radiation-loss data from gold microballoons are presented, which show that these results are essentially identical with those obtained at glass-laser wavelengths. Significant progress in characterizing laser fusion targets is reported. New processes for fabricating glass miroballoon x-ray diagnostic targets, the application of high-quality metallic coatings, and the deposition of thick plastic coatings are described. Results in the development of x-ray diagnostics are reported, and research in the Los Alamos heavy-ion fusion program is summarized. Results of investigations of phase-conjugation research of gaseous saturable absorbers and of the use of alkali-halide crystals in a new class of saturable absorbers are summarized. New containment-vessel concepts for Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors are discussed, and results of a scoping study of four fusion-fission hybrid concepts are presented.

  1. Developments in inertial fusion energy and beam fusion at magnetic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich

    2004-10-01

    The 70-year anniversary of the first nuclear fusion reaction of hydrogen isotopes by Oliphant, Harteck, and Rutherford is an opportunity to realize how beam fusion is the path for energy production, including both branches, the magnetic confinement fusion and the inertial fusion energy (IFE). It is intriguing that Oliphant's basic concept for igniting controlled fusion reactions by beams has made a comeback even for magnetic confinement plasma, after this beam fusion concept was revealed by the basically nonlinear processes of the well-known alternative of inertial confinement fusion using laser or particle beams. After reviewing the main streams of both directions some results are reported—as an example of possible alternatives—about how experiments with skin layer interaction and avoiding relativistic self-focusing of clean PW ps laser pulses for IFE may possibly lead to a simplified fusion reactor scheme without the need for special compression of solid deuterium tritium fuel.

  2. Progress in heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Bangerter, R.O.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1994-12-22

    Heavy-ion induction accelerators are being developed as fusion drivers for ICF power production in the US Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) program, in the Office of Fusion Energy of the US Department of Energy. In addition, they represent an attractive driver option for a high-yield microfusion facility for defense research. This paper describes recent progress in induction drivers for Heavy-Ion Fusion (HIF), and plans for future work. It presents research aimed at developing drivers having reduced cost and size, specifically advanced induction linacs and recirculating induction accelerators (recirculators). The goals and design of the Elise accelerator being built at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), as the first stage of the ILSE (Induction Linac Systems Experiments) program, are described. Elise will accelerate, for the first time, space-charge-dominated ion beams which are of full driver scale in line-charge density and diameter. Elise will be a platform on which the critical beam manipulations of the induction approach can be explored. An experimental program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exploring the recirculator principle on a small scale is described in some detail; it is expected that these studies will result ultimately in an operational prototype recirculating induction accelerator. In addition, other elements of the US HIF program are described.

  3. Induction linac drivers for commercial heavy-ion beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1987-11-01

    This paper discusses induction linac drivers necessary to accelerate heavy ions at inertial fusion targets. Topics discussed are: driver configurations, the current-amplifying induction linac, high current beam behavior and emittance growth, new considerations for driver design, the heavy ion fusion systems study, and future studies. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  4. Progress in KEKB beam instrumentation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arinaga, Mitsuhiro; Flanagan, John W.; Fukuma, Hitoshi; Furuya, Takaaki; Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Ikeda, Hitomi; Ishii, Hitoshi; Kikutani, Eiji; Mitsuhashi, Toshiyuki; Mori, Kenji; Tejima, Masaki; Tobiyama, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    The paper describes several topics relating to the beam instrumentation systems at the KEKB B-factory (KEKB) from 2003 to the end of its operation. It covers 1) measurement of the tilt angle of a bunch caused by a crab cavity, 2) a diagnostic system for beam aborts, 3) bunch feedback and related systems, and 4) progress in the beam position monitor system.

  5. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  6. Simulating Intense Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2001-02-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program's goal is the development of the body of knowledge needed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) to realize its promise. The intense ion beams that will drive HIF targets are nonneutral plasmas and exhibit collective, nonlinear dynamics which must be understood using the kinetic models of plasma physics. This beam physics is both rich and subtle: a wide range in spatial and temporal scales is involved, and effects associated with both instabilities and non-ideal processes must be understood. Ion beams have a ''long memory'', and initialization of a beam at mid-system with an idealized particle distribution introduces uncertainties; thus, it will be crucial to develop, and to extensively use, an integrated and detailed ''source-to-target'' HIF beam simulation capability. We begin with an overview of major issues.

  7. Simulating Intense Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    2001-02-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program's goal is the development of the body of knowledge needed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) to realize its promise. The intense ion beams that will drive HIF targets are rzonneutral plasmas and exhibit collective, nonlinear dynamics which must be understood using the kinetic models of plasma physics. This beam physics is both rich and subtle: a wide range in spatial and temporal scales is involved, and effects associated with both instabilities and non-ideal processes must be understood. Ion beams have a ''long memory,'' and initialization of a beam at mid-system with an idealized particle distribution introduces uncertainties; thus, it will be crucial to develop, and to extensively use, an integrated and detailed ''source-to-target'' HIF beam simulation capability. We begin with an overview of major issues.

  8. Technological Progress on Multi-Beam Klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yaogen

    2006-01-01

    The technological progress on Multi-Beam Klystrons (MBKs) at the Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) is presented in this paper. Topics to be discussed include the development of cathodes with high current densities and low evaporation rates; multi-beam electron guns with reduced chances for breakdown; multi-beam electron optics systems with high beam transmission; RF systems with wide bandwidth and high efficiency; the oscillation and broad spectrum noise caused by non-operational modes and reflecting electrons; and computer simulations of the multi-beam electron optics system and beam-wave interaction. In addition, the research progress of several types of MBKs developed in IECAS is reported. These MBKs range in frequency from L- to X-band with corresponding peak powers ranging from several tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, average powers from several kilowatts to tens of kilowatts, and bandwidths from 3% to 12%.

  9. Multiple beam induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Barnard, John J.; Faltens, Andris; Friedman, Alex; Waldron, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Induction accelerators are appealing for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy (HIF) because of their high efficiency and their demonstrated capability to accelerate high beam current (≥10 kA in some applications). For the HIF application, accomplishments and challenges are summarized. HIF research and development has demonstrated the production of single ion beams with the required emittance, current, and energy suitable for injection into an induction linear accelerator. Driver scale beams have been transported in quadrupole channels of the order of 10% of the number of quadrupoles of a driver. We review the design and operation of induction accelerators and the relevant aspects of their use as drivers for HIF. We describe intermediate research steps that would provide the basis for a heavy-ion research facility capable of heating matter to fusion relevant temperatures and densities, and also to test and demonstrate an accelerator architecture that scales well to a fusion power plant.

  10. New Capabilities for Modeling Intense Beams in Heavy Ion Fusion Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Bieniosek, F M; Celata, C M; Cohen, R H; Davidson, R C; Grote, D P; Haber, I; Henestroza, E; Lee, E P; Lund, S M; Qin, H; Sharp, W M; Startsev, E; Vay, J L

    2003-09-09

    Significant advances have been made in modeling the intense beams of heavy-ion beam-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (Heavy Ion Fusion). In this paper, a roadmap for a validated, predictive driver simulation capability, building on improved codes and experimental diagnostics, is presented, as are examples of progress. The Mesh Refinement and Particle-in-Cell methods were integrated in the WARP code; this capability supported an injector experiment that determined the achievable current rise time, in good agreement with calculations. In a complementary effort, a new injector approach based on the merging of {approx}100 small beamlets was simulated, its basic feasibility established, and an experimental test designed. Time-dependent 3D simulations of the High Current Experiment (HCX) were performed, yielding voltage waveforms for an upcoming study of bunch-end control. Studies of collective beam modes which must be taken into account in driver designs were carried out. The value of using experimental data to tomographically ''synthesize'' a 4D beam particle distribution and so initialize a simulation was established; this work motivated further development of new diagnostics which yield 3D projections of the beam phase space. Other developments, including improved modeling of ion beam focusing and transport through the fusion chamber environment and onto the target, and of stray electrons and their effects on ion beams, are briefly noted.

  11. Accelerators for heavy ion inertial fusion: Progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.; Friedman, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1994-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Program is the principal part of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program in the Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The emphasis of the Heavy Ion Program is the development of accelerators for fusion power production. Target physics research and some elements of fusion chamber development are supported in the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, a dual purpose (defense and energy) program in the Defense Programs part of the Department of Energy. The accelerator research program will establish feasibility through a sequence of scaled experiments that will demonstrate key physics and engineering issues at low cost compared to other fusion programs. This paper discusses progress in the accelerator program and outlines how the planned research will address the key economic issues of inertial fusion energy.

  12. Multi-beam RFQ linac structure for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Ishibashi, Takuya; Ito, Taku; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    Both the RF linear accelerator (linac) and the linear induction accelerator have been considered as injectors in a driver system for heavy ion fusion (HIF). In order to relax beam defocusing by space charge effect in the low-energy region, the accelerating beams that were merged and had their beam currents increased by the funnel tree system are injected into storage rings. A multi-beam linac that accelerates multiple beams in an accelerator cavity has the advantages of cost reduction and downsizing of the system. We modeled the multi-beam Interdigital-H type radio frequency quadruple (IH-RFQ) cavities with the different beam numbers and evaluated the electromagnetic characteristics by simulation. As a result, the reasonable ranges of their configuration were indicated for a practical use.

  13. Fission-Fusion Neutron Source Progress Report July 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G; Daffin, F; Clarke, R

    2010-02-19

    In this report the authors describe progress in evaluating the feasibility of a novel concept for producing intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons using the DT fusion reaction. In this new scheme the heating of the DT is accomplished using fission fragments rather than ion beams as in conventional magnet fusion schemes or lasers in ICF schemes. This has the great advantage that there is no need for any large auxiliary power source. The scheme does require large magnetic fields, but generating these fields, e.g. with superconducting magnets, requires only a modest power source. As a source of fission fragments they propose using a dusty reactor concept introduced some time ago by one of us (RC). The version of the dusty reactor that they propose using for our neutron source would operate as a thermal neutron reactor and use highly enriched uranium in the form of micron sized pellets of UC. Our scheme for using the fission fragments to produce intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons is based on the fission fragment rocket idea. In the fission fragment rocket scheme it was contemplated that the fission fragments produced in a low density reactor core would then be guided out of the reactor by large magnetic fields. A simple version of this idea would be to use the fission fragments escaping from one side of a tandem magnet mirror to heat DT gas confined in the adjacent magnetic trap.

  14. Fission-Fusion Neutron Source Progress Report Sept 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G F; Daffin, F; Clark, R

    2010-02-19

    In this report the authors describe the progress made in FY09 in evaluating the feasibility of a new concept for using the DT fusion reaction to produce intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons. In this new scheme the heating of the DT is accomplished using fission fragments rather than ion beams as in conventional magnet confinement fusion schemes or lasers in inertial confinement schemes. As a source of fission fragments they propose using a dust reactor concept introduced some time ago by one of us (RC). An attractive feature of this approach is that there is no need for a large auxiliary power source to heat the DT plasma to the point where self-sustaining fusion become possible. Their scheme does require pulsed magnetic fields, but generating these fields requires only a modest power source. The dust reactor that they propose using for their neutron source would use micron-sized UC pellets suspended in a vacuum as the reactor fuel. Surrounding the fuel with a moderator such as heavy water (D{sub 2}O) would allow the reactor to operate as a thermal reactor and require only modest amounts of HEU. The scheme for using fission fragments to generate intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons is based on the fission fragment rocket idea. In the fission fragment rocket scheme it was contemplated that the fission fragments produced in a low density reactor core could be guided out of the reactor by large magnetic fields used to form a 'rocket exhaust'. Their adaptation of this idea for the purposes of making a neutron source involves using the fission fragments escaping from one side of a tandem magnet mirror to heat DT gas confined in the adjacent magnetic trap.

  15. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  16. Nuclear fusion of advanced fuels using converging focused ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egle, Brian James

    The Six Ion Gun Fusion Experiment (SIGFE) was designed and built to investigate a possible avenue to increase the reaction rate efficiency of the D-D and D-3He nuclear fusion reactions in Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) devices to the levels required for several non-electric applications of nuclear fusion. The SIGFE is based on the seminal IEC experiment published by Hirsch in 1967, and is the first experiment to recreate the results and unique features of the Hirsch device. The SIGFE used six identical ion beams to focus and converge deuterium and helium-3 ions into a sphere of less than 2 mm at nearly mono-energetic ion energies up to 150 keV. With improved ion optics and diagnostics, the SIGFE concluded that within the investigated parameter space, the region where the ion beams converged accounted for less than 0.2% of the total D-D fusion reactions. The maximum D-D fusion rates were observed when the ion beams were intentionally defocused to strike the inside surface of the cathode lenses. In this defocused state, the total D-D fusion rate increased when the chamber pressure was decreased. The maximum D-D fusion rate was 4.3 x 107 neutrons per second at a cathode voltage of -130 kV, a total cathode current of 10 mA, and a chamber pressure of 27 mPa. The D and 3He ion beams were produced in six self-contained ion gun modules. The modules were each capable of at least 4 mA of ion current while maintaining a main chamber pressure as low as 13 mPa. The theoretically calculated extractable ion current agreed with the experiment within a factor of 2. A concept was also developed and evaluated for the production of radioisotopes from the 14.7 MeV D-3He fusion protons produced in an IEC device. Monte Carlo simulations of this concept determined that a D-3He fusion rate on the order of 1011 s-1 would be required for an IEC device to produce 1 mCi of the 11C radioisotope.

  17. Progress in the MITICA beam source designa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pavei, M.; Pilan, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Sonato, P.; Spada, F.; Trevisan, L.

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of the development of the ITER neutral beam (NB) system, a test facility is planned to be built in Padova. A full size prototype of the ITER heating NB injector (MITICA) shall be built and tested at full beam power (17 MW) as per ITER requirements. The design of the MITICA beam source has further progressed following updated optimization and overall integration criteria. In the paper, the major design choices and revisions are presented, together with some results of numerical analyses carried out in order to assess the electrostatic and thermo-mechanical behaviour of the source.

  18. Progress in the MITICA beam source design.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, P; Agostinetti, P; Marcuzzi, D; Pavei, M; Pilan, N; Rizzolo, A; Sonato, P; Spada, F; Trevisan, L

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of the development of the ITER neutral beam (NB) system, a test facility is planned to be built in Padova. A full size prototype of the ITER heating NB injector (MITICA) shall be built and tested at full beam power (17 MW) as per ITER requirements. The design of the MITICA beam source has further progressed following updated optimization and overall integration criteria. In the paper, the major design choices and revisions are presented, together with some results of numerical analyses carried out in order to assess the electrostatic and thermo-mechanical behaviour of the source.

  19. Beam limiter for thermonuclear fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Kaminsky, Manfred S.

    1976-01-01

    A beam limiter circumscribes the interior surface of a vacuum vessel to inhibit collisions of contained plasma and the vessel walls. The cross section of the material making up the limiter has a flatsided or slightly concave portion of increased width towards the plasma and portions of decreased width towards the interior surface of the vessel. This configuration is designed to prevent a major fraction of the material sputtered, vaporized and blistered from the limiter from reaching the plasma. It also allows adequate heat transfer from the wider to the narrower portions. The preferred materials for the beam limiter are solids of sintered, particulate materials of low atomic number with low vapor pressure and low sputtering and blistering yields.

  20. Technological aspects of particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reactor design considerations which are unique to the utilization of light ion beams are presented. Some of the basic technological and economic issues associated with reactor size are addressed. Advanced experimental facilities needed for the development of this technology as a power source are described, and an example of one of this technology as a power source are described, and an example of one of them is given. A few brief comments on the power supply technology which might be employable in these facilities conclude this overview.

  1. Pierce instability in neutralized inertial confinement fusion ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.; Cary, J.R.

    1982-06-01

    The stability of a charge and current neutralized electron-ion beam propagating between two planar boundaries is investigated. For equipotential boundaries the beam is, as originally shown by Pierce, electrostatically unstable for electron current densities above a certain limiting value. If, however, the electric field at the upstream boundary is required to vanish, there is no instability. An intermediate case, in which the two boundaries are electrically connected with a finite conductivity plasma, corresponds to the proposed use of neutralized light and heavy ion beams for inertial confinement fusion drivers. Results indicate such beams can propagate either stably or with zero-frequency Pierce instability growth rates which are probably insignificant. lectric currents; boundary conditions; current density; electric fields; plasma;

  2. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  3. Generating High-Brightness Ion Beams for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, M. E.

    1997-11-01

    The generation of high current density ion beams with applied-B ion diodes showed promise in the late-1980's as an efficient, rep-rate, focusable driver for inertial confinement fusion. These devices use several Tesla insulating magnetic fields to restrict electron motion across anode-cathode gaps of order 1-2 cm, while accelerating ions to generate ≈ 1 kA/cm^2, 5 - 15 MeV beams. These beams have been used to heat hohlraums to about 65 eV. However, meeting the ICF driver requirements for low-divergence and high-brightness lithium ion beams has been more technically challenging than initially thought. Experimental and theoretical work over the last 5 years shows that high-brightness beams meeting the requirements for inertial confinement fusion are possible. The production of these beams requires the simultaneous integration of at least four conditions: 1) rigorous vacuum cleaning techniques for control of undesired anode, cathode, ion source and limiter plasma formation from electrode contaminants to control impurity ions and impedance collapse; 2) carefully tailored insulating magnetic field geometry for uniform beam generation; 3) high magnetic fields (V_crit/V > 2) and other techniques to control the electron sheath and the onset of a high divergence electromagnetic instability that couples strongly to the ion beam; and 4) an active, pre-formed, uniform lithium plasma for low source divergence which is compatible with the above electron-sheath control techniques. These four conditions have never been simultaneously present in any lithium beam experiment, but simulations and experimental tests of individual conditions have been done. The integration of these conditions is a goal of the present ion beam generation program at Sandia. This talk will focus on the vacuum cleaning techniques for ion diodes and pulsed power devices in general, including experimental results obtained on the SABRE and PBFA-II accelerators over the last 3 years. The current status of

  4. Simulations of longitudinal beam dynamics of space-charge dominated beams for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Debra Ann Callahan

    1994-12-01

    The longitudinal instability has potentially disastrous effects on the ion beams used for heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion. This instability is a "resistive wall" instability with the impedance coining from the induction modules in the accelerator used as a driver. This instability can greatly amplify perturbations launched from the beam head and can prevent focusing of the beam onto the small spot necessary for fusion. This instability has been studied using the WARPrz particle-in-cell code. WARPrz is a 2 1/2 dimensional electrostatic axisymmetric code. This code includes a model for the impedance of the induction modules. Simulations with resistances similar to that expected in a driver show moderate amounts of growth from the instability as a perturbation travels from beam head to tail as predicted by cold beam fluid theory. The perturbation reflects off the beam tail and decays as it travels toward the beam head. Nonlinear effects cause the perturbation to steepen during reflection. Including the capacitive component of the, module impedance. has a partially stabilizing effect on the longitudinal instability. This reduction in the growth rate is seen in both cold beam fluid theory and in simulations with WARPrz. Instability growth rates for warm beams measured from WARPrz are lower than cold beam fluid theory predicts. Longitudinal thermal spread cannot account for this decrease in the growth rate. A mechanism for coupling the transverse thermal spread to decay of the longitudinal waves is presented. The longitudinal instability is no longer a threat to the heavy ion fusion program. The simulations in this thesis have shown that the growth rate for this instability will not be as large as earlier calculations predicted.

  5. Overview of U.S. heavy ion fusion progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Bieniosek`, F.; Celata, C.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Prost, L.; Roy, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.; Yu, S.; Barnard, J.; Callahan, D.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.; Lund, S.; Davidson, R.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Rose, D.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.; Kishek, R.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.

    2004-12-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy.

  6. Longitudinal beam dynamics for heavy ion fusion using WARPrz

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1993-02-22

    WARPrz is a 2.5 dimensional, cylindrically symmetric, electrostatic, particle-in-cell code. It is part of the WARP family of codes which has been developed to study heavy ion fusion driver issues. WARPrz is being used to study the longitudinal dynamics of heavy ion beams including a longitudinal instability that is driven by the impedance of the LINAC accelerating modules. This instability is of concern because it can enhance longitudinal momentum spread; chromatic abhoration in the lens system restricts the amount of momentum spread allowed in the beam in the final focusing system. The impedance of the modules is modeled by a continuum of resistors and capacitors in parallel in WARPrz. We discuss simulations of this instability including the effect of finite temperature and reflection of perturbations off the beam ends. We also discuss intermittency of axial confining fields (``ears`` fields) as a seed for this instability.

  7. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year.

  8. SIMULATION OF INTENSE BEAMS FOR HEAVY ION FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2004-06-10

    Computer simulations of intense ion beams play a key role in the Heavy Ion Fusion research program. Along with analytic theory, they are used to develop future experiments, guide ongoing experiments, and aid in the analysis and interpretation of experimental results. They also afford access to regimes not yet accessible in the experimental program. The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory and its collaborators have developed state-of-the art computational tools, related both to codes used for stationary plasmas and to codes used for traditional accelerator applications, but necessarily differing from each in important respects. These tools model beams in varying levels of detail and at widely varying computational cost. They include moment models (envelope equations and fluid descriptions), particle-in-cell methods (electrostatic and electromagnetic), nonlinear-perturbative descriptions (''{delta}f''), and continuum Vlasov methods. Increasingly, it is becoming clear that it is necessary to simulate not just the beams themselves, but also the environment in which they exist, be it an intentionally-created plasma or an unwanted cloud of electrons and gas. In this paper, examples of the application of simulation tools to intense ion beam physics are presented, including support of present-day experiments, fundamental beam physics studies, and the development of future experiments. Throughout, new computational models are described and their utility explained. These include Mesh Refinement (and its dynamic variant, Adaptive Mesh Refinement); improved electron cloud and gas models, and an electron advance scheme that allows use of larger time steps; and moving-mesh and adaptive-mesh Vlasov methods.

  9. Microfabricated Ion Beam Drivers for Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter; Ji, Qing; Ardanuc, Serhan; Miller, Joseph; Lal, Amit; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Efficient, low-cost drivers are important for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). Ion beams offer a high degree of control to deliver the required mega joules of driver energy for MTF and they can be matched to several types of magnetized fuel targets, including compact toroids and solid targets. We describe an ion beam driver approach based on the MEQALAC concept (Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator) with many beamlets in an array of micro-fabricated channels. The channels consist of a lattice of electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQ) for focusing and of radio-frequency (RF) electrodes for ion acceleration. Simulations with particle-in-cell and beam envelope codes predict >10x higher current densities compared to state-of-the-art ion accelerators. This increase results from dividing the total ion beam current up into many beamlets to control space charge forces. Focusing elements can be biased taking advantage of high breakdown electric fields in sub-mm structures formed using MEMS techniques (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). We will present results on ion beam transport and acceleration in MEMS based beamlets. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  10. U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Science towards inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Baca, D.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Burkhart, C.; Celata, C.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Cohen, R.H.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion P.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Grisham, L.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, W.W.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; O'Shea, P.G.; Olson, C.; Olson, R.E.; Prost, L.R.; Qin, H.; Reiser, M.; Rose, D.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Shuman, D.B.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    2002-10-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress in the U.S heavy-ion fusion (HIF) program is reported in modeling and measurements of intense space-charge-dominated heavy ion and electron beams. Measurements of the transport of a well-matched and aligned high current (0.2A) 1.0 MeV potassium ion beam through 10 electric quadrupoles, with a fill factor of 60%, shows no emittance growth within experimental measurement uncertainty, as expected from the simulations. Another experiment shows that passing a beam through an aperture can reduce emittance to near the theoretical limits, and that plasma neutralization of the beam's space-charge can greatly reduce the focal spot radius. Measurements of intense beamlet current density, emittance, charge-state purity, and energy spread from a new, high-brightness, Argon plasma source for HIF experiments are described. New theory and simulations of neutralization of intense beam space charge with plasma in various focusing chamber configurations indicate that near-emittance-limited beam focal spot sizes can be obtained even with beam perveance an order of magnitude higher than in earlier HIF focusing experiments.

  11. Laser beam propagation through inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Dixit, S.; Neumayer, P.; Moody, J. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S.; Suter, L.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2007-05-15

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (T{sub e}=3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e}=5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}), long-scale length (L{approx}2 mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I<2x10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (n{sub e}=10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are accessed. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes and we show that scattering is small for gains less than 20 which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  12. Progressive multi-atlas label fusion by dictionary evolution.

    PubMed

    Song, Yantao; Wu, Guorong; Bahrami, Khosro; Sun, Quansen; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-02-01

    Accurate segmentation of anatomical structures in medical images is important in recent imaging based studies. In the past years, multi-atlas patch-based label fusion methods have achieved a great success in medical image segmentation. In these methods, the appearance of each input image patch is first represented by an atlas patch dictionary (in the image domain), and then the latent label of the input image patch is predicted by applying the estimated representation coefficients to the corresponding anatomical labels of the atlas patches in the atlas label dictionary (in the label domain). However, due to the generally large gap between the patch appearance in the image domain and the patch structure in the label domain, the estimated (patch) representation coefficients from the image domain may not be optimal for the final label fusion, thus reducing the labeling accuracy. To address this issue, we propose a novel label fusion framework to seek for the suitable label fusion weights by progressively constructing a dynamic dictionary in a layer-by-layer manner, where the intermediate dictionaries act as a sequence of guidance to steer the transition of (patch) representation coefficients from the image domain to the label domain. Our proposed multi-layer label fusion framework is flexible enough to be applied to the existing labeling methods for improving their label fusion performance, i.e., by extending their single-layer static dictionary to the multi-layer dynamic dictionary. The experimental results show that our proposed progressive label fusion method achieves more accurate hippocampal segmentation results for the ADNI dataset, compared to the counterpart methods using only the single-layer static dictionary.

  13. Progress in Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion Energy: From Scaled Experiments to the Integrated Research Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Ahle, L E; Baca, D; Bangerter, R O; Bieniosek, F M; Celata, C M; Chacon-Golcher, E; Davidson, R C; Faltens, A; Friedman, A; Franks, R M; Grote, D P; Haber, I; Henestroza, E; de Hoon, M J; Kaganovich, I; Karpenko, V P; Kishek, R A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G; Lund, S M; Meier, W R; Molvik, W; Olson, C; Prost, L R; Qin, H; Rose, D; Sabbi, G L; Sangster, T C; Seidl, P A; Sharp, W M; Shuman, D; Vay, J L; Waldron, W L; Welch, D; Yu, S S

    2001-07-10

    The promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ion beams requires the development of accelerators that produce ion currents (approx 100's Amperes/beam) and ion energies ({approx} 1 - 10 GeV) that have not been achieved simultaneously in any existing accelerator. The high currents imply high generalized perveances, large tun depressions, and high space charge potentials of the beam center relative to the beam pipe. Many of the scientific issues associated with ion beams of high perveance and large tune depression have been addressed over the last two decades on scaled experiments at Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the University of Maryland, and elsewhere. The additional requirement of high space charge potential (or equivalently high line charge density) gives rise to effects (particularly the role of electrons in beam transport) which must be understood before proceeding to a large scale accelerator. The first phase of a new series of experiments in the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF VNL), the High Current Experiments (HCX), is now beginning at LBNL. The mission of the HCX is to transport beams with driver line charge density so as to investigate the physics of this regime, including constraints on the maximum radial filling factor of the beam through the pipe. This factor is important for determining both cost and reliability of a driver scale accelerator. The HCX will provide data for design of the next steps in the sequence of experiments leading to an inertial fusion energy power plant. The focus of the program after the HCX will be on integration of all of the manipulations required for a driver. In the near term following HCX, an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) of the same general scale as the HCX is envisioned. The step which bridges the gap between the IBX and an engineering test facility for fusion has been designated the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE (like the IBX) will provide an

  14. Laser Beam Propagation through Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N B; DIxit, S; Neumayer, P; Moody, J D; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-10-26

    A study of the relevant laser-plasma interaction processes has been performed in long-scale length plasmas that emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Experiments in this high-temperature (T{sub e} = 3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e} = 0.5 - 1 x 10{sup -3}) hohlraum plasma have demonstrated that blue 351-nm laser beams produce less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for ignition relevant laser intensities (I < 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}). The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows that these results are relevant for the outer beams in ignition hohlraum experiments corresponding to a gain threshold for stimulated Brillouin scattering of 15. By increasing the gas fill density in these experiments further accesses inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes. They show that scattering is small for gains smaller than 20, which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  15. Progress in Mirror-Based Fusion Neutron Source Development.

    PubMed

    Anikeev, A V; Bagryansky, P A; Beklemishev, A D; Ivanov, A A; Kolesnikov, E Yu; Korzhavina, M S; Korobeinikova, O A; Lizunov, A A; Maximov, V V; Murakhtin, S V; Pinzhenin, E I; Prikhodko, V V; Soldatkina, E I; Solomakhin, A L; Tsidulko, Yu A; Yakovlev, D V; Yurov, D V

    2015-12-04

    The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in worldwide collaboration has developed a project of a 14 MeV neutron source for fusion material studies and other applications. The projected neutron source of the plasma type is based on the gas dynamic trap (GDT), which is a special magnetic mirror system for plasma confinement. Essential progress in plasma parameters has been achieved in recent experiments at the GDT facility in the Budker Institute, which is a hydrogen (deuterium) prototype of the source. Stable confinement of hot-ion plasmas with the relative pressure exceeding 0.5 was demonstrated. The electron temperature was increased up to 0.9 keV in the regime with additional electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of a moderate power. These parameters are the record for axisymmetric open mirror traps. These achievements elevate the projects of a GDT-based neutron source on a higher level of competitive ability and make it possible to construct a source with parameters suitable for materials testing today. The paper presents the progress in experimental studies and numerical simulations of the mirror-based fusion neutron source and its possible applications including a fusion material test facility and a fusion-fission hybrid system.

  16. Progress in Mirror-Based Fusion Neutron Source Development

    PubMed Central

    Anikeev, A. V.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Beklemishev, A. D.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kolesnikov, E. Yu.; Korzhavina, M. S.; Korobeinikova, O. A.; Lizunov, A. A.; Maximov, V. V.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Pinzhenin, E. I.; Prikhodko, V. V.; Soldatkina, E. I.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Tsidulko, Yu. A.; Yakovlev, D. V.; Yurov, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in worldwide collaboration has developed a project of a 14 MeV neutron source for fusion material studies and other applications. The projected neutron source of the plasma type is based on the gas dynamic trap (GDT), which is a special magnetic mirror system for plasma confinement. Essential progress in plasma parameters has been achieved in recent experiments at the GDT facility in the Budker Institute, which is a hydrogen (deuterium) prototype of the source. Stable confinement of hot-ion plasmas with the relative pressure exceeding 0.5 was demonstrated. The electron temperature was increased up to 0.9 keV in the regime with additional electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of a moderate power. These parameters are the record for axisymmetric open mirror traps. These achievements elevate the projects of a GDT-based neutron source on a higher level of competitive ability and make it possible to construct a source with parameters suitable for materials testing today. The paper presents the progress in experimental studies and numerical simulations of the mirror-based fusion neutron source and its possible applications including a fusion material test facility and a fusion-fission hybrid system. PMID:28793722

  17. Activities on heavy ion inertial fusion and beam-driven high energy density science in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horioka, K.; Kawamura, T.; Nakajima, M.; Kondo, K.; Ogawa, M.; Oguri, Y.; Hasegawa, J.; Kawata, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sasaki, T.; Murakami, M.; Takayama, K.

    2009-07-01

    Recent research activities in Japan relevant to heavy ion fusion (HIF) are presented. During the past two years, significant progress in HIF and high energy density (HED) physics research has been made by a number of research groups in universities and accelerator facilities. Evolutions in phase space during the longitudinal compression of intense beams were investigated at UU-NUT-TIT. Beam-plasma interaction experiments and related theoretical studies are in progress at RLNR-TIT. In the study, shock-heated hydrogen was used for the interaction experiments as a well-defined non-ideal-plasma target. In the beam-plasma interaction experiments, a special emphasis is placed on an evaluation of non-linear effects on the stopping power in a beam-heated plasma target. A direct-indirect hybrid scheme of a beam-driven ICF target has been proposed and discussed at UU. In the same group, a method for controlling the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in imploding fuel target has been proposed using oscillating heavy ion beams (HIBs). Core dynamics of the impact ignition has been investigated both experimentally and numerically at ILE—Osaka. Dense plasmas driven by intense ion beams and/or a pulse powered device, were evaluated by a group of DES-TIT, concerning the researches on HED and warm dense matter (WDM) physics. A quasi-statically tamped target was proposed to make a well-defined, warm dense state for equation-of-state (EOS) studies based on ion accelerators. The potentiality of the new facility planned at KEK was evaluated by a collaborating group of TIT-UU-KEK, which can extend the parameter regime for laboratory experiments to study the properties of matter under extreme conditions. A possible method to make a high-pressure condition for study of the planetary science was discussed as a short-term subject of intense HIBs.

  18. Transient beam oscillation with a highly dynamic scanner for laser beam fusion cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goppold, Cindy; Pinder, Thomas; Herwig, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Sheet metals with thicknesses >8 mm have a distinct cutting performance. The free choice of the optical configuration composed of fiber diameter, collimation, and focal length offers many opportunities to influence the static beam geometry. Previous analysis points out the limitations of this method in the thick section area. Within the present study, an experimental investigation of fiber laser fusion cutting of 12 mm stainless steel was performed by means of dynamical beam oscillation. Two standard optical setups are combined with a highly dynamic galvano-driven scanner that achieves frequencies up to 4 kHz. Dependencies of the scanner parameter, the optical circumstances, and the conventional cutting parameters are discussed. The aim is to characterize the capabilities and challenges of the dynamic beam shaping in comparison to the state-of-the-art static beam shaping. Thus, the trials are evaluated by quality criteria of the cut edge as surface roughness and burr height, the feed rate, and the cut kerf geometry. The investigation emphasizes promising procedural possibilities for improvements of the cutting performance in the case of fiber laser fusion cutting of thick stainless steel by means of the application of a highly dynamic scanner.

  19. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 {mu}s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within {plus_minus} 100 {mu}m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  20. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 [mu]s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within [plus minus] 100 [mu]m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  1. Progress in the Development of Superconducting Quadrupoles forHeavy-ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, R.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-08-19

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  2. Progress in the development of superconducting quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, B.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-05-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  3. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  4. LIBRA-A light ion beam fusion reactor conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Bruggink, D.; Engelstad, R.; Lovell, E.; MacFarlane, J.; Musicki, Z.; Peterson, R.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslavsky, I.

    1988-01-01

    The LIBRA light ion beam fusion commercial reactor study is a self-consistent conceptual design of a 330 MWe power plant with an accompanying economic analysis. Fusion targets are imploded by 4-MJ-shaped pulses of 30 MeV Li ions at a rate of 3 Hz. The target gain is 80, leading to a yield of 320 MJ. The high intensity part of the ion pulse is delivered by 16 diodes through 16 separate z-pinch plasma channels formed in 100 torr of helium with trace amounts of lithium. The blanket is an array of porous flexible silicon carbide tubes with Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ flowing downward through them. These tubes (INPORT units) shield the target chamber wall from both neutron damage and the shock overpressure of the target explosion. The target chamber is a right circular cylinder, 8.7 meters in diameter. The target chamber is ''self-pumped'' by the target explosion generated overpressure into a surge tank partially filled with liquid that surrounds the target chamber. This scheme refreshes the chamber at the desired 3 Hz frequency without excessive pumping demands. The blanket multiplication is 1.2 and the tritium breeding ratio is 1.4. The direct capital cost of LIBRA is estimated to be $2200/kWe. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Overview of the LIBRA light ion beam fusion conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Bruggink, D.; Engelstad, R.; Lovell, E.; MacFarlane, J.; Musicki, Z.; Peterson, R.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslavsky, I.

    1989-03-01

    The LIBRA light ion beam fusion commercial reactor study is a self-consistent conceptual design of a 330 MWe power plant with an accompanying economic analysis. Fusion targets are imploded by 4 MJ shaped pulses of 30 MeV Li ions at a rate of 3 Hz. The target gain is 80, leading to a yield of 320 MJ. The high intensity part of the ion plate is delivered by 16 diodes through 16 separate z-pinch plasma channels formed in 100 torr of helium with trace amounts of lithium. The blanket is an array of porous flexible silicon carbide tubes with Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ flowing downward through them. These tubes (INPORT units) shield the target chamber wall from both neutron damage and the shock overpressure of the target explosion. The target chamber is self-pumped by the target explosion generated overpressure into a surge tank partially filled with Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ that surrounds the target chamber. This scheme refreshes the chamber at the desired 3 Hz frequency without excessive pumping demands. The blanket multiplication is 1.2 and the tritium breeding ratio is 1.4. The direct capital cost of LIBRA is estimated to be $2200/kWe.

  6. Progress at LLNL toward DPSSL-Driven Intertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C D; Rothenberg, J E; Payne, S A; Powell, H T

    2002-02-19

    We describe research indicating that a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) can serve as a viable driver for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The ongoing construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sets the stage for a new era to start in the next decade for target research aimed at achieving the high gains necessary for both defense and energy applications. In addition, advances in DPSSL research show that this type of laser can have adequate efficiency and reliability, and can achieve the effective beam smoothness required for direct-drive IFE.

  7. Fast Ignition: Physics Progress in the US Fusion Energy Program and Prospects for Achieving Ignition.

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M H; Andersen, C; Cowan, T; Fisch, N; Freeman, R; Hatchett, S; Hill, J; King, J; Koch, J; Lasinski, B; Langdon, B; MacKinnon, A; Parks, P; Rosenbluth, M; Ruhl, H; Snavely, R; Stephens, R; Tabak, M; Town, R

    2002-10-16

    Fast ignition (FI) has significant potential advantages for inertial fusion energy and it is therefore being studied as an exploratory concept in the US fusion energy program. FI is based on short pulse isochoric heating of pre-compressed DT by intense beams of laser accelerated MeV electrons or protons. Recent experimental progress in the study of these two heating processes is discussed. The goal is to benchmark new models in order to predict accurately the requirements for full-scale fast ignition. An overview is presented of the design and experimental testing of a cone target implosion concept for fast ignition. Future prospects and conceptual designs for larger scale FI experiments using planned high energy petawatt upgrades of major lasers in the US are outlined. A long-term roadmap for FI is defined.

  8. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This report summarizes research and development effort in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program, including absorption measurements with an integrating sphere, generation of high CO/sub 2/-laser harmonics in the backscattered light from laser plasmas, and the effects of hydrogen target contamination on the hot-electron temperature and transport. The development of new diagnostics is outlined and measurements taken with a proximity-focused x-ray streak camera are presented. High gain in phase conjugation using germanium was demonstrated, data were obtained on retropulse isolation by plasmas generated from metal shutters, damage thresholds for copper mirrors at high fluences were characterized, and phase conjugation in the ultraviolet was demonstrated. Significant progress in the characterization of targets, new techniques in target coating, and important advances in the development of low-density, small-cell-size plastic foam that permit highly accurate machining to any desired shape are presented. The results of various fusion reactor system studies are summarized.

  9. Intense ion beam applications to magnetic confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R N

    1980-08-18

    The ion ring project objective is to trap a ring of high energy, axis-encircling ions in a magnetic mirror. The number of ring ions should be such as to produce deltaB/B on the ring axis of order 10%. The second experiment, LONGSHOT, is directed to producing a long pulse ion beam source so that the total number of protons required for an ion ring can be provided a lower diode power and, hence, at much less cost than that of 100 nsec pulsed power generators like the NRL GAMBLE II. A detailed report of the progress on IREX and LONGSHOT is given. (MOW)

  10. Fusion safety regulations in the United States: Progress and trends

    SciTech Connect

    DeLooper, J.

    1994-07-01

    This paper explores the issue of regulations as they apply to current and future fusion experimental machines. It addresses fusion regulatory issues, current regulations used for fusion, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor experience with regulations, and future regulations to achieve fusion`s safety and environmental potential.

  11. One-Dimensional Lagrangian Code for Plasma Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Fusion Pellet Driven by Ion Beams.

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 The MEDUSA-IB code performs implosion and thermonuclear burn calculations of an ion beam driven ICF target, based on one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics and transport theory. It can calculate the following values in spherical geometry through the progress of implosion and fuel burnup of a multi-layered target. (1) Hydrodynamic velocities, density, ion, electron and radiation temperature, radiation energy density, Rs and burn rate of target as a function of coordinates and time, (2) Fusion gain as a function of time, (3) Ionization degree, (4) Temperature dependent ion beam energy deposition, (5) Radiation, -particle and neutron spectra as a function of time.

  12. Flagellin-PAc Fusion Protein Inhibits Progression of Established Caries.

    PubMed

    Bao, R; Yang, J Y; Sun, Y; Zhou, D H; Yang, Y; Li, Y M; Cao, Y; Xiao, Y; Li, W; Yu, J; Zhao, B L; Zhong, M H; Yan, H M

    2015-07-01

    Dental caries remains one of the most common infectious diseases of humankind, which develops slowly throughout life, affecting children, adolescents, and adults. A vaccine against caries is urgently needed. We previously developed recombinant flagellin as a mucosal adjuvant for anti-Streptococcus mutans vaccines by nasal immunization. Furthermore, we demonstrated a fusion protein strategy that combined flagellin and the target surface adhesion protein (PAc) in a single construct. This construct enhanced specific IgA responses in oral fluids and provided improved prophylactic protection against caries. In the present study, we observed prolonged progression of dental caries in rats after S. mutans Ingbritt challenge. In addition, we observed a therapeutic effect of the flagellin-PAc fusion protein (KF-rPAc) against dental caries as a mucosal vaccine with a new immunization protocol. The present study demonstrated that KF-rPAc by nasal immunization can promote PAc-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses and inhibit dental caries progression efficiently after the implant of S. mutans into the oral cavity of the rats. The rats immunized with KF-rPAc exhibited 53.9% caries reduction compared with the sham-immunized rats. Our data support the concept of administration of KF-rPAc to humans after infection and even caries that has begun to alleviate caries progression. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that KF-rPAc could be used as an anticaries therapeutic mucosal vaccine.

  13. Beyond ITER: neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited).

    PubMed

    McAdams, R

    2014-02-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  14. Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, R.

    2014-02-15

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  15. Fusion measurements in light and medium mass heavy-ion reactions. Progress report, June 1, 1980-May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    The data obtained for fusion residues from the /sup 16/ /sup 18/O + /sup 24/ /sup 26/Mg systems have been analyzed and are being compared to each other and to predictions from the fusion-evaporation code CASCADE. Analysis of data obtained for a small step excitation curve for the /sup 16/O + /sup 24/Mg system has been started to determine the possible presence of structure in the fusion cross section. Additional data for the fusion cross sections of these systems have been obtained at energies from 100 to 140 MeV at the ATLAS facility and are being analyzed. Initial measurements of the fusion-fission cross sections for /sup 58/Ni beams, at energies up to 320 MeV on targets from /sup 116/Sn to /sup 170/Yb have been made. Analysis is in progress and additional experiments are planned. A collaboration is planned at Notre Dame for experiments to determine the entry line for fusion in the /sup 12/C + /sup 16/O system, both for the interest in this system and for preparation for additional experiments at higher energies at Michigan State when the new facility there becomes available. These experiments should lead to information about the importance of incomplete fusion in this system. Experiments to test the limitation on fusion cross sections predicted by the rotating liquid drop model are planned as higher energies become available at ATLAS and MSU.

  16. Nonuniformity Mitigation of Beam Illumination in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Shigeo; Noguchi, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kurosaki, T.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.

    2013-10-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion wobbling heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination was proposed to realize a uniform implosion. The wobbling HIB axis oscillation is precisely controlled. The oscillating frequency may be several 100 MHz ~ 1 GHz. In the wobbling HIBs illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and space on a HIF target. The oscillating-HIB energy deposition may contribute to the reduction of the HIBs' illumination nonuniformity. Three-dimensional HIBs illumination computations presented here show that the few percent wobbling HIBs illumination nonuniformity oscillates with the same wobbling HIBs frequency. In general a perturbation of physical quantity would feature the instability onset. Normally the perturbation phase is unknown so that the instability growth is discussed with the growth rate. However, if the perturbation phase is known, the instability growth can be controlled by a superposition of perturbations; the well-known mechanism is a feedback control to compensate the displacement of physical quantity. If the perturbation is induced by, for example, a HIB axis wobbling, the perturbation phase could be controlled and the instability growth is mitigated by the superposition of the growing perturbations. Partly supported by JSPS, MEXT, CORE, ASHULA, Japan / US Cooperation program and ILE/Osaka University.

  17. Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smolanczuk, Robert

    2010-06-15

    Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out reactions) using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because in most of the cases intensities of radioactive beams are significantly less than those of the stable beams, reactions with the greatest radioactive-beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland [Phys. Rev. C 76, 014612 (2007)], who investigated the same nuclei.

  18. Feasibility study of fusion plasma heating by relativistic high-current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimenko, V.

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this research will be to study the feasibility of fusion plasma heating using ultra-short high intensity electron beam by dissipating the energy of excited wakes either in linear or nonlinear regimes.

  19. Development of neutral beams for fusion plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Haselton, H.H.; Pyle, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    A state-of-the-art account of neutral beam technology at the LBL/LLNL and ORNL facilities is given with emphasis on positive-ion-based systems. The advances made in the last few years are elaborated and problem areas are identified. The ORNL program has successfully completed the neutral injection systems for PLT, ISX-B, and most recently, PDX and the ISX-B upgrade. All of these are high current (60 to 100 A), medium energy (40 to 50 keV) systems. This program is also engaged in the development of a reactor-grade advanced positive ion system (150 to 200 kV/100 A/5 to 10 s) and a multimegawatt, long pulse (30 s) heating system for ISX-C. In a joint program, LBL and LLNL are developing and testing neutral beam injection systems based on the acceleration of positive ions for application in the 80- to 160-keV range on MFTF-B, D-III, TFTR/TFM, ETF, MNS, etc. A conceptual design of a 160-keV injection system for the German ZEPHYR project is in progress at LBL/LLNL and independently at ORNL. The laboratories are also engaged in the development of negative-ion-based systems for future applications at higher energies.

  20. Progress on a 200kW Diagnostic Neutral Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartman, Ethan; Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F.; Kwan, J. W.; Leung, K. N.; Wu, Y.; Vainionpaa, H.

    2009-11-01

    The interaction of neutral beam atoms with a magnetized plasma provides diagnostic access to the interiors of fusion experiments. Parameters which can be measured using neutral beams include ion temperature and velocity, density fluctuations and also local magnetic field direction. Nova Photonics, Inc and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are developing a diagnostic neutral beam for use in fusion experiments which lack neutral heating beams, or on which the heating beam is not suitable for diagnostics. Our apparatus is designed to produce a 1 s duration, 5 x 8 cm elliptical cross section hydrogen beam at energies up to 40 kV and up to 5 A current. Hydrogen ions are produced in a multicusp 13 kW, 13 MHz RF source. The extracted ions have current densities of 100 - 150 mA/cm^2. The proton fraction of the hydrogen ions is 85%. Beams are extracted from the source with a rectangular, multi-aperature grids. Details of the source performance will be presented as well as initial operation of the extraction optics and neutralizer region. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under grant DE-FG02-05ER86256.

  1. Progress of beam diagnosis system for EAST neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y. J. Hu, C. D.; Yu, L.; Liang, L. Z.; Zhang, W. T.; Chen, Y.; Li, X.

    2016-02-15

    Neutral beam injection has been recognized as one of the most effective means for plasma heating. According to the research plan of the EAST physics experiment, two sets of neutral beam injector (NBI) were built and operational in 2014. The paper presents the development of beam diagnosis system for EAST NBI and the latest experiment results obtained on the test-stand and EAST-NBI-1 and 2. The results show that the optimal divergence angle is (0.62°, 1.57°) and the full energy particle is up to 77%. They indicate that EAST NBI work properly and all targets reach or almost reach the design targets. All these lay a solid foundation for the achievement of high quality plasma heating for EAST.

  2. Recent Progress and Future Plans for Fusion Plasma Synthetic Diagnostics Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Kramer, Gerrit; Tang, William; Tobias, Benjamin; Valeo, Ernest; Churchill, Randy; Hausammann, Loic

    2015-11-01

    The Fusion Plasma Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (FPSDP) is a Python package developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It is dedicated to providing an integrated programmable environment for applying a modern ensemble of synthetic diagnostics to the experimental validation of fusion plasma simulation codes. The FPSDP will allow physicists to directly compare key laboratory measurements to simulation results. This enables deeper understanding of experimental data, more realistic validation of simulation codes, quantitative assessment of existing diagnostics, and new capabilities for the design and optimization of future diagnostics. The Fusion Plasma Synthetic Diagnostics Platform now has data interfaces for the GTS and XGC-1 global particle-in-cell simulation codes with synthetic diagnostic modules including: (i) 2D and 3D Reflectometry; (ii) Beam Emission Spectroscopy; and (iii) 1D Electron Cyclotron Emission. Results will be reported on the delivery of interfaces for the global electromagnetic PIC code GTC, the extended MHD M3D-C1 code, and the electromagnetic hybrid NOVAK eigenmode code. Progress toward development of a more comprehensive 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission module will also be discussed. This work is supported by DOE contract #DEAC02-09CH11466.

  3. Induction-accelerator heavy-ion fusion: Status and beam physics issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    1996-01-26

    Inertial confinement fusion driven by beams of heavy ions is an attractive route to controlled fusion. In the U.S., induction accelerators are being developed as {open_quotes}drivers{close_quotes} for this process. This paper is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the concept of induction-accelerator driven heavy-ion fusion is briefly reviewed, and the U.S. program of experiments and theoretical investigations is described. In the second, a {open_quotes}taxonomy{close_quotes} of space-charge-dominated beam physics issues is presented, accompanied by a brief discussion of each area.

  4. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, ioanis

    2014-06-01

    After a 14 month shutdown accelerator modifications and upgrades are in place to allow us doubling of the Main Injector beam power. We will discuss the past MI high power operation and the current progress towards doubling the power.

  5. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, January 1-June 30, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Skoberne, F.

    1980-05-01

    Studies and experiments aimed at investigating the possibility of restoring wavefront quality in optical systems through phase conjugation are summarized, and work that could lead to the development of highly damage-resistant isolators is discussed. The effects of various parameters on pulse-energy uniformity and of multipass extraction on laser efficiency are reported. Results of equation-of-state, shock propagation, multiburst simulation, and opacity measurements are discussed. Target designs are described that should provide a smooth transition from the exploding-pusher regime of experiments to that of isentropic compression. Progress in target fabrication techniques toward creating a 20-times-liquid-density target are outlined, and efforts that led to the extension of our neutron detection capability to levels of less than 10/sup 3/ n are summarized. The results of various studies of laser fusion application, e.g., for producing ultrahigh-temperature process heat or hydrogen from water decomposition are presented, as well as investigations of fusion-fission hybrids for the production of /sup 233/U from /sup 232/Th.

  6. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis

    2014-07-01

    After a 16 month shutdown to reconfigure the Fermilab Accelerators for high power operations, the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is again providing beams for numerous Physics Experiments. By using the Recycler to slip stack protons while the Main Injector is ramping, the beam power at 120 GeV can reach 700 KW, a factor of 2 increase. The progress towards doubling the Fermilab's Accelerator complex beam power will be presented.

  7. RECENT RESULTS OF FUSION INDUCED BY NEUTRON-RICH RADIOACTIVE BEAMS STUDIED AT HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J Felix

    2013-01-01

    The reaccelerated fission-fragment beams at HRIBF provide a unique opportunity for studying the mechanisms of fusion involving nuclei with large neutron excess. The fusion excitation functions for neutron-rich ra- dioactive 132Sn incident on 40Ca and 58Ni targets have been measured to explore the role of transfer couplings in sub-barrier fusion enhancement. Evaporation residue cross sections for 124,126,127,128Sn+64Ni were measured to study the dependence of fusion probability on neutron excess.

  8. Several atomic-physics issues connected with the use of neutral beams in fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Fonck, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    Energetic neutral beams are used for heating and diagnostics in present magnetic fusion experiments. They are also being considered for use in future large experiments. Atomic physics issues are important for both the production of the neutral beams and the interaction of the beams and the plasma. Interest in neutral beams based on negative hydrogen ions is growing, largely based on advances in producing high current ion sources. An extension of the negative ion approach has been the suggestion to use negative ions of Z > 1 elements, such as carbon and oxygen, to form high power neutral beams for plasma heating.

  9. Modeling space charge in beams for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.

    1995-05-02

    A new analytic model is presented which accurately estimates the radially averaged axial component of the space-charge field of an axisymmetric heavy-ion beam in a cylindrical beam pipe. The model recovers details of the field near the beam ends that are overlooked by simpler models, and the results compare well to exact solutions of Poisson`s equation. Field values are shown for several simple beam profiles and are compared with values obtained from simpler models.

  10. Self-pinched beam transport experiments Relevant to Heavy Ion Driven inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.; Fessenden, T.J.; Lee, E.P.; Yu, S.S.; Olson, C.L.; Welch, D.R.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Logan, B.G.; Moir, R.W.; Haber, I.; Ottinger, P.F.; Young, F.C.; Peterson, R.R.; Briggs, R.J.

    1998-02-06

    An attractive feature of the inertial fusion energy (IFE) approach to commercial energy production is that the fusion driver is well separated from the fusion confinement chamber. This ''standoff'' feature means the driver is largely isolated from fusion reaction products. Further, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target ignition (with modest gain) is now scheduled to be demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using a laser driver system. The NIF program will, to a considerable extent, validate indirectly-driven heavy-ion fusion (HIF) target designs for IFE. However, it remains that HIF standoff between the final focus system and the fusion target needs to be seriously addressed. In fact, there now exists a timely opportunity for the Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES) to experimentally explore the feasibility of one of the attractive final transport options in the fusion chamber: the self-pinched transport mode. Presently, there are several mainline approaches for HIF beam transport and neutralization in the fusion chamber. These range from the (conservative) vacuum ballistic focus, for which there is much experience from high energy research accelerators, to highly neutralized ballistic focus, which matches well to lower voltage acceleration with resulting lower driver costs. Alternatively, Z-discharge channel transport and self-pinched transport in gas-filled chambers may relax requirements on beam quality and final focusing systems, leading to even lower driver cost. In any case, these alternative methods of transport, especially self-pinched transport, are unusually attractive from the standpoint of chamber design and neutronics. There is no requirement for low chamber pressure. Moreover, only a minuscule fraction of the fusion neutrons can escape from the chamber. Therefore, it is relatively easy to shield sensitive components, e-g., superconducting magnets from any significant neutron flux. Indeed, self-pinched transport and liquid wall

  11. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, Nigel Oswald

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of ~17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, ~200 g/cm3 and ~20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases ~350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  12. Fusion Power Program biannual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    This biannual report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the April-September 1979 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Separate abstracts were prepared for three sections. (MOW)

  13. High illumination uniformity scheme with 32 beams configuration for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Li; Gu, Chun; Xu, Lixin; Zhou, Shenlei

    2016-04-15

    The self-adapting algorithms are improved to optimize a beam configuration in the direct drive laser fusion system with the solid state lasers. A configuration of 32 laser beams is proposed for achieving a high uniformity illumination, with a root-mean-square deviation at 10{sup −4} level. In our optimization, the parameters such as beam number, beam arrangement, and beam intensity profile are taken into account. The illumination uniformity robustness versus the parameters such as intensity profile deviations, power imbalance, intensity profile noise, the pointing error, and the target position error is also discussed. In this study, the model is assumed a solid-sphere illumination, and refraction effects of incident light on the corona are not considered. Our results may have a potential application in the design of the direct-drive laser fusion of the Shen Guang-II Upgrading facility (SG-II-U, China).

  14. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-05-16

    Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy-ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX inertial confinement fusion target physics code shows the ion range increasing fourfold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16% to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

  15. The MARVEL domain protein, Singles Bar, is required for progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Beatriz; Maeland, Anne D; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Bloor, James W; Brown, Nicholas H; Michelson, Alan M

    2007-07-15

    Multinucleated myotubes develop by the sequential fusion of individual myoblasts. Using a convergence of genomic and classical genetic approaches, we have discovered a novel gene, singles bar (sing), that is essential for myoblast fusion. sing encodes a small multipass transmembrane protein containing a MARVEL domain, which is found in vertebrate proteins involved in processes such as tight junction formation and vesicle trafficking where--as in myoblast fusion--membrane apposition occurs. sing is expressed in both founder cells and fusion competent myoblasts preceding and during myoblast fusion. Examination of embryos injected with double-stranded sing RNA or embryos homozygous for ethane methyl sulfonate-induced sing alleles revealed an identical phenotype: replacement of multinucleated myofibers by groups of single, myosin-expressing myoblasts at a stage when formation of the mature muscle pattern is complete in wild-type embryos. Unfused sing mutant myoblasts form clusters, suggesting that early recognition and adhesion of these cells are unimpaired. To further investigate this phenotype, we undertook electron microscopic ultrastructural studies of fusing myoblasts in both sing and wild-type embryos. These experiments revealed that more sing mutant myoblasts than wild-type contain pre-fusion complexes, which are characterized by electron-dense vesicles paired on either side of the fusing plasma membranes. In contrast, embryos mutant for another muscle fusion gene, blown fuse (blow), have a normal number of such complexes. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that sing acts at a step distinct from that of blow, and that sing is required on both founder cell and fusion-competent myoblast membranes to allow progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion, possibly by mediating fusion of the electron-dense vesicles to the plasma membrane.

  16. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOEpatents

    Lasche, George P.

    1988-01-01

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

  17. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOEpatents

    Lasche, G.P.

    1987-02-20

    A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

  18. Proton Beam Fast Ignition Fusion: Synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The proton beam generation and focusing in fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is studied. The spatial and energy spread of the proton beam generated in a laser-solid interaction is increased due to the synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The focal spot radius can reach 100 μm, which is nearly an order of magnitude larger than the optimal value. The energy spread decreases the beam deposition energy in the focal spot. Under these conditions, ignition of a precompressed DT fuel is achieved with the beam powers much higher than the values presently in consideration. Work supported in part by NIKOLA TESLA Laboratories (Stefan University), La Jolla, CA.

  19. Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolańczuk, Robert

    2010-06-01

    Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out reactions) using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because in most of the cases intensities of radioactive beams are significantly less than those of the stable beams, reactions with the greatest radioactive-beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.76.014612 76, 014612 (2007)], who investigated the same nuclei.

  20. Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Honrubia, J. J.; Murakami, M.

    2015-01-15

    Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects, such as ion beam divergence, not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core, ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point has been analyzed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

  1. Progress in theory and simulation of ion cyclotron emission from magnetic confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard; Chapman, Ben; Chapman, Sandra; Cook, James; Reman, Bernard; McClements, Ken; Carbajal, Leopoldo

    2016-10-01

    Suprathermal ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is detected from all large tokamak and stellarator plasmas. Its frequency spectrum has narrow peaks at sequential cyclotron harmonics of the energetic ion population (fusion-born or neutral beam-injected) at the outer edge of the plasma. ICE was the first collective radiative instability driven by confined fusion-born ions observed in deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET and TFTR, and the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability is the most likely emission mechanism. Contemporary ICE measurements are taken at very high sampling rates from the LHD stellarator and from the conventional aspect ratio KSTAR tokamak. A correspondingly advanced modelling capability for the ICE emission mechanism has been developed using 1D3V PIC and hybrid-PIC codes, supplemented by analytical theory. These kinetic codes simulate the self-consistent full orbit dynamics of energetic and thermal ions, together with the electric and magnetic fields and the electrons. We report recent progress in theory and simulation that addresses: the scaling of ICE intensity with energetic particle density; the transition between super-Alfvénic and sub-Alfvénic regimes for the collectively radiating particles; and the rapid time evolution that is seen for some ICE measurements. This work was supported in part by the RCUK Energy Programme [Grant Number EP/I501045] and by Euratom.

  2. Possibilities of production of transfermium nuclei in complete fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Juhee; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2017-07-01

    The possibilities of direct production of new isotopes of transfermium nuclei 261,263,264No, 264Lr263, 263,264,266,268Rf, 265Db264, and 267,268,270,272Sg are studied in various asymmetric hot fusion-evaporation reactions with radioactive beams. The optimal reaction partners and conditions for the synthesis of new isotopes are suggested. The products of the suggested reactions can fill a gap of unknown isotopes between the isotopes of heaviest nuclei obtained in the x n evaporation channels of the cold and hot complete fusion reactions with the stable beams.

  3. The MARVEL domain protein, Singles Bar, is required for progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Beatriz; Maeland, Anne D.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Bloor, James W.; Brown, Nicholas H.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multinucleated myotubes develop by the sequential fusion of individual myoblasts. Using a convergence of genomic and classical genetic approaches, we have discovered a novel gene, singles bar (sing), that is essential for myoblast fusion. sing encodes a small multipass transmembrane protein containing a MARVEL domain, which is found in vertebrate proteins involved in processes such as tight junction formation and vesicle trafficking where—as in myoblast fusion—membrane apposition occurs. sing is expressed in both founder cells and fusion competent myoblasts preceding and during myoblast fusion. Examination of embryos injected with double-stranded sing RNA or embryos homozygous for ethane methyl sulfonate-induced sing alleles revealed an identical phenotype: replacement of multinucleated myofibers by groups of single, myosin-expressing myoblasts at a stage when formation of the mature muscle pattern is complete in wild-type embryos. Unfused sing mutant myoblasts form clusters, suggesting that early recognition and adhesion of these cells is unimpaired. To further investigate this phenotype, we undertook electron microscopic ultrastructural studies of fusing myoblasts in both sing and wild-type embryos. These experiments revealed that more sing mutant myoblasts than wild-type contain pre-fusion complexes, which are characterized by electron-dense vesicles paired on either side of the fusing plasma membranes. In contrast, embryos mutant for another muscle fusion gene, blown fuse (blow), have a normal number of such complexes. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that sing acts at a step distinct from that of blow, and that sing is required on both founder cell and fusion-competent myoblast membranes to allow progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion, possibly by mediating fusion of the electron-dense vesicles to the plasma membrane. PMID:17537424

  4. Recent progress in tailoring trap-based positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Natisin, M. R.; Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2013-03-19

    Recent progress is described to implement two approaches to specially tailor trap-based positron beams. Experiments and simulations are presented to understand the limits on the energy spread and pulse duration of positron beams extracted from a Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap after the particles have been buffer-gas cooled (or heated) in the range of temperatures 1000 {>=} T {>=} 300 K. These simulations are also used to predict beam performance for cryogenically cooled positrons. Experiments and simulations are also presented to understand the properties of beams formed when plasmas are tailored in a PM trap in a 5 tesla magnetic field, then non-adiabatically extracted from the field using a specially designed high-permeability grid to create a new class of electrostatically guided beams.

  5. Progress Towards the Development of a Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter for Aneutronic Fusion Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarditi, A. G.; Chap, A.; Wolinsky, J.; Scott, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    A coordinated experimental and theory/simulation effort has been carried out to investigate the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC), a scheme that has been proposed in the past for the direct conversion into electricity of the kinetic energy of an ion beam generated from fusion reactions. This effort has been focused in particular on the TWDEC process in the high density beam regime, thus accounting for the ion beam expansion due to its space charge.

  6. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  7. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1994-03-01

    The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

  9. Proof-of-concept experiments for negative ion driver beams forheavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leung, K.N.

    2003-05-13

    Negative halogen ion beams have recently been proposed as heavy ion fusion drivers. They would avoid the problem of electron accumulation in positive ion beams, and could be efficiently photodetached to neutrals if desired [1]. Initial experiments using chlorine produced a current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} of 99.5% atomic negative Cl with an e/Cl{sup -} ratio as low as 7:1 and good emittance.

  10. Proof-of-Concept Experiments for Negative Ion Driver Beams for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    L.R. Grisham; S.K. Hahto; S.T. Hahto; J.W. Kwan; K.N. Leung

    2003-05-06

    Negative halogen ion beams have recently been proposed as heavy ion fusion drivers. They would avoid the problem of electron accumulation in positive ion beams, and could be efficiently photo-detached to neutrals if desired. Initial experiments using chlorine produced a current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} of 99.5% atomic negative Cl with an e/Cl- ratio as low as 7:1 and good emittance.

  11. Nonuniformity for rotated beam illumination in directly driven heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, J.; Logan, B.G.

    2009-01-02

    A key issue in heavy-ion beam inertial confinement fusion is target interaction, especially implosion symmetry. In this paper the 2D beam irradiation nonuniformity on the surface of a spherical target is studied. This is a first step to studies of 3D dynamical effects on target implosion. So far non-rotated beams have been studied. Because normal incidence may increase Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, it has been suggested to rotate beams (to increase average uniformity) and hit the target tangentially. The level of beam irradiation uniformity, beam spill and normal incidence is calculated in this paper. In Mathematica the rotated beams are modeled as an annular integrated Gaussian beam. To simplify the chamber geometry, the illumination scheme is not a 4{pi} system, but the beams are arranged on few polar rings around the target. The position of the beam spot rings is efficiently optimized using the analytical model. The number of rings and beams, rotation radii and widths are studied to optimize uniformity and spilled intensity. The results demonstrate that for a 60-beam system on four rings Peak-To-Valley nonuniformities of under 0.5% are possible.

  12. Novel neutralized-beam intense neutron source for fusion technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Osher, J.E.; Perkins, L.J.

    1983-07-08

    We describe a neutralized-beam intense neutron source (NBINS) as a relevant application of fusion technology for the type of high-current ion sources and neutral beamlines now being developed for heating and fueling of magnetic-fusion-energy confinement systems. This near-term application would support parallel development of highly reliable steady-state higher-voltage neutral D/sup 0/ and T/sup 0/ beams and provide a relatively inexpensive source of fusion neutrons for materials testing at up to reactor-like wall conditions. Beam-target examples described incude a 50-A mixed D-T total (ions plus neutrals) space-charge-neutralized beam at 120 keV incident on a liquid Li drive-in target, or a 50-A T/sup 0/ + T/sup +/ space-charge-neutralized beam incident on either a LiD or gas D/sub 2/ target with calculated 14-MeV neutron yields of 2 x 10/sup 15//s, 7 x 10/sup 15//s, or 1.6 x 10/sup 16//s, respectively. The severe local heat loading on the target surface is expected to limit the allowed beam focus and minimum target size to greater than or equal to 25 cm/sup 2/.

  13. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  14. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING EMPLACEMENT STEEL BEAMS FUEL STORAGE BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING EMPLACEMENT STEEL BEAMS FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603) LOOKING EAST. INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-51-1371. Unknown Photographer, 1/31/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. Measuring the Fusion Cross-Section of Light Nuclei with Low-Intensity Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Tracy; Brown, Kyle; Hudan, Sylvie; Desouza, Romualdo

    2014-03-01

    Reactions between neutron-rich light nuclei have been proposed as a heat source in the crust of an accreting neutron star that triggers an X-ray superburst. To explore the probability of such fusion events as well as better understand the fusion dynamics between neutron-rich nuclei, an experimental program to measure the dependence of the fusion cross-section on neutron number has been initiated. Key to these measurements is developing an approach to measure the total fusion cross-section for beams of low-intensity light nuclei (<105 ions/s) on light targets. Fusion residues resulting from the fusion of oxygen nuclei with 12C at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier are directly measured and distinguished from unreacted beam particles on the basis of their energy and time-of-flight (TOF). The TOF is measured between a microchannel plate (MCP) detector and a segmented Si detector. Two initial problems were charge trapping in the Si detector and slit scattering in the MCP detector. These problems have both been minimized by implementing a gridless MCP detector and a new Si design making the measurement feasible. Supported by the US DOE under Grant No. DEFG02-88ER-40404

  16. TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injected power measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Dudek, L.E.; Gammel, G.M.; Johnson, G.A.; Kugel, H.W.; Lagin, L.; O'Connor, T.E.; Shah, P.A.; Sichta, P.

    1989-05-01

    Energy flow within TFTR neutral beamlines is measured with a waterfall calorimetry system capable of simultaneously measuring the energy deposited within four heating beamlines (three ion sources each), or of measuring the energy deposited in a separate neutral beam test stand. Of the energy extracted from the ion source in the well instrumented test stand, 99.5 +- 3.5% can be accounted for. When the ion deflection magnet is energized, however, 6.5% of the extracted energy is lost. This loss is attributed to a spray of devious particles onto unmonitored surfaces. A 30% discrepancy is also observed between energy measurements on the internal beamline calorimeter and energy measurements on a calorimeter located in the test stand target chamber. Particle reflection from the flat plate calorimeter in the target chamber, which the incident beam strikes at a near-grazing angle of 12/degree/, is the primary loss of this energy. A slight improvement in energy accountability is observed as the beam pulse length is increased. This improvement is attributed to systematic error in the sensitivity of the energy measurement to small fluctuations on the supply water temperature. An overall accuracy of 15% is estimated for the total power injected into TFTR. Contributions to this error are uncertainties in the beam neutralization efficiency, reionization and beam scrape-off in the drift duct, and fluctuations in the temperature of the supply water. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Progress on Gyrotrons for ITER and Future Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Thumm, Manfred K.

    2009-11-26

    The prototype of the Japan 170 GHz ITER gyrotron holds the energy and efficiency world record of 2.88 GJ (0.8 MW, 3600 s, 57%) with 55% efficiency at 1 MW, 800 s, whereas the Russian 170 GHz ITER prototype tube achieved 0.83 MW with a pulse duration of 203 s at 48% efficiency and 1 MW at 116 s and 52%. The record parameters of the European megawatt-class 140 GHz gyrotron for the Stellarator Wendelstein W7-X are: 0.92 MW output power at 1800 s pulse duration, almost 45% efficiency and 97.5% Gaussian mode purity. All these gyrotrons employ a cylindrical cavity, a quasi-optical output coupler, a synthetic diamond window and a single-stage depressed collector (SDC) for energy recovery. In coaxial cavities the existence of the longitudinally corrugated inner conductor reduces the problems of mode competition and limiting current, thus allowing one to use even higher order modes with lower Ohmic attenuation than in cylindrical cavities. Synthetic diamond windows with a transmission capability of 2 MW, continuous wave (CW) are feasible. In order to keep the number of the required gyrotrons and magnets as low as possible, to reduce the costs of the ITER 26 MW, 170 GHz ECRH system and to allow compact upper launchers for plasma stabilization, 2 MW mm-wave power per gyrotron tube is desirable. The FZK pre-prototype tube for an EU 170 GHz, 2 MW ITER gyrotron has achieved 1.8 MW at 28% efficiency (without depressed collector). Design studies for a 4 MW 170 GHz coaxial-cavity gyrotron with two synthetic diamond output windows and two 2 MW mm-wave output beams for future fusion reactors are currently being performed at FZK. The availability of sources with fast frequency tunability (several GHz s{sup -1}, tuning in 1.5-2.5% steps for about ten different frequencies) would permit the use of a simple, fixed, non-steerable mirror antenna for local current drive (ECCD) experiments and plasma stabilization. GYCOM in Russia develops in collaboration with IPP Garching and FZK an

  18. Microstructural evolution of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Nakata, K.; Zhang, J.X.; Yamamoto, N.; Liao, J.

    2012-03-15

    Microstructural evolution of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium was studied by means of electron backscattering diffraction. The microstructural evolution is strongly affected by the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation mechanism dependent on the cooling rate during phase transformation. The long-range diffusional transformation mainly occurs in the fusion zone at the low cooling rate, and the massive transformation dominantly takes place at the high cooling rate. For this reason, the grain morphologies probably change from the granular-like to columnar-like grains with the cooling rate increasing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing cooling rate changes grain morphology from granular to columnar one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Final microstructures depend on the {beta}{yields}{alpha} transformation mechanisms.

  19. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.; Eriksson, J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girardo, J.-B.; Hellsten, T.; Khilkevitch, E.; Kiptily, V. G.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Nocente, M.; Salewski, M.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevelev, A. E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast ion diagnostics, showing an overall good agreement. Finally, a sawtooth activity for these experiments has been observed and interpreted using SPOT/RFOF simulations in the framework of Porcelli’s theoretical model, where NBI+ICRH accelerated ions are found to have a strong stabilizing effect, leading to monster sawteeth.

  20. Progress of Multi-Beam Long Trace-Profiler Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kester, Thomas; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2012-01-01

    The multi-beam long trace profiler (LTP) under development at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center[1] is designed to increase the efficiency of metrology of replicated X-ray optics. The traditional LTP operates on a single laser beam that scans along the test surface to detect the slope errors. While capable of exceptional surface slope accuracy, the LTP single beam scanning has slow measuring speed. As metrology constitutes a significant fraction of the time spent in optics production, an increase in the efficiency of metrology helps in decreasing the cost of fabrication of the x-ray optics and in improving their quality. Metrology efficiency can be increased by replacing the single laser beam with multiple beams that can scan a section of the test surface at a single instance. The increase in speed with such a system would be almost proportional to the number of laser beams. A collaborative feasibility study has been made and specifications were fixed for a multi-beam long trace profiler. The progress made in the development of this metrology system is presented.

  1. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Loisel, G.; Yahia, V.; Rafelski, J.

    2013-10-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

  2. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Labaune, C; Baccou, C; Depierreux, S; Goyon, C; Loisel, G; Yahia, V; Rafelski, J

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

  3. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    DOE PAGES

    Friedman, Alex

    2013-10-19

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, which each have unique arrival times and may have unique kinetic energies. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: thatmore » the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of \\main-pulse" beams relative to \\foot-pulse" beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying \\di erential acceleration" to individual beams or sets of beam at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams \\sooner" and others \\later," it is possible to simplify the beam line con guration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use di erential acceleration to e ect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams ( e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model con gurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy.« less

  4. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2013-10-19

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, which each have unique arrival times and may have unique kinetic energies. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: that the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of \\main-pulse" beams relative to \\foot-pulse" beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying \\di erential acceleration" to individual beams or sets of beam at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams \\sooner" and others \\later," it is possible to simplify the beam line con guration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use di erential acceleration to e ect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams ( e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model con gurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy.

  5. Applications and Progress of Dust Injection to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhehui; Wurden, Glen A.; Mansfield, Dennis K.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Ticos, Catalin M.

    2008-09-07

    Three regimes of dust injection are proposed for different applications to fusion energy. In the 'low-speed' regime (<5 km/s), basic dust transport study, edge plasma diagnostics, edge-localized-mode (ELM) pacing in magnetic fusion devices can be realized by injecting dust of known properties into today's fusion experiments. ELM pacing, as an alternative to mini-pellet injection, is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion devices. Different schemes are available to inject dust. In the 'intermediate-speed' regime (10-200 km/s), possible applications of dust injection include fueling of the next-step fusion devices, core-diagnostics of the next-step fusion devices, and compression of plasma and solid targets to aid fusion energy production. Promising laboratory results of dust moving at 10-50 km/s do exist. Significant advance in this regime may be expected in the near term to achieve higher dust speeds. In the 'high-speed' regime (>500 km/s), dust injection can potentially be used to directly produce fusion energy through impact. Ideas on how to achieve these extremely high speeds are mostly on paper. No plan exists today to realize them in laboratory. Some experimental results, including electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration, are summarized and compared. Some features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. A necessary component of all dust injectors is the dust dropper (also known as dust dispenser). A computer-controlled piezoelectric crystals has been developed to dropped dust in a systematic and reproducible manner. Particle fluxes ranges from a few tens of particles per second up to thousands of particles per second by this simple device.

  6. Three-dimensional particle simulation of heavy-ion fusion beams*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Haber, Irving

    1992-07-01

    The beams in a heavy-ion-beam-driven inertial fusion (HIF) accelerator are collisionless, nonneutral plasmas, confined by applied magnetic and electric fields. These space-charge-dominated beams must be focused onto small (few mm) spots at the fusion target, and so preservation of a small emittance is crucial. The nonlinear beam self-fields can lead to emittance growth, and so a self-consistent field description is needed. To this end, a multidimensional particle simulation code, warp [Friedman et al., Part. Accel. 37-38, 131 (1992)], has been developed and is being used to study the transport of HIF beams. The code's three-dimensional (3-D) package combines features of an accelerator code and a particle-in-cell plasma simulation. Novel techniques allow it to follow beams through many accelerator elements over long distances and around bends. This paper first outlines the algorithms employed in warp. A number of applications and corresponding results are then presented. These applications include studies of: beam drift-compression in a misaligned lattice of quadrupole focusing magnets; beam equilibria, and the approach to equilibrium; and the MBE-4 experiment [AIP Conference Proceedings 152 (AIP, New York, 1986), p. 145] recently concluded at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Finally, 3-D simulations of bent-beam dynamics relevant to the planned Induction Linac Systems Experiments (ILSE) [Fessenden, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Plasma Res. A 278, 13 (1989)] at LBL are described. Axially cold beams are observed to exhibit little or no root-mean-square emittance growth at midpulse in transiting a (sharp) bend. Axially hot beams, in contrast, do exhibit some emittance growth.

  7. Summary II - Fusion Ion sources, Beam Formation, Acceleration and Neutralisation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T. T. C.

    2007-08-10

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 13th - 15th September 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the sessions of the Symposium devoted to the topics listed in the title.

  8. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernández Niello, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the 10,13,15C+12C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  9. Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B. Grant; Logan, B. Grant; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

    2007-06-25

    Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry and Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX ICF target physics code shows the ion range increasing four-fold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16 to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

  10. Electron-temperature requirements for neutralized inertial-confinement-fusion light-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their large self-space-charge fields, light ion beam drivers of energy and power sufficient to achieve inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cannot be focused on a small fuel pellet unless neutralized. Even if initially neutralized with comoving electrons, these beams will not stay neutralized and focus during propagation through a vacuum chamber unless the initial thermal energy of the neutralizing electrons is sufficiently small. In this paper we discuss the effects which contribute to the effective initial temperature of the neutralizing electrons, including compressional shock heating. We also employ a simple heuristic model to construct envelope equations which govern axial as well as radial beam compression and use them to predict the largest initial electron temperature consistent with the required beam compression. This temperature for typical light ion beam systems is about ten eV - a temperature which may be possible to achieve.

  11. Pre-formed plasma channels for ion beam fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. R.; Olson, C. L.

    1997-04-01

    The transport of driver ions to the target in an IFE power plant is an important consideration in IFE target chamber design. Pre-formed laser-guided plasma discharge channels have been considered for light ions because they reduce the beam microdivergence constraints, allow long transport lengths, and require a target chamber fill gas that can help protect the target chamber from the target explosion. Here, pre-formed plasma discharge channels are considered for heavy ion transport. The channel formation parameters are similar to those for light ions. The allowable ion power per channel is limited by the onset of plasma instabilities and energy loss due to a reverse emf from the rapid channel expansion driven by the ion beam.

  12. NRL Light Ion Beam Research for Inertial Confinement Fusion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-20

    S. A. Goldstein, in Proceedings of the International Topical Conference on Electron Beam Research and Technology, Albuquerque, New Mexico (1975), p...Research and Technology, Albuquerque, New Mexico (1975), p. 247. 14. S. J. Stephanakis, D. Mosher, G. Cooperstein, J. R. Boller, J. Golden, and Shyke A...Tech Info Center/S-1930 1 copy CEA, Centre de Etudes de Valduc P. B. 14 21120 Is-sur-Tille France Attn: J. Barbaro 1 copy C. Bruno 1 copy N. Camarcat

  13. Method and apparatus for timing of laser beams in a multiple laser beam fusion system

    DOEpatents

    Eastman, Jay M.; Miller, Theodore L.

    1981-01-01

    The optical path lengths of a plurality of comparison laser beams directed to impinge upon a common target from different directions are compared to that of a master laser beam by using an optical heterodyne interferometric detection technique. The technique consists of frequency shifting the master laser beam and combining the master beam with a first one of the comparison laser beams to produce a time-varying heterodyne interference pattern which is detected by a photo-detector to produce an AC electrical signal indicative of the difference in the optical path lengths of the two beams which were combined. The optical path length of this first comparison laser beam is adjusted to compensate for the detected difference in the optical path lengths of the two beams. The optical path lengths of all of the comparison laser beams are made equal to the optical path length of the master laser beam by repeating the optical path length adjustment process for each of the comparison laser beams. In this manner, the comparison laser beams are synchronized or timed to arrive at the target within .+-.1.times.10.sup.-12 second of each other.

  14. Ion Beam Collider for Fusion Using Ion-Beams Trapped in a Radial Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohri, Akihiro; Yuyama, Tetsumori; Michishita, Toshinori; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    1990-11-01

    A new method for D-3He fusion is proposed. To generate the fusion reaction, counterstreaming energetic ions are produced and trapped in the radial effective potential well which is formed by a radial electric field and an axial magnetic field. Deformation of the magnetic field due to diamagnetic currents increases the counteraction of the motion. Study of the local power balance by a 2D-Fokker-Planck code shows that a net fusion output is obtainable at an electron energy confinement time in a probably accessible range.

  15. Progress In Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Francis Y. C.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Wu, S. T.; Schmidt, George; hide

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC).

  16. Simulation of Intense Beams and Targets for Heavy-Ion-Fusion Science (HEDLP / Inertial Fusion Energy)

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex; Barnard, John J.; Cohen, Ron H.; Dorf, Mikhail; Eder, David; Grote, Dave P.; Lund, Steve M.; Sharp, William M.; Henestroza, Enrique; Lee, Ed P.; Vay, Jean -Luc; Davidson, Ron C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Qin, Hong; Startsev, Ed; Fagnan, Kirsten; Koniges, Alice; Bertozzi, Andrea

    2010-08-26

    Our principal goals, and activities in support of those goals, over the next five years are as follows: (1) Optimize the properties of the NDCX-II beam for each class of target experiments; achieve quantitative agreement with measurements; develop improved machine configurations and operating points. To accomplish these goals, we plan to use Warp to simulate NDCX-II from source to target, in full kinetic detail, including first-principles modeling of beam neutralization by plasma. The output from an ensemble of Warp runs (representing shot-to-shot variations) will be used as input to target simulations using ALE-AMR on NERSC, and other codes. (2) Develop enhanced versions of NDCX-II (the machine is designed to be extensible and reconfigurable), and carry out studies to define a next-step ion beam facility. To accomplish these goals, much of the work will involve iterative optimization employing Warp runs that assume ideal beam neutralization downstream of the accelerator. (3) Carry out detailed target simulations in the Warm Dense Matter regime using the ALE-AMR code, including surface tension effects, liquid-vapor coexistence, and accurate models of both the driving beam and the target geometry. For this we will need to make multiple runs (to capture shot-to-shot variations), and to both develop and employ synthetic diagnostics (to enable comparison with experiments). The new science that will be revealed is the physics of the transition from the liquid to vapor state of a volumetrically superheated material, wherein droplets are formed, and wherein phase transitions, surface tension and hydrodynamics all play significant roles in the dynamics. These simulations will enable calculations of equation of state and other material properties, and will also be of interest for their illumination of the science of droplet formation.

  17. Chamber design for the LIBRA light ion beam fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Lovell, E.G.; Engelstad, R.L.

    1989-03-01

    Scoping analysis was performed for LIBRA to determine the blanket design options that satisfy the tritium breeding and wall protection requirements. The blanket is made of banks of INPORT tubes of porous SiC and Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ flowing in them. The reference design utilizes a 1.35 m thick blanket region backed by a 0.5 m thick HT-9 reflector. The lithium in the blanket and reflector is enriched to 90% /sup 6/Li. This design leads to the shortest possible beam propagation channel. The TBR is 1.5 and the end-of-life dpa in the chamber wall is 200 dpa. In this paper the authors describe the design and configuration of the chamber as well as the tritium fueling and the response to the target explosion.

  18. Inertial fusion energy target injection, tracking, and beam pointing

    SciTech Connect

    Petzoldt, Ronald Wayne

    1995-03-07

    Several cryogenic targets must be injected each second into a reaction chamber. Required target speed is about 100 m/s. Required accuracy of the driver beams on target is a few hundred micrometers. Fuel strength is calculated to allow acceleration in excess of 10,000 m/s2 if the fuel temperature is less than 17 K. A 0.1 μm thick dual membrane will allow nearly 2,000 m/s2 acceleration. Acceleration is gradually increased and decreased over a few membrane oscillation periods (a few ms), to avoid added stress from vibrations which could otherwise cause a factor of two decrease in allowed acceleration. Movable shielding allows multiple targets to be in flight toward the reaction chamber at once while minimizing neutron heating of subsequent targets. The use of multiple injectors is recommended for redundancy which increases availability and allows a higher pulse rate. Gas gun, rail gun, induction accelerator, and electrostatic accelerator target injection devices are studied, and compared. A gas gun is the preferred device for indirect-drive targets due to its simplicity and proven reliability. With the gas gun, the amount of gas required for each target (about 10 to 100 mg) is acceptable. A revolver loading mechanism is recommended with a cam operated poppet valve to control the gas flow. Cutting vents near the muzzle of the gas gun barrel is recommended to improve accuracy and aid gas pumping. If a railgun is used, we recommend an externally applied magnetic field to reduce required current by an order of magnitude. Optical target tracking is recommended. Up/down counters are suggested to predict target arrival time. Target steering is shown to be feasible and would avoid the need to actively point the beams. Calculations show that induced tumble from electrostatically steering the target is not excessive.

  19. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  20. Fusion reactor materials. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee`, S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  1. Fusion of Multi-Pinched Plasma Beams Converging with Spatial Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Feng; Zheng, Xianjun; Deng, Baiquan

    2015-07-01

    Fusion reactions can be achieved by using deuterium from sea water as the fuel. The amount of deuterium in one gallon of sea water contains energy equivalent to three hundred gallons of gasoline. Satisfactory conditions of plasma temperature and density necessary to initiate fusion have been achieved in various research facilities. However, the confinement time is not sufficient for ignition due to plasma instabilities. Here we show that fatal plasma instabilities could be suppressed by the ingenious arrangement of multi-pinched plasma beams converging symmetrically in space based on the minimization principle of plasma potential energy. Confirmation tests are proposed using tiny wires containing deuterium. If successful, the results could lead to a feasible approach to obtaining commercial fusion power from sea water, hence without the need to use expensive and radioactive tritium as the fuel. supported by the Fund for the Construction of Graduate Degree, China (No. 2014XWD-S0805)

  2. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOEpatents

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  3. Heating neutral beams for ITER: negative ion sources to tune fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. J.; Boilson, D.; Polevoi, A. R.; Oikawa, Toshihiro; Mitteau, Raphael

    2017-05-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) based on a negative ion source is one of the basic heating and current drive systems designed for ITER required to reach its goals of the operation with high fusion power, P fus ∼ 500 MW with fusion gain, Q = 10 for 400 s in a baseline scenario, and P fus > 250 MW, Q = 5 operation for 3600 s in an advanced scenario. A total power of 33 MW from the two heating neutral beam (HNB) injectors is envisaged in the present scenario. The scope of the present paper is to provide an overview of the main aspects of the interaction of the HNBs with the ITER plasma. Various operational scenarios with different mixtures of the main ion species, He, H, DD and DT, foreseen at different phases of the ITER operation are considered.

  4. Recent progress in the development of materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    Development of materials with suitable properties is essential if fusion is to be realized as an economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable energy source. For each of the major reactor systems (e.g., superconducting magnets, blankets, divertors, auxiliary heating, and diagnostic devices), material requirements have been defined and alloy and ceramic systems, which have attractive properties for the various applications, have been identified. The next experimental fusion reactor, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will utilize existing materials technology. However, for many applications in power reactors, existing materials do not have adequate properties and advanced materials must be developed. This paper presents an overview of the status of materials technology in four key areas: structural materials for the first wall and blanket (FWB), plasma-facing materials, materials for superconducting magnets, and ceramics for electrical and structural applications. 7 refs.

  5. Two dimensional beam smoothing by spectral dispersion for direct drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, J.E.

    1995-07-11

    Two dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion is analyzed by using diffraction theory calculations. It is shown that by using standard frequency modulated light one can obtain bandwidth limited smoothing over integration times relevant to inertial confinement fusion (about 1 nsec) with modest induced beam divergence. At longer integration times one can obtain bandwidth limited smoothing by increasing the divergence and/or by using more advanced phase modulation methods.

  6. Fusion reactivity, confinement, and stability of neutral-beam heated plasmas in TFTR and other tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyeon, K.; Sabbagh, S.A.

    1996-05-01

    The hypothesis that the heating beam fueling profile shape connects the edge condition and improved core confinement and fusion reactivity is extensively studied on TFTR and applied to other tokamaks. The derived absolute scalings based on beam fueling profile shape for the stored energy and neutron yield can be applied to the deuterium discharges at different major radii in TFTR. These include Supershot, High poloidal beta, L-mode, and discharges with a reversed shear (RS) magnetic configuration. These scalings are also applied to deuterium-tritium discharges. The role of plasma parameters, such as plasma current, Isdo2(p), edge safety factor, qsdo5(a), and toroidal field, Bsdo2(T), in the performance and stability of the discharges is explicitly studied. Based on practical and externally controllable plasma parameters, the limitation and optimization of fusion power production of the present TFTR is investigated and a path for a discharge condition with fusion power gain, Q > 1 is suggested based on this study. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks.

  7. Fusion neutron generation computations in a stellarator-mirror hybrid with neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Agren, O.

    2012-06-19

    In the paper [Moiseenko V.E., Noack K., Agren O. 'Stellarator-mirror based fusion driven fission reactor' J Fusion Energy 29 (2010) 65.], a version of a fusion driven system (FDS), i.e. a sub-critical fast fission assembly with a fusion plasma neutron source, is proposed. The plasma part of the reactor is based on a stellarator with a small mirror part. Hot ions with high perpendicular energy are assumed to be trapped in the magnetic mirror part. The stellarator part which connects to the mirror part and provides confinement for the bulk (deuterium) plasma. In the magnetic well of the mirror part, fusion reactions occur from collisions between a of hot ion component (tritium) with cold background plasma ions. RF heating is one option to heat the tritium. A more conventional method to sustain the hot ions is neutral beam injection (NBI), which is here studied numerically for the above-mentioned hybrid scheme. For these studies, a new kinetic code, KNBIM, has been developed. The code takes into account Coulomb collisions between the hot ions and the background plasma. The geometry of the confining magnetic field is arbitrary for the code. It is accounted for via a numerical bounce averaging procedure. Along with the kinetic calculations the neutron generation intensity and its spatial distribution are computed.

  8. Recent Progress in Multi-Beam Klystron in IECAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaogen, Ding

    2002-08-01

    Recent research progresses in MBK in IECAS are briefly introduced in the paper. The S-band MBKs of IECAS have peak power of 120-250 kW, average power of 4-9 kW, efficiency of 35-45 %, gain of 41-46 dB, beam voltage of 15-19 kV, and weight of 40-45 kg. Some key technical problems of MBK are also described and discussed. Among them, improving the design of MBK to obtain the required bandwidth, raising beam transmission to increase average power, eliminating oscillation and spray spectrum, overcoming window breakdown caused by magic mode, reducing breakdown times of electron gun, are most important things for the practical MBK. Besides, further research work in MBK in IECAS is commented.

  9. Generating High-Brightness Light Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.; Cuneno, M.E.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Filuk, A.B.; Hanson, D.L.; Johnson, D.J.; Mehlohorn, T.A.; Menge, P.R.; Olson, C.L.; Pointon, T.D. Slutz, S.A.; Vesey, R.A.; Welch, D.R.; Wenger, D.F.

    1998-10-22

    Light ion beams may be the best option for an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) driver from the standpoint of ei%ciency, standoff, rep-rate operation and cost. This approach uses high-energy-density pulsed power to efficiently accelerate ions in one or two stages at fields of 0.5 to 1.0 GV/m to produce a medium energy (30 MeV), high-current (1 MA) beam of light ions, such as lithium. Ion beams provide the ability for medium distance transport (4 m) of the ions to the target, and standofl of the driver from high- yield implosions. Rep-rate operation of' high current ion sources has ako been demonstrated for industrial applications and couId be applied to IFE. Although (hese factors make light ions the best Iong-teml pulsed- power approach to IFE, light-ion research is being suspended this year in favor of a Z-pinch-driven approach which has the best opport lnity to most-rapidly achieve the U.S. Department of Energy sponsor's goal of high-yield fusion. This paper will summarize the status and most recent results of the light-ion beam program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and document the prospects of light ions for future IFE driver development.

  10. Laser-guided, intersecting discharge channels for the final beam transport in heavy-ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, C.; Neff, S.; Tauschwitz, A.; Penache, D.; Birkner, R.; Constantin, C.; Knobloch, R.; Presura, R.; Rosmej, F. B.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Yu, S. S.

    2003-06-01

    Ion-beam transport in space charge neutralizing discharge channels has been proposed for the final focus and chamber transport in a heavy-ion fusion reactor. A driver scenario with two-sided target illumination requires a system of two intersecting discharges to transport beams of the same charge from opposite sides towards the fusion target. In this article we report on experiments on the creation of free-standing, intersecting high-current discharge channels. The discharges are initiated in ammonia gas (NH3) in a metallic chamber by two perpendicular CO2-laser beams, which resonantly heat and subsequently rarefy the gas along the laser paths before the breakdown. These low density channels guide the discharges along the predefined paths and also around the 90° angles without any mechanical guiding structures. In this way stable X-, T-, and L-shaped discharges with currents in excess of 40 kA, at pressures of a few mbar were created with a total length of 110 cm. An 11.4 A MeV 58Ni+12 beam from the UNILAC (Universal Linear Accelerator) linear accelerator was used to probe the line-integrated ion-optical properties of the central channel in a T-shaped discharge.

  11. Progress in Z-pinch inertial fusion energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, John Woodruff

    2010-03-01

    The goal of z-pinch inertial fusion energy (IFE) is to extend the single-shot z-pinch inertial confinement fusion (ICF) results on Z to a repetitive-shot z-pinch power plant concept for the economical production of electricity. Z produces up to 1.8 MJ of x-rays at powers as high as 230 TW. Recent target experiments on Z have demonstrated capsule implosion convergence ratios of 14-21 with a double-pinch driven target, and DD neutron yields up to 8x10exp10 with a dynamic hohlraum target. For z-pinch IFE, a power plant concept is discussed that uses high-yield IFE targets (3 GJ) with a low rep-rate per chamber (0.1 Hz). The concept includes a repetitive driver at 0.1 Hz, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the driver to the target, high-yield targets, and a thick-liquid wall chamber. Recent funding by a U.S. Congressional initiative for $4M for FY04 is supporting research on RTLs, repetitive pulsed power drivers, shock mitigation, full RTL cycle planned experiments, high-yield IFE targets, and z-pinch power plant technologies. Recent results of research in all of these areas are discussed, and a Road Map for Z-Pinch IFE is presented.

  12. TU-C-17A-07: FusionARC Treatment with Adaptive Beam Selection Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Li, R; Xing, L; Lee, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recently, a new treatment scheme, FusionARC, has been introduced to compensate for the pitfalls in single-arc VMAT planning. It basically allows for the static field treatment in selected locations, while the remaining is treated by single-rotational arc delivery. The important issue is how to choose the directions for static field treatment. This study presents an adaptive beam selection method to formulate fusionARC treatment scheme. Methods: The optimal plan for single-rotational arc treatment is obtained from two-step approach based on the reweighted total-variation (TV) minimization. To choose the directions for static field treatment with extra segments, a value of our proposed cost function at each field is computed on the new fluence-map, which adds an extra segment to the designated field location only. The cost function is defined as a summation of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of all structures with the fluence-map, while assuming that the lower cost function value implies the enhancement of plan quality. Finally, the extra segments for static field treatment would be added to the selected directions with low cost function values. A prostate patient data was applied and evaluated with three different plans: conventional VMAT, fusionARC, and static IMRT. Results: The 7 field locations, corresponding to the lowest cost function values, are chosen to insert extra segment for step-and-shoot dose delivery. Our proposed fusionARC plan with the selected angles improves the dose sparing to the critical organs, relative to static IMRT and conventional VMAT plans. The dose conformity to the target is significantly enhanced at the small expense of treatment time, compared with VMAT plan. Its estimated treatment time, however, is still much faster than IMRT. Conclusion: The fusionARC treatment with adaptive beam selection method could improve the plan quality with insignificant damage in the treatment time, relative to the conventional VMAT.

  13. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and

  14. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1992-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power.as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs.

  15. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 1, Magnetic confinement Fusion Plasma Theory. Annual progress report, November 16, 1992--November 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has concentrated on few tokamak plasma confinement issues: applications of our new Chapman-Enskog-like approach for developing hybrid fluid/kinetic descriptions of tokamak plasmas; multi-faceted studies as part of our development of a new interacting island paradigm for the tokamak equilibrium`` and transport; investigations of the resolution power of BES and ECE diagnostics for measuring core plasma fluctuations; and studies of net transport in the presence of fluctuating surfaces. Recent progress and publications in these areas, and in the management of the NERSC node and the fusion theory workstations are summarized briefly in this report.

  16. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Haendler, B.L.; Buckley, S.R.; Chen, C.; Cook, A.R.; Cook, R.C.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Kramer, H.D.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III

    1988-06-01

    This report describes progress made in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser inertial confinement fusion during 1987. The foam materials are polystyrene, resorcinol-formaldehyde, carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationship of their properties to target specifications are presented. Progress in the creation and testing of prototype targets is also described.

  17. Progress in Target Physics and Design for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan-Miller, Debra

    1999-11-01

    Two-dimensional, integrated calculations of a close-coupled version of the distributed radiator, heavy ion target predict gain 130 from 3.3 MJ of beam energy. To achieve these results, the case-to-capsule ratio was decreased by about 25% from our previous targets.(M. Tabak, D. Callahan-Miller, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1895 (1998).) The smaller hohlraum results in smaller beam spots than had been previously assumed; this puts renewed emphasis on controlling emittance growth in the accelerator and on space-charge neutralization in the reactor chamber. These targets are robust--changes in ion range and ion stopping model can be accommodated by changes in the target. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth rates for this capsule are smaller than those for at least one NIF design. As a result, stability issues for the heavy ion capsule can be settled on NIF. The close-coupled target also opens up the possibility of a high gain Engineering Test Facility from a 1.5-2 MJ driver; calculations predict that gain 90 is achievable from 1.75 MJ of beam energy. Gain curves, used for optimizing the system of accelerator, final focus, chamber transport, and target, are in good agreement with the two-dimensional calculations for both the ``conventional'' and close-coupled case-to-capsule ratio. Finally, we will discuss the choice of hohlraum wall material which must satisfy constraints from target physics (high opacity/low heat capacity to minimize the amount of energy in the hohlraum wall), environment and safety (low activation for recycling and waste disposal), chamber design (recovery of the material from the chamber), and target fabrication (need to produce many low cost targets per day).

  18. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    2000-03-01

    This is the twenty-seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components.

  19. New Fusion Concept Using Coaxial Passing Through Each Other Self-focusing Colliding Beams (Invention)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikvashvili, Ioseb

    2011-10-01

    In proposed Concept it is offered to use two ion beams directed coaxially at the same direction but with different velocities (center-of-mass collision energy should be sufficient for fusion), to direct oppositely the relativistic electron beam for only partial compensation of positive space charge and for allowing the combined beam's pinch capability, to apply the longitudinal electric field for compensation of alignment of velocities of reacting particles and also for compensation of energy losses of electrons via Bremsstrahlung. On base of Concept different types of reactor designs can be realized: Linear and Cyclic designs. In the simplest embodiment the Cyclic Reactor (design) may include: betatron type device (circular store of externally injected particles - induction accelerator), pulse high-current relativistic electron injector, pulse high-current slower ion injector, pulse high-current faster ion injector and reaction products extractor. Using present day technologies and materials (or a reasonable extrapolation of those) it is possible to reach: for induction linear injectors (ions&electrons) - currents of thousands A, repeatability - up to 10Hz, the same for high-current betatrons (FFAG, Stellatron, etc.). And it is possible to build the fusion reactor using the proposed Method just today.

  20. Progress in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.a.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-06-28

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is expected to demonstrate high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next decade and is a leading candidate for inertial fusion energy production. The NIF will initially be configured for x-ray drive and with no beams placed at the target equator to provide a symmetric irradiation of a direct-drive capsule. LLE is developing the “polar-direct-drive” (PDD) approach that repoints beams toward the target equator. Initial 2-D simulations have shown ignition. A unique “Saturn-like” plastic ring around the equator refracts the laser light incident near the equator toward the target, improving the drive uniformity.

  1. Copper-coated laser-fusion targets using molecular-beam levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Rocke, M.J.

    1981-09-08

    A series of diagnostic experiments at the Shiva laser fusion facility required targets of glass microspheres coated with 1.5 to 3.0 ..mu..m of copper. Previous batch coating efforts using vibration techniques gave poor results due to microsphere sticking and vacuum welding. Molecular Beam Levitation (MBL) represented a noncontact method to produce a sputtered copper coating on a single glassmicrosphere. The coating specifications that were achieved resulted in a copper layer up to 3 ..mu..m thick with the allowance of a maximum variation of 10 nm in surface finish and thickness. These techniques developed with the MBL may be applied to sputter coat many soft metals for fusion target applications.

  2. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for edge plasma analysis in Tokamaks. Annual progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Castracane, J.; Saravia, E.; Beckstead, J.; Aceto, S.

    1993-09-03

    The contents of this report present the progress achieved to date on the Heavy Neutral Beam Probe project. This effort is an international collaboration in magnetic confinement fusion energy research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research (Confinement Systems Division) and the Centre Canadien de Fusion Magnetique (CCFM). The overall objective of the effort is to develop and apply a neutral particle beam to the study of edge plasma dynamics in discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) facility in Montreal, Canada. To achieve this goal, a research and development project was established to produce the necessary hardware to make such measurements and meet the scheduling requirements of the program. At present the project is in the middle of its second budget period with the instrumentation on-site at TdeV. The first half of this budget period was used to complete total system tests at InterScience, Inc., dismantle and ship the hardware to TdeV, re-assemble and install the HNBP on the tokamak. Integration of the diagnostic into the TdeV facility has progressed to the point of first beam production and measurement on the plasma. At this time, the HNBP system is undergoing final de-bugging prior to re-start of machine operation in early Fall of this year.

  3. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-15

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  4. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  5. Fast ignition of a compressed inertial confinement fusion hemispherical capsule by two proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, Mauro

    2006-12-15

    A hemispherical conically guided indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion capsule has been considered. The fast ignition of the precompressed capsule driven by one or two laser-accelerated proton beams has been numerically investigated. The energy distribution of the protons is Gaussian with a mean energy of 12 MeV and a full width at half maximum of 1 MeV. A new scheme that uses two laser-accelerated proton beams is proposed. It is found that the energy deposition of 1 kJ provided by a first proton beam generates a low-density cylindrical channel and launches a forward shock. A second proton beam, delayed by a few tens of ps and driving the energy of 6 kJ, crosses the low-density channel and heats the dense shocked region where the ignition of the deuterium-tritium nuclear fuel is achieved. For the considered capsule, this new two-beam configuration reduces the ignition energy threshold to 7 kJ.

  6. Progress of laser fusion in the last 40 years and expected prosperous applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    2008-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion has remarkably developed in the last 40 years. In the 21st century, we can expect fusion energy for civilian use. We had performed two types of fusion experiments: High Temperature Demonstration and High Density Demonstration. The former experiment attained a neutron yield 1013 using the LHART target driven by the GEKKO XII laser. The latter achieved the 1000 times normal density using the random phased laser beams which realized the Edward Teller proposal of IQEC 1972. Now, the FIREX project to explore fast ignition is going on. The heating process of energetic electrons as well as ions is a key issue of the fast ignition. Investigation on the extreme condition of plasma in high density and high temperature which are introduced by the PW laser give us a new field of nuclear science. On the way to the final fusion goal, we can expect various fruits in the field of high power laser applications, such as laser-induced nuclear reaction, EUV light source for lithography, nuclear transmutation, laser astrophysics, medical application of particle beam and so on.

  7. A 3-year plan for beam science in the heavy-ion fusion virtual national laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B. Grant

    2001-09-10

    In December 1998, LBNL Director Charles Shank and LLNL Director Bruce Tarter signed a Memorandum of Agreement to create the Heavy-Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) with the purpose of improving the efficiency and productivity of heavy ion research through coordination of the two laboratories' efforts under one technical director. In 1999, PPPL Director Robert Goldston signed the VNL MOA for PPPL's heavy-ion fusion group to join the VNL. LBNL and LLNL each contribute about 45% of the $10.6 M/yr trilab VNL effort, and PPPL contributes currently about 10% of the VNL effort. The three labs carry out collaborative experiments, theory and simulations of a variety of intense beam scientific issues described below. The tri-lab HIF VNL program is part of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) fusion program. A short description of the four major tasks areas of HIF-VNL research is given in the next section. The task areas are: High Current Experiment, Final Focus/Chamber Transport, Source/Injector/Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), and Theory/Simulation. As a result of the internal review, more detailed reviews of the designs, costs and schedules for some of the tasks have been completed, which will provide more precision in the scheduled completion dates of tasks. The process for the ongoing engineering reviews and governance for the future management of tasks is described in section 3. A description of the major milestones and scientific deliverables for flat guidance budgets are given in section 4. Section 5 describes needs for enabling technology development for future experiments that require incremental funding.

  8. Considerations for the development of neutral beam injection for fusion reactors or DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.; Boilson, D.

    2017-08-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) has been the most successful heating scheme applied to fusion devices, the majority of which have been based on the acceleration and neutralization in a gas target of accelerated positive ions. For large fusion devices such as ITER, DEMO and fusion reactors, beam energies of the order of 0.5 MeV per nucleon or higher are required to penetrate deeply into the fusing plasma, and thus to heat the plasma in the most important region, i.e. near the poloidal axis of the device, and to drive current in the plasma. Because the efficiency of neutralization of positive ions in a gas target becomes unacceptably low at energies above ≈100 keV/nucleon, future injectors will be based on the neutralization of negative ions, either in a gas target, by photons or in a plasma target. So far only two systems based on negative ions have been used on fusion devices, at JT-60U and at LHD, both based on neutralization in a gas target. The injectors for ITER will also use a gas target, but the energy and operating environment are reactor and DEMO relevant. Also the ITER injectors will have to operate for pulse lengths orders of magnitude higher than all previous NBI systems. In this paper the R&D required for an NBI system for a reactor, or DEMO, is considered against the background of the ITER NBI system development, and the main elements of the required R&D are identified.

  9. Can fan beam iCT accurately predict indirect decompression in MISS fusion procedures?

    PubMed

    Janssen, Insa; Lang, Gernot; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Jada, Ajit; Berlin, Connor; Hilis, Aaron; Zubkov, Micaella; Gandevia, Lena; Härtl, Roger

    2017-08-07

    Recently, a novel mobile intraoperative fan-beam CT (iFBCT) was introduced, allowing for real time navigation and immediate intraoperative evaluation of neural decompression in spine surgery. This study sought to investigate whether intraoperatively assessed neural decompression during minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) has a predictive value for clinical and radiographic outcome. A retrospective study of patients undergoing iCT-guided extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) was conducted. Pre- (1) and intraoperative (after cage implantation; 2), postoperative (3), and follow-up (4) radiographic and clinical parameters obtained from X-rays or CT were quantified. 34 patients (41 spinal segments) were analyzed. iCT-based navigation was successfully accomplished in all patients. Radiographic parameters, revealed significant improvement from preoperatively to intraoperatively after cage implantation in both MISS procedures (XLIF/TLIF) (p≤0.05). Radiological parameters for both MISS fusion procedures did not reveal significant differences to the assessed radiographic measures at follow-up (P>0.05). Radiological outcome values did not decrease when compared intraoperatively (after cage implantation) to latest follow-up. Utilization of intraoperative fan-beam CT is capable of assessing neural decompression intraoperatively with high accuracy allowing for precise prediction of radiological outcome and earliest possible feedback during MISS fusion procedures. These findings are highly valuable for routine practice and future investigations towards finding a threshold for neural decompression that translates into clinical improvement. If sufficient neural decompression has been confirmed with iCT imaging studies, additional postoperative and/or follow-up imaging studies might no longer be required if patients remain asymptomatic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ion cyclotron emission due to collective instability of fusion products and beam ions in TFTR and JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, R. O.; McClements, K. G.; Lashmore-Davies, C. N.; Cottrell, G. A.; Majeski, R.; Cauffman, S.

    1995-12-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been observed from neutral beam heated TFTR, and JET tritium experiments at sequential cyclotron harmonics of both fusion products and beam ions. The emission originates from the outer midplane plasma, where fusion products and beam ions are likely to have a drifting ring-type velocity-space distribution that is anisotropic and sharply peaked. Fusion product driven ICE in both TFTR and JET can be attributed to the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, which involves the excitation of obliquely propagating waves on the fast Alfven/ion Bernstein branch at cyclotron harmonics of the fusion products. Differences between ICE observations in JET and TFTR appear to reflect the sensitivity of the instability growth rate to the ratio vbirth/cA where vbirth is the fusion product birth speed and cA is the local Alfven speed for fusion products in the outer midplane edge of TFTR supershots, vbirth < cA for alpha particles in the outer midplane edge of JET, the opposite inequality applies. If sub-Alfvenic fusion products are isotropic or have undergone even a moderate degree of thermalization, the magnetoacoustic instability cannot occur. In contrast, the super-Alfvenic alpha particles that are present in the outer midplane of JET can drive the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability even if they are isotropic or have a relatively broad distribution of speeds. These conclusions may account for the observation that fusion product driven ICE in JET persists for longer than fusion product driven ICE in TFTR. Moreover, the time evolution of the maximum growth rate, obtained using the Sigmar model for the alpha particle distribution and TFTR data for the fusion product source rate, closely follows the observed time evolution of the ICE amplitude in TFTR supershot discharges. Other observed features of fusion product driven ICE that match the linear instability include the scaling with fusion product density, doublet splitting of spectral peaks, the

  11. Two decades of progress in understanding and control of laser plasma instabilities in indirect drive inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David S.

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of laser-plasma instability (LPI) physics has improved dramatically over the past two decades through advancements in experimental techniques, diagnostics, and theoretical and modeling approaches. We have progressed from single-beam experiments—ns pulses with ˜kJ energy incident on hundred-micron-scale target plasmas with ˜keV electron temperatures—to ones involving nearly 2 MJ energy in 192 beams onto multi-mm-scale plasmas with temperatures ˜4 keV. At the same time, we have also been able to use smaller-scale laser facilities to substantially improve our understanding of LPI physics and evaluate novel approaches to their control. These efforts have led to a change in paradigm for LPI research, ushering in an era of engineering LPI to accomplish specific objectives, from tuning capsule implosion symmetry to fixing nonlinear saturation of LPI processes at acceptable levels to enable the exploration of high energy density physics in novel plasma regimes. A tutorial is provided that reviews the progress in the field from the vantage of the foundational LPI experimental results. The pedagogical framework of the simplest models of LPI will be employed, but attention will also be paid to settings where more sophisticated models are needed to understand the observations. Prospects for the application of our improved understanding for inertial fusion (both indirect- and direct-drive) and other applications will also be discussed.

  12. Two decades of progress in understanding and control of laser plasma instabilities in indirect drive inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Montgomery, David S.

    2016-04-14

    Our understanding of laser-plasma instability (LPI) physics has improved dramatically over the past two decades through advancements in experimental techniques, diagnostics, and theoretical and modeling approaches. We have progressed from single-beam experiments—ns pulses with ~kJ energy incident on hundred-micron-scale target plasmas with ~keV electron temperatures—to ones involving nearly 2 MJ energy in 192 beams onto multi-mm-scale plasmas with temperatures ~4 keV. At the same time, we have also been able to use smaller-scale laser facilities to substantially improve our understanding of LPI physics and evaluate novel approaches to their control. These efforts have led to a change in paradigm formore » LPI research, ushering in an era of engineering LPI to accomplish specific objectives, from tuning capsule implosion symmetry to fixing nonlinear saturation of LPI processes at acceptable levels to enable the exploration of high energy density physics in novel plasma regimes. A tutorial is provided that reviews the progress in the field from the vantage of the foundational LPI experimental results. The pedagogical framework of the simplest models of LPI will be employed, but attention will also be paid to settings where more sophisticated models are needed to understand the observations. Prospects for the application of our improved understanding for inertial fusion (both indirect- and direct-drive) and other applications will also be discussed.« less

  13. Two decades of progress in understanding and control of laser plasma instabilities in indirect drive inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, David S.

    2016-04-14

    Our understanding of laser-plasma instability (LPI) physics has improved dramatically over the past two decades through advancements in experimental techniques, diagnostics, and theoretical and modeling approaches. We have progressed from single-beam experiments—ns pulses with ~kJ energy incident on hundred-micron-scale target plasmas with ~keV electron temperatures—to ones involving nearly 2 MJ energy in 192 beams onto multi-mm-scale plasmas with temperatures ~4 keV. At the same time, we have also been able to use smaller-scale laser facilities to substantially improve our understanding of LPI physics and evaluate novel approaches to their control. These efforts have led to a change in paradigm for LPI research, ushering in an era of engineering LPI to accomplish specific objectives, from tuning capsule implosion symmetry to fixing nonlinear saturation of LPI processes at acceptable levels to enable the exploration of high energy density physics in novel plasma regimes. A tutorial is provided that reviews the progress in the field from the vantage of the foundational LPI experimental results. The pedagogical framework of the simplest models of LPI will be employed, but attention will also be paid to settings where more sophisticated models are needed to understand the observations. Prospects for the application of our improved understanding for inertial fusion (both indirect- and direct-drive) and other applications will also be discussed.

  14. Octopole correction of geometric aberrations for high-current heavy-ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D.D.M.; Haber, I.; Crandall, K.R.; Brandon, S.T.

    1989-03-17

    The success of heavy-ion fusion depends critically on the ability to focus heavy-ion beams to millimeter-size spots. Third-order geometric aberrations caused by fringe fields of the final focusing quadrupoles can significantly distort the focal spot size calculated by first-order theory. We present a method to calculate the locations and strengths of the octopoles that are needed to correct these aberrations. Calculation indicates that the strengths of the octopoles are substantially less than that of the final focusing quadrupoles. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Experimental Investigations on Fusion Cutting Stainless Steel with Fiber and CO2 Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, S.; Mahrle, A.; Wetzig, A.; Beyer, E.

    First results of an experimental study on inert-gas fusion cutting stainless steel with different types of laser are presented. In particular, the cutting capabilities of a fiber and a CO2 laser beam with similar Rayleigh length have been compared as a function of material thickness with respect to achievable maximum cutting speed, cut edge surface roughness and cut kerf geometry. The most interesting finding achieved so far concerns the observation that the cut kerfs are nearly identical in size but differ qualitatively in shape for both laser teypes.

  16. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for the Period Ending June 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1999-09-01

    This is the twenty-sixth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and its reported separately.

  17. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

  18. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-09-01

    This is the twenty-fourth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

    1999-04-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

  20. Recent progress in understanding the behavior of dust in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu; Smirnov, R. D.; Rosenberg, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Benson, D. J.; Soboleva, T. K.; Rognlien, T. D.; Mendis, D. A.; Bray, B. D.; Rudakov, D. L.; Yu, J. H.; West, W. P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.; Terry, J. L.; Lipschultz, B.; Bader, A.; Granetz, R. S.; Pitcher, C. S.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.; Masuzaki, S.; Ashikawa, N.; Shiratani, M.; Tokitani, M.; Kumazawa, R.; Asakura, N.; Nakano, T.; Litnovsky, A. M.; Maqueda, R.; LHD Experimental Group

    2008-12-01

    It has been known for a long time that microscopic dust appears in plasmas in fusion devices. Recently it was shown that dust can be responsible for the termination of long- discharges. Also, in ITER-scale experiments dust can pose safety problems related to its chemical activity, tritium retention and radioactive content. In particular, the presence of dust in the vacuum chamber of ITER is one of the main concerns of the ITER licensing process. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of different experimental and theoretical aspects of the physics of dust dynamics and transport in fusion plasmas and discuss the remaining issues.

  1. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1987-09-01

    This is the second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities in the following areas: (1) Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; (2) Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and (3) Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. Separate analytics were prepared for the reports in this volume.

  2. MR cone-beam CT fusion image overlay for fluoroscopically guided percutaneous biopsies in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Patel, Premal A; Gu, Richard; Rea, Vanessa; Amaral, Joao; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2016-03-01

    Lesions only visible on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging cannot easily be targeted for image-guided biopsy using ultrasound or X-rays but instead require MR guidance with MR-compatible needles and long procedure times (acquisition of multiple MR sequences). We developed an alternative method for performing these difficult biopsies in a standard interventional suite, by fusing MR with cone-beam CT images. The MR cone-beam CT fusion image is then used as an overlay to guide a biopsy needle to the target area under live fluoroscopic guidance. Advantages of this technique include (i) the ability for it to be performed in a conventional interventional suite, (ii) three-dimensional planning of the needle trajectory using cross-sectional imaging, (iii) real-time fluoroscopic guidance for needle trajectory correction and (iv) targeting within heterogeneous lesions based on MR signal characteristics to maximize the potential biopsy yield.

  3. Ion-beam inertial fusion: the requirements posed by target and deposition physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1981-10-19

    The demonstration of ICF scientific feasibility requires success in target design, driver development and target fabrication. Since these are interrelated, we present here some results of ion beam target studies and relate them to parameters of interest to ion accelerators. Ion deposition physics have long been a well known subject apart from high beam currents. Recent NRL experiments at up to 250 kA/cm/sup 2/ ions confirm the classical deposition physics now at current densities which are comparable to most ion targets. On the other hand, GSI data at low current density but 1 to 10 MeV/nucleon are continually being accumulated. They have yet to find anomalous results. Relying on target concepts outlined briefly, we report on the energy gain of ion-driven fusion targets as a function of input energy, ion ranges and focal spot radius. We also comment on some consequences of target gain versus driver and reactor requirements.

  4. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  5. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  6. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  7. Computer and experimental modeling of target performance in particle beams and fusion or fission environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptelov, E. A.; Lebedev, S. G.; Matveev, V. A.; Sobolevsky, N. M.; Strebkov, Yu. S.; Subbotin, A. V.

    2002-03-01

    Computer simulation of target performance in particle beams for fusion or fission irradiation is considered. Such simulation is realized by means of a set of Russian computer codes SHIELD, RADDAM, etc. The set can permit the full modeling of irradiation conditions of any possible installation in terms of such parameters as: point defect generation by irradiation; rate of accumulation of He atoms produced in nuclear reactions; rate of accumulation of H atoms; spectra of primary knock-on atoms in collision displacements and temperature of the sample under irradiation. The evidence of possibilities for the modeling of different irradiation conditions (for example, fusion) at the RADEX facility of the INR RAS is presented. RADEX is the irradiation channel located inside the proton target of the beam stop of the INR RAS linear proton accelerator with energy up to 600 MeV. The proton target is situated in the bottom part of target's cylindrical container and is formed by tungsten plates, which are covered with a titanium coating and cooled by light water. The RADEX irradiation channel is located asymmetrically relatively to the vertical axis of the cylinder. The proton beam enters the irradiation channel through the aluminum alloy first wall, having passed through some of the tungsten plates, all of thickness ˜4 cm. Besides the proton flux, the irradiation channel is subjected to a neutron flux of a spallation spectrum. The location of the irradiation channel of the RADEX facility can be changed by rotation of the proton target about the vertical axis. There are six possible different positions of the irradiation channel, with angles of 0°, 60°, 120°, 180°, 240°, 300°, 360° relative to the proton beam direction. In the position 0, the proton and neutron fluxes are maximal in the irradiation channel, and the spectrum of primary knock-on atoms in the irradiated sample will be very hard due to the predominance of high-energy protons in the irradiation field. The

  8. PROGRESS: Fusion of forecasts from the Sun to the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Simon; Balikhin, Michael; Wintoft, Peter; Arber, Tony; Krasnoselskikh, Volodya; Ganushkina, Natalia; Liemohn, Michael; Shprits, Yuri; Boynton, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The particle environment of the inner magnetosphere is strongly coupled to variations in the solar wind. The introduction of large fluxes of electrons into the radiation belts and their subsequent acceleration to high energies can result in the internal and surface charging of space assets, possibly leading to disruption and even cessation of essential services. Reliable forecast of the fluences of these electrons can assist in the mitigation of undesirable effects on spacecraft. PROGRESS, an EU Horizon 2020 funded project, aims to provide forecasts of the evolution of the geospace environment beginning from the surface of the sun to the radiation belts. We review the current status of the projects and the challenges that still lie ahead.

  9. Simulations of the performance of the Fusion-FEM, for an increased e-beam emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Tulupov, A.V.; Urbanus, W.H.; Caplan, M.

    1995-12-31

    The original design of the Fusion-FEM, which is under construction at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, was based on an electron beam emittance of 50 {pi} mm mrad. Recent measurements of the emittance of the beam emitted by the electron gun showed that the actual emittance is 80 {pi} mm mrad. This results in a 2.5 times lower beam current density inside the undulator. As a result it changes the linear gain, the start-up time, the saturation level and the frequency spectrum. The main goal of the FEM project is to demonstrate a stable microwave output power of at least 1 MW. The decrease of the electron beam current density has to be compensated by variations of the other FEM parameters, such as the reflection (feedback) coefficient of the microwave cavity and the length of the drift gap between the two sections of the step-tapered undulator. All basic dependencies of the linear and nonlinear gain, and of the output power on the main FEM parameters have been simulated numerically with the CRMFEL code. Regimes of stable operation of the FEM with the increased emittance have been found. These regimes could be found because of the original flexibility of the FEM design.

  10. Negative ion source development for a photoneutralization based neutral beam system for future fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, A.; Agnello, R.; Bechu, S.; Bernard, J. M.; Blondel, C.; Boeuf, J. P.; Bresteau, D.; Cartry, G.; Chaibi, W.; Drag, C.; Duval, B. P.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Fubiani, G.; Furno, I.; Grand, C.; Guittienne, Ph; Howling, A.; Jacquier, R.; Marini, C.; Morgal, I.

    2016-12-01

    In parallel to the developments dedicated to the ITER neutral beam (NB) system, CEA-IRFM with laboratories in France and Switzerland are studying the feasibility of a new generation of NB system able to provide heating and current drive for the future DEMOnstration fusion reactor. For the steady-state scenario, the NB system will have to provide a high NB power level with a high wall-plug efficiency (η ˜ 60%). Neutralization of the energetic negative ions by photodetachment (so called photoneutralization), if feasible, appears to be the ideal solution to meet these performances, in the sense that it could offer a high beam neutralization rate (>80%) and a wall-plug efficiency higher than 60%. The main challenge of this new injector concept is the achievement of a very high power photon flux which could be provided by 3 MW Fabry-Perot optical cavities implanted along the 1 MeV D- beam in the neutralizer stage. The beamline topology is tall and narrow to provide laminar ion beam sheets, which will be entirely illuminated by the intra-cavity photon beams propagating along the vertical axis. The paper describes the present R&D (experiments and modelling) addressing the development of a new ion source concept (Cybele source) which is based on a magnetized plasma column. Parametric studies of the source are performed using Langmuir probes in order to characterize and compare the plasma parameters in the source column with different plasma generators, such as filamented cathodes, radio-frequency driver and a helicon antenna specifically developed at SPC-EPFL satisfying the requirements for the Cybele (axial magnetic field of 10 mT, source operating pressure: 0.3 Pa in hydrogen or deuterium). The paper compares the performances of the three plasma generators. It is shown that the helicon plasma generator is a very promising candidate to provide an intense and uniform negative ion beam sheet.

  11. Three dimensional simulations of space charge dominated heavy ion beams with applications to inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, David Peter

    1994-11-01

    Heavy ion fusion requires injection, transport and acceleration of high current beams. Detailed simulation of such beams requires fully self-consistent space charge fields and three dimensions. WARP3D, developed for this purpose, is a particle-in-cell plasma simulation code optimized to work within the framework of an accelerator`s lattice of accelerating, focusing, and bending elements. The code has been used to study several test problems and for simulations and design of experiments. Two applications are drift compression experiments on the MBE-4 facility at LBL and design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector for the proposed ILSE facility. With aggressive drift compression on MBE-4, anomalous emittance growth was observed. Simulations carried out to examine possible causes showed that essentially all the emittance growth is result of external forces on the beam and not of internal beam space-charge fields. Dominant external forces are the dodecapole component of focusing fields, the image forces on the surrounding pipe and conductors, and the octopole fields that result from the structure of the quadrupole focusing elements. Goal of the design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector is to produce a beam of as low emittance as possible. The simulations show that the dominant effects that increase the emittance are the nonlinear octopole fields and the energy effect (fields in the axial direction that are off-axis). Injectors were designed that minimized the beam envelope in order to reduce the effect of the nonlinear fields. Alterations to the quadrupole structure that reduce the nonlinear fields further were examined. Comparisons were done with a scaled experiment resulted in very good agreement.

  12. Comparison of electron beam and laser beam powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process for high temperature turbine component materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A; Ryan, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The evolving 3D printer technology is now at the point where some turbine components could be additive manufactured (AM) for both development and production purposes. However, this will require a significant evaluation program to qualify the process and components to meet current design and quality standards. The goal of the project was to begin characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nickel Alloy X (Ni-22Cr-18Fe-9Mo) test bars fabricated by powder bed fusion (PBF) AM processes that use either an electron beam (EB) or laser beam (LB) power source. The AM materials produced with the EB and LB processes displayed significant differences in microstructure and resultant mechanical properties. Accordingly, during the design analysis of AM turbine components, the specific mechanical behavior of the material produced with the selected AM process should be considered. Comparison of the mechanical properties of both the EB and LB materials to those of conventionally processed Nickel Alloy X materials indicates the subject AM materials are viable alternatives for manufacture of some turbine components.

  13. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  14. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This is the seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance, damage analysis and fundamental studies, and special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  16. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1988-03-01

    This is the third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performances; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  17. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This is the sixteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following Progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. The individual papers in this paper have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  18. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1991-07-01

    This is the tenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance; damage analysis and fundamental studies; special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the test of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  19. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  20. Progress in Inertial Fusion Energy Modelling at DENIM

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde, G; Cabellos, O; Caturla, M J; Florido, R; Gil, J M; Leon, P T; Mancini, R; Marian, J; Martel, P; Martinez-Val, J M; Minguez, E; Mota, F; Ogando, F; Perlado, J M; Piera, M; Reyes, S; Rodriguez, R; Rubiano, J G; Salvador, M; Sanz, J; Sauvan, P; Velarde, M; Velarde, P

    2004-11-17

    . However, results from theory and simulation to explain that physics is being slowly progressing. The systematic identification of type of stable defects is the first goal that will presented after verification of a new tight binding MD technique. The different level of knowledge between simulation and experiments will be remarked. Our research on simulation of Silica Irradiation Damage will also be presented. We also will present the role of ingestion by tritiated foods, when the most important chemical forms of tritium, elemental tritium (HT) and tritiated water (HTO) derive in special form of tritium: Organically Bound Tritium (OBT).

  1. Recent progress on MHD-induced loss of D-D fusion products in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Budny, R.V.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Herrmann, H.; Mynick, H.E.; Schivell, J.; Chang, Z.

    1993-08-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress made toward understanding the MHD-induced loss of D-D fusion products which has been seen on TFTR since 1988. These measurements have been made using the ``lost alpha`` diagnostic, which is described briefly. The largest MHD- induced loss occurs with coherent 3/2 or 2/1 MHD activity (kink/tearing modes), which can cause up to {approx}3--5 times the first-orbit loss at I{approx}1.6--1.8 MA, roughly a {approx}20--30% global los of D-D fusion products. Modeling of these MHD-induced losses has progressed to the point where the basic loss mechanism can be accounted for qualitatively, but the experimental results can not yet be understood quantitatively. Several alpha loss codes are being developed to improve the quantitative comparison between experiment and theory.

  2. Maryland controlled fusion research program. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Drake, J.F.; Finn, J.M.; Guzdar, P.; Hassam, A.; Liu, C.S.; Ott, E.

    1993-05-01

    In recent years, members of the Maryland Plasma Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory program, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In this paper, we summarize the technical progress in four major areas of tokamak research: (a) L/H transition and edge turbulence and transport; (b) active control of micro-turbulence and transport; (c) major disruptions; and (d) the sawtooth crash.

  3. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Cook, R.C.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Letts, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    We describe progress made during 1986 in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser fusion. The foam materials are polystyrene and resorcinolformaldehyde. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationships of their properties to target specifications are presented. In the final section, we discuss statistical experimental design techniques that are being used to optimize the foams. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  5. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitively pulsed, intense- ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.; Reass, W.A.; Coates, D.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Schleinitz, H.M.; Lovberg, R.H.; Greenly, J.B.

    1996-07-01

    A number of intense ion beams applications are emerging requiring repetitive high-average-power beams. These applications include ablative deposition of thin films, rapid melt and resolidification for surface property enhancement, advanced diagnostic neutral beams for the next generation of Tokamaks, and intense pulsed-neutron sources. We are developing a 200-250 keV, 15 kA, 1 {mu}s duration, 1-30 Hz intense ion beam accelerator to address these applications.

  6. The giant ion sources of neutral-beam injectors for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1989-07-01

    All large tokamak fusion experiments today use auxiliary heating by multi-megawatt beams of neutral isotopes of hydrogen injected with energies in the neighborhood of 100 keV per atom. This requires reliable operation of large ion sources, each delivering many tens of amperes of protons or deuterons, and soon even tritons. For meaningful experiments these sources must operate with pulse durations measured in seconds, although the duty factor may still be small. It is remarkable that the successful sources developed in Europe, Japan and the US are all very similar in basic design: the plasma is produced by diffuse low-pressure high-current discharges in magnetic multipole buckets'' was distributed thermionically emitting cathodes. This paper briefly reviews the principal considerations and the basic physics of these sources, and summarizes the collective experience to date and describes the impressive recent performance of the US Common Long Pulse Source, as a specific example. 20 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-03-01

    This is the twenty-third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. A large fraction of this work, particularly in relation to fission reactor experiments, is carried out collaboratively with their partners in Japan, Russia, and the European Union. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Microwave generation for magnetic fusion energy applications. Progress report, July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.

    1993-02-01

    This work strives to develop high average power FELs at voltages below I MV allowing for smaller and less costly power supplies. To achieve operation of an FEL with 100 GHZ {approx_lt} f {approx_lt} 150 GHz and with relatively modest voltage, we have been investigating the use of small period ({lambda}{sub {omega}} {approximately} 1 cm) planar wiggler magnets together with sheet electron beams. The sheet beam geometry allows for an FEL interaction region in the form of a narrow slit with high wiggler field at the center plane where the electrons are concentrated. The total current and power may then be increased without making current density excessive by increasing the wide dimension of the sheet beam. Sheet beam FEL design parameters for both a Proof-of-Principle (PoP) FEL experiment, which is current in progress, and an ITER relevant FEL design are shown. A central issue in the sheet beam FEL concept is propagation of the beam through the interaction region without excessive interception by the walls. In section 2 below we describe a successful experimental demonstration of sheet beam propagation through a 56 period uniform wiggler. Cold testing and initial hot test operation of the (PoP) FEL amplifier are also described. Finally, we present a theoretical investigation of the bandwidth of an FEL amplifier with a tapered wiggler operating in saturation is described.

  9. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  10. Efficiency and beam quality deterioration in double-cladding fiber amplifiers induced by core misalignment of fusion splices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chen; Yan, Ping; Xiao, Qirong; li, Dan; Gong, Mali

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the efficiency and beam quality deteriorations in double-cladding fiber (DCF) amplifiers induced by core misalignment of series fusion splices are investigated. The losses of guide modes and power conversions between fundamental mode and high order modes (HOM) are well described according to mode coupling theory. Furthermore, a typical fiber amplifier with three fusion splices and bending mode-selection is established to discuss the mechanism of deteriorations in total systems. Mode competition theory is also introduced to describe different modes powers and beam quality changes with fiber length. Based on these calculations, the accumulations of deterioration caused by series fusion splices are intuitively illustrated. These simulations of laser performance show good accordance with the experimental results. An effective method to significantly enhance the performance of the fiber amplifier is also shown and discussed.

  11. Development of the Science and Technology of Electron Beam Pumped KrF Lasers for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, John

    2002-11-01

    Electron beam pumped krypton fluoride (KrF) lasers are an attractive driver for inertial fusion energy. They have demonstrated very high beam quality, which is essential for reducing imprint in direct drive targets. Their short wavelength (248 nm) mitigates the growth of plasma instabilities. And they have the potential to meet the fusion needs for repetition rate, efficiency, and cost. This paper reviews the development of e-beam pumped KrF lasers. It will include a description of the fundamental physics and technology, as well as the challenges in developing a fusion system. Although KrF laser development is a multi-disciplinary endeavor, this talk will emphasize areas of interest to plasma physicists: electron beams, KrF kinetics, and pulsed power. The paper will describe experiments and modeling that has identified and mitigated instabilities in the electron beam. It will describe the electron beam propagation experiments, the supporting 3D parallel PIC codes, and how these have been used to design systems for maximum electron energy deposition into the laser gas. KrF kinetics modeling will be discussed. These newly developed time dependent codes can predict the output of several experiments operating under significantly different conditions. They are now being used as a design tool to predict the performance of future KrF systems. Finally, the talk will discuss the development of the pulsed power needed to drive the electron beams. This includes conventional gas switched systems for single shot devices together with the recently demonstrated all solid state switches that have the promise to meet the fusion requirements. The talk will be cast in context of the large, single shot KrF lasers built in the 1990's such as Nike (NRL-US), Ashura (Japan), and Titania (UK), as well as the Electra 700 J, 5 Hz rep-rate laser that is currently under development at NRL.

  12. Near and sub-barrier fusion of neutron-rich oxygen and carbon nuclei using low-intensity beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Tracy K.

    Fusion between neutron-rich light nuclei in the crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as a heat source that triggers an X-ray superburst. To explore the probability with which such fusion events occur and examine their decay characteristics, an experimental program using beams of neutron-rich light nuclei has been established. Evaporation residues resulting from the fusion of oxygen and 12C nuclei, are directly measured and distinguished from unreacted beam particles on the basis of their energy and time-of-flight. Using an experimental setup developed for measurements utilizing low-intensity (< 105 ions/s) radioactive beams, the fusion excitation functions for 16O + 12C and 18O + 12C have been measured. The fusion excitation function for 18O + 12C has been measured in the sub-barrier domain down to the 820 mub level, a factor of 30 lower than previous direct measurements. This measured fusion excitation function is compared to the predictions of a density constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock model. This comparison reveals a shape difference in the fusion excitation functions, indicating a larger tunneling probability for the experimental data as compared to the theoretical calculations. In addition to the measured cross-section, the measured angular distribution of the evaporation residues provides insight into the relative importance of the different de-excitation channels. These evaporation residue angular distributions are compared to the predictions of a statistical model code, evapOR, revealing an under-prediction of the de-excitation channels associated with alpha particle emission.

  13. Active and Progressive Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Using Multisource Information Fusion From EMG and Force-Position EPP.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuanjie; Yin, Yuehong

    2013-12-01

    Although exoskeletons have received enormous attention and have been widely used in gait training and walking assistance in recent years, few reports addressed their application during early poststroke rehabilitation. This paper presents a healthcare technology for active and progressive early rehabilitation using multisource information fusion from surface electromyography and force-position extended physiological proprioception. The active-compliance control based on interaction force between patient and exoskeleton is applied to accelerate the recovery of the neuromuscular function, whereby progressive treatment through timely evaluation contributes to an effective and appropriate physical rehabilitation. Moreover, a clinic-oriented rehabilitation system, wherein a lower extremity exoskeleton with active compliance is mounted on a standing bed, is designed to ensure comfortable and secure rehabilitation according to the structure and control requirements. Preliminary experiments and clinical trial demonstrate valuable information on the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of the progressive exoskeleton-assisted training.

  14. Recent progress in research on tungsten materials for nuclear fusion applications in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dudarev, S. L.; Gonzalez de Vicente, S. M.; Aktaa, J.; Ahlgren, T.; Antusch, S.; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Balden, M.; Baluc, N.; Barthe, M.-F.; Basuki, W. W.; Battabyal, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Blagoeva, D.; Boldyryeva, H.; Brinkmann, J.; Celino, M.; Ciupinski, L.; Correia, J. B.; De Backer, A.; Domain, C.; Gaganidze, E.; García-Rosales, C.; Gibson, J.; Gilbert, M. R.; Giusepponi, S.; Gludovatz, B.; Greuner, H.; Heinola, K.; Höschen, T.; Hoffmann, A.; Holstein, N.; Koch, F.; Krauss, W.; Li, H.; Lindig, S.; Linke, J.; Linsmeier, Ch.; López-Ruiz, P.; Maier, H.; Matejicek, J.; Mishra, T. P.; Muhammed, M.; Muñoz, A.; Muzyk, M.; Nordlund, K.; Nguyen-Manh, D.; Opschoor, J.; Ordás, N.; Palacios, T.; Pintsuk, G.; Pippan, R.; Reiser, J.; Riesch, J.; Roberts, S. G.; Romaner, L.; Rosiński, M.; Sanchez, M.; Schulmeyer, W.; Traxler, H.; Ureña, A.; van der Laan, J. G.; Veleva, L.; Wahlberg, S.; Walter, M.; Weber, T.; Weitkamp, T.; Wurster, S.; Yar, M. A.; You, J. H.; Zivelonghi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The current magnetic confinement nuclear fusion power reactor concepts going beyond ITER are based on assumptions about the availability of materials with extreme mechanical, heat, and neutron load capacity. In Europe, the development of such structural and armour materials together with the necessary production, machining, and fabrication technologies is pursued within the EFDA long-term fusion materials programme. This paper reviews the progress of work within the programme in the area of tungsten and tungsten alloys. Results, conclusions, and future projections are summarized for each of the programme's main subtopics, which are: (1) fabrication, (2) structural W materials, (3) W armour materials, and (4) materials science and modelling. It gives a detailed overview of the latest results on materials research, fabrication processes, joining options, high heat flux testing, plasticity studies, modelling, and validation experiments.

  15. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    This is the twenty-second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Topics covered here are: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composites; ferritic/martensitic steels; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects mechanistic studies and experimental methods; dosimetry damage parameters; activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; irradiation facilities; test matrices; and experimental methods.

  16. Progression of Coronal Cobb Angle After Short-Segment Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Patients with Degenerative Lumbar Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam; Yi, Seong; Shin, Dong Ah; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoon, Do Heum; Ha, Yoon

    2016-05-01

    The progression of scoliosis after fusion surgery is a poor prognostic factor of long-term outcomes in patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis (DLS). In this study we aimed to investigate changes in coronal alignment and identify risk factors related to progression of scoliosis after fusion. There were 540 patients with symptomatic DLS treated by short-segment lumbar fusion surgery. Among them, 50 patients had coronal Cobb angles >10° at the final follow-up. Sixteen patients had increases >5° (progression group), and 34 patients had increases <5° (nonprogression group). Radiologic parameters that may affect the progression of scoliosis were compared. The mean progression of the Cobb angle was 7.92° in the progression group and 1.25° in the nonprogression group. The progression group had significantly longer follow-up periods and a lower preoperative Cobb angle. The apical vertebra (AV) of the major curve was more frequently thoracic in the progression group. Progression of the Cobb angle was correlated with the follow-up period, preoperative Cobb angle, and location of the AV. Multivariate regression analysis showed that progression of the Cobb angle was significantly associated with a lower preoperative Cobb angle, and both facet degeneration of the upper instrumented vertebra at the fusion site and vertebral spur formation on the concave side also appeared to be associated with progression of the Cobb angle. The global magnitude of progression of the Cobb angle after short-segment lumbar fusion surgery in patients with DLS is similar to the natural curve progression of adult degenerative scoliosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of posterior long fusion versus conservative treatment for the progressive rheumatoid cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Omura, Kikuo; Hukuda, Sinsuke; Katsuura, Akitomo; Saruhashi, Yasuo; Imanaka, Toru; Imai, Shinji

    2002-06-15

    Results of the posterior long fusion performed for the progressive cervical lesions of rheumatoid arthritis were compared with the outcomes of those who did not undergo surgical treatment. To provide a clue as to whether posterior long fusion improves or maintains the impaired daily life activity of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis with progressive, mutilating-type joint involvements. To provide optimal treatments for the cervical lesions of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, the natural courses of cervical lesions should be taken into account. In the authors' preliminary study they have retrospectively investigated natural courses of cervical rheumatoid arthritis lesions and have found that the seropositive patients with rheumatoid arthritis with mutilating-type joint involvement are at a high risk of deteriorating the cervical lesion once their cervical spine becomes affected. In the present study 17 seropositive patients with rheumatoid arthritis with mutilating-type joint involvements were studied. Eleven patients underwent surgical treatments (operated group), whereas six patients did not (nonoperated group). All of the operated patients underwent occipitocervical or occipitocervicothoracic fusion supplemented by the Luque's sublaminar wiring and preoperative and postoperative usage of halo-jacket. The six patients of the nonoperated group worsened the activities of daily living score and resulted in either complete bedridden or in death by the time point of final follow-up. In contrast, all of the 11 operated patients either improved or maintained the activities of daily living score: those operated because of neurologic compromise due to myelopathy improved at least one class in the activities of daily living score, and those operated because of severe occipitocervical pain maintained the activities of daily living with relief of pain. The present study suggests that posterior long fusion may achieve an improvement of activities of daily living, at

  18. A dual modality phantom for cone beam CT and ultrasound image fusion in prostate implant

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Angela; Beiki-Ardakan, Akbar; Tong, Shidong; Moseley, Douglas; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Jaffray, David; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2008-05-15

    In transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate seed brachytherapy, TRUS provides good delineation of the prostate while x-ray imaging, e.g., C-arm, gives excellent contrast for seed localization. With the recent availability of cone beam CT (CBCT) technology, the combination of the two imaging modalities may provide an ideal system for intraoperative dosimetric feedback during implantation. A dual modality phantom made of acrylic and copper wire was designed to measure the accuracy and precision of image coregistration between a C-arm based CBCT and 3D TRUS. The phantom was scanned with TRUS and CBCT under the same setup condition. Successive parallel transverse ultrasound (US) images were acquired through manual stepping of the US probe across the phantom at an increment of 1 mm over 7.5 cm. The CBCT imaging was done with three reconstructed slice thicknesses (0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 mm) as well as at three different tilt angles (0 deg., 15 deg., 30 deg. ), and the coregistration between CBCT and US images was done using the Variseed system based on four fiducial markers. Fiducial localization error (FLE), fiducial registration error (FRE), and target registration error (TRE) were calculated for all registered image sets. Results showed that FLE were typically less than 0.4 mm, FRE were less than 0.5 mm, and TRE were typically less than 1 mm within the range of operation for prostate implant (i.e., <6 cm to surface of US probe). An analysis of variance test showed no significant difference in TRE for the CBCT-US fusion among the three slice thicknesses (p=0.37). As a comparison, the experiment was repeated with a US-conventional CT scanner combination. No significant difference in TRE was noted between the US-conventional CT fusion and that for all three CBCT image slice thicknesses (p=0.21). CBCT imaging was also performed at three different C-arm tilt angles of 0 deg., 15 deg., and 30 deg. and reconstructed at a slice thickness of 0.8 mm. There is no significant

  19. The Progress of Research Project for Magnetized Target Fusion in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xian-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of magnetized plasma called Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a hot research area recently. It may significantly reduce the cost and size. Great progress has been achieved in past decades around the world. Five years ago, China initiated the MTF project and has gotten some progress as follows: 1. Verifying the feasibility of ignition of MTF by means of first principle and MHD simulation; 2. Generating the magnetic field over 1400 Tesla, which can be suppress the heat conduction from charged particles, deposit the energy of alpha particle to promote the ignition process, and produce the stable magnetized plasma for the target of ignition; 3. The imploding facility of FP-1 can put several Mega Joule energy to the solid liner of about ten gram in the range of microsecond risen time, while the simulating tool has been developed for design and analysis of the process; 4. The target of FRC can be generated by ``YG 1 facility'' while some simulating tools have be developed. Next five years, the above theoretical work and the experiments of MTF may be integrated to step up as the National project, which may make my term play an important lead role and be supposed to achieve farther progress in China. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11175028.

  20. Microwave generation for magnetic fusion energy applications. Progress report, September 15, 1991--July 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report encompasses work on two separate projects, both related to developing sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetic fusion plasmas. The report is therefore divided into two parts as follows: Free electron laser with small period wigglers; and theory and modeling of high frequency, high power gryotron operation. Task A is experimental and eventually aims at developing continuously tunable, cw sources for ECRH with power per unit as high as 5 megawatts. Task B provides gryotron theory and modeling in support of the gryotron development programs at MIT and Varian.

  1. Progress in the Science and Technology of Direct Drive Laser Fusion with the KrF Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    important parameters KrF technology leads) Direct Laser Drive is a better choice for Energy Indirect Drive (initial path for NIF ) Laser Beams x-rays Hohlraum...Pellet Direct Drive (IFE) Laser Beams Pellet .. • ID Ignition being explored on NIF • Providing high enough gain for pure fusion energy is...challenging. • DD Ignition physics can be explored on NIF . • More efficient use of laser light, and greater flexibility in applying drive provides potential for

  2. Plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Included are the following topics: Plasma focus and Z-pinch, Review of mirror fusion research, Progress in studies of x-ray and ion-beam emission from plasma focus facilities.

  3. Recent Progress of Neutral Beam Injector and Beam Emission Diagnosis in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsunori, Ikeda; Kenichi, Nagaoka; Yasuhiko, Takeiri; Masaki, Osakabe; Katsuyoshi, Tsumori; Osamu, Kaneko

    2009-08-01

    Large size hydrogen neutral beam injectors (NBI) used a negative ion source (NNBI) as well as a proton source (PNBI) were developed for the large helical device (LHD). The injected power from NNBI and PNBI have reached 16 MW and 6.8 MW, respectively. These injected powers have outstripped the nominal beam powers. A diagnostic system of beam-emitted hydrogen visible spectrum has been installed along the beam injection axis to estimate the energy fraction on PNBI. The full energy beam component is about half which is equivalent to 70% of injected beam power. The attenuation of high energy neutral beam is also observed on NNBI. The peak density distribution is effective to increase beam deposition power.

  4. BNCT dose distribution in liver with epithermal D-D and D-T fusion-based neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Bleuel, D L; Nastasi, U; Lou, T P; Reijonen, J; Leung, K-N

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a new application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment has been introduced. Results have indicated that liver tumors can be treated by BNCT after removal of the liver from the body. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, compact neutron generators based on (2)H(d,n)(3)He (D-D) or (3)H(t,n)(4)He (D-T) fusion reactions are being developed. Preliminary simulations of the applicability of 2.45 MeV D-D fusion and 14.1 MeV D-T fusion neutrons for in vivo liver tumor BNCT, without removing the liver from the body, have been carried out. MCNP simulations were performed in order to find a moderator configuration for creating a neutron beam of optimal neutron energy and to create a source model for dose calculations with the simulation environment for radiotherapy applications (SERA) treatment planning program. SERA dose calculations were performed in a patient model based on CT scans of the body. The BNCT dose distribution in liver and surrounding healthy organs was calculated with rectangular beam aperture sizes of 20 cm x 20 cm and 25 cm x 25 cm. Collimator thicknesses of 10 and 15 cm were used. The beam strength to obtain a practical treatment time was studied. In this paper, the beam shaping assemblies for D-D and D-T neutron generators and dose calculation results are presented.

  5. Fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT and endoscopic video for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Prisman, E.; Vescan, A.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Weersink, R.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2010-02-01

    Methods for accurate registration and fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) with endoscopic video have been developed and integrated into a system for surgical guidance that accounts for intraoperative anatomical deformation and tissue excision. The system is based on a prototype mobile C-Arm for intraoperative CBCT that provides low-dose 3D image updates on demand with sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility, and also incorporates subsystems for real-time tracking and navigation, video endoscopy, deformable image registration of preoperative images and surgical plans, and 3D visualization software. The position and pose of the endoscope are geometrically registered to 3D CBCT images by way of real-time optical tracking (NDI Polaris) for rigid endoscopes (e.g., head and neck surgery), and electromagnetic tracking (NDI Aurora) for flexible endoscopes (e.g., bronchoscopes, colonoscopes). The intrinsic (focal length, principal point, non-linear distortion) and extrinsic (translation, rotation) parameters of the endoscopic camera are calibrated from images of a planar calibration checkerboard (2.5×2.5 mm2 squares) obtained at different perspectives. Video-CBCT registration enables a variety of 3D visualization options (e.g., oblique CBCT slices at the endoscope tip, augmentation of video with CBCT images and planning data, virtual reality representations of CBCT [surface renderings]), which can reveal anatomical structures not directly visible in the endoscopic view - e.g., critical structures obscured by blood or behind the visible anatomical surface. Video-CBCT fusion is evaluated in pre-clinical sinus and skull base surgical experiments, and is currently being incorporated into an ongoing prospective clinical trial in CBCT-guided head and neck surgery.

  6. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, 1 November 1993--31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results obtained by the Institute contribute to the progress of nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power as a basic energy source. Close collaborative relationships have been developed with other university and national laboratory fusion groups, both in the US and abroad. In addition to its primary focus on mainstream fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in fusion-sidestream fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, space plasmas and astrophysics, statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and accelerator physics. Important research discoveries are briefly described.

  7. Progress on Converting a NIF Quad to Eight, Petawatt Beams for Advanced Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J K

    2009-10-19

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  8. Fusion reactor systems studies. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-09

    Fusion Technology Institute personnel actively participated in the ARIES/PULSAR project during the present contract period. Numerous presentations were made at PULSAR project meetings, major contributions were written for the ARIES-II/IV Final Report presentations and papers were given at technical conferences contributions were written for the ARIES Lessons Learned report and a very large number of electronic-mail and regular-mail communications were sent. The remaining sections of this progress report win summarize the work accomplished and in progress for the PULSAR project during the contract period. The main areas of effort are: PULSAR Research; ARIES-II/IV Report Contributions; ARIES Lessons Learned Report Contributions; and Stellarator Study.

  9. X-Band Multi-Beam Klystron Design and Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Aaron; Neilson, Jeff; Tantawi, Sami

    2015-04-15

    Progress on the development of a 5MW 16 beam x-band multi-beam klystron is presented. The power from each of the 16 klystrons is combined using a matched waveguide network. Mechanical and electric models and simulations are discussed. The status of procuring and assembling parts is presented.

  10. TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Gene Expression in Prostate Tumor Cells and Its Clinical and Biological Significance in Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    St. John, Jason; Powell, Katelyn; Conley-LaComb, M. Katie; Chinni, Sreenivasa R.

    2012-01-01

    TMPRSS2-Ets gene fusions were identified in prostate cancers where the promoter of transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) fused with coding sequence of the erythroblastosis virus E26 (Ets) gene family members. TMPRSS2 is an androgen responsive transmembrane serine protease. Ets family members are oncogenic transcription factors that contain a highly conserved Ets DNA binding domain and an N-terminal regulatory domain. Fusion of these gene results in androgen dependent transcription of Ets factor in prostate tumor cells. The ERG is the most common fusion partner with TMPRSS2 promoter in prostate cancer patients. The high prevalence of these gene fusions, in particular TMPRSS2-ERG, makes them attractive as potential diagnostic and prognostic indicators, as well as making them a potential target for tailored therapies. This review focuses on the clinical and biological significance of TMPRSS2-ERG fusions and their role in PC development and progression. PMID:23264855

  11. Progress towards a high-gain and robust target design for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grant Logan, B.

    2012-07-15

    Recently [E. Henestroza et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)], a new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided axial illumination has been explored. This class of target uses annular and solid-profile heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an 'X.' X-targets using all-DT-filled metal cases imploded by three annular ion beams resulted in fuel densities of {approx}50 g/cm{sup 3} at peak compression, and fusion gains of {approx}50, comparable to heavy ion driven hohlraum targets [D. A. Callahan-Miller and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)]. This paper discusses updated X-target configurations that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT fuel. The updated configurations are capable of assembling higher fuel areal densities {approx}2 g/cm{sup 2} using two annular beams to implode the target to peak DT densities {approx}100 g/cm{sup 3}, followed by a fast-ignition solid ion beam which heats the high-density fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in {approx}200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of {approx}300. These targets have been modeled using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] in two- and three- dimensions to study the properties of the implosion as well as the ignition and burn propagation phases. At typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, the aluminum-DT interface shows negligible Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth; also, the shear flow of the DT fuel as it slides along the metal X-target walls, which drives the RT and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, does not have a major effect on the burning rate. An analytic estimate of the RT instability process at the Al-DT interface shows that the aluminum spikes generated during the pusher deceleration phase would not

  12. Progress towards a high-gain and robust target design for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grant Logan, B.

    2012-07-01

    Recently [E. Henestroza et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)], a new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided axial illumination has been explored. This class of target uses annular and solid-profile heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an "X." X-targets using all-DT-filled metal cases imploded by three annular ion beams resulted in fuel densities of ˜50 g/cm3 at peak compression, and fusion gains of ˜50, comparable to heavy ion driven hohlraum targets [D. A. Callahan-Miller and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)]. This paper discusses updated X-target configurations that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT fuel. The updated configurations are capable of assembling higher fuel areal densities ˜2 g/cm2 using two annular beams to implode the target to peak DT densities ˜100 g/cm3, followed by a fast-ignition solid ion beam which heats the high-density fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in ˜200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of ˜300. These targets have been modeled using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] in two- and three- dimensions to study the properties of the implosion as well as the ignition and burn propagation phases. At typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, the aluminum-DT interface shows negligible Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth; also, the shear flow of the DT fuel as it slides along the metal X-target walls, which drives the RT and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, does not have a major effect on the burning rate. An analytic estimate of the RT instability process at the Al-DT interface shows that the aluminum spikes generated during the pusher deceleration phase would not reach the ignition zone in time to affect the burning

  13. Progressive kyphosis following solid anterior spine fusion in children with tuberculosis of the spine. A long-term study.

    PubMed

    Fountain, S S; Hsu, L C; Yau, A C; Hodgson, A R

    1975-12-01

    Two hundred and forty-one consecutive anterior spine fusions for tuberculosis were reviewed to determine how often late progressive kyphosis occurred because of disproportionate growth of the posterior and anterior elements. Three of thirty-one patients with objective roentgenographic evidence of solid anterior fusion had an increase in kyphosis. Two of these had findings suggestive of growth retardation of the anterior ring epiphysis above the fusion mass. Posterior-element overgrowth in the third patient could not be excluded as a cause.

  14. Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Liedl, G.L.

    1993-06-01

    MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in ``user friendly`` aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year all 232 operational days were fully utilized. Beam line tests coupled with MATRIX members combined to use 284 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and four groups were provided 48 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1992 the MATRIX group published six articles. To date, for 1993 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation nine articles. Recent research milestones include: the first quantitative structural information on the as-quenched and early stages of decomposition of supersaturated Al-Li alloys; the first quantitative diffuse scattering measurements on a complex system (Co substitute for Cu YBCO superconductor); demonstration of capabilities of a new UHV surface diffraction chamber with in-situ characterization and temperature control (30-1300K); feasibility of phasing structure factors in a quasicrystal using multiple Bragg scattering.

  15. Studies of longitudinal instability with an electron beam. Technical progress report, September 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This progress report covers the research on the {open_quotes}Study of Longitudinal Instability with an Electron Beam{close_quotes} performed at the University of Maryland during the period from September 1, 1993 to February 28, 1994 of the two-year grant sponsored by the Department of Energy, under Grant No. DEFG02-92ER54178. This research is motivated by the issue of longitudinal instability in induction linacs as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion. The Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC) in its final report to DOE (September 1990) identified longitudinal instability as a key physics problem that needs to be solved if an induction linac is to be developed into a successful HIF driver. The FPAC report also stated that {open_quotes}in parallel{close_quotes} to the design and construction of ILSE {open_quotes}enhanced theoretical and experimental efforts are required for an improved understanding of potentially serious longitudinal beam instability issues{close_quotes}. The experiment with electron beams in this area is a low-cost way to gain a thorough understanding of the instability and to test computer codes in collaboration with LBL, LLNL, and I. Haber at NRL. The last six months saw the transition of the research activities from phase 1 to phase 2. By the end of last September, the experiments on space-charge waves had been completed. This had fulfilled the first year`s goal of this two-year grant. Though the completion of the experiments was one month later than that scheduled and the data analysis still continues up to now, the authors have done much more than was originally proposed.

  16. PROGRESS IN BEAM FOCUSING AND COMPRESSION FOR WARM-DENSE MATTER EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Calanog, J.; Chen, A.X.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.K.; Van den Bogert, K.; Waltron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2008-09-25

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the Warm Dense Matter regime, using spacecharge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has beendemonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlledramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30-mA K+ ion beam with initialkinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to ~;;50-fold current amplification andsimultaneous radial focusing to beam radii of a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to our Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment and associated beam diagnostics that are under development to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including: (1) greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp using a new bunching module with approximately twice the available voltseconds; (2) improved centroid control via beam steering dipoles to mitigate aberrations in the bunching module; (3) time-dependent focusing elements to correct considerable chromatic aberrations; and (4) plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be>1013 cm-3.

  17. Progress in beam focusing and compression for warm-dense matter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Calanog, J.; Chen, A. X.; Cohen, R. H.; Coleman, J. E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D. P.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P. K.; Van den Bogert, K.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2009-07-01

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the warm-dense matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30-mA K + ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to ˜50-fold current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to beam radii of a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to our Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment and associated beam diagnostics that are under development to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including (1) greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp using a new bunching module with approximately twice the available volt seconds (Vs); (2) improved centroid control via beam steering dipoles to mitigate aberrations in the bunching module; (3) time-dependent focusing elements to correct considerable chromatic aberrations; and (4) plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be >10 13 cm -3.

  18. Progress toward a new beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerheide, Shannon Fogwell

    2016-09-01

    Neutron beta decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. A precise value of the neutron lifetime is important for consistency tests of the Standard Model and Big Bang Nucleosysnthesis models. The beam neutron lifetime method requires the absolute counting of the decay protons in a neutron beam of precisely known flux. Recent work has resulted in improvements in both the neutron and proton detection systems that should permit a significant reduction in systematic uncertainties. A new measurement of the neutron lifetime using the beam method will be performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. The projected uncertainty of this new measurement is 1 s. An overview of the measurement and the technical improvements will be discussed.

  19. Progress toward a new beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerheide, Shannon Fogwell; BL2 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Neutron beta decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. A precise value of the neutron lifetime is important for consistency tests of the Standard Model and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis models. The beam neutron lifetime method requires the absolute counting of the decay protons in a neutron beam of precisely known flux. Recent work has resulted in improvements in both the neutron and proton detection systems that should permit a significant reduction in systematic uncertainties. A new measurement of the neutron lifetime using the beam method is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. The projected uncertainty of this new measurement is 1 s. An overview of the measurement, its current status, and the technical improvements will be discussed.

  20. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza,E; Houck, T L; S M, Lidia; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-07-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, l-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5"-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 120-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 {pi}-mm-mr. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive-wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  1. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westenskow, G. A.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T. L.; Lidia, S. M.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.

    1999-07-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5″-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 120-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 π-mm-mr. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive-wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  2. Risk factors for progressive neuromuscular scoliosis requiring posterior spinal fusion after selective dorsal rhizotomy.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Christensen, Michael T; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Smith, John T; Halvorson, Kyle; Brockmeyer, Douglas L; Walker, Marion L; Bollo, Robert J

    2017-09-08

    OBJECTIVE Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) via limited laminectomy is an effective treatment of lower-extremity spasticity in the pediatric population. Children with spasticity are also at risk for neuromuscular scoliosis; however, specific risk factors for progressive spinal deformity requiring posterior spinal fusion (PSF) after SDR are unknown. The authors' goal was to identify potential risk factors. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent SDR via limited laminectomy between 2003 and 2014 and who had at least 1 year of follow-up. They analyzed demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables to elucidate risk factors for progressive neuromuscular scoliosis. The primary outcome was need for PSF. RESULTS One hundred thirty-four patients underwent SDR and had at least 12 months of follow-up (mean 65 months); 48 patients (36%) had detailed pre- and postoperative radiographic data available. The mean age at surgery was 10 years (SD 5.1 years). Eighty-four patients (63%) were ambulatory before SDR, 109 (82%) underwent a single-level laminectomy, and a mean of 53% of the dorsal rootlets from L-1 to S-1 were sectioned. Fifteen patients (11.2%) subsequently required PSF for progressive deformity. Nonambulatory status (p < 0.001) and a preoperative Cobb angle > 30° (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with PSF on univariate analysis, but no statistically significant correlation was found with any clinical or radiographic variable and PSF after SDR on multivariate regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS Patients with preoperative nonambulatory status and Cobb angle > 30° may be at risk for progressive spinal deformity requiring PSF after SDR. These are well-known risk factors for progressive deformity in children with spasticity in general. Although our analysis suggests SDR via limited laminectomy may not significantly accelerate the development of neuromuscular scoliosis, further case-control studies are critical to

  3. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This is the twenty-first in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The report covers the following topics: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composite materials; ferritic/martensitic steels; copper alloys and high heat flux materials; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects, mechanistic studies and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; and irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods.

  4. Interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saedjalil, N.; Mehrangiz, M.; Jafari, S.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme has been presented. We propose here to merge a plasma-loaded cone with the precompressed DT target in order to strongly focus the incident laser beam on the core to improve the fusion gain. The WKB approximation is used to derive a differential equation that governs the evolution of beamwidth of the incident laser beam with the distance of propagation in the plasma medium. The effects of initial plasma and laser parameters, such as initial plasma electron temperature, initial radius of the laser beam, initial laser beam intensity and plasma density, on self-focusing and defocusing of the Gaussian laser beam have been studied. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency (or plasma density) in the cone, the laser beam will be self-focused noticeably, while for a thinner laser beam (with small radius), it will diverge as propagate in the cone. By evaluating the energy deposition of the relativistic electron ignitors in the fuel, the importance of electron transportation in the cone-attached shell was demonstrated. Moreover, by lessening the least energy needed for ignition, the electrons coupling with the pellet enhances. Therefore, it increases the fusion efficiency. In this scheme, with employing a plasma-loaded cone, the fusion process improves without needing an ultrahigh-intensity laser beam in a conventional ICF.

  5. Progress report of the innovated KIST ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonkon; Eliades, John A.; Yu, Byung-Yong; Lim, Weon Cheol; Chae, Keun Hwa; Song, Jonghan

    2017-01-01

    The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST, Seoul, Republic of (S.) Korea) ion beam facility consists of three electrostatic accelerators: a 400 kV single ended ion implanter, a 2 MV tandem accelerator system and a 6 MV tandem accelerator system. The 400 kV and 6 MV systems were purchased from High Voltage Engineering Europa (HVEE, Netherlands) and commissioned in 2013, while the 2 MV system was purchased from National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC, USA) in 1995. These systems are used to provide traditional ion beam analysis (IBA), isotope ratio analysis (ex. accelerator mass spectrometry, AMS), and ion implantation/irradiation for domestic industrial and academic users. The main facility is the 6 MV HVEE Tandetron system that has an AMS line currently used for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36 Cl, 41Ca and 129I analyses, and three lines for IBA that are under construction. Here, these systems are introduced with their specifications and initial performance results.

  6. Recent Progress on the Marylie/Impact Beam Dynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Qiang, J.; Bethel, E.W.; Pogorelov, I.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C.; Venturini, M.; Dragt, A.J.; Adelmann, A.; Abell, D.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Neri, F.; Walstrom, P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Samulyak, R.

    2006-12-06

    MARYLIE/IMPACT (ML/I) is a hybrid code that combines the beam optics capabilities of MARYLIE with the parallel Particle-In-Cell capabilities of IMPACT. In addition to combining the capabilities of these codes, ML/I has a number of powerful features, including a choice of Poisson solvers, a fifth-order rf cavity model, multiple reference particles for rf cavities, a library of soft-edge magnet models, representation of magnet systems in terms of coil stacks with possibly overlapping fields, and wakefield effects. The code allows for map production, map analysis, particle tracking, and 3D envelope tracking, all within a single, coherent user environment. ML/I has a front end that can read both MARYLIE input and MAD lattice descriptions. The code can model beams with or without acceleration, and with or without space charge. Developed under a US DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) project, ML/I is well suited to large-scale modeling, simulations having been performed with up to 100M macroparticles. The code inherits the powerful fitting and optimizing capabilities of MARYLIE augmented for the new features of ML/I. The combination of soft-edge magnet models, high-order capability, space charge effects, and fitting/optimization capabilities, make ML/I a powerful code for a wide range of beam optics design problems. This paper provides a description of the code and its unique capabilities.

  7. Additive manufacturing of 316L stainless steel by electron beam melting for nuclear fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yuan; Rännar, Lars-Erik; Liu, Leifeng; Koptyug, Andrey; Wikman, Stefan; Olsen, Jon; Cui, Daqing; Shen, Zhijian

    2017-04-01

    A feasibility study was performed to fabricate ITER In-Vessel components by one of the metal additive manufacturing methods, Electron Beam Melting® (EBM®). Solid specimens of SS316L with 99.8% relative density were prepared from gas atomized precursor powder granules. After the EBM® process the phase remains as austenite and the composition has practically not been changed. The RCC-MR code used for nuclear pressure vessels provides guidelines for this study and tensile tests and Charpy-V tests were carried out at 22 °C (RT) and 250 °C (ET). This work provides the first set of mechanical and microstructure data of EBM® SS316L for nuclear fusion applications. The mechanical testing shows that the yield strength, ductility and toughness are well above the acceptance criteria and only the ultimate tensile strength of EBM® SS316L is below the RCC-MR code. Microstructure characterizations reveal the presence of hierarchical structures consisting of solidified melt pools, columnar grains and irregular shaped sub-grains. Lots of precipitates enriched in Cr and Mo are observed at columnar grain boundaries while no sign of element segregation is shown at the sub-grain boundaries. Such a unique microstructure forms during a non-equilibrium process, comprising rapid solidification and a gradient 'annealing' process due to anisotropic thermal flow of accumulated heat inside the powder granule matrix. Relations between process parameters, specimen geometry (total building time) and sub-grain structure are discussed. Defects are formed mainly due to the large layer thickness (100 μm) which generates insufficient bonding between a few of the adjacently formed melt pools during the process. Further studies should focus on adjusting layer thickness to improve the strength of EBM® SS316L and optimizing total building time.

  8. Measurements of fusion reactions of low-intensity radioactive carbon beams on 12C and their implications for the understanding of X-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Carnelli, P F F; Almaraz-Calderon, S; Rehm, K E; Albers, M; Alcorta, M; Bertone, P F; Digiovine, B; Esbensen, H; Niello, J O Fernández; Henderson, D; Jiang, C L; Lai, J; Marley, S T; Nusair, O; Palchan-Hazan, T; Pardo, R C; Paul, M; Ugalde, C

    2014-05-16

    The interaction between neutron-rich nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion process as well as for the energy production through pycnonuclear reactions in the crust of neutron stars. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems (10,14,15)C+(12)C using a new active target-detector system. In the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams, a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical cross sections is observed. This gives confidence in our ability to calculate fusion cross sections for systems which are outside the range of today's radioactive beam facilities.

  9. Measurements of Fusion Reactions of Low-Intensity Radioactive Carbon Beams on C12 and their Implications for the Understanding of X-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Niello, J. O. Fernández; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2014-05-01

    The interaction between neutron-rich nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion process as well as for the energy production through pycnonuclear reactions in the crust of neutron stars. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems C10,14,15+C12 using a new active target-detector system. In the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams, a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical cross sections is observed. This gives confidence in our ability to calculate fusion cross sections for systems which are outside the range of today's radioactive beam facilities.

  10. Fast ignition when heating the central part of an inertial confinement fusion target by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the ignition and burning of a precompressed laser fusion target when it is rapidly heated by an ion beam with the formation of a temperature peak in the central part of the target. We present the results of our comprehensive numerical simulations of the problem that include the following components: (1) the target compression under the action of a profiled laser pulse, (2) the heating of the compressed target with spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a beam of high-energy ions, and (3) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum target compression and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of the compressed-target heating by an ion beam. The dependences of the threshold energies of the igniting ion beam and the thermonuclear gain on the width of the Gaussian beam ion energy spectrum have been established. The peculiarities of fast ignition by an ion beam related to the spatial distribution of parameters for the target precompressed by a laser pulse are discussed.

  11. Progress in the electron beam treatment of stack gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, S.

    The Electron Beam Dry Scrubbing Process removes simultaneously SO 2 and NO x from exhaust gases forming solid Ammoniumsulfate and -nitrate in the presence of NH 3 which can be sold as fertilizer. Basic research on this process started 1970 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and at Tokyo University while the technical development was followed up by EBARA Corporation. A first pilot plant was built and operated in 1977. A second phase of intense development on the process started in 1983 in the USA and the Federal Republic of Germany. Initiated by legislative efforts in West Germany to reduce SO 2 and NO x emissions, the development of a low cost, flexible and simultaneous scrubbing process was promoted. Two technical scale Electron Beam research facilities and two pilot plants are in operation since 1984 resp. 1985 in Karlsruhe, Germany, and Indianapolis, USA. From these plants operating with flue gas from crude oil, gas and coal fired boilers numerous data are available. Extensive parameter measurements enable to identify the conditions where the process has high efficiencies.

  12. Progress in Beam Focusing and Compression for Target Heating and Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Peter; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2009-04-17

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the warm dense matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30 mA K{sup +} ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to {approx}50X current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to NDCX to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including: beam diagnostics, greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp; and plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be > 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}.

  13. A non-statistical atomic model for beam emission and motional Stark effect diagnostics in fusion plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralchenko, Yu.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Schlummer, T.; Schultz, D. R.; Stambulchik, E.

    2012-10-01

    In this work we analyze magnetic sublevel populations in a neutral beam penetrating a fusion plasma. The collisional-radiative model NOMAD was extended to include magnetic parabolic sublevels with principal quantum numbers n ⩽ 10. The collisional parameters were calculated with the advanced atomic-orbital close coupling method and the Glauber approximation. The ionization by the induced electric field was also included in the model. The results of our calculations show significant deviations of the sublevel populations and, accordingly, line intensities of the σ and π components, from the statistical approximation. It is shown, for instance, that for a number of experimental conditions the total intensity of σ components is not equal to the total intensity of π components, which has a strong effect on determination of magnetic field and pitch angle in fusion devices. The results are presented for a wide range of plasma and beam parameters. The most significant deviations are observed for strong magnetic fields and high beam energies typical for the ITER plasma, where component intensity ratios may deviate by more than 20% from the statistical values.

  14. Efficiency of a Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter with High-Density Beam for Applications to Aneutronic Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, Alfonso

    2012-03-01

    Due to the appeal of aneutronic fusion, a variety of reactor concepts have been proposed in past. In most cases, to achieve a positive net power balance these reactor concepts rely on a significant re-circulation of the energy produced to maintain a non-equilibrium configuration (unlike ignited plasmas). The availability of a direct conversion process with high efficiency is then critical for determining the feasibility of a reactor (particularly when the ``almost true aneutronic'' reaction like p-^11B is considered). A Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC, [1]) is considered for the energy conversion of a high-density beam formed by the fusion products (MeV-range α-particles). As in [2], a PIC code is utilized for a realistic beam model. The study is focused on the possibility of obtaining high-efficiency coupling between a modulated high-density ``bunched'' beam, accounting also for a neutralizing electron environment, and the TWDEC electrode collector structure.[4pt] [1] Momota et al. (1999) Fus. Tech., 35, 60[0pt] [2] Y.Yasaka et al. (2009), Nucl. Fus., 49, 075009

  15. A non-statistical atomic model for beam emission and motional Stark effect diagnostics in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ralchenko, Yu; Marchuk, O; Biel, W; Schlummer, T; Schultz, D R; Stambulchik, E

    2012-10-01

    In this work we analyze magnetic sublevel populations in a neutral beam penetrating a fusion plasma. The collisional-radiative model NOMAD was extended to include magnetic parabolic sublevels with principal quantum numbers n ≤ 10. The collisional parameters were calculated with the advanced atomic-orbital close coupling method and the Glauber approximation. The ionization by the induced electric field was also included in the model. The results of our calculations show significant deviations of the sublevel populations and, accordingly, line intensities of the σ and π components, from the statistical approximation. It is shown, for instance, that for a number of experimental conditions the total intensity of σ components is not equal to the total intensity of π components, which has a strong effect on determination of magnetic field and pitch angle in fusion devices. The results are presented for a wide range of plasma and beam parameters. The most significant deviations are observed for strong magnetic fields and high beam energies typical for the ITER plasma, where component intensity ratios may deviate by more than 20% from the statistical values.

  16. Recent Progress in a Beam-Beam Simulation Code for Circular Hadron Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Kabel, Andreas; Fischer, Wolfram; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2007-09-10

    While conventional tracking codes can readily provide higher-order optical quantities and give an estimate of dynamic apertures, they are unable to provide directly measurable quantities such as lifetimes and loss rates. The particle tracking framework Plibb aims at modeling a storage ring with sufficient accuracy and a sufficiently high number of turns and in the presence of beam-beam interactions to allow for an estimate of these quantities. We provide a description of new features of the codes; we also describe a novel method of treating chromaticity in ring sections in a symplectic fashion.

  17. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1990-02-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

  18. Soft Fusion Energy Path: Isotope Production in Energy Subcritical/Economy Hypercritical D +D Colliding-Beam Mini Fusion Reactor `Exyder'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Bethe1 and Sakharov2 argued for soft fusion energy path via isotope production, substantiated by Manheimer3. - Copious T and 3He production4 , 5 from D(d, p) T and D(d, n) 3He reactions in 725 KeV D +D colliding beams was measured in weak-focusing Self-Collider6 , 7 radius 0.15 m, in B = 3.12 T, non-linearly stabilized by electron cloud oscillations8 to confinement time = 24 s. Simulations6 predict that by switching to strong focusing9, 10 deuterons 0.75 MeV each, generate 1 3He +1T +1p + 1n at total input energy cost 10.72 MeV. Economic value of T and 3He is 65 and 120 MeV/atom, respectively. We obtain economic gain 205MeV/10.72 MeV ~ 2,000% i.e. 3He production funds cost of T. If first wall is made of Thorium n's will breed 233U releasing 200 MeV/fission, at neutron cost 5.36 MeV versus 160 MeV in beam on target, resulting in no cost 3He production, valued 75K/g. 1. Physics Today, May 1979, p.44; 2. Memoirs, Vintage Books, (1992); 3. Phys. Today, May 2012 p. 12; 4. Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 796 (1985); 5. Bull. APS, 57, No. 3 (2012); 6. Part. Acc.1, (1970); 7. ANEUTRONIC FUSION NIM A 271 1-167 (1988); 8. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1818 (1993); 9. Part. Acc. 34, 13 (1990).

  19. Value of C-Arm Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Fusion in Maximizing the Versatility of Endovascular Robotics.

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Ponraj; Duran, Cassidy; Al-Jabbari, Odeaa; Abu Saleh, Walid K; Lumsden, Alan; Bismuth, Jean

    2016-01-01

    To report our initial experience and highlight the value of using intraoperative C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CT; DynaCT(®)) image fusion guidance along with steerable robotic endovascular catheter navigation to optimize vessel cannulation. Between May 2013 and January 2015, all patients who underwent endovascular procedures using DynaCT image fusion technique along with Hansen Magellan vascular robotic catheter were included in this study. As a part of preoperative planning, relevant vessel landmarks were electronically marked in contrast-enhanced multi-slice computed tomography images and stored. At the beginning of procedure, an intraoperative noncontrast C-arm cone beam CT (syngo DynaCT(®), Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc.) was acquired in the hybrid suite. Preoperative images were then coregistered to intraoperative DynaCT images using aortic wall calcifications and bone landmarks. Stored landmarks were then overlaid on 2-dimensional (2D) live fluoroscopic images as virtual markers that are updated in real-time with C-arm, table movements and image zoom. Vascular access and robotic catheter (Magellan(®), Hansen Medical) was setup per standard. Vessel cannulation was performed based on electronic virtual markers on live fluoroscopy using robotic catheter. The impact of 3-dimensional (3D) image fusion guidance on robotic vessel cannulation was evaluated retrospectively, by assessing quantitative parameters like number of angiograms acquired before vessel cannulation and qualitative parameters like accuracy of vessel ostium and centerline markers. All 17 vessels were cannulated successfully in 14 patients' attempted using robotic catheter and image fusion guidance. Median vessel diameter at origin was 5.4 mm (range, 2.3-13 mm), whereas 12 of 17 (70.6%) vessels had either calcified and/or stenosed origin from parent vessel. Nine of 17 vessels (52.9 %) were cannulated without any contrast injection. Median number of angiograms required before

  20. Characteristics of a high-power RF source of negative hydrogen ions for neutral beam injection into controlled fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrashitov, G. F.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Gusev, I. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kondakov, A. A.; Sanin, A. L.; Sotnikov, O. Z.; Shikhovtsev, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    An injector of hydrogen atoms with an energy of 0.5-1 MeV and equivalent current of up to 1.5 A for purposes of controlled fusion research is currently under design at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. Within this project, a multiple-aperture RF surface-plasma source of negative hydrogen ions is designed. The source design and results of experiments on the generation of a negative ion beam with a current of >1 A in the long-pulse mode are presented.

  1. [Research progress of multi-model medical image fusion and recognition].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Lu, Huiling; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ma, Jingxian

    2013-10-01

    Medical image fusion and recognition has a wide range of applications, such as focal location, cancer staging and treatment effect assessment. Multi-model medical image fusion and recognition are analyzed and summarized in this paper. Firstly, the question of multi-model medical image fusion and recognition is discussed, and its advantage and key steps are discussed. Secondly, three fusion strategies are reviewed from the point of algorithm, and four fusion recognition structures are discussed. Thirdly, difficulties, challenges and possible future research direction are discussed.

  2. Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

    1995-09-01

    The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

  3. Progress Towards Plasma Pulse Compression of High Energy, Long Pulse Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R K; Ping, Y; Rygg, R; Wilks, S; Meezan, N; Niemann, C; Landen, O; Fisch, N; Malkin, V; Valeo, E; Wurtele, J

    2008-06-19

    Compression of laser pulses to < {approx} 1-10 ps duration using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a plasma promises to provide unprecedented power and intensity for a variety of applications, by avoiding the limits to fluence and intensity that are needed to avoid damage to the solid state optics that are used in conventional approaches. In particular, the ability to compress pump beam pulses of {approx} ns duration will allow present facilities with 10's kJ to over a MJ of energy to produce ultra short pulses efficiently, advancing applications in; fusion by fast ignition, x-ray production of high energy density experiments, as well as laser driven particle accelerators. We will discuss a series of experiments to demonstrate the needed beam amplification rate, and focal spot quality in a < 3mm plasma with the properties needed for compression of these pulses (n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}, T{sub e} 200 to 300 eV) when the plasma is extended. The experiments use He plasmas produced with a 300 J, 1 ns, beam at the Jupiter Laser facility to amplify a counter-propagating, ultra-short pulse (USP) seed by a factor of 10x to 37x and study the dependence of the amplification, the associated non-linear wave response, and the resulting beam quality and energy, on the intensity of both seed and pump beam. In particular, a regime in which amplification of USP beams is achieved while maintaining a low angular divergence of the beam consistent with good focal spot quality will be discussed.

  4. A wave-based model for cross-beam energy transfer in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myatt, J. F.; Follett, R. K.; Shaw, J. G.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Goncharov, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is thought to be responsible for a 30% reduction in hydrodynamic coupling efficiency on OMEGA and up to 50% at the ignition scale for direct-drive (DD) implosions. These numbers are determined by ray-based models that have been developed and integrated within the radiation-hydrodynamics codes LILAC (1-D) and DRACO (2-D). However, ray-based modeling of CBET in an inhomogeneous plasma assumes a steady-state plasma response, does not include the effects of beam speckle, and treats ray caustics in an ad hoc manner. The validity of the modeling for ignition-scale implosions has not yet been determined. To address the physics shortcomings, which have important implications for DD inertial confinement fusion, a new wave-based model has been developed. It solves the time-enveloped Maxwell equations in three dimensions, including polarization effects, plasma inhomogeneity, and open-boundary conditions with the ability to prescribe beams incident at arbitrary angles. Beams can be made realistic with respect to laser speckle, polarization smoothing, and laser bandwidth. This, coupled to a linearized low-frequency plasma response that does not assume a steady state, represents the most-complete model of CBET to date.

  5. Experimental results of a sheet-beam, high power, FEL amplifier with application to magnetic fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1995-12-31

    The experimental study of sheet-beam FELs as candidate millimeter-wave sources for heating magnetic fusion plasmas has achieved a major milestone. In a proof-of-principle, pulsed experiment, saturated FEL amplifier operation was achieved with 250 kW of output power at 86 GHz. Input microwave power was 1 kW, beam voltage was 450 kV and beam current was 17 A. The planar wiggler had a peak value of 3.8 kG, a period of 0.96 cm and was 71 cm long. The linear gain of 30 dB, saturated gain of 24 dB and saturated efficiency of 3% all are in good agreement with theoretical prediction. Follow-on work would include development of a thermionic sheet-beam electron-gun compatible with CW FEL operation, adding a section of tapered wiggler to increase the output power to levels in excess of 1 megawatt, and increasing the FEL frequency.

  6. Thermal and mechanical properties of e-beam irradiated butt-fusion joint in high-density polyethylene pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Vipin; Pokharel, Pashupati; Kang, Min Kwan; Choi, Sunwoong

    2016-05-01

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on the thermal and mechanical properties of a butt-fusion joint in high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes were investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy of welded samples revealed the changes of crystallinity due to the cross linking effect of electron beam irradiation. The suppression of the degree of crystallinity with increasing the irradiation dose from 0 kGy to 500 kGy indicated that the e-beam radiation induced cross-links among the polymer chains at the weld zone. The cross-link junction at the joint of HDPE pipe prevented chain folding and reorganization leading to the formation of imperfect crystallites with smaller size and also less in content. Tensile test of the welded samples with different dose of e-beam irradiation showed the increased values of the yield stress and Young's modulus as a function of irradiation dose. On the other hand, the elongation at break diminished clearly with increasing the irradiation doses.

  7. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  8. Measuring the Fusion Cross-Section of 18O + 12C with Low-Intensity Beams near and below the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Tracy; Vadas, Justin; Singh, Varinderjit; Hudan, Sylvie; Desouza, Romualdo; Baby, Lagy; Kuvin, Sean; Wiedenhover, Ingo; Umar, Sait; Oberacker, Volker

    2016-03-01

    Fusion between neutron-rich light nuclei in the crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as a heat source that triggers an X-ray superburst. To explore the probability of such fusion events and examine their decay characteristics an experimental program using beams of neutron-rich light nuclei has been initiated. The evaporation residues (ERs) that result from the fusion of 18O and 12C nuclei, are directly measured and distinguished from unreacted beam particles on the basis of their energy and TOF. Using an experimental setup developed for the measurement with low-intensity (<105 ions/s) radioactive beams the fusion excitation function for 18O+12C has been measured in the sub-barrier domain down to the 820 μb level. The measured fusion excitation function is compared to the prediction of a density constrained TDHF model. In addition to the measured cross-section, the measured ER angular distributions provide insight into the relative importance of the different de-excitation channels. These ER angular distributions are compared to the predictions of a statistical model code, EVAPOR revealing an under-prediction of the de-excitation channels associated with α emission. The de-excitation channels associated with proton emission following fusion will also be investigated. Supported by the US DOE under Grant No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  9. Progressive halo-vest traction preceding posterior occipitocervical instrumented fusion for irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation and basilar invagination.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Bao, Deming; Cheng, Huijuan; Meng, Fanshuai; Li, Junwei

    2017-09-05

    Surgical treatment of irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation (IAAD) with basilar invagination (BI) is associated with high rates of severe complications, including mortality. This retrospective study investigated the safety and efficacy of progressive halo-vest traction for IAAD with BI prior to posterior occipitocervical instrumented fusion. Between 2009 and 2013, 39 patients with IAAD with BI underwent preoperative reduction by progressive halo-vest traction for 20.82±4.21days. Instrumented fusion was then performed through a posterior approach. Clinical outcomes were based on pain scale and Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores. Radiographic analysis evaluated changes in atlantodental distance, McGregor's line violation, spinal canal width at the craniocervical junction, cervicomedullary angle, C2-C7 lordosis angle, and the occiput-C2 angle. Follow-ups ranged from 48 to 96 months. Both atlantodental distance and BI significantly improved in all patients. The rates of complete anatomical reduction were 85% for IAAD, and 95% for BI. Most of the patients reported satisfactory pain relief and improvement in daily activity; the mean JOA scores at baseline and last follow-up were 9.10 and 15.92, respectively. Although complications occurred in 10 patients (25.64%), all of which healed uneventfully. The bony fusion rate was 100%. Progressive halo-vest traction before surgery is safe and effective for reduction of IAAD with BI. The technique we describe is a promising method for treatment of complex craniocervical junction deformity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Progress on optimization of the nonlinear beam dynamics in the MEIC collider rings

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y. M.; Cai, Y.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.; Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Lin, F.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-13

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  11. Progress on Optimization of the Nonlinear Beam Dynamics in the MEIC Collider Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli

    2015-09-01

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  12. Gas utilization in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1987-08-01

    Measurements of gas utilization in a test TFTR neutral beam injector have been performed to study the feasibility of running tritium neutral beams with existing ion sources. Gas consumption is limited by the restriction of 50,000 curies of T/sub 2/ allowed on site. It was found that the gas efficiency of the present long-pulse ion sources is higher than it was with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range of 35 to 55%. At the high end of this range the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted by room temperature molecular gas flow. This is consistent with observations made on the JET injectors, where it has been attributed to beam heating of the neutralizer gas and a concomitant increase in conductance. It was found that a working gas isotope exchange from H/sub 2/ to D/sub 2/ could be accomplished on the first beam shot after changing the gas supply, without any intermediate preconditioning. The mechanism believed responsible for this phenomenon is heating of the plasma generator walls by the arc and a resulting thermal desorption of all previously adsorbed and implanted gas. Finally, it was observed that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV operation could produce a beam pulse after a waiting period of fourteen hours by preceding the beam extraction with several hi-pot/filament warm-up pulses, without any gas consumption. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Design progress for the National Ignition Facility laser alignment and beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S W; Bliss, E S; Boege, S J; Boyd, R D; Bronisz, L; Bruker, J; C W Lauman, McCarville, T J; Chocol, C; Davis, D T; Demaret, R D; Feldman, M; Gates, A J; Holdener, F R; Hollis, J; Knopp, C F; Kyker, R; Miller, J L; Miller-Kamm, V J; Rivera, W E; Salmon, J T; Severyn, J R; Sheem, S K; Sheridan, T; Thompson, D Y; Wang, M F; Witaker, D; Yoeman, M F; Zacharias, R A

    1998-09-09

    Earlier papers have described approaches to NIF alignment and laser diagnostics tasks. 1,2,3 Now, detailed design of alignment and diagnostic systems for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is in its last year. Specifications are more detailed, additional analyses have been completed, Pro-E models have been developed, and prototypes of specific items have been built. In this paper we update top level concepts, illustrate specific areas of progress, and show design implementations as represented by prototype hardware. The alignment light source network has been fully defined. It utilizes an optimized number of lasers combined with fiber optic distribution to provide the chain alignment beams, system centering references, final spatial filter pinhole references, target alignment beams, and wavefront reference beams. The input and output sensors are being prototyped. They are located respectively in the front end just before beam injection into the full aperture chain and at the transport spatial filter, where the full energy infrared beam leaves the laser. The modularity of the input sensor is improved, and each output sensor mechanical package now incorporates instrumentation for four beams. Additional prototype hardware has been tested for function, and lifetime tests are underway. We report some initial results.

  14. Design progress for the National Ignition Facility laser alignment and beam diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Boege, Steven J.; Boyd, Robert D.; Davis, Donald T.; Demaret, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark; Gates, Alan J.; Holdener, Fred R.; Knopp, Carl F.; Kyker, R. D.; Lauman, C. W.; McCarville, Tom J.; Miller, John L.; Miller-Kamm, Victoria J.; Rivera, W. E.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Severyn, J. R.; Sheem, Sang K.; Thomas, Stan W.; Thompson, Calvin E.; Wang, David Y.; Yoeman, M. F.; Zacharias, Richard A.; Chocol, Clifford J.; Hollis, J.; Whitaker, Daniel E.; Brucker, J.; Bronisz, L.; Sheridan, T.

    1999-07-01

    Earlier papers have described approaches to NIF alignment and laser diagnostics tasks. Now, detailed design of alignment and diagnostic systems for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is in its last year. Specifications are more detailed, additional analyses have been completed, Pro- E models have been developed, and prototypes of specific items have been built. In this paper we update top level concepts, illustrate specific areas of progress, and show design implementations as represented by prototype hardware. The alignment light source network has been fully defined. It utilizes an optimized number of lasers combined with fiber optic distribution to provide the chain alignment beams, system centering references, final spatial filter pinhole references, target alignment beams, and wavefront reference beams. The input and output sensor are being prototyped. They are located respectively in the front end just before beam injection into the full aperture chain and at the transport spatial filter, where the full energy infrared beam leaves the laser. The modularity of the input sensor is improved, and each output sensor mechanical package now incorporates instrumentation for four beams.

  15. Progress in safety and environmental aspects of inertial fusion energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Meier, W R

    2000-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is making significant progress in several areas related to the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of inertial fusion energy (IFE). A detailed accident analysis has been completed for the HYLIFE-II power plant design. Additional accident analyses are underway for both the HYLIFE-II and Sombrero designs. Other S and E work at LLNL has addressed the issue of the driver-chamber interface and its importance for both heavy-ion and laser-driven IFE. Radiation doses and fluences have been calculated for final focusing mirrors and magnets and shielding optimization is underway to extend the anticipated lifetimes for key components. Target designers/fabrication specialists have been provided with ranking information related to the S and E characteristics of candidate target materials (e.g., ability to recycle, accident consequences, and waste management). Ongoing work in this area will help guide research directions and the selection of target materials. Published and continuing work on fast ignition has demonstrated some of the potentially attractive S and E features of such designs. In addition to reducing total driver energies, fast ignition may ease target fabrication requirements, reduce radiation damage rates, and enable the practical use of advanced (e.g., tritium-lean) labels with significantly reduced neutron production rates, the possibility of self-breeding targets, and dramatically increased flexibility in blanket design. Domestic and international collaborations are key to success in the above areas. A brief summary of each area is given and plans for future work are outlined.

  16. Response to FESAC survey, non-fusion connections to Fusion Energy Sciences. Applications of the FES-supported beam and plasma simulation code, Warp

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Vay, J. L.

    2015-05-29

    The Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee’s subcommittee on non-fusion applications (FESAC NFA) is conducting a survey to obtain information from the fusion community about non-fusion work that has resulted from their DOE-funded fusion research. The subcommittee has requested that members of the community describe recent developments connected to the activities of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. Two questions in particular were posed by the subcommittee. This document contains the authors’ responses to those questions.

  17. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The Fusion Program carries out work in a number of areas: (1) experimental and theoretical research on two magnetic confinement concepts - the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) and the tokamak, (2) theoretical and engineering studies on a third concept - the stellarator, (3) engineering and physics of present-generation fusion devices, (4) development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques, (5) development and testing of materials for fusion devices, (6) development and testing of the essential technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, (7) development and testing of the superconducting magnets that will be needed to confine these plasmas, (8) design of future devices, (9) assessment of the environmental impact of fusion energy, and (10) assembly and distribution to the fusion community of data bases on atomic physics and radiation effects. The interactions between these activities and their integration into a unified program are major factors in the success of the individual activities, and the ORNL Fusion Program strives to maintain a balance among these activities that will lead to continued growth.

  18. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide. [plasma heating for controlled fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is reported. For the case of an axially uniform waveguide it is found that the basic characteristics of alternating focusing and defocusing beams are maintained. However, the intensity distribution is changed at the foci and outer-beam regions. The features of paraxial beam propagation are discussed with reference to axially varying waveguides. Laser plasma coupling is considered noting the case where laser heating produces a density distribution radially parabolic near the axis and the energy absorbed over the focal length of the plasma is small. It is found that: (1) beam-propagation stability is governed by the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations existing in the axial variation of the waveguides due to laser heating, and (2) for beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, the global instability of the propagation is a function of the initial fluctuation growth rate as compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide.

  20. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide. [plasma heating for controlled fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is reported. For the case of an axially uniform waveguide it is found that the basic characteristics of alternating focusing and defocusing beams are maintained. However, the intensity distribution is changed at the foci and outer-beam regions. The features of paraxial beam propagation are discussed with reference to axially varying waveguides. Laser plasma coupling is considered noting the case where laser heating produces a density distribution radially parabolic near the axis and the energy absorbed over the focal length of the plasma is small. It is found that: (1) beam-propagation stability is governed by the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations existing in the axial variation of the waveguides due to laser heating, and (2) for beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, the global instability of the propagation is a function of the initial fluctuation growth rate as compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide.

  1. Fusion research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The ORNL Fusion Program includes the experimental and theoretical study of two different classes of magnetic confinement schemes - systems with helical magnetic fields, such as the tokamak and stellarator, and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) class of toroidally linked mirror systems; the development of technologies, including superconducting magnets, neutral atomic beam and radio frequency (rf) heating systems, fueling systems, materials, and diagnostics; the development of databases for atomic physics and radiation effects; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; and the design of advanced demonstration fusion devices. The program involves wide collaboration, both within ORNL and with other institutions. The elements of this program are shown. This document illustrates the program's scope; and aims by reviewing recent progress.

  2. Cervical cord injury in patients with ankylosed spines: progressive paraplegia in two patients after posterior fusion without decompression.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ito, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masato; Tomioka, Masao; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakago, Kie; Yagata, Yukihisa; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2009-11-01

    Case report and clinical discussion. To describe technical pitfall to treat 2 cervical cord injuries, including dislocations in patients with ankylosed spine due to diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). DISH and OPLL are disease processes similar in pathology, which can lead to unexpected fractures due to low-energy trauma. In reported cases of fracture of the ankylosed spine in patients with DISH or OPLL, increasing lever arm and a grossly unstable fracture occurred. However, the actual surgical intervention for these fractures and spinal cord injuries was not discussed. We report 2 cervical cord injuries, including dislocations in patients with ankylosed spine due to DISH or OPLL. Two patients underwent posterior fusion without decompression; however, postoperative progressive paraplegia still occurred. There were 3 points in common: these patients had ankylosed spines due to DISH or OPLL; they were elderly and had spinal canal stenosis; and after undergoing posterior fusion without decompression, their bilateral, lower extremity palsies worsened after surgery. Cervical alignment was slightly different after posterior fusion, and this change concentrated in one segment because adjacent vertebral bodies were ankylosed, and thus, immoveable. Additionally, this stress caused infolding of the ligamentum flavum with resultant spinal cord compression. In these cases, we recommend posterior fusion and decompression such as laminoplasty to avoid worsening palsy.

  3. Development of Electron Beam Pumped KrF Lasers for Fusion Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    McLean, VA F. Hegeler , Commonwealth Technology, Inc, Alexandria, VA S. Swanekamp, JAYCOR, Alexandria, VA D. Weidenheimer, Titan-Pulse Sciences...Obenschain, F. Hegeler , S. Swanekamp, in Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications, edited by K.A. Tanaka, D.D. Meyerhoffer and J. Meyer-ter-Vehn...Albuquerque, NM 87110; http://www.mrcabq.com. [19] D. V. Rose, D. R. Welch, F. Hegeler , S. B. Swanekamp, M. C. Myers, and J. D. Sethian, submitted to J

  4. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

  5. A Wave-Based Model for Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myatt, J. F.

    2016-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is thought to be responsible for an 30 % reduction in hydrodynamic coupling efficiency on OMEGA and up to 50% at the ignition scale for direct-drive (DD) implosions. These numbers are determined by ray-based models that have been developed and integrated within the radiation-hydrodynamics codes LILAC (1-D) and DRACO (2-D). However, ray-based modeling of CBET in an inhomogeneous plasma assumes a steady-state plasma response, does not include the effects of beam speckle, and ray caustics are treated in an ad hoc manner. Nevertheless, simulation results are in good qualitative agreement with implosion experiments on OMEGA (when combined with a model for nonlocal heat transport). The validity of the modeling for ignition-scale implosions has not yet been determined. To address the physics shortcomings, which have important implications for DD inertial confinement fusion, a new wave-based model has been constructed. It solves the time-enveloped Maxwell equations in three-dimensions, including polarization effects, plasma inhomogeneity, and open-boundary conditions with the ability to prescribe beams incident at arbitrary angles. Beams can be made realistic with respect to laser speckle, polarization smoothing, and laser bandwidth. This, coupled to a linearized low-frequency plasma response that does not assume a steady state, represents the most-complete model of CBET to date. New results will be presented and the implications for CBET modeling and mitigation will be described. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DENA0001944, in collaboration with J. G. Shaw, R. K. Follett, and D. H. Edgell (LLE).

  6. Progress on using deuteron-deuteron fusion generated neutrons for 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutte, Daniel; Renne, Paul R.; Becker, Tim; Waltz, Cory; Ayllon Unzueta, Mauricio; Zimmerman, Susan; Hidy, Alan; Finkel, Robert; Bauer, Joseph D.; Bernstein, Lee; van Bibber, Karl

    2017-04-01

    We present progress on the development and proof of concept of a deuteron-deuteron fusion based neutron generator for 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation. Irradiation with deuteron-deuteron fusion neutrons is anticipated to reduce Ar recoil and Ar production from interfering reactions. This will allow dating of smaller grains and increase accuracy and precision of the method. The instrument currently achieves neutron fluxes of ˜9×107 cm-2s-1 as determined by irradiation of indium foils and use of the activation reaction 115In(n,n')115mIn. Multiple foils and simulations were used to determine flux gradients in the sample chamber. A first experiment quantifying the loss of 39Ar is underway and will likely be available at the time of the presentation of this abstract. In ancillary experiments via irradiation of K salts and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis we determined the cross-sections of the 39K(n,p)39Ar reaction at ˜2.8 MeV to be 160 ± 35 mb (1σ). This result is in good agreement with bracketing cross-section data of ˜96 mb at ˜2.45 MeV and ˜270 mb at ˜4 MeV [Johnson et al., 1967; Dixon and Aitken, 1961 and Bass et al. 1964]. Our data disfavor a much lower value of ˜45 mb at 2.59 MeV [Lindström & Neuer, 1958]. In another ancillary experiment the cross section for 39K(n,α)36Cl at ˜2.8 MeV was determined as 11.7 ± 0.5 mb (1σ), which is significant for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology due to subsequent decay to 36Ar as well as for the determination of production rates of cosmogenic 36Cl. Additional experiments resolving the cross section functions on 39K between 1.5 and 3.6 MeV are on their way using the LICORNE neutron source of the IPN Orsay tandem accelerator. Results will likely be available at the time of the presentation of this abstract. While the neutron generator is designed for fluxes of ˜109 cm-2s-1, arcing in the sample chamber currently limits the power—straightforwardly correlated to the neutron flux—the generator can safely be run at. Further

  7. Critical heat flux investigations for fusion-relevant conditions with the use of a rastered electron beam apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Croessmann, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    With the use of a rastered electron beam apparatus, investigations of critical heat flux (CH) and associated noise, pressure and flow spectra have been completed for water-cooled test targets under conditions relevant to the design of high-heat-flux components for fusion energy applications. Targets tested were copper tubes with attached graphite armor tiles. Water flows with velocities ranging from 3 to 10 m/s were used, with axially uniform heat fluxes ranging from 10 to 60 MW/m/sup 2/ applied along only one side of the tube to simulate the heating pattern often encountered by plasma facing components in fusion applications. Targets included stainless steel twisted tapes mechanically locked into the tube bore to increase CH levels. Exit conditions typical of highly subcooled flow boiling were considered, e.g., exit qualities of about /minus/0.3, with exit pressures near 1 MPa, and exit temperatures in the 30 to 40 C range. Besides observation of CHF and the comparison to CHF correlations, the studies also examined possible means for predicting and preventing tube burnout. Diagnostics tried included acoustic amplitude and spectra in both the audible and above audible frequency ranges, exit pressure amplitude and spectra, and flow variations and spectra. During testing, signals from the diagnostics showed a large increase in amplitude before CHF occurred. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Enhanced thermotolerance and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutated by high-energy pulse electron beam and protoplast fusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xiao, Yu; Zhu, Rongrong; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Shi-Long

    2012-11-01

    To increase thermotolerance and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YZ1, the strategies of high-energy pulse electron beam (HEPE) and three rounds of protoplast fusion were explored. The YF31 strain had the characteristics of resistant to high-temperature, high-ethanol tolerance, rapid growth and high yield. The YF31 could grow on plate cultures up to 47 °C, containing 237.5 g L(-1) of ethanol. In particular, the mutant strain YF31 generated 94.2 ± 4.8 g L(-1) ethanol from 200 g glucose L(-1) at 42 °C, which was 2.48 times the production of the wild strain YZ1. Results demonstrated that the variant phenotypes from the strains screening by HEPE irradiation could be used as parent stock for yeast regeneration and the protoplast fusion technology is sufficiently powerful in combining suitable characteristics in a single strain for ethanol fermentation.

  9. Aging characteristics of electron beam and gas tungsten arc fusion zones of Al-Cu-Li alloy 2090

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J. . Center for Advanced Materials); Morris, J.W. Jr. . Dept of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-04-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of the electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) fusion zones of 2090 indicates that in both the as-welded and aged conditions, the EB and GTA fusion zones lack the volume fraction and the homogeneity of strengthening precipitates found in the base metal. In the underaged and peak-aged conditions, the [delta][prime] phase is the primary strengthener, the volume fraction of T[sub 1] present being too low to be effective. The T[sub 1] precipitates are found either in the vicinity of other inclusions or at the dendrite boundaries. As the strength increases with postweld aging, the elongation decreased to 1%. The presence of the boundary phases and Cu- and Cl-containing inclusions at the boundaries leads to poor elongation. The joint efficiencies of the peak-aged EB and GTA weldments (EBWs and GTAWs, respectively) are 75 and 55% at 293 K and 75 and 50% at 77 K, respectively. Both EBWs and GTAWs have relatively low elongations.

  10. Advances in U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Ni, P.; Perkins, L. J.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Seidl, P.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Waldron, W.L.

    2007-09-01

    During the past two years, the US heavy ion fusion science program has made significant experimental and theoretical progress in simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter targets, high-brightness beam transport, advanced theory and numerical simulations, and heavy ion target physics for fusion. First experiments combining radial and longitudinal compression {pi} of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam densities increased by 700X at the focal plane. With further improvements planned in 2008, these results enable initial ion beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin next year. They are assessing how these new techniques apply to higher-gain direct-drive targets for inertial fusion energy.

  11. Advances in U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, JJ; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Ni, P.; Perkins, L.J.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Seidl, P.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Waldron, W.L.

    2007-09-03

    During the past two years, the US heavy ion fusion science program has made significant experimental and theoretical progress in simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter targets, high-brightness beam transport, advanced theory and numerical simulations, and heavy ion target physics for fusion. First experiments combining radial and longitudinal compression {pi} of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam densities increased by 700X at the focal plane. With further improvements planned in 2008, these results enable initial ion beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin next year. They are assessing how these new techniques apply to higher-gain direct-drive targets for inertial fusion energy.

  12. Summary II — Fusion Ion sources, Beam Formation, Acceleration and Neutralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. T. C.

    2007-08-01

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 13th - 15th September 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the sessions of the Symposium devoted to the topics listed in the title.

  13. Focusing Intense Charged Particle Beams with Achromatic Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrani, James; Kaganovich, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Final focusing systems designed to minimize the effects of chromatic aberrations in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) are described. NDCX-II is a linear induction accelerator, designed to accelerate short bunches at high current. Previous experiments showed that neutralized drift compression significantly compresses the beam longitudinally (˜60x) in the z-direction, resulting in a narrow distribution in z-space, but a wide distribution in pz-space. Using simple lenses (e.g., solenoids, quadrupoles) to focus beam bunches with wide distributions in pz-space results in chromatic aberrations, leading to lower beam intensities (J/cm^2). Therefore, the final focusing system must be designed to compensate for chromatic aberrations. The paraxial ray equations and beam envelope equations are numerically solved for parameters appropriate to NDCX-II. Based on these results, conceptual designs for final focusing systems using a combination of solenoids and/or quadrupoles are optimized to compensate for chromatic aberrations. Lens aberrations and emittance growth will be investigated, and analytical results will be compared with results from numerical particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation codes.

  14. Electro-optical deflectors as a method of beam smoothing for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The electro-optic deflector is analyzed and compared to smoothing by spectral dispersion for efficacy as a beam smoothing method for ICF. It is found that the electro-optic deflector is inherently somewhat less efficient when compared either on the basis of equal peak phase modulation or equal generated bandwidth.

  15. Small tritium filling and monitoring apparatus for particle beam inertial confinement fusion targets.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Leeper, R J; Martinez, C; McMurtry, W M

    1980-03-01

    A small gas filling apparatus has been developed to fill a particle beam ICF target with D-T gas mixture seconds before the target is irradiated. Included in the filling apparatus is a novel miniature pressure monitor which determines quantitatively the fill pressure by counting the rate of Beta particles emitted by the decaying tritium atoms.

  16. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are to (1) conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; and (3) train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. During FY 1995, a number of significant scientific advances were achieved at the IFS, both in long-range fundamental problems as well as in near-term strategic issues, consistent with the Institute`s mandate. Examples of these achievements include, for example, tokamak edge physics, analytical and computational studies of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulent transport, alpha-particle-excited toroidal Alfven eigenmode nonlinear behavior, sophisticated simulations for the Numerical Tokamak Project, and a variety of non-tokamak and non-fusion basic plasma physics applications. Many of these projects were done in collaboration with scientists from other institutions. Research discoveries are briefly described in this report.

  17. Fusion reactor systems studies. Progress report for the period November 1, 1996--October 31, 1997, and final report

    SciTech Connect

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Blanchard, J.P.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1997-08-01

    During FY97, the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute personnel have participated in the ARIES-RS and the ARIES-ST projects. The main areas of effort are: (1) neutronics analysis; (2) shielding of components and personnel; (3) neutron wall loading distribution; (4) radiation damage to in-vessel components; (5) components lifetimes; (6) embrittled materials designs issues; (7) stress and structural analysis; (8) activation, LOCA, and safety analysis; (9) support and fabrication of components; (10) vacuum system; and (11) maintenance. Progress made in these areas are summarized.

  18. A System for Measuring Defect Induced Beam Modulation on Inertial Confinement Fusion-class Laser Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R; Widmayer, C; Williams, W; Weinzapfel, C; Roberts, D

    2005-10-18

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm{sup 2} and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO{sub 2} lasers.

  19. Plasma Channel Transport for Heavy Ion Fusion: Investigation of Beam Transport, Channel Initiation and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauschwitz, Andreas; Niemann, Christoph; Penache, Dan; Birkner, Richard; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.; Kobloch, Renate; Neff, Stefan; Presura, Radu; Ponce, Dave; Rosmej, Frank; Yu, Simon

    2002-12-01

    For final beam transport in an IFE reactor three alternatives are mainly discussed. These are neutralized ballistic transport, self-pinched transport, and plasma channel transport. Discharge plasma channels were investigated in the recent years at GSI Darmstadt and at LBNL Berkeley in a number of experiments. Different initiation mechanisms for gas discharges of up to 60 kA were studied and compared. In the Berkeley experiments laser ionization of organic vapors in a buffer gas was used to initiate and direct the discharge while at GSI laser gas heating and ion beam induced gas ionization were tested as initiation mechanisms. Measurements of temperature, electron density, gas density, and magnetic field distribution in the channels are compared with results of beam transport experiments at the GSI UNILAC accelerator and with MHD simulations of the 1D-fluidcode CYCLOPS, which was developed in Berkeley. Good agreement between plasma diagnostics results, measured ion optical properties and MHD simulations was found. Parameters that are required for a reactor application are a discharge current of 50 kA, a channel diameter below 1 cm, a pointing stability better than 500 μm, and MHD stability for more than 10 μs. These parameters have been demonstrated in the recent experiments. The results imply that transport channels work with sufficient stability, reproducibility and ion optical properties in a wide pressure range and for various discharge gases.

  20. Behavior of wet precast beam column connections under progressive collapse scenario: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimse, Rohit B.; Joshi, Digesh D.; Patel, Paresh V.

    2014-12-01

    Progressive collapse denotes a failure of a major portion of a structure that has been initiated by failure of a relatively small part of the structure such as failure of any vertical load carrying element (typically columns). Failure of large part of any structure will results into substantial loss of human lives and natural resources. Therefore, it is important to prevent progressive collapse which is also known as disproportionate collapse. Nowadays, there is an increasing trend toward construction of buildings using precast concrete. In precast concrete construction, all the components of structures are produced in controlled environment and they are being transported to the site. At site such individual components are connected appropriately. Connections are the most critical elements of any precast structure, because in past major collapse of precast structure took place because of connection failure. In this study, behavior of three different 1/3rd scaled wet precast beam column connections under progressive collapse scenario are studied and its performance is compared with monolithic connection. Precast connections are constructed by adopting different connection detailing at the junction by considering reinforced concrete corbel for two specimens and steel billet for one specimen. Performance of specimen is evaluated on the basis of ultimate load carrying capacity, maximum deflection and deflection measured along the span of the beam. From the results, it is observed that load carrying capacity and ductility of precast connections considered in this study are more than that of monolithic connections.

  1. Progress report on muon catalyzed fusion studies in H2+D2 and HD gaseous targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniol, K. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Noble, A. J.; Stanislaus, S.; Virtue, C. J.; Measday, D. F.; Horvath, D.; Robertson, B. C.; Salomon, M.; Jones, S. E.

    1988-12-01

    Gamma yields from the decay of the muonic molecule pdμ produced in muon-catalyzed fusion studies in H2+D2 and HD gaseous targets have been measured. The experiments have been performed at TRIUMF and the data is presented in this report. (AIP)

  2. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-04-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  3. Progress in modular-stellarator fusion-power-reactor conceptual designs

    SciTech Connect

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Van Sciver, S.W.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent encouraging experimental results on stellarators/torsatrons/heliotrons (S/T/H) have revived interest in these concepts as possible fusion power reactors. The use of modular coils to generate the stellarator topology has added impetus to this renewed interest. Studies of the modular coil approach to stellarators by UW-Madison and Los Alamos National Laboratory are summarized in this paper.

  4. Centroid and Envelope Eynamics of Charged Particle Beams in an Oscillating Wobbler and External Focusing Lattice for Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Davidson and B. Grant Logan

    2011-07-19

    Recent heavy ion fusion target studies show that it is possible to achieve ignition with direct drive and energy gain larger than 100 at 1MJ. To realize these advanced, high-gain schemes based on direct drive, it is necessary to develop a reliable beam smoothing technique to mitigate instabilities and facilitate uniform deposition on the target. The dynamics of the beam centroid can be explored as a possible beam smoothing technique to achieve a uniform illumination over a suitably chosen region of the target. The basic idea of this technique is to induce an oscillatory motion of the centroid for each transverse slice of the beam in such a way that the centroids of different slices strike different locations on the target. The centroid dynamics is controlled by a set of biased electrical plates called 'wobblers'. Using a model based on moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations, we show that the wobbler deflection force acts only on the centroid motion, and that the envelope dynamics are independent of the wobbler fields. If the conducting wall is far away from the beam, then the envelope dynamics and centroid dynamics are completely decoupled. This is a preferred situation for the beam wobbling technique, because the wobbler system can be designed to generate the desired centroid motion on the target without considering its effects on the envelope and emittance. A conceptual design of the wobbler system for a heavy ion fusion driver is briefly summarized.

  5. Potential applications of fusion neutral beam facilities for advanced material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Whealton, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    Surface processing techniques involving high energy ion implantation have achieved commercial success for semiconductors and biomaterials. However, wider use has been limited in good part by economic factors, some of which are related to the line-of-sight nature of the beam implantation process. Plasma source ion implantation is intended to remove some of the limitations imposed by directionality of beam systems and also to help provide economies of scale. The present paper will outline relevant technologies and areas of expertise that exist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in relation to possible future needs in materials processing. Experience in generation of plasmas, control of ionization states, pulsed extraction, and sheath physics exists. Contributions to future technology can be made either for the immersion mode or for the extracted beam mode. Existing facilities include the High Power Test Facility, which could conservatively operate at 1 A of continuous current at 100 kV delivered to areas of about 1 m{sup 2}. Higher instantaneous voltages and currents are available with a reduced duty cycle. Another facility, the High Heat Flux Facility can supply a maximum of 60 kV and currents of up to 60 A for 2 s on a 10% duty cycle. Plasmas may be generated by use of microwaves, radio-frequency induction or other methods and plasma properties may be tailored to suit specific needs. In addition to ion implantation of large steel components, foreseeable applications include ion implantation of polymers, ion implantation of Ti alloys, Al alloys, or other reactive surfaces.

  6. Traverse Focusing of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Chromatic Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Mitrani, Igor D. Kaganovich, Ronald C. Davidson

    2013-01-28

    A fi nal focusing scheme designed to minimize chromatic effects is discussed. The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II) will apply a velocity tilt for longitudinal bunch compression, and a fi nal focusing solenoid (FFS) for transverse bunch compression. In the beam frame, neutralized drift compression causes a suffi ciently large spread in axial momentum, pz , resulting in chromatic effects to the fi nal focal spot during transverse bunch compression. Placing a weaker solenoid upstream of a stronger fi nal focusing solenoid (FFS) mitigates chromatic effects and improves transverse focusing by a factor of approximately 2-4 for appropriate NDCX-II parameters.

  7. Particle beam fusion program. Publications and related reports: a bibliography, January 1971-July 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, G.

    1980-03-01

    This bibliography documents the evolution of this program and consolidates its 207 entries into a handy source book. The entries represent documents published by Sandia between January 1, 1971 and July 31, 1979. In order to assist the reader, the reports have been categorized into the general topics of Reviews, Beams and Plasmas, Deposition Physics and Targets, Pulsed Power Technology, and Reactors and Repetitive Pulsed Technology, and arranged in chronological order, with the most recent report in each area presented first. The reports are also cross-indexed by author and by publication number (SLA, SAND, etc.).

  8. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Croci, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Gorini, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2014-08-21

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  9. Recent progress in the development of a circular ion induction accelerator for space charge dominated beams at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L; Autrey, D; Barnard, J; Berners, D; Craig, G; Debeling, A; Eylon, S; Friedman, A; Fritz, W; Grote, D P; Halaxa, E; Hanks, R L; Hernandez, M; Judd, D L; Kirbie, H C; Logan, B G; Lund, S M; Mant, G; Molvik, A W; Reginato, L; Sangster, T C; Sharp, W M

    1998-08-19

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has for several years been developing the world's first circular ion induction accelerator. This machine has recently been extended to 90 degrees, or 10 half-lattice periods (HLP) with full beam transport. In addition, induction cores have been installed on five of the HLP's, each with an independent arbitrary waveform pulser. An arbitrary waveform pulser for the bending electrostatic dipoles has also been enabled. Together, they have allowed the first attempts at coordinated bending and acceleration of the beam. The results of these first attempts will be reported on in the paper by examining the output of various diagnostic devices, such as the capacitive Beam Probes (C-probes), slit scanners, and the Gated Beam Imager(GBI).

  10. NBI: Progress in Physics and Engineering toward Fusion Reactors 6.Application of NBI Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Andoh, Yasunori

    Technologies of a large ion source developed for neutral beam injectors(NBI) have been applied to various fields of industries such as ion beam machining for semiconductors, electronics and optical devices, and manufacturing process of a large size liquid crystal display. Power supply technology of a high performance core snubber for NBI has also been applied to high energy particle accelerators to improve the efficiency.

  11. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scaletransport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2004-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program that explores heavy-ion beam as the driver option for fusion energy production in an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) plant. The HCX is a beam transport experiment at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linear accelerator driver. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density ~0.2 μC/m) over long pulse durations (4 μs) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K+ ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor (~80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss. We achieved good envelope control, and re-matching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  12. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Merrill, Amy E.; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb–/–mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb–/–mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb–/–mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  13. Energy balance in disk and CO2 laser beam inert gas fusion cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scintilla, Leonardo Daniele; Tricarico, Luigi; Wetzig, Andreas; Beyer, Eckhard

    2012-03-01

    Experimental, numerical and analytical investigations were performed to give a possible explanation of the differences in cutting quality detected for inert gas laser beam cutting process performed with disk and CO2 laser sources. Cutting experiments were carried out at maximum cutting speed on cold work steel test specimens with different sheet thicknesses. The particular feature of the applied experimental setup was the similar geometry of both the CO2 and the disk laser beam with comparable values of the focus diameter and the Rayleigh length. The thermodynamic analysis was based on experimentally primary losses evaluation by means of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) blocks, on numerical computation of conductive power losses and analytical calculation of the remaining terms of energy balance. Energy balance allowed the evaluation of secondary losses and proportion of vaporized kerf volume used for justifying the lower quality of disk laser cuts. The lower proportion of vaporized kerf volume detected for disk laser cuts results in an increased process temperature, thus an increase of viscosity of molten material and the subsequent more difficult ejection of the melted material from the cut kerf.

  14. Measuring the Fusion Cross-Section of 18,19 O + 12 C with Low-Intensity Beams at Energies Near and Below the Coulomb Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Tracy; Vadas, Justin; Schmidt, Jon; Singh, Varinderjit; Hudan, Sylvie; Desouza, Romualdo; Baby, Lagy; Kuvin, Sean; Wiedenhover, Ingo; Umar, Sait; Oberacker, Volker

    2015-04-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei has been proposed as a heat source that triggers an X-ray superburst in the crust of an accreting neutron star. To investigate this hypothesis the total fusion cross-section for beams of low-intensity, neutron-rich nuclei (<105 ions/s) on light targets has been measured at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier. Evaporation residues, resulting from the fusion of oxygen and 12 C nuclei, were identified by their energy and Time-of-flight. Using this technique, the fusion excitation function was measured in the sub-barrier domain down to the 2 mb level. Comparison of the measured fusion excitation function with the predictions of a density constrained TDHF model reveals that the experimental data exhibit a smaller decrease in cross-section with decreasing energy than is theoretically predicted. This difference can be interpreted as a larger tunneling probability for the experimental data as compared to the theoretical predictions. To determine if this difference increases in magnitude with decreasing incident energy improvements have been implemented to enable measurement of the fusion cross-section to an even lower level. Supported by the US DOE under Grand No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  15. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed.

  16. Progress in accident analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-10-11

    The present work continues our effort to perform an integrated safety analysis for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. Recently we developed a base case for a severe accident scenario in order to calculate accident doses for HYLIFE-II. It consisted of a total loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in which all the liquid flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) was lost at the beginning of the accident. Results showed that the off-site dose was below the limit given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for public protection in case of accident, and that his dose was dominated by the tritium released during the accident.

  17. Fusion development and technology. Technical progress report, October 15, 1990--October 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R&D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development.

  18. Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research and Implications for Fusion Energy Development Path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Masayuki

    2014-10-01

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A =R0 / a) reduced to A near 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A equal to 2.5 or greater. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural plasma elongation which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to the longer term goal of an attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two mega-ampere class ST facilities in 2000, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in the UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all areas of fusion research, including fundamental fusion energy science as well as technological innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research in both the near and longer term. The talk will summarize the key physics results from worldwide ST experiments, and describe ST community plans to provide the database for FNSF design while improving predictive capabilities for ITER and beyond. This work supported by DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. A large fraction of this work, particularly in relation to fission reactor experiments, is carried out collaboratively with partners in Japan, Russian, and the European Union. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. The following subjects are covered: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composite materials; ferritic/martensitic steels; copper alloys and high heat flux materials; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects; mechanistic studies and experimental methods dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; and irradiation facilities, test matrices and experimental methods. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Low pressure and high power rf sources for negative hydrogen ions for fusion applications (ITER neutral beam injection).

    PubMed

    Fantz, U; Franzen, P; Kraus, W; Falter, H D; Berger, M; Christ-Koch, S; Fröschle, M; Gutser, R; Heinemann, B; Martens, C; McNeely, P; Riedl, R; Speth, E; Wünderlich, D

    2008-02-01

    The international fusion experiment ITER requires for the plasma heating and current drive a neutral beam injection system based on negative hydrogen ion sources at 0.3 Pa. The ion source must deliver a current of 40 A D(-) for up to 1 h with an accelerated current density of 200 Am/(2) and a ratio of coextracted electrons to ions below 1. The extraction area is 0.2 m(2) from an aperture array with an envelope of 1.5 x 0.6 m(2). A high power rf-driven negative ion source has been successfully developed at the Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) at three test facilities in parallel. Current densities of 330 and 230 Am/(2) have been achieved for hydrogen and deuterium, respectively, at a pressure of 0.3 Pa and an electron/ion ratio below 1 for a small extraction area (0.007 m(2)) and short pulses (<4 s). In the long pulse experiment, equipped with an extraction area of 0.02 m(2), the pulse length has been extended to 3600 s. A large rf source, with the width and half the height of the ITER source but without extraction system, is intended to demonstrate the size scaling and plasma homogeneity of rf ion sources. The source operates routinely now. First results on plasma homogeneity obtained from optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probes are very promising. Based on the success of the IPP development program, the high power rf-driven negative ion source has been chosen recently for the ITER beam systems in the ITER design review process.

  1. Performance of plasma opening switches for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II)

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.; McDaniel, D.H.; Mendel, C.W.; Sweeney, M.A.; Moore, W.B.S.; Mowrer, G.R.; Simpson, W.W.; Zagar, D.M.; Grasser, T.; McDougal, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    During 1987 and 1988, Plasma Opening Switch (POS) experiments have been continued with the goal of providing voltage and power gain on the PBFA II ion beam accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. The experiments have developed a POS that has a rugged plasma source, will open rapidly, and will couple to a high-impedance load. The initial erosion switch design with improved plasma uniformity does not couple to these loads. Therefore, we have abandoned further development of this switch for voltage and power gain. Three alternate designs have been developed, tested, and are found to have better performance with the high-impedance loads. These new switches employ magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. A summary of the switch configurations, their theory of operation, and the experimental results is presented and discussed. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Progress on the Implementation of a Neutral Beam for the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment-Beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Enrique; Kozub, Thomas; Boyle, Dennis; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Smirnov, Artem; Catalano, Ryan

    2016-10-01

    In the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX), good performance discharges have been achieved with reduced-recycling lithium walls. Two hydrogen neutral beams (NB) have been loaned to the LTX project by Tri-Alpha Energy, Inc. To further improve plasma parameters, one of these neutral beams is being installed as part of an upgrade to LTX (LTX-Beta). Current ohmic input power in LTX is less than 100 kW. The NB will provide core plasma fueling with up to 700 kW of injected power. Requirements for accommodating the NB include the addition of injection and beam-dump ports on the vessel, and their designs have been finalized. Progress has also been made on the NB power supplies, including the preparation of a new room to accommodate them. A description of these activities and the status of other improvements to LTX for LTX-Beta will be presented. Work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02- 09CH11466 and DE-AC05- 00OR22725.

  3. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices.

    PubMed

    Pilan, N; Antoni, V; De Lorenzi, A; Chitarin, G; Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  4. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pilan, N. Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-15

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF{sub 6} instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  5. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Dyer, G.; Ihn, Y. S.; Cortez, J.; Aymond, F.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Barbui, M.; Bonasera, A.; Natowitz, J. B.; Albright, B. J.; Fernández, J. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-12-10

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure the average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.

  6. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; ...

    2014-12-10

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure themore » average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.« less

  7. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Dyer, G.; Ihn, Y. S.; Cortez, J.; Aymond, F.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Barbui, M.; Bonasera, A.; Natowitz, J. B.; Albright, B. J.; Fernández, J. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-12-01

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure the average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.

  8. The role and application of ion beam analysis for studies of plasma-facing components in controlled fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, Marek; Petersson, Per; Alves, Eduardo; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Coad, Joseph Paul; Heinola, Kalle; Mayer, Matej; Widdowson, Anna

    2016-03-01

    First wall materials in controlled fusion devices undergo serious modification by several physical and chemical processes arising from plasma-wall interactions. Detailed information is required for the assessment of material lifetime and accumulation of hydrogen isotopes in wall materials. The intention of this work is to give a concise overview of key issues in the characterization of plasma-facing materials and components in tokamaks, especially in JET with an ITER-Like Wall. IBA techniques play a particularly prominent role here because of their isotope selectivity in the low-Z range (1-10), high sensitivity and combination of several methods in a single run. The role of 3He-based NRA, RBS (standard and micro-size beam) and HIERDA in fuel retention and material migration studies is presented. The use of tracer techniques with rare isotopes (e.g. 15N) or marker layers on wall diagnostic components is described. Special instrumentation, development of equipment to enhance research capabilities and issues in handling of contaminated materials are addressed.

  9. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Bang, W; Quevedo, H J; Bernstein, A C; Dyer, G; Ihn, Y S; Cortez, J; Aymond, F; Gaul, E; Donovan, M E; Barbui, M; Bonasera, A; Natowitz, J B; Albright, B J; Fernández, J C; Ditmire, T

    2014-12-01

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure the average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.

  10. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  11. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  12. Heavy ion fusion program. Semi-annual progress report, October 1, 1979-March 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    HIF activity at ANL during FY 1980 has been primarily concentrated on conceptual design work, and on initial tests of the independently-phased rf acceleration cavities. Calculations for near-term foil-heating experiments were carried out, and a specific cost-effective synchrotron (Beam Development Facility) plan was developed. Program logics were further refined, and some conceptual reactor issues were addressed.

  13. Integral experiments for fusion-reactor shield design. Summary of progress

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra from the reactions of approx. 14-MeV neutrons in blanket and shield materials and from the streaming of these neutrons through a cylindrical duct (L/D approx. 2) have been measured and calculated. These data are being obtained in a series of integral experiments to verify the radiation transport methods and nuclear data that are being used in nuclear design calculations for fusion reactors. The experimental procedures and analytical methods used to obtain the calculated data are reviewed. Comparisons between measured and calculated data for the experiments that have been performed to date are summarized.

  14. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1987-09-01

    These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The major areas of concern covered in this report are irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; ceramics and superconducting magnet materials. There are 61 reports cataloged separately. (LSP)

  15. Characteristics of confinement and fusion reactivity in JT-60U high-{beta}{rho} and TFTR supershot regimes with deuterium neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.; Bell, M.G.; Yamada, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high performance regimes achieved in JT-60U and TFTR have produced peak DD fusion neutron rates up to 5.6 {times} 10{sup 16}/s for similar heating beam powers, in spite of considerable differences in machine operation and plasma configuration. A common scaling for the DD fusion neutron rate (S{sub DD} {proportional_to} P{sub abs}{sup 2.0} H{sub ne} V{sub p}{sup {minus}0.9}) is obtained, where P{sub abs} and H{sub ne} are the absorbed beam power and beam fueling peaking factor, respectively, and V{sub p} is the plasma volume. The maximum stored energy obtained in each machine has been up to 5.4 MJ in TFTR and 8.7 MJ in JT-60U. Further improvements in the fusion neutron rate and the stored energy are limited by the {beta}-limit in Troyon range, {beta}{sub N} {approximately} 2.0--2.5. A common scaling for the stored energy (W{sub tot} {proportional_to} P{sub abs}V{sub p}H{sub ne}{sup 0.2}) is also proposed.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Fusion Biopsy to Detect Progression in Patients with Existing Lesions on Active Surveillance for Low and Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Frye, Thomas P; George, Arvin K; Kilchevsky, Amichai; Maruf, Mahir; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; Kongnyuy, Michael; Muthigi, Akhil; Han, Hui; Parnes, Howard L; Merino, Maria; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris; Wood, Brad; Pinto, Peter A

    2017-03-01

    Active surveillance is an established option for men with low risk prostate cancer. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion guided biopsy may better identify patients for active surveillance compared to systematic 12-core biopsy due to improved risk stratification. To our knowledge the performance of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in following men on active surveillance with visible lesions is unknown. We evaluated multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion guided biopsy to monitor men on active surveillance. This retrospective review included men from 2007 to 2015 with prostate cancer on active surveillance in whom magnetic resonance imaging visible lesions were monitored by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and fusion guided biopsy. Progression was defined by ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology) grade group 1 to 2 and ISUP grade group 2 to 3. Significance was considered at p ≤0.05. A total of 166 patients on active surveillance with 2 or more fusion guided biopsies were included in analysis. Mean followup was 25.5 months. Of the patients 29.5% had pathological progression. Targeted biopsy alone identified 44.9% of patients who progressed compared to 30.6% identified by systematic 12-core biopsy alone (p = 0.03). Fusion guided biopsy detected 26% more cases of pathological progression on surveillance biopsy compared to systematic 12-core biopsy. Progression on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was the sole predictor of pathological progression at surveillance biopsy (p = 0.013). Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging progression in the entire cohort had 81% negative predictive value, 35% positive predictive value, 77.6% sensitivity and 40.5% specificity in detecting pathological progression. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging progression predicts the risk of pathological

  17. Dynamical dipole mode in fusion reactions at 16 MeV/nucleon and beam energy dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Martin, B.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Cardella, G.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Filippo, E. De; Zoppo, A. Del; Toro, M. Di; Inglima, G.; Glodariu, T.; Commara, M. La; Maiolino, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Pagano, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pirrone, S.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Signorini, C.

    2009-08-01

    High-energy γ rays and light charged particles from the Ar36+Zr96 and Ar40+Zr92 reactions at Elab=16 and 15.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively, were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues by means of the MEDEA multidetector array coupled to four parallel plate avalanche counters. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the prompt γ radiation, emitted in the decay of the dynamical dipole mode, in the ~16 MeV/nucleon energy range and to map its beam energy dependence, comparing the present results with our previous ones obtained at lower energies. The studied reactions populate, through entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, a compound nucleus in the region of Ce under the same conditions of excitation energy and spin. Light charged particle energy spectra were used to pin down the average excitation energy and the average mass of the system. By studying the γ-ray spectra of the charge symmetric reaction Ar40+Zr92, the statistical giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters and angular distribution were extracted, and a comparison of the linearized 90°γ-ray spectra of the two reactions revealed a 12% extra yield in the GDR energy region for the more charge asymmetric system. The center-of-mass angular distribution data of this extra γ yield, compatible with a dipole oscillating along the symmetry axis of the dinuclear system, support its dynamical nature. The experimental findings are compared with theoretical predictions performed within a Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov transport model and based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the entrance channel reaction dynamics. An interesting sensitivity to the symmetry term of the equation of state and to in-medium effects on nucleon-nucleon (nn) cross sections is finally discussed.

  18. Maryland controlled fusion research program. Progress report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, H.R.; Liu, C.S.

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, we summarize the technical progress in four major areas of tokamak research: (a) L/H transition and edge turbulence and transport; (b) active control of microturbulence and transport; (c) major disruptions; and (d) the sawtooth crash.

  19. Materials recycle and waste management in fusion power reactors. Progress report for 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, S.; Jung, J.; Steindler, M.J.; Maya, I.; Levine, H.E.; Peterman, D.D.; Strausburg, S.; Schultz, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Several components of a STARFIRE fusion reactor have been studied. The breeding ratios were calculated as a function of lithium enrichment and neutron multiplier for systems containing either Li/sub 2/O or LiAlO/sub 2/. The lithium requirements for a fusion economy were also estimated for those cases and the current US resources were found to be adequate. However, competition with other lithium demands in the future emphasizes the need for recovering and reusing lithium. The radioactivities induced in the breeder and the impurities responsible for their formation were determined. The residual radioactivities of several low-activation structural materials were compared with the radioactivity from the prime candidate alloy (PCA) a titanium modified Type 316 stainless steel used in STARFIRE. The impurities responsible for the radioactivity levels were identified. From these radioactive impurity levels it was determined that V15Cr5Ti could meet the requirements for shallow land burial as specified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10CFR61), whereas PCA would require a more restrictive disposal mode, i.e. in a geologic medium. The costs for each of these disposal modes were then estimated.

  20. Progress in laboratory high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion): Prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, E.; Lindl, J.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Bernat, T.P.; Coleman, L.W.; Emmett, J.L.; Hogan, W.J.; Hunt, J.T.; Krupke, W.F.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a thermonuclear reaction in a small (/approximately/5 mm diameter) fuel capsule filled with a few milligrams of deuterium and tritium, has been the subject of very fruitful experimentation since the early 1970's. High gain ICF is now on the threshold of practical applications. With a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), these applications will have major implications for national defense, basic and applied science, and power production. With a driver capable of delivering about 10 MJ in a 10-ns pulse at an intensity of /approximately/3 /times/ 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/, an appropriately configured cryogenic capsule could be compressed to a density of about 200 g/cm/sup 3/ and a temperature of 3--5 keV. Under these conditions, up to 10 mg of DT could be ignited, and with a burn efficiency of about 30%, release up to 1000 MJ of fusion energy, an energy gain of about 100. A thousand megajoules is equivalent to about one quarter ton of TNT, or about 7 gallons of oil--an amount of energy tractable under laboratory conditions and potentially very useful for a variety of applications. 61 refs., 33 figs.

  1. Inertial Confinement Fusion: progress through close coupling of theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, Keith

    2008-11-01

    It has been nearly 50 years since the first approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) was discussed and 36 years since the first publication appeared. For DT plasmas, the ignition (Lawson) criterion can be simply stated as (pressure * time) > 10 atmosphere-seconds. In ICF, plasma confinement times are set by the plasma inertia to a few 10's of picoseconds. Therefore, an igniting ICF plasma needs pressures > 100 billion atmospheres. Achieving these extreme conditions requires a temporally precise, intense field (the equivalent of >200 TW/cm^2) that symmetrically (˜1%) drives the fusion target. Over the past three decades the goal of achieving these extreme conditions has led to tremendous advances in plasma physics, computational tools, diagnostics, precision targets, and experimental facilities. Close coupling of simulations and experiments have led the way to a detailed understanding of the requirements for achieving ignition, enabled by driver energies that have gone from kilojoules to Megajoules and simulations that will soon exceed a Petaflop. ICF research in the United States is entering an exciting new phase with the recent completion of the Sandia Z-Refurbishment Project and the LLE Omega Extended Performance Project. The LLNL National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project will be completed in 2009, and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) will perform the first ignition attempts on the NIF soon thereafter. This talk will briefly review highlights of the history of ICF with particular attention to the close coupling of theory and experiment, which has been a hallmark of ICF research.

  2. Initial progress in the first wall, blanket, and shield Engineering Test Program for magnetically confined fusion-power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, H.; Baker, C.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1981-10-01

    The first wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program (ETP) progressed from the planning stage into implementation during July, 1981. The program, generic in nature, comprises four Test Program Elements (TPE's), the emphasis of which is on defining the performance parameters for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) and the major fusion device to follow FED. These elements are: (1) nonnuclear thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing of first wall and component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads and heat transient (i.e., plasma disruption) effects; (2) nonnuclear and nuclear testing of FW/B/S components and assemblies with emphasis on bulk (nuclear) heating effects, integrated FW/B/S hydraulics and mechanics, blanket coolant system transients, and nuclear benchmarks; (3) FW/B/S electromagnetic and eddy current effects testing, including pulsed field penetration, torque and force restraint, electromagnetic materials, liquid metal MHD effects and the like; and (4) FW/B/S Assembly, Maintenance and Repair (AMR) studies focusing on generic AMR criteria, with the objective of preparing an AMR designers guidebook; also, development of rapid remote assembly/disassembly joint system technology, leak detection and remote handling methods.

  3. Performance of magnetically injected plasma opening switches for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator 2 (PBFA 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.; McDaniel, D.H.; Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Sweeney, M.A.; Moore, W.B.S.; Mowrer, G.R.; Simpson, W.W.; Zagar, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma opening switch experiments using a magnetically injected plasma have been in progress since October 1988. Plasma densities of 1 {times} 10{sup 12} to 2 {times} 10{sup 13} e/cm{sup 3} have been injected from the anode side into the 8 cm gap of the 20 ohm magnetically insulated transmission line of PBFA II using a slowly rising B{sub r,z} magnetic field. This field confines the azimuthally-uniform plasma to produce switches up to 30 cm in length. Four MIP geometries have been investigated to find a higher electrical impedance when the switch opens. These studies have shown that a separation of 10 to 20 cm from the load is important to keep the POS from affecting the load performance. With such a separation, 20 to 30 TW of power at 7 to 11 MV has been delivered to electron and ion diode loads. Data on switch performance with various loads and factors that improve performance are discussed. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Reverse propagation and negative angular momentum density flux of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial fractional Bessel vortex beam of progressive waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-09-01

    Energy and angular momentum flux density characteristics of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial vector Bessel vortex beam of fractional order are examined based on the dual-field method for the generation of symmetric electric and magnetic fields. Should some conditions determined by the polarization state, the half-cone angle as well as the beam-order (or topological charge) be met, the axial energy and angular momentum flux densities vanish (representing Poynting singularities), before they become negative. These negative counterintuitive properties suggest retrograde (negative) propagation as well as a rotation reversal of the angular momentum with respect to the beam handedness. These characteristics of nondiffracting nonparaxial Bessel fractional vortex beams of progressive waves open new capabilities in optical tractor beam tweezers, optical spanners, invisibility cloaks, optically engineered metamaterials, and other applications.

  5. Toward mapping crop progress at field scales through fusion of Landsat and MODIS imagery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop progress and condition are required for crop management and yield estimation. In the United States, they are reported weekly at state or district level by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) using the field observations provided by local far...

  6. Applications of computer modeling to fusion research. Progress report, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J.M.

    1989-12-31

    Progress achieved during this report period is presented on the following topics: Development and application of gyrokinetic particle codes to tokamak transport, development of techniques to take advantage of parallel computers; model dynamo and bootstrap current drive; and in general maintain our broad-based program in basic plasma physics and computer modeling.

  7. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility injector acceptance tests at CEA/Saclay: 140 mA/100 keV deuteron beam characterization.

    PubMed

    Gobin, R; Bogard, D; Cara, P; Chauvin, N; Chel, S; Delferrière, O; Harrault, F; Mattei, P; Mosnier, A; Senée, F; Shidara, H; Okumura, Y

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the ITER broader approach, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) deuteron accelerator (2 × 125 mA at 40 MeV) is an irradiation tool dedicated to high neutron flux production for future nuclear plant material studies. During the validation phase, the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc) machine will be tested on the Rokkasho site in Japan. This demonstrator aims to produce 125 mA/9 MeV deuteron beam. Involved in the LIPAc project for several years, specialists from CEA/Saclay designed the injector based on a SILHI type ECR source operating at 2.45 GHz and a 2 solenoid low energy beam line to produce such high intensity beam. The whole injector, equipped with its dedicated diagnostics, has been then installed and tested on the Saclay site. Before shipment from Europe to Japan, acceptance tests have been performed in November 2012 with 100 keV deuteron beam and intensity as high as 140 mA in continuous and pulsed mode. In this paper, the emittance measurements done for different duty cycles and different beam intensities will be presented as well as beam species fraction analysis. Then the reinstallation in Japan and commissioning plan on site will be reported.

  8. Progress in navigation filter estimate fusion and its application to spacecraft rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    1994-01-01

    A new derivation of an algorithm which fuses the outputs of two Kalman filters is presented within the context of previous research in this field. Unlike other works, this derivation clearly shows the combination of estimates to be optimal, minimizing the trace of the fused covariance matrix. The algorithm assumes that the filters use identical models, and are stable and operating optimally with respect to their own local measurements. Evidence is presented which indicates that the error ellipsoid derived from the covariance of the optimally fused estimate is contained within the intersections of the error ellipsoids of the two filters being fused. Modifications which reduce the algorithm's data transmission requirements are also presented, including a scalar gain approximation, a cross-covariance update formula which employs only the two contributing filters' autocovariances, and a form of the algorithm which can be used to reinitialize the two Kalman filters. A sufficient condition for using the optimally fused estimates to periodically reinitialize the Kalman filters in this fashion is presented and proved as a theorem. When these results are applied to an optimal spacecraft rendezvous problem, simulated performance results indicate that the use of optimally fused data leads to significantly improved robustness to initial target vehicle state errors. The following applications of estimate fusion methods to spacecraft rendezvous are also described: state vector differencing, and redundancy management.

  9. Rapidly progressive stage IVB mycosis fungoides treated with low-dose total skin electron beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Kabbani, Ahmad A; Rimtepathip, Parin; Cole, David A; Cohen, David J

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common subtype of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Normally, MF has an indolent course although patients can progress to an advanced disease state (stages IIB-IVB). Advanced-stage disease is typically aggressive, leaving patients with debilitating symptoms and a decreased quality of life. Moreover, advanced-stage MF often proves refractory to therapy and carries a very poor prognosis. Total skin electron beam (TSEB) therapy is a well-established and successful treatment for early stage MF; however, its efficacy dramatically decreases with advanced-stage disease. In fact, TSEB in advanced-stage MF is generally considered to be palliative. Current consensus guidelines recommend a dose of 30-36 Gy to be delivered in 8-10 weeks; however, limited studies exist to determine the ideal treatment in Stage IV MF. Herein, we describe a case of a 50-year-old male who developed rapidly progressive stage IVB (T3N3M1B0) MF and was treated with low-dose (24 Gy) TSEB over 8 weeks. The patient was not treated with any systemic therapy before starting TSEB due to the widespread nature and the speed of disease progression. Remarkably, our patient showed nearly complete (95%) response of his MF with no apparent side effects from radiation. Furthermore, he has remained in remission over 4 years, requiring only a small boost to a few "shadowed" areas. Our case illustrates the benefit of using TSEB in stage IV MF. Additionally, our experience shows that low-dose TSEB can occasionally be efficacious in stage IV disease.

  10. Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in a progressive and standing zero-order quasi-Bessel-Gauss beam.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Liu, Xiaozhou; Liu, Jiehui; Mao, Yiwei; Marston, Philip L

    2017-04-01

    By means of series expansion theory, the incident quasi-Bessel-Gauss beam is expanded using spherical harmonic functions, and the beam coefficients of the quasi-Bessel-Gauss beam are calculated. According to the theory, the acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit energy on a unit cross-sectional surface on a sphere made of diverse materials and immersed in an ideal fluid along the propagation axis of zero-order quasi-Bessel-Gauss progressive and standing beams, is investigated. The acoustic radiation force function is calculated as a function of the spherical radius parameter ka and the half-cone angle β with different beam widths in a progressive and standing zero-order Bessel-Gauss beam. Simulation results indicate that the acoustic radiation forces with different waist radii demonstrate remarkably different features from those found in previous studies. The results are expected to be useful in potential applications such as acoustic tweezers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Tissue Regeneration in the Chronically Inflamed Tumor Environment: Implications for Cell Fusion Driven Tumor Progression and Therapy Resistant Tumor Hybrid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Thomas; Zänker, Kurt S.

    2015-01-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion in a cancer context is still a matter of controversial debates. Even though a plethora of in vitro and in vivo data have been published in the past decades the ultimate proof that tumor hybrid cells could originate in (human) cancers and could contribute to the progression of the disease is still missing, suggesting that the cell fusion hypothesis is rather fiction than fact. However, is the lack of this ultimate proof a valid argument against this hypothesis, particularly if one has to consider that appropriate markers do not (yet) exist, thus making it virtually impossible to identify a human tumor cell clearly as a tumor hybrid cell. In the present review, we will summarize the evidence supporting the cell fusion in cancer concept. Moreover, we will refine the cell fusion hypothesis by providing evidence that cell fusion is a potent inducer of aneuploidy, genomic instability and, most likely, even chromothripsis, suggesting that cell fusion, like mutations and aneuploidy, might be an inducer of a mutator phenotype. Finally, we will show that “accidental” tissue repair processes during cancer therapy could lead to the origin of therapy resistant cancer hybrid stem cells. PMID:26703575

  12. Efficacy and safety of VEPTR instrumentation for progressive spine deformities in young children without rib fusions.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Carol-Claudius; Mehrkens, Arne; Hefti, Fritz

    2010-03-01

    This retrospective study analyses 23 children treated with vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) for correction of non-congenital early onset spine deformities. After the index procedure (IP), the device was lengthened at 6-month intervals. The average (av) age at the time of IP was 6.5 years (1.11-10.5). The av follow-up time was 3.6 years (2-5.8). Diagnosis included 1 early onset idiopathic scoliosis, 11 neuromuscular, 2 post-thoracotomy scoliosis, 1 Sprengel deformity, 2 hyperkyphosis, 1 myopathy and 5 syndromic. Surgeries (187) included 23 IPs, av 6.5 (4-10) device expansions per patient (149) and 15 unplanned surgeries. 23 complications (0.13 per surgery) included 10 skin sloughs, 5 implant dislocations, 2 rod breakages and 6 infections. Coronal Cobb angle was av 68 degrees (11 degrees -111 degrees ), at follow-up av 54 degrees (0 degrees -105 degrees). Pelvic obliquity was av 33 degrees (13 degrees -60 degrees ), at follow-up av 16 degrees (0 degrees -42 degrees ). T1 tilt was av 29 degrees (5 degrees -84 degrees ), two remained unchanged, the remainder improved 10 degrees -68 degrees. Sagittal plane: All but two had stable profiles, two hyperkyphosis of 110 degrees /124 degrees improved to 56 degrees /86 degrees. Space available for lung ratio was less than 90% in ten before the IP, improved in nine and deteriorated in one. Originally designed for thoracic insufficiency syndromes related to rib and vertebral anomalies, VEPTR proved to be a valuable alternative to dual growing rods for non-congenital early onset spine deformities. The complication rate was lower, the control of the sagittal plane and the pelvic obliquity was as good, but the correction of the coronal plane deformity was less than growing rods. However, VEPTR's spine-sparing approach might provoke less spontaneous spinal fusion and ease the final correction at maturity.

  13. LIF Measurements on an Atomic Helium Beam in the Edge of a Fusion Plasma—possible derivation of the electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krychowiak, M.; Mertens, Ph.; Schweer, B.; Brezinsek, S.; König, R.; Schmitz, O.; Brix, M.; Klinger, T.; Samm, U.

    2008-03-01

    Local values of the electron density and temperature in the edge of a fusion plasma can be derived with high space and time resolution by the use of line radiation of atomic helium beams. The accuracy of this method is mainly limited by the uncertainties in the collisional-radiative model which is needed in order to obtain both plasma parameters from the measured relative intensities of atomic helium lines. Combination of a helium beam with a pulsed high-power laser provides a possibility of ne measurement which does not require a detailed knowledge of the collisional-radiative model. The method relies on resonant laser pumping of some levels and analyzing their fluorescence after the end of the laser pulse. Such measurements were already performed in low temperature plasmas with some content of atomic helium [1,2,3]. In this paper, we discuss the applicability of this method in the fusion edge plasma in the density range of ˜1012-1013 cm-3 when exciting helium atoms with a laser at the wavelength of λ = 388.9 nm tuned to the triplet transition 23S⃗33P ° and observing the fluorescence light at the laser wavelength and at λ = 587.6 nm(33D⃗23P °). A first test measurement at the TEXTOR tokamak in Jülich performed by use of an excimer-pumped dye laser in connection with a thermal helium beam is shown and discussed.

  14. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics. Technical progress report, July 11, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in theoretical and experimental research funded by US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG03-92ER54150, during the period July 11, 1992 through May 31, 1993. Four main tasks are reported: applied plasma physics theory, alpha particle diagnostic, edge and current density diagnostic, and plasma rotation drive. The report also discusses the research plans for the theory and experimental programs for the next grant year. Reports and publications supported by the grant during this period are listed in the final section.

  15. Efficacy and safety of VEPTR instrumentation for progressive spine deformities in young children without rib fusions

    PubMed Central

    Mehrkens, Arne; Hefti, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective study analyses 23 children treated with vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) for correction of non-congenital early onset spine deformities. After the index procedure (IP), the device was lengthened at 6-month intervals. The average (av) age at the time of IP was 6.5 years (1.11–10.5). The av follow-up time was 3.6 years (2–5.8). Diagnosis included 1 early onset idiopathic scoliosis, 11 neuromuscular, 2 post-thoracotomy scoliosis, 1 Sprengel deformity, 2 hyperkyphosis, 1 myopathy and 5 syndromic. Surgeries (187) included 23 IPs, av 6.5 (4–10) device expansions per patient (149) and 15 unplanned surgeries. 23 complications (0.13 per surgery) included 10 skin sloughs, 5 implant dislocations, 2 rod breakages and 6 infections. Coronal Cobb angle was av 68° (11°–111°), at follow-up av 54° (0°–105°). Pelvic obliquity was av 33° (13°–60°), at follow-up av 16° (0°–42°). T1 tilt was av 29° (5°–84°), two remained unchanged, the remainder improved 10°–68°. Sagittal plane: All but two had stable profiles, two hyperkyphosis of 110°/124° improved to 56°/86°. Space available for lung ratio was less than 90% in ten before the IP, improved in nine and deteriorated in one. Originally designed for thoracic insufficiency syndromes related to rib and vertebral anomalies, VEPTR proved to be a valuable alternative to dual growing rods for non-congenital early onset spine deformities. The complication rate was lower, the control of the sagittal plane and the pelvic obliquity was as good, but the correction of the coronal plane deformity was less than growing rods. However, VEPTR’s spine-sparing approach might provoke less spontaneous spinal fusion and ease the final correction at maturity. PMID:20041270

  16. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  17. [Fluctuations and transport in fusion plasma]: Progress report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-12-31

    In the study of plasma collection by obstacles in a tokamak edge plasma, the effect of anomalous transport have been examined using an extension of the 2D fluid code developed here previously (Appendices A and B). The origin of the anomalous transport is assumed to be a randomly fluctuating electric field such as would be caused by drift waves. As before, the magnetic field is assumed to be uniform and perpendicular to the obstacle, which is taken to be an infinite strip. In the absence of ambient plasma flow, the numerical results indicate that ion viscous heating is important near the tip of the obstacle, where there is a large velocity gradient in the flow. For typical plasma parameters, the maximum ion temperature near the tip is up to 85% higher than the ambient ion temperature. When there is a subsonic plasma flow past the obstacle, the numerical results indicate that, near the tip of the obstacle, the ions on the downstream side are hotter than those on the upstream side. Furthermore, the ion density is higher on the upstream side. A detailed report of this work has been prepared and will be submitted as part of the Annual Progress Report. Recently, the 2D parallel electrostatic plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) code described in reference (9) (Appendix B) has been upgraded to a 2D fully electromagnetic PIC code. This code has been successfully tested on the JPL/Caltech Mark III Hypercube concurrent computers and can be used to simulate interactions of electromagnetic waves with a magnetized plasma. It is currently applied to investigate the decay of large amplitude Alfven waves, such as those observed in the solar wind. Large amplitude Alfven waves, propagating parallel to the magnetic field, are predicted to decay into obliquely propagating daughter waves and standing magnetosonic waves. Results from the simulations will be compared with theoretical predictions.

  18. Modeling of the cross-beam energy transfer with realistic inertial-confinement-fusion beams in a large-scale hydrocode.

    PubMed

    Colaïtis, A; Duchateau, G; Ribeyre, X; Tikhonchuk, V

    2015-01-01

    A method for modeling realistic laser beams smoothed by kinoform phase plates is presented. The ray-based paraxial complex geometrical optics (PCGO) model with Gaussian thick rays allows one to create intensity variations, or pseudospeckles, that reproduce the beam envelope, contrast, and high-intensity statistics predicted by paraxial laser propagation codes. A steady-state cross-beam energy-transfer (CBET) model is implemented in a large-scale radiative hydrocode based on the PCGO model. It is used in conjunction with the realistic beam modeling technique to study the effects of CBET between coplanar laser beams on the target implosion. The pseudospeckle pattern imposed by PCGO produces modulations in the irradiation field and the shell implosion pressure. Cross-beam energy transfer between beams at 20(∘) and 40(∘) significantly degrades the irradiation symmetry by amplifying low-frequency modes and reducing the laser-capsule coupling efficiency, ultimately leading to large modulations of the shell areal density and lower convergence ratios. These results highlight the role of laser-plasma interaction and its influence on the implosion dynamics.

  19. Electra: A Repetitively Pulsed, Electron Beam Pumped KrF Laser to Develop the Technologies for Fusion Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    primary source of beam electrons comes from the inside of the capillary wall, and not explosive emission from the cathode material itself. This should...emitted from a field emission cathode driven by a fast pulsed power system. The electron beam propagates through a thin foil, which serves as the...pressure after the shot was reduced about five fold. In the case of the carbon fiber cathode , the RMS non-uniformity of the electron beam dropped

  20. Range shortening, radiation transport, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena in ion-beam-driven inertial-fusion-reactor-size targets: Implosion, ignition, and burn phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Keith A.; Tahir, Naeem A.

    1987-03-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the theory of the energy deposition of ions in cold materials and hot dense plasmas together with numerical calculations for heavy and light ions of interest to ion-beam fusion. We have used the gorgon computer code of Long, Moritz, and Tahir (which is an extension of the code originally written for protons by Nardi, Peleg, and Zinamon) to carry out these calculations. The energy-deposition data calculated in this manner has been used in the design of heavy-ion-beam-driven fusion targets suitable for a reactor, by its inclusion in the medusa code of Christiansen, Ashby, and Roberts as extended by Tahir and Long. A number of other improvements have been made in this code and these are also discussed. Various aspects of the theoretical analysis of such targets are discussed including the calculation of the hydrodynamic stability, the hydrodynamic efficiency, and the gain. Various different target designs have been used, some of them new. In general these targets are driven by Bi+ ions of energy 8-12 GeV, with an input energy of 4-6.5 MJ, with output energies in the range 600-900 MJ, and with gains in the range 120-180. The peak powers are in the range of 500-750 TW. We present detailed calculations of the ablation, compression, ignition, and burn phases. By the application of a new stability analysis which includes ablation and density-gradient effects we show that these targets appear to implode in a stable manner. Thus the targets designed offer working examples suited for use in a future inertial-confinement fusion reactor.

  1. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Intrator, T. P.; Grabowski, T. C.; Degnan, J. H.; Domonkos, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; Betti, R.; Bauer, B. S.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Siemon, R. E.; Miller, R. L.; Laberge, M.; Delage, M.

    2015-11-17

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). The status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans.

  2. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Wurden, G. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Intrator, T. P.; ...

    2015-11-17

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). Furthermore, the status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans.

  3. Progressive cone beam CT dose control in image-guided radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hao; Zhen, Xin; Cerviño, Laura; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) offers a tremendous advantage for treatment guidance. The associated imaging dose is a clinical concern. One unique feature of CBCT-based IGRT is that the same patient is repeatedly scanned during a treatment course, and the contents of CBCT images at different fractions are similar. The authors propose a progressive dose control (PDC) scheme to utilize this temporal correlation for imaging dose reduction. Methods: A dynamic CBCT scan protocol, as opposed to the static one in the current clinical practice, is proposed to gradually reduce the imaging dose in each treatment fraction. The CBCT image from each fraction is processed by a prior-image based nonlocal means (PINLM) module to enhance its quality. The increasing amount of prior information from previous CBCT images prevents degradation of image quality due to the reduced imaging dose. Two proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted using measured phantom data and Monte Carlo simulated patient data with deformation. Results: In the measured phantom case, utilizing a prior image acquired at 0.4 mAs, PINLM is able to improve the image quality of a CBCT acquired at 0.2 mAs by reducing the noise level from 34.95 to 12.45 HU. In the synthetic patient case, acceptable image quality is maintained at four consecutive fractions with gradually decreasing exposure levels of 0.4, 0.1, 0.07, and 0.05 mAs. When compared with the standard low-dose protocol of 0.4 mAs for each fraction, an overall imaging dose reduction of more than 60% is achieved. Conclusions: PINLM-PDC is able to reduce CBCT imaging dose in IGRT utilizing the temporal correlations among the sequence of CBCT images while maintaining the quality. PMID:23718579

  4. Superficial Hyperthermia plus External Beam Radiation in the Palliation of Locally Progressive Chemoradiation-Resistant Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heese, Curt; Lavagnini, Pablo; Mills, Pamela; Lewis, Mark; Markman, Maurie

    2012-01-01

    Local chest wall progression of chemotherapy/radiation-resistant breast cancer can result in substantial morbidity. In this retrospective review of 39 patients in this difficult clinical setting treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (Eastern Regional Medical Center), approximately one-half of the population experienced meaningful short-term palliation and improvement in quality of life when managed with local superficial hyperthermia plus external beam radiation. PMID:23139665

  5. Progress in long-pulse production of powerful negative ion beams for JT-60SA and ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, A.; Umeda, N.; Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Akino, N.; Komata, M.; Mogaki, K.; Sasaki, S.; Seki, N.; Nemoto, S.; Shimizu, T.; Endo, Y.; Ohasa, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Grisham, L. R.

    2015-06-01

    Significant progress in the extension of pulse durations of powerful negative ion beams has been made to realize the neutral beam injectors for JT-60SA and ITER. In order to overcome common issues of the long-pulse production/acceleration of negative ion beams in JT-60SA and ITER, new technologies have been developed in the JT-60SA ion source and the MeV accelerator in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. As for the long-pulse production of high-current negative ions for the JT-60SA ion source, the pulse durations have been successfully increased from 30 s at 13 A on JT-60U to 100 s at 15 A by modifying the JT-60SA ion source, which satisfies the required pulse duration of 100 s and 70% of the rated beam current for JT-60SA. This progress was based on the R&D efforts for the temperature control of the plasma grid and uniform negative ion productions with the modified tent-shaped filter field configuration. Moreover, each parameter of the required beam energy, current and pulse has been achieved individually by these R&D efforts. The developed techniques are useful to design the ITER ion source because the sustainment of the caesium coverage in the large extraction area is one of the common issues between JT-60SA and ITER. As for the long-pulse acceleration of high power density beams in the MeV accelerator for ITER, the pulse duration of MeV-class negative ion beams has been extended by more than 2 orders of magnitude by modifying the extraction grid with a high cooling capability and a high transmission of negative ions. A long-pulse acceleration of 60 s has been achieved at 70 MW m-2 (683 keV, 100 A m-2) which has reached the power density of JT-60SA level of 65 MW m-2. No degradations of the voltage holding capability of the acceleration voltage and the beam optics due to the distortion of the acceleration grids have been observed in this power density level. These results are the longest pulse durations of high-current and high-power-density negative ion beams in the

  6. LIF Measurements on an Atomic Helium Beam in the Edge of a Fusion Plasma--possible derivation of the electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Krychowiak, M.; Koenig, R.; Klinger, T.; Mertens, Ph.; Schweer, B.; Brezinsek, S.; Schmitz, O.; Samm, U.; Brix, M.

    2008-03-19

    Local values of the electron density and temperature in the edge of a fusion plasma can be derived with high space and time resolution by the use of line radiation of atomic helium beams. The accuracy of this method is mainly limited by the uncertainties in the collisional-radiative model which is needed in order to obtain both plasma parameters from the measured relative intensities of atomic helium lines. Combination of a helium beam with a pulsed high-power laser provides a possibility of n{sub e} measurement which does not require a detailed knowledge of the collisional-radiative model. The method relies on resonant laser pumping of some levels and analyzing their fluorescence after the end of the laser pulse. Such measurements were already performed in low temperature plasmas with some content of atomic helium [1,2,3]. In this paper, we discuss the applicability of this method in the fusion edge plasma in the density range of {approx}10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} when exciting helium atoms with a laser at the wavelength of {lambda} = 388.9 nm tuned to the triplet transition 2{sup 3}S-vector3{sup 3}P deg. and observing the fluorescence light at the laser wavelength and at {lambda} = 587.6 nm(3{sup 3}D-vector2{sup 3}P deg.). A first test measurement at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich performed by use of an excimer-pumped dye laser in connection with a thermal helium beam is shown and discussed.

  7. [Pulsed electron beam precharger]. Technical progress report No. 2, December 1, 1989--February 28, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  8. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan,J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay,J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Cohen,R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P; Covo, Kireeff M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik,A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham,L.R.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.A.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.; Prost, L.R.; Prost, L.

    2004-11-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy.

  9. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan,J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay,J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Cohen,R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik,A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham,L.R.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.A.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.; Prost, L.R.

    2005-06-23

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy.

  10. Equivalence of expressions for the acoustic scattering of a progressive high-order Bessel beam by an elastic sphere.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Farid G

    2009-05-01

    The exact analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a high-order (commonly known as generalized) Bessel beam (HOBB) by an elastic sphere immersed in an ideal fluid and centered along the beam axis is revisited. The far-field acoustic scattering field is expressed as a partial wave series involving the scattering angle relative to the beam axis, the order, and the half-conical angle of the wave number components of the generalized Bessel beam. Using an appropriate grouping of terms, the expressions for the incident and scattered pressures, as well as the scattering (complex) form function provided in a recent work are transformed into expressions involving the partial wave series starting from the order m of the generalized Bessel beam. In this new formulation, the scattering coefficients for a HOBB are found to equal those obtained from the study of sound scattering of plane progressive waves by an elastic sphere. This suggests that the (complex) form function presented here may be used to advantage toward studying the acoustic scattering of a HOBB by spherical shells, coated spheres, and coated spherical shells using their corresponding scattering partial wave coefficients available in standard and recent literature texts.

  11. Progress on the Creation of a High-Brightness Ba+ Focused Ion Beam (FIB) Using Transverse Laser Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Truman; McClelland, Jabez

    2014-05-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) systems have a wide range of nanotechnology applications including high-resolution imaging and nanofabrication of materials. To meet a growing demand for improved FIB performance, new sources that take advantage of laser-cooling of atoms have recently been introduced. In this poster, I will present our progress towards the creation of a laser-cooled focused ion-beam source using 138Ba+. Ba+ is created by surface impact ionization of Ba vapor on a heated Ir target. These ions are then extracted to a region where we can apply laser light transverse to the direction of the ion beam propagation tuned to the Ba II cooling transitions at 493.4 nm and 649.9 nm. By laser cooling transverse to the ion beam, it should be possible to create a FIB source with a brightness that exceeds that of the Ga+ source used currently for many nanotechnology applications. It may also be possible to counteract some of the heating effects of Coulomb interactions, allowing higher beam currents. If successful, this technique could open the possibility of a new class of FIB sources using ions that can be effectively laser-cooled.

  12. Impact of EWS-ETS fusion type on disease progression in Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor: prospective results from the cooperative Euro-E.W.I.N.G. 99 trial.

    PubMed

    Le Deley, Marie-Cecile; Delattre, Olivier; Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Burchill, Sue A; Koehler, Gabriele; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Lion, Thomas; Poremba, Christopher; Marandet, Julien; Ballet, Stelly; Pierron, Gaelle; Brownhill, Samantha C; Nesslböck, Michaela; Ranft, Andreas; Dirksen, Uta; Oberlin, Odile; Lewis, Ian J; Craft, Alan W; Jürgens, Heribert; Kovar, Heinrich

    2010-04-20

    PURPOSE EWS-ETS fusion genes are the driving force in Ewing's sarcoma pathogenesis. Because of the variable breakpoint locations in the involved genes, there is heterogeneity in fusion RNA and protein architecture. Since previous retrospective studies suggested prognostic differences among patients expressing different EWS-FLI1 fusion types, the impact of fusion RNA architecture on disease progression and relapse was studied prospectively within the Euro-E.W.I.N.G. 99 clinical trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS Among 1,957 patients who registered before January 1, 2007, 703 primary tumors were accessible for the molecular biology study. Fusion type was assessed by polymerase chain reaction on frozen (n = 578) or paraffin-embedded materials (n = 125). The primary end point was the time to disease progression or relapse. Results After exclusion of noninformative patients, 565 patients were entered into the prognostic factor analysis comparing type 1 (n = 296), type 2 (n = 133), nontype 1/nontype 2 EWS-FLI1 (n = 91) and EWS-ERG fusions (n = 45). Median follow-up time was 4.5 years. The distribution of sex, age, tumor volume, tumor site, disease extension, or histologic response did not differ between the four fusion type groups. We did not observe any significant prognostic value of the fusion type on the risk of progression or relapse. The only slight difference was that the risk of progression or relapse associated with nontype 1/nontype 2 EWS-FLI1 fusions was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.96 to 2.0) times higher than risk associated with other fusion types, but it was not significant (P = .10). CONCLUSION In contrast to retrospective studies, the prospective evaluation did not confirm a prognostic benefit for type 1 EWS-FLI1 fusions.

  13. Mirror fusion vacuum technology developments

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1983-11-21

    Magnetic Mirror Fusion experiments, such as MFTF-B+T (Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B, Tritium Upgrade) and foreseeable follow-on devices, have operational and maintenance requirements that have not yet been fully demonstrated. Among those associated with vacuum technology are the very-high continuous-pumping speeds, 10/sup 7/ to 10/sup 8/ l/s for D/sub 2/, T/sub 2/ and, to a lesser extent, He; the early detection of water leaks from the very-high heat-flux neutral-beam dumps and the detection and location of leaks in the superconducting magnets not protected by guard vacuums. Possible solutions to these problems have been identified and considerable progress has been made toward successfully demonstrating their feasibility.

  14. The progress of funnelling gun high voltage condition and beam test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D. M.; Lambiase, R.; Meng, W.; Rahman, O.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Pietz, J.; Ackeret, M.; Yeckel, C.; Miller, R.; Dobrin, E.; Thompson, K.

    2015-05-03

    A prototype of a high average current polarized electron funneling gun as an eRHIC injector has been built at BNL. The gun was assembled and tested at Stangenes Incorporated. Two beams were generated from two GaAs photocathodes and combined by a switched combiner field. We observed the combined beams on a YAG crystal and measured the photocurrent by a Faraday cup. The gun has been shipped to Stony Brook University and is being tested there. In this paper we will describe the major components of the gun and recent beam test results. High voltage conditioning is discussed as well.

  15. Progress in four-beam nulling: results from the Terrestrial Planet Finder Planet Detection Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I) is a large space telescope consisting of four 4 meter diameter telescopes flying in formation in space together with a fifth beam combiner spacecraft.

  16. Progress in four-beam nulling: results from the Terrestrial Planet Finder planet detection testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I) is a large space telescope consisting of four 4 meter diameter telescopes flying in formation in space together with a fifth beam combiner spacecraft.

  17. Electron cloud effects in intense, ion beam linacs theory and experimental planning for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Lund, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lee, E.P.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-05-21

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation a large fractional electron population ({approx}>1%) is predicted in the High-Current Experiment (HCX), but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron flow is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as the their effect on the ion beam.

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of H 2 and D 2 helicon plasmas generated by a resonant antenna for neutral beam applications in fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, C.; Agnello, R.; Duval, B. P.; Furno, I.; Howling, A. A.; Jacquier, R.; Karpushov, A. N.; Plyushchev, G.; Verhaegh, K.; Guittienne, Ph.; Fantz, U.; Wünderlich, D.; Béchu, S.; Simonin, A.

    2017-03-01

    A new generation of neutral beam systems will be required in future fusion reactors, such as DEMO, able to deliver high power (up to 50 MW) with high (800 keV or higher) neutral energy. Only negative ion beams may be able to attain this performance, which has encouraged a strong research focus on negative ion production from both surface and volumetric plasma sources. A novel helicon plasma source, based on the resonant birdcage network antenna configuration, is currently under study at the Swiss Plasma Centre before installation on the Cybele negative ion source at the Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research, CEA, Cadarache, France. This source is driven by up to 10 kW at 13.56 MHz, and is being tested on a linear resonant antenna ion device. Passive spectroscopic measurements of the first three Balmer lines α, β and γ and of the Fulcher-α bands were performed with an f/2 spectrometer, for both hydrogen and deuterium. Multiple viewing lines and an absolute intensity calibration were used to determine the plasma radiance profile, with a spatial resolution  <3 mm. A minimum Fisher regularization algorithm was applied to obtain the absolute emissivity profile for each emission line for cylindrical symmetry, which was experimentally confirmed. An uncertainty estimate of the inverted profiles was performed using a Monte Carlo approach. Finally, a radiofrequency-compensated Langmuir probe was inserted to measured the electron temperature and density profiles. The absolute line emissivities are interpreted using the collisional-radiative code YACORA which estimates the degree of dissociation and the distribution of the atomic and molecular species, including the negative ion density. This paper reports the results of a power scan up to 5 kW in conditions satisfying Cybele requirements for the plasma source, namely a low neutral pressure, p≤slant 0.3 Pa and magnetic field B≤slant 150 G.

  19. Mode--particle resonances during near-tangential neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; White, R.B.; Morris, A.W.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Murphy, T.J.; Scott, S.D. )

    1990-07-01

    Coherent magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed previously during neutral beam injection in the PDX tokamak (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 50}, 891 (1983)) and they have now been seen in the TFTR tokamak (Phys. Fluids {bold 26}, 2958 (1983)). Periodic bursts of oscillations were detected with several plasma diagnostics, and Fokker--Planck calculations show that the populations of trapped particles in both tokamaks are sufficient to account for fishbone destabilization if a resonant interaction, between the mode and the beam ions, is assumed. Estimates of mode parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, and they indicate that the fishbone mode may continue to affect the performance of intensely heated tokamaks.

  20. Progress toward fully noninductive discharge operation in DIII-D using off-axis neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Hyatt, A. W.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Petrie, T. W.; Petty, C. C.; Holcomb, C. T.; Park, J. M.; Turco, F.; Hanson, J. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; In, Y.; Okabayashi, M.

    2013-09-15

    The initial experiments on off-axis neutral beam injection into high noninductive current fraction (f{sub NI}), high normalized pressure (β{sub N}) discharges in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] have demonstrated changes in the plasma profiles that increase the limits to plasma pressure from ideal low-n instabilities. The current profile is broadened and the minimum value of the safety factor (q{sub min}) can be maintained above 2 where the profile of the thermal component of the plasma pressure is found to be broader. The off-axis neutral beam injection results in a broadening of the fast-ion pressure profile. Confinement of the thermal component of the plasma is consistent with the IPB98(y,2) scaling, but global confinement with q{sub min}>2 is below the ITER-89P scaling, apparently as a result of enhanced transport of fast ions. A 0-D model is used to examine the parameter space for f{sub NI}=1 operation and project the requirements for high performance steady-state discharges. Fully noninductive solutions are found with 4<β{sub N}<5 and bootstrap current fraction near 0.5 for a weak shear safety factor profile. A 1-D model is used to show that a f{sub NI}=1 discharge at the top of this range of β{sub N} that is predicted stable to n=1, 2, and 3 ideal MHD instabilities is accessible through further broadening of the current and pressure profiles with off-axis neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron current drive.

  1. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Technical progress report No. 5, September 1--November 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-12-31

    Electrostatic collection of a high resistivity aerosol using the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) collecting section was demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarter Five). Collection efficiency experiments were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. The reason for doing this was to attempt to improve upon the collection efficiency of the precipitator alone when testing with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. From the collector shakedown runs, a set of suitable operational parameters were determined for the downstream electrostatic collecting sections of the Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. These parameters, along with those for the MINACC electron beam, will generally be held constant while the numerous precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electrostatic collector experiments were part of a larger, comprehensive investigation on electron beam precharging of high resistivity aerosol particles performed during the period covered by Quarters Five, Six, and Seven. This body of work used the same experimental apparatus and procedures and the experimental run period lasted nearly continuously for six months. A summary of the Quarter Five work is presented in the following paragraphs. Section II-A of TPR 5 contains a report on the continuing effort which was expended on the modification and upgrade of the pulsed power supply and the monitoring systems prior to the initiation of the electron beam precharging experimental work.

  2. Improving the Mechanical Properties of the Fusion Zone in Electron-Beam Welded Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Christopher J.; Sabol, Joseph C.; Pasang, Timotius; Watanabe, Masashi; Misiolek, Wojciech Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is well-known that ω-phase precipitates embrittle Ti-5553 alloys and that ω-phase embrittlement can be overcome with appropriate heat treatments. However, the microstructural evolution of electron-beam welded Ti-5553 is not as understood as compared to the cast or wrought material. This study compared the microstructures of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated specimens by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and similarly compared the localized mechanical behavior of the fusion zones with microhardness testing and digital image correlation coupled tensile testing. The primary observations were that the embrittling ω-phase precipitates formed upon cooling, and could not be fully solutionized in a single-step treatment of 1077 K (804 °C) for 1 hour. It was also discovered that nanoscale α-phase precipitates nucleated after the single-step treatment, although they were small in number and sparsely distributed. However, a two-step heat treatment of 1077 K (804 °C) for 1 hour and 873 K (600 °C) for 4 hours completely solutionized the ω-phase and produced a dense network of 2-μm-wide α-phase plates, which significantly improved the mechanical properties. Overall, this study has shown that post-weld heat treatments improve the strength and ductility of electron-beam welded Ti-5553 alloys by controlling ω- and α-phase evolution.

  3. Improving the Mechanical Properties of the Fusion Zone in Electron-Beam Welded Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Christopher J.; Sabol, Joseph C.; Pasang, Timotius; Watanabe, Masashi; Misiolek, Wojciech Z.

    2017-04-01

    It is well-known that ω-phase precipitates embrittle Ti-5553 alloys and that ω-phase embrittlement can be overcome with appropriate heat treatments. However, the microstructural evolution of electron-beam welded Ti-5553 is not as understood as compared to the cast or wrought material. This study compared the microstructures of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated specimens by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and similarly compared the localized mechanical behavior of the fusion zones with microhardness testing and digital image correlation coupled tensile testing. The primary observations were that the embrittling ω-phase precipitates formed upon cooling, and could not be fully solutionized in a single-step treatment of 1077 K (804 °C) for 1 hour. It was also discovered that nanoscale α-phase precipitates nucleated after the single-step treatment, although they were small in number and sparsely distributed. However, a two-step heat treatment of 1077 K (804 °C) for 1 hour and 873 K (600 °C) for 4 hours completely solutionized the ω-phase and produced a dense network of 2- μm-wide α-phase plates, which significantly improved the mechanical properties. Overall, this study has shown that post-weld heat treatments improve the strength and ductility of electron-beam welded Ti-5553 alloys by controlling ω- and α-phase evolution.

  4. Progress toward uranium scrap recycling via electron beam cold hearth refining

    SciTech Connect

    McKoon, R.H.

    1994-12-15

    A 250 kW electron beam cold hearth refining (EBCHR) melt furnace at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been in operation for over a year producing 5.5 in.-diameter ingots of various uranium alloys. Production of in-specification uranium-6%-niobium (U-6Nb) alloy ingots has been demonstrated using Virgin feedstock. A vibratory scrap feeder has been installed on the system and the ability to recycle chopped U-6Nb scrap has been established. A preliminary comparison of vacuum arc remelted (VAR) and electron beam (EB) melted product is presented.

  5. Progress in computer-assisted diagnosis and control of neutral beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.; Elischer, V.; Fiddler, J.; Jacobs, N.J.D.; Jacobson, V.; Lawhorn, R.; Uber, D.; Wilner, D.

    1980-09-01

    This paper discusses the principles that have guided the development of a computerized diagnostic and control system for both the Neutral Beam Systems Test Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Doublet III neutral beams at the General Atomic Company. The emphasis is not on the particular details of the implementation, but on general considerations which have influenced the design criteria for the system. Foremost among these are the requirements of an appropriate human interface to the system, and effective use of a relational data base. Examples are used to illustrate how these principles are carried out in practice. A systems view of diagnostic programs is suggested in the light of our experience.

  6. Classical physics impossibility of magnetic fusion reactor with neutral beam injection at thermonuclear energies below 200 KeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan; Hester, Timothy; Vaucher, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Lawson criterion was specifically derived for inertial fusion and DT gas of stable lifetime without ions and magnetic fields. It was revised with realistic parametrers. To account for the losses of unstable ions against neutralization with lifetime τ, n (t) = nτ [ 1 - exp (- t / - tτ τ) ] -> nτ for τ << t , where τ-1 =n0 [ ERR : md : MbegChr = 0 x 2329 , MendChr = 0 x 232 A , nParams = 1 ] , residual gas density. Second revised criterion becomes: ntL =1014cm-3 s , tL = Lawson conf. time becomes nτtL =1014 orntL =1016 / τ . In CT resonance regime below critical energy To, τ 10-5 , and Lawson requirement ntL 1021 i.e. not realistic. Luminosity (reaction rate for σ = 1) is that of two unstable particles each with lifetime τ: L =n2(t)v12 =n2t2v12 . In subcritical regime, L =10-10n2 forn =1014cm-3 , v 109 cms-1 = L =1027 . Which is negligible and implies a negative power flow reactor. But above T0 , atTD = 725 KeV , τ = 20 s was observed implying L =1039 i.e. massive fusion energy production.

  7. On the path to fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabak, M.

    2006-06-01

    There is a need to develop alternate energy sources in the coming century because fossil fuels will become depleted and their use may lead to global climate change. Inertial fusion can become such an energy source, but significant progress must be made before its promise is realized. The high-density approach to inertial fusion suggested by Nuckolls, et al., leads to reactors compatible with civilian power production. Methods to achieve the good control of hydrodynamic stability (adiabat shaping) and implosion symmetry required to achieve these high fuel densities will be discussed. Examples of symmetry control for targets driven by Z-pinches or heavy ion beams are given. Fast Ignition, a technique that achieves fusion ignition by igniting fusion fuel after it is assembled, will be described along with its gain curves. Fusion costs of energy for conventional hotspot ignition will be compared with those of Fast Ignition and their capital costs compared with advanced fission plants. Finally, techniques that may improve possible Fast Ignition gains by an order of magnitude and reduce driver scales by an order of magnitude below conventional ignition requirements are described. If these innovations are successful, the fusion specific capital costs can be reduced below 10% of the balance of plant.

  8. Strategy for treating motor neuron diseases using a fusion protein of botulinum toxin binding domain and streptavidin for viral vector access: work in progress.

    PubMed

    Drachman, Daniel B; Adams, Robert N; Balasubramanian, Uma; Lu, Yang

    2010-12-01

    Although advances in understanding of the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) have suggested attractive treatment strategies, delivery of agents to motor neurons embedded within the spinal cord is problematic. We have designed a strategy based on the specificity of botulinum toxin, to direct entry of viral vectors carrying candidate therapeutic genes into motor neurons. We have engineered and expressed fusion proteins consisting of the binding domain of botulinum toxin type A fused to streptavidin (SAv). This fusion protein will direct biotinylated viral vectors carrying therapeutic genes into motor nerve terminals where they can enter the acidified endosomal compartments, be released and undergo retrograde transport, to deliver the genes to motor neurons. Both ends of the fusion proteins are shown to be functionally intact. The binding domain end binds to mammalian nerve terminals at neuromuscular junctions, ganglioside GT1b (a target of botulinum toxin), and a variety of neuronal cells including primary chick embryo motor neurons, N2A neuroblastoma cells, NG108-15 cells, but not to NG CR72 cells, which lack complex gangliosides. The streptavidin end binds to biotin, and to a biotinylated Alexa 488 fluorescent tag. Further studies are in progress to evaluate the delivery of genes to motor neurons in vivo, by the use of biotinylated viral vectors.

  9. Strategy for Treating Motor Neuron Diseases Using a Fusion Protein of Botulinum Toxin Binding Domain and Streptavidin for Viral Vector Access: Work in Progress

    PubMed Central

    Drachman, Daniel B.; Adams, Robert N.; Balasubramanian, Uma; Lu, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Although advances in understanding of the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) have suggested attractive treatment strategies, delivery of agents to motor neurons embedded within the spinal cord is problematic. We have designed a strategy based on the specificity of botulinum toxin, to direct entry of viral vectors carrying candidate therapeutic genes into motor neurons. We have engineered and expressed fusion proteins consisting of the binding domain of botulinum toxin type A fused to streptavidin (SAv). This fusion protein will direct biotinylated viral vectors carrying therapeutic genes into motor nerve terminals where they can enter the acidified endosomal compartments, be released and undergo retrograde transport, to deliver the genes to motor neurons. Both ends of the fusion proteins are shown to be functionally intact. The binding domain end binds to mammalian nerve terminals at neuromuscular junctions, ganglioside GT1b (a target of botulinum toxin), and a variety of neuronal cells including primary chick embryo motor neurons, N2A neuroblastoma cells, NG108-15 cells, but not to NG CR72 cells, which lack complex gangliosides. The streptavidin end binds to biotin, and to a biotinylated Alexa 488 fluorescent tag. Further studies are in progress to evaluate the delivery of genes to motor neurons in vivo, by the use of biotinylated viral vectors. PMID:22069580

  10. Thermonuclear and Beam-Target Fusion in Deuterium Gas-Puff Z-Pinch Implosions: Theory and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. W.; Deeney, C.; Cooper, G.; Franklin, J.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2005-10-01

    Recent experiments with 8 cm diameter deuterium gas puff implosions on the Z accelerator at currents from 13 to 17 MA demonstrated reproducible production of high neutron yields, up to ˜3x10^13. We report the results of 1-D and 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of these experiments. The simulations predict relatively low, ˜10-fold, radial compression ratios, and rapid bouncing of the imploded plasma due to small radiative energy losses. Simulated spectra with argon and freon R12 dopants in the deuterium agree with the observations. Calculated temperature, density, and inertial confinement time of the stagnated plasma are consistent with the hypothesis of thermonuclear origin of the observed neutrons. The alternative assumption of beam-target neutron generation in these experiments implies an unusually high, ˜10% efficiency of energy conversion into non-thermal deuterium ions, and multi-MA levels of the ion beam current.

  11. Design of a distributed radiator target for inertial fusion driven from two sides with heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, M.; Callahan-Miller, D.

    1997-11-10

    We describe the status of a distributed radiator heavy ion target design. In integrated calculations this target ignited and produced 390-430 MJ of yieldwhen driven with 5.8-6.5 MJ of 3-4 GeV Pb ions. The target has cylindrical symmetry with disk endplates. The ions uniformly illuminate these endplates in a 5mm radius spot. We discuss the considerations which led to this design together with some previously unused design features: low density hohlraum walls in approximate pressure balance with internal low-Z fill materials, radiationsymmetry determined by the position of the radiator materials and particle ranges, and early time pressure symmetry possibly influenced by radiation shims. We discuss how this target scales to lower input energy or to lower beam power. Variant designs with more realistic beam focusing strategies are also discussed. We show the tradeoffs required for targets which accept higher particle energies.

  12. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  13. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle. (LSP)

  14. Progress and process improvements for multiple electron-beam direct write

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servin, Isabelle; Pourteau, Marie-Line; Pradelles, Jonathan; Essomba, Philippe; Lattard, Ludovic; Brandt, Pieter; Wieland, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Massively parallel electron beam direct write (MP-EBDW) lithography is a cost-effective patterning solution, complementary to optical lithography, for a variety of applications ranging from 200 to 14 nm. This paper will present last process/integration results to achieve targets for both 28 and 45 nm nodes. For 28 nm node, we mainly focus on line-width roughness (LWR) mitigation by playing with stack, new resist platform and bias design strategy. The lines roughness was reduced by using thicker spin-on-carbon (SOC) hardmask (-14%) or non-chemically amplified (non-CAR) resist with bias writing strategy implementation (-20%). Etch transfer into trilayer has been demonstrated by preserving pattern fidelity and profiles for both CAR and non-CAR resists. For 45 nm node, we demonstrate the electron-beam process integration within optical CMOS flows. Resists based on KrF platform show a full compatibility with multiple stacks to fit with conventional optical flow used for critical layers. Electron-beam resist performances have been optimized to fit the specifications in terms of resolution, energy latitude, LWR and stack compatibility. The patterning process overview showing the latest achievements is mature enough to enable starting the multi-beam technology pre-production mode.

  15. Inertial Fusion Energy Studies on an Earth Simulator-Class Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Stephens, R

    2002-08-13

    The U.S. is developing fusion energy based on inertial confinement of the burning fusion fuel, as a complement to the magnetic confinement approach. DOE's Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) program within the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) is coordinated with, and gains leverage from, the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Advanced plasma and particle beam simulations play a major role in the IFE effort, and the program is well poised to benefit from an Earth Simulator-class resource. Progress in all key physics areas of IFE, including heavy-ion ''drivers'' which impart the energy to the fusion fuel, the targets for both ion- and laser-driven approaches, and an advanced concept known as fast ignition, would be dramatically accelerated by an Earth Simulator-class resource.

  16. Recent Progress in the Negative-Ion-Based Neutral Beam Injectors in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Ikeda, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Oka, Y.; Asano, E.; Kondo, T.; Sato, M.; Shibuya, M.; Komada, S.; Kaneko, O.

    2009-03-12

    Negative-ion-based neutral beam injection (negative-NBI) system has been operated for 10 years in Large Helical Device (LHD). The injection power has been increased year by year, according to the improvement of the negative ion sources. Up to now, every injector achieves the designed injection energy and power of 180 keV-5 MW with hydrogen beams, and the total injection power exceeds 16 MW with three injectors. In the multi-round aperture grounded grid (GG), the diameter of a round aperture has been enlarged for higher GG transparency. Then, the GG heat load is reduced, as well as in the multi-slotted GG, and the voltage holding ability in the beam acceleration was improved. As a result, the beam energy is raised and the injection power is increased. To improve the anisotropic property of the beamlet convergence condition between the perpendicular and the parallel directions to the slots in the multi-slotted GG, a round-shape aperture of the steering grid (SG) has been changed to a racetrack shape. As a result, the difference of the beamlet conversion condition is much mitigated, and the injection efficiency (port-transmission efficiency) is improved, leading to 188 keV-6.4 MW injection. The Cs consumption is observed to be proportional to the tungsten evaporation from filaments. The Cs behavior is investigated with optical emission spectroscopy. During the beam extraction, the Cs recycling is dominated by Cs on the backplate, which is evaporated into the plasma by the backstreaming positive ions, and the wall surfaces should be loss regions for the supplied Cs.

  17. Recent Progress in the Negative-Ion-Based Neutral Beam Injectors in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Ikeda, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Oka, Y.; Asano, E.; Kondo, T.; Sato, M.; Shibuya, M.; Komada, S.; Kaneko, O.

    2009-03-01

    Negative-ion-based neutral beam injection (negative-NBI) system has been operated for 10 years in Large Helical Device (LHD). The injection power has been increased year by year, according to the improvement of the negative ion sources. Up to now, every injector achieves the designed injection energy and power of 180 keV-5 MW with hydrogen beams, and the total injection power exceeds 16 MW with three injectors. In the multi-round aperture grounded grid (GG), the diameter of a round aperture has been enlarged for higher GG transparency. Then, the GG heat load is reduced, as well as in the multi-slotted GG, and the voltage holding ability in the beam acceleration was improved. As a result, the beam energy is raised and the injection power is increased. To improve the anisotropic property of the beamlet convergence condition between the perpendicular and the parallel directions to the slots in the multi-slotted GG, a round-shape aperture of the steering grid (SG) has been changed to a racetrack shape. As a result, the difference of the beamlet conversion condition is much mitigated, and the injection efficiency (port-transmission efficiency) is improved, leading to 188 keV-6.4 MW injection. The Cs consumption is observed to be proportional to the tungsten evaporation from filaments. The Cs behavior is investigated with optical emission spectroscopy. During the beam extraction, the Cs recycling is dominated by Cs on the backplate, which is evaporated into the plasma by the backstreaming positive ions, and the wall surfaces should be loss regions for the supplied Cs.

  18. Transition from Beam-Target to Thermonuclear Fusion in High-Current Deuterium Z-Pinch Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, Dustin; Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Clark, Robert; Mostrom, Chris; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Fusion yields from dense, Z-pinch plasmas are known to scale with the drive current, which is favorable for many potential applications. Decades of experimental studies, however, show an unexplained drop in yield for currents above a few mega-ampere (MA). In this work, simulations of DD Z-Pinch plasmas have been performed in 1D and 2D for a constant pinch time and initial radius using the code LSP, and observations of a shift in scaling are presented. The results show that yields below 3 MA are enhanced relative to pure thermonuclear scaling by beamlike particles accelerated in the Rayleigh-Taylor induced electric fields, while yields above 3 MA are reduced because of energy lost by the instability and the inability of the beamlike ions to enter the pinch region. This research was developed with funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

  19. Transition from Beam-Target to Thermonuclear Fusion in High-Current Deuterium Z-Pinch Simulations.

    PubMed

    Offermann, Dustin T; Welch, Dale R; Rose, Dave V; Thoma, Carsten; Clark, Robert E; Mostrom, Chris B; Schmidt, Andrea E W; Link, Anthony J

    2016-05-13

    Fusion yields from dense, Z-pinch plasmas are known to scale with the drive current, which is favorable for many potential applications. Decades of experimental studies, however, show an unexplained drop in yield for currents above a few mega-ampere (MA). In this work, simulations of DD Z-Pinch plasmas have been performed in 1D and 2D for a constant pinch time and initial radius using the code Lsp, and observations of a shift in scaling are presented. The results show that yields below 3 MA are enhanced relative to pure thermonuclear scaling by beamlike particles accelerated in the Rayleigh-Taylor induced electric fields, while yields above 3 MA are reduced because of energy lost by the instability and the inability of the beamlike ions to enter the pinch region.

  20. High-Grade Adult Isthmic L5–S1 Spondylolisthesis: A Report of Intraoperative Slip Progression Treated with Surgical Reduction and Posterior Instrumented Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Mikhael, Mark M.; Shapiro, Gary S.; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Adult isthmic spondylolisthesis most commonly occurs at the L5–S1 level of the lumbar spine. Slip progression is relatively rare in adults with this condition and slippage is typically associated with advanced degeneration of the disk below the pars defect. When symptomatic, radiculopathy is the typical complaint in adults with isthmic spondylolisthesis. When considering options for surgical treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis, the surgeon must consider several different options, such as decompression, fusion, instrumentation, reduction, and type of bone graft to be used. All of these decisions must be individualized as deemed appropriate for each particular patient. This report presents a case of intraoperative slip progression of a L5–S1 adult isthmic spondylolisthesis to a high-grade slip, which was treated with complete surgical reduction and posterior instrumented fusion. This case demonstrates the potential instability of this condition in adults and has not been previously reported. The case details and images are reviewed and the intraoperative decisions, treatment options, and patient outcome are discussed. PMID:24353957

  1. Progress towards the laser cooling of the magnesium fluoride molecular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yong; Dai, Dapeng; Li, Xingjia; Yin, Yanning; Yin, Jianping

    2015-05-01

    Though the laser cooling techniques that have been tremendously successful in producing ultracold atoms are difficult to apply to molecules, in the past few years, a new approach, laser cooling and trapping of diatomic molecules has become possible. We select magnesium fluoride (MgF) as a prototype molecule for laser cooling experiment. In order to compensate the changes of the Doppler shift during the longitudinal slowing of the molecular beam, we theoretically investigate the possibility of stimulated light force deceleration and cooling of the diatomic magnesium fluoride molecular beam with near-cycling transitions in the bichromatic standing light wave of high intensity which estimated by the two-level optical Bloch equations. We also demonstrate a robust and versatile solution for locking the continuous-wave Ti:sapphire tunable laser for applications in laser cooling of molecules which need linewidth-narrowed and frequency-stabilized lasers.

  2. Electron-beam-ion-source (EBIS) modeling progress at FAR-TECH, Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. S. Zhao, L. Spencer, J. A. Evstatiev, E. G.

    2015-01-09

    FAR-TECH, Inc. has been developing a numerical modeling tool for Electron-Beam-Ion-Sources (EBISs). The tool consists of two codes. One is the Particle-Beam-Gun-Simulation (PBGUNS) code to simulate a steady state electron beam and the other is the EBIS-Particle-In-Cell (EBIS-PIC) code to simulate ion charge breeding with the electron beam. PBGUNS, a 2D (r,z) electron gun and ion source simulation code, has been extended for efficient modeling of EBISs and the work was presented previously. EBIS-PIC is a space charge self-consistent PIC code and is written to simulate charge breeding in an axisymmetric 2D (r,z) device allowing for full three-dimensional ion dynamics. This 2D code has been successfully benchmarked with Test-EBIS measurements at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For long timescale (< tens of ms) ion charge breeding, the 2D EBIS-PIC simulations take a long computational time making the simulation less practical. Most of the EBIS charge breeding, however, may be modeled in 1D (r) as the axial dependence of the ion dynamics may be ignored in the trap. Where 1D approximations are valid, simulations of charge breeding in an EBIS over long time scales become possible, using EBIS-PIC together with PBGUNS. Initial 1D results are presented. The significance of the magnetic field to ion dynamics, ion cooling effects due to collisions with neutral gas, and the role of Coulomb collisions are presented.

  3. Revision surgery for curve progression after implant removal following posterior fusion only at a young age in the treatment of congenital scoliosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong-Gune; Yang, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Jung-Sub; Suh, Seung-Woo; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Oh, Seung-Yeol; Cho, Woojin; Park, Jong-Beom; Suk, Se-Il

    2016-11-01

    Congenital scoliosis due to a hemivertebra creates a wedge-shaped deformity, which progresses and causes severe spinal deformities as an individual grows. The treatment of congenital scoliosis focuses on early diagnosis and appropriate surgical management before the development of severe deformity. We report the case of a 4-year-old male child with a left thoracolumbar scoliosis of 27° (T10-T12) due to a T11 hemivertebra who was treated by posterior fusion and pedicle screw fixation at the age of 4 years. The implant was removed due to pain secondary to implant prominence after 4 years without definitive revision surgery, which led to significant progression of the scoliosis, to 50°. The indication for posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) is a congenital spinal deformity with a curve magnitude greater than 30° with fast progression. This includes documented progression of the curve by more than 5° in a 6- month period, failure of conservative treatment, or both. The patient underwent PVCR of the T11 hemivertebra. Nine years after the revision surgery with PVCR, the patient showed satisfactory results and his spine was well balanced. This case shows that removal of an implant that was not the only cause of curve progression at a young age may lead to progression of scoliosis and, therefore, should be avoided unless it is absolutely necessary. Congenital scoliosis due to a hemivertebra at a young age could be treated by hemivertebra resection or anterior and posterior epiphysiodesis as definitive surgical treatment. The patient was eventually treated with PVCR, which achieved satisfactory correction without curve progression in a long-term follow-up.

  4. Revision surgery for curve progression after implant removal following posterior fusion only at a young age in the treatment of congenital scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Dong-Gune; Yang, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Jung-Sub; Suh, Seung-Woo; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Oh, Seung-Yeol; Cho, Woojin; Park, Jong-Beom; Suk, Se-Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Congenital scoliosis due to a hemivertebra creates a wedge-shaped deformity, which progresses and causes severe spinal deformities as an individual grows. The treatment of congenital scoliosis focuses on early diagnosis and appropriate surgical management before the development of severe deformity. Patient concerns: We report the case of a 4-year-old male child with a left thoracolumbar scoliosis of 27° (T10-T12) due to a T11 hemivertebra who was treated by posterior fusion and pedicle screw fixation at the age of 4 years. The implant was removed due to pain secondary to implant prominence after 4 years without definitive revision surgery, which led to significant progression of the scoliosis, to 50°. The indication for posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) is a congenital spinal deformity with a curve magnitude greater than 30° with fast progression. This includes documented progression of the curve by more than 5° in a 6- month period, failure of conservative treatment, or both. Outcomes: The patient underwent PVCR of the T11 hemivertebra. Nine years after the revision surgery with PVCR, the patient showed satisfactory results and his spine was well balanced. Lessons: This case shows that removal of an implant that was not the only cause of curve progression at a young age may lead to progression of scoliosis and, therefore, should be avoided unless it is absolutely necessary. Conclusion: Congenital scoliosis due to a hemivertebra at a young age could be treated by hemivertebra resection or anterior and posterior epiphysiodesis as definitive surgical treatment. The patient was eventually treated with PVCR, which achieved satisfactory correction without curve progression in a long-term follow-up. PMID:27893663

  5. Studies of nuclei using radioactive beams. Progress report, May 1988--July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Piercey, R.B.

    1989-07-01

    The 12 month period from May 1988 to July 1989 represents the first full year of our 18 month pilot program in nuclear structure research. In this period, research was initiated to develop a capability for radioactive secondary beams at Argonne National Laboratory using the Atlas and the new Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA), which is currently under construction. Two major new detector facilities are currently in the final stages of design and testing. The Large-Area, Scintillator Telescope (LAST) detector is fully operational and will be shipped to Argonne National Laboratory in August for fit-tests and in-beam calibrations. The first segments of a new sixteen-segment neutron multiplicity detector have been built and tested. The remaining segments are currently being constructed. Research was continued in the areas of (1) Coulomb excitation studies of rare earth and actinide nuclei; (2) In-beam, gamma-ray spectroscopy of nuclei in the mass 100 region, and (3) Advanced detector design. Several journal articles and abstracts were published or submitted for publication in the reporting period, and others are currently in preparation. Three graduate students participated in the program, one from the University of Florida and two from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.

  6. REBL: design progress toward 16 nm half-pitch maskless projection electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, Mark A.; Petric, Paul; Ummethala, Upendra; Carroll, Allen; Kojima, Shinichi; Grella, Luca; Shriyan, Sameet; Rettner, Charles T.; Bevis, Chris F.

    2012-03-01

    REBL (Reflective Electron Beam Lithography) is a novel concept for high speed maskless projection electron beam lithography. Originally targeting 45 nm HP (half pitch) under a DARPA funded contract, we are now working on optimizing the optics and architecture for the commercial silicon integrated circuit fabrication market at the equivalent of 16 nm HP. The shift to smaller features requires innovation in most major subsystems of the tool, including optics, stage, and metrology. We also require better simulation and understanding of the exposure process. In order to meet blur requirements for 16 nm lithography, we are both shrinking the pixel size and reducing the beam current. Throughput will be maintained by increasing the number of columns as well as other design optimizations. In consequence, the maximum stage speed required to meet wafer throughput targets at 16 nm will be much less than originally planned for at 45 nm. As a result, we are changing the stage architecture from a rotary design to a linear design that can still meet the throughput requirements but with more conventional technology that entails less technical risk. The linear concept also allows for simplifications in the datapath, primarily from being able to reuse pattern data across dies and columns. Finally, we are now able to demonstrate working dynamic pattern generator (DPG) chips, CMOS chips with microfabricated lenslets on top to prevent crosstalk between pixels.

  7. The Heavy Ion Fusion Program in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.

    2000-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established a new, larger inertial fusion energy program. To manage program growth, we have developed a new inertial fusion energy research and we have established a Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion. There has been significant technical progress. Improvements in target design have reduced the predicted energy requirements by approximately a factor of two. There have also been important experiments on chamber dynamics and other inertial fusion technologies. The accelerator program has completed a number of small-scale experiments. Experiments with driver-scale beams are being designed -- including experiments with driver-scale ion sources and injectors. Finally we are developing the technologies needed to build a major research facility known as the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE)

  8. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyekyoon

    1987-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of a railgun accelerator to inject hydrogen pellets into a magnetic fusion reactor for refueling purposes. Specific studies in this paper include: 1.5 mm-diameter two-stage fuseless plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun, construction and testing of a 3.2 mm-diameter two-stage railgun and a theoretical analysis of the behavior of a railgun plasma-arc armature inside a railgun. (LSP)

  9. Recent developments in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Esbensen, H.; Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E.

    2014-01-01

    In this review the main advances in heavy-ion fusion research that have taken place over the last decade are addressed. During this period, experimental studies have been extended to deep sub-barrier energies to reveal the unexpected phenomenon of fusion hindrance. The coupled-channels descriptions have been refined to include the effects of nucleon transfer and to account for the fusion hindrance in terms of the ion-ion potential in the strongly overlapping region. Substantial progress has been made in time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory to the point that this approach now can make parameter-free predictions of heavy-ion fusion excitation functions. As several heavy-ion fusion reactions are of crucial importance in late-stage giant-star evolution, these reactions continue to be studied with better experimental and theoretical tools in order to provide improved input to astrophysical models. The effects of loosely bound valence nucleons on the fusion cross sections are the focus of a number of experimental studies involving radioactive beams, which have only recently become available. And finally, as the active field of synthesizing superheavy elements relies on heavy-ion fusion to reach the nuclei of interest, it is important to understand the fusion dynamics that plays a crucial role in both the "cold-fusion" and "hot-fusion" approaches to the superheavy island of stability. Also this area has seen significant progress in several different approaches to the problem of predicting the cross sections for formation and survival of these rare nuclei.

  10. In-beam measurements of 13C+12C fusion reaction cross section at energies around and below Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, I.; Chilug, A.; Tudor, D.; Trache, L.; Straticiuc, M.; Burducea, I.; Focsa, I. M.; Ghita, D. G.; Zhang, N.; Tang, X.; Chen, H.

    2017-06-01

    The reaction cross section of the 12C+12C system is difficult to measure because of the presence of the resonances in the Gamow energy window. It has been proved that the 13C+12C reaction is a good alternative to study the behavior of the reaction cross section at energies relevant for astrophysics. We have measured it with activation and online techniques. During online measurements we were interested to determine the relative contributions of the open channels of the 13C+12C reaction. These determinations are necessary to evaluate the total fusion reaction cross section. Therefore, we have measured the γ-ray yields of proton, neutron and alpha particle evaporation channels from the resulting 25Mg compound nucleus using prompt γ-rays measurements. This complements the activation method. The irradiations took place at the 3 MV Tandetron Accelerator at IFIN-HH [1], Bucharest and the prompt gamma-rays were measured using a hyper-pure germanium detector with 100% relative efficiency, shielded with lead bricks. The energy range for the irradiation was from 4.6 up to 11 MeV (in laboratory frame), in steps of 0.2 MeV and the online measurements were performed from 6.4 up to 11 MeV.

  11. Fusion of cone-beam CT and 3D photographic images for soft tissue simulation in maxillofacial surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soyoung; Kim, Joojin; Hong, Helen

    2016-03-01

    During maxillofacial surgery, prediction of the facial outcome after surgery is main concern for both surgeons and patients. However, registration of the facial CBCT images and 3D photographic images has some difficulties that regions around the eyes and mouth are affected by facial expressions or the registration speed is low due to their dense clouds of points on surfaces. Therefore, we propose a framework for the fusion of facial CBCT images and 3D photos with skin segmentation and two-stage surface registration. Our method is composed of three major steps. First, to obtain a CBCT skin surface for the registration with 3D photographic surface, skin is automatically segmented from CBCT images and the skin surface is generated by surface modeling. Second, to roughly align the scale and the orientation of the CBCT skin surface and 3D photographic surface, point-based registration with four corresponding landmarks which are located around the mouth is performed. Finally, to merge the CBCT skin surface and 3D photographic surface, Gaussian-weight-based surface registration is performed within narrow-band of 3D photographic surface.

  12. Supersonic bare metal cluster beams. Technical progress report, February 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, R.E.

    1994-05-01

    This progress report describes work in the Rice group on fullerene research projects. Seven papers have gone out in this period, including two patent applications. Work includes one publication which describes a new method for the production of fullerenes using direct solar vaporization of a carbon feedstock.

  13. Recent progress in optically-pumped cesium beam clock at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Zhou, S.; Wan, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    A compact, long-life, and low-drift cesium beam clock is investigated at Peking University, where the atoms are magnetic-state selected and optically detected. Stability close to that of the best commercial cesium clocks has been achieved from 10 to 105 s. As previously shown, the short-term stability is determined by atomic shot noise or laser frequency noise. The stabilizations of microwave power and C-field improve the long-term stability, with the help of a digital servo system based on field-programmable gate array.

  14. Development of laser-ion beam photodissociation methods. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    During this report period our research efforts have concentrated on the continued development of the tandem magnetic sector (EB)/reflectron-time-of-flight (TOF) instrument, preliminary experiments with the tandem TOF/TOF E/R-TOF instrument, developing the methodology for performing photodissociation with pulsed lasers on the EB/R-TOF instrument, preliminary experiments with laser ionization on the aerosol-particle beam apparatus, development of a vacuum ultra-violet laser for photoionization/photoexcitation of gas phase ions, and fundamental studies on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI).

  15. Population of isomeric states in fusion and transfer reactions in beams of loosely bound nuclei near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, N. K.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of the mechanisms of nuclear reactions on the population of 195 m Hg and 197 m Hg(7/2-), 198 m Tl and 196 m Tl(7+), and 196 m Au and 198 m Au(12-) isomeric nuclear states obtained in reactions induced by beams of 3He, 6Li, and 6He weakly bound nuclei is studied. The behavior of excitation functions and high values of isomeric ratios ( δ m/ δ g) for products of nuclear reactions proceeding through a compound nucleus and involving neutron evaporation are explained within statistical models. Reactions in which the emission of charged particles occurs have various isomeric ratios depending on the reaction type. The isomeric ratio is lower in direct transfer reactions involving charged-particle emission than in reactions where the evaporation of charged particles occurs. Reactions accompanied by neutron transfer usually have a lower isomeric ratio, which behaves differently for different direct-reaction types (stripping versus pickup reactions).

  16. Accuracy and Reliability of a Novel Method for Fusion of Digital Dental Casts and Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Frits A.; Maal, Thomas J. J.; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; Breuning, K. Hero; Schols, Jan G. J. H.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed to integrate digital models into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Since all these methods have some drawbacks such as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and time-consuming digital handling processes, we propose a new method to integrate digital dental casts into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Plaster casts of 10 patients were randomly selected and 5 titanium markers were glued to the upper and lower plaster cast. The plaster models were scanned, impressions were taken from the plaster models and the impressions were also scanned. Linear measurements were performed on all three models, to assess accuracy and reproducibility. Besides that, matching of the scanned plaster models and scanned impressions was done, to assess the accuracy of the matching procedure. Results show that all measurement errors are smaller than 0.2 mm, and that 81% is smaller than 0.1 mm. Matching of the scanned plaster casts and scanned impressions show a mean error between the two surfaces of the upper arch of 0.14 mm and for the lower arch of 0.18 mm. The time needed for reconstructing the CBCT scans to a digital patient, where the impressions are integrated into the CBCT scan of the patient takes about 15 minutes, with little variance between patients. In conclusion, we can state that this new method is a reliable method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. As far as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and digital handling processes are concerned, it is a significant improvement compared to the previously published methods. PMID:23527111

  17. Accuracy and reliability of a novel method for fusion of digital dental casts and Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Frits A; Maal, Thomas J J; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Breuning, K Hero; Schols, Jan G J H; Bergé, Stefaan J; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed to integrate digital models into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Since all these methods have some drawbacks such as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and time-consuming digital handling processes, we propose a new method to integrate digital dental casts into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Plaster casts of 10 patients were randomly selected and 5 titanium markers were glued to the upper and lower plaster cast. The plaster models were scanned, impressions were taken from the plaster models and the impressions were also scanned. Linear measurements were performed on all three models, to assess accuracy and reproducibility. Besides that, matching of the scanned plaster models and scanned impressions was done, to assess the accuracy of the matching procedure. Results show that all measurement errors are smaller than 0.2 mm, and that 81% is smaller than 0.1 mm. Matching of the scanned plaster casts and scanned impressions show a mean error between the two surfaces of the upper arch of 0.14 mm and for the lower arch of 0.18 mm. The time needed for reconstructing the CBCT scans to a digital patient, where the impressions are integrated into the CBCT scan of the patient takes about 15 minutes, with little variance between patients. In conclusion, we can state that this new method is a reliable method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. As far as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and digital handling processes are concerned, it is a significant improvement compared to the previously published methods.

  18. White Paper on Ion Beam Transport for ICF: Issues, R&D Need,and Tri-Lab Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.; Lee, E.; Langdon, B.

    2005-05-04

    To date, most resources for ion beam fusion have been devoted to development of accelerators and target physics; relatively few resources have gone into ion beam transport development. Because of theoretical studies and substantial experience with electron beam transport, the ion beam transport community is now poised to develop and optimize ion beam transport for ICF. Because of this Tri-Lab effort, a path for coordinated development of ion beam transport has been established. The rate of progress along this path will now be determined largely by the availability of resources.

  19. Progress and future developments of high current ion source for neutral beam injector in the ASIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao

    2015-04-01

    A high current hot cathode bucket ion source, which based on the US long pulse ion source is developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The ion source consists of a bucket plasma generator with multi-pole cusp fields and a set of tetrode accelerator with slit apertures. So far, four ion sources are developed and conditioned on the ion source test bed. 4 MW hydrogen beam with beam energy of 80 keV is extracted. In Aug. 2013, EAST NBI 1 with two ion source installed on the EAST, and achieved H-mode plasma with NBI injection for the first time. In order to achieve stable long pulse operation of high current ion source and negative ion source research, the RF ion source with 200 mm diameter and 120 mm depth driver is designed and developed. The first RF plasma generated with 2 kW power of 1 MHz frequency. More of the RF plasma tests and negative source relative research need to do in the future.

  20. Progress and future developments of high current ion source for neutral beam injector in the ASIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao

    2015-04-08

    A high current hot cathode bucket ion source, which based on the US long pulse ion source is developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The ion source consists of a bucket plasma generator with multi-pole cusp fields and a set of tetrode accelerator with slit apertures. So far, four ion sources are developed and conditioned on the ion source test bed. 4 MW hydrogen beam with beam energy of 80 keV is extracted. In Aug. 2013, EAST NBI 1 with two ion source installed on the EAST, and achieved H-mode plasma with NBI injection for the first time. In order to achieve stable long pulse operation of high current ion source and negative ion source research, the RF ion source with 200 mm diameter and 120 mm depth driver is designed and developed. The first RF plasma generated with 2 kW power of 1 MHz frequency. More of the RF plasma tests and negative source relative research need to do in the future.

  1. Progress in the realization of the PRIMA neutral beam test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toigo, V.; Boilson, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Piovan, R.; Hanada, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Agarici, G.; Antoni, V.; Baruah, U.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hemsworth, R.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, H.; Pomaro, N.; Rotti, C.; Serianni, G.; Simon, M.; Singh, M.; Singh, N. P.; Svensson, L.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Andreani, R.; Aprile, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Bettini, P.; Blatchford, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bonomo, F.; Bragulat, E.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chuilon, B.; Coniglio, A.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Dave, R.; De Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Muri, M.; Delogu, R.; Dhola, H.; Fantz, U.; Fellin, F.; Fellin, L.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Gaio, E.; Gambetta, G.; Gomez, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Gorini, G.; Grando, L.; Gupta, V.; Gutierrez, D.; Hanke, S.; Hardie, C.; Heinemann, B.; Kojima, A.; Kraus, W.; Maeshima, T.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J. F.; Moresco, M.; Muraro, A.; Muvvala, V.; Nocentini, R.; Ocello, E.; Ochoa, S.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pilard, V.; Recchia, M.; Riedl, R.; Rizzolo, A.; Roopesh, G.; Rostagni, G.; Sandri, S.; Sartori, E.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Thakkar, A.; Umeda, N.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Yadav, A.; Yamanaka, H.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1 MV a 40 A beam of negative deuterium ions, to deliver to the plasma a power of about 17 MW for one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was recognized as necessary to setup a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. This realization is made with the main contribution of the European Union, through the Joint Undertaking for ITER (F4E), the ITER Organization and Consorzio RFX which hosts the Test Facility. The Japanese and the Indian ITER Domestic Agencies (JADA and INDA) participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as IPP-Garching, KIT-Karlsruhe, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. Presently, the assembly of SPIDER is on-going and the MITICA design is being completed. The paper gives a general overview of the test facility and of the status of development of the MITICA and SPIDER main components at this important stage of the overall development; then it focuses on the latest and most critical issues, regarding both physics and technology, describing the identified solutions.

  2. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group: Progress report, March 1, 1987-February 29, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Progress is reported on the OPAL experiment at LEP, including construction and assembly of the hadron calorimeter and development of OPAL software. Progress on the JADE experiment, which examines e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at PETRA, and of the PLUTO collaboration are also discussed. Experiments at Fermilab are reported, including deep inelastic muon scattering at TeV II, the D0 experiment at TeV I, and hadron jet physics. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering and a search for point-sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are reported. Other activities discussed include polarization in electron storage rings, participation in studies for the SSC and LEP 200, neutron-antineutron oscillations, and the work of the electronics support group. High energy physics computer experience is also discussed. 158 refs. (LEW)

  3. Development of laser-ion beam photodissociation methods. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on developing the tandem magnetic sector (EB)/reflection-time-of-flight (TOF) instrument, preliminary experiments with tandem TOF/TOF instruments, developing method for performing photodissociation with pulsed lasers, experiments with laser ionization of aerosol particles, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), and ion-molecule reaction chemistry of ground and excited state transition metal ions. This progress report is divided into: photodissociation, MALDI (including aerosols), and ion chemistry fundamentals.

  4. Recent Progress in the Development of a Multi-Layer Green's Function Code for Ion Beam Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, John; Walker, Steven A.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2008-01-01

    To meet the challenge of future deep space programs, an accurate and efficient engineering code for analyzing the shielding requirements against high-energy galactic heavy radiation is needed. To address this need, a new Green's function code capable of simulating high charge and energy ions with either laboratory or space boundary conditions is currently under development. The computational model consists of combinations of physical perturbation expansions based on the scales of atomic interaction, multiple scattering, and nuclear reactive processes with use of the Neumann-asymptotic expansions with non-perturbative corrections. The code contains energy loss due to straggling, nuclear attenuation, nuclear fragmentation with energy dispersion and downshifts. Previous reports show that the new code accurately models the transport of ion beams through a single slab of material. Current research efforts are focused on enabling the code to handle multiple layers of material and the present paper reports on progress made towards that end.

  5. Progress toward a prototype recirculating ion induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    The U.S. Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Program is developing the physics and technology of ion induction accelerators, with the goal of electric power production by means of heavy ion beam-driven inertial fusion (commonly called heavy ion fusion, or HIF). Such accelerators are the principal candidates for inertial fusion power production applications, because they are expected to enjoy high efficiency, inherently high pulse repetition frequency (power plants are expected to inject and burn several fusion targets per second), and high reliability. In addition (and in contrast with laser beams, which are focused with optical lenses) heavy-ion beams will be focused onto the target by magnetic fields, which cannot be damaged by target explosions. Laser beams are used in present-day and planned near-term facilities (such as LLNUs Nova and the National Ignition Facility, which is being designed) because they can focus beams onto very small, intensely illuminated spots for scaled experiments and because the laser technology is already available. An induction accelerator works by passing the beam through a series of accelerating modules, each of which applies an electromotive force to the beam as it goes by; effectively, the beam acts as the secondary winding of a series of efficient one-turn transformers. The authors present plans for and progress toward the development of a small (4.5-m-diam) prototype recirculator, which will accelerate singly charged potassium ions through 15 laps, increasing the ion energy from 80 to 320 keV and the beam current from 2 to 8 mA. Beam confinement and bending are effected with permanent-magnet quadrupoles and electric dipoles, respectively. The design is based on scaling laws and on extensive particle and fluid simulations of the behavior of the space charge-dominated beam.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Progress in laser spectroscopy at radioactive ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheal, B.; Flanagan, K. T.

    2010-11-01

    In the last decade there has been a renaissance in laser spectroscopy at on-line facilities. This has included the introduction of ion traps and the use of laser ion sources to study the hyperfine structure of exotic nuclei far from stability and produce selective enhancement of isomeric beams. In-source spectroscopy has allowed the study of rare isotopes with yields as low as 0.1 atoms per second. In the case of high-resolution spectroscopy, cooling and trapping the ions has dramatically improved the sensitivity. Some elements that were previously inaccessible to laser spectroscopy are now available for study through the technique of in-trap optical pumping. This paper reviews the field of laser spectroscopy at on-line facilities, with an emphasis on new techniques. A summary of experimental data is presented.

  7. Population of isomeric states in fusion and transfer reactions in beams of loosely bound nuclei near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, N. K.

    2015-07-15

    The influence of the mechanisms of nuclear reactions on the population of {sup 195m}Hg and {sup 197m}Hg(7/2{sup −}), {sup 198m}Tl and {sup 196m}Tl(7{sup +}), and {sup 196m}Au and {sub 198m}Au(12{sup −}) isomeric nuclear states obtained in reactions induced by beams of {sup 3}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 6}He weakly bound nuclei is studied. The behavior of excitation functions and high values of isomeric ratios (δ{sub m}/δ{sub g}) for products of nuclear reactions proceeding through a compound nucleus and involving neutron evaporation are explained within statistical models. Reactions in which the emission of charged particles occurs have various isomeric ratios depending on the reaction type. The isomeric ratio is lower in direct transfer reactions involving charged-particle emission than in reactions where the evaporation of charged particles occurs. Reactions accompanied by neutron transfer usually have a lower isomeric ratio, which behaves differently for different direct-reaction types (stripping versus pickup reactions)

  8. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling. Technical progress report, [July 16, 1990--August 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1991-08-01

    This report contains three documents describing the progress made by the University of Illinois electromagnetic railgun program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of the United States Department of Energy during the period from July 16, 1990 to August 16, 1991. The first document contains a brief summary of the tasks initiated, continued, or completed, the status of major tasks, and the research effort distribution, estimated and actual, during the period. The second document contains a description of the work performed on time resolved laser interferometric density measurement of the railgun plasma-arc armature. The third document is an account of research on the spectroscopic measurement of the electron density and temperature of the railgun plasma arc.

  9. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

  10. Axial acoustic radiation force on rigid oblate and prolate spheroids in Bessel vortex beams of progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2017-02-01

    The analysis using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates is extended to evaluate the acoustic radiation force experienced by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids centered on the axis of wave propagation of high-order Bessel vortex beams composed of progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves, respectively. A coupled system of linear equations is derived after applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface in a non-viscous fluid, and solved numerically by matrix inversion after performing a single numerical integration procedure. The system of linear equations depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated but converging PWSEs in the least-squares sense. Numerical results for the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit energy density and unit cross-sectional surface, are computed with particular emphasis on the amplitude ratio describing the transition from the progressive to the pure standing waves cases, the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle and order of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter. A generalized expression for the radiation force function is derived for cases encompassing the progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves of Bessel vortex beams. This expression can be reduced to other types of beams/waves such as the zeroth-order Bessel non-vortex beam or the infinite plane wave case by appropriate selection of the beam parameters. The results for progressive waves reveal a tractor beam behavior, characterized by the emergence of an attractive pulling force acting in opposite direction of wave propagation. Moreover, the transition to the quasi-standing and pure standing wave cases shows the acoustical tweezers behavior in dual-beam Bessel vortex beams. Applications in acoustic levitation, particle manipulation and acousto

  11. Unenhanced Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Fusion Imaging in Direct Percutaneous Sac Injection for Treatment of Type II Endoleak: Technical Note

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Ierardi, Anna Maria; Radaelli, Alessandro; Marchi, Giuseppe De; Floridi, Chiara; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Federico, Fontana

    2016-03-15

    AimTo evaluate safety, feasibility, technical success, and clinical success of direct percutaneous sac injection (DPSI) for the treatment of type II endoleaks (T2EL) using anatomical landmarks on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and fusion imaging (FI).Materials and MethodsEight patients with T2EL were treated with DPSI using CBCT as imaging guidance. Anatomical landmarks on unenhanced CBCT were used for referencing T2EL location in the first five patients, while FI between unenhanced CBCT and pre-procedural computed tomography angiography (CTA) was used in the remaining three patients. Embolization was performed with thrombin, glue, and ethylene–vinyl alcohol copolymer. Technical and clinical success, iodinated contrast utilization, procedural time, fluoroscopy time, and mean radiation dose were registered.ResultsDPSI was technically successful in all patients: the needle was correctly positioned at the first attempt in six patients, while in two of the first five patients the needle was repositioned once. Neither minor nor major complications were registered. Average procedural time was 45 min and the average administered iodinated contrast was 13 ml. Mean radiation dose of the procedure was 60.43 Gy cm{sup 2} and mean fluoroscopy time was 18 min. Clinical success was achieved in all patients (mean follow-up of 36 months): no sign of T2EL was reported in seven patients until last CT follow-up, while it persisted in one patient with stability of sac diameter.ConclusionsDPSI using unenhanced CBCT and FI is feasible and provides the interventional radiologist with an accurate and safe alternative to endovascular treatment with limited iodinated contrast utilization.

  12. WE-EF-207-08: Improve Cone Beam CT Using a Synchronized Moving Grid, An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion and a Probability Total Variation Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J; Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system, which uses a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) to reduce and correct scatter, an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) algorithm to estimate the missing information blocked by the grid, and a probability total variation (pTV) algorithm to reconstruct the CBCT image. Methods: A prototype SMOG-equipped CBCT system was developed, and was used to acquire gridded projections with complimentary grid patterns in two neighboring projections. Scatter was reduced by the grid, and the remaining scatter was corrected by measuring it under the grid. An IPSF algorithm was used to estimate the missing information in a projection from data in its 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was used to reconstruct the initial CBCT image using projections after IPSF processing for pTV. A probability map was generated depending on the confidence of estimation in IPSF for the regions of missing data and penumbra. pTV was finally used to reconstruct the CBCT image for a Catphan, and was compared to conventional CBCT image without using SMOG, images without using IPSF (SMOG + FDK and SMOG + mask-TV), and image without using pTV (SMOG + IPSF + FDK). Results: The conventional CBCT without using SMOG shows apparent scatter-induced cup artifacts. The approaches with SMOG but without IPSF show severe (SMOG + FDK) or additional (SMOG + TV) artifacts, possibly due to using projections of missing data. The 2 approaches with SMOG + IPSF removes the cup artifacts, and the pTV approach is superior than the FDK by substantially reducing the noise. Using the SMOG also reduces half of the imaging dose. Conclusion: The proposed technique is promising in improving CBCT image quality while reducing imaging dose.

  13. Big fusion, little fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Frank; ddtuttle

    2016-08-01

    In reply to correspondence from George Scott and Adam Costley about the Physics World focus issue on nuclear energy, and to news of construction delays at ITER, the fusion reactor being built in France.

  14. Inertial confinement fusion reactor cavity analysis: Progress report for the period 1 July 1986 to 30 June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.R.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Moses, G.A.; El-Afify, M.; Corradini, M.L.

    1987-07-01

    This is a process report for research performed from July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1987, for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under subcontract number 9265205 with the project title: Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor Cavity Analysis. This research generally considers the problems of vaporization and condensation of liquid metal or solid first surface materials in high yield ICF facilities such as reactors or high yield target test experiments. The past year's research consisted of 1.2 man years of effort on three tasks. These tasks were: verify the current vaporization-condensation models in CONRAD through literature surveys of relevant published data, and evaluation and comparison of these data with predictions by CONRAD on condensation phenomena, and with predictions by CONRAD, ZPINCH, and/or MIXERG on radiation phenomena, design a small-scale vaporization experiment by evaluating existing experimental facilities, selecting a primary facility, and conceptually designing an experiment complete with facility parameters and measurables, and design a small-scale condensation experiment including experimental parameters, measurables, and diagnostics. 48 refs.

  15. Heavy Ion Reactions with Neutron-Rich Beams - Proceedings of the Riken International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, S.; Ishihara, M.; Takigawa, N.

    1993-11-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Opening Address * Fusion I * Heavy Ion Fusion at Subbarrier Energies: Progress and Questions * Angular Momentum in Heavy Ion Subbarrier Interaction * Fusion II * High Precision Fusion Excitation Function Measurements: What Can We Learn from Them? * Transfer Reactions for 16O + 144,152Sm near the Coulomb Barrier * Fusion III * Recent Theoretical Developments in the Study of Subbarrier Fusion * Direct Reaction Approach to Heavy Ion Scattering and Fusion at Energies near Coulomb Barrier * Fusion IV * Roles of Multi-Step Transfer in Fusion Process Induced by Heavy Ion Reactions * Special Session * RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility (RARF) * Fission I * Bimodal Nature of Nuclear Fission * Systematics of Isotope Production Rates: Mass Excess Dependence of Fission Products * Semiclassical Methods for the Multi-Dimensional Quantum Decay * Dynamics of Di-Nucleus Systems: Molecular Resonances * Fission II * The Competition Between Fusion-Fission and Deeply Inelastic Reactions in the Medium Mass Systems * Unstable Nuclei I * Coulomb Dissociation and Momentum Distributions for 11Li → 9Li+n+n Breakup Reactions * Unstable Nuclei II * Elastic Scattering and Fragmentation of Halo Nuclei * Secondary Reactions of Neutron-Rich Nuclei at Intermediate Energies * Life Time of Soft Dipole Excitation * Unstable Nuclei III * Shell Structure of Exotic Unstable Nuclei * Properties of Unstable Nuclei Within the Relativistic Many-Body Theory * Fusion with Unstable Nuclei * Barrier Distributions for Heavy Ion Fusion * Heavy Ion Reactions with Neutron-Rich Beams * Heavy Ion Fusion with Neutron-Rich Beams * Superheavy Elements * Study of α Decays Following 40Ar Bombardment on 238U * Production of Superheavy Elements via Fusion: What is Limiting Us? * Panel Session * Comments * List of Participants

  16. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  17. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

  18. Role of cone-beam computed tomography in the evaluation of a paradental cyst related to the fusion of a wisdom tooth with a paramolar: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Soylu, Emrah; Nazlim, Sinan; Amuk, Mehmet; Avci, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Fusion is an abnormality of tooth development defined as the union of two developing dental germs, resulting in a single large dental structure. This irregular tooth morphology is associated with a high predisposition to dental caries and periodontal diseases. As a result of recurring inflammatory periodontal processes, disorders such as periodontal pocket, pericoronitis, and paradental cysts may develop. A rare mandibular anatomic variation is the retromolar canal, which is very significant for surgical procedures. The fusion of a paramolar and mandibular third molar associated with a paradental cyst co-occurring with the presence of a retromolar canal is rare, and the aim of the present study is to describe the evaluation of this anatomical configuration using cone-beam computed tomography. PMID:27051641

  19. Surgical fusion in childhood spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Stanton, R P; Meehan, P; Lovell, W W

    1985-01-01

    Twenty cases of surgical fusion for spondylolisthesis were reviewed at the Scottish Rite Hospital (Atlanta, GA, U.S.A.) to determine whether a procedure other than a simple posterolateral fusion is necessary for most patients. The patients were treated postoperatively with pantaloon spica cast immobilization. The fusion rate was high (90%), and patient satisfaction was high. One patient developed neurologic loss postoperatively. Two patients' slips progressed greater than 10% before solid fusion occurred. Thus, bilateral posterolateral fusion, followed by pantaloon spica cast immobilization, is effective for patients with symptomatic spondylolisthesis or asymptomatic children with grade 3 or greater slips. Reduction was not performed in this series.

  20. Minimum 10-Year Follow-up Study of Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: Progressive Pattern of the Adjacent Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Taketoshi; Hori, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kayo; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose The aims of the current study are to evaluate the minimum 10-year follow-up clinical results of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature ALIF has been widely used as a treatment regimen in the management of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Still much controversy exists regarding the factors that affect the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods The author performed a retrospective review of 20 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis treated with ALIF (follow-up, 16.4 years). The clinical results were assessed by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for low back pain, vertebral slip and disc height index on the radiographs. Results The mean preoperative JOA score was 7.1 ± 1.8 points (15-point-method). At 1 year, 5 years, and 10 years or more after surgery, the JOA scores were assessed as 12.4 ± 2.2 points, 12.7 ± 2.6 points, 12.0 ± 2.5 points, respectively (excluding the data of reoperated cases). The adjacent disc degeneration developed in all cases during the long-term follow-up. The progressive pattern of disc degeneration was divided into three types. Initially, disc degeneration occurred due to disc space narrowing. After that, the intervertebral discs showed segmental instability with translation at the upper level. But the lower discs showed osteophyte formation, and occasionally lead to the collapse or spontaneous union. Conclusions The clinical results of the long-term follow-up data after ALIF became worse due to the adjacent disc degeneration. The progressive pattern of disc degeneration was different according to the adjacent levels. PMID:22708014

  1. Inertial fusion program, January 1-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Skoberne, F.

    1981-06-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse carbon dioxide laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements are outlined for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Gemini System, which permitted over 500 shots in support of 10 different target experiments; the transformation of our eight-beam system, Helios, from a developmental to an operational facility that is capable of irradiating targets on a routine basis is described; and progress made toward completion of Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is detailed. Investigations of phenomena such as phase conjugation by degenerate four-wave mixing and its applicability to laser fusion systems, and frequency multiplexing as a means toward multipulse energy extraction are summarized. Also discussed are experiments with targets designed for adiabatic compression. Progress is reported in the development of accurate diagnostics, especially for the detection of expanding ions, of neutron yield, and of x-ray emission. Significant advances in our theoretical efforts are summarized, such as the adaptation of our target design codes for use with the CRAY-1 computer, and new results leading to a better understanding of implosion phenomena are reported. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, including the development of an ICF reactor blanket that offers a promising alternative to the usual lithium blanket, and the formulation of a capital-cost data base for laser fusion reactors to permit meaningful comparisons with other technologies.

  2. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Freedland, Stephen J.; Gerber, Leah; Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S.; Salama, Joseph K.; Stone, Steven

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy.

  3. Polarized fuel for controlled thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartalucci, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    The use of polarized nuclei as a fuel for thermonuclear fusion reactors was suggested more than 30 years ago, providing evidence for a significant increase of the total cross section. In particular, an enhancement factor close to 1.5 is expected in the energy range below 100 keV for the dominant nuclear fusion reactions 2H + 3H → 4He + n + 17.58 MeV and 2H + 3He → 4He + p + 18.34 MeV. Furthermore, the use of polarized fuel allows one to control the ejectile trajectories, via an enhancement in the forward-backward cross section asymmetry due to polarization. This allows some control on the energy transfer from the plasma to the reactor wall or helps concentrate the neutron flux to defined wall areas. Nevertheless, this idea was received with skepticism by the relevant scientific community, due to some uncertainty in the physics of the process, the low efficiency in the production of polarized beams for injection into plasma and the apparent difficulty of preserving the ion polarization for a time long compared with nuclear burning time. But more recently, as a consequence of significant progress in the field of atomic beam sources and polarized targets, the interest in this matter has been refreshed for both inertially and magnetically confined plasmas. The possibility of implementing nuclear polarization in present and future fusion reactors is discussed in this paper. In particular, the interaction between polarized ions and magnetic fields, both static and RF, which are typically used in a Tokamak for plasma heating via ion cyclotron resonance (ICRH), is considered. Also, experimental issues for practically performing a feasibility test on a real fusion reactors are illustrated.

  4. Human-Centered Fusion Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; White, Amanda M.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2007-05-16

    In recent years the benefits of fusing signatures extracted from large amounts of distributed and/or heterogeneous data sources have been largely documented in various problems ranging from biological protein function prediction to cyberspace monitoring. In spite of significant progress in information fusion research, there is still no formal theoretical framework for defining various types of information fusion systems, defining and analyzing relations among such types, and designing information fusion systems using a formal method approach. Consequently, fusion systems are often poorly understood, are less than optimal, and/or do not suit user needs. To start addressing these issues, we outline a formal humancentered fusion framework for reasoning about fusion strategies. Our approach relies on a new taxonomy for fusion strategies, an alternative definition of information fusion in terms of parameterized paths in signature related spaces, an algorithmic formalization of fusion strategies and a library of numeric and dynamic visual tools measuring the impact as well as the impact behavior of fusion strategies. Using a real case of intelligence analysis we demonstrate that the proposed framework enables end users to rapidly 1) develop and implement alternative fusion strategies, 2) understand the impact of each strategy, 3) compare the various strategies, and 4) perform the above steps without having to know the mathematical foundations of the framework. We also demonstrate that the human impact on a fusion system is critical in the sense that small changes in strategies do not necessarily correspond to small changes in results.

  5. Advanced development of particle-beam-probe diagnostic systems. Technical progress report, 1 July 1980-30 April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R.L.; Jennings, W.C.; Woo, J.T.; Connor, K.A.

    1981-05-01

    The heavy ion beam probe system on the RENTOR tokamak has been reinstalled with considerably improved performance. The heavy neutral beam probe system on the ALEX baseball facility has demonstrated the capability of measuring space potential in minimum-B geometry. A large amount of data were obtained from the highly successful TMX beam probe system and are presently being analyzed. Technological improvements were made on both the RENTOR and ALEX diagnostic systems, new ion sources and extraction configurations were investigated, and the superiority of off-line processing techniques for beam probe data has been demonstrated. The development of high energy probing beams for application to major confinement experiments has been initiated and cross-over sweep systems to improve spatial resolution, differential pumping, and reduce energy requirements have been designed.

  6. Spinal Fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... bone taken from the patient has a long history of use and results in predictable healing. Autograft ...

  7. Spinal Fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... bone taken from the patient has a long history of use and results in predictable healing. Autograft ...

  8. Design assumptions and bases for small D-T-fueled Sperical Tokamak (ST) fusion core

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Galambos, J.D.; Fogarty, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Recent progress in defining the assumptions and clarifying the bases for a small D-T-fueled ST fusion core are presented. The paper covers several issues in the physics of ST plasmas, the technology of neutral beam injection, the engineering design configuration, and the center leg material under intense neutron irradiation. This progress was driven by the exciting data from pioneering ST experiments, a heightened interest in proof-of-principle experiments at the MA level in plasma current, and the initiation of the first conceptual design study of the small ST fusion core. The needs recently identified for a restructured fusion energy sciences program have provided a timely impetus for examining the subject of this paper. Our results, though preliminary in nature, strengthen the case for the potential realism and attractiveness of the ST approach.

  9. Accelerator based fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Chao, Alexander Wu

    2017-08-01

    A feasibility study of fusion reactors based on accelerators is carried out. We consider a novel scheme where a beam from the accelerator hits the target plasma on the resonance of the fusion reaction and establish characteristic criteria for a workable reactor. We consider the reactions d+t\\to n+α,d+{{}3}{{H}\\text{e}}\\to p+α , and p+{{}11}B\\to 3α in this study. The critical temperature of the plasma is determined from overcoming the stopping power of the beam with the fusion energy gain. The needed plasma lifetime is determined from the width of the resonance, the beam velocity and the plasma density. We estimate the critical beam flux by balancing the energy of fusion production against the plasma thermo-energy and the loss due to stopping power for the case of an inert plasma. The product of critical flux and plasma lifetime is independent of plasma density and has a weak dependence on temperature. Even though the critical temperatures for these reactions are lower than those for the thermonuclear reactors, the critical flux is in the range of {{10}22}-{{10}24}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-2}~{{\\text{s}}-1} for the plasma density {ρt}={{10}15}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} in the case of an inert plasma. Several approaches to control the growth of the two-stream instability are discussed. We have also considered several scenarios for practical implementation which will require further studies. Finally, we consider the case where the injected beam at the resonance energy maintains the plasma temperature and prolongs its lifetime to reach a steady state. The equations for power balance and particle number conservation are given for this case.

  10. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  11. Overview of Theory and Simulations in the Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2006-07-03

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is a collaboration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. These laboratories, in cooperation with researchers at other institutions, are carrying out a coordinated effort to apply intense ion beams as drivers for studies of the physics of matter at extreme conditions, and ultimately for inertial fusion energy. Progress on this endeavor depends upon coordinated application of experiments, theory, and simulations. This paper describes the state of the art, with an emphasis on the coordination of modeling and experiment; developments in the simulation tools, and in the methods that underly them, are also treated.

  12. Overview of Theory and Simulations in the Heavy Ion Fusion ScienceVirtual National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2006-07-09

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is a collaboration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. These laboratories, in cooperation with researchers at other institutions, are carrying out a coordinated effort to apply intense ion beams as drivers for studies of the physics of matter at extreme conditions, and ultimately for inertial fusion energy. Progress on this endeavor depends upon coordinated application of experiments, theory, and simulations. This paper describes the state of the art, with an emphasis on the coordination of modeling and experiment; developments in the simulation tools, and in the methods that underly them, are also treated.

  13. Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

  14. Measurements of neutral beam species, impurities, spatial divergence, energy dispersion, pressure, and reionization for the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) US Common Long Pulse Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Gammel, G.M.; Grisham, L.R.; Kaita, R.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Langley, R.A.; Magee, C.W.; Medley, S.S.; Murphy, T.J.; Roquemore, A.L.; Williams, M.D.

    1988-06-01

    Physical characteristics of TFTR neutral beams were measured during the first tests and initial operating experience with production TFTR US Common Long Pulse Ion Sources on beamlines in the TFTR experimental environment under actual user conditions. These measurements were performed with different power supply systems, controls, diagnostics, and operating methods compared to those used at LBL during the development phase. The set of diagnostics included water calorimetry, thermocouples, vacuum ionization gauges, photodiodes, neutron, gamma-ray and charged particle backscatter spectroscopy, and implantation/secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These systems were used to perform complementary measurements of neutral beam species, measurements were performed either in the neutralizer region, where the beam contained both ions and neutrals, or in the region of the output neutral beam. In general, consistent with estimates made during the LBL development phase. They can provide guidance for the optimization of TFTR neutral beam heating operations and the understanding of auxilliary heated TFTR plasmas. 21 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Technical progress report No. 5-6, September 1, 1990--February 28, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-12-31

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarters Five and Six). The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will generally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge.

  16. Installation and first operation of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility injector at the Rokkasho site

    SciTech Connect

    Gobin, Raphael Bogard, Daniel; Bolzon, Benoit; Bourdelle, Gilles; Chauvin, Nicolas; Chel, Stéphane; Girardot, Patrick; Gomes, Adelino; Guiho, Patrice; Harrault, Francis; Loiseau, Denis; Lussignol, Yves; Misiara, Nicolas; Roger, Arnaud; Senée, Franck; Valette, Matthieu; Okumura, Yoshikazu [IFMIF and others

    2016-02-15

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) linear IFMIF prototype accelerator injector dedicated to high intensity deuteron beam production has been designed, built, and tested at CEA/Saclay between 2008 and 2012. After the completion of the acceptance tests at Saclay, the injector has been fully sent to Japan. The re-assembly of the injector has been performed between March and May 2014. Then after the check-out phase, the production of the first proton beam occurred in November 2014. Hydrogen and deuteron beam commissioning is now in progress after having proceeded with the final tests on the entire injector equipment including high power diagnostics. This article reports the different phases of the injector installation pointing out the safety and security needs, as well as the first beam production results in Japan and chopper tests. Detailed operation and commissioning results (with H{sup +} and D{sup +} 100 keV beams) are reported in a second article.

  17. Installation and first operation of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility injector at the Rokkasho site.

    PubMed

    Gobin, Raphael; Bogard, Daniel; Bolzon, Benoit; Bourdelle, Gilles; Chauvin, Nicolas; Chel, Stéphane; Girardot, Patrick; Gomes, Adelino; Guiho, Patrice; Harrault, Francis; Loiseau, Denis; Lussignol, Yves; Misiara, Nicolas; Roger, Arnaud; Senée, Franck; Valette, Matthieu; Cara, Philippe; Duglué, Daniel; Gex, Dominique; Okumura, Yoshikazu; Ayala, Juan Marcos; Knaster, Juan; Marqueta, Alvaro; Kasugai, Atsushi; O'Hira, Shigeru; Shinto, Katsuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2016-02-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) linear IFMIF prototype accelerator injector dedicated to high intensity deuteron beam production has been designed, built, and tested at CEA/Saclay between 2008 and 2012. After the completion of the acceptance tests at Saclay, the injector has been fully sent to Japan. The re-assembly of the injector has been performed between March and May 2014. Then after the check-out phase, the production of the first proton beam occurred in November 2014. Hydrogen and deuteron beam commissioning is now in progress after having proceeded with the final tests on the entire injector equipment including high power diagnostics. This article reports the different phases of the injector installation pointing out the safety and security needs, as well as the first beam production results in Japan and chopper tests. Detailed operation and commissioning results (with H(+) and D(+) 100 keV beams) are reported in a second article.

  18. RF Gas Plasma Source Development for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L; Hall, R P; Molvik, A W; Kwan, J W; Leung, K N

    2001-09-04

    Presently the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is researching ion sources and injector concepts to understand how to optimize beam brightness over a range of currents (50-2000 mA argon equivalent). One concept initially accelerates millimeter size, milliamp beamlets to 1 MeV before merging them into centimeter size, ampere beams. Computer simulations have shown the final brightness of the merged beams is dominated by the emittance growth of the merging process, as long as the beamlets ion temperature is below a few eV. Thus, a RF multicusp source capable of high current density can produce beams with better brightness compared to ones extracted from a colder source with a large aperture and lower current density. As such, experiments have begun to develop a RF multicusp source capable of delivering one amp of extracted beam current. It is expected that it will require 10 kW of 13 MHz RF power delivered via a quartz shielded, one and half turn, four inch diameter antenna. Important considerations in the development of the source include the dependence of current density and beam ion temperature on consumed RF power and gas pressure. A fast rise time ({approx} 100 ns) for the extracted beam pulse must also be achieved. Progress on these experiments will be presented.

  19. RF gas plasma source development for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L.E.; Hall, R.P.; Molvik, A.W.

    2002-02-22

    Presently the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is researching ion sources and injector concepts to understand how to optimize beam brightness over a range of currents (50-2000 mA argon equivalent). One concept initially accelerates millimeter size, milliamp beamlets to 1 MeV before merging them into centimeter size, ampere beams. Computer simulations have shown the final brightness of the merged beams is dominated by the emittance growth of the merging process, as long as the beamlets ion temperature is below a few eV. Thus, a RF multicusp source capable of high current density can produce beams with better brightness compared to ones extracted from a colder source with a large aperture and lower current density. As such, experiments have begun to develop a RF multicusp source capable of delivering one amp of extracted beam current. It is expected that it will require 10 kW of 13 MHz RF power delivered via a quartz shielded, one and half turn, four inch diameter antenna. Important considerations in the development of the source include the dependence of current density and beam ion temperature on consumed RF power and gas pressure. A fast rise time ({approx}100 ns) for the extracted beam pulse must also be achieved. Progress on these experiments will be presented.

  20. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Ramsey, A.T.; Synakowski, E.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.; Valanju, P.M. . Plasma Physics Lab.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX . Fusion Research Center)

    1989-09-01

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C{sup +5} n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with I{sub p} = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Z{sub eff} and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of n{sub e}, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with I{sub p} and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of I{sub p} and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Radioscapholunate Fusions

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Duncan Thomas; Bain, Gregory Ian

    2012-01-01

    Radiocarpal fusions are performed for a variety of indications, most commonly for debilitating painful arthritis. The goal of a wrist fusion is to fuse the painful, diseased joints and to preserve motion through the healthy joints. Depending on the extent of the disease process, radiocarpal fusions may take the form of radiolunate, radioscapholunate, or total wrist fusions. Surgical techniques and instrumentation have advanced over the last few decades, and consequently the functional outcomes have improved and complications decreased. Techniques for partial carpal fusions have improved and now include distal scaphoid and triquetrum excision, which improves range of motion and fusion rates. In this article we discuss the various surgical techniques and fixation methods available and review the corresponding evidence in the literature. The authors' preferred surgical technique of radioscapholunate fusion with distal scaphoid and triquetrum excision is outlined. New implants and new concepts are also discussed. PMID:24179717

  2. The path to fusion power.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn; Cowley, Steve

    2010-03-13

    The promise, status and challenges of developing fusion power are outlined. The key physics and engineering principles are described and recent progress quantified. As the successful demonstration of 16 MW of fusion in 1997 in the Joint European Torus showed, fusion works. The central issue is therefore to make it work reliably and economically on the scale of a power station. We argue that to meet this challenge in 30 years we must follow the aggressive programme known as the 'Fast Track to Fusion'. This programme is described in some detail.

  3. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  4. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  5. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  6. Interpretation and Visualization of Non-Linear Data Fusion in Kernel Space: Study on Metabolomic Characterization of Progression of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Smolinska, Agnieszka; Blanchet, Lionel; Coulier, Leon; Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Luider, Theo; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background In the last decade data fusion has become widespread in the field of metabolomics. Linear data fusion is performed most commonly. However, many data display non-linear parameter dependences. The linear methods are bound to fail in such situations. We used proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, two well established techniques, to generate metabolic profiles of Cerebrospinal fluid of Multiple Sclerosis (MScl) individuals. These datasets represent non-linearly separable groups. Thus, to extract relevant information and to combine them a special framework for data fusion is required. Methodology The main aim is to demonstrate a novel approach for data fusion for classification; the approach is applied to metabolomics datasets coming from patients suffering from MScl at a different stage of the disease. The approach involves data fusion in kernel space and consists of four main steps. The first one is to extract the significant information per data source using Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination. This method allows one to select a set of relevant variables. In the next step the optimized kernel matrices are merged by linear combination. In step 3 the merged datasets are analyzed with a classification technique, namely Kernel Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis. In the final step, the variables in kernel space are visualized and their significance established. Conclusions We find that fusion in kernel space allows for efficient and reliable discrimination of classes (MScl and early stage). This data fusion approach achieves better class prediction accuracy than analysis of individual datasets and the commonly used mid-level fusion. The prediction accuracy on an independent test set (8 samples) reaches 100%. Additionally, the classification model obtained on fused kernels is simpler in terms of complexity, i.e. just one latent variable was sufficient. Finally, visualization of variables importance in

  7. Interpretation and visualization of non-linear data fusion in kernel space: study on metabolomic characterization of progression of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, Agnieszka; Blanchet, Lionel; Coulier, Leon; Ampt, Kirsten A M; Luider, Theo; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Buydens, Lutgarde M C

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade data fusion has become widespread in the field of metabolomics. Linear data fusion is performed most commonly. However, many data display non-linear parameter dependences. The linear methods are bound to fail in such situations. We used proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, two well established techniques, to generate metabolic profiles of Cerebrospinal fluid of Multiple Sclerosis (MScl) individuals. These datasets represent non-linearly separable groups. Thus, to extract relevant information and to combine them a special framework for data fusion is required. The main aim is to demonstrate a novel approach for data fusion for classification; the approach is applied to metabolomics datasets coming from patients suffering from MScl at a different stage of the disease. The approach involves data fusion in kernel space and consists of four main steps. The first one is to extract the significant information per data source using Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination. This method allows one to select a set of relevant variables. In the next step the optimized kernel matrices are merged by linear combination. In step 3 the merged datasets are analyzed with a classification technique, namely Kernel Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis. In the final step, the variables in kernel space are visualized and their significance established. We find that fusion in kernel space allows for efficient and reliable discrimination of classes (MScl and early stage). This data fusion approach achieves better class prediction accuracy than analysis of individual datasets and the commonly used mid-level fusion. The prediction accuracy on an independent test set (8 samples) reaches 100%. Additionally, the classification model obtained on fused kernels is simpler in terms of complexity, i.e. just one latent variable was sufficient. Finally, visualization of variables importance in kernel space was achieved.

  8. Multiple beam induction linac research at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, T.; Eylon, S.; Fessenden, T.J.; Hahn, K.; Henestroza, E.; Keefe, D.

    1990-06-01

    We present results of progress on the LBL multiple beam induction linac experiment (MBE-4). This machine models the accelerator physics of the electric-focused portion of a driver for heavy ion inertial confinement fusion. Four beams of cesium ions are accelerated in common through twenty four induction gaps while being separately focused in individual electrostatic AG focusing channels. Early experiments have demonstrated current amplification in the linac, from 10 mA to 90 mA per beam. This is achieved both by acceleration (from 200 keV to 1 MeV) and by carefully controlled bunch compression. Recent experiments have concentrated on studies of beams extracted from an ion source which produces 5 mA cesium beams at emittances near 0.03 {pi} mm-mrad (normalized). Experiments and theory show a growth of emittance (by about a factor of 2) as these beams are accelerated through the linac. Results of recent measurements of the transverse emittance behavior of these strongly space-charge-dominated ion beams are reviewed and compared with theory. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Progress on the Development of the Next Generation X-ray Beam Position Monitors at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Yang, B.X.; Decker, G.; Sereno, N.; Ramanathan, M.

    2016-07-27

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are ke y elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The next generat ion XBPMs for high heat load front ends (HHL FEs) have been designed to meet these requirements by utilizing Cu K-edge x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from a pair of copper absorbers and have been installed at the front ends (FEs) of the APS. Com missioning data showed a significant performance improvement over the existing photoemission-based XBPMs. While a similar design concept can be applied for the canted undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0-mrad, the lower beam power (< 10 kW) per undulator allows us to explore lower-cost solutions based on Compton scat tering from the diamond blades placed edge-on to the x- ray beam. A prototype of the Compton scattering XBPM system was i nstalled at 24-ID-A in May 2015. In this report, the design and test results for XRF-based XBPM and Compton scattering based XBPM are presented. Ongoing research related to the development of the next generation XBPMs on thermal contac t resistance of a joint between two solid bodies is also discussed

  10. Fusion gamma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, S. S.; Cecil, F. E.; Cole, D.; Conway, M. A.; Wilkinson, F. J., III

    1985-05-01

    Nuclear reactions of interest in fusion research often possess a branch yielding prompt emission of gamma radiation in excess of 15 MeV which can be exploited to provide a new fusion reaction diagnostic having applications similar to conventional neutron emission measurements. Conceptual aspects of fusion gamma diagnostics are discussed with emphasis on application to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during deuterium neutral beam heating of D-T and D-3He plasmas. Recent measurements of the D (T, γ)5He, D(3He, γ)5Li, and D(D, γ)4He branching ratios at low center-of-mass energy (30-100 keV) and of the response of a large volume Ne226 detector for gamma detection in high neutron backgrounds are presented. Using a well-shielded Ne226 detector during 20 MW-120 kV deuterium beam heating of a tritium plasma in TFTR, the D(T, γ)5He gamma signal level is estimated to be 3.5×105 cps.

  11. The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, Stewart

    2011-05-04

    When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

  12. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  13. Stabilized Spheromak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T

    2007-04-03

    The U.S. fusion energy program is focused on research with the potential for studying plasmas at thermonuclear temperatures, currently epitomized by the tokamak-based International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) but also continuing exploratory work on other plasma confinement concepts. Among the latter is the spheromak pursued on the SSPX facility at LLNL. Experiments in SSPX using electrostatic current drive by coaxial guns have now demonstrated stable spheromaks with good heat confinement, if the plasma is maintained near a Taylor state, but the anticipated high current amplification by gun injection has not yet been achieved. In future experiments and reactors, creating and maintaining a stable spheromak configuration at high magnetic field strength may require auxiliary current drive using neutral beams or RF power. Here we show that neutral beam current drive soon to be explored on SSPX could yield a compact spheromak reactor with current drive efficiency comparable to that of steady state tokamaks. Thus, while more will be learned about electrostatic current drive in coming months, results already achieved in SSPX could point to a productive parallel development path pursuing auxiliary current drive, consistent with plans to install neutral beams on SSPX in the near future. Among possible outcomes, spheromak research could also yield pulsed fusion reactors at lower capital cost than any fusion concept yet proposed.

  14. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation. 2015 Annual Progress Report for DOE/NE/NEET

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S. O.

    2016-03-07

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation processes in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 2, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics in SiC and (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of the defect generation rate. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  15. Fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989 to 1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R and D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R and D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  16. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  17. Research and development on vanadium alloys for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Matsui, H.; Abe, K.; Smith, D.L.; Osch, E. van; Kazakov, V.A.

    1998-03-01

    The current status of research and development on unirradiated and irradiated V-Cr-Ti alloys intended for fusion reactor structural applications is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the flow and fracture behavior of neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys. Recent progress on fabrication, joining, oxidation behavior, and the development of insulator coatings is also summarized. Fabrication of large (>500 kg) heats of V-4Cr-4Ti with properties similar to previous small laboratory heats has now been demonstrated. Impressive advances in the joining of thick sections of vanadium alloys using GTA and electron beam welds have been achieved in the past two years, although further improvements are still needed.

  18. Induction Linac Systems Experiments for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1994-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory propose to build at LBL the Induction Linac Systems Experiments (ILSE), the next logical step toward the eventual goal of a heavy ion induction accelerator powerful enough to implode or drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Though much smaller than a driver, ILSE will be at full driver scale in several important parameters. Nearly all accelerator components and beam manipulations required for a driver will be tested. It is expected that ILSE will be built in stages as funds and technical progress allow. The first stage, called Elise will include all of the electrostatic quadrupole focused parts of ILSE.

  19. Fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-04-20

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

  20. Fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-02-22

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

  1. The US ICF Ignition Program and the Inertial Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, J D; Hammel, B A; Logan, B G; Meyerhofer, D D; Payne, S A; Stehian, J D

    2003-07-02

    There has been rapid progress in inertial fusion in the past few years. This progress spans the construction of ignition facilities, a wide range of target concepts, and the pursuit of integrated programs to develop fusion energy using lasers, ion beams and z-pinches. Two ignition facilities are under construction (NIF in the U.S. and LMJ in France) and both projects are progressing toward an initial experimental capability. The LIL prototype beamline for LMJ and the first 4 beams of NIF will be available for experiments in 2003. The full 192 beam capability of NIF will be available in 2009 and ignition experiments are expected to begin shortly after that time. There is steady progress in the target science and target fabrication in preparation for indirect drive ignition experiments on NIF. Advanced target designs may lead to 5-10 times more yield than initial target designs. There has also been excellent progress on the science of ion beam and z-pinch driven indirect drive targets. Excellent progress on direct-drive targets has been obtained on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester. This includes improved performance of targets with a pulse shape predicted to result in reduced hydrodynamic instability. Rochester has also obtained encouraging results from initial cryogenic implosions. There is widespread interest in the science of fast ignition because of its potential for achieving higher target gain with lower driver energy and relaxed target fabrication requirements. Researchers from Osaka have achieved outstanding implosion and heating results from the Gekko XII Petawatt facility and implosions suitable for fast ignition have been tested on the Omega laser. A broad based program to develop lasers and ions beams for IFE is under way with excellent progress in drivers, chambers, target fabrication and target injection. KrF and Diode Pumped Solid-State lasers (DPSSL) are being developed in conjunction with drywall chambers and direct drive targets

  2. Investigation on non-glass laser fusion targets: their fabrication, characterization, and transport. Charged Particle Research Laboratory report No. 2-81, progress report, June 1, 1980-January 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of the research progress made under LLNL Subcontract 8320003 for the period of June 1, 1980 through January 31, 1981. The main theme of the research has continued to be the development of techniques for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting laser fusion targets on a continuous basis. The target fabrication techniques are intended mainly for non-glass spherical shell targets, both cryogenic and non-cryogenic. Specifically, progress has been made in each of the following categories. (1) Investigation of liquid hydrogen behavior inside a spherical laser fusion target. (2) Development of automated target characterization scheme. (3) Study of cryogenic target fabrication scheme utilizing cold-gas-levitation and electric field positioning. (4) Development of a cryogenic target fabrication system based on target free-fall method. (5) Generation of hydrogen powder using electro-hydrodynamic spraying. (6) Study of target-charging techniques for application to contactless cryogenic target fabrication. (7) Development of hollow metal sphere production technique. A brief summary of the research progress made in each category is presented.

  3. "Polarized" Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieck, Hans Paetz Gen.

    Increasing energy demand in view of limited supply, as well as environmental and nuclear-safety concerns leading to increased emphasis on renewable energy sources such as solar or wind energy are expected to focus public and scientific interest increasingly also on fusion energy. With the decision to build ITER (low-density magnetic confinement) and also continuing research on (high-density) inertial-confinement fusion (cf. the inauguration of the laser fusion facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) prospects of fusion energy have probably entered a new era.

  4. Computer Modeling of a Fusion Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I

    2000-12-15

    Progress in the study of plasma physics and controlled fusion has been profoundly influenced by dramatic increases in computing capability. Computational plasma physics has become an equal partner with experiment and traditional theory. This presentation illustrates some of the progress in computer modeling of plasma physics and controlled fusion.

  5. Fission-detector determination of D-D triton burnup fraction in beam-heated TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Hendel, H.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Bosch, S.; Cecil, F.E.; McCune, D.C.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Strachan, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    After the end of a neutral-beam injection pulse into a low-density TFTR plasma, once the beam-injected deuterons have thermalized, the neutron emission is dominated by the 14-MeV neutron production from D-D triton burnup. Ordinary fission detectors can measure the 14-MeV emission rate, which can be extrapolated back in time to estimate the equilibrium triton burnup fraction. The fractional burnup determined by this method is in the range of 0.3 to 1.5% for TFTR discharges to date, and is consistent with classical confinement and slowing down. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams. Technical progress report, 1 October 1982 - 30 September, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.A.; Kusse, B.R.; Sudan, R.N.

    1983-07-01

    The progress on this contract is described in three parts. The first deals with the technical operation of the LION accelerator. The second and third parts are concerned with the experimental results.

  7. L-Boronophenylalanine-Mediated Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Glioma Progressing After External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Beule, Annette; Collan, Juhani; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Seren, Tom; Paetau, Anders; Saarilahti, Kauko; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety of boronophenylalanine-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of malignant gliomas that progress after surgery and conventional external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Adult patients who had histologically confirmed malignant glioma that had progressed after surgery and external beam radiotherapy were eligible for this Phase I study, provided that >6 months had elapsed from the last date of radiation therapy. The first 10 patients received a fixed dose, 290 mg/kg, of L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (L-BPA-F) as a 2-hour infusion before neutron irradiation, and the remaining patients were treated with escalating doses of L-BPA-F, either 350 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, or 450 mg/kg, using 3 patients on each dose level. Adverse effects were assessed using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 2.0. Results: Twenty-two patients entered the study. Twenty subjects had glioblastoma, and 2 patients had anaplastic astrocytoma, and the median cumulative dose of prior external beam radiotherapy was 59.4 Gy. The maximally tolerated L-BPA-F dose was reached at the 450 mg/kg level, where 4 of 6 patients treated had a grade 3 adverse event. Patients who were given >290 mg/kg of L-BPA-F received a higher estimated average planning target volume dose than those who received 290 mg/kg (median, 36 vs. 31 Gy [W, i.e., a weighted dose]; p = 0.018). The median survival time following BNCT was 7 months. Conclusions: BNCT administered with an L-BPA-F dose of up to 400 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion is feasible in the treatment of malignant gliomas that recur after conventional radiation therapy.

  8. Plasma fusion and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hideo, Kozima

    1996-12-31

    Fundamental problems of plasma fusion (controlled thermonuclear fusion) due to the contradicting demands of the magnetic confinement of plasma and suppression of instabilities occurring on and in plasma are surveyed in contrast with problems of cold fusion. Problems in cold fusion due to the complicated constituents and types of force are explained. Typical cold fusion events are explained by a model based on the presence of trapped neutrons in cold fusion materials. The events include Pons-Fleishmann effect, tritium anomaly, helium 4 production, and nuclear transmutation. Fundamental hypothesis of the model is an effectiveness of a new concept--neutron affinity of elements. The neutron affinity is defined and some bases supporting it are explained. Possible justification of the concept by statistical approach is given.

  9. Energy dependence of fusion cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, J.M.; Ferreira, L.S.; Maglione, E.; Hansteen, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Observed enhancements of fusion cross sections at low energies are explained as caused by an underestimate of beam energy due to an overestimate of the stopping energy loss. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics: research with multiple- beam experiment MBE-4; induction linac systems experiments; and long- range research and development of heavy-ion fusion accelerators.

  11. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  12. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  13. Highlights of the heavy ion fusion symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    The current status and prospects for inertial confinement fusion based on the use of intense beams of heavy ions will be described in the light of results presented at the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion, (Washington, DC, May 27-29, 1986).

  14. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1981-September 1982. Fiscal year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.K.; Bouret, C.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers the activities of LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) during 1982. In nuclear physics, the Uranium Beams Improvement Project was concluded early in the year, and experimentation to exploit the new capabilities began in earnest. Technical improvement of the Bevalac during the year centered on a heavy-ion radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as part of the local injector upgrade, and we collaborated in studies of high-energy heavy-ion collision facilities. The Division continued its collaboration with Fermilab to design a beam-cooling system for the Tevatron I proton-antiprotron collider and to engineer the needed cooling components for the antiproton. The high-field magnet program set yet another record for field strength in an accelerator-type dipole magnet (9.2 T at 1.8 K). The Division developed the design for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring designed explicitly (with low beam emittance and 12 long straight sections) to generate high-brilliance synchrotron light from insertion devices. The Division's Magnetic Fusion Energy group continued to support major experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and General Atomic Co. by developing positive-ion-based neutral-beam injectors. Progress was made toward converting our major source-test facility into a long-pulse national facility, the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility, which was completed on schedule and within budget in 1983. Heavy Ion Fusion research focused on planning, theoretical studies, and beam-transport experiments leading toward a High Temperature Experiment - a major test of this promising backup approach to fusion energy.

  15. Heavy ion fusion accelerator research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to access the suitabilty of heavy ion accelerators as iginiters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accerelator techonolgy, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawerence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the vadidation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. The papers in this report that address these goals are: MBE-4 mechanical progress, alignment of MBE-4, a compact energy analyzer for MBE-4, Cs/sup +/ injector modeling with the EGUN code, an improved emittance scanning system for HIFAR, 2-MV injector, carbon arc source development, beam combining in ILSE, emittance growth due to transverse beam combining in ILSE - particle simulation results, achromatic beam combiner for ILSE, additional elements for beam merging, quadrupole magnet design for ILSE, and waveforms and longitudinal beam-parameters for ILSE.

  16. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams. Technical progress report, 20 August 1981-30 September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.A.; Kusse, B.R.; Sudan, R.N.

    1983-07-01

    The progress on this contract is described in two parts. The first deals with the technical operation of the LION accelerator which is the exact equivalent to one line of PBFA-I. The second part is concerned with the experimental results on the ion diode mounted at the front end of the LION accelerator.

  17. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  18. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  19. Proton Collimators for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu

    2003-01-01

    Proton collimators have been proposed for incorporation into inertial-electrostatic-confinement (IEC) fusion reactors. Such reactors have been envisioned as thrusters and sources of electric power for spacecraft and as sources of energetic protons in commercial ion-beam applications.

  20. Is there hope for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-04-12

    From the outset in the 1950's, fusion research has been motivated by environmental concerns as well as long-term fuel supply issues. Compared to fossil fuels both fusion and fission would produce essentially zero emissions to the atmosphere. Compared to fission, fusion reactors should offer high demonstrability of public protection from accidents and a substantial amelioration of the radioactive waste problem. Fusion still requires lengthy development, the earliest commercial deployment being likely to occur around 2025--2050. However, steady scientific progress is being made and there is a wide consensus that it is time to plan large-scale engineering development. A major international effort, called the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is being carried out under IAEA auspices to design the world's first fusion engineering test reactor, which could be constructed in the 1990's. 4 figs., 3 tabs.