Science.gov

Sample records for beam loss control

  1. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  2. Beam Loss Control for the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Choi, J.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II storage ring is designed for the full injected beam losses in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but for the remainder of the ring its shielded for {le} 10% top-off injection beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed these levels for time sufficient to cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring (LCM) system will control the beam losses to the more heavily shielded injection region while monitoring the losses outside this region. To achieve this scrapers are installed in the injection region to intercept beam particles that might be lost outside this region. The scrapers will be thin (< 1Xrad) that will allow low energy electrons to penetrate and the subsequent dipole will separate them from the stored beam. These thin scrapers will reduce the radiation from the scraper compared to thicker scrapers. The dipole will provide significant local shielding for particles that hit inside the gap and a source for the loss monitor system that will measure the amount of beam lost in the injection region.

  3. Characterizing and Controlling Beam Losses at the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.

    2012-09-12

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) currently provides 100-MeV H{sup +} and 800-MeV H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have distinct beam requirements, e.g. intensity, micropulse pattern, duty factor, etc. Minimizing beam loss is critical to achieving good performance and reliable operation, but can be challenging in the context of simultaneous multi-beam delivery. This presentation will discuss various aspects related to the observation, characterization and minimization of beam loss associated with normal production beam operations in the linac.

  4. Beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanGinneken, A.; Edwards, D.; Harrison, M.

    1989-04-01

    This paper presents results from simulations of beam losses during the operation of a superconducting accelerator. The calculations use a combination of hadron/electromagnetic cascade plus elastic scattering codes with accelerator tracking routines. These calculations have been used in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab Tevatron. First accelerator geometry is described. The rest of the paper discusses a detailed attempt to simulate a fast extraction cycle, essentially in chronological order. Beginning with an unperturbed beam, the simulation generates proton phase-space distributions incident on the electrostatic septum. These interact either elastically or inelastically with the septum wires, and the products of these interactions are traced through the machine. Where these leave the accelerator, energy deposition levels in the magnets are calculated together with the projected response of the beam-loss monitors in this region. Finally, results of the calculation are compared with experimental data. (AIP)

  5. BEAM LOSS ESTIMATES AND CONTROL FOR THE BNL NEUTRINO FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    WENG, W.-T.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPARIA, D.; TSOUPAS, N.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.

    2005-05-16

    The requirement for low beam loss is very important both to protect the beam component, and to make the hands-on maintenance possible. In this report, the design considerations to achieving high intensity and low loss will be presented. We start by specifying the beam loss limit at every physical process followed by the proper design and parameters for realizing the required goals. The process considered in this paper include the emittance growth in the linac, the H{sup -} injection, the transition crossing, the coherent instabilities and the extraction losses.

  6. CEBAF beam loss accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Ursic, R.; Mahoney, K.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Sinclair, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a beam loss accounting system for the CEBAF electron accelerator. This system samples the beam curent throughout the beam path and measures the beam current accurately. Personnel Safety and Machine Protection systems use this system to turn off the beam when hazardous beam losses occur.

  7. Issues and experience with controlling beam loss at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Gerald; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Controlling beam loss in the Tevatron collider is of great importance because of the delicate nature of the cryogenic magnet system and the collider detectors. Maximizing the physics potential requires optimized performance as well as protection of all equipment. The operating history of the Tevatron has significantly influenced the way losses are managed. The development of beam loss management in the Tevatron will be presented.

  8. Micro-nanopores fabricated by high-energy electron beam irradiation: suitable structure for controlling pesticide loss.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yubin; Wang, Ning; Song, Jimei; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2013-06-01

    Pesticide sprayed onto crop leaves tends to be washed off by rainwater and discharge into the environment through leaching and runoff, resulting in severe pollution to both soil and water. Here, to control pesticide loss, we developed a loss-control pesticide (LCP) by adding modified natural nanoclay (diatomite) through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) to traditional pesticide. After HEEB treatment, the originally clogged pores in diatomite opened, resulting in plenty of micro-nanopores in diatomite, which are beneficial for the pesticide molecules to access and be adsorbed. This pesticide-diatomite complex tended to be retained by the rough surface of crop leaves, displaying a high adhesion performance onto the leaves, so that the pesticide loss reduced, sufficient pesticide for crops was supplied, and the pollution risk of the pesticide could be substantially lowered.

  9. RHIC BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM INITIAL OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; MICHNOFF,R.J.; GELLER,J.M.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent beam loss quenching of the superconducting magnets, and acquire loss data. Four hundred ion chambers are located around the rings to detect losses. The required 8-decade range in signal current is compressed using an RC pre- integrator ahead of a low current amplifier. A beam abort may be triggered if fast or slow losses exceed programmable threshold levels. A micro-controller based VME module sets references and gains and reads trip status for up to 64 channels. Results obtained with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the prototype electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line are presented along with the present status of the system.

  10. PDX neutral beam reionization losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Dylla, H.F.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Moore, R.; Schilling, G.; Stuart, L.D.; Von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-04-01

    Reionization losses for 1.5 MW H /sup 0/ and 2 MW D /sup 0/ neutral beams injected into the PDX tokamak were studied using pressure gauges, phototransistors, thermocouples, surface shielding, and surface sample analysis. Considerable outgassing of conventionally prepared 304 SS ducts occurred during initial injections and gradually decreased with the cumulative absorption of beam power. Reionization power losses are presently about 5% in the ducts and about 12% total for a beamline including the duct. Present duct pressures are attributed primarily to gas from the ion source and neutralizer with much smaller contributions from residual wall desorption. Physical mechanisms for the observed duct outgassing are discussed.

  11. RHIC beam loss monitor system design

    SciTech Connect

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-07-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized for data logging. The output is also applied to an analog multiplier which compensates the energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. High and low pass filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent programmable trip levels. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer (FEC) for real-time operation. Results with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line will be presented.

  12. Preliminary comments about beam loss

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, D.

    1985-10-01

    A variety of beam loss questions are being investigated. They affect several design issues, ranging from machine-associated background in the detectors to the radiation lifetime of the main-ring magnets: (1) Muons. Oppositely directed muon beams from prompt muon production, primary meson decay, and a variety of other processes radiate from each IR. If they were not fanned by the insertion dipoles, the beams would be sufficiently intense and energetic that they would present a radiation hazard even after penetrating 2 km of soil or rock. (2) Machine-associated background in the IR`s. About 30 mb of the total cross section is elastic or quasi-elastic, and most of the protons are in a Gaussian spot with sigma = 9 mr. These particles are well within the machine acceptance, but there is a grey area in the tail of the distributions in which the scattered particles `almost` remain in orbit - they continue for some distance but eventually hit a wall. (3) Cryogenic load. This problem has been addressed to some degree in the RDS, but considerably more detail is needed. It appears that a very large fraction of the inelastic particle energy will be deposited here. (4) Radiation damage in the ring. The lifetime of both magnets and electronics in the tunnel might be limited by radiation due to particle loss. Early results are not reassuring. Tevatron measurements, reported to the authors by John Elias, indicate that most of the tunnel background comes from particle loss due to beam-gas collisions.

  13. Preservation of beam loss induced quenches, beam lifetime and beam loss measurements with the HERAp beam-loss-monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenburg, Kay

    1994-06-01

    The beam-loss-monitors (BLMs) in the HERA-proton-ring (HERAp) must fulfill the following requirements: They have to measure losses sensitive and fast enough to prevent the superconducting magnets from beam loss induced quenching; the dynamic range of the monitors must exceed several decades in order to measure losses during beam lifetimes of hundreds of hours as well as the much stronger losses that may quench superconducting magnets; they have to be insensitive to the synchrotron radiation of the adjacent electron-ring (HERAe); and their radiation hardness must allow a monitor-lifetime of a few years of HERA operation. These requirements are well satisfied by the HERAp-BLM-System.

  14. RHIC low energy beam loss projections

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.

    2009-08-01

    For RHIC low-energy operations, we plan to collide Au beams with energies of E = 2:5-10 GeV/u in RHIC. Beams are injected into collision optics, and RHIC runs as a storage ring with no acceleration. At these low energies, observed beam lifetimes are minutes, with measured beam lifetimes of 3.5 min (fast) and 50 min (slow) at E=4.6 GeV/u in the March 2008 test run. With these lifetimes we can operate RHIC as a storage ring to produce reasonable integrated luminosity. This note estimates beam losses and collimator/dump energy deposition in normal injection modes of low energy operation. The main question is whether a normal injection run is feasible for an FY10 10-15 week operations run from a radiation safety perspective. A peripheral question is whether continuous injection operations is feasible from a radiation safety perspective. In continuous injection mode, we fill both rings, then continuously extract and reinject the oldest bunches that have suffered the most beam loss to increase the overall integrated luminosity. We expect to gain a factor of 2-3 in integrated luminosity from continuous injection at lowest energies if implemented[1]. Continuous injection is feasible by FY11 from an engineering perspective given enough effort, but the required extra safety controls and hardware dose risk make it unappealing for the projected luminosity improvement. Low-energy electron cooling will reduce beam losses by at least an order of magnitude vs normal low-energy operations, but low energy cooling is only feasible in the FY13 timescale and therefore beyond the scope of this note. For normal injection low energy estimates we assume the following: (1) RHIC beam total energies are E=2.5-10 GeV/u. (Continuous injection mode is probably unnecessary above total energies of E=7-8 GeV/u.); (2) RHIC operates only as a storage ring, with no acceleration; (3) 110 bunches of about 0.5-1.0 x 10{sup 9} initial bunch intensities (50-100% injection efficiency, likely conservative

  15. Beam cooling with ionization losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbia, C.; Ferrari, A.; Kadi, Y.; Vlachoudis, V.

    2006-12-01

    This novel type of Ionization Cooling is an effective method in order to enhance the (strong) interaction probability of slow (few MeV/A) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin target strongly improve the nuclear reaction rate with respect to a single-pass collision, in a steady configuration in which ionization losses of a target "foil" (typically few hundred μg/cm 2 thick) are continuously recovered by an RF-cavity. With a flat foil, betatron oscillations are "cooled", but the momentum spread diverges exponentially, since faster (slower) particles ionize less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" the beam also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge-shaped "foil". Therefore, in equilibrium conditions, multiple scattering and straggling are both balanced by phase-space compression. Classic Ionization Cooling [A.A. Kolomensky, Atomnaya Energiya 19 (1965) 534; Yu.M. Ado, V.I. Balbekov, Atomnaya Energiya 31(1) (1971) 40-44; A.N. Skrinsky, V.V. Parkhomchuk, Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 12 (1981) 3; E.A. Perevendentsev, A.N. Skrinsky, in: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on High Energy Acceleration, 1983, p. 485] is designed to cool the direct beam until it has been compressed and extracted for further use. In practice, this limits its applicability to non-interacting muon beams. Instead, in this new method, applicable to strongly interacting collisions, the circulating beam is not extracted. Ionization cooling provides "in situ" storage of the beam until it is converted by a nuclear interaction with the target. Simple reactions—for instance 7Li+D→8Li+p—are more favourably produced in the "mirror" kinematical frame, namely with a heavier ion colliding against a gas-jet D 2 target. Kinematics is generally very favourable, with angles in a narrow angular cone (around ˜10° for the mentioned reaction) and with a relatively concentrated outgoing energy spectrum which allows an efficient collection of 8

  16. Analysis of beam loss mechanism in the Project X linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Minimization of the beam losses in a multi-MW H{sup -} linac such as ProjectX to a level below 1 W/m is a challenging task. The impact of different mechanism of beam stripping, including stripping in electric and magnetic fields, residual gas, blackbody radiation and intra-beam stripping, is analyzed. Other sources of beam losses are misalignements of beamline elements and errors in RF fields and phases. We present in this paper requirements for dynamic errors and correction schemes to keep beam losses under control.

  17. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  18. Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

  19. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modeling for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mikkelsen; D.S. Darrow; L. Grisham; R. Akers; S. Kaye

    1999-06-01

    A numerical model, EIGOL, has been developed to calculate the loss rate of neutral beam ions from NSTX and the resultant power density on the plasma facing components. This model follows the full gyro-orbit of the beam ions, which can be a significant fraction of the minor radius. It also includes the three-dimensional structure of the plasma facing components inside NSTX. Beam ion losses from two plasma conditions have been compared: {beta} = 23%, q{sub 0} = 0.8, and {beta} = 40%, q{sub 0} = 2.6. Global losses are computed to be 4% and 19%, respectively, and the power density on the rf antenna is near the maximum tolerable levels in the latter case.

  20. PDX neutral-beam reionization losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Dylla, H.F.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Moore, R.; Schilling, G.; Stewart, L.D.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-02-01

    Reionization losses for 1.5 MW H/sup 0/ and 2 MW D/sup 0/ neutral beams injected into the PDX tokamak were studied using pressure gauges, photo-transistors, thermocouples, surface shielding, and surface sample analysis. Considerable outgassing of conventionally prepared 304SS ducts occurred during initial injections and gradually decreased with the cumulative absorption of beam power. Reionization power losses are presently about 5% in the ducts and about 12% total for a beamline including the duct. Present duct pressures are attributed primarily to gas from the ion source and neutralizer with much smaller contributions from residual wall desorption. Physical mechanisms for the observed duct outgassing are discussed.

  1. The ATLAS Beam Condition and Beam Loss Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenc, I.

    2010-04-01

    The primary goal of ATLAS Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) and Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) is to protect the ATLAS Inner Detector against damaging LHC beam incidents by initiating beam abort in case of beam failures. Poly-crystalline Chemical Vapour Deposition (pCVD) diamond was chosen as the sensor material for both systems. ATLAS BCM will provide real-time monitoring of instantaneous particle rates close to the interaction point (IP) of ATLAS spectrometer. Using fast front-end and signal processing electronics the time-of-flight and pulse amplitude measurements will be performed to distinguish between normal collisions and background events due to natural or accidental beam losses. Additionally, BCM will also provide coarse relative luminosity information. A second system, the ATLAS BLM, is an independent system which was recently added to complement the BCM. It is a current measuring system and was partially adopted from the BLM system developed by the LHC beam instrumentation group with pCVD diamond pad sensors replacing the ionisation chambers. The design of both systems and results of operation in ATLAS framework during the commissioning with cosmic rays will be reported in this contribution.

  2. Fluid-loss control

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, C.W.; Trittipo, B.L. ); Hutchinson, B.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Acid fluid loss is extremely difficult to control and is generally considered to be the major factor limiting the effectiveness of acid fracturing treatments. Chemical erosion of fracture faces and the development of wormholes are largely responsible for the reduced efficiency of acid fracturing fluids. The creation of acid wormholes increases the effective area from which leakoff occurs, thus reducing the acid hydraulic efficiency. Once wormholes form, most acid fluid loss originates from these wormholes rather than penetrating uniformly into the fracture face. Methods of acid fluid-loss control are discussed and evaluated with an improved fluid-loss test procedure. This procedure uses limestone cores of sufficient length to contain wormhole growth. Studies demonstrate that if wormhole growth can be controlled, acid fluid loss approaches that of nonreactive fluids. An improved acid fracturing fluid having unique rheological characteristics is described. This acid has a low initial viscosity but temporarily becomes extremely viscous during leakoff. This high leakoff viscosity blocks wormhole development and prevents acid entry into natural fractures. After the treatment, spent-acid viscosity declines rapidly to ensure easier cleanup.

  3. Beam loss monitor system for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.G.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1993-10-01

    At full intensity the energy contained in each beam of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is 400 MJ. The loss of a small fraction of that beam has the potential to cause magnet quenches or even severe damage to Collider components. To help protect the machine a sensitive and reliable beam loss monitor (BLM) system must be designed and built. In fact, BLM systems will be needed for all the accelerators of the SSC. The BLM system requirements for each of these accelerators will be discussed, but emphasis will be placed on the Collider. The discussion will include the preliminary design of BLM systems, the considerations that led to these designs, the calculations that were performed in development of the designs, and the problems that remain to be solved. A major tool in the design process has been a series of Monte Carlo calculations that were used to estimate beam loss distributions for the Collider arcs, the interaction regions, and the west utility region. These calculations were also used to study the fluence as a function of energy, the particle content, and the dose rate at selected positions. Detailed considerations such as detector spacing and sensitivity, loss fluctuations, reliability, and maintainability will be discussed. The proposed preliminary BLM system design for the Collider uses a radiation-hard, solid-state ionization detector and fast analog-to-digital conversion. Details of this design and relevant options will be discussed.

  4. The AGS Booster beam loss monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.; Bennett, G.W.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A beam loss monitor system has been developed for the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster accelerator, and is designed for use with intensities of up to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons and carbon to gold ions at 50-3 {times} 10{sup 9} ions per pulse. This system is a significant advance over the present AGS system by improving the sensitivity, dynamic range, and data acquisition. In addition to the large dynamic range achievable, it is adaptively shifted when high losses are detected. The system uses up to 80 argon filled ion chambers as detectors, as well as newly designed electronics for processing and digitizing detector outputs. The hardware simultaneously integrates each detector output, interfaces to the beam interrupt systems, and digitizes all 80 channels to 21 bits at 170 KHz. This paper discuses the design, construction, and operation of the system. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  6. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Chao, A.W.; Seryi, A.; Sramek, C.K.; /Rice U.

    2005-06-30

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ''banana effect''). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  7. BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

  8. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  9. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  10. Digitally Controlled Beam Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppler, W. W.; Kudva, B.; Dobbins, J. T.; Lee, C. S.; Van Lysel, M. S.; Hasegawa, B. H.; Mistretta, C. A.

    1982-12-01

    In digital fluorographic techniques the video camera must accommodate a wide dynamic range due to the large variation in the subject thickness within the field of view. Typically exposure factors and the optical aperture are selected such that the maximum video signal is obtained in the most transmissive region of the subject. Consequently, it has been shown that the signal-to-noise ratio is severely reduced in the dark regions. We have developed a prototype digital beam attenuator (DBA) which will alleviate this and some related problems in digital fluorography. The prototype DBA consists of a 6x6 array of pistons which are individually controlled. A membrane containing an attenuating solu-tion of (CeC13) in water and the piston matrix are placed between the x-ray tube and the subject. Under digital control the pistons are moved into the attenuating material in order to adjust the beam intensity over each of the 36 cells. The DBA control unit which digitizes the image during patient positioning will direct the pistons under hydraulic control to produce a uniform x-ray field exiting the subject. The pistons were designed to produce very little structural background in the image. In subtraction studies any structure would be cancelled. For non-subtraction studies such as cine-cardiology we are considering higher cell densities (eg. 64x64). Due to the narrow range of transmission provided by the DBA, in such studies ultra-high contrast films could be used to produce a high resolution quasi-subtraction display. Additional benefits of the DBA are: 1) reduced dose to the bright image areas when the dark areas are properly exposed. 2) improved scatter and glare to primary ratios, leading to improved contrast in the dark areas.

  11. Aircraft Loss of Control Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control has become the leading cause of jet fatalities worldwide. Aside from their frequency of occurrence, accidents resulting from loss of aircraft control seize the public s attention by yielding large numbers of fatalities in a single event. In response to the rising threat to aviation safety, NASA's Aviation Safety Program has conducted a study of the loss of control problem. This study gathered four types of information pertaining to loss of control accidents: (1) statistical data; (2) individual accident reports that cite loss of control as a contributing factor; (3) previous meta-analyses of loss of control accidents; and (4) inputs solicited from aircraft manufacturers, air carriers, researchers, and other industry stakeholders. Using these information resources, the study team identified causal factors that were cited in the greatest number of loss of control accidents, and which were emphasized most by industry stakeholders. For each causal factor that was linked to loss of control, the team solicited ideas about what solutions are required and future research efforts that could potentially help avoid their occurrence or mitigate their consequences when they occurred in flight.

  12. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  13. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  14. Theory of mode-induced beam particle loss in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. B.; Goldston, R. J.; McGuire, K.; Boozer, Allen H.; Monticello, D. A.; Park, W.

    1983-10-01

    Large-amplitude rotating magnetohydrodynamic modes are observed to induce significant high-energy beam particle loss during high-power perpendicular netural beam injection on the poloidal divertor experiment (PDX). A Hamiltonian formalism for drift orbit trajectories in the presence of such modes is used to study induced particle loss analytically and numerically. Results are in good agreement with experiment.

  15. Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

  16. Beam ion losses due to energetic particle geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. K.; Pace, D. C.; Kramer, G. J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Nazikian, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; García-Muñoz, M.

    2012-12-01

    We report the first experimental observations of fast-ion loss in a tokamak due to energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs). A fast-ion loss detector installed on the DIII-D tokamak observes bursts of beam ion losses coherent with the EGAM frequency. The EGAM activity results in a significant loss of beam ions, comparable to the first orbit losses. The pitch angles and energies of the measured fast-ion losses agree with predictions from a full orbit simulation code SPIRAL, which includes scattering and slowing-down.

  17. Design for controllable optofluidic beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xionggui; Liang, Shan; Li, Rujian

    2016-01-01

    A novel configuration for controllable optofluidic beam splitter is proposed, which consists of the asymmetric Y-branch waveguide and the microfluidic channel filled with fluid mixture. The beam propagation method (BPM) is employed to numerically investigate the optical performance of device in our layout. The simulated results demonstrate that arbitrary splitting ratio and low optical loss for both TE and TM mode can be easily achieved, with a low dependence of wavelength and polarization. Particularly, the optofluidic beam splitter has advantages such as compact structure and large fabrication tolerance. The proposed device provides a new way to manipulate the optical power splitting, and has wide potential applications in integrated optofluidic system.

  18. H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Galambos, John D; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

  19. The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System

    SciTech Connect

    Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

  20. Monitoring system experiments on beam loss at SSRF injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jun; Xia, XiaoBin; Xu, XunJiang; Liu, Xin; Xu, JiaQiang; Wang, GuangHong; Zeng, Ming

    2011-12-01

    Experiments on beam loss by using beam loss monitoring (BLM) system were carried out at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) injector. This system used highly sensitive and current-integrated Si-photodiode detectors and an Ethernet data acquisition (DAQ) system. The experimental results demonstrate that the Si-photodiode detectors are a useful tool that provides dynamic information on beam loss and investigates problems of machine operation. It also shows that the Si-photodiode BLM system is suitable for pulse-radiation of high-energy accelerators.

  1. CCD based beam loss monitor for ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, A.; Mustafin, E.; Ensinger, W.

    2014-04-01

    Beam loss monitoring is an important aspect of proper accelerator functioning. There is a variety of existing solutions, but each has its own disadvantages, e.g. unsuitable dynamic range or time resolution, high cost, or short lifetime. Therefore, new options are looked for. This paper shows a method of application of a charge-coupled device (CCD) video camera as a beam loss monitor (BLM) for ion beam accelerators. The system was tested with a 500 MeV/u N+7 ion beam interacting with an aluminum target. The algorithms of camera signal processing with LabView based code and beam loss measurement are explained. Limits of applicability of this monitor system are discussed.

  2. Coherent parasitic energy loss of the recycler beam

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-07-14

    Parasitic energy loss of the particle beam in the Recycler Ring is discussed. The long beam confined between two barrier waves has a spectrum that falls off rapidly with frequency. Discrete summation over the revolution harmonics must be made to obtain the correct energy loss per particle per turn, because only a few lower revolution harmonics of real part of the longitudinal impedance contribute to the parasitic energy loss. The longitudinal impedances of the broadband rf cavities, the broadband resistive-wall monitors, and the resistive wall of the vacuum chamber are discussed. They are the main sources of the parasitic energy loss.

  3. Dependence of bunch energy loss in cavities on beam velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1999-03-01

    Beam energy loss in a cavity can be easily computed for a relativistic bunch using time-domain codes like MAFIA or ABCI. However, for nonrelativistic beams the problem is more complicated because of difficulties with its numerical formulation in the time domain. We calculate the cavity loss factors for a bunch in frequency domain as a function of its velocity and compare results with the relativistic case.

  4. Toward automated beam optics control

    SciTech Connect

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a ''mouseable'' representation of a typical beam line. This responds actively to changes entered from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beam line itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operater. We have incorporated TRANSPORT, written in Fortran but running as a callable procedure in the LISP environment, for simulation of the beam-line optics. This paper describes the experience gained in meeting our first goal and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in realtime, on an operating beam line. 11 refs.

  5. Parasitic mode losses versus signal sensitivity in beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denard, J. C.; Bane, K. L.; Bijleveld, J.; Hutton, A. M.; Pellegrin, J. I.; Rivkin, L.; Wang, P.; Weaver, J. N.

    1985-04-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) for a storage or damping ring may be subject to heating problems due to the parasitic mode (PM) losses, beam interception and synchrotron radiation interception. In addition, high PM losses can cause beam instabilities under some conditions. Recessing and/or masking the BPM may increase the PM losses in the process of solving the latter two problems. Three complementary methods for estimating the PM losses and for improving the design of a stripline directional coupler type of BPM: bench measurements, computer modeling (TBCI), and an equivalent circuit representation are presented. These methods lead to a decrease in PM losses without significant reduction in output signal for the north Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping ring BPMs.

  6. DATA ACQUISITION FOR SNS BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    YENG,Y.GASSNER,D.HOFF,L.WITKOVER,R.

    2003-10-13

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor system uses VME based electronics to measure the radiation produced by lost beam. Beam loss signals from cylindrical argon-filled ion chambers and neutron detectors will be conditioned in analog front-end (AFE) circuitry. These signals will be digitized and further processed in a dedicated VME crate. Fast beam inhibit and low-level, long-term loss warnings will be generated to provide machine protection. The fast loss data will have a bandwidth of 35kHz. While the low level, long-term loss data will have much higher sensitivity. This is further complicated by the 3 decade range of intensity as the Ring accumulates beam. Therefore a bandwidth of 100kHz and dynamic range larger than 21 bits data acquisition system will be required for this purpose. Based on the evaluation of several commercial ADC modules in preliminary design phase, a 24 bits Sigma-Delta data acquisition VME bus card was chosen as the SNS BLM digitizer. An associated vxworks driver and EPICS device support module also have been developed at BNL. Simulating test results showed this system is fully qualified for both fast loss and low-level, long-term loss application. The first prototype including data acquisition hardware setup and EPICS software (running database and OPI clients) will be used in SNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL) system commissioning.

  7. Individual Beam Size And Length Measurements at the SLC Interaction Point Derived From the Beam Energy Loss During a Beam Beam Deflection Scan

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Field, R.Clive; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.C.; Slaton, T.; Traller, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    At the Interaction Point (IP) of the SLC Final Focus, beam-beam deflection scans routinely provide a measurement of the sum in quadrature of the electron and positron transverse beam sizes, but no information on the individual beam sizes. During the 1996 SLC run, an upgrade to the Final Focus beam position monitor system allowed a first measurement of the absolute beam energy loss of both beams on each step of the deflection scan. A fit to the energy loss distributions of the two beams provides a measurement not only of the individual transverse beam sizes at the IP but also of the individual bunch lengths.

  8. Beam loss detection system in the arcs of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arauzo, A.; Bovet, C.

    2000-11-01

    Over the whole circumference of the LHC, Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) will be needed for a continuous surveillance of fast and slow beam losses. In this paper, the location of the BLMs set outside the magnet cryostats in the arcs is proposed. In order to know the number of protons lost on the beam screen, the sensitivity of each BLM has been computed using the program GEANT 3.21, which generates the shower inside the cryostat. The material and the magnetic fields have been described thoroughly in 3-D and the simulation results show the best locations for 6 BLMs needed around each quadrupole. The number of minimum ionizing particles received for each lost proton serves to define local thresholds to dump the beam when the losses are menacing to quench a magnet.

  9. MHD Induced Neutral Beam Ion Loss from NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, A.L. Roquemore, and K. Shinohara

    2007-12-13

    Bursts of ~60 kHz activity on Mirnov coils occur frequently in NSTX plasmas and these are accompanied by bursts of neutral beam ion loss over a range in pitch angles. These losses have been measured with a scintillator type loss probe imaged with a high speed (>10,000 frames/s) video camera, giving the evolution of the energy and pitch angle distributions of the lost neutral beam ions over the course of the events. The instability occurs below the TAE frequency in NSTX (~100 kHz) in high beta plasmas and may be a beta driven Alfvén acoustic (BAAE) mode.

  10. Analysis ob beam losses at PSR (Proton Storage Ring)

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Plum, M.A.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Beam losses and the resulting component activation at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have limited operating currents to about 30..mu..A average at a repetition rate of 15 Hz. Loss rates were found to be approximately proportional to the circulating current and can be understood by a detailed accounting of emittance growth in the two step injection process along with Coulomb scattering of the stored beam during multiple traversals of the injection foil. Calculations and simulations of the losses are in reasonable agreement with measurements.

  11. Laser-Beam-Alignment Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasowski, M. J.; Dickens, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    In laser-beam-alignment controller, images from video camera compared to reference patterns by fuzzy-logic pattern comparator. Results processed by fuzzy-logic microcontroller, which sends control signals to motor driver adjusting lens and pinhole in spatial filter.

  12. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  13. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOEpatents

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H.; Henry, J. James; Davenport, Clyde M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  14. New Beam Loss Monitor for 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Kelly Mahoney

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes a new VME based machine protection Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) signal processing board designed at Jefferson Lab to replace the current CAMAC based BLM board. The new eight-channel BLM signal processor has linear, logarithmic, and integrating amplifiers that simultaneously provide the optimal signal processing for each application. Amplified signals are digitized and then further processed through a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Combining both the diagnostic and machine protection functions in each channel allows the operator to tune-up and monitor beam operations while the machine protection is integrating the same signal. Other features include extensive built-in-self-test, fast shutdown interface (FSD), and 16-Mbit buffers for beam loss transient play-back. The new VME BLM board features high sensitivity, high resolution, and low cost per channel.

  15. RF Cavity Induced Sensitivity Limitations on Beam Loss Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastriotou, M.; Degiovanni, A.; Sousa, F. S. Domingues; Effinger, E.; Holzer, E. B.; Quirante, J. L. Navarro; del Busto, E. N.; Tecker, F.; Viganò, W.; Welsch, C. P.; Woolley, B. J.

    Due to the secondary showers generated when a particle hits the vacuum chamber, beam losses at an accelerator may be detected via radiation detectors located near the beam line. Several sources of background can limit the sensitivity and reduce the dynamic range of a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM). This document concentrates on potential sources of background generated near high gradient RF cavities due to dark current and voltage breakdowns. An optical fibre has been installed at an experiment of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF3), where a dedicated study of the performance of a loaded and unloaded CLIC accelerating structure is undergoing. An analysis of the collected data and a benchmarking simulation are presented to estimate BLM sensitivity limitations. Moreover, the feasibility for the use of BLMs optimised for the diagnostics of RF cavities is discussed.

  16. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) optical beam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurvick, Tod; Starman, LaVern; Coutu, Ronald, Jr.

    2009-08-01

    This experiment explores the manufacturability of controllable Micro-electromechanical (MEMS) mirrors to direct optical signals. Design includes four separate mirrors which independently control vertical displacement, horizontal displacement, vertical pitch and horizontal pitch. Such devices could be used for a variety of applications but were specifically intended for future use in communications between optical based circuits residing on separate chips. Prototype devices were built in PolyMUMPs to test the feasibility of this process for applications such as this, including a full outgoing beam path with mirror orientations and actuation designs to accomplish this. Several elements of this outgoing beam path were successful and those which needed improvement indicate a high probability of success with limited trials needed. Improvement recommendations on currently successful design elements which could still be improved within the scope of PolyMUMPs have been identified. Originally intended only to direct the outgoing beam, this design could be used on the incoming path as well. Such a design would ensure that the receiving device only requires a target location and not that a specific incoming vector be obtained. This would thus comprise all the elements needed for a prototype proof of concept device to be built. More sophisticated fabrication processes could provide drastic improvements to both transmission and reception beam paths and potentially allow for a variety of more sophisticated designs to improve compactness, controllability, tighten tolerances on moving parts, increase mirror quality, and improved productivity of large quantities of devices.

  17. beam loss scenarios for MuCool Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; Johnstone, Carol; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets, gas-filled RF cavities, and other apparatus being developed to cool intense, large-emittance muon beams. In this study the results of Monte Carlo modeling of several beam loss scenarios are presented. The MTA facility was designed to test targets and other muon cooling apparatus using the intense Fermilab Linac beam. The requested intensity of the proton beam for the MTA is essentially full Linac capability, or 1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse and an energy of 400 MeV. Two modes of operation will be supported in the MuCOOL beamline: one mode for emittance measurements (and beamline studies) and a second mode for MTA experiments. Maximum beam intensity for these two modes is: 9.6 x 10{sup 15} protons/hr - 600 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity (1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) to the emittance beam absorber and 9.6 x 10{sup 14} protons/hour - 60 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity to experiments in the MTA experimental hall. This extremely high intensity implies careful investigation into and application of proper shielding materials and configuration in order to satisfy the following two requirements: (i) to reduce the instantaneous dose rate outside of the experimental enclosure to prescribed levels appropriate for the area considered; (ii) to ensure the civil construction of the hall is capable of additional shielding and, further, that the weight of the shielding is commensurate with the loading specifications of the enclosure, notably the ceiling. A number of scenarios for beam loss at different locations were studied in order to determine the maximum beam intensity which is in compliance with the existing shielding. The modeling was performed with the MARS15 code.

  18. MPS beam control software architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, K.; Crane, M.

    1993-04-01

    The new Machine Protection System (MPS) now being tested at SLAC has a beam control subsystem resident in processors located close to the beam monitoring devices within the machine. There are two types of beam control micros: Algorithm Processors (AP`s) which collect and evaluate data from monitoring devices, and a Supervisor (SUPE) which collects and evaluates data from all the AP`s. The SUPE also receives the global machine beamcode indicating beam presence, and passes it on to the AP`s. The SUPE receives the beamcode pattern from the Master Pattern Generator (MPG) via a shared-memory communication link. MIL-1553 serial communication is used between the SUPE and the AP`s, and between the AP`s and the monitoring devices. Multitasking software is used to allow high priority handling of data evaluation and low priority handling of host/user interfacing and event reporting. Pipelining of data between acquisition and evaluation and reporting is used to accomodate the processing capacity, while still supporting full processing at the 360Hz broadcast rate of the beamcode pattern.

  19. Beam loss reduction by magnetic shielding using beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, J.; Ogiwara, N.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Kinsho, M.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main sources of beam loss in high power accelerators is unwanted stray magnetic fields from magnets near the beam line, which can distort the beam orbit. The most effective way to shield such magnetic fields is to perfectly surround the beam region without any gaps with a soft magnetic high permeability material. This leads to the manufacture of vacuum chambers (beam pipes and bellows) with soft magnetic materials. A Ni-Fe alloy (permalloy) was selected for the material of the pipe parts and outer bellows parts, while a ferritic stainless steel was selected for the flanges. An austenitic stainless steel, which is non-magnetic material, was used for the inner bellows for vacuum tightness. To achieve good magnetic shielding and vacuum performances, a heat treatment under high vacuum was applied during the manufacturing process of the vacuum chambers. Using this heat treatment, the ratio of the integrated magnetic flux density along the beam orbit between the inside and outside of the beam pipe and bellows became small enough to suppress beam orbit distortion. The outgassing rate of the materials with this heat treatment was reduced by one order magnitude compared to that without heat treatment. By installing the beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials as part of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron beam line, the closed orbit distortion (COD) was reduced by more than 80%. In addition, a 95.5% beam survival ratio was achieved by this COD improvement.

  20. Beam Loss and Longitudinal Emittance Growth in SIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M.; Hofmann, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Spiller, P.; Hülsmann, P.; Franchetti, G.; Damerau, H.; König, H. Günter; Klingbeil, H.; Kumm, M.; Moritz, P.; Schütt, P.; Redelbach, A.

    2005-06-01

    Beam losses of several percent occur regularly in SIS. The onset occurs during the RF capture of the beam. Previous studies have revealed that the losses can come from the RF bucket at the start of acceleration being over filled due to the longitudinal bucket acceptance being too small, or due to the mismatch between the mean energy from the UNILAC and synchronous energy of the SIS. The beam losses as measured by a DC beam transformer however show in addition to the sharp initial drop, for the above reasons, a much slower decay in the beam intensity. The speculated cause comes from the incoherent transverse tune shift of the bunched beam, which forces particles into transverse resonant conditions. The longitudinal emittance growth is also another important issue for SIS. Past measurements from Schottky-noise pick-ups have shown a factor of 3-5 increase in the longitudinal emittance depending on the extraction energy; a large factor when compared against expectations from theory. These factors were calculated from the ratio between the normalized relative momentum spread of the DC beam before RF capture and after debunching. In this present work, tomographical techniques have been used to reconstruct the phasespace from a series of bunch profile measurements from a Beam Position Monitor (BPM). Therefore one can find the rate of growth in the longitudinal emittance from a series of high resolution BPM measurements along the RF ramp. Furthermore the initial phasespace density matrix from these reconstructions has been used to generate the initial population of macroparticles for the ESME longitudinal dynamics Particle-In-Cell code, thereby enabling a comparison between the longitudinal emittance growth of the beam under ideal conditions and that of the experiment. The longitudinal emittance growth (rms) during the acceleration (˜540ms) was approximately 20%, and that during the RF capture was estimated to have an upper limit of about 40%. Later measurements have also

  1. Vaccum and beam diagnostic controls for ORIC beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Vacuum and beam diagnostic equipment on beam lines from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, ORIC, is now controlled by a new dedicated system. The new system is based on an industrial programmable logic controller with an IBM AT personal computer providing control room operator interface. Expansion of this system requires minimal reconfiguration and programming, thus facilitating the construction of additional beam lines. Details of the implementation, operation, and performance of the system are discussed. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Beam-loss monitoring system with free-air ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, H.; Shibata, S.; Hiramatsu, S.; Uchino, K.; Takashima, T.

    1980-08-01

    A monitoring system for proton beam losses was installed in the proton synchrotron at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan (KEK). The system consists of 56 air ionization chambers (AIC) for radiation detectors, 56 integrators, 56 variable gain amplifiers, two multiplexers, a computer interface circuit, a manual controller and a high tension power supply. The characteristics of the AIC, time resolution, radiation measurement upper limit saturation, kinetic energy dependence of the sensitivity, chamber activation effect, the beam loss detection system and the results of observations with the monitoring system are described.

  3. Beam loss and radiation effects in the SSC lattice elements

    SciTech Connect

    Baishev, I.S.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V. |

    1990-11-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is designed to be an advanced machine with relatively low beam loss-induced radiation levels. However, a fraction of the beam lost in the lattice due to pp-collisions at the interaction points, beam-gas scattering, bearn-halo scraping, various instabilities and errors will result in the irradiation of conventional and superconducting components of the accelerator and experimental apparatus. The level of the beam loss and its distribution along the machine structure has impact on all of the three crucial radiation effects at the SSC: quenching of the superconducting magnets, survivability of the accelerator and detectors components in the near-beam regions, and influence to the environment. This paper, based on the full-scale Monte Carlo simulation, will explore all major sources of beam loss in the Collider and measures to reduce the irradiation of the accelerator components. Basic parameters of the Super Collider accepted throughout this report are as follows: Proton energy E{sub 0} = 20 TeV, injection energy is 2 TeV, number of protons circulating in each of the collider rings is N = 1.3 {times} 10{sup 14}, circumference is 87.12 km, the transverse normalized emittance {var_epsilon}{sub N}({sigma}) = 1 {pi} mm-mrad, for the regular lattice ({beta} = 305 m) the beam R.M.S. sizes are {sigma} = 0.12 mm at 20 TEV and {sigma} = 0.38 mm at the injection energy. The dipole length is 15.815 m with the effective field length of 15.165 m. The magnetic field map for B{sub 0} = 6.5999 T has been calculated with the POISSON program by Greg Snitchler. The turn angle of each dipole is {alpha} = 1.50027 mrad. The dipole aperture is 50 mm. The two beam pipe diameters are studied 33 and 40 mm. The operating temperature is T{sub 0} = 4.35 K.

  4. Benchmarking of collimation tracking using RHIC beam loss data.

    SciTech Connect

    Robert-Demolaize,G.; Drees, A.

    2008-06-23

    State-of-the-art tracking tools were recently developed at CERN to study the cleaning efficiency of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system. In order to estimate the prediction accuracy of these tools, benchmarking studies can be performed using actual beam loss measurements from a machine that already uses a similar multistage collimation system. This paper reviews the main results from benchmarking studies performed with specific data collected from operations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  5. Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  7. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  8. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2010-09-21

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  9. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  10. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  11. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  12. Aircraft Loss-of-Control Accident Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine M.; Foster, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control remains one of the largest contributors to fatal aircraft accidents worldwide. Aircraft loss-of-control accidents are complex in that they can result from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or (more often) in combination. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents. To gain a better understanding into aircraft loss-of-control events and possible intervention strategies, this paper presents a detailed analysis of loss-of-control accident data (predominantly from Part 121), including worst case combinations of causal and contributing factors and their sequencing. Future potential risks are also considered.

  13. Recording PEP2 Ring Beam Losses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Hendrickson, L.; Krauter, K.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    The PEP2 (e+)(e-) storage rings contain many complex interrelated systems. When the beam aborts, examining a record of the orbit from the time just before the abort can help identify the root cause. At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a system has been developed to continuously record beam orbits from Beam Position Monitors (BPMS) into a circular buffer. When the beam is aborted the buffers are frozen and their contents are stored for later analysis. BPM orbits are saved on a turn by turn basis for 2800 turns in both the high energy ring (HER) and the low energy ring (LER). Each BPM Processor (BPMP) can either monitor the HER or the LER, but not both as the readout of the two rings is multiplexed into a single readout channel. Tools exist as part of the SLAC Control Program (SCP) to collect, display, and save the data. A physicist or operator can choose a few BPMS in which to view all 2800 turns to identify the turn in which the beam went awry; then ask for that specific orbit from all of the BPMS in the storage ring to determine the root cause of the abort.

  14. Three-dimensional particle trajectories and waste beam losses in injection dump beam line of SNS accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Plum, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The SNS ring injection dump beam line has been suffering high beam losses since its commissioning. In order to understand the mechanisms of the beam losses, we have performed 3D simulation studies of the beam line. The 3D models consist of three injection chicane dipoles and one injection dump septum magnet. 3D particle trajectories in the models are computed. We then extend particle optics calculations to the injection dump. Our studies have clearly shown some design and operation problems, that cause beam losses in the injection dump beam line. These include incorrect chicane dipole settings, incorrect position of a chicane dipole, too small aperture of injection dump septum, and inadequate focusing downstream. This paper reports our findings and the remedies to the injection beam loss problems.

  15. A Fast VME Data Acquisition System for Spill Analysis and Beam Loss Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T.; Liakin, D. A.; Forck, P.

    2002-12-01

    Particle counters perform the control of beam loss and slowly extracted currents at the heavy ion synchrotron (SIS) at GSI. For these devices a new data acquisition system has been developed with the main intention to combine the operating purposes beam loss measurement, spill analysis, spill structure measurement and matrix switching functionality in one single assembly. To provide a reasonable digital selection of counters at significant locations a modular VME setup based on the GSI data acquisition software MBS (Multi Branch System) was chosen. An overview of the design regarding the digital electronics and the infrastructure is given. Of main interest in addition to the high performance of the used hardware is the development of a user-friendly software interface for hardware controls, data evaluation and presentation to the operator.

  16. Loss of balance during balance beam walking elicits a multifocal theta band electrocortical response.

    PubMed

    Sipp, Amy R; Gwin, Joseph T; Makeig, Scott; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-11-01

    Determining the neural correlates of loss of balance during walking could lead to improved clinical assessment and treatment for individuals predisposed to falls. We used high-density electroencephalography (EEG) combined with independent component analysis (ICA) to study loss of balance during human walking. We examined 26 healthy young subjects performing heel-to-toe walking on a treadmill-mounted balance beam as well as walking on the treadmill belt (both at 0.22 m/s). ICA identified clusters of electrocortical EEG sources located in or near anterior cingulate, anterior parietal, superior dorsolateral-prefrontal, and medial sensorimotor cortex that exhibited significantly larger mean spectral power in the theta band (4-7 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. Left and right sensorimotor cortex clusters produced significantly less power in the beta band (12-30 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. For each source cluster, we also computed a normalized mean time/frequency spectrogram time locked to the gait cycle during loss of balance (i.e., when subjects stepped off the balance beam). All clusters except the medial sensorimotor cluster exhibited a transient increase in theta band power during loss of balance. Cluster spectrograms demonstrated that the first electrocortical indication of impending loss of balance occurred in the left sensorimotor cortex at the transition from single support to double support prior to stepping off the beam. These findings provide new insight into the neural correlates of walking balance control and could aid future studies on elderly individuals and others with balance impairments.

  17. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  18. Loss of accuracy using smeared properties in composite beam modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning

    Advanced composite materials have broad, proven applications in many engineering systems ranging from sports equipment sectors to components on the space shuttle because of their lightweight characteristics and significantly high stiffness. Together with this merit of composite materials is the challenge of improving computational simulation process for composites analysis. Composite structures, particularly composite laminates, usually consist of many layers with different lay-up angles. The anisotropic and heterogeneous features render 3D finite element analysis (FEA) computationally expensive in terms of the computational time and the computing power. At the constituent level, composite materials are heterogeneous. But quite often one homogenizes each layer of composites, i.e. lamina, and uses the homogenized material properties as averaged (smeared) values of those constituent materials for analysis. This is an approach extensively used in design and analysis of composite laminates. Furthermore, many industries tempted to use smeared properties at the laminate level to further reduce the model of composite structures. At this scale, smeared properties are averaged material properties that are weighted by the layer thickness. Although this approach has the advantage of saving computational time and cost of modeling significantly, the prediction of the structural responses may not be accurate, particularly the pointwise stress distribution. Therefore, it is important to quantify the loss of accuracy when one uses smeared properties. In this paper, several different benchmark problems are carefully investigated in order to exemplify the effect of the smeared properties on the global behavior and pointwise stress distribution of the composite beam. In the classical beam theory, both Newtonian method and variational method include several ad hoc assumptions to construct the model, however, these assumptions are avoided if one uses variational asymptotic method. VABS

  19. Duration of memory loss due to electron beam exposure. Final report Jan-May 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Tilton, B.M.

    1983-08-01

    Electron beam exposure has been shown to produce retrograde amnesia (RA). The objective of this study was to determine the duration of memory loss upon electron beam exposure. It is important to know if exposure produces a memory loss of the events which occurred in the preceding 1 sec or memory loss of the preceding minute's events. The task was a single-trial avoidance paradigm. The animal was placed in a small aversive chamber. After a 90-sec adaptation period, a door opened that provided access to a large, dark, preferred chamber. The time required for the animal to enter the preferred chamber was the measure of interest (T). Once inside the preferred chamber, a 1-sec footshock was delivered. Following the footshock by some preset delay (delta T), the animal was exposed to a 10-microsec, 10-rad electron beam (or X-ray). A second trial on the task was run 2 hr postexposure. The second trial consisted of placing the animal in the aversive chamber and monitoring the time (T') required to enter the preferred chamber. If the electron beam exposure interfered with the animal's ability to recall the shock, T' would be greatly reduced as compared with the sham controls. The exposure delay times used were delta T = 1, 3, 5, and 10 sec.

  20. Beam loss by collimation in a neutralizer duct

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, G.W.; Willmann, P.A.

    1980-04-03

    Beam fractions lost by collimation in a neutralizer duct are computed in x-x' phase space by using three examples of slab beam distributions under a broad range of duct dimensions, beam half-widths, and beam divergences. The results can be used to design compact neutralizers and to specify beam requirements. The computer code ILOST can be used under a broad range of beam conditions to compute the fraction lost by collimation.

  1. Measuring correlations between beam loss and residual radiation in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce C.; Wu, Guan Hong; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    In order to control beam loss for high intensity operation of the Fermilab Main Injector, electronics has been implemented to provide detailed loss measurements using gas-filled ionization monitors. Software to enhance routine operation and studies has been developed and losses are logged for each acceleration cycle. A systematic study of residual radiation at selected locations in the accelerator tunnel have been carried out by logging residual radiation at each of 142 bar-coded locations. We report on fits of the residual radiation measurements to half-life weighted sums of the beam loss data using a few characteristic lifetimes. The data are now available over a multi-year period including residual radiation measurements repeated multiple times during three extended facility shutdown periods. Measurement intervals of a few weeks combined with variable delays between beam off time and the residual measurement permits sensitivity to lifetimes from hours to years. The results allow planning for work in radiation areas to be based on calibrated analytic models.

  2. Controlling Vector Bessel Beams with Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Carl; Grbic, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    Unprecedented control of an electromagnetic wave front is demonstrated with reflectionless metasurfaces that can manipulate vector Bessel beams: cylindrical vector beams with a Bessel profile. First, two metasurfaces are developed to convert linearly and circularly polarized Gaussian beams into vector Bessel beams. Each unit cell of the metasurfaces provides polarization and phase control with high efficiency. Next, the reciprocal process is demonstrated: an incident radially polarized Bessel beam is transformed into collimated, linearly and circularly polarized beams. In this configuration, a planar Bessel beam launcher is integrated with a collimating metasurface lens to realize a low-profile lens-antenna. The lens-antenna achieves a high directivity (exceeding 20 dB) with a subwavelength overall thickness. Finally, a metasurface providing isotropic polarization rotation is used to transform a radially polarized Bessel beam into an azimuthally polarized Bessel beam. This work demonstrates that metasurfaces can be used to generate arbitrary combinations of radial and azimuthal polarizations for applications such as focus shaping or generating tractor beams.

  3. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Sonato, P.

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  4. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Veltri, P.

    2014-02-01

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  5. Controllable laser ion beam generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, D.; Takano, M.; Nagashima, T.; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.

    2016-05-01

    In intense-laser plasma interaction, several issues still remain to be solved for a future laser particle acceleration. In this paper we focus on a bunching of ion beam, which is preaccelerated by a strong electric field generated in a laser plasma interaction. In this study, a nearcritical-density plasma target is illuminated by an intense short laser pulse. A moving strong inductive electric field is generated inside of the target. We have successfully obtained a bunched ion beam in our particle-in-cell simulations in this paper.

  6. The control of powerful neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.

    1986-05-02

    While significant progress has been made in the development of neutral beams for the heating and sustaining of plasmas in large fusion experiments, the control of such devices has largely been a matter of hardware interlocks and operator experience. The need for computer-assisted control becomes more evident, however, with the initiation of multi-beamline experiments. This paper describes a software system that incorporates simple mathematical models coupled to Kalman filters for control of the high power (6 to 8 MW) beams currently under development at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility. Among the principal features of the system are: reduction of a large number of operator variables to just a few (usually one or two); the ability to describe most of the major neutral beams in use and under development; a foundation resting on statistical data analysis and control system principles rather than rules-of-thumb.

  7. Automatic Beam Position Control at LASREF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oothoudt, M. A.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M. V.

    1997-05-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual control to position the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp was used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances. Results and details of the system will be presented.

  8. Automated beam steering using optimal control

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. K.

    2004-01-01

    We present a steering algorithm which, with the aid of a model, allows the user to specify beam behavior throughout a beamline, rather than just at specified beam position monitor (BPM) locations. The model is used primarily to compute the values of the beam phase vectors from BPM measurements, and to define cost functions that describe the steering objectives. The steering problem is formulated as constrained optimization problem; however, by applying optimal control theory we can reduce it to an unconstrained optimization whose dimension is the number of control signals.

  9. Theory of mode-induced beam-particle loss in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Goldston, R.J.; McGuire, K.; Boozer, A.H.; Monticello, D.A.; Park, W.

    1983-04-01

    Large-amplitude rotating magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed to induce significant high-energy-beam particle loss during high-power perpendicular neutral-beam injection on PDX. A Hamiltonian formalism for drift-orbit trajectories in the presence of such modes is used to study induced particle loss analytically and numerically. Results are in good agreement with experiment.

  10. A fast beam loss monitor system for the KEK proton synchrotron complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. A.; Kishiro, J.; Arakawa, D.; Hiramatsu, S.

    1991-06-01

    Efforts to increase the intensity of the KEK proton synchrotron have led to the need for a new fast response beam loss monitor system. The design and some prelimitary test results of a new beam loss monitor system are presented.(AIP)

  11. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  12. Size modulated transition in the fluid-structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pandey, A. K.; Parpia, J. M.; Verbridge, S. S.; Craighead, H. G.; Pratap, R.

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  13. A COMPACTRIO-BASED BEAM LOSS MONITOR FOR THE SNS RF TEST CAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Armstrong, Gary A

    2009-01-01

    An RF Test Cave has been built at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be able to test RF cavities without interfering the SNS accelerator operations. In addition to using thick concrete wall to minimize radiation exposure, a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) must abort the operation within 100 usec when the integrated radiation within the cave exceeds a threshold. We choose the CompactRIO platform to implement the BLM based on its performance, cost-effectiveness, and rapid development. Each in/output module is connected through an FPGA to provide point-by-point processing. Every 10 usec the data is acquired analyzed and compared to the threshold. Data from the FPGA is transferred using DMA to the real-time controller, which communicates to a gateway PC to talk to the SNS control system. The system includes diagnostics to test the hardware and integrates the losses in real-time. In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and results

  14. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-09-26

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

  15. Control and Manipulation of Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2009-01-22

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  16. SYNTHESIZER CONTROLLED BEAM TRANSFER FROM THE AGS TO RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DELONG,J.; BRENNAN,J.M.; FISCHER,W.; HAYES,T.; SMITH,K.; VALENTINO,S.

    2001-06-18

    To ensure minimal losses and to preserve longitudinal emittance, beam is transferred from the AGS to the RHIC bunch to bucket. This requires precision frequency and phase control for synchronization and kicker timing. The required precision is realized with a set of Direct Digital Synthesizers. Each synthesizer can be frequency and phase modulated to align the AGS bunch to the target bucket in the RHIC phase.

  17. Markers of loss of control of hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Casson, Richard Ian; King, Will D.; Godwin, Noah Marshall S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify markers for loss of control of hypertension. DESIGN: Questionnaire administered to patients who had been monitored for 18 months and had had their blood pressure (BP) measured many times. SETTING: Fifty family practices in southeastern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred eighty-five adults with essential hypertension that was initially stable and controlled by medication. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Change in BP (from baseline to mean of three measurements over 18 months) and proportion of patients with BP exceeding threshold values at most follow-up visits. RESULTS: Higher income was associated with an increase in diastolic BP; poor adherence to medication regimens and higher life stress were associated with increases in systolic BP Stress also led to a twofold increase in risk of exceeding BP thresholds. Other factors under study were not related to loss of control. CONCLUSION: Adherence to medication regimens, higher income, and life stress were the only factors associated with elevated BP or loss of control in previously controlled hypertension. PMID:14594101

  18. Particle Rate and Host Accelerator Beam Loss on the MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Adam James

    2011-10-01

    A study is presented of particle rates in the MICE Muon Beamline and their relationship to beam loss produced in ISIS. A brief overview of neutrino physics is presented, together with a discussion on the Neutrino Factory as a motivation for MICE. An overview of MICE itself is then presented, highlighting the need for a systematic understanding of the relationship between the MICE target parameters, ISIS beam loss, and MICE particle rate. The variation of beam loss with target depth is examined and observed to be non-linear. The variation of beam loss with respect to the target dip time in the ISIS cycle is examined and observed to be approximately linear for dip times between 11.1 ms and 12.6 ms after ISIS injection, before tailing at earlier dip times. The variation of beam loss with particle rate is also observed to follow an approximately linear relationship from 0.05 V.ms to 4.7 V.ms beam loss, with a further strong indication that this continues up to 7.1 V.ms. Particle identification using time-of-flight data is used to give an insight into the relative abundances of each particle species present in the MICE beam. Estimates of muon rate are then produced as a function of beam loss. At a level of 2 V.ms beam loss ~10.9 muons per spill for a 3.2 ms spill with negative π → μ optics, and ~31.1 muons per 1 ms spill with positive π → μ optics are observed. Simulations using the ORBIT particle tracking code of the beam loss distributions around the ISIS ring, caused by the MICE target, are also presented and the implications for MICE running discussed.

  19. Parametric Modeling of Electron Beam Loss in Synchrotron Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.; Hartman, E.; Corbett, J.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Paterson, E.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Synchrotron light is used for a wide variety of scientific disciplines ranging from physical chemistry to molecular biology and industrial applications. As the electron beam circulates, random single-particle collisional processes lead to decay of the beam current in time. We report a simulation study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to capture the decay in beam current due to Touschek, Bremsstrahlung, and Coulomb effects. The FP block in the combined model is a parametric description of the beam current decay where model parameters vary as a function of beam operating conditions (e.g. vertical scraper position, RF voltage, number of the bunches, and total beam current). The NN block provides the parameters of the FP model and is trained (through constrained nonlinear optimization) to capture the variation in model parameters as operating condition of the beam changes. Simulation results will be presented to demonstrate that the proposed combined framework accurately models beam decay as well as variation to model parameters without direct access to parameter values in the model.

  20. Collimation system design for beam loss localization with slipstacking injection in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Brown, B.C.; Johnson, D.E.; Koba, K.; Kourbanis, I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; Sidorov, V.I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Results of modeling with the 3-D STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss localization and related radiation effects are presented for the slipstacking injection to the Fermilab Main Injector. Simulations of proton beam loss are done using multi-turn tracking with realistic accelerator apertures, nonlinear fields in the accelerator magnets and time function of the RF manipulations to explain the results of beam loss measurements. The collimation system consists of one primary and four secondary collimators. It intercepts a beam power of 1.6 kW at a scraping rate of 5% of 5.5E+13 ppp, with a beam loss rate in the ring outside the collimation region of 1 W/m or less. Based on thorough energy deposition and radiation modeling, a corresponding collimator design was developed that satisfies all the radiation and engineering constraints.

  1. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  2. Beam loss and backgrounds in the CDF and D0 detectors due to nuclear elastic beam-gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Valery A. Lebedev; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-05-27

    Detailed simulations were performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the Tevatron Collider detectors due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions. It turns out that this component can drive the accelerator-related background rates in the CDF and D0 detectors, exceeding those due to outscattering from collimation system, inelastic beam-gas interactions and other processes [1, 2]. Results of realistic simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes are presented for the interaction region components and the CDF and D0 detectors. It is shown that a steel mask placed upstream of the detectors can reduce the background rates by almost an order of magnitude.

  3. Controlling Second Harmonic Efficiency of Laser Beam Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method is provided for controlling second harmonic efficiency of laser beam interactions. A laser system generates two laser beams (e.g., a laser beam with two polarizations) for incidence on a nonlinear crystal having a preferred direction of propagation. Prior to incidence on the crystal, the beams are optically processed based on the crystal's beam separation characteristics to thereby control a position in the crystal along the preferred direction of propagation at which the beams interact.

  4. Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  5. RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, James R; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2010-01-01

    Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

  6. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates without energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yingli; Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Mingwu; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Yuezhao; Cai, Xiaohong

    2015-12-21

    Using a pair of grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800–2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams.

  7. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF THE BEAM LOSS MONITORING SYSTEM FOR THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.; GASSNER,D.

    2002-05-06

    The SNS to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide a high average intensity 1 GeV beam to produce spallation neutrons. Loss of a even small percentage of this intense beam would result in high radiation. The Beam Loss Monitor (ELM) system must detect such small, long term losses yet be capable of measuring infrequent short high losses. The large dynamic range presents special problems for the system design. Ion chambers will be used as the detectors. A detector originally designed for the FNAL Tevatron, was considered but concerns about ion collection times and low collection efficiency at high loss rates favor a new design. The requirements and design concepts of the proposed approach will be presented. Discussion of the design and testing of the ion chambers and the analog j-Point end electronics will be presented. The overall system design will be described.

  8. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-06-15

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to {+-}21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than {+-}3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  9. Basis for low beam loss in the high-current APT linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Kurennoy, S.S.; Lawrence, G.P.; Ryne, R.D.; Crandall, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    The present evidence that the APT proton linac design will meet its goal of low beam loss operation. The conclusion has three main bases: (1) extrapolation from the understanding of the performance of the 800-MeV LANSCE proton linac at Los Alamos, (2) the theoretical understanding of the dominant halo-forming mechanism in the APT accelerator from physics models and multiparticle simulations, and (3) the conservative approach and key principles underlying the design of the APT linac, which are aimed at minimizing beam halo and providing large apertures to reduce beam loss to a very low value.

  10. Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

    2011-03-28

    A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

  11. H- Beam Loss and Evidence for Intrabeam Stripping in the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Kelsey, Charles T. IV; McCrady, Rodney C.; Pang, Xiaoying

    2012-05-15

    The LANSCE accelerator complex is a multi-beam, multi-user facility that provides high-intensity H{sup +} and H{sup -} particle beams for a variety of user programs. At the heart of the facility is a room temperature linac that is comprised of 100-MeV drift tube and 800-MeV coupled cavity linac (CCL) structures. Although both beams are similar in intensity and emittance at 100 MeV, the beam-loss monitors along the CCL show a trend of increased loss for H{sup -} that is not present for H{sup +}. This difference is attributed to stripping mechanisms that affect H{sup -} and not H{sup +}. We present the results of an analysis of H{sup -} beam loss along the CCL that incorporates beam spill measurements, beam dynamics simulations, analytical models and radiation transport estimates using the MCNPX code. The results indicate a significant fraction of these additional losses result from intrabeam stripping.

  12. Beam loss and collimation in the Fermilab 16 GeV proton driver

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin, Oleg E. Krivosheev and Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2001-07-20

    A high beam power of 1.15 MW in the proposed 16-GeV Proton Driver [1] implies serious constraints on beam losses in the machine. The main concerns are the hands-on maintenance and ground-water activation. Only with a very efficient beam collimation system can one reduce uncontrolled beam losses to an allowable level. The results on tolerable beam loss and on a proposed beam collimation system are summarized in this paper. A multi-turn particle tracking in the accelerator defined by all lattice components with their realistic strengths and aperture restrictions, and halo interactions with the collimators is done with the STRUCT code [2]. Full-scale Monte Carlo hadronic and electromagnetic shower simulations in the lattice elements, shielding, tunnel and surrounding dirt with realistic geometry, materials and magnetic field are done with the MARS14 code [3]. It is shown that the proposed 3-stage collimation system, allows localization of more than 99% of beamloss in a special straight section. Beam loss in the rest of the accelerator is 0.2 W/m on average.

  13. The upgraded data acquisition system for beam loss monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Briegel, C.; Brown, B.C.; Capista, D.; Drennan, C.; Fellenz, B.; Knickerbocker, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Marchionni, A.; Needles, C.; Olson, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    A VME-based data acquisition system for beam-loss monitors has been developed and is in use in the Tevatron and Main Injector accelerators at the Fermilab complex. The need for enhanced beam-loss protection when the Tevatron is operating in collider-mode was the main driving force for the new design. Prior to the implementation of the present system, the beam-loss monitor system was disabled during collider operation and protection of the Tevatron magnets relied on the quench protection system. The new Beam-Loss Monitor system allows appropriate abort logic and thresholds to be set over the full set of collider operating conditions. The system also records a history of beam-loss data prior to a beam-abort event for post-abort analysis. Installation of the Main Injector system occurred in the fall of 2006 and the Tevatron system in the summer of 2007. Both systems were fully operation by the summer of 2008. In this paper we report on the overall system design, provide a description of its normal operation, and show a number of examples of its use in both the Main Injector and Tevatron.

  14. Simulation of the ATLAS SCT barrel module response to LHC beam loss scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P.; Grillo, A. A.; Fadeyev, V.; Spencer, E.; Wilder, M.; Domingo, M.

    2014-03-01

    In the event of beam loss at the LHC, ATLAS Inner Detector components nearest the beam line may be subjected to unusually large amounts of radiation. Understanding their behavior in such an event is important in determining whether they would still function properly. We built a SPICE model of the silicon strip module electrical system to determine the behavior of its elements during a realistic beam loss scenario. We found that the power supply and bias filter characteristics strongly affect the module response in such scenarios. In particular, the following self-limiting phenomena were observed: there is a finite amount of charge initially available on the bias filter capacitors for collection by the strips; the power supply current limit reduces the rate at which the bias filter capacitors' charge can be replenished; the reduced bias voltage leads to a smaller depletion depth in the sensors which results in less collected charge. These effects provide a larger measure of safety during beam loss events than was previously assumed. In particular, the voltage across the coupling capacitor stays below the specifications limit for a wide range of beam loss rates. The current into the ABCD channels exceeds the limit only for very high rates of beam loss.

  15. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2005-06-08

    The increase of beam energy and beam intensity, together with the use of super conducting magnets, opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system, and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data has been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis spaces from the components data to the system configuration.

  16. Stochastic Orbit Loss of Neutral Beam Ions From NSTX Due to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode Avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; Gorelenkova, M; Kubota, S; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Shi, L

    2012-07-11

    Short toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and sometimes a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions occurs. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding center code that incorporates plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are similar to those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary.

  17. Beam Loss due to Foil Scattering in the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the contribution of scattering from the primary stripper foil to losses in the SNS ring, we have carried out calculations using the ORBIT Code aimed at evaluating these losses. These calculations indicate that the probability of beam loss within one turn following a foil hit is ~1.8 10-8 , where is the foil thickness in g/cm2, assuming a carbon foil. Thus, for a typical SNS stripper foil of thickness = 390 g/cm2, the probability of loss within one turn of a foil hit is ~7.0 10-6. This note describes the calculations used to arrive at this result, presents the distribution of these losses around the SNS ring, and compares the calculated results with observed ring losses for a well-tuned production beam.

  18. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.J.

    1998-06-02

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

  19. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  20. Use of beam deflection to control an electron beam wire deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for controlling an electron beam process wherein a wire is melted and deposited on a substrate as a molten pool comprises generating the electron beam with a complex raster pattern, and directing the beam onto an outer surface of the wire to thereby control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool. Directing the beam selectively heats the outer surface of the wire and maintains the position of the wire with respect to the molten pool. An apparatus for controlling an electron beam process includes a beam gun adapted for generating the electron beam, and a controller adapted for providing the electron beam with a complex raster pattern and for directing the electron beam onto an outer surface of the wire to control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool.

  1. Calculating the Loss factor of the LCLS Beam Line Elements for Ultra-Shrot Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2009-10-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE 1.5-15 {angstrom} x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility. Since an ultra-short intense bunch is used in the LCLS operation one might suggest that wake fields, generated in the vacuum chamber, may have an effect on the x-ray production because these fields can change the beam particle energies thereby increasing the energy spread in a bunch. At LCLS a feedback system precisely controls the bunch energy before it enters a beam transport line after the linac. However, in the transport line and later in the undulator section the bunch energy and energy spread are not under feedback control and may change due to wake field radiation, which depends upon the bunch current or on a bunch length. The linear part of the energy spread can be compensated in the upstream linac; the energy loss in the undulator section can be compensated by varying the K-parameter of the undulators, however we need a precise knowledge of the wake fields in this part of the machine. Resistive wake fields are known and well calculated. We discuss an additional part of the wake fields, which comes from the different vacuum elements like bellows, BPMs, transitions, vacuum ports, vacuum valves and others. We use the code 'NOVO' together with analytical estimations for the wake potential calculations.

  2. A demonstration of beam intensity modulation without loss of charge

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, G.H.; Rawnsley, W.R.; Lee, R.

    1995-09-01

    The large acceptance and the simplicity of H{sup {minus}} extraction makes practical unusual modes of cyclotron operation. RF equipment, initially installed for H{sup {minus}} extraction at TRIUMF, has been used to modulate the beam intensity at the extraction radius. This equipment consists of a 92 MHz, 150 kV cavity (AAC) and an RFD (11.5 MHz, 20 kV). The AAC augments the acceleration provided by the main 23 MHz, RF system; the RFD excites radial betatron oscillations. These devices may be operated at frequencies slightly different from their design multiple; their effect then beats with the main RF. In this mode the AAC, for example, alternately reduces the rate of acceleration, thus increasing the overlap of turns, then enhances it, sweeping the clustered turns onto a probe or foil. Operating the AAC or RFD in this manner gathers the bulk of the charge into peaks a few microseconds wide and spaced between 6 and 50 {micro}s. Changing the frequency offset alters the spacing. The peak to valley ratio was 23:1 and all beam was transmitted to the extraction radius.

  3. Location of Maximum Credible Beam Losses in LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Stan

    2010-12-13

    The memo describes the maximum credible beam the LCLS injector can produce and lose at various locations along the beamline. The estimation procedure is based upon three previous reports [1, 2, 3]. While specific numbers have been updated to accurately reflect the present design parameters, the conclusions are very similar to those given in Ref 1. The source of the maximum credible beam results from the explosive electron emission from the photocathode if the drive laser intensity exceeds the threshold for plasma production. In this event, the gun's RF field can extract a large number of electrons from this plasma which are accelerated out of the gun and into the beamline. This electron emission persists until it has depleted the gun of all its energy. Hence the number of electrons emitted per pulse is limited by the amount of stored RF energy in the gun. It needs to be emphasized that this type of emission is highly undesirable, as it causes permanent damage to the cathode.

  4. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control the flexural oscillations of large structures in space is investigated. Flexural oscillations are excited by impulsive loads. The vibratory response can degrade the pointing accuracy of cameras and antennae, and can cause high stresses at structural node points. Piezoelectric actuators have the advantage of exerting localized bending moments. In this way, vibration is controlled without exciting rigid body modes. The actuators are used in collocated sensor/driver pairs to form a feedback control system. The sensor produces a voltage that is proportional to the dynamic stress at the sensor location, and the driver produces a force that is proportional to the voltage applied to it. The analog control system amplifies and phase shifts the sensor signal to produce the voltage signal that is applied to the driver. The feedback control is demonstrated to increase the first mode damping in a cantilever beam by up to 100 percent, depending on the amplifier gain. The damping efficiency of the control system when the piezoelectrics are not optimally positioned at points of high stress in the beam is evaluated.

  5. Incoherent vertical ion losses during multiturn stacking cooling beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syresin, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    The efficiency of the multiturn ion injection with electron cooling depends on two parameters, namely, cooling efficiency and ion lifetime. The lifetime of freshly injected ions is usually shorter than the lifetime of strongly cooled stacked ions. Freshly injected ions are lost in the vertical direction because the vertical acceptance of the synchrotron is usually a few times smaller than the horizontal acceptance. Incoherent vertical losses of freshly injected ions arise from their multiple scattering by residual gas atoms and transverse diffusion caused by stack noise. Reduced ion lifetime limits the multiturn injection efficiency. Analytical estimations and BETACOOL-based numerical evaluations of the vertical ion losses during multiturn injection are presented in comparison with the experimental data obtained at the HIMAC synchrotron and the S-LSR storage ring.

  6. Control of transformer losses in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    A new standard issued by the Canadian Standards Association, CSA C802, imposes maximum losses on transformers 10 MVA and below. Included are Distribution Transformers, small Power Transformers, and Dry Types. Implementation will start though the publishing in mid 1994 of the Gazette by Ontario`s Ministry of Energy. The Gazette will call for conformance to C802 after a lead time of one year to eighteen months, depending on the type of transformer. Other provincial energy ministries have been awaiting this development and are expected to follow suit shortly thereafter. The federal department, Natural Resources Canada, is also attuned to these actions and is expected to issue supportive legislation which will control movement of transformers across provincial and national borders.

  7. Effects of Optical Loss Factors on Heliostat Field Layout for Beam-Down Solar Concentrating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Takamatsu, Tadahiko; Yuasa, Minoru; Kajita, Rina; Yamamoto, Takashi

    A methodology to give an optimal layout of a group of heliostats has been developed for beam-down concentrating solar tower systems. Given the maximum solar power together with optical parameters, the method determines an optimal configuration of a heliostat field around a tower. Various optical losses such as cosine factor, shadowing and blocking at heliostats are considered in the calculation. Furthermore, spillage at the receiver is taken into account due to the spread of light caused by the effects of a finite solar disk, flat facet and various stochastic errors in optical hardware and control. It is found the effect of spillage becomes significant at heliostats from the tower at the distance farther than four times of upper focus height of the reflector when receiver diameter is one fifteenth of the height and dominates the configuration of the optimal heliostat layout.

  8. Optimal control of the Starfire Beam Director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanier, Troy V.

    1992-12-01

    The Starfire Beam Director (SBD) is located at the Starfire Optical Range at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The SBD capabilities include tracking celestial objects and active or passive tracking of artificial satellites to support the Phillips Laboratory Ground Based Laser Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing (GBL ATP) program. The pointing and tracking accuracy needed to support such experiments is micron rad to sub-grad level. To accomplish this goal requires precise pointing of the massive 6 ton 1-meter clear aperture coelostat. Optimal control design techniques are used to develop a controller to meet the stringent pointing requirements. A nominal linear state-space model was built which included gimbal dynamics, plant disturbances, and sensor noise. Then optimal control design techniques were used to develop unity feedback and two degree of freedom controllers. The various controllers were simulated with the coelostat truth model, which incorporated the higher frequency control loop and motor dynamics, nonlinearities, plant disturbances, sensor noise, and discrete control effects. The best of the designs, the H2 unity feedback controller, was compared and contrasted with the performance of the controller currently being used, which was obtained by classical control design. The H2 controller exceeded tracking requirements and in most areas performed better than the current controller.

  9. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental

  10. First calibration of a Cherenkov beam loss sensor at ALICE using SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intermite, A.; Putignano, M.; Wolski, A.

    2012-06-01

    The need for real-time monitoring of beam losses, including evaluation of their intensity and localization of their exact position, together with the possibility to overcome the limitations due to the reduced space for the diagnostics, makes exploitation of the Cherenkov effect in optical fibres, one of the most suitable candidates for beam loss monitoring. In this article, we report on the first tests of an optical fibre beam loss monitor based on large numerical aperture pure silica fibres and silicon photomultipliers. The tests were carried out at the ALICE accelerator research and development facility, Daresbury Laboratories, UK. In contrast to the results already published where the fibres are longitudinally placed with respect to the accelerator beam path and the losses are multidirectional charged particle showers, for the first time a dedicated set-up with an incident accelerator beam impinging directly on the optical fibre was used for optimizing the collection efficiency of the Cherenkov effect as a function of the incident angle by changing the fibre direction. For this purpose large core fibres were used together with the latest generation silicon detector instead of the standard photomultiplier tubes commonly used for Cherenkov beam loss monitoring. The experiments described in this contribution aim to demonstrate the suitability of the optical fibre sensor for loss monitoring, to optimize the Collection Efficiency (CE) of the Cherenkov photons inside the fibre as a function of the particle incident angle, to calibrate the sensor and calculate its sensitivity, and to understand the limits of temporal resolution of losses from different bunches in the accelerator.

  11. Summary of beam quality diagnostics and control working group

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, John; Piot, Philippe; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    The working group on beam quality, diagnostics, and control at the 12th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. The generation of bright charged-particle beams (in particular electron and positron beams), along with state-of-the-art beam diagnostics and synchronization were discussed.

  12. Digital Controller For Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem: Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Homayoon; Voisinet, Leeann

    1995-01-01

    A report presents additional information about laser-beam-steering apparatus described in "Digital Controller for Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem" (NPO-19193) and "More About Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19381). Reiterates basic principles of operation of beam-steering subsystem, with emphasis on modes of operation, basic design concepts, and initial experiments on partial prototype of apparatus.

  13. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    DOE PAGES

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while inmore » other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.« less

  14. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while in other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.

  15. Active control of buckling of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Tampe, L.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using the rapidly growing technology of the shape memory alloys actuators in actively controlling the buckling of large flexible structures is investigated. The need for such buckling control systems is becoming inevitable as the design trends of large space structures have resulted in the use of structural members that are long, slender, and very flexible. In addition, as these truss members are subjected mainly to longitudinal loading they become susceptible to structural instabilities due to buckling. Proper control of such instabilities is essential to the effective performance of the structures as stable platforms for communication and observation. Mathematical models are presented that simulate the dynamic characteristics of the shape memory actuator, the compressive structural members, and the associated active control system. A closed-loop computer-controlled system is designed, based on the developed mathematical models, and implemented to control the buckling of simple beams. The performance of the computer-controlled system is evaluated experimentally and compared with the theoretical predictions to validate the developed models. The obtained results emphasize the importance of buckling control and suggest the potential of the shape memory actuators as attractive means for controlling structural deformation in a simple and reliable way.

  16. Measured and simulated heavy-ion beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, P. D.; Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.; Valentino, G.; Wollmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN pushes forward to new regimes in terms of beam energy and intensity. In view of the combination of very energetic and intense beams together with sensitive machine components, in particular the superconducting magnets, the LHC is equipped with a collimation system to provide protection and intercept uncontrolled beam losses. Beam losses could cause a superconducting magnet to quench, or in the worst case, damage the hardware. The collimation system, which is optimized to provide a good protection with proton beams, has shown a cleaning efficiency with heavy-ion beams which is worse by up to two orders of magnitude. The reason for this reduced cleaning efficiency is the fragmentation of heavy-ion beams into isotopes with a different mass to charge ratios because of the interaction with the collimator material. In order to ensure sufficient collimation performance in future ion runs, a detailed theoretical understanding of ion collimation is needed. The simulation of heavy-ion collimation must include processes in which 82+208Pb ions fragment into dozens of new isotopes. The ions and their fragments must be tracked inside the magnetic lattice of the LHC to determine their loss positions. This paper gives an overview of physical processes important for the description of heavy-ion loss patterns. Loss maps simulated by means of the two tools ICOSIM [1,2] and the newly developed STIER (SixTrack with Ion-Equivalent Rigidities) are compared with experimental data measured during LHC operation. The comparison shows that the tool STIER is in better agreement.

  17. A Loss Tolerant Rate Controller for Reliable Multicast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Todd

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the design, specification, and performance of a Loss Tolerant Rate Controller (LTRC) for use in controlling reliable multicast senders. The purpose of this rate controller is not to adapt to congestion (or loss) on a per loss report basis (such as per received negative acknowledgment), but instead to use loss report information and perceived state to decide more prudent courses of action for both the short and long term. The goal of this controller is to be responsive to congestion, but not overly reactive to spurious independent loss. Performance of the controller is verified through simulation results.

  18. Modeling the response of a fast ion loss detector using orbit tracing techniques in a neutral beam prompt-loss study on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Muscatello, C. M.; Zhu, Y. B.; Fisher, R. K.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Nazikian, R.

    2010-10-15

    A numerical model describing the expected measurements of neutral beam prompt-losses by a newly commissioned fast ion loss detector (FILD) in DIII-D is presented. This model incorporates the well understood neutral beam deposition profiles from all eight DIII-D beamlines to construct a prompt-loss source distribution. The full range of detectable ion orbit phase space available to the FILD is used to calculate ion trajectories that overlap with neutral beam injection footprints. Weight functions are applied to account for the level of overlap between these detectable orbits and the spatial and velocity (pitch) properties of ionized beam neutrals. An experimental comparison is performed by firing each neutral beam individually in the presence of a ramping plasma current. Fast ion losses determined from the model are in agreement with measured losses.

  19. Modeling the response of a fast ion loss detector using orbit tracing techniques in a neutral beam prompt-loss study on the DIII-D tokamak.

    PubMed

    Pace, D C; Fisher, R K; García-Muñoz, M; Darrow, D S; Heidbrink, W W; Muscatello, C M; Nazikian, R; Van Zeeland, M A; Zhu, Y B

    2010-10-01

    A numerical model describing the expected measurements of neutral beam prompt-losses by a newly commissioned fast ion loss detector (FILD) in DIII-D is presented. This model incorporates the well understood neutral beam deposition profiles from all eight DIII-D beamlines to construct a prompt-loss source distribution. The full range of detectable ion orbit phase space available to the FILD is used to calculate ion trajectories that overlap with neutral beam injection footprints. Weight functions are applied to account for the level of overlap between these detectable orbits and the spatial and velocity (pitch) properties of ionized beam neutrals. An experimental comparison is performed by firing each neutral beam individually in the presence of a ramping plasma current. Fast ion losses determined from the model are in agreement with measured losses.

  20. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E.J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas (P{sub NBI}=15 thinspthinspMW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14thinspthinspMeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40{percent} beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length {Delta}t=70 thinspthinspms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita {ital et al.,} Nucl.thinspthinspFusion {bold 37}, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R. V.; McCune, D. C.; Medley, S. S.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E. J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R. B.; Zweben, S. J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas ( PNBI = 15 MW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14 MeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40% beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length Δt = 70 ms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita et al., Nucl. Fusion 37, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly.

  2. Predicting Loss-of-Control Boundaries Toward a Piloting Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Jonathan; Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2012-01-01

    This work presents an approach to predicting loss-of-control with the goal of providing the pilot a decision aid focused on maintaining the pilot's control action within predicted loss-of-control boundaries. The predictive architecture combines quantitative loss-of-control boundaries, a data-based predictive control boundary estimation algorithm and an adaptive prediction method to estimate Markov model parameters in real-time. The data-based loss-of-control boundary estimation algorithm estimates the boundary of a safe set of control inputs that will keep the aircraft within the loss-of-control boundaries for a specified time horizon. The adaptive prediction model generates estimates of the system Markov Parameters, which are used by the data-based loss-of-control boundary estimation algorithm. The combined algorithm is applied to a nonlinear generic transport aircraft to illustrate the features of the architecture.

  3. Cavity loss factors of non-relativistic beams for Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Kazakov, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Cavity loss factor calculation is an important part of the total cryolosses estimation for the super conductive (SC) accelerating structures. There are two approaches how to calculate cavity loss factors, the integration of a wake potential over the bunch profile and the addition of loss factors for individual cavity modes. We applied both methods in order to get reliable results for non-relativistic beam. The time domain CST solver was used for a wake potential calculation and the frequency domain HFSS code was used for the cavity eigenmodes spectrum findings. Finally we present the results of cavity loss factors simulations for a non-relativistic part of the ProjectX and analyze it for various beam parameters.

  4. Stability of adaptive control of a light beam in the presence of nonstationary thermal blooming in a moving medium

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, K.D.

    1988-06-01

    The adaptive control problem for a nonlinearly propagating light beam in a moving atmosphere presupposes continuous optimization of the beam parameters while the characteristics of the medium are varying. If the time scales of such variations are comparable to the characteristic times for the establishment of a thermal lens along the ray path, the beam can be controlled under highly nonstationary propagation conditions. We investigate the mechanism of stability loss during adaptive focusing of a light beam subject to wind refraction. In the aberrationless approximation, we examine the dynamics of beam parameters controlled by adaptive systems capable of operating at different speeds.

  5. The Evaluation of the Residual Dose Caused by the Large-Angle Foil Scattering Beam Loss for the High Intensity Beam Operation in the J-PARC RCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Kazami; Harada, Hiroyuki; Hotchi, Hideaki; Saha, Pranab K.; Kinsho, Michikazu

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) has adopted the multi-turn charge-exchange injection scheme that uses H- beams. During injection, both the injected and circulating beams scatter from the charge-exchange foil. Therefore, the beam loss caused by the large-angle scattering from the foil occurs downstream of the injection point. For countermeasure against the uncontrolled beam loss, a new collimation system was developed and installed in the summer shutdown period in 2011. During beam commissioning, this uncontrolled beam loss was successfully localized for a 300 kW beam. Since the present target power of the RCS is 1 MW, the accurate simulation model to reproduce experimental results has been constructed in order to evaluate residual dose at higher power operation.

  6. Multiple-electron losses in uranium ion beams in heavy ion synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozyk, L.; Chill, F.; Litsarev, M. S.; Tolstikhina, I. Yu.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Charge changing processes as the result of collisions with residual gas particles are the main cause of beam loss in high energy medium charge state heavy ion beams. To investigate the magnitude of this effect for heavy ion synchrotrons like the planned SIS100 at GSI, the multiple-electron and the total electron-loss cross sections are calculated for Uq+ ions, q = 10, 28, 40, 73, colliding with typical gas components H2, He, C, N2, O2, and Ar at ion energies E = 1 MeV/u-10 GeV/u. The total electron-capture cross sections for U28+ and U73+ ions interacting with these gases are also calculated. Most of these cross sections are new and presented for the first time. Calculated charge-changing cross sections are used to determine the ion-beam lifetimes τ for U28+ ions which agree well with the recently measured values at SIS18/GSI in the energy range E = 10-200 MeV/u. Using simulations made by the StrahlSim code with the reference ion U28+, it is found that in SIS100 the beam loss caused by single and multiple electron losses has only little impact on the residual gas density due to the high efficiency of the ion catcher system.

  7. Distributed beam loss monitor based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Yu; Emanov, F. A.; Petrenko, A. V.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses a distributed beam loss monitor which is based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber and which has been installed at the VEPP-5 Injection Complex at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The principle of the device operation consists in detecting the Cherenkov radiation generated in an optical fiber by relativistic charged particles that are produced in an electromagnetic shower when highly relativistic beam particles (electrons or positrons) hit the accelerator vacuum chamber wall. Our experiments used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to detect the Cherenkov light. Knowing when the PMT signal arrives tells us where the beam loss occurs. Using a 20-m-long optical fiber allowed a detector spatial resolution of 3 m. The way to improve the resolution is to optimize the monitor working conditions and optical fiber and PMT parameters, potentially leading to a resolution of as fine as 0.5 m according to our estimates.

  8. Enhanced relativistic-electron-beam energy loss in warm dense aluminum.

    PubMed

    Vaisseau, X; Debayle, A; Honrubia, J J; Hulin, S; Morace, A; Nicolaï, Ph; Sawada, H; Vauzour, B; Batani, D; Beg, F N; Davies, J R; Fedosejevs, R; Gray, R J; Kemp, G E; Kerr, S; Li, K; Link, A; McKenna, P; McLean, H S; Mo, M; Patel, P K; Park, J; Peebles, J; Rhee, Y J; Sorokovikova, A; Tikhonchuk, V T; Volpe, L; Wei, M; Santos, J J

    2015-03-01

    Energy loss in the transport of a beam of relativistic electrons in warm dense aluminum is measured in the regime of ultrahigh electron beam current density over 2×10^{11}  A/cm^{2} (time averaged). The samples are heated by shock compression. Comparing to undriven cold solid targets, the roles of the different initial resistivity and of the transient resistivity (upon target heating during electron transport) are directly observable in the experimental data, and are reproduced by a comprehensive set of simulations describing the hydrodynamics of the shock compression and electron beam generation and transport. We measured a 19% increase in electron resistive energy loss in warm dense compared to cold solid samples of identical areal mass. PMID:25793822

  9. Enhanced relativistic-electron-beam energy loss in warm dense aluminum.

    PubMed

    Vaisseau, X; Debayle, A; Honrubia, J J; Hulin, S; Morace, A; Nicolaï, Ph; Sawada, H; Vauzour, B; Batani, D; Beg, F N; Davies, J R; Fedosejevs, R; Gray, R J; Kemp, G E; Kerr, S; Li, K; Link, A; McKenna, P; McLean, H S; Mo, M; Patel, P K; Park, J; Peebles, J; Rhee, Y J; Sorokovikova, A; Tikhonchuk, V T; Volpe, L; Wei, M; Santos, J J

    2015-03-01

    Energy loss in the transport of a beam of relativistic electrons in warm dense aluminum is measured in the regime of ultrahigh electron beam current density over 2×10^{11}  A/cm^{2} (time averaged). The samples are heated by shock compression. Comparing to undriven cold solid targets, the roles of the different initial resistivity and of the transient resistivity (upon target heating during electron transport) are directly observable in the experimental data, and are reproduced by a comprehensive set of simulations describing the hydrodynamics of the shock compression and electron beam generation and transport. We measured a 19% increase in electron resistive energy loss in warm dense compared to cold solid samples of identical areal mass.

  10. APPARATUS FOR ELECTRON BEAM HEATING CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Jones, W.H.; Reece, J.B.

    1962-09-18

    An improved electron beam welding or melting apparatus is designed which utilizes a high voltage rectifier operating below its temperature saturation region to decrease variations in electron beam current which normally result from the gas generated in such apparatus. (AEC)

  11. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2004-11-10

    The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration.

  12. Aircraft Loss of Control Causal Factors and Mitigation Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control is the leading cause of jet fatalities worldwide. Aside from their frequency of occurrence, accidents resulting from loss of aircraft control seize the public s attention by yielding a large number of fatalities in a single event. In response to the rising threat to aviation safety, the NASA Aviation Safety Program has conducted a study of the loss of control problem. This study gathered four types of information pertaining to loss of control accidents: (1) statistical data; (2) individual accident reports that cite loss of control as a contributing factor; (3) previous meta-analyses of loss of control accidents; and (4) inputs solicited from aircraft manufacturers, air carriers, researchers, and other industry stakeholders. Using these information resources, the study team identified the causal factors that were cited in the greatest number of loss of control accidents, and which were emphasized most by industry stakeholders. This report describes the study approach, the key causal factors for aircraft loss of control, and recommended mitigation strategies to make near-term impacts, mid-term impacts, and Next Generation Air Transportation System impacts on the loss of control accident statistics

  13. Summary Report on Beam and Radiation Generation, Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D. F.; Power, J. G.

    2009-01-22

    The discussions of the working group on beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control (working group 6) at the 2008 advanced accelerator concepts workshop are summarized. The discussions concerned electron injectors, phase space manipulation, beam diagnostics, pulse train generation, intense beam physics, and radiation generation.

  14. Generation of stochastic electromagnetic beams with complete controllable coherence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xudong; Chang, Chengcheng; Chen, Ziyang; Lin, Zhili; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-09-19

    We generate a stochastic electromagnetic beam (SEB) with complete controllable coherence, that is, the coherence degree can be controlled independently along two mutually perpendicular directions. We control the coherence of the SEB by adjusting the phase modulation magnitude applied onto two crossed phase only spatial light modulators. We measure the beam's coherence properties using Young's interference experiment, as well as the beam propagation factor. It is shown that the experimental results are consistent with our theoretical predictions. PMID:27661897

  15. Evaluation of Beam Loss and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Doyle, E.; Ferrari, A.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Smith, J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.; /CERN

    2011-11-07

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  16. Optimization of electron beam patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane mask edge roughness for low-loss silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Michael G.; Chen, Li; Burr, Justin R.; Reano, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a multiparameter fabrication study designed to reduce the line edge roughness (LER) of electron beam (e-beam) patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane resist for the purpose of producing low-loss silicon strip waveguides. Reduced mask roughness was achieved for 50°C pre-exposure baking, 5000 μC/cm2 dose with a beam spot size more than twice as large as the electron beam step size, development in 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide and postdevelopment baking with rapid thermal annealing in an O2 ambient at 1000°C. The LER caused by pattern fracturing and stage stitches was reduced with multipass writing and per-pass linear and rotational offsets. Si strip waveguides patterned with the optimized mask have root-mean-square sidewall roughness of 2.1 nm with a correlation length of 94 nm, as measured by three-dimensional atomic force microscopy. Measured optical propagation losses of these waveguides across the telecommunications C-band were 2.5 and 2.8 dB/cm for the transverse magnetic and transverse electric modes, respectively. These reduced loss waveguides enable the fabrication of advanced planar lightwave circuit topologies.

  17. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection. PMID:26932000

  18. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  19. Polarisation splitting of laser beams by large angles with minimal reflection losses

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, B L

    2006-05-31

    New crystal anisotropic prisms for splitting orthogonally polarised components of laser radiation by large angles with minimal reflection losses caused by the Brewster refraction and total internal reflection of polarised waves from the crystal-air interface are considered and the method for their calculation is described. It is shown that, by assembling glue-free combinations of two or three prisms, thermally stable beamsplitters can be fabricated, which are free from the beam astigmatism and the wave dispersion of the output angles of the beams. The parameters and properties of new beamsplitters are presented in a convenient form in figures and tables. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Aircraft Accident Prevention: Loss-of-Control Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwatny, Harry G.; Dongmo, Jean-Etienne T.; Chang, Bor-Chin; Bajpai, Guarav; Yasar, Murat; Belcastro, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of fatal aircraft accidents are associated with loss-of-control . Yet the notion of loss-of-control is not well-defined in terms suitable for rigorous control systems analysis. Loss-of-control is generally associated with flight outside of the normal flight envelope, with nonlinear influences, and with an inability of the pilot to control the aircraft. The two primary sources of nonlinearity are the intrinsic nonlinear dynamics of the aircraft and the state and control constraints within which the aircraft must operate. In this paper we examine how these nonlinearities affect the ability to control the aircraft and how they may contribute to loss-of-control. Examples are provided using NASA s Generic Transport Model.

  1. Numerical study for beam loss occurring for wide-ranging transverse injection painting and its mitigation scenario in the J-PARC 3-GeV RCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchi, Hideaki; Tani, Norio; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-04-01

    In the J-PARC 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), transverse injection painting is utilized to manipulate the transverse beam profile according to the requirements from the downstream facilities as well as to mitigate the space-charge induced beam loss in RCS. Therefore, a flexible control is required for the transverse painting area. But now the available range of transverse painting is limited to small area due to beta function beating caused by the edge focus of injection bump magnets which operate during the beam injection period. This beta function beating additionally excites various random betatron resonances through a distortion of the lattice super-periodicity, causing a shrinkage of the dynamic aperture during the injection period. This decrease of the dynamic aperture leads to extra beam loss at present when applying large transverse painting. For beta function beating caused by the edge focus, we proposed a correction scheme with additional pulse-type quadrupole correctors. In this paper, we will discuss the feasibility and effectiveness of this correction scheme for expanding the transverse injection painting area with no extra beam loss, while considering the beam loss and its mitigation mechanisms, based on numerical simulations.

  2. Controllable Airy-like beams induced by tunable phase patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Qian, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally observe a novel family of Airy-like beams. First, we theoretically investigate the physical generation of our proposed controllable Airy-like beams by introducing a rotation angle factor into the phase function, which can regulate and flexibly control the beam wavefront. Meanwhile we can also readily control the main lobes of these beams to follow appointed parabolic trajectories using the rotation angle factor. We also demonstrate that the controllable Airy-like beams lack the properties of being diffraction-free and self-healing. The experiments are performed and the results are in accord with the theoretical simulations. We believe that the intriguing characteristics of our proposed Airy-like beams could provide more degrees of freedom, and are likely to give rise to new applications and lend versatility to the emerging field.

  3. Specialty flat-top beam delivery fibers with controlled beam parameter product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollivet, C.; Farley, K.; Conroy, M.; Abramczyk, J.; Belke, S.; Becker, F.; Tankala, K.

    2016-03-01

    Beam delivery fibers have been used widely for transporting the optical beams from the laser to the subject of irradiation in a variety of markets including industrial, medical and defense applications. Standard beam delivery fibers range from 50 to 1500 μm core diameter and are used to guide CW or pulsed laser light, generated by solid state, fiber or diode lasers. Here, we introduce a novel fiber technology capable of simultaneously controlling the beam profile and the angular divergence of single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) beams using a single-optical fiber. Results of beam transformation from a SM to a MM beam with flat-top intensity profile are presented in the case of a controlled BPP at 3.8 mm*mrad. The scaling capabilities of this flat-top fiber design to achieve a range of BPP values while ensuring a flat-top beam profile are discussed. In addition, we demonstrate, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the homogenizer capabilities of this novel technology, able to transform random MM beams into uniform flat-top beam profiles with very limited impact on the beam brightness. This study is concluded with a discussion on the scalability of this fiber technology to fit from 50 up to 1500 μm core fibers and its potential for a broader range of applications.

  4. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  5. The impact of loss of control on movement BCIs.

    PubMed

    Reuderink, Boris; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Anton

    2011-12-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are known to suffer from spontaneous changes in the brain activity. If changes in the mental state of the user are reflected in the brain signals used for control, the behavior of a BCI is directly influenced by these states. We investigate the influence of a state of loss of control in a variant of Pacman on the performance of BCIs based on motor control. To study the effect a temporal loss of control has on the BCI performance, BCI classifiers were trained on electroencephalography (EEG) recorded during the normal control condition, and the classification performance on segments of EEG from the normal and loss of control condition was compared. Classifiers based on event-related desynchronization unexpectedly performed significantly better during the loss of control condition; for the event-related potential classifiers there was no significant difference in performance.

  6. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  7. Vibration Control of a Rotating EULER-BERNOULLI Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DIKEN, H.

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, vibration control of a rotating Euler-Bernoulli beam is considered. It is assumed that the fixed-free elastic beam is attached to the servomotor which uses PD control to achieve the desired angular rotation, at the same time, the shear force measured at the root of the beam is used as a feedback to control the beam tip vibration. Mode summation techniques and Laplace domain synthesis techniques are used to analyze the system. Parametric transfer functions relating beam tip motion to the desired rotation and beam rotation to the desired input rotation are obtained. One parameter is the frequency ratio between the natural frequency of the beam and the frequency of the control system, second parameter is the ratio between the shear force feedback gain and the control damping. Stability conditions with respect to these parameters are given. The effect of these parameters on the rotational motion and the beam tip vibration is discussed. Some values of these parameters that make possible desired rotational motion with suppressed tip vibration are suggested. Analysis and results of this work can also be applied to the bending strain feedback and tip velocity feedback control of a rotating Euler-Bernoulli beam.

  8. Reducing the extraction loss via laser notching the H- beam at the Booster injection revolution frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    With the requirement for more protons per hour from Booster, the radiation is a limiting factor. Laser notching the H{sup -} beam at the Booster injection revolution frequency and properly aligning those notches on top of each other at the injection and relative to the trigger of firing extraction kickers can remove most of the extraction loss caused by the slow rise time of the kicker field.

  9. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    SciTech Connect

    Malumbela, Goitseone; Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  10. DEVICE CONTROL TOOL FOR CEBAF BEAM DIAGNOSTICS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2008-02-11

    Continuously monitoring the beam quality in the CEBAF accelerator, a variety of beam diagnostics software created at Jefferson Lab makes a significant contribution to very high availability of the machine for nuclear physics experiments. The interface between this software and beam instrumentation hardware components is provided by a device control tool, which is optimized for beam diagnostics tasks. As a part of the device/driver development framework at Jefferson Lab, this tool is very easy to support and extend to integrate new beam instrumentation components. All device control functions are based on the configuration (ASCII text) files that completely define the used hardware interface standards (CAMAC, VME, RS-232, GPIB, etc.) and communication protocols. The paper presents the main elements of the device control tool for beam diagnostics software at Jefferson Lab.

  11. Highly accurate servo control of reference beam angle in holographic memory with polarized servo beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Makoto; Ogata, Takeshi; Yamada, Kenichiro; Yamazaki, Kazuyoshi; Shimada, Kenichi

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new servo technique for controlling the reference beam angle in angular multiplexing holographic memory to attain higher capacity and higher speed data archiving. An orthogonally polarized beam with an incident angle slightly different from that of the reference beam is newly applied to the optics. The control signal for the servo is generated as the difference between the diffracted light intensities of these two beams from a hologram. The incident angle difference between the beams to the medium was optimized as sufficient properties of the control signal were obtained. The high accuracy of the control signal with an angle error lower than 1.5 mdeg was successfully confirmed in the simulations and experiments.

  12. Method for measuring and controlling beam current in ion beam processing

    DOEpatents

    Kearney, Patrick A.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2003-04-29

    A method for producing film thickness control of ion beam sputter deposition films. Great improvements in film thickness control is accomplished by keeping the total current supplied to both the beam and suppressor grids of a radio frequency (RF) in beam source constant, rather than just the current supplied to the beam grid. By controlling both currents, using this method, deposition rates are more stable, and this allows the deposition of layers with extremely well controlled thicknesses to about 0.1%. The method is carried out by calculating deposition rates based on the total of the suppressor and beam currents and maintaining the total current constant by adjusting RF power which gives more consistent values.

  13. TFTR neutral beam control and monitoring for DT operations

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Chu, J.

    1995-12-31

    Record fusion power output has recently been obtained in TFTR with the injection of deuterium and tritium neutral beams. This significant achievement was due in part to the controls, software, and data processing capabilities added to the neutral beam system for DT operations. Chief among these improvements was the addition of SUN workstations and large dynamic data storage to the existing Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition (CICADA) system. Essentially instantaneous look back over the recent shot history has been provided for most beam waveforms and analysis results. Gas regulation controls allowing remote switchover between deuterium and tritium were also added. With these tools, comparison of the waveforms and data of deuterium and tritium for four test conditioning pulses quickly produced reliable tritium setpoints. Thereafter, all beam conditioning was performed with deuterium, thus saving the tritium supply for the important DT injection shots. The lookback capability also led to modifications of the gas system to improve reliability and to control ceramic valve leakage by backbiasing. Other features added to improve the reliability and availability of DT neutral beam operations included master beamline controls and displays, a beamline thermocouple interlock system, a peak thermocouple display, automatic gas inventory and cryo panel gas loading monitoring, beam notching controls, a display of beam/plasma interlocks, and a feedback system to control beam power based on plasma conditions.

  14. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  15. Plasma Charge Current for Controlling and Monitoring Electron Beam Welding with Beam Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process. PMID:23242276

  16. Plasma charge current for controlling and monitoring electron beam welding with beam oscillation.

    PubMed

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-12-14

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process.

  17. Loss-proof self-accelerating beams and their use in non-paraxial manipulation of particles' trajectories.

    PubMed

    Schley, Ran; Kaminer, Ido; Greenfield, Elad; Bekenstein, Rivka; Lumer, Yaakov; Segev, Mordechai

    2014-01-01

    Self-accelerating beams--shape-preserving bending beams--are attracting great interest, offering applications in many areas such as particle micromanipulation, microscopy, induction of plasma channels, surface plasmons, laser machining, nonlinear frequency conversion and electron beams. Most of these applications involve light-matter interactions, hence their propagation range is limited by absorption. We propose loss-proof accelerating beams that overcome linear and nonlinear losses. These beams, as analytic solutions of Maxwell's equations with losses, propagate in absorbing media while maintaining their peak intensity. While the power such beams carry decays during propagation, the peak intensity and the structure of their main lobe region are maintained over large distances. We use these beams for manipulation of particles in fluids, steering the particles to steeper angles than ever demonstrated. Such beams offer many additional applications, such as loss-proof self-bending plasmons. In transparent media these beams show exponential intensity growth, which facilitates other novel applications in micromanipulation and ignition of nonlinear processes. PMID:25355605

  18. Improving the Fermilab Booster Notching Efficiency, Beam Losses and Radiation Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.L.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Sidorov, V.I.; Tropin, I.S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    A fast vertical 1.08-m long kicker (notcher) located in the Fermilab Booster Long-05 straight section is currently used to remove 3 out of 84 circulating bunches after injection to generate an abort gap. With the maximum magnetic field of 72.5 Gauss, it removes only 87% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400 MeV, with 75% loss on pole tips of the focusing Booster magnets, 11% on the Long-06 collimators, and 1% in the rest of the ring. We propose to improve the notching efficiency and reduce beam loss in the Booster by using three horizontal kickers in the Long-12 section. STRUCT calculations show that using horizontal notchers, one can remove up to 96% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400-700 MeV, directing 95% of it to a new beam dump at the Long-13 section. This fully decouples notching and collimation. The beam dump absorbs most of the impinging proton energy in its jaws. The latter are encapsulated into an appropriate radiation shielding that reduces impact on the machine components, personnel and environment to the tolerable levels. MARS simulations show that corresponding prompt and residual radiation levels can be reduced ten times compared to the current ones.

  19. Reproducible and controllable induction voltage adder for scaled beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasuo; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    A reproducible and controllable induction adder was developed using solid-state switching devices and Finemet cores for scaled beam compression experiments. A gate controlled MOSFET circuit was developed for the controllable voltage driver. The MOSFET circuit drove the induction adder at low magnetization levels of the cores which enabled us to form reproducible modulation voltages with jitter less than 0.3 ns. Preliminary beam compression experiments indicated that the induction adder can improve the reproducibility of modulation voltages and advance the beam physics experiments.

  20. Very-high-level neutral-beam control system

    SciTech Connect

    Elischer, V.; Jacobson, V.; Theil, E.

    1981-10-01

    As increasing numbers of neutral beams are added to fusion machines, their operation can consume a significant fraction of a facility's total resources. LBL has developed a very high level control system that allows a neutral beam injector to be treated as a black box with just 2 controls: one to set the beam power and one to set the pulse duration. This 2 knob view allows simple operation and provides a natural base for implementing even higher level controls such as automatic source conditioning.

  1. Reproducible and controllable induction voltage adder for scaled beam experiments.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuo; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    A reproducible and controllable induction adder was developed using solid-state switching devices and Finemet cores for scaled beam compression experiments. A gate controlled MOSFET circuit was developed for the controllable voltage driver. The MOSFET circuit drove the induction adder at low magnetization levels of the cores which enabled us to form reproducible modulation voltages with jitter less than 0.3 ns. Preliminary beam compression experiments indicated that the induction adder can improve the reproducibility of modulation voltages and advance the beam physics experiments. PMID:27587112

  2. Digital Controller For Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Homayoon

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional information about proposed apparatus described in "Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19069). Discusses design of digital beam-steering control subsystem and, in particular, that part of design pertaining to digital compensation for frequency response of steering mirror.

  3. Stochastic orbit loss of neutral beam ions from NSTX due to toroidal Alfvén eigenmode avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D. S.; Crocker, N.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Gorelenkova, M.; Kubota, S.; Medley, S. S.; Podestà, M.; Shi, L.; White, R. B.

    2012-12-17

    Short toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and could also cause a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions takes place. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding centre code that incorporates the plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are like those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary and the trajectories along which modes may transport particles extend from the deposition volume to the loss boundary.

  4. A long-range polarization-controlled optical tractor beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvedov, Vladlen; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Hnatovsky, Cyril; Engheta, Nader; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2014-11-01

    The laser beam has become an indispensable tool for the controllable manipulation and transport of microscopic objects in biology, physical chemistry and condensed matter physics. In particular, ‘tractor’ laser beams can draw matter towards a laser source and perform, for instance, all-optical remote sampling. Recent advances in lightwave technology have already led to small-scale experimental demonstrations of tractor beams. However, the realization of long-range tractor beams has not gone beyond the realm of theoretical investigations. Here, we demonstrate the stable transfer of gold-coated hollow glass spheres against the power flow of a single inhomogeneously polarized laser beam over tens of centimetres. Additionally, by varying the polarization state of the beam we can stop the spheres or reverse the direction of their motion at will.

  5. High performance quantum cascade lasers: Loss, beam stability, and gain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzi, Pierre Michel

    Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers are semiconductor devices emitting in the mid-infrared (3-30 micron) and terahertz (30-300 micron) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since their first demonstration by Jerome Faist et. al. in 1994, they have evolved very quickly into high performance devices and given rise to many applications such as trace-gas sensing, medical diagnosis, free-space communication, and light detection and ranging (LIDAR). In this thesis, we investigate a further increase of the performance of QC devices and, through meticulous device modeling and characterizations, gain a deeper understanding of several of their unique characteristics, especially their carrier transport and lifetime, their characteristic temperature, their waveguide loss and modal gain, their leakage current, and their transverse mode profile. First, in our quest to achieve higher performance, we investigate the effect of growth asymmetries on device transport characteristics. This investigation stems from recent studies on the role of interface roughness on intersubband scattering and device performance. Through a symmetric active core design, we find that interface roughness and ionized impurity scattering induced by dopant migration play a significant role in carrier transport through the device. Understanding how interface roughness affects intersubband scattering, in turn, we engineer the gain in QC devices by placing monolayer barriers at specific locations within the device band structure. These strategically placed additional thin barrier layers introduce roughness scattering into the device active region, thereby selectively decreasing the lower laser state lifetime and increasing population inversion necessary for laser action. Preliminary measurement results from modified devices reveal a 50% decrease in the emission broadening compared to the control structures, which should lead to a two-fold increase in gain. A special class of so-called "strong coupling" QC lasers

  6. Loss of beam ions to the inside of the PDX (Poloidal Divertor Experiment) tokamak during the fishbone instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    1986-11-01

    Using data from two vertical charge-exchange detectors on the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), we have identified a set of conditions for which loss of beam ions inward in major radius is observed during the fishbone instability. Previously, it was reported that beam ions were lost only to the outside of the PDX tokamak.

  7. Loss-of-Control-Inhibitor Systems for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    AHarrah, Ralph C.

    2007-01-01

    Systems to provide improved tactile feedback to aircraft pilots are being developed to help the pilots maintain harmony between their control actions and the positions of aircraft control surfaces, thereby helping to prevent loss of control. A system of this type, denoted a loss-of-control-inhibitor system (LOCIS) can be implemented as a relatively simple addition to almost any pre-existing flight-control system. The LOCIS concept offers at least a partial solution to the problem of (1) keeping a pilot aware of the state of the control system and the aircraft and (2) maintaining sufficient control under conditions that, as described below, have been known to lead to loss of control. Current commercial aircraft exhibit uneven responses of primary flight-control surfaces to aggressive pilot control commands, leading to deterioration of pilots ability to control their aircraft. In severe cases, this phenomenon can result in loss of control and consequent loss of aircraft. For an older aircraft equipped with a purely mechanical control system, the loss of harmony between a pilot s command action and the control- surface response can be attributed to compliance in the control system (caused, for example, by stretching of control cables, flexing of push rods, or servo-valve distortion). In a newer aircraft equipped with a fly-by-wire control system, the major contributions to loss of harmony between the pilot and the control surfaces are delays attributable to computer cycle time, control shaping, filtering, aliasing, servo-valve distortion, and actuator rate limiting. In addition, a fly-by-wire control system provides no tactile feedback that would enable the pilot to sense such features of the control state as surface flutter, surface jam, position limiting, actuator rate limiting, and control limiting imposed by the aircraft operational envelope. Hence, for example, when a pilot is involved in aggressive closed-loop maneuvering, as when encountering a wake

  8. Low-loss ultrabroadband 90 degree optical rotator with collinear input and output beams.

    PubMed

    Appel, Roland K; Dyer, Chris D

    2002-04-01

    An achromatic device to rotate optical polarization by 90 degrees is described. This is based on a series of reflecting surfaces that rotates incoming light about the optical axis and translates it such that the exiting light is collinear. Polarization rotation is achieved by rotation of the optical beam, as opposed to the more common approach of phase retardation by use of birefringent elements. For broadband operation from the UV to the near infrared, the device was constructed by use of total internal reflection in three fused-silica glass components. Losses are minimized with interstitial surfaces designed to be angled close to Brewster's angle. PMID:11936786

  9. Creating high-harmonic beams with controlled orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T J; Frumker, E; Boyd, Robert W; Corkum, P B

    2014-10-10

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ = ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ| = 1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  10. Updated analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitation - II. Mixed energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Dobranskis, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider simultaneous analytical solutions of continuity equations for electron beam precipitation (a) in collisional losses and (b) in ohmic losses, or mixed energy losses (MEL) by applying the iterative method to calculate the resulting differential densities at given precipitation depth. The differential densities of precipitating electrons derived from the analytical solutions for MELs reveal increased flattening at energies below 10-30 keV compared to a pure collisional case. This flattening becomes stronger with an increasing precipitation depth turning into a positive slope at greater precipitation depths in the chromosphere resulting in a differential density distribution with maximum that shifts towards higher energies with increase in column depth, while the differential densities combining precipitating and returning electrons are higher at lower energies than those for a pure collisional case. The resulting hard X-ray (HXR) emission produced by the beams with different initial energy fluxes and spectral indices is calculated using the MEL approach for different ratios between the differential densities of precipitating and returning electrons. The number of returning electrons can be even further enhanced by a magnetic mirroring, not considered in the present model, while dominating at lower atmospheric depths where the magnetic convergence and magnitude are the highest. The proposed MEL approach provides an opportunity to account simultaneously for both collisional and ohmic losses in flaring events, which can be used for a quick spectral fitting of HXR spectra and evaluation of a fraction of returning electrons versus precipitating ones. The semi-analytical MEL approach is used for spectral fitting to Reuven High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations of nine C, M and X class flares revealing a close fit to the observations and good resemblance to numerical FP solutions.

  11. Single-beam water vapor detection system with automatic photoelectric conversion gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. G.; Chang, J.; Wang, P. P.; Wang, Q.; Wei, W.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, S. S.

    2014-11-01

    A single-beam optical sensor system with automatic photoelectric conversion gain control is proposed for doing high reliability water vapor detection under relatively rough environmental conditions. Comparing to a dual-beam system, it can distinguish the finer photocurrent variations caused by the optical power drift and provide timely compensation by automatically adjusting the photoelectric conversion gain. This system can be rarely affected by the optical power drift caused by fluctuating ambient temperature or variation of fiber bending loss. The deviation of the single-beam system is below 1.11% when photocurrent decays due to fiber bending loss for bending radius of 5 mm, which is obviously lower than the dual-beam system (8.82%). We also demonstrate the long-term stability of the single-beam system by monitoring a 660 ppm by volume (ppmv) water vapor sample continuously for 24 h. The maximum deviation of the measured concentration during the whole testing period does not exceed 10 ppmv. Experiments have shown that the new system features better reliability and is more apt for remote sensing application which is often subject to light transmission loss.

  12. Beam control and laser characterization for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Boege, S. J., LLNL

    1998-06-10

    The demanding energy, power, pulse shape, focusability, pointing, and availability requirements placed on the 192 National Ignition Facility (NIF) beams lead to the need for an automatic operation capability that is well beyond that of previous inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers. Alignment, diagnostic, and wavefront correction subsystems are integrated in an approach that, by permitting maximal sharing of instrumentation between subsystems, meets performance requirements at a reasonable cost.

  13. Performance and Controllability of Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Yazawa, Masaru; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    We propose novel propulsion driven by ablation plasma pressures produced by the irradiation of pulsed ion beams onto a propellant. The ion beam ablation propulsion demonstrates by a thin foil (50 {mu}mt), and the flyer velocity of 7.7 km/s at the ion beam energy density of 2 kJ/cm2 adopted by using the Time-of-flight method is observed numerically and experimentally. We estimate the performance of the ion beam ablation propulsion as specific impulse of 3600 s and impulse bit density of 1700 Ns/m2 obtained from the demonstration results. In the numerical analysis, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model with ion beam energy depositions is used. The control of the ion beam kinetic energy is only improvement of the performance but also propellant consumption. The spacecraft driven by the ion beam ablation provides high performance efficiency with short-pulsed ion beam irradiation. The numerical results of the advanced model explained latent heat and real gas equation of state agreed well with experimental ones over a wide range of the incident ion beam energy density.

  14. Accuracy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Detection of Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi Pour, Daryoush; Soleimani Shayesteh, Yadollah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bone assessment is essential for diagnosis, treatment planning and prediction of prognosis of periodontal diseases. However, two-dimensional radiographic techniques have multiple limitations, mainly addressed by the introduction of three-dimensional imaging techniques such as cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). This study aimed to assess the accuracy of CBCT for detection of marginal bone loss in patients receiving dental implants. Materials and Methods: A study of diagnostic test accuracy was designed and 38 teeth from candidates for dental implant treatment were selected. On CBCT scans, the amount of bone resorption in the buccal, lingual/palatal, mesial and distal surfaces was determined by measuring the distance from the cementoenamel junction to the alveolar crest (normal group: 0–1.5mm, mild bone loss: 1.6–3mm, moderate bone loss: 3.1–4.5mm and severe bone loss: >4.5mm). During the surgical phase, bone loss was measured at the same sites using a periodontal probe. The values were then compared by McNemar’s test. Results: In the buccal, lingual/palatal, mesial and distal surfaces, no significant difference was observed between the values obtained using CBCT and the surgical method. The correlation between CBCT and surgical method was mainly based on the estimation of the degree of bone resorption. CBCT was capable of showing various levels of resorption in all surfaces with high sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value compared to the surgical method. Conclusion: CBCT enables accurate measurement of bone loss comparable to surgical exploration and can be used for diagnosis of bone defects in periodontal diseases in clinical settings. PMID:26877741

  15. A redundant regulator control with low standby losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andryczyk, R. W.; Peck, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    Shunt regulator circuit for outer-planet-spacecraft radiosotope thermoelectric generator minimizes power-conditioning losses. Unit consists of bank of duplicate regulator control amplifiers and their associated shunt transistors connecter across power supply line. Its high-gain circuitry arranged in redundant configuration in very reliable and is characterized by low standby loss. Circuit can be used on other power-supply applications where size, weight, and reliability are important.

  16. TANGO standard software to control the Nuclotron beam slow extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. A.; Volkov, V. I.; Gorbachev, E. V.; Isadov, V. A.; Kirichenko, A. E.; Romanov, S. V.; Sedykh, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    TANGO Controls is a basis of the NICA control system. The report describes the software which integrates the Nuclotron beam slow extraction subsystem into the TANGO system of NICA. Objects of control are power supplies for resonance lenses. The software consists of the subsystem device server, remote client and web-module for viewing the subsystem data.

  17. Controlled Electron Acceleration in a Plane Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataronis, J. A.; Petržílka, V.; Krlín, L.

    2002-11-01

    Through numerical modeling of the relativistic test particle motion of an ensemble of electrons in a plane laser beam, we show in the present contribution that a significant electron acceleration arises if an additional perpendicularly propagagating transverse laser beam with a randomized phase is present. We also demonstrate that the acceleration rate can be controlled by the power flux intensity of the additional laser beam. The power flux intensity of the additional beam can be typically much lower than the power flux intensity of the main laser beam. In the main laser beam, the electrons perform also a forward oscillating motion because of the effects of the magnetic field intensity of the beam. The acceleration results from the accumulation of the forward electron motion due to phase changes provided by the additional laser beam. For parameters of the PALS^1 device (Prague Asterix Laser System), the attainable electron energy is about 40 MeV in 10^4 wave periods. [2pt] Acknowledgments: This work has been supported by Czech grant GACR 202/00/1217 and USDOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER54398. [2pt] ^1K.Jungwirth et al., Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2495.

  18. Control of a flexible beam using fuzzy logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, Claire L.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project, funded under the NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship program, was to evaluate control methods utilizing fuzzy logic for applicability to control of flexible structures. This was done by applying these methods to control of the Control Structures Interaction Suitcase Demonstrator developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The CSI Suitcase Demonstrator is a flexible beam, mounted at one end with springs and bearing, and with a single actuator capable of rotating the beam about a pin at the fixed end. The control objective is to return the tip of the free end to a zero error position (from a nonzero initial condition). It is neither completely controllable nor completely observable. Fuzzy logic control was demonstrated to successfully control the system and to exhibit desirable robustness properties compared to conventional control.

  19. Active control of transmission loss with smart foams.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Abhishek; Berry, Alain

    2011-02-01

    Smart foams combine the complimentary advantages of passive foam material and spatially distributed piezoelectric actuator embedded in it for active noise control applications. In this paper, the problem of improving the transmission loss of smart foams using active control strategies has been investigated both numerically and experimentally inside a waveguide under the condition of plane wave propagation. The finite element simulation of a coupled noise control system has been undertaken with three different smart foam designs and their effectiveness in cancelling the transmitted wave downstream of the smart foam have been studied. The simulation results provide insight into the physical phenomenon of active noise cancellation and explain the impact of the smart foam designs on the optimal active control results. Experimental studies aimed at implementing the real-time control for transmission loss optimization have been performed using the classical single input/single output filtered-reference least mean squares algorithm. The active control results with broadband and single frequency primary source inputs demonstrate a good improvement in the transmission loss of the smart foams. The study gives a comparative description of the transmission and absorption control problems in light of the modification of the vibration response of the piezoelectric actuator under active control.

  20. Optimal vibration control of curved beams using distributed parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushou; Jin, Dongping; Wen, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The design of linear quadratic optimal controller using spectral factorization method is studied for vibration suppression of curved beam structures modeled as distributed parameter models. The equations of motion for active control of the in-plane vibration of a curved beam are developed firstly considering its shear deformation and rotary inertia, and then the state space model of the curved beam is established directly using the partial differential equations of motion. The functional gains for the distributed parameter model of curved beam are calculated by extending the spectral factorization method. Moreover, the response of the closed-loop control system is derived explicitly in frequency domain. Finally, the suppression of the vibration at the free end of a cantilevered curved beam by point control moment is studied through numerical case studies, in which the benefit of the presented method is shown by comparison with a constant gain velocity feedback control law, and the performance of the presented method on avoidance of control spillover is demonstrated.

  1. Continuous beam divergence control via wedge-pair for laser communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, Keith M.; DeCew, Alan E.; Narkewich, Lawrence E.; Williams, Timothy H.

    2015-03-01

    Lasercom terminals often scan an area of uncertainty during acquisition with a wide-divergence beacon beam. Once the terminal has established cooperative tracking with the remote terminal, a narrow divergence beam is used for communication. A mechanism that enables continuous beam divergence control can provide significant size, weight, and power (SWaP) benefits to the terminal. First, the acquisition and the communication beams can be launched from the same fiber so only a single high-power optical amplifier is required. Second, by providing mid-divergences, it eases the remote terminal's transition from the acquisition phase to the communication phase. This paper describes a mechanism that provides gradual, progressive adjustment of far-field beam divergence, from wide divergence (> 300 μrad FWHM) through collimated condition (38 μrad FWHM) and that works over a range of wavelengths. The mechanism is comprised of a variable-thickness optical element, formed by a pair of opposing wedges that is placed between the launch fiber and the collimating lens. Variations in divergence with no beam blockage are created by laterally translating one wedge relative to a fixed wedge. Divergence is continuously adjustable within the thickness range, allowing for a coordinated transition of divergence, wavelength, and beam power. Measurements of this low-loss, low-wavefront error assembly show that boresight error during divergence transition is maintained to a fraction of the communication beamwidth over wavelength and optical power ranges.

  2. Electron Beam Technology for Environmental Pollution Control.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, there are over 1700 electron beam (EB) units in commercial use, providing an estimated added value to numerous products, amounting to 100 billion USD or more. High-current electron accelerators are used in diverse industries to enhance the physical and chemical properties of materials and to reduce undesirable contaminants such as pathogens, toxic byproducts, or emissions. Over the past few decades, EB technologies have been developed aimed at ensuring the safety of gaseous and liquid effluents discharged to the environment. It has been demonstrated that EB technologies for flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification, and sludge hygienization can be effectively deployed to mitigate environmental degradation. Recently, extensive work has been carried out on the use of EB for environmental remediation, which also includes the removal of emerging contaminants such as VOCs, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), and potential EDCs.

  3. Electron Beam Technology for Environmental Pollution Control.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, there are over 1700 electron beam (EB) units in commercial use, providing an estimated added value to numerous products, amounting to 100 billion USD or more. High-current electron accelerators are used in diverse industries to enhance the physical and chemical properties of materials and to reduce undesirable contaminants such as pathogens, toxic byproducts, or emissions. Over the past few decades, EB technologies have been developed aimed at ensuring the safety of gaseous and liquid effluents discharged to the environment. It has been demonstrated that EB technologies for flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification, and sludge hygienization can be effectively deployed to mitigate environmental degradation. Recently, extensive work has been carried out on the use of EB for environmental remediation, which also includes the removal of emerging contaminants such as VOCs, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), and potential EDCs. PMID:27620188

  4. Active fault tolerant control of a flexible beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuanqiang; Grigoriadis, Karolos M.; Song, Gangbing

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents the development and application of an H∞ fault detection and isolation (FDI) filter and fault tolerant controller (FTC) for smart structures. A linear matrix inequality (LMI) formulation is obtained to design the full order robust H∞ filter to estimate the faulty input signals. A fault tolerant H∞ controller is designed for the combined system of plant and filter which minimizes the control objective selected in the presence of disturbances and faults. A cantilevered flexible beam bonded with piezoceramic smart materials, in particular the PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate), in the form of a patch is used in the validation of the FDI filter and FTC controller design. These PZT patches are surface-bonded on the beam and perform as actuators and sensors. A real-time data acquisition and control system is used to record the experimental data and to implement the designed FDI filter and FTC. To assist the control system design, system identification is conducted for the first mode of the smart structural system. The state space model from system identification is used for the H∞ FDI filter design. The controller was designed based on minimization of the control effort and displacement of the beam. The residuals obtained from the filter through experiments clearly identify the fault signals. The experimental results of the proposed FTC controller show its e effectiveness for the vibration suppression of the beam for the faulty system when the piezoceramic actuator has a partial failure.

  5. Intelligent mirror monitor and controller for synchrotron radiation beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.L.; Yang, J.

    1983-01-01

    A microprocessor-based, stand-alone mirror monitor and control system has been developed for synchrotron radiation beam lines. The operational requirements for mirror position and tilt angle, including the parameters for controlling the number of steps, direction, speed and acceleration of the driving motors, may be programmed into EPROMS. The instruction sequence to carry out critical motions will be stored in a program buffer. A manual control knob is also provided to fine tune the mirror position if desired. A synchronization scheme for the height and tilt motions maintains a fixed mirror angle during insertion. Absolute height and tilt angle are displayed. Electronic (or programmable) tilt angle limits are provided to protect against damage from misalignment of high power beams such as focussed wiggler beams. A description of mirror drives with a schematic diagram is presented. Although the controller is made for mirror movers, it can be used in other applications where multiple stepping motors perform complex synchronized motions.

  6. Control of Space-Based Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifzer. W. J.; Taminger, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Engineering a closed-loop control system for an electron beam welder for space-based additive manufacturing is challenging. For earth and space based applications, components must work in a vacuum and optical components become occluded with metal vapor deposition. For extraterrestrial applications added components increase launch weight, increase complexity, and increase space flight certification efforts. Here we present a software tool that closely couples path planning and E-beam parameter controls into the build process to increase flexibility. In an environment where data collection hinders real-time control, another approach is considered that will still yield a high quality build.

  7. GENERATION AND CONTROL OF HIGH PRECISION BEAMS AT LEPTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Chiu Chao

    2007-06-25

    Parity violation experiments require precision manipulation of helicity-correlated beam coordinates on target at the nm/nrad-level. Achieving this unprecedented level of control requires a detailed understanding of the particle optics and careful tuning of the beam transport to keep anomalies from compromising the design adiabatic damping. Such efforts are often hindered by machine configuration and instrumentation limitations at the low energy end. A technique has been developed at CEBAF including high precision measurements, Mathematica-based analysis for obtaining corrective solutions, and control hardware/software developments for realizing such level of control at energies up to 5 GeV.

  8. Controllable light capsules employing modified Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Zhao, Qian; Ren, Yuxuan; Qiu, Xingze; Zhong, Mincheng; Li, Yinmei

    2016-01-01

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a novel class of controlled light capsules with nearly perfect darkness, directly employing intrinsic properties of modified Bessel-Gauss beams. These beams are able to naturally create three-dimensional bottle-shaped region during propagation as long as the parameters are properly chosen. Remarkably, the optical bottle can be controlled to demonstrate various geometries through tuning the beam parameters, thereby leading to an adjustable light capsule. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of the light capsule derived from modified Bessel-Gauss beams. Moreover, a binary digital micromirror device (DMD) based scheme is first employed to shape the bottle beams by precise amplitude and phase manipulation. Further, we demonstrate their ability for optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles, which play a particular role in biomedical research, with holographic optical tweezers. Therefore, our observations provide a new route for generating and controlling bottle beams and will widen the potentials for micromanipulation of absorbing particles, aerosols or even individual atoms. PMID:27388558

  9. Controllable light capsules employing modified Bessel-Gauss beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Zhao, Qian; Ren, Yuxuan; Qiu, Xingze; Zhong, Mincheng; Li, Yinmei

    2016-07-01

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a novel class of controlled light capsules with nearly perfect darkness, directly employing intrinsic properties of modified Bessel-Gauss beams. These beams are able to naturally create three-dimensional bottle-shaped region during propagation as long as the parameters are properly chosen. Remarkably, the optical bottle can be controlled to demonstrate various geometries through tuning the beam parameters, thereby leading to an adjustable light capsule. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of the light capsule derived from modified Bessel-Gauss beams. Moreover, a binary digital micromirror device (DMD) based scheme is first employed to shape the bottle beams by precise amplitude and phase manipulation. Further, we demonstrate their ability for optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles, which play a particular role in biomedical research, with holographic optical tweezers. Therefore, our observations provide a new route for generating and controlling bottle beams and will widen the potentials for micromanipulation of absorbing particles, aerosols or even individual atoms.

  10. Controllable light capsules employing modified Bessel-Gauss beams

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Zhao, Qian; Ren, Yuxuan; Qiu, Xingze; Zhong, Mincheng; Li, Yinmei

    2016-01-01

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a novel class of controlled light capsules with nearly perfect darkness, directly employing intrinsic properties of modified Bessel-Gauss beams. These beams are able to naturally create three-dimensional bottle-shaped region during propagation as long as the parameters are properly chosen. Remarkably, the optical bottle can be controlled to demonstrate various geometries through tuning the beam parameters, thereby leading to an adjustable light capsule. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of the light capsule derived from modified Bessel-Gauss beams. Moreover, a binary digital micromirror device (DMD) based scheme is first employed to shape the bottle beams by precise amplitude and phase manipulation. Further, we demonstrate their ability for optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles, which play a particular role in biomedical research, with holographic optical tweezers. Therefore, our observations provide a new route for generating and controlling bottle beams and will widen the potentials for micromanipulation of absorbing particles, aerosols or even individual atoms. PMID:27388558

  11. Fuzzy-based adaptive bandwidth control for loss guarantees.

    PubMed

    Siripongwutikorn, Peerapon; Banerjee, Sujata; Tipper, David

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents the use of adaptive bandwidth control (ABC) for a quantitative packet loss rate guarantee to aggregate traffic in packet switched networks. ABC starts with some initial amount of bandwidth allocated to a queue and adjusts it over time based on online measurements of system states to ensure that the allocated bandwidth is just enough to attain the specified loss requirement. Consequently, no a priori detailed traffic information is required, making ABC more suitable for efficient aggregate quality of service (QoS) provisioning. We propose an ABC algorithm called augmented Fuzzy (A-Fuzzy) control, whereby fuzzy logic control is used to keep an average queue length at an appropriate target value, and the measured packet loss rate is used to augment the standard control to achieve better performance. An extensive simulation study based on both theoretical traffic models and real traffic traces under a wide range of system configurations demonstrates that the A-Fuzzy control itself is highly robust, yields high bandwidth utilization, and is indeed a viable alternative and improvement to static bandwidth allocation (SBA) and existing adaptive bandwidth allocation schemes. Additionally, we develop a simple and efficient measurement-based admission control procedure which limits the amount of input traffic in order to maintain the performance of the A-Fuzzy control at an acceptable level.

  12. 10 orders of magnitude current measurement digitisers for the CERN beam loss systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, W.; Alsdorf, M.; Dehning, B.; Kwiatkowski, M.; Venturini, G. G.; Zamantzas, C.

    2014-02-01

    A wide range current digitizer card is needed for the acquisition module of the beam loss monitoring systems in the CERN Injector Complex. The fully differential frequency converter allows measuring positive and negative input currents with a resolution of 31 nA in an integration window of 2 μs. Increasing the integration window, the dynamic range covers 21010 were the upper part of the range is converted by measuring directly the voltage drop on a resistor. The key elements of this design are the fully differential integrator and the switches operated by an FPGA. The circuit is designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and reliability and failsafe operational considerations are main design goals. The circuit will be discussed in detail and lab and field measurements will be shown.

  13. Readout process and noise elimination firmware for the Fermilab beam loss system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Baumbaugh, Alan; Drennan, Craig; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Lewis, Jonathan; Shi, Zonghan; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    In the Fermilab Beam Loss Monitor System, inputs from ion chambers are integrated for a short period of time, digitized and processed to create the accelerator abort request signals. The accelerator power supplies employing 3-phase 60Hz AC cause noise at various harmonics on our inputs which must be eliminated for monitoring purposes. During accelerator ramping, both the sampling frequency and the amplitudes of the noise components change. As such, traditional digital filtering can partially reduce certain noise components but not all. A nontraditional algorithm was developed in our work to eliminate remaining ripples. The sequencing in the FPGA firmware is conducted by a micro-sequencer core we developed: the Enclosed Loop Micro-Sequencer (ELMS). The unique feature of the ELMS is that it supports the ''FOR'' loops with pre-defined iterations at the machine code level, which provides programming convenience and avoids many micro-complexities from the beginning.

  14. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: causal parameters and duration of memory loss. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron beam exposure has been investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task across a 10/sup 4/ dose range for 10-, 1-, and 0.1-..mu..sec pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 10/sup 6/ rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (10/sup 6/ rad/sec) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli.

  15. Capture from pair production as a beam loss mechanism for heavy ions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Belkacem, A.; Bossingham, R.; Gould, H.; Meyerhof, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    Electron capture from electron-positron pair production is predicted to be a major source of beam loss for the heaviest ions at RHIC. Achieving the highest luminosity thus requires an understanding of the capture process. We report the first observation and measurement of this process, in Bevalac experiments using 1 GeV/u U{sup 92+} projectiles on Au targets. Capture from pair production is a process in which the very high electromagnetic field involved in the collision of two relativistic heavy ions polarizes the vacuum, resulting in the production of an electron-positron pair and the capture of the electron by one of the ions. There are many theoretical papers published on capture from pair production with very large discrepancies between predicted cross sections. The experimental results are compared to theory, and the implications of extrapolations to RHIC energies are presented.

  16. Capture from pair production as a beam loss mechanism for heavy ions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Belkacem, A.; Claytor, N.; Dinneen, T.; Gould, H.

    1997-05-01

    Electron capture from electron-positron pair production is predicted to be a major source of beam loss for the heaviest ions at RHIC. Achieving the highest luminosity thus requires an understanding of the capture process. The authors report measurements of this process at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s AGS using 10.8 GeV/nucleon Au{sup 79+} projectiles on Au targets. Capture from pair production is a process in which the very high electromagnetic field involved in the collision of two relativistic heavy ions results in the production of an electron-positron pair with the capture of the electron by one of the ions. There are many theoretical papers published on capture from pair production with discrepancies between predicted cross sections. The experimental results are compared to theory and to previous experiments at 1 GeV/nucleon. The implications of extrapolations to RHIC energies are presented.

  17. Loss of control during instrumental learning: a source localization study.

    PubMed

    Diener, Carsten; Kuehner, Christine; Flor, Herta

    2010-04-01

    This study used multi-channel electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate cortical correlates of response-outcome contingency appraisal as indexed by the postimperative negative variation (PINV) during instrumental learning. PINV data were subjected to standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) for source localization. Forty-six healthy adult persons underwent a forewarned S1-S2 paradigm where response-outcome contingencies varied in three consecutive conditions. Initially subjects could control aversive stimulation by a correct behavioral response followed by loss of control and subsequent restitution of control. Throughout the experiment, reaction times, errors, ratings of controllability, arousal, emotional valence and helplessness were assessed. Topographical EEG analyses showed that in particular frontal PINV magnitudes covaried with the experimental manipulation. Loss of control induced extensive response-outcome uncertainty accompanied by a fronto-central PINV maximum. sLORETA functional analyses of the PINV revealed that dependent on the experimental conditions frontal, temporal and parietal areas seem to be related to PINV formation. In particular during loss of control, between-conditions sLORETA comparisons found Brodmann Area 24 in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to be associated with PINV generation, which was confirmed by correlational analyses. These results provide further evidence for the role of the ACC in detecting response conflict and its involvement in the generation of the PINV.

  18. VERTICAL BEAM SIZE CONTROL IN TLS AND TPS.

    SciTech Connect

    KUO, C.C.; CHEN, J.R.; CHOU, P.J.; CHANG, H.P.; HSU, K.T.; LUO, G.H.; TSAI, H.J.; WANG, D.J.; WANG, M.H.

    2006-06-26

    Vertical beam size control is an important issue in the light source operations. The horizontal-vertical betatron coupling and vertical dispersion were measured and corrected to small values in the TLS 1.5 GeV storage ring. Estimated beam sizes are compared with the measured values. By employing an effective transverse damping system, the vertical beam blow-up due to transverse coherent instabilities, such as the fast-ion beam instability, was suppressed. As a result, the light source is very stable. In NSRRC we are designing an ultra low emittance 3-GeV storage ring and its designed vertical beam size could be as small as a few microns. The ground and mechanic vibration effects, and coherent instabilities could spoil the expected photon brightness due to blow-up of the vertical beam size if not well taken care of. The contributions of these effects to vertical beam size increase will be evaluated and the counter measures to minimize them will be proposed and reported in this paper.

  19. Study on the radiation problem caused by electron beam loss in accelerator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan-Feng; Guo, Bing-Qi; Zhang, Jie-Xi; Chen, Huai-Bi

    2008-07-01

    The beam dynamic code PARMELA was used to simulate the transportation process of accelerating electrons in S-band SW linacs with different energies of 2.5, 6 and 20 MeV. The results indicated that in the ideal condition, the percentage of electron beam loss was 50% in accelerator tubes. Also we calculated the spectrum, the location and angular distribution of the lost electrons. Calculation performed by Monte Carlo code MCNP demonstrated that the radiation distribution of lost electrons was nearly uniform along the tube axis, the angular distributions of the radiation dose rates of the three tubes were similar, and the highest leaking dose was at the angle of 160° with respect to the axis. The lower the energy of the accelerator, the higher the radiation relative leakage. For the 2.5 MeV accelerator, the maximum dose rate reached 5% of the main dose and the one on the head of the electron gun was 1%, both of which did not meet the eligible protection requirement for accelerators. We adopted different shielding designs for different accelerators. The simulated result showed that the shielded radiation leaking dose rates fulfilled the requirement. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10135040)

  20. The value of exercising control over monetary gains and losses.

    PubMed

    Leotti, Lauren A; Delgado, Mauricio R

    2014-02-01

    Using functional MRI, we examined how the affective experience of choice, the means by which individuals exercise control, is modulated by the valence of potential outcomes (gains, losses). When trials involved potential gains, participants reported liking cues predicting a choice opportunity better than cues predicting no choice opportunity--an effect that corresponded with blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) increases in ventral striatum (VS) activity. Surprisingly, no differences were observed between choice and no-choice cues when participants anticipated potential losses. Individual differences in subjective choice preference in the loss condition, however, corresponded to choice-related BOLD activity in VS. We conducted a second experiment to examine whether monetary losses were perceived differently in the context of simultaneous gains. When losses occurred in the absence of gains, participants showed an increased affective experience of choice--they reported greater liking of choice than no-choice trials, and VS activity was greater for choice than for no-choice cues. Collectively, the findings suggest that the affective experience of choice involves reward-processing circuitry when people anticipate appetitive and aversive outcomes, but the choice experience may be sensitive to context and individual differences. PMID:24390827

  1. On-Line Loss of Control Detection Using Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J. (Technical Monitor); Thompson, Peter M.; Klyde, David H.; Bachelder, Edward N.; Rosenthal, Theodore J.

    2005-01-01

    Wavelet transforms are used for on-line detection of aircraft loss of control. Wavelet transforms are compared with Fourier transform methods and shown to more rapidly detect changes in the vehicle dynamics. This faster response is due to a time window that decreases in length as the frequency increases. New wavelets are defined that further decrease the detection time by skewing the shape of the envelope. The wavelets are used for power spectrum and transfer function estimation. Smoothing is used to tradeoff the variance of the estimate with detection time. Wavelets are also used as front-end to the eigensystem reconstruction algorithm. Stability metrics are estimated from the frequency response and models, and it is these metrics that are used for loss of control detection. A Matlab toolbox was developed for post-processing simulation and flight data using the wavelet analysis methods. A subset of these methods was implemented in real time and named the Loss of Control Analysis Tool Set or LOCATS. A manual control experiment was conducted using a hardware-in-the-loop simulator for a large transport aircraft, in which the real time performance of LOCATS was demonstrated. The next step is to use these wavelet analysis tools for flight test support.

  2. Sensor enabled closed-loop bending control of soft beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Jennifer C.; White, Edward L.; Kramer, Rebecca K.

    2016-04-01

    Control of soft-bodied systems is challenging, as the absence of rigidity typically implies distributed deformations and infinite degrees-of-freedom. In this paper, we demonstrate closed-loop control of three elastomer beams that vary in bending stiffness. The most stiff beam is comprised of a single prismatic structure made from a single elastomer. In the next beam, increased flexibility is introduced via an indentation in the elastomer, forming a joint. The most flexible beam uses a softer elastomer in the joint section, along with an indentation. An antagonistic pair of actuators bend the joint while a pair of liquid-metal-embedded strain sensors provide angle feedback to a control loop. We were able to achieve control of the system with a proportional-integral-derivative control algorithm. The procedure we demonstrate in this work is not dependent on actuator and sensor choice and could be applied to to other hardware systems, as well as more complex multi-joint robotic structures in the future.

  3. Vibration control of flexible beams using an active hinge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudney, H. H., Jr.; Inman, D. J.; Horner, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    The use of an active hinge to attenuate the transverse vibrations of a flexible beam is examined. A slender aluminum beam is suspended vertically, cantilevered at the top. An active hinge is placed at the node of the second vibration mode. The active hinge consists of a torque motor, strain gauge, and tachometer. A control law is implemented using both beam-bending strain and the relative angular velocity measured at this hinge, thereby configuring the hinge to act as an active damper. Results from implementing this control law show little improvement in the first mode damping ratio, 130 percent increase in the second mode damping ratio, and 180 percent increase in the third mode damping ratio. The merits of using a motor with a gearbox are discussed.

  4. Structural control of thermoelastic beams for vibration suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, J. C., Jr.; Adali, S.; Sadek, I. S.; Sloss, J. M.

    1993-09-01

    The vibrations of a thermoelastic beam subject to a sudden heat input are damped by active control. The control objective is specified as the minimization of a quadratic functional in terms of displacement and velocity at a given time. The control is exercised by means of point actuators which are placed so as to minimize the maximum actuator force. The solution of the control problem is obtained by means of eigenfunction expansions. The physical problem corresponds to the suppression of vibrations of a structure suddenly entering into the daylight zone. Numerical results indicate that the displacement and velocity of the beam can be effectively reduced by means of active control exercised by point actuators.

  5. Control of beam dynamics in high energy induction linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1986-07-29

    The Advent of laser-ion-guiding in the Advanced test Accelerator along with the development of accelerator cavities optimized with respect to beam breakup coupling impedence now make it possible to consider a new class of high current, high emergy linear induction accelerators. The control of the beam breakup and other instabilities by laser guiding and by various magnetic focusing schemes will be discussed along with the scaling laws for the design of such machines to minimize the growth of the beam breakup instability. Many linacs, particularly induction linacs are limited in performance by the beam breakup (BBU) instability. The instability is found in two forms. In the first form the accelerating cavities communicate with one another through interaction with the beam and through propagation of cavity fields through the accelerator structure. In the second form which is the more virulent of the two, the cavities couple to each other only through their interactions with the beam. It is this second form of PPU that will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Energy harvesting from controlled buckling of piezoelectric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. H.; Karami, M. Amin

    2015-11-01

    A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is presented that can generate electricity from the weight of passing cars or crowds. The energy harvester consists of a piezoelectric beam, which buckles when the device is stepped on. The energy harvester can have a horizontal or vertical configuration. In the vertical (direct) configuration, the piezoelectric beam is vertical and directly sustains the weight of the vehicles or people. In the horizontal (indirect) configuration, the vertical weight is transferred to a horizontal axial force through a scissor-like mechanism. Buckling of the beam results in significant stresses and, thus, large power production. However, if the beam’s buckling is not controlled, the beam will fracture. To prevent this, the axial deformation is constrained to limit the deformations of the beam. In this paper, the energy harvester is analytically modeled. The considered piezoelectric beam is a general non-uniform beam. The natural frequencies, mode shapes, and the critical buckling force corresponding to each mode shape are calculated. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities are included in the model. The design criteria for the device are discussed. It is demonstrated that a device, realized with commonly used piezoelectric patches, can generate tens of milliwatts of power from passing car traffic. The proposed device could also be implemented in the sidewalks or integrated in shoe soles for energy generation. One of the key features of the device is its frequency up-conversion characteristics. The piezoelectric beam undergoes free vibrations each time the weight is applied to or removed from the energy harvester. The frequency of the free vibrations is orders of magnitude larger than the frequency of the load. The device is, thus, both efficient and insensitive to the frequency of the force excitations.

  7. On-chip generation and control of the vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aiping; Zou, Chang-Ling; Ren, Xifeng; Wang, Qin; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-05-01

    A method to generate and control the amplitude and phase distributions of an optical vortex beam is proposed. By introducing a holographic grating on the top of a dielectric waveguide, the free space vortex beam and the in-plane guiding wave can be converted to each other. This microscale holographic grating is very robust against the variation of geometry parameters. The designed vortex beam generator can produce the target beam with a fidelity up to 0.93, and the working bandwidth is about 175 nm with the fidelity larger than 0.80. In addition, a multiple generator composed of two holographic gratings on two parallel waveguides is studied, which can perform an effective and flexible modulation on the vortex beam by controlling the phase of the input light. Our work opens an available avenue towards the integrated orbital angular momentum devices with multiple degrees of optical freedom, which can be used for optical tweezers, micronano imaging, information processing, and so on.

  8. Adaptive robust control of longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeizadeh, Amin; Schilcher, Thomas; Smith, Roy S.

    2016-05-01

    Feedback control of the longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles are considered to be critical for beam control in accelerators. In the feedback scheme, the longitudinal or transverse beam profile is measured and compared to a desired profile to give an error estimate. The error is then used to act on the appropriate actuators to correct the profile. The role of the transverse feedback is to steer the beam in a particular trajectory, known as the "orbit." The common approach for orbit correction is based on approximately inverting the response matrix, and in the best case, involves regulating or filtering the singular values. In the current contribution, a more systematic and structured way of handling orbit correction is introduced giving robustness against uncertainties in the response matrix. Moreover, the input bounds are treated to avoid violating the limits of the corrector currents. The concept of the robust orbit correction has been successfully tested at the SwissFEL injector test facility. In the SwissFEL machine, a photo-injector laser system extracts electrons from a cathode and a similar robust control method is developed for the longitudinal feedback control of the current profile of the electron bunch. The method manipulates the angles of the crystals in the laser system to produce a desired charge distribution over the electron bunch length. This approach paves the way towards automation of laser pulse stacking.

  9. A METHOD TO CONTROL MULTIPASS BEAM BREAKUP IN RECIRCULATING LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Byung Yunn

    2003-05-01

    We investigate a method to control the multipass dipole beam breakup instability in a recirculating linac including energy recovery. Effectiveness of an external feedback system for such a goal is shown clearly in a simplified model. We also verify the theoretical result with a simulation study.

  10. Beaconless stochastic parallel gradient descent laser beam control: numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Piatrou, Piotr; Roggemann, Michael

    2007-09-20

    We apply a target-in-the-loop strategy to the case of adaptive optics beam control in the presence of strong atmospheric turbulence for air-to-ground directed energy laser applications. Using numerical simulations we show that in the absence of a cooperative beacon to probe the atmosphere it is possible to extract information suitable for effective beam control from images of the speckled and strongly turbulence degraded intensity distribution of the laser energy at the target. We use a closed-loop, single-deformable-mirror adaptive optics system driven by a target-in-the-loop stochastic parallel gradient descent optimization algorithm minimizing a mean-radius performance metric defined on the image of the laser beam intensity distribution formed at the receiver. We show that a relatively low order 25-channel zonal adaptive optical beam control system controlled in this way is capable of achieving a high degree of turbulence compensation with respect to energy concentration if the tilt can be corrected separately.

  11. Ion beam control in laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Nagashima, T.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2016-03-01

    By a two-stage successive acceleration in laser ion acceleration, our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by a few hundreds of MeV; the maximum proton energy reaches about 250MeV. The ions are accelerated by the inductive continuous post-acceleration in a laser plasma interaction together with the target normal sheath acceleration and the breakout afterburner mechanism. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when an intense short- pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in the plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field strength, the moving longitudinal inductive electric field is induced by the Faraday law, and accelerates the forward-moving ions continously. The multi-stage acceleration provides a unique controllability in the ion energy and its quality.

  12. Greater weight loss among men participating in a commercial weight loss program: a pooled analysis of 2 randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Barraj, Leila M; Murphy, Mary M; Heshka, Stanley; Katz, David L

    2014-02-01

    Being overweight and obese are significant health concerns for men and women, yet despite comparable needs for effective weight loss and maintenance strategies, little is known about the success of commercial weight loss programs in men. This study tests the hypothesis that men participating in a commercial weight loss program (Weight Watchers) had significantly greater weight loss than men receiving limited support from health professionals for weight loss (controls). A pooled analysis of weight loss and related physiologic parameter data from 2 randomized clinical trials was conducted. After 12 months, analysis of covariance tests showed that men in the commercial program group (n = 85) lost significantly more weight (P < .01) than men in the control group (n = 84); similar significant differences were observed for body mass index and waist circumference. These results suggest that participation in a commercial weight loss program may be a more effective means to lose weight and maintain weight loss.

  13. Simplex method in problems of light-beam phase control.

    PubMed

    Chesnokov, S S; Davletshina, I V

    1995-12-20

    The possibility of the application of the simplex method to problems of wave-front control for light beams propagating in a nonlinear medium is investigated. A numerical analysis of simplex-method effectiveness in comparison with the gradient procedure of hill climbing is carried out. The regimes of stationary and nonstationary wind refraction are considered. The simplest optimization of the simplex size and the control basis is done. PMID:21068958

  14. Induced radioactivity and its relation to beam losses in the CERN 26 GeV proton synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, A. H.

    1987-06-01

    The results of induced radioactivity measurements made over the past 10 years around the CERN 26 GeV proton synchrotron are presented. The dose rate near different sections of the machine is shown to vary by factors up to 10 above and below the mean. A correlation is made between beam losses and radiation level, where it is estimated that to a first approximation in a machine that has been running a few years, the dose rate at 50 cm from a straight section between magnets and 24 h after stop will be 1.0 mSv/h (100 mrem/h) for beam losses equivalent to 1 W per meter of machine circumference. The dose rate after a cooling time of t days ( t ≪ 1 yr) is derived to be: D=p(1-0.4 log10t) mSv/h, where p is the average beam power loss, in W per m of circumference, over the two preceding months. This dependence of dose rate on decay time is compared with measured data from the PS for up to 43 days of cooling time. Beam losses estimated from induced activity dose rates using the above relation are shown to correspond reasonably with those expected for two operating conditions of the CERN 26 GeV proton synchrotron.

  15. Beaconless adaptive-optics technique for HEL beam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    Effective performance of forthcoming laser systems capable of power delivery on a distant target requires an adaptive optics system to correct atmospheric perturbations on the laser beam. The turbulence-induced effects are responsible for beam wobbling, wandering, and intensity scintillation, resulting in degradation of the beam quality and power density on the target. Adaptive optics methods are used to compensate for these negative effects. In its turn, operation of the AOS system requires a reference wave that can be generated by the beacon on the target. This report discusses a beaconless approach for wavefront correction with its performance based on the detection of the target-scattered light. Postprocessing of the beacon-generated light field enables retrieval and detailed characterization of the turbulence-perturbed wavefront -data that is essential to control the adaptive optics module of a high-power laser system.

  16. Orbital angular moment of a partially coherent beam propagating through an astigmatic ABCD optical system with loss or gain.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yangjian; Zhu, Shijun

    2014-04-01

    We derive the general expression for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) flux of an astigmatic partially coherent beam carrying twist phase [i.e., twisted anisotropic Gaussian-Schell model (TAGSM) beam] propagating through an astigmatic ABCD optical system with loss or gain. The evolution properties of the OAM flux of a TAGSM beam in a Gaussian cavity or propagating through a cylindrical thin lens are illustrated numerically with the help of the derived formula. It is found that we can modulate the OAM of a partially coherent beam by varying the parameters of the cavity or the orientation angle of the cylindrical thin lens, which will be useful in some applications, such as free-space optical communications and particle trapping.

  17. Measurement profiles of nano-scale ion beam for optimized radiation energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, T. H.; Cho, H. S.

    2011-10-01

    The behavior of charged particles is investigated for nano-scale ion beam therapy using a medical accelerator. Computational work is performed for the Bragg-peak simulation, which is focused on human organ material of pancreas and thyroid. The Results show that the trends of the dose have several different kinds of distributions. Before constructing a heavy ion collider, this study can give us the reliability of the therapeutic effect. Realistic treatment using human organs is calculated in a simple and cost effective manner using the computational code, the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter 2008 (SRIM 2008). Considering the safety of the therapy, it is suggested to give a patient orient planning of the cancer therapy. The energy losses in ionization and phonon are analyzed, which are the behaviors in the molecular level nano-scopic investigation. The different fluctuations are shown at 150 MeV, where the lowest temperature is found in proton and pancreas case. Finally, the protocol for the radiation therapy is constructed by the simulation in which the procedure for a better therapy is selected. An experimental measurement incorporated with the simulations could be programmed by this protocol.

  18. Localization of the large-angle foil-scattering beam loss caused by the multiturn charge-exchange injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Kazami; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kinsho, Michikazu

    2013-07-01

    In the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, significant losses were observed at the branching of the H0 dump line and the beam position monitor that was inserted downstream of the H0 dump branch duct. These losses were caused by the large-angle scattering of the injection and circulating beams at the charge-exchange foil. To realize high-power operation, these losses must be mitigated. Therefore, a new collimation system was developed and installed in October 2011. To efficiently optimize this system, the behavior of particles scattered by the foil and produced by the absorber were simulated, and the optimal position and angle of the absorber were investigated. During this process, an angle regulation method for the absorber was devised. An outline of this system, the angle regulation method for the absorber, and the performance of this new collimation system are described.

  19. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.

    1994-01-01

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

  20. Electron beam control rf discharges for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Ruzic, D.N.; Yang, J.

    1995-12-31

    Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) discharges for microelectronics fabrication suffer from the inability to separately control plasma density and ion power flux to the wafer. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) reactors have been developed to provide some degree of independent control. This is accomplished by arranging for ionization to be provided dominantly by the applied electromagnetic instead of the rf bias to the substrate. Both ICP and ECR reactors, though, optimally operate at low gas pressures, and are not typically used for intermediate to high pressure etching and deposition systems. To address the higher pressure range, a hybrid electron beam/RIE discharge system (EB-RIE) has been developed. In the EB-RIE system, a planar electron beam (1--3 kV) is injected into the plasma chamber above and parallel to the wafer. An rf bias is separately applied to the substrate. A 2-dimensional model of the EB-RIE reactor has been developed to investigate the scaling of the device and analyze previous experimental measurements. Results from the model are discussed for Ar and Ar/SiH{sub 4} gas mixtures in which the beam energy, gas pressure and positioning of the beam are varied.

  1. Controls on nitrogen loss processes in Chesapeake Bay sediments.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Ward, Bess B

    2013-05-01

    The flux of fixed nitrogen into the marine environment is increasing as a direct result of anthropogenic nitrogen loading, but the controls on the mechanisms responsible for the removal of this increased supply are not well constrained. The fate of fixed nitrogen via mineralization and nitrogen loss processes was investigated by simulating a settling event of organic matter (OM) in mesocosms containing Chesapeake Bay sediments. Microorganisms rapidly transformed the OM during the course of a seven week incubation ultimately leading to nitrogen loss via denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). The microbial community responded quickly to the OM amendment suggesting that estuarine sediments can buffer the natural system against sudden injections of organic material. Two different levels of organic matter amendment resulted in different magnitudes of ammonium and nitrite accumulation during the incubation, but both treatments exhibited the same overall sequence of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) accumulation and removal. An inverse least-squares analysis coupled to a Michaelis-Menten prognostic model was conducted to estimate rates of nitrogen transformations from the measured DIN concentrations. Whereas the rates were higher at higher OM, the percentage of nitrogen lost via anammox was constant at 44.3 ± 0.3%. The stoichiometry of organic matter and the allochthonous supply of ammonium determined the relative contribution of anammox and denitrification to overall nitrogen loss. Further, in situ thermodynamics based on measured concentrations suggested that the energy favorability of denitrification and anammox plays a role in determining the timing of these processes as OM remineralization progresses.

  2. Design of Main Control Console Software in EAST Neutral Beam Injector's Control System for the First Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, De-Yun; Hu, Chun-Dong; Sheng, Peng; Zhao, Yuan-Zhe; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Cui, Qing-Long

    2013-10-01

    Neutral beam injector is one of the main plasma heating and plasma current driving methods for experimental advanced superconducting tokomaks (EAST). In order to realize visual operation of EAST neutral beam injector's control system (NBICS), main control console (MCC) is developed to work as the human-machine interface between the NBICS and physical operator. It can meet the requirements of visual control of NBICS by providing a user graphic interface. With the specific algorithms, the setup of power supply sequence is relatively independent and simple. Displaying the real-time feedback of the subsystems provides a reference for operators to monitor the status of the system. The MCC software runs on a Windows system and uses C++ language code while using client/server (C/S) mode, multithreading and cyclic redundancy check technology. The experimental results have proved that MCC provides a stability and reliability operation of NBICS and works as an effective man-machine interface at the same time.

  3. Ultra-precise holographic beam shaping for microscopic quantum control.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Philip; Preiss, Philipp M; Ma, Ruichao; Lukin, Alexander; Eric Tai, M; Rispoli, Matthew; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2016-06-27

    High-resolution addressing of individual ultracold atoms, trapped ions or solid state emitters allows for exquisite control in quantum optics experiments. This becomes possible through large aperture magnifying optics that project microscopic light patterns with diffraction limited performance. We use programmable amplitude holograms generated on a digital micromirror device to create arbitrary microscopic beam shapes with full phase and amplitude control. The system self-corrects for aberrations of up to several λ and reduces them to λ/50, leading to light patterns with a precision on the 10-4 level. We demonstrate aberration-compensated beam shaping in an optical lattice experiment and perform single-site addressing in a quantum gas microscope for 87Rb. PMID:27410551

  4. Electronically-Controlled Beam-Steering through Vanadium Dioxide Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Mohammed Reza M.; Yang, Shang-Hua; Wang, Tongyu; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Jarrahi, Mona

    2016-10-01

    Engineered metamaterials offer unique functionalities for manipulating the spectral and spatial properties of electromagnetic waves in unconventional ways. Here, we report a novel approach for making reconfigurable metasurfaces capable of deflecting electromagnetic waves in an electronically controllable fashion. This is accomplished by tilting the phase front of waves through a two-dimensional array of resonant metasurface unit-cells with electronically-controlled phase-change materials embedded inside. Such metasurfaces can be placed at the output facet of any electromagnetic radiation source to deflect electromagnetic waves at a desired frequency, ranging from millimeter-wave to far-infrared frequencies. Our design does not use any mechanical elements, external light sources, or reflectarrays, creating, for the first time, a highly robust and fully-integrated beam-steering device solution. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept beam-steering metasurface optimized for operation at 100 GHz, offering up to 44° beam deflection in both horizontal and vertical directions. Dynamic control of electromagnetic wave propagation direction through this unique platform could be transformative for various imaging, sensing, and communication applications, among others.

  5. Electronically-Controlled Beam-Steering through Vanadium Dioxide Metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Mohammed Reza M.; Yang, Shang-Hua; Wang, Tongyu; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Jarrahi, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Engineered metamaterials offer unique functionalities for manipulating the spectral and spatial properties of electromagnetic waves in unconventional ways. Here, we report a novel approach for making reconfigurable metasurfaces capable of deflecting electromagnetic waves in an electronically controllable fashion. This is accomplished by tilting the phase front of waves through a two-dimensional array of resonant metasurface unit-cells with electronically-controlled phase-change materials embedded inside. Such metasurfaces can be placed at the output facet of any electromagnetic radiation source to deflect electromagnetic waves at a desired frequency, ranging from millimeter-wave to far-infrared frequencies. Our design does not use any mechanical elements, external light sources, or reflectarrays, creating, for the first time, a highly robust and fully-integrated beam-steering device solution. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept beam-steering metasurface optimized for operation at 100 GHz, offering up to 44° beam deflection in both horizontal and vertical directions. Dynamic control of electromagnetic wave propagation direction through this unique platform could be transformative for various imaging, sensing, and communication applications, among others. PMID:27739471

  6. Electron beam controller. [using magnetic field to refocus spent electron beam in microwave oscillator tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An electron beam device which extracts energy from an electron beam before the electrons of the beam are captured by a collector apparatus is described. The device produces refocusing of a spent electron beam by minimizing tranverse electron velocities in the beam where the electrons, having a multiplicity of axial velocities, are sorted at high efficiency by collector electrodes.

  7. An ultra-compact and low loss passive beam-forming network integrated on chip with off chip linear array

    SciTech Connect

    Lepkowski, Stefan Mark

    2015-05-01

    The work here presents a review of beam forming architectures. As an example, the author presents an 8x8 Butler Matrix passive beam forming network including the schematic, design/modeling, operation, and simulated results. The limiting factor in traditional beam formers has been the large size dictated by transmission line based couplers. By replacing these couplers with transformer-based couplers, the matrix size is reduced substantially allowing for on chip compact integration. In the example presented, the core area, including the antenna crossover, measures 0.82mm×0.39mm (0.48% the size of a branch line coupler at the same frequency). The simulated beam forming achieves a peak PNR of 17.1 dB and 15dB from 57 to 63GHz. At the 60GHz center frequency the average insertion loss is simulated to be 3.26dB. The 8x8 Butler Matrix feeds into an 8-element antenna array to show the array patterns with single beam and adjacent beam isolation.

  8. Electronically controlled optical beam-steering by an active phased array of metallic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    DeRose, C T; Kekatpure, R D; Trotter, D C; Starbuck, A; Wendt, J R; Yaacobi, A; Watts, M R; Chettiar, U; Engheta, N; Davids, P S

    2013-02-25

    An optical phased array of nanoantenna fabricated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process is presented. The optical phased array is fed by low loss silicon waveguides with integrated ohmic thermo-optic phase shifters capable of 2π phase shift with ∼ 15 mW of applied electrical power. By controlling the electrical power to the individual integrated phase shifters fixed wavelength steering of the beam emitted normal to the surface of the wafer of 8° is demonstrated for 1 × 8 phased arrays with periods of both 6 and 9 μm. PMID:23482053

  9. Vibration control in smart coupled beams subjected to pulse excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarski, Dominik; Bajer, Czesław I.; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajkowski, Jacek M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a control method to stabilize the vibration of adjacent structures is presented. The control is realized by changes of the stiffness parameters of the structure's couplers. A pulse excitation applied to the coupled adjacent beams is imposed as the kinematic excitation. For such a representation, the designed control law provides the best rate of energy dissipation. By means of a stability analysis, the performance in different structural settings is studied. The efficiency of the proposed strategy is examined via numerical simulations. In terms of the assumed energy metric, the controlled structure outperforms its passively damped equivalent by over 50 percent. The functionality of the proposed control strategy should attract the attention of practising engineers who seek solutions to upgrade existing damping systems.

  10. Collimation system for beam loss localization with slip stacking injection in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce C.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Slip stacking injection for high intensity operation of the Fermilab Main Injector produces a small fraction of beam which is not captured in buckets and accelerated. A collimation system has been implemented with a thin primary collimator to define the momentum aperture at which this beam is lost and four massive secondary collimators to capture the scattered beam. The secondary collimators define tight apertures and thereby capture a fraction of other lost beam. The system was installed in 2007 with commissioning continuing in 2008. The collimation system will be described including simulation, design, installation, and commissioning. Successful operation and operational limitations will be described.

  11. Mitigation of beam fluctuation due to atmospheric turbulence and prediction of control quality using intelligent decision-making tools.

    PubMed

    Raj, A Arockia Bazil; Selvi, J Arputha Vijaya; Kumar, D; Sivakumaran, N

    2014-06-10

    In free-space optical link (FSOL), atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in both intensity and phase of the received beam and impairing link performance. The beam motion is one of the main causes for major power loss. This paper presents an investigation on the performance of two types of controller designed for aiming a laser beam to be at a particular spot under dynamic disturbances. The multiple experiment observability nonlinear input-output data mapping is used as the principal components for controllers design. The first design is based on the Taguchi method while the second is artificial neural network method. These controllers process the beam location information from a static linear map of 2D plane: optoelectronic position detector, as observer, and then generate the necessary outputs to steer the beam with a microelectromechanical mirror: fast steering mirror. The beam centroid is computed using monopulse algorithm. Evidence of suitability and effectiveness of the proposed controllers are comprehensively assessed and quantitatively measured in terms of coefficient of correlation, correction speed, control exactness, centroid displacement, and stability of the receiver signal through the experimental results from the FSO link setup established for the horizontal range of 0.5 km at an altitude of 15.25 m. The test field type is open flat terrain, grass, and few isolated obstacles.

  12. Sliding Mode Control of a Slewing Flexible Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David G.; Parker, Gordon G.; Starr, Gregory P.; Robinett, Rush D., III

    1997-01-01

    An output feedback sliding mode controller (SMC) is proposed to minimize the effects of vibrations of slewing flexible manipulators. A spline trajectory is used to generate ideal position and velocity commands. Constrained nonlinear optimization techniques are used to both calibrate nonlinear models and determine optimized gains to produce a rest-to-rest, residual vibration-free maneuver. Vibration-free maneuvers are important for current and future NASA space missions. This study required the development of the nonlinear dynamic system equations of motion; robust control law design; numerical implementation; system identification; and verification using the Sandia National Laboratories flexible robot testbed. Results are shown for a slewing flexible beam.

  13. The system of RF beam control for electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. M.; Chernousov, Yu. D.; Ivannikov, V. I.; Levichev, A. E.; Shebolaev, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    The system of RF control of three-electrode electron gun current is described. It consists of a source of microwave signal, coaxial line, coaxial RF switch and RF antenna lead. The system allows one to get the electron beam in the form of bunches with the frequency of the accelerating section to achieve the capture of particles in the acceleration mode close to 100%. The results of calculation and analysis of the elements of the system are presented. Characteristics of the devices are obtained experimentally. The results of using RF control in three-electrode electron gun at electron linear accelerator are described.

  14. Constrained modes in control theory - Transmission zeros of uniform beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T.

    1992-01-01

    Mathematical arguments are presented demonstrating that the well-established control system concept of the transmission zero is very closely related to the structural concept of the constrained mode. It is shown that the transmission zeros of a flexible structure form a set of constrained natural frequencies for it, with the constraints depending explicitly on the locations and the types of sensors and actuators used for control. Based on this formulation, an algorithm is derived and used to produce dimensionless plots of the zero of a uniform beam with a compatible sensor/actuator pair.

  15. Experimental studies on active vibration control of a smart composite beam using a PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Miroslav M.; Simonović, Aleksandar M.; Zorić, Nemanja D.; Lukić, Nebojša S.; Stupar, Slobodan N.; Ilić, Slobodan S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents experimental verification of the active vibration control of a smart cantilever composite beam using a PID controller. In order to prevent negative occurrences in the derivative and integral terms in a PID controller, first-order low-pass filters are implemented in the derivative action and in the feedback of the integral action. The proposed application setup consists of a composite cantilever beam with a fiber-reinforced piezoelectric actuator and strain gage sensors. The beam is modeled using a finite element method based on third-order shear deformation theory. The experiment considers vibration control under periodic excitation and an initial static deflection. A control algorithm was implemented on a PIC32MX440F256H microcontroller. Experimental results corresponding to the proposed PID controller are compared with corresponding results using proportional (P) control, proportional-integral (PI) control and proportional-derivative (PD) control. Experimental results indicate that the proposed PID controller provides 8.93% more damping compared to a PD controller, 14.41% more damping compared to a PI controller and 19.04% more damping compared to a P controller in the case of vibration under periodic excitation. In the case of free vibration control, the proposed PID controller shows better performance (settling time 1.2 s) compared to the PD controller (settling time 1.5 s) and PI controller (settling time 2.5 s).

  16. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-06-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H{sup +} for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H{sub 0} atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  17. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-01-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H[sup +] for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 [mu]g/cm[sup 2], were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H[sub 0] atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  18. Experimental demonstration of a controllable electrostatic molecular beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lianzhong; Liang, Yan; Gu, Zhenxing; Hou, Shunyong; Li, Shengqiang; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2011-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a controllable electrostatic beam splitter for guided ND3 molecules with a single Y-shaped charged wire and a homogeneous bias field generated by a charged metallic parallel-plate capacitor. We study the dependences of the splitting ratio R of the guided ND3 beam and its relative guiding efficiency η on the voltage difference between two output arms of the splitter. The influences of the molecular velocity v and the cutting position L on the splitting ratio R are investigated as well, and the guiding and splitting dynamic processes of cold molecules are simulated. Our study shows that the splitting ratio R of our splitter can be conveniently adjusted from 10% to 90% by changing ΔU from -6  kV to +6  kV, and the simulated results are consistent with our experimental ones.

  19. Input reconstruction for networked control systems subject to deception attacks and data losses on control signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, J. Y.; Chabir, K.; Sauter, D.

    2016-03-01

    State estimation of stochastic discrete-time linear systems subject to unknown inputs or constant biases has been widely studied but no work has been dedicated to the case where a disturbance switches between unknown input and constant bias. We show that such disturbance can affect a networked control system subject to deception attacks and data losses on the control signals transmitted by the controller to the plant. This paper proposes to estimate the switching disturbance from an augmented state version of the intermittent unknown input Kalman filter recently developed by the authors. Sufficient stochastic stability conditions are established when the arrival binary sequence of data losses follows a Bernoulli random process.

  20. Summary report of working group 5 : beam generation, monitoring, and control.;

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, J. W.; Piot, P.; Accelerator Systems Division; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2006-01-01

    The working group on beam quality, diagnostics, and control at the 12th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. The generation of bright charged-particle beams (in particular electron and positron beams), along with state-of-the-art beam diagnostics and synchronization were discussed.

  1. A novel digitization scheme with FPGA-base TDC for beam loss monitors operating at cryogenic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Warner, Arden; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Recycling integrators are common current-to-frequency converting circuits for measurements of low current such as that produced by Fermilab's cryogenic ionization chambers. In typical digitization/readout schemes, a counter is utilized to accumulate the number of pulses generated by the recycling integrator to adequately digitize the total charge. In order to calculate current with reasonable resolution (e.g., 7-8 bits), hundreds of pulses must be accumulated which corresponds to a long sampling period, i.e., a very low sampling rate. In our new scheme, an FPGA-based Time-to-Digital Convertor (TDC) is utilized to measure the time intervals between the pulses output from the recycling integrator. Using this method, a sample point of the current can be made with good resolution (>10 bits) for each pulse. This effectively increases the sampling rates by hundreds of times for the same recycling integrator front-end electronics. This scheme provides a fast response to the beams loss and is potentially suitable for accelerator protection applications. Moreover, the method is also self-zero-suppressed, i.e., it produces more data when the beam loss is high while it produces significantly less data when the beam loss is low.

  2. Energy Loss of High Intensity Focused Proton Beams Penetrating Metal Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Evans, M.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Canning, D.; Mastrosimone, D.; Foord, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Shortpulse-laser-driven intense ion beams are appealing for applications in probing and creating high energy density plasmas. Such a beam isochorically heats and rapidly ionizes any target it enters into warm dense matter with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we present experimental measurements taken with the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP BL shortpulse laser of the proton and carbon spectra after passing through metal foils. The laser irradiated spherically curved C targets with intensity 4×1018 W/cm2, producing proton beams with 3 MeV slope temperature and a sharp low energy cutoff at 5 MeV which has not been observed on lower energy, shorter pulse intense lasers. The beam either diverged freely or was focused to estimated 1016 p +/cm2 ps by a surrounding structure before entering the metal foils (Al or Ag and a Cu tracer layer). The proton and ion spectra were altered by the foil depending on material and whether or not the beam was focused. Transverse proton radiography probed the target with ps temporal and 10 micron spatial resolution, indicating an electrostatic field on the foil may also have affected the beam. We present complementary particle-in-cell simulations of the beam generation and transport to the foils. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA National Laser User Facility program, Contract DE-SC0001265.

  3. Active Position Control of a Flexible Smart Beam Using Internal Model Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEE, Y.-S.; ELLIOTT, S. J.

    2001-05-01

    The problem of controlling the position at the tip of a flexible cantilever beam to follow a command signal is considered, by using a pair of piezoelectric actuators at the clamped end. The beam is lightly damped and so the natural transient response is rather long, and also since the sensor and actuator are not collocated, the plant response is non-minimum phase. Two control strategies were investigated. The first involved conventional PID control in which the feedback gains were adjusted to give the fastest closed-loop response to a step input. The second control strategy was based on an internal model control (IMC) architecture. The control filter in the IMC controller was a digital FIR device designed to minimize the expectation of the mean square tracking error. In practice, such smart beams could be exposed to temperature fluctuations and changes in geometry. The effect of these variations on the stability was studied and it is shown that the need for robustness to such variations leads to a limitation in the performance of an IMC controller. The improvement in the stability robustness by incorporating control effort weighting into the cost function being minimized was investigated, as was the incorporation of modelling delay in the design of the IMC control filter. The IMC controller designed for the beam was found to have much reduced settling times to a step input compared with those of the PID controller while maintaining good robustness to changes in temperature. However, the extremely low damping of the experimental beam made it difficult to implement an accurate plant model in practice.

  4. Geologic controls influencing CO2 loss from a leaking well.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Polly L.; Martinez, Mario J.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Klise, Katherine A.

    2010-12-01

    Injection of CO2 into formations containing brine is proposed as a long-term sequestration solution. A significant obstacle to sequestration performance is the presence of existing wells providing a transport pathway out of the sequestration formation. To understand how heterogeneity impacts the leakage rate, we employ two dimensional models of the CO2 injection process into a sandstone aquifer with shale inclusions to examine the parameters controlling release through an existing well. This scenario is modeled as a constant-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into the existing formation where buoyancy effects, relative permeabilities, and capillary pressures are employed. Three geologic controls are considered: stratigraphic dip angle, shale inclusion size and shale fraction. In this study, we examine the impact of heterogeneity on the amount and timing of CO2 released through a leaky well. Sensitivity analysis is performed to classify how various geologic controls influence CO2 loss. A 'Design of Experiments' approach is used to identify the most important parameters and combinations of parameters to control CO2 migration while making efficient use of a limited number of computations. Results are used to construct a low-dimensional description of the transport scenario. The goal of this exploration is to develop a small set of parametric descriptors that can be generalized to similar scenarios. Results of this work will allow for estimation of the amount of CO2 that will be lost for a given scenario prior to commencing injection. Additionally, two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are compared to quantify the influence that surrounding geologic media has on the CO2 leakage rate.

  5. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Wenwu; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang; Li, Songhai; Tang, Liguo; Zhang, Sai

    2016-07-01

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  6. Fabrication of low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon strip waveguide using focused proton-beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Teo, E J; Bettiol, A A; Yang, P; Breese, M B H; Xiong, B Q; Mashanovich, G Z; Headley, W R; Reed, G T

    2009-03-01

    We have successfully fabricated low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon (SOPS) strip waveguides with high-index contrast using focused proton-beam irradiation and electrochemical etching. Smooth surface quality with rms roughness of 3.1 nm is achieved for a fluence of 1x10(15)/cm(2) after postoxidation treatment. Optical characterization at a wavelength of 1550 nm shows a loss of 1.1+/-0.4 dB/cm and 1.2+/-0.4 dB/cm in TE and TM polarization respectively, which we believe is the lowest reported loss for SOPS waveguides. This opens up new opportunities for all-silicon-based optoelectronics applications.

  7. Active vibration control of a free-free beam by using a tendon mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Junji; Ueda, Hiroki

    This paper is concerned with an active vibration control of a free-free beam. The beam is reduced to a finite-degree-of-freedom system by the modal analysis, in which the mode function is derived from the transfer matrix method. A control force is produced by a pair of tendons and a DC servo motor attached to the beam. The state of the beam is presumed by the minimum order state observer and the control force is determined by the digital optimum regulator theory. It is found that the active tendon control method is effective to suppress the vibration of the free-free beam.

  8. Beam control and diagnostic functions in the NIF transport spatial filter

    SciTech Connect

    Holdener, F.R.; Ables, E.; Bliss, E.S.

    1996-10-01

    Beam control and diagnostic systems are required to align the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser prior to a shot as well as to provide diagnostics on 192 beam lines at shot time. A design that allows each beam`s large spatial filter lenses to also serve as objective lenses for beam control and diagnostic sensor packages helps to accomplish the task at a reasonable cost. However, this approach also causes a high concentration of small optics near the pinhole plane of the transport spatial filter (TSF) at the output of each beam. This paper describes the optomechanical design in and near the central vacuum vessel of the TSF.

  9. Genetic Control of Weight Loss During Pneumonic Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Felicia D.; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Cui, Yan; Williams, Robert W.; Miller, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causal agent of a high morbidity/mortality disease syndrome known as melioidosis. This syndrome can range from acute fulminate disease to chronic, local, and disseminated infections that are often difficult to treat because Bp exhibits resistance to many antibiotics. Bp is a prime candidate for use in biological warfare/terrorism and is classified as a Tier-1 Select Agent by HHS and APHIS. It is known that inbred mouse strains display a range of susceptibility to Bp and that the murine infection model is ideal for studying acute melioidosis. Here we exploit a powerful mouse genetics resource that consists of a large family of BXD type recombinant inbred strains, to perform genome-wide linkage analysis of the weight loss phenotype following pneumonic infection with Bp. We infected parental mice and 32 BXD strains with 50-100 CFU of Bp (strain 1026b) and monitored weight retention each day over an eleven-day time course. Using the computational tools in GeneNetwork, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis to identify an interval on chromosome 12 that appears to control the weight retention trait. We then analysed and ranked positional candidate genes in this interval, several of which have intriguing connections with innate immunity, calcium homeostasis, lipid transport, host cell growth and development, and autophagy. PMID:24687986

  10. Unexpected advantages of a temporary fluid-loss control pill

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, M.

    1996-09-01

    Economics often dictate research; however, serendipity can benefit the results of research and simultaneously soften the rigidity of economic demands. Such as the case with a recently developed fluid-loss control pill. Economic reasons compelled researchers to find a replacement for an existing field product, the characteristics of which had to be duplicated. Initially, researchers sought to develop a pill that blocked fluid flow into and out of the wellbore and was mixable in brines from 8.35 to 19 lb/gal. The degradation of the replacement crosslinkable hydroxyethyl cellulose fluid (RXHEC) involves uncrosslinking and unzipping of backbone, which simplifies the disposal of returns. In addition to being environmentally acceptable, RXHEC is capable of breaking with weak acids, allowing the use of external breakers in acid-sensitive wells. Additional advantages include the ease with which tubulars can pass through the RXHEC pill and leave it in place, making a remedial pill unnecessary. The RXHEC uses a liquid gel concentrate (LGC) system and is stable beyond 125 C.

  11. Examination of Icing Induced Loss of Control and Its Mitigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Colantonio, Renato O.

    2010-01-01

    Factors external to the aircraft are often a significant causal factor in loss of control (LOC) accidents. In today s aviation world, very few accidents stem from a single cause and typically have a number of causal factors that culminate in a LOC accident. Very often the "trigger" that initiates an accident sequence is an external environment factor. In a recent NASA statistical analysis of LOC accidents, aircraft icing was shown to be the most common external environmental LOC causal factor for scheduled operations. When investigating LOC accident or incidents aircraft icing causal factors can be categorized into groups of 1) in-flight encounter with super-cooled liquid water clouds, 2) take-off with ice contamination, or 3) in-flight encounter with high concentrations of ice crystals. As with other flight hazards, icing induced LOC accidents can be prevented through avoidance, detection, and recovery mitigations. For icing hazards, avoidance can take the form of avoiding flight into icing conditions or avoiding the hazard of icing by making the aircraft tolerant to icing conditions. Icing detection mitigations can take the form of detecting icing conditions or detecting early performance degradation caused by icing. Recovery from icing induced LOC requires flight crew or automated systems capable of accounting for reduced aircraft performance and degraded control authority during the recovery maneuvers. In this report we review the icing induced LOC accident mitigations defined in a recent LOC study and for each mitigation describe a research topic required to enable or strengthen the mitigation. Many of these research topics are already included in ongoing or planned NASA icing research activities or are being addressed by members of the icing research community. These research activities are described and the status of the ongoing or planned research to address the technology needs is discussed

  12. Fullerene-assisted electron-beam lithography for pattern improvement and loss reduction in InP membrane waveguide devices.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuqing; Pello, Josselin; Mejia, Alonso Millan; Shen, Longfei; Smalbrugge, Barry; Geluk, Erik Jan; Smit, Meint; van der Tol, Jos

    2014-03-15

    In this Letter, we present a method to prepare a mixed electron-beam resist composed of a positive resist (ZEP520A) and C60 fullerene. The addition of C60 to the ZEP resist changes the material properties under electron beam exposure significantly. An improvement in the thermal resistance of the mixed material has been demonstrated by fabricating multimode interference couplers and coupling regions of microring resonators. The fabrication of distributed Bragg reflector structures has shown improvement in terms of pattern definition accuracy with respect to the same structures fabricated with normal ZEP resist. Straight InP membrane waveguides with different lengths have been fabricated using this mixed resist. A decrease of the propagation loss from 6.6 to 3.3  dB/cm has been demonstrated.

  13. Procedures control total mud losses while drilling in deep water

    SciTech Connect

    Dewar, J. ); Halkett, D. )

    1993-11-01

    In the deepwater (830-1,000 m) drilling program offshore Philippines, reefal limestones were encountered in which total mud losses could be expected because of the presence of large fractures. The danger was that a sudden drop in hydrostatic head (resulting from the losses) could allow any natural gas to enter the well bore quickly. The gas could then migrate up the well bore and form hydrates in the blowout preventers (BOPs). Once hydrates form, they are difficult to remove and can make a BOP stack inoperable. To combat this potential problem, containment procedures were developed to cope with these fluid losses. The philosophy behind the procedures was to prevent hydrocarbons from entering the well bore and, if they did enter, to ensure that they did not move up the well bore and into the riser. Additionally, procedures were developed to allow drilling to continue during the losses and the curing of losses.

  14. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B.

    1995-10-12

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia`s 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (150 and 225 kW), scan frequency (30, 115 and 450 Hz) and background pressure (10{sup {minus}3}, 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}5} torr).

  15. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Avyle, J.V.D.; Damkroger, B.

    1995-12-31

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia`s 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (10{sup {minus}3}, 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}5} torr).

  16. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 2: with Beam Shutdown Only

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. This report documents the results of simulations of a Loss-of-Flow Accident (LOFA) where power is lost to all of the pumps that circulate water in the blanket region, the accelerator beam is shut off and neither the residual heat removal nor cavity flood systems operate.

  17. Estimation of the equivalent complex modulus of laminated glass beams and its application to sound transmission loss prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Belder, K.; Pintelon, R.; Demol, C.; Roose, P.

    2010-04-01

    The complex modulus E( jω) characterizes the visco-elastic behavior of a material. Using a system identification approach, this modulus can be measured via broadband modal analysis experiments. The technique is applied to determine the equivalent complex modulus E( jω), with its uncertainty bound, of multilayer glass beams from transversal vibration experiments in free-free boundary conditions. This property is related to the effective complex bending stiffness of the laminated glass specimen, and is further used for predicting the sound transmission loss of a multilayer plate. The data are rationalized in the terms of the linear visco-elastic properties of the polymer interlayer.

  18. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  19. An Agile Beam Transmit Array Using Coupled Oscillator Phase Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald S.; Scaramastra, Rocco P.; Huang, John; Beckon, Robert J.; Petree, Steve M.; Chavez, Cosme

    1993-01-01

    A few years ago York and colleagues suggested that injection locking of voltage controlled oscillators could be used to implement beam steering in a phased array [I]. The scheme makes use of the fact that when an oscillator is injection locked to an external signal, the phase difference between the output of the oscillator and the injection signal is governed by the difference between the injection frequency and the free running frequency of the oscillator (the frequency to which the oscillator is tuned). Thus, if voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs) are used, this phase difference is controlled by an applied voltage. Now, if a set of such oscillators are coupled to nearest neighbors, they can be made to mutually injection lock and oscillate as an ensemble. If they are all tuned to the same frequency, they will all oscillate in phase. Thus, if the outputs are connected to radiating elements forming a linear array, the antenna will radiate normal to the line of elements. Scanning is accomplished by antisymmetrically detuning the end oscillators in the array by application of a pair of appropriate voltages to their tuning ports. This results in a linear phase progression across the array which is just the phasing required to scan the beam. The scan angle is determined by the degree of detuning. We have constructed a seven element one dimensional agile beam array at S-band based on the above principle. Although, a few such arrays have been built in the past, this array possesses two unique features. First, the VCO MMICs have buffer amplifiers which isolate the output from the tuning circuit, and second, the oscillators are weakly coupled to each other at their resonant circuits rather than their outputs. This results in a convenient isolation between the oscillator array design and the radiating aperture design. An important parameter in the design is the so called coupling phase which determines the phase shift of the signals passing from one oscillator to its

  20. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between Pb ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; Bocian, D.; Gilardoni, S.; Jowett, J.M.; /CERN

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the alice interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  1. Combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy losses in solids irradiated with a dual-ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomé, Lionel; Debelle, Aurélien; Garrido, Frédérico; Trocellier, Patrick; Serruys, Yves; Velisa, Gihan; Miro, Sandrine

    2013-04-01

    Single and dual-beam irradiations of oxide (c-ZrO2, MgO, Gd2Ti2O7) and carbide (SiC) single crystals were performed to study combined effects of nuclear (Sn) and electronic (Se) energy losses. Rutherford backscattering experiments in channeling conditions show that the Sn/Se cooperation induces a strong decrease of the irradiation-induced damage in SiC and MgO and almost no effects in c-ZrO2 and Gd2Ti2O7. The healing process is ascribed to electronic excitations arising from the electronic energy loss of swift ions. These results present a strong interest for both fundamental understanding of the ion-solid interactions and technological applications in the nuclear industry where expected cooperative Sn/Se effects may lead to the preservation of the integrity of nuclear devices.

  2. Coating synthesis controlled by electron-beam heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. I.; Knyazeva, A. G.; Pobol, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    The methods of combined electron-beam treatment of parts made of steel with one- and two-layer coatings are studied experimentally. Ti-Ni, Ni-Al and Al-Ti systems were used as the examples in the experiments. The mathematical model is suggested for coating formation in the controlled regime of high temperature synthesis during high energy source motion along the preliminarily deposited layer of exothermic composition. The study takes into account the difference in thermophysical properties of the materials of coating and substrate, heat release from chemical reaction that leads to the coating properties formation and other factors. The realization of the synthesis depends on technological parameters. Various regimes of the treatment process are investigated numerically.

  3. Proton beam therapy: A promising method of locoregional cancer control

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, J.M.; Preston, W. )

    1990-01-01

    Proton beams offer superior characteristics for clinical radiation therapy, including the capability to localize precisely the dose to the desired target volume. Such precision enables the radiation therapist to give higher doses to the tumor while avoiding intolerable doses to adjacent normal tissues. Locoregional control is thus increased, and treatment morbidity and side effects are decreased. When it opens in late spring 1990, Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton treatment facility will feature the world's first accelerator and proton therapy system designed for patient care. During the next decade, other similarly-designed proton therapy systems will be built in Canada, England, France, Belgium, Germany, Japan, and South Africa, as well as at Massachusetts General Hospital in the United States.

  4. Summary report on beam and radiation generation, monitoring and control (working group 6).

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Gordon, D. F.; High Energy Physics; Naval Research Lab.

    2009-01-01

    The discussions of the working group on beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control (working group 6) at the 2008 advanced accelerator concepts workshop are summarized. The discussions concerned electron injectors, phase space manipulation, beam diagnostics, pulse train generation, intense beam physics, and radiation generation.

  5. Fast beam steering with full polarization control using a galvanometric optical scanner and polarization controller.

    PubMed

    Jofre, M; Anzolin, G; Steinlechner, F; Oliverio, N; Torres, J P; Pruneri, V; Mitchell, M W

    2012-05-21

    Optical beam steering is a key element in many industrial and scientific applications like in material processing, information technologies, medical imaging and laser display. Even though galvanometer-based scanners offer flexibility, speed and accuracy at a relatively low cost, they still lack the necessary control over the polarization required for certain applications. We report on the development of a polarization steerable system assembled with a fiber polarization controller and a galvanometric scanner, both controlled by a digital signal processor board. The system implements control of the polarization decoupled from the pointing direction through a feed-forward control scheme. This enables to direct optical beams to a desired direction without affecting its initial polarization state. When considering the full working field of view, we are able to compensate polarization angle errors larger than 0.2 rad, in a temporal window of less than ∼ 20 ms. Given the unification of components to fully control any polarization state while steering an optical beam, the proposed system is potentially integrable and robust.

  6. Fast beam steering with full polarization control using a galvanometric optical scanner and polarization controller.

    PubMed

    Jofre, M; Anzolin, G; Steinlechner, F; Oliverio, N; Torres, J P; Pruneri, V; Mitchell, M W

    2012-05-21

    Optical beam steering is a key element in many industrial and scientific applications like in material processing, information technologies, medical imaging and laser display. Even though galvanometer-based scanners offer flexibility, speed and accuracy at a relatively low cost, they still lack the necessary control over the polarization required for certain applications. We report on the development of a polarization steerable system assembled with a fiber polarization controller and a galvanometric scanner, both controlled by a digital signal processor board. The system implements control of the polarization decoupled from the pointing direction through a feed-forward control scheme. This enables to direct optical beams to a desired direction without affecting its initial polarization state. When considering the full working field of view, we are able to compensate polarization angle errors larger than 0.2 rad, in a temporal window of less than ∼ 20 ms. Given the unification of components to fully control any polarization state while steering an optical beam, the proposed system is potentially integrable and robust. PMID:22714214

  7. Modal domain fiber optic sensor for closed loop vibration control of a flexible beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D.; Thomas, D.; Reichard, K.; Lindner, D.; Claus, R. O.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a modal domain sensor in a vibration control experiment is described. An optical fiber is bonded along the length of a flexible beam. A control signal derived from the output of the modal domain sensor is used to suppress vibrations induced in the beam. A distributed effect model for the modal domain sensor is developed and combined with models of the beam and actuator dynamics to produce a system suitable for control design.

  8. Swelling-induced and controlled curving in layered gel beams

    PubMed Central

    Lucantonio, A.; Nardinocchi, P.; Pezzulla, M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe swelling-driven curving in originally straight and non-homogeneous beams. We present and verify a structural model of swollen beams, based on a new point of view adopted to describe swelling-induced deformation processes in bilayered gel beams, that is based on the split of the swelling-induced deformation of the beam at equilibrium into two components, both depending on the elastic properties of the gel. The method allows us to: (i) determine beam stretching and curving, once assigned the characteristics of the solvent bath and of the non-homogeneous beam, and (ii) estimate the characteristics of non-homogeneous flat gel beams in such a way as to obtain, under free-swelling conditions, three-dimensional shapes. The study was pursued by means of analytical, semi-analytical and numerical tools; excellent agreement of the outcomes of the different techniques was found, thus confirming the strength of the method. PMID:25383031

  9. Updated analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitation - I. Pure collisional and pure ohmic energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobranskis, R. R.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    We present updated analytical solutions of continuity equations for power-law beam electrons precipitating in (a) purely collisional losses and (b) purely ohmic losses. The solutions of continuity equation (CE) normalized on electron density presented in Dobranskis & Zharkova are found by method of characteristics eliminating a mistake in the density characteristic pointed out by Emslie et al. The corrected electron beam differential densities (DD) for collisions are shown to have energy spectra with the index of -(γ + 1)/2, coinciding with the one derived from the inverse problem solution by Brown, while being lower by 1/2 than the index of -γ/2 obtained from CE for electron flux. This leads to a decrease of the index of mean electron spectra from -(γ - 2.5) (CE for flux) to -(γ - 2.0) (CE for electron density). The similar method is applied to CE for electrons precipitating in electric field induced by the beam itself. For the first time, the electron energy spectra are calculated for both constant and variable electric fields by using CE for electron density. We derive electron DD for precipitating electrons (moving towards the photosphere, μ = +1) and `returning' electrons (moving towards the corona, μ = -1). The indices of DD energy spectra are reduced from -γ - 1 (CE for flux) to -γ (CE for electron density). While the index of mean electron spectra is increased by 0.5, from -γ + 0.5 (CE for flux) to -γ + 1(CE for electron density). Hard X-ray intensities are also calculated for relativistic cross-section for the updated differential spectra revealing closer resemblance to numerical Fokker-Planck (FP) solutions.

  10. Future Integrated Systems Concept for Preventing Aircraft Loss-of-Control Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine M.; Jacobson, Steven r.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control remains one of the largest contributors to aircraft fatal accidents worldwide. Aircraft loss-of-control accidents are highly complex in that they can result from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or (more often) in combination. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents. This paper presents future system concepts and research directions for preventing aircraft loss-of-control accidents.

  11. Control of ion loss from Mars during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Stephen H.; Ledvina, Stephen A.

    2012-02-01

    A hybrid particle code has been used to examine the interaction of the solar wind with Mars during solar minimum. The results were surprising as they produced ion loss rates from Mars far in excess of what is estimated from MEX. The results are analyzed and found to be consistent with the competition between photochemical rates and advection of the ionosphere. The simulations showed significant erosion of the ionosphere at altitudes between 200 km and 250 km altitudes. Addition of the crustal magnetic fields reduced the erosion and reduced the ion loss rates to a level consistent with the data.

  12. The toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode structure in DIII-D: Implications of soft x-ray and beam-ion loss data

    SciTech Connect

    Carolipio, E. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chu, M. S.; Fu, G. Y.; Jaun, A.; Spong, D. A.; Turnbull, A. D.; White, R. B.

    2001-07-01

    The internal structure of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) is studied by comparing soft x-ray profile and beam ion loss data taken during TAE activity in the DIII-D tokamak [W. W. Heidbrink , Nucl. Fusion 37, 1411 (1997)] with predictions from theories based on ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), gyrofluid, and gyrokinetic models. The soft x-ray measurements indicate a centrally peaked eigenfunction, a feature which is closest to the gyrokinetic model's prediction. The beam ion losses are simulated using a guiding center code. In the simulations, the TAE eigenfunction calculated using the ideal MHD model acts as a perturbation to the equilibrium field. The predicted beam ion losses are an order of magnitude less than the observed {approx}6%--8% losses at the peak experimental amplitude of {delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}{approx_equal}2--5 x 10{sup -4}.

  13. Controlling leakage losses in subwavelength grating silicon metamaterial waveguides.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Merenguel, J Darío; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Wangüemert-Pérez, J Gonzalo; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Durán-Valdeiglesias, Elena; Cheben, Pavel; Molina-Fernández, Íñigo; Halir, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Subwavelength gratings (SWG) are photonic structures with a period small enough to suppress diffraction, thereby acting as artificial dielectric materials, also called all-dielectric metamaterials. This property has been exploited in many high-performance photonic integrated devices in the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. While SWG waveguides are theoretically lossless, they may exhibit leakage penalty to the substrate due to a combination of reduced modal confinement and finite thickness of the buried oxide (BOX) layer. In this Letter, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we analyze substrate leakage losses in SWG waveguides. We establish a direct relation between the effective index of the waveguide mode and the leakage losses which, remarkably, is independent of the geometric parameters of the SWG waveguide. This universal relation is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, and it provides practical design guidelines to mitigate leakage losses. For BOX thicknesses of 2 and 3 μm, we find negligible leakage losses when the mode effective index is higher than 1.65 and 1.55, respectively. PMID:27472589

  14. EVALUATION OF NANOFILTRATION PRETREATMENTS FOR FLUX LOSS CONTROL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The loss of membrane flux due to fouling is a major impediment to the development of membrane processes for use in drinking water treatment. The objective of this work was to evaluate fouling in nanofiltration (NF) pilot systems fed conventionally-treated (coagulation/sedimentati...

  15. Model-based beam control for illumination of remote objects, part II: laboratory testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Santasri; Voelz, David; Chandler, Susan M.; Lukesh, Gordon W.; Sjogren, Jon

    2004-10-01

    When a laser beam propagates through the atmosphere, it is subject to corrupting influences including mechanical vibrations, turbulence and tracker limitations. As a result, pointing errors can occur, causing loss of energy or signal at the target. Nukove Scientific Consulting has developed algorithms to estimate these pointing errors from the statistics of the return photons from the target. To prove the feasibility of this approach for real-time estimation, an analysis tool called RHINO was developed by Nukove. Associated with this effort, New Mexico State University developed a laboratory testbed, the ultimate objective being to test the estimation algorithms under controlled conditions and to stream data into RHINO to prove the feasibility of real-time operation. The present paper outlines the description of this testbed and the results obtained through RHINO when the testbed was used to test the estimation approach.

  16. Synthesis of Pt nanoparticles and their burrowing into Si due to synergistic effects of ion beam energy losses.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravin; Singh, Udai Bhan; Mal, Kedar; Ojha, Sunil; Sulania, Indra; Kanjilal, Dinakar; Singh, Dinesh; Singh, Vidya Nand

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles and their burrowing into silicon upon irradiation of a Pt-Si thin film with medium-energy neon ions at constant fluence (1.0 × 10(17) ions/cm(2)). Several values of medium-energy neon ions were chosen in order to vary the ratio of the electronic energy loss to the nuclear energy loss (S e/S n) from 1 to 10. The irradiated films were characterized using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A TEM image of a cross section of the film irradiated with S e/S n = 1 shows ≈5 nm Pt NPs were buried up to ≈240 nm into the silicon. No silicide phase was detected in the XRD pattern of the film irradiated at the highest value of S e/S n. The synergistic effect of the energy losses of the ion beam (molten zones are produced by S e, and sputtering and local defects are produced by S n) leading to the synthesis and burrowing of Pt NPs is evidenced. The Pt NP synthesis mechanism and their burrowing into the silicon is discussed in detail. PMID:25383298

  17. Ammonia Volatilization Losses from Paddy Fields under Controlled Irrigation with Different Drainage Treatments

    PubMed Central

    He, Yupu; Yang, Shihong; Wang, Yijiang

    2014-01-01

    The effect of controlled drainage (CD) on ammonia volatilization (AV) losses from paddy fields under controlled irrigation (CI) was investigated by managing water table control levels using a lysimeter. Three drainage treatments were implemented, namely, controlled water table depth 1 (CWT1), controlled water table depth 2 (CWT2), and controlled water table depth 3 (CWT3). As the water table control levels increased, irrigation water volumes in the CI paddy fields decreased. AV losses from paddy fields reduced due to the increases in water table control levels. Seasonal AV losses from CWT1, CWT2, and CWT3 were 59.8, 56.7, and 53.0 kg N ha−1, respectively. AV losses from CWT3 were 13.1% and 8.4% lower than those from CWT1 and CWT2, respectively. A significant difference in the seasonal AV losses was confirmed between CWT1 and CWT3. Less weekly AV losses followed by TF and PF were also observed as the water table control levels increased. The application of CD by increasing water table control levels to a suitable level could effectively reduce irrigation water volumes and AV losses from CI paddy fields. The combination of CI and CD may be a feasible water management method of reducing AV losses from paddy fields. PMID:24741349

  18. High-speed reference-beam-angle control technique for holographic memory drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ken-ichiro; Ogata, Takeshi; Hosaka, Makoto; Fujita, Koji; Okuyama, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    We developed a holographic memory drive for next-generation optical memory. In this study, we present the key technology for achieving a high-speed transfer rate for reproduction, that is, a high-speed control technique for the reference beam angle. In reproduction in a holographic memory drive, there is the issue that the optimum reference beam angle during reproduction varies owing to distortion of the medium. The distortion is caused by, for example, temperature variation, beam irradiation, and moisture absorption. Therefore, a reference-beam-angle control technique to position the reference beam at the optimum angle is crucial. We developed a new optical system that generates an angle-error-signal to detect the optimum reference beam angle. To achieve the high-speed control technique using the new optical system, we developed a new control technique called adaptive final-state control (AFSC) that adds a second control input to the first one derived from conventional final-state control (FSC) at the time of angle-error-signal detection. We established an actual experimental system employing AFSC to achieve moving control between each page (Page Seek) within 300 µs. In sequential multiple Page Seeks, we were able to realize positioning to the optimum angles of the reference beam that maximize the diffracted beam intensity. We expect that applying the new control technique to the holographic memory drive will enable a giga-bit/s-class transfer rate.

  19. ISS Contingency Attitude Control Recovery Method for Loss of Automatic Thruster Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrossian, Nazareth; Bhatt, Sagar; Alaniz, Abran; McCants, Edward; Nguyen, Louis; Chamitoff, Greg

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the attitude control issues associated with International Space Station (ISS) loss of automatic thruster control capability are discussed and methods for attitude control recovery are presented. This scenario was experienced recently during Shuttle mission STS-117 and ISS Stage 13A in June 2007 when the Russian GN&C computers, which command the ISS thrusters, failed. Without automatic propulsive attitude control, the ISS would not be able to regain attitude control after the Orbiter undocked. The core issues associated with recovering long-term attitude control using CMGs are described as well as the systems engineering analysis to identify recovery options. It is shown that the recovery method can be separated into a procedure for rate damping to a safe harbor gravity gradient stable orientation and a capability to maneuver the vehicle to the necessary initial conditions for long term attitude hold. A manual control option using Soyuz and Progress vehicle thrusters is investigated for rate damping and maneuvers. The issues with implementing such an option are presented and the key issue of closed-loop stability is addressed. A new non-propulsive alternative to thruster control, Zero Propellant Maneuver (ZPM) attitude control method is introduced and its rate damping and maneuver performance evaluated. It is shown that ZPM can meet the tight attitude and rate error tolerances needed for long term attitude control. A combination of manual thruster rate damping to a safe harbor attitude followed by a ZPM to Stage long term attitude control orientation was selected by the Anomaly Resolution Team as the alternate attitude control method for such a contingency.

  20. Spillover Effects of Loss of Control on Risky Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Beisswingert, Birgit M; Zhang, Keshun; Goetz, Thomas; Fischbacher, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Decision making in risky situations is frequently required in our everyday lives and has been shown to be influenced by various factors, some of which are independent of the risk context. Based on previous findings and theories about the central role of perceptions of control and their impact on subsequent settings, spillover effects of subjective loss of control on risky decision-making are assumed. After developing an innovative experimental paradigm for inducing loss of control, its hypothesized effects on risky decision-making are investigated. Partially supporting the hypotheses, results demonstrated no increased levels of risk perceptions but decreased risk-taking behavior following experiences of loss of control. Thus, this study makes a methodological contribution by proposing a newly developed experimental paradigm facilitating further research on the effects of subjective loss of control, and additionally provides partial evidence for the spillover effects of loss of control experiences on risky decision-making. PMID:26930066

  1. Spillover Effects of Loss of Control on Risky Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Beisswingert, Birgit M; Zhang, Keshun; Goetz, Thomas; Fischbacher, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Decision making in risky situations is frequently required in our everyday lives and has been shown to be influenced by various factors, some of which are independent of the risk context. Based on previous findings and theories about the central role of perceptions of control and their impact on subsequent settings, spillover effects of subjective loss of control on risky decision-making are assumed. After developing an innovative experimental paradigm for inducing loss of control, its hypothesized effects on risky decision-making are investigated. Partially supporting the hypotheses, results demonstrated no increased levels of risk perceptions but decreased risk-taking behavior following experiences of loss of control. Thus, this study makes a methodological contribution by proposing a newly developed experimental paradigm facilitating further research on the effects of subjective loss of control, and additionally provides partial evidence for the spillover effects of loss of control experiences on risky decision-making.

  2. Spillover Effects of Loss of Control on Risky Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Beisswingert, Birgit M.; Zhang, Keshun; Goetz, Thomas; Fischbacher, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Decision making in risky situations is frequently required in our everyday lives and has been shown to be influenced by various factors, some of which are independent of the risk context. Based on previous findings and theories about the central role of perceptions of control and their impact on subsequent settings, spillover effects of subjective loss of control on risky decision-making are assumed. After developing an innovative experimental paradigm for inducing loss of control, its hypothesized effects on risky decision-making are investigated. Partially supporting the hypotheses, results demonstrated no increased levels of risk perceptions but decreased risk-taking behavior following experiences of loss of control. Thus, this study makes a methodological contribution by proposing a newly developed experimental paradigm facilitating further research on the effects of subjective loss of control, and additionally provides partial evidence for the spillover effects of loss of control experiences on risky decision-making. PMID:26930066

  3. Optimum shape control of flexible beams by piezo-electric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the static deformation and shape of flexible beams is examined. An optimum design procedure is presented to enable the selection of the optimal location, thickness and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the deflection of the beam to which these actuators are bonded. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the developed optimization procedure in minimizing structural deformation of beams using ceramic and polymeric piezoelectric actuators bonded to the beams with a typical bonding agent. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised rational produce in designing beam-actuator systems with minimal elastic distortions.

  4. Electron beam treatment parameters for control of stored product insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleghorn, D. A.; Nablo, S. V.; Ferro, D. N.; Hagstrum, D. W.

    2002-03-01

    The fluidized bed process (EBFB) has been evaluated for the disinfestation of cereal grains. The various life stages from egg to adult have been studied on the 225 kV pilot as a function of surface dose. Three of the most common pests were selected: the rice weevil ( S. oryzae), the lesser grain borer ( R. dominica) and the red flour beetle ( T. castaneum). The major challenge to this process lies in those "protected" life-stages active deeply within the endosperm of the grain kernel. The rice weevil is such an internal feeder in which the larvae develop through several molts during several weeks before pupation and adult emergence. Product velocities up to 2000 m/min have been used for infested hard winter wheat at dose levels up to 1000 Gy. Detailed depth of penetration studies at three life stages of S. oryzae larvae were conducted at 225-700 kV and demonstrated effective mortality at 400 kV×200 Gy. Mortality data are also presented for the radiation labile eggs of these insects as well as the (sterile) adults, which typically lived for several weeks before death. These results are compared with earlier 60Co gamma-ray studies on these same insects. Based upon these studies, the effectiveness of the fluidized bed process employing self-shielded electron beam equipment for insect control in wheat/rice at sub-kilogray dose levels has been demonstrated.

  5. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: casual parameters and duration of memory loss. Final report for November 84

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron-beam exposure was investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task for 10, 1, and 0.1 microsecond pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 1,000,000 rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (1,000,000 rad/s) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory system activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli.

  6. 7 CFR 4288.137 - Succession and loss of control of advanced biofuel facilities and production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Succession and loss of control of advanced biofuel... PROGRAMS Advanced Biofuel Payment Program General Provisions Payment Provisions § 4288.137 Succession and loss of control of advanced biofuel facilities and production. (a) Contract succession. An entity...

  7. 7 CFR 4288.137 - Succession and loss of control of advanced biofuel facilities and production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Succession and loss of control of advanced biofuel... PROGRAMS Advanced Biofuel Payment Program General Provisions § 4288.137 Succession and loss of control of advanced biofuel facilities and production. (a) Contract succession. An entity who becomes the...

  8. 7 CFR 4288.137 - Succession and loss of control of advanced biofuel facilities and production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Succession and loss of control of advanced biofuel... PROGRAMS Advanced Biofuel Payment Program General Provisions § 4288.137 Succession and loss of control of advanced biofuel facilities and production. (a) Contract succession. An entity who becomes the...

  9. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. In the event of voluntary or involuntary loss of control of the land by the ECP or EFRP cost-share...

  10. Active H ∞ control of the vibration of an axially moving cantilever beam by magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Chen, Huai-hai; He, Xu-dong

    2011-11-01

    An H ∞ method for the vibration control of an iron cantilever beam with axial velocity using the noncontact force by permanent magnets is proposed in the paper. The transverse vibration equation of the axially moving cantilever beam with a tip mass is derived by D'Alembert's principle and then updated by experiments. An experimental platform and a magnetic control system are introduced. The properties of the force between the magnet and the beam have been determined by theoretic analysis and tests. The H ∞ control strategy for the suppression of the beam transverse vibration by initial deformation excitations is put forward. The control method can be used for the beam with constant length or varying length. Numerical simulation and actual experiments are implemented. The results show that the control method is effective and the simulations fit well with the experiments.

  11. Optimum vibration control of flexible beams by piezo-electric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the structural vibrations of flexible beams is examined. A Modified Independent Modal Space Control (MIMSC) method is devised to enable the selection of the optimal location, control gains and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the amplitudes of vibrations of beams to which these actuators are bonded, as well as the input control energy necessary to suppress these vibrations. The developed method accounts for the effects that the piezoelectric actuators have on changing the elastic and inertial properties of the flexible beams. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the developed MIMSC method in minimizing the structural vibrations of beams of different materials when subjected to different loading and end conditions using ceramic or polymeric piezoelectric actuators. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised method in designing more realistic active control systems for flexible beams, in particular, and large flexible structures in general.

  12. Optimum vibration control of flexible beams by piezo-electric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.; Studer, P.

    1988-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the structural vibrations of flexible beams is examined. A Modified Independent Modal Space Control (MIMSC) method is devised to enable the selection of the optimal location, control gains and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the amplitudes of vibrations of beams to which these actuators are bonded, as well as the input control energy necessary to suppress these vibrations. The developed method accounts for the effects that the piezoelectric actuators have on changing the elastic and inertial properties of the flexible beams. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the developed MIMSC method in minimizing the structural vibrations of beams of different materials when subjected to different loading and end conditions using ceramic or polymeric piezoelectric actuators. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised method in designing more realistic active control systems for flexible beams, in particular, and large flexible structures in general.

  13. Dynamics and Control of Articulated Anisotropic Timoshenko Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1996-01-01

    The paper illustrates the use of continuum models in control design for stabilizing flexible structures. A 6-DOF anisotropic Timoshenko beam with discrete nodes where lumped masses or actuators are located provides a sufficiently rich model to be of interest for mathematical theory as well as practical application. We develop concepts and tools to help answer engineering questions without having to resort to ad hoc heuristic ("physical") arguments or faith. In this sense the paper is more mathematically oriented than engineering papers and vice versa at the same time. For instance we make precise time-domain solutions using the theory of semigroups of operators rather than formal "inverse Laplace transforms." We show that the modes arise as eigenvalues of the generator of the semigroup, which are then related to the eigenvalues of the stiffness operator. With the feedback control, the modes are no longer orthogonal and the question naturally arises as to whether there is still a modal expansion. Here we prove that the eigenfunctions yield a biorthogonal Riesz basis and indicate the corresponding expansion. We prove mathematically that the number of eigenvalues is nonfinite, based on the theory of zeros of entire functions. We make precise the notion of asymptotic modes and indicate how to calculate them. Although limited by space, we do consider the root locus problem and show for instance that the damping at first increases as the control gain increases but starts to decrease at a critical value, and goes to zero as the gain increases without bound. The undamped oscillatory modes remain oscillatory and the rigid-body modes go over into deadbeat modes. The Timoshenko model dynamics are translated into a canonical wave equation in a Hilbert space. The solution is shown to require the use of an "energy" norm which is no more than the total energy: potential plus kinetic. We show that, under an appropriate extension of the notion of controllability, rate feedback with

  14. Carbon loss induced by plasma beam irradiation in porous silica films

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, K.; Ono, T.; Kohmura, K.; Tanaka, H.; Fujii, N.; Hata, N.; Kikkawa, T.

    2007-06-01

    Plasma-induced damages of porous silica films during plasma processes were investigated by using a plasma beam irradiation apparatus. We used the porous silica films incorporated with methyl groups to achieve high hydrophobicity. The carbon (methyl group) reductions in the film as an index of the level of damages induced by Ar, He, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} plasma irradiations were examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The damage due to Ar and He plasma bombardment increased with an increase in the ion dosage, although it was not strongly affected by the ion energy in the range higher than 130 eV. Furthermore, it was found that the damage near the film surface was influenced more by metastable He atoms than by metastable Ar atoms. Both O ions and O atoms caused severe damage. N atoms did not affect the decrease of carbon content but reacted with carbon to form CN bonds. H atoms decreased carbon content slightly, but the amount of decrease was saturated by the further irradiation of H atoms.

  15. Controlling the resistive hose instability in relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fernsler, R.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Lampe, M.; Hubbard, R.F.

    1995-11-01

    The resistive hose instability has long been recognized as the major impediment to the propagation of intense, relativistic electrons beams in dense gas. However, hose is a convective instability, and therefore its growth is limited by the length of the beam pulse, the local growth rate, and the speed at which the instability convects through the pulse. The convective speed and the growth rate depend on the beam and plasma parameters, and these vary strongly from beam head to tail. In this paper, hose theory is reformulated to incorporate these variations, and the reformulated model is then used to compute the maximum hose growth possible in a given beam pulse. In air, the model predicts that hose grows by many orders of magnitude when the beam current is less than 10 kA or has a rise time more than a few nanoseconds long. But the growth is predicted to be less than a factor of 20 if the current is 50 kA or more, the rise time is subnanosecond, and the beam radius is properly tapered from head to tail. The model is supported by extensive numerical simulations and is in general agreement with available experimental data. Many of the issues discussed here may have application to other instabilities as well. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  17. Control of post-disruption runaway electron beams in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Eidietis, N. W.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Hollmann, E. M.; Humphrey, D. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; Moyer, R.A.; Strait, E. J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Wesley, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments in the DIII-D tokamak have demonstrated real-time control and dissipation of post-disruption runaway electron (RE) beams. In the event that disruption avoidance, control, and mitigation schemes fail to avoid or suppress RE generation, active control of the RE beam may be an important line of defense to prevent the rapid, localized deposition of RE beam energy onto vulnerable vessel sections. During and immediately after the current quench, excessive radial compression of the runaway beams is avoided by a combination of techniques, improving the likelihood of the beams surviving this dynamic period without a fast termination. Once stabilized, the runaway beams are held in a steady state (out to the ohmic flux limit) with the application of active plasma current and position controls. Beam interaction with the vessel wall is minimized by avoiding distinct thresholds for enhanced wall interaction at small and large radii, corresponding to inner wall and outer limiter interaction, respectively. Staying within the 'safe zone' between those radial thresholds allows for the sustainment of long-lived, quiescent runaway beams. The total beam energy and runaway electron population are then dissipated gradually by a controlled ramp-down of the runaway current.

  18. Force modification and deflection loss compensation to the pilot's controls in an aircraft simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Control loader systems are used widely in flight simulator cockpits so that pilots may experience the correct forces while manipulating the flight controls. Two simulators at Ames Research Center the Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft (FSAA) and the Moving Cab Transport Simulator (MCTS) - contain control loader systems that exhibit small control deflection losses at high forces. These losses make force calibration and documentation difficult and also may cause losses in control authority of the simulated aircraft. The study of the deflection losses indicates that the major cause is a structural or mechanical distortion that is linear with applied force. Thus, the phenomena may be modeled and, subsequently, compensation for the losses may be made in the associated simulation computer.

  19. Controlling multiple filaments by relativistic optical vortex beams in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, L. B.; Huang, T. W.; Xiao, K. D.; Wu, G. Z.; Yang, S. L.; Li, R.; Yang, Y. C.; Long, T. Y.; Zhang, H.; Wu, S. Z.; Qiao, B.; Ruan, S. C.; Zhou, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    Filamentation dynamics of relativistic optical vortex beams (OVBs) propagating in underdense plasma is investigated. It is shown that OVBs with finite orbital angular momentum (OAM) exhibit much more robust propagation behavior than the standard Gaussian beam. In fact, the growth rate of the azimuthal modulational instability decreases rapidly with increase of the OVB topological charge. Thus, relativistic OVBs can maintain their profiles for significantly longer distances in an underdense plasma before filamentation occurs. It is also found that an OVB would then break up into regular filament patterns due to conservation of the OAM, in contrast to a Gaussian laser beam, which in general experiences random filamentation.

  20. Advanced Beam Energy Spread Monitoring Systems and Their Control at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2005-03-01

    Two Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI) have been in use at Jefferson Lab for more than one year. Each SLI is an absolutely not invasive beam diagnostic device routinely monitoring the transverse beam size and beam energy spread in a wide range of beam energies and intensities with a very high accuracy. The SLI are automated with the use of distributed, multi-level, and multi-component control software. The paper describes the SLI configuration, the structure of the SLI control software and its performance.

  1. Interaction effect of psychological distress and asthma control on productivity loss?

    PubMed

    Moullec, Grégory; FitzGerald, J Mark; Rousseau, Roxanne; Chen, Wenjia; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the potential synergistic effect of comorbid psychological distress (PD) and uncontrolled asthma (UA) on productivity loss. We estimated the productivity loss associated with the combination of these two potentially preventable conditions in employed adults with asthma. A population-based random sample of 300 adults with asthma in British Columbia, Canada, was prospectively recruited between Dec 2010 and Aug 2012. PD and productivity loss due to absenteeism and presenteeism was measured using validated instruments, and asthma control was ascertained using 2010 Global Initiative for Asthma management strategy. We used two-part regression models to study the contribution of UA and PD to productivity loss. Compared with reference group (controlled asthma (CA)+noPD), those with UA+noPD had CAD$286 (95%CI $276-297) weekly productivity loss, and those with CA+PD had CAD$465 ($445-485). Those with UA+PD had CAD$449 (437-462) in productivity loss. There was no significant interaction effect of PD with asthma control levels on productivity loss (p=0.22). In patients without PD, uncontrolled asthma was associated with a higher productivity loss than controlled asthma, but this was not the case in patients with PD. This finding can be explained by the fact that the contribution of PD to productivity loss is so large that there is no room for synergy with asthma control. Future studies should assess the impact of interventions that modify PD in patients with asthma.

  2. Loss of Control Prevention and Recovery: Onboard Guidance, Control, and Systems Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of control (LOC) is one of the largest contributors to fatal aircraft accidents worldwide. LOC accidents are complex in that they can result from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or (more often) in combination. These LOC hazards include vehicle impairment conditions, external disturbances; vehicle upset conditions, and inappropriate crew actions or responses. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents. NASA previously defined a comprehensive research and technology development approach for reducing LOC accidents and an associated integrated system concept. Onboard technologies for improved situation awareness, guidance, and control for LOC prevention and recovery are needed as part of this approach. Such systems should include: LOC hazards effects detection and mitigation; upset detection, prevention and recovery; and mitigation of combined hazards. NASA is conducting research in each of these areas. This paper provides an overview of this research, including the near-term LOC focus and associated analysis, as well as preliminary flight system architecture.

  3. BEAM CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Casey, W.; Job, P.K.

    2010-05-23

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam loss in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of {le} 10% full beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses don't exceed these levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation levels outside the shield walls. This beam containment system will measure, provide a level of control and alarm indication of the beam power losses along the beam path from the source (e-gun, linac) thru the injection system and the storage ring. This system will consist of collimators that will provide limits to (and potentially to measure) the beam miss-steering and control the loss points of the charge and monitors that will measure the average beam current losses along the beam path and alarm when this beam power loss exceeds the level set by the shielding specifications. This will require some new ideas in beam loss detection capability and collimation. The initial planning and R&D program will be presented.

  4. Combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy losses in solids irradiated with a dual-ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, Lionel; Debelle, Aurelien; Garrido, Frederico; Trocellier, Patrick; Serruys, Yves; Miro, Sandrine

    2013-04-08

    Single and dual-beam irradiations of oxide (c-ZrO{sub 2}, MgO, Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}) and carbide (SiC) single crystals were performed to study combined effects of nuclear (S{sub n}) and electronic (S{sub e}) energy losses. Rutherford backscattering experiments in channeling conditions show that the S{sub n}/S{sub e} cooperation induces a strong decrease of the irradiation-induced damage in SiC and MgO and almost no effects in c-ZrO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The healing process is ascribed to electronic excitations arising from the electronic energy loss of swift ions. These results present a strong interest for both fundamental understanding of the ion-solid interactions and technological applications in the nuclear industry where expected cooperative S{sub n}/S{sub e} effects may lead to the preservation of the integrity of nuclear devices.

  5. Losses in chopper-controlled DC series motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Motors for electric vehicle (EV) applications must have different features than dc motors designed for industrial applications. The EV motor application is characterized by the following requirements: (1) the need for highest possible efficiency from light load to overload, for maximum EV range, (2) large short time overload capability (The ratio of peak to average power varies from 5/1 in heavy city traffic to 3/1 in suburban driving situations) and (3) operation from power supply voltage levels of 84 to 144 volts (probably 120 volts maximum). A test facility utilizing a dc generator as a substitute for a battery pack was designed and utilized. Criteria for the design of such a facility are presented. Two motors, differing in design detail, commercially available for EV use were tested. Losses measured are discussed, as are waves forms and their harmonic content, the measurements of resistance and inductance, EV motor/chopper application criteria, and motor design considerations.

  6. System modeling for the longitudinal beam dynamics control problem in heavy ion induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, A.N.

    1993-05-17

    We address the problem of developing system models that are suitable for studying the control of the longitudinal beam dynamics in induction accelerators for heavy ions. In particular, we present the preliminary results of our efforts to devise a general framework for building detailed, integrated models of accelerator systems consisting of pulsed power modular circuits, induction cells, beam dynamics, and control system elements. Such a framework will permit us to analyze and design the pulsed power modulators and the control systems required to effect precise control over the longitudinal beam dynamics.

  7. E-beam-patterned hydrogels to control nanoscale surface bioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsko, P.; Saaem, I.; Clancy, R.; Geller, H.; Soteropoulos, P.; Libera, M.

    2005-11-01

    We are interested in controlling the spatial distribution of proteins on surfaces at cellular and subcellular length scales. To do this, we use a variation of e-beam lithography in a field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) to radiation crosslink thin films of water- soluble polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] and poly (carboxylic acids). We can simultaneously pattern the resulting hydrogels on silicon or glass surfaces with nanoscale and microscale feature sizes. Using hydroxy-terminated PEG 6800 we create gels with swell ratios between unity and fifteen depending on the degree of radiation crosslinking, and the swelling properties can be interpreted in terms of the Flory-Rehner formulation modified for one-dimensional swelling. While lightly-crosslinked PEG gels resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion as expected, highly crosslinked PEG gels adsorb such proteins as fibronectin and laminin and consequently become adhesive to fibroblasts, macrophages, and neurons. By spatially modulating the degree of crosslinking, we can localize these cells on surfaces and, for example, direct neurite outgrowth. If instead of using hydroxy-terminated PEG we use amine- terminated PEG, we introduce the additional flexibility of creating high-swelling PEG gels that resist nonspecific protein adsorption but to which specific proteins can be covalently bound. These can be surface patterned at submicron spacings, and we can pattern 7500 nanohydrogels in a 100 micron diameter arrays in 10 seconds. This is an areal density ~104 times greater than a modern DNA/protein chip, and the required bioreagents for chip fabrication and processing are proportionately less. We can bind fibronectin and laminin to different arrays, and we show that these proteins maintain their biospecificity after binding to the nanohydrogels with high fidelity. Looking to applications in next-generation protein-chip technology, our most recent experiments compare the performance of nanohydrogel

  8. Towards correcting atmospheric beam wander via pump beam control in a down conversion process.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Christopher J; Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto; Jennewein, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Correlated photon pairs produced by a spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) process can be used for secure quantum communication over long distances including free space transmission over a link through turbulent atmosphere. We experimentally investigate the possibility to utilize the intrinsic strong correlation between the pump and output photon spatial modes to mitigate the negative targeting effects of atmospheric beam wander. Our approach is based on a demonstration observing the deflection of the beam on a spatially resolved array of single photon avalanche diodes (SPAD-array). PMID:27607697

  9. Towards correcting atmospheric beam wander via pump beam control in a down conversion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, Christopher J.; Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto; Jennewein, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Correlated photon pairs produced by a spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) process can be used for secure quantum communication over long distances including free space transmission over a link through turbulent atmosphere. We experimentally investigate the possibility to utilize the intrinsic strong correlation between the pump and output photon spatial modes to mitigate the negative targeting effects of atmospheric beam wander. Our approach is based on a demonstration observing the deflection of the beam on a spatially resolved array of single photon avalanche diodes (SPAD-array).

  10. CRionScan: A stand-alone real time controller designed to perform ion beam imaging, dose controlled irradiation and proton beam writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudin, L.; Barberet, Ph.; Serani, L.; Moretto, Ph.

    2013-07-01

    High resolution ion microbeams, usually used to perform elemental mapping, low dose targeted irradiation or ion beam lithography needs a very flexible beam control system. For this purpose, we have developed a dedicated system (called “CRionScan”), on the AIFIRA facility (Applications Interdisciplinaires des Faisceaux d'Ions en Région Aquitaine). It consists of a stand-alone real-time scanning and imaging instrument based on a Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (Compact RIO) device from National Instruments™. It is based on a real-time controller, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), input/output modules and Ethernet connectivity. We have implemented a fast and deterministic beam scanning system interfaced with our commercial data acquisition system without any hardware development. CRionScan is built under LabVIEW™ and has been used on AIFIRA's nanobeam line since 2009 (Barberet et al., 2009, 2011) [1,2]. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) embedded in the Compact RIO as a web page is used to control the scanning parameters. In addition, a fast electrostatic beam blanking trigger has been included in the FPGA and high speed counters (15 MHz) have been implemented to perform dose controlled irradiation and on-line images on the GUI. Analog to Digital converters are used for the beam current measurement and in the near future for secondary electrons imaging. Other functionalities have been integrated in this controller like LED lighting using Pulse Width Modulation and a “NIM Wilkinson ADC” data acquisition.

  11. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-15

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I{sub 2}-I{sub 1}), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current I{sub b} = (I{sub 2} + I{sub 1}). The values of I{sub 1} and I{sub 2} depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. Solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.

  12. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGES

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-06

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I2-I1), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current Ib = (I2 + I1). The values of I1more » and I2 depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. As a result, solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.« less

  13. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-06

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I2-I1), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current Ib = (I2 + I1). The values of I1 and I2 depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. As a result, solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.

  14. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-07-15

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 μs at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method.

  15. Quantized stabilization of wireless networked control systems with packet losses.

    PubMed

    Qu, Feng-Lin; Hu, Bin; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Yong-Hong; He, Ding-Xin; Zheng, Ding-Fu

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers stabilization of discrete-time linear systems, where wireless networks exist for transmitting the sensor and controller information. Based on Markov jump systems, we show that the coarsest quantizer that stabilizes the WNCS is logarithmic in the sense of mean square quadratic stability and the stabilization of this system can be transformed into the robust stabilization of an equivalent uncertain system. Moreover, a method of optimal quantizer/controller design in terms of linear matrix inequality is presented. Finally, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the developed theoretical results.

  16. Self-governance, control and loss of control amongst drink-drivers.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Fynbo, Lars

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyses driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs (DUI) from a governmentality perspective. The paper is based on qualitative interviews with 25 persons, convicted of drink-driving and at the time of the interviews participating in Alcohol/Traffic courses in Denmark (mandatory courses for DUI-convicted people). Four drink-driver profiles are identified: regular heavy drinkers who regard themselves as addicted; regular drinkers who claim they are in control of both their alcohol use and their drink-driving; occasional multi-substance users who associate their DUI with strong feelings of control loss; and occasional drinkers or drug users with limited experience of drink-driving. The paper analyses drink-driving as a form of "failed self-governance" and shows how some of the convicted drink-drivers negotiate guilt and blame by either justifying their DUI (they were "in full control" and hence did not risk other people's lives) or excusing it (they had "lost control" over their alcohol and/or drug intake and therefore did not engage in DUI of their own free will).

  17. Active control of the forced and transient response of a finite beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Structural vibrations from a point force are modelled on a finite beam. This research explores the theoretical limit on controlling beam vibrations utilizing another point source as an active controller. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. For harmonic excitation, control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam. Control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the required interval, is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. The form of the controller is specified as either one or two delayed pulses, thus constraining the controller to be casual. The best possible control is examined while varying the region of control and the controller location. It is found that control is always possible using either one or two control pulses.

  18. Prompt non-resonant neutral beam-ion loss induced by Alfvén eigenmodes in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Austin, M. E.; Fisher, R. K.; Nazikian, R.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Prompt neutral beam-ion loss due to non-resonant scattering caused by toroidicity-induced and reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE/RSAEs) have been observed in DIII-D. The coherent losses are of full-energy beam ions born on unperturbed trapped orbits that would carry them close to a fast-ion loss detector (FILD) within one poloidal transit. However, in the presence of AEs, the particles are expelled from the plasma before completing their first poloidal orbits. The loss signals on FILD emerge within 100 µs after the beam switch-on (which is the time scale of a single poloidal transit) and oscillate at mode frequencies. Time-resolved loss measurements show a linear dependence on the AE fluctuation amplitude and a radial ‘kick’ of ˜10 cm by an n = 2 RSAE at δB/B ⩽ 1 × 10-3 can be directly inferred from the measurements. Full-orbit modelling of the fast-ion displacement caused by the AEs is in good quantitative agreement with the measurements. Direct interactions of the mode and the beam-ion orbit can account for a large fraction of fast-ion losses observed in such DIII-D discharges. The first orbit non-resonant loss mechanism may also contribute to enhanced localized losses in ITER and future reactors. A new diagnostic method of the radial displacement is inspired by these findings and can be used to study the interaction between fast ions and various MHD modes as well as three-dimensional fields.

  19. Active Control of the Forced and Transient Response of a Finite Beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John Theodore

    1989-01-01

    When studying structural vibrations resulting from a concentrated source, many structures may be modelled as a finite beam excited by a point source. The theoretical limit on cancelling the resulting beam vibrations by utilizing another point source as an active controller is explored. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. In each case, a cost function is defined and minimized for numerous parameter variations. For the case of harmonic excitation, the cost function is obtained by integrating the mean squared displacement over a region of the beam in which control is desired. A controller is then found to minimize this cost function in the control interval. The control interval and controller location are continuously varied for several frequencies of excitation. The results show that control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam, but control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, the cost function is realized by integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the interval of the beam in which control is desired. This is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. A cost function representative of the beam vibration is obtained by integrating the transient displacement squared over a region of the beam and over all time. The form of the controller is chosen a priori as either one or two delayed pulses. Delays

  20. Changes in weight control behaviors and hedonic hunger during a 12-week commercial weight loss program.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Patrick M; Theim, Kelly R; Boeka, Abbe; Johnson, Gail; Miller-Kovach, Karen

    2012-12-01

    Greater use of key self-regulatory behaviors (e.g., self-monitoring of food intake and weight) is associated with greater weight loss within behavioral weight loss treatments, although this association is less established within widely-available commercial weight loss programs. Further, high hedonic hunger (i.e., susceptibility to environmental food cues) may present a barrier to successful behavior change and weight loss, although this has not yet been examined. Adult men and women (N=111, body mass index M±SD=31.5±2.7kg/m(2)) were assessed before and after participating in a 12-week commercial weight loss program. From pre- to post-treatment, reported usage of weight control behaviors improved and hedonic hunger decreased, and these changes were inversely associated. A decrease in hedonic hunger was associated with better weight loss. An improvement in reported weight control behaviors (e.g., self-regulatory behaviors) was associated with better weight loss, and this association was even stronger among individuals with high baseline hedonic hunger. Findings highlight the importance of specific self-regulatory behaviors within weight loss treatment, including a commercial weight loss program developed for widespread community implementation. Assessment of weight control behavioral skills usage and hedonic hunger may be useful to further identify mediators of weight loss within commercial weight loss programs. Future interventions might specifically target high hedonic hunger and prospectively examine changes in hedonic hunger during other types of weight loss treatment to inform its potential impact on sustained behavior change and weight control.

  1. Boundary control of a Timoshenko beam system with input dead-zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Meng, Tingting; Liu, Jin-Kun; Qin, Hui

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, boundary control is designed for a Timoshenko beam system with the input dead-zone. By the Hamilton's principle, the dynamics of the Timoshenko beam system is represented by a distributed parameter model with two partial differential equations and four ordinary differential equations. The bounded part is separated from the input dead-zone and then forms the disturbance-like term together with the boundary disturbance, which finally acts on the Timoshenko beam system. Boundary control, based on the Lyapunov's direct method, is proposed to ensure the Timoshenko beam converge into a small neighbourhood of zero, where stability of the system is also analysed. Besides, the existence and uniqueness of the solution of the Timoshenko beam system are proved. Simulations are provided to reveal the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  2. Controlling FAMA by the Ptolemy II model of ion beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvanović, R.; Rađenović, B.; Beličev, P.; Nešković, N.

    2009-08-01

    FAMA is a facility for modification and analysis of materials with ion beams. Due to the wide range of ion beams and energies used in the facility and its future expansion, the need has arisen for faster tuning of ion beams transport control parameters. With this aim, a new approach to modeling ion-beam transport system was developed, based on the Ptolemy II modeling and design framework. A model in Ptolemy II is a hierarchical aggregation of components called actors, which communicate with other actors using tokens, or pieces of data. Each ion optical element is modeled by a composite actor implementing beam matrix transformation function, while tokens carry beam matrix data. A basic library of models of typical ion optical elements is developed, and a complex model of FAMA ion beam transport system is hierarchically integrated with bottom-up approach. The model is extended to include control functions. The developed model is modular, flexible and extensible. The results obtained by simulation on the model demonstrate easy and efficient tuning of beam line control parameters. Fine tuning of control parameters, due to uncertainties inherent to modeling, still has to be performed on-line.

  3. Methodological demonstration of laser beam pointing control for space gravitational wave detection missions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu-Hui; Liu, He-Shan; Luo, Zi-Ren; Li, Yu-Qiong; Jin, Gang

    2014-07-01

    In space laser interferometer gravitational wave (G.W.) detection missions, the stability of the laser beam pointing direction has to be kept at 10 nrad/√Hz. Otherwise, the beam pointing jitter noise will dominate the noise budget and make the detection of G.W. impossible. Disturbed by the residue non-conservative forces, the fluctuation of the laser beam pointing direction could be a few μrad/√Hz at frequencies from 0.1 mHz to 10 Hz. Therefore, the laser beam pointing control system is an essential requirement for those space G.W. detection missions. An on-ground test of such beam pointing control system is performed, where the Differential Wave-front Sensing technique is used to sense the beams pointing jitter. An active controlled steering mirror is employed to adjust the beam pointing direction to compensate the jitter. The experimental result shows that the pointing control system can be used for very large dynamic range up to 5 μrad. At the interested frequencies of space G.W. detection missions, between 1 mHz and 1 Hz, beam pointing stability of 6 nrad/√Hz is achieved. PMID:25085155

  4. Methodological demonstration of laser beam pointing control for space gravitational wave detection missions

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yu-Hui; Liu, He-Shan; Luo, Zi-Ren; Li, Yu-Qiong; Jin, Gang

    2014-07-15

    In space laser interferometer gravitational wave (G.W.) detection missions, the stability of the laser beam pointing direction has to be kept at 10 nrad/√Hz. Otherwise, the beam pointing jitter noise will dominate the noise budget and make the detection of G.W. impossible. Disturbed by the residue non-conservative forces, the fluctuation of the laser beam pointing direction could be a few μrad/√Hz at frequencies from 0.1 mHz to 10 Hz. Therefore, the laser beam pointing control system is an essential requirement for those space G.W. detection missions. An on-ground test of such beam pointing control system is performed, where the Differential Wave-front Sensing technique is used to sense the beams pointing jitter. An active controlled steering mirror is employed to adjust the beam pointing direction to compensate the jitter. The experimental result shows that the pointing control system can be used for very large dynamic range up to 5 μrad. At the interested frequencies of space G.W. detection missions, between 1 mHz and 1 Hz, beam pointing stability of 6 nrad/√Hz is achieved.

  5. Control on the anomalous interactions of Airy beams in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Li, Wei; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-04-18

    We reveal a controllable manipulation of anomalous interactions between Airy beams in nonlocal nematic liquid crystals numerically. With the help of an in-phase fundamental Gaussian beam, attraction between in-phase Airy beams can be suppressed or become a repulsive one to each other; whereas the attraction can be strengthened when the Gaussian beam is out-of-phase. In contrast to the repulsive interaction in local media, stationary bound states of breathing Airy soliton pairs are found in nematic liquid crystals.

  6. Interaction between beam control and rf feedback loops for high Q cavities an heavy beam loading. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, L.K.; Kwan, C.M.; Yeung, K.S.

    1994-04-01

    An open-loop state space model of all the major low-level rf feedback control loops is derived. The model has control and state variables for fast-cycling machines to apply modern multivariable feedback techniques. A condition is derived to know when exactly we can cross the boundaries between time-varying and time-invariant approaches for a fast-cycling machine like the Low Energy Booster (LEB). The conditions are dependent on the Q of the cavity and the rate at which the frequency changes with time. Apart from capturing the time-variant characteristics, the errors in the magnetic field are accounted in the model to study the effects on synchronization with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The control model is useful to study the effects on beam control due to heavy beam loading at high intensities, voltage transients just after injection especially due to time-varying voltages, instability thresholds created by the cavity tuning feedback system, cross coupling between feedback loops with and without direct rf feedback etc. As a special case we have shown that the model agrees with the well known Pedersen model derived for the CERN PS booster. As an application of the model we undertook a detailed study of the cross coupling between the loops by considering all of them at once for varying time, Q and beam intensities. A discussion of the method to identify the coupling is shown. At the end a summary of the identified loop interactions is presented.

  7. 40 CFR 1060.104 - What running loss emission control requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and equipment must prevent fuel boiling during operation as specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What running loss emission control... STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.104 What running loss...

  8. 40 CFR 1060.104 - What running loss emission control requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and equipment must prevent fuel boiling during operation as specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What running loss emission control... STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.104 What running loss...

  9. 40 CFR 1060.104 - What running loss emission control requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and equipment must prevent fuel boiling during operation as specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What running loss emission control... STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.104 What running loss...

  10. 40 CFR 1060.104 - What running loss emission control requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and equipment must prevent fuel boiling during operation as specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What running loss emission control... STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.104 What running loss...

  11. 40 CFR 1060.104 - What running loss emission control requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and equipment must prevent fuel boiling during operation as specified in 40 CFR 1048.105. (3... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What running loss emission control... STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.104 What running loss...

  12. Design, development, and operation of a fiber-based Cherenkov beam loss monitor at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maréchal, X.-M.; Asano, Y.; Itoga, T.

    2012-05-01

    A fiber-based Cherenkov beam loss monitor (CBLM) consisting of large core (400 μm), long (≥150 m) multimode fibers, has been developed as an online long-range detection tool with high sensitivity and good position resolution for the 8 GeV SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser: primarily designed for radiation safety in order to limit the dose outside the shielding of the machine, this monitor also serves as an early warning tool to avoid radiation damages done by lost electrons to the undulator magnets. This paper presents the approach chosen to insure that the required sensitivity (≤1 pC) could be obtained over more than 100 m. A beam-based approach was used to characterize (attenuation and signal strength) different fibers (diameter, index profile, and numerical aperture) and to select the most appropriate one. The response of the detector has also been studied numerically for different geometries (vacuum pipe and in-vacuum type undulators), beam energies, and beam loss scenarios, to determine the optimum number of fibers and their position in order to achieve the required detection limit. The results of the first few months of operation show that the SPring-8 CBLM can detect beam losses of less than 0.5 pC over the full 150 m length of the fiber.

  13. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Craxton, R. Stephen; Soures, John

    1990-01-01

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

  14. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

    1990-10-02

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

  15. Analysis and control of the photon beam position at PLS-II.

    PubMed

    Ko, J; Kim, I-Y; Kim, C; Kim, D-T; Huang, J-Y; Shin, S

    2016-03-01

    At third-generation light sources, the photon beam position stability is a critical issue for user experiments. In general, photon beam position monitors are developed to detect the real photon beam position, and the position is controlled by a feedback system in order to maintain the reference photon beam position. At Pohang Light Source II, a photon beam position stability of less than 1 µm r.m.s. was achieved for a user service period in the beamline, where the photon beam position monitor is installed. Nevertheless, a detailed analysis of the photon beam position data was necessary in order to ensure the performance of the photon beam position monitor, since it can suffer from various unknown types of noise, such as background contamination due to upstream or downstream dipole radiation, and undulator gap dependence. This paper reports the results of a start-to-end study of the photon beam position stability and a singular value decomposition analysis to confirm the reliability of the photon beam position data. PMID:26917132

  16. Analysis and control of the photon beam position at PLS-II.

    PubMed

    Ko, J; Kim, I-Y; Kim, C; Kim, D-T; Huang, J-Y; Shin, S

    2016-03-01

    At third-generation light sources, the photon beam position stability is a critical issue for user experiments. In general, photon beam position monitors are developed to detect the real photon beam position, and the position is controlled by a feedback system in order to maintain the reference photon beam position. At Pohang Light Source II, a photon beam position stability of less than 1 µm r.m.s. was achieved for a user service period in the beamline, where the photon beam position monitor is installed. Nevertheless, a detailed analysis of the photon beam position data was necessary in order to ensure the performance of the photon beam position monitor, since it can suffer from various unknown types of noise, such as background contamination due to upstream or downstream dipole radiation, and undulator gap dependence. This paper reports the results of a start-to-end study of the photon beam position stability and a singular value decomposition analysis to confirm the reliability of the photon beam position data.

  17. Coherent control of atomic beam diffraction by standing light waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Bijoy K.

    2003-02-01

    Quantum interference is shown to deliver a means of regulating the diffraction pattern of a thermal atomic beam interacting with two standing-wave electric fields. Parameters have been identified to enhance the diffraction probability of one momentum component over the others, with specific application to Rb atoms.

  18. Mars Express observations of high altitude planetary ion beams and their relation to the "energetic plume" loss channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Johnson, Blake C.; Fränz, Markus; Barabash, Stas

    2014-12-01

    This study presents observational evidence of high-energy (ions >2 keV) beams of planetary ions above Mars' induced magnetospheric boundary (IMB) and relates them with the energetic plume loss channel calculated from numerical models. A systematic search of the Mars Express (MEX) ion data using an orbit filtering criteria is described, using magnetometer data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) to determine the solar wind motional electric field (Esw) direction. Two levels of statistical survey are presented, one focused on times when the MEX orbit was directly in line with the Esw and another for all angles between the MEX location and the Esw. For the first study, within the 3 year overlap of MGS and MEX, nine brief intervals were found with clear and unambiguous high-energy O+ observations consistent with the energetic plume loss channel. The second survey used a point-by-point determination of MEX relative to the E-field and contained many thousands of 192 s measurements. This study yielded only a weak indication for an Esw-aligned plume. Furthermore, the y-z components of the weighted average velocities in the bins of this y-z spatial domain survey do not systematically point in the Esw direction. The first survey implies the existence of this plume and shows that its characteristics are seemingly consistent with the expected energy and flight direction from numerical studies; the second study softens the finding and demonstrates that there are many planetary ions beyond the IMB moving in unexpected directions. Several possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed.

  19. Relations of dietary restraint and depressive symptomatology to loss of control over eating in overweight youngsters.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Lien; Braet, Caroline; Bosmans, Guy

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the dietary restraint and depression pathway to loss of control over eating among a sample of overweight youngsters based on the assumptions of the extended cognitive behavioural theory for bulimia nervosa. The children's version of the eating disorder examination interview and the children's depression inventory were administered to 350 overweight youngsters (with a mean age of 13.30 years old). Structural equation modelling indicated that the over-evaluation of eating, weight and shape was significantly associated with dietary restraint, which in turn was significantly associated with loss of control over eating. Evidence was also found for a direct pathway between depressive symptoms and loss of control over eating. It can be concluded that in general, the main components to maintain the bulimic cycle in eating disordered patients operate in a similar way to maintain loss of control over eating in overweight youngsters.

  20. Compensation method for random drifts of laser beams based on moving average feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lixia; Wang, Ruilin; Lin, Wumei; Liao, Zhijie

    2012-10-01

    In order to eliminate the measurement errors caused by the instability of laser beams, a real-time compensation algorithms for the random drifts of laser beams based on moving average (MA) correction mechanism was presented. By establishing a correction model with two fast steering mirrors in the beam delivery path and analyzing the pulse to pulse beam fluctuation, a real-time beam drifts correction is implemented based on closed loop feedback control, which especially focuses on reducing the pulse to pulse drifts and ground fluctuations. The simulation results show that this algorithm can control beam drifts effectively. Optimal MA can be reduced to 3n-1/2 times (n--pulse numbers in a window) without the ground vibrations. There are a series of improvements on the moving standard deviation (MSD) as well. MSD get a sudden decline at the window pulse. Meanwhile, the drifts can be restrained while loading the ground vibrations without any big jump, and the dropping amplitude is bigger than without the ground vibration. MSD drop while the whole system is controlled by this compensation method and the results are stable. The key of this compensation method for random drifts of laser beams based on moving average feedback control lies in the appropriate corrections formula. What is more, this algorithm which is practical can achieve high precision control of direction drifts.

  1. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGES

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total forcemore » on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.« less

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.

  3. Dual controls on carbon loss during drought in peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongjun; Richardson, Curtis J.; Ho, Mengchi

    2015-06-01

    Peatlands store one-third of global soil carbon. Drought/drainage coupled with climate warming present the main threat to these stores. Hence, understanding drought effects and inherent feedbacks related to peat decomposition has been a primary global challenge. However, widely divergent results concerning drought in recent studies challenge the accepted paradigm that waterlogging and associated anoxia are the overarching controls locking up carbon stored in peat. Here, by linking field and microcosm experiments, we show how previously unrecognized mechanisms regulate the build-up of phenolics, which protects stored carbon directly by reducing phenol oxidase activity during short-term drought and, indirectly, through a shift from low-phenolic Sphagnum/herbs to high-phenolic shrubs after long-term moderate drought. We demonstrate that shrub expansion induced by drought/warming in boreal peatlands might be a long-term self-adaptive mechanism not only increasing carbon sequestration but also potentially protecting historic soil carbon. We therefore propose that the projected `positive feedback loop’ between carbon emission and drought in peatlands may not occur in the long term.

  4. Numerical analysis and control for cantilever flexible beams using PZT patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shi; Zhang, Hao

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on a vibration control of a cantilever flexible beam using PZT patches. The PZT patches used as both actuators and sensors were adopted in the forms of surface-bond devices on the flexible aluminum beam to control actively the vibration responses. The beam was actuated electrically by the PZT actuator to generate the vibration and the feedback signals were collected by the PZT sensors during the numerical analysis and experimental validation. A finite element method (FEM) in which the materials of the beam and PZTs were coupled was used numerically to analyze the vibration and structural control. A compare study between the numerical simulation and experiment results was finished. The results of the FEM simulation showed that it was effective to use PZT patches to control the responses of flexible structure and the proposed numerical method was also successful in analyzing the vibration responses of the coupled material structures.

  5. Measurement of Absolute Excitation Cross Sections in Highly-Charged Ions Using Electron Energy Loss and Merged Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Smith, Steven J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis during this decade on understanding energy balance and phenomena observed in high electron temperature plasmas. The UV spectral return from FUSE, the X-ray spectral return from the HETG on Chandra and the LETGS 011 XMM-Newton are just beginning. Line emissions are almost entirely from highly-charged ions (HCIs) of C, N, 0, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ca, and Fe. The Constellation-X mission will provide X-ray spectroscopy up to photon energies of 0.12 nm (10 keV) where primary line emitters will be HCIs. A variety of atomic parameters are required to model the stellar and solar plasma. These include cross sections for excitation, ionization, charge-exchange, X-ray emission, direct and indirect recombination, lifetimes and branching ratios, and dependences on l, m mixing by external E and B fields. In almost all cases the atomic quantities are calculated, and few comparisons to experiment have been carried out. Collision strengths and Einstein A-values are required to convert the observed spectral intensities to electron temperatures and densities in the stellar plasma. The JPL electron energy-loss and merged beam approach has been used to measure absolute collision strengths in a number of ions, with critical comparison made to the best available theories.

  6. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-08-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances.

  7. National Ignition Facility, subsystem design requirements beam control {ampersand} laser diagnostics SSDR 1.7

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E.

    1996-11-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Alignment subsystem (WBS 1.7.1), Beam Diagnostics (WBS 1.7.2), and the Wavefront Control subsystem (WBS 1.7. 3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). These three subsystems are collectively referred to as the Beam Control & Laser Diagnostics Subsystem. The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. TOPOLOGY FOR A DSP BASED BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM IN THE AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    DELONG,J.BRENNAN,J.M.HAYES,T.LE,T.N.SMITH,K.

    2003-05-12

    The AGS Booster supports beams of ions and protons with a wide range of energies on a pulse-by-pulse modulation basis. This requires an agile beam control system highly integrated with its controls. To implement this system digital techniques in the form of Digital Signal Processors, Direct Digital Synthesizers, digital receivers and high speed Analog to Digital Converters are used. Signals from the beam and cavity pick-ups, as well as measurements of magnetic field strength in the ring dipoles are processed in real time. To facilitate this a multi-processor topology with high bandwidth data links is being designed.

  9. Electron-beam controlled switching using quartz and polycrystalline ZnSe

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W. . Lab. of Beam Technology); Zinsmeyer, K.; Less, M.; Kristiansen, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Schoenbach, K.H. . Physical Electronics Research Inst.)

    1994-04-01

    Results of electron-beam controlled switching experiments with switch samples of quartz crystal and polycrystalline zinc selenide (ZnSe) are presented. For switch samples of both materials, drastic reductions of the switch resistance were induced by the electron beam. The quartz sample showed very fast temporal response (less than 1 ns) with potential applicability for current control. The ZnSe samples, on the other hand, showed longer current transients (on the order of 10 ns) with exponential development of the switch resistance after the electron beam pulse.

  10. Summary report of working group 5: Beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control

    SciTech Connect

    Church, Mike; Kim, Ki-Yong; /Maryland U.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  11. The entire beam wavefront control of high power laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wanjun; Wang, Deen; Hu, Dongxia; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Qiang; Deng, Xuewei; Wang, Yuancheng; Deng, Wu; Yang, Ying; Zhu, Qihua; Jing, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Experiment of entire beam wavefront compensation was carried out in a beamline of a high power laser facility, and two adaptive optics systems with different intentions were applied in the chosen beamline. After correction, the far-filed irradiance distribution is concentrated evidently and the entrance rate of 3ω focal spot to a 500-μm hole is improved to be about 95% under number kilojoules energy.

  12. Nonlinear Control of Multicolor Beams in Coupled Optical Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshev, Dragomir N.; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    Photonic structures with a periodic modulation of the optical refractive index play an important role in the studies of the fundamental aspects of wave dynamics [1, 2]. In particular, photonic crystals, layered media, or closely spaced optical waveguides enable manipulation of the key phenomena governing optical beam propagation: spatial refraction and diffraction. Arrays of coupled optical waveguides are particularly attractive as an experimental testbed due to their easier fabrication and characterization, as well as because of the opportunities they offer for enhanced nonlinear effects as a result of the large propagation distances in such structures. The physics of beam propagation in optical waveguide arrays is governed by the coupling of light between neighboring waveguides and the subsequent interference of the coupled light. Since both the coupling and the interference processes are sensitive to the light wavelength, the output intensity profiles can be drastically different for each spectral component of the input beam. This is a particular concern in many practical cases, including ultra-broad bandwidth optical communications, manipulation of ultra-short pulses or supercontinuum radiation, where the bandwidth of the optical signals can span over a wide frequency range.

  13. Applying CLIPS to control of molecular beam epitaxy processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabeau, Arthur A.; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Jamison, Keith D.; Horton, Charles; Ignatiev, Alex; Glover, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A key element of U.S. industrial competitiveness in the 1990's will be the exploitation of advanced technologies which involve low-volume, high-profit manufacturing. The demands of such manufacture limit participation to a few major entities in the U.S. and elsewhere, and offset the lower manufacturing costs of other countries which have, for example, captured much of the consumer electronics market. One such technology is thin-film epitaxy, a technology which encompasses several techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE), and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy (VPE). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a technology for creating a variety of electronic and electro-optical materials. Compared to standard microelectronic production techniques (including gaseous diffusion, ion implantation, and chemical vapor deposition), MBE is much more exact, though much slower. Although newer than the standard technologies, MBE is the technology of choice for fabrication of ultraprecise materials for cutting-edge microelectronic devices and for research into the properties of new materials.

  14. Layerwise Analysis of Thermal Shape Control in Graded Piezoelectric Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2003-01-01

    A layerwise finite element formulation developed for piezoelectric materials is used to investigate the displacement and stress response of a functionally graded piezoelectric bimorph actuator. The formulation is based on the principles of linear thermopiezoelectricity and accounts for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric materials. The layerwise laminate theory is implemented into a linear beam element in order to provide a more accurate representation of the transverse and shear effects that are induced by increased inhomogeneities introduced through-the-thickness by using functionally graded materials. The accuracy of the formulation is verified with previously published experimental results for a piezoelectric bimorph actuator. Additional studies are conducted to analyze the impact of electric and thermal loads on the deflections and stresses in a bimorph actuator. Results of the study help demonstrate the capability of the layerwise theory to provide a more complete representation of shear effects that are no longer negligible even in thin piezoelectric beams. In addition, the effects of varying piezoelectric properties through-the-thickness of the beam are shown to provide additional benefits in minimizing the induced deformations and stresses.

  15. Beam-Beam Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, Christopher

    2003-09-05

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea-Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. Finally, a study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam spotsizes.

  16. Monolithic millimeter-wave diode array beam controllers: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, L. B.; Liu, H.-X. L.; Wang, F.; Liu, T.; Wu, W.; Qin, X.-H.; Chung, E.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Maserjian, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the current work, multi-function beam control arrays have been fabricated and have successfully demonstrated amplitude control of transmitted beams in the W and D bands (75-170 GHz). While these arrays are designed to provide beam control under DC bias operation, new designs for high-speed electronic and optical control are under development. These arrays will fill a need for high-speed watt-level beam switches in pulsed reflectometer systems under development for magnetic fusion plasma diagnostics. A second experimental accomplishment of the current work is the demonstration in the 100-170 GHz (D band) frequency range of a new technique for the measurement of the transmission phase as well as amplitude. Transmission data can serve as a means to extract ('de-embed') the grid parameters; phase information provides more complete data to assist in this process. Additional functions of the array beam controller yet to be tested include electronically controlled steering and focusing of a reflected beam. These have application in the areas of millimeter-wave electronic scanning radar and reflectometry, respectively.

  17. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-15

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}) with the injected beam current given by I{sub b} = I{sub 1} + I{sub 2}. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I{sub 2}−I{sub 1}) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to I{sub b}. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ε{sub RMS}) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ε{sub RMS} at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ∼5 times larger at the target, ε{sub RMS} is 2–3 times larger at the target.

  18. Relative Humidity Controls Ammonia Loss from Urea Applied to Loblolly Pine

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Miguel L.; Kissel, David E.; Craig, J. R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Vaio, N.; Rema, John A.; Morris, Larry A.

    2010-04-01

    In the United States of America, approximately 600,000 ha of southern pine are fertilized with urea each year, with NH3 volatilization losses ranging from <1% to >50% depending on environmental conditions. Previous work showed that timing of rainfall after urea application plays a significant role in controlling NH3 loss, but the effect of other environmental variables is not well understood. We conducted ten 29-d studies under different environmental conditions during two years to identify important variables controlling NH3 loss from urea applied to loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) at 200 kg N ha-1. Ammonia loss was measured with dynamic chambers that adjusted the rate of air flow through the system based on wind speed at 1 cm above the soil surface. Regression analysis indicated that a variable related to initial water content of the forest floor and a variable related to relative humidity (RH) during the study explained 85 to 94% of the observed variability in NH3 loss. Relatively high initial water content followed by consistently high RH led to large NH3 losses. In contrast, low initial water contents resulted in slow rates of NH3 loss, which increased when elevated RH led to an increase in the water content of the forest floor. These results indicate that RH can play a significant role in NH3 loss by accelerating urea dissolution and by increasing or decreasing the water content of the forest floor, which in turn can affect the rate of urea hydrolysis.

  19. Phase control of the microwave radiation in free electron laser two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Sessler, A.M.

    1987-07-01

    A phase control system for the FEL portion of Two-Beam Accelerator is proposed. The control keeps the phase error within acceptable bounds. The control mechanism is analyzed, both analytically in a ''resonant particle'' approximation and numerically in a multi-particle simulation code. Sensitivity of phase errors to the FEL parameters has been noticed.

  20. Decoupling and observation theory applied to control of a long flexible beam in orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques which use decoupling theory and state variable feedback to control the pitch attitude and the flexible mode amplitudes of a long, thin beam are discussed. An observer based on the steady state Kalman filter was incorporated into the control design procedure in order to estimate the values of the modal state variables required for the feedback control law.

  1. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158 GeV/u In49+ ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Hansen, J.; Page, E.; Vincke, H.

    2004-10-01

    During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 104 to 107 molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the Super Proton Synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV) graphite, and 316LN (low carbon with nitrogen) stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158 GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental setup, the results of the pressure rise measurements are presented, and the derived desorption yields are compared with data from other experiments.

  2. Test and control computer user's guide for a digital beam former test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexovich, Robert E.; Mallasch, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A Digital Beam Former Test System was developed to determine the effects of noise, interferers and distortions, and digital implementations of beam forming as applied to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite 2 (TDRS 2) architectures. The investigation of digital beam forming with application to TDRS 2 architectures, as described in TDRS 2 advanced concept design studies, was conducted by the NASA/Lewis Research Center for NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. A Test and Control Computer (TCC) was used as the main controlling element of the digital Beam Former Test System. The Test and Control Computer User's Guide for a Digital Beam Former Test System provides an organized description of the Digital Beam Former Test System commands. It is written for users who wish to conduct tests of the Digital Beam forming Test processor using the TCC. The document describes the function, use, and syntax of the TCC commands available to the user while summarizing and demonstrating the use of the commands wtihin DOS batch files.

  3. NOTE: Control of photon beam dose profiles by localized transverse magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiffel, L.; Li, A.; Chu, J.; Wheatley, R. W.; Naqvi, S.; Pillsbury, R.; Saxena, A.

    2000-12-01

    Unlike electron beams, scant attention has been paid in the literature to possible magnetic field effects on therapeutic photon beams. Generally, dose profiles are considered to be fully determined by beam shape, photon spectrum and the substances in the beam path. Here we show that small superconducting magnets can exercise potentially useful control over photon dose profiles. The magnet produces a locally strong transverse field with large gradients and is applied to the tissue surface below which the photon beam is passing. For one practical magnet design, our simulations, which use the EGS-4 Monte Carlo code modified to include magnetic field effects, show significant intensification and shielding effects. In water phantoms, the effects extend to 3-4 cm or more beyond the warm face of the cryostat and greater distances are achieved in phantoms simulating lung (density ~0.3). Advances in applying the concept and in superconducting materials and magnet design hold promise for extending these ranges.

  4. BNL alternating gradient synchrotron with four helical magnets to minimize the losses of the polarized proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W. W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2013-04-01

    The principle of using multiple partial helical magnets to preserve the polarization of the proton beam during its acceleration was applied successfully to the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS) which currently operates with two partial helical magnets. In this paper we further explore this idea by using four partial helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS, which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets and their relatively lower field of operation allows for better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection and allows both the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed within the “spin tune gap,” therefore eliminating the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS during the acceleration cycle. Second, it provides a wider spin tune gap. Third, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical. Although the spin tune gap, which is created with four partial helices, can also be created with a single or two partial helices, the high field strength of a single helical magnet which is required to generate such a spin tune gap makes the use of the single helical magnet impractical, and that of the two helical magnets rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare them with those from the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. Although in this paper we specifically discuss the effect of the four partial helices on the AGS, this method which can eliminate simultaneously the vertical and horizontal intrinsic spin resonances is a general method and can be applied to any medium energy synchrotron which operates in similar energy range like the AGS and provides the required space to accommodate the four

  5. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. In the event... during the practice life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become...

  6. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. In the event... during the practice life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become...

  7. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. In the event... during the practice life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become...

  8. Measurement of Absolute Excitation Cross Sections in Highly-Charged Ions Using Electron Energy Loss and Merged Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutjian, A.; Smith, Steven J.; Lozano, J. A.

    2002-11-01

    There is increasing emphasis within this decade on understanding energy balance and new phenomena observed in high electron temperature plasmas. The UV spectral return from FUSE, and the X-ray spectral return from the HETG on Chandra and the LETGS on XMM-Newton are just beginning. The line emissions are almost entirely from highly-charged ions (HCIs) of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ca, and Fe. In addition, the Constellation-X mission, currently in the planning stages, will provide high-throughput X-ray spectroscopy up to photon energies of 0.12 nm (10 keV), where the primary line emitters will again be the HCIs. This array of space instruments is providing an overwhelming return of HCI spectral data from a variety of astrophysical objects. Collision strengths and Einstein A-values are required to convert the observed spectral intensities to electron temperatures and densities in the stellar plasma [1]. The JPL electron energy-loss and merged-beams approach [2] has been used to measure absolute collision strengths in a number of ions, with critical comparisons to the best available theories. Experimental methods will be reviewed, and results presented on experimental comparisons to R-Matrix and Breit-Pauli theoretical results in C3+[3], O2+[4], O5+[5], S2+[6], and Fe9+ [7]. Work is planned for comparisons in Mgq+, and higher charge states Fe(10-15)+. J. Lozano thanks the National Research Council for a fellowship though the NASA- NRC program. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and was supported under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Dynamic Beam Solutions for Real-Time Simulation and Control Development of Flexible Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Weihua; King, Cecilia K.; Clark, Scott R.; Griffin, Edwin D.; Suhey, Jeffrey D.; Wolf, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, flexible rockets are structurally represented by linear beams. Both direct and indirect solutions of beam dynamic equations are sought to facilitate real-time simulation and control development for flexible rockets. The direct solution is completed by numerically integrate the beam structural dynamic equation using an explicit Newmark-based scheme, which allows for stable and fast transient solutions to the dynamics of flexile rockets. Furthermore, in the real-time operation, the bending strain of the beam is measured by fiber optical sensors (FOS) at intermittent locations along the span, while both angular velocity and translational acceleration are measured at a single point by the inertial measurement unit (IMU). Another study in this paper is to find the analytical and numerical solutions of the beam dynamics based on the limited measurement data to facilitate the real-time control development. Numerical studies demonstrate the accuracy of these real-time solutions to the beam dynamics. Such analytical and numerical solutions, when integrated with data processing and control algorithms and mechanisms, have the potential to increase launch availability by processing flight data into the flexible launch vehicle's control system.

  10. Control of the natural frequencies of nitinol-reinforced composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.; Ro, J.; Gilheany, J.

    1995-08-01

    The natural frequencies of flexible fiberglass composite beams are controlled by activating optimal sets of shape memory alloy (NITINOL) wires which are embedded along the neutral axes of these beams. The underlying phenomena influencing the behavior of this class of composite structural members are presented. The individual contributions of the fiberglass-resin matrix, the NITINOL wires and the shape memory effect to the overall performance of the composite beam are determined at different operating temperatures and initial preloads of the wires. The modes of vibration of the fiberglass beams are measured with and without the NITINOL reinforcement at various operating conditions. With properly designed NITINOL reinforcement, it is shown that the beams can become stiffer and less susceptible to buckling. The modes of vibrations of the activated NITINOL-reinforced composite beams can also be shifted to higher frequency bands relative to those of the unactivated or un-reinforced beams. Finite element model is developed to described the interaction between the NITINOL wires and the fiberglass-resin matrix. Close agreement is obtained between theoretical predictions and experimental results. With such tunable characteristics, the NITINOL-reinforced composite beams can be effective in attenuating the vibrations induced by various external disturbances.

  11. Ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, A.N.; Soden, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    An ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits are disclosed. The ion-beam apparatus comprises a stage for holding one or more integrated circuits (ICs); a source means for producing a focused ion beam; and a beam-directing means for directing the focused ion beam to irradiate a predetermined portion of the IC for sufficient time to provide an ion-beam-generated electrical input signal to a predetermined element of the IC. The apparatus and method have applications to failure analysis and developmental analysis of ICs and permit an alteration, control, or programming of logic states or device parameters within the IC either separate from or in combination with applied electrical stimulus to the IC for analysis thereof. Preferred embodiments of the present invention including a secondary particle detector and an electron floodgun further permit imaging of the IC by secondary ions or electrons, and allow at least a partial removal or erasure of the ion-beam-generated electrical input signal. 4 figs.

  12. Ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Ann N.; Soden, Jerry M.

    1998-01-01

    An ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits. The ion-beam apparatus comprises a stage for holding one or more integrated circuits (ICs); a source means for producing a focused ion beam; and a beam-directing means for directing the focused ion beam to irradiate a predetermined portion of the IC for sufficient time to provide an ion-beam-generated electrical input signal to a predetermined element of the IC. The apparatus and method have applications to failure analysis and developmental analysis of ICs and permit an alteration, control, or programming of logic states or device parameters within the IC either separate from or in combination with applied electrical stimulus to the IC for analysis thereof. Preferred embodiments of the present invention including a secondary particle detector and an electron floodgun further permit imaging of the IC by secondary ions or electrons, and allow at least a partial removal or erasure of the ion-beam-generated electrical input signal.

  13. Ion beam machining error control and correction for small scale optics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xuhui; Zhou, Lin; Dai, Yifan; Li, Shengyi

    2011-09-20

    Ion beam figuring (IBF) technology for small scale optical components is discussed. Since the small removal function can be obtained in IBF, it makes computer-controlled optical surfacing technology possible to machine precision centimeter- or millimeter-scale optical components deterministically. Using a small ion beam to machine small optical components, there are some key problems, such as small ion beam positioning on the optical surface, material removal rate, ion beam scanning pitch control on the optical surface, and so on, that must be seriously considered. The main reasons for the problems are that it is more sensitive to the above problems than a big ion beam because of its small beam diameter and lower material ratio. In this paper, we discuss these problems and their influences in machining small optical components in detail. Based on the identification-compensation principle, an iterative machining compensation method is deduced for correcting the positioning error of an ion beam with the material removal rate estimated by a selected optimal scanning pitch. Experiments on ϕ10 mm Zerodur planar and spherical samples are made, and the final surface errors are both smaller than λ/100 measured by a Zygo GPI interferometer.

  14. Vespertilionid bats control the width of their biosonar sound beam dynamically during prey pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2010-01-01

    Animals using sound for communication emit directional signals, focusing most acoustic energy in one direction. Echolocating bats are listening for soft echoes from insects. Therefore, a directional biosonar sound beam greatly increases detection probability in the forward direction and decreases off-axis echoes. However, high directionality has context-specific disadvantages: at close range the detection space will be vastly reduced, making a broad beam favorable. Hence, a flexible system would be very advantageous. We investigated whether bats can dynamically change directionality of their biosonar during aerial pursuit of insects. We trained five Myotis daubentonii and one Eptesicus serotinus to capture tethered mealworms and recorded their echolocation signals with a multimicrophone array. The results show that the bats broaden the echolocation beam drastically in the terminal phase of prey pursuit. M. daubentonii increased the half-amplitude angle from approximately 40° to approximately 90° horizontally and from approximately 45° to more than 90° vertically. The increase in beam width is achieved by lowering the frequency by roughly one octave from approximately 55 kHz to approximately 27.5 kHz. The E. serotinus showed beam broadening remarkably similar to that of M. daubentonii. Our results demonstrate dynamic control of beam width in both species. Hence, we propose directionality as an explanation for the frequency decrease observed in the buzz of aerial hawking vespertilionid bats. We predict that future studies will reveal dynamic control of beam width in a broad range of acoustically communicating animals. PMID:20643943

  15. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for major depression following perinatal loss: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer E; Price, Ann Back; Kao, Jennifer Chienwen; Fernandes, Karen; Stout, Robert; Gobin, Robyn L; Zlotnick, Caron

    2016-10-01

    This randomized controlled pilot trial examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an adapted interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for major depressive disorder (MDD) following perinatal loss (miscarriage, stillbirth, or early neonatal death). Fifty women who experienced a perinatal loss within the past 18 months, whose current depressive episode onset occurred during or after the loss, were randomized to the group IPT adapted for perinatal loss (the Group IPT for Major Depression Following Perinatal Loss manual developed for this study is available at no cost by contacting either of the first two authors) or to the group Coping with Depression (CWD), a cognitive behavioral treatment which did not focus on perinatal loss nor social support. Assessments occurred at baseline, treatment weeks 4 and 8, post-treatment, and 3 and 6 months after the end of treatment. IPT was feasible and acceptable in this population. Although some participants were initially hesitant to discuss their losses in a group (as occurred in IPT but not CWD), end of treatment satisfaction scores were significantly (p = 0.001) higher in IPT than in CWD. Confidence intervals around between-groups effect sizes favored IPT for reductions in depressive symptoms during treatment as well as for improvement in mode-specific targets (social support, grief symptoms) and recovery from a post-traumatic stress disorder over follow-up. This group IPT treatment adapted for MDD after perinatal loss is feasible, acceptable, and possibly efficacious. PMID:27003141

  16. Controlled generation of higher-order Poincaré sphere beams from a laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidoo, Darryl; Roux, Filippus S.; Dudley, Angela; Litvin, Igor; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The angular momentum of light can be described by positions on a higher-order Poincaré sphere, where superpositions of spin and orbital angular momentum states give rise to laser beams that have many applications, from microscopy to materials processing. Many techniques exist to create such beams but none so far allow their creation at the source. Here we report on a new class of laser that is able to generate all states on the higher-order Poincaré sphere. We exploit geometric phase control inside a laser cavity to map polarization to orbital angular momentum, demonstrating that the orbital angular momentum degeneracy of a standard laser cavity may be broken, producing pure orbital angular momentum beams, and that generalized vector vortex beams may be created with high purity at the source. This work paves the way to new lasers for structured light based on intracavity geometric phase control.

  17. Spin-controlled orbital motion in tightly focused high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yongyin; Zhu, Tongtong; Lv, Haiyi; Ding, Weiqiang

    2016-02-22

    Spin angular momentum can contribute to both optical force and torque exerted on spheres. Orbit rate of spheres located in tightly focused LG beams with the same azimuthal mode index l is spin-controlled due to spin-orbit coupling. Laguerre-Gaussian beams with high-order azimuthal mode are used here to study the orbit rate of dielectric spheres. Orbit rates of spheres with varying sizes and refravtive indices are investigated as well as optical forces acting on spheres in LG beams with different azimuthal modes. These results would be much helpful to investigation on optical rotation and transfer of spin and orbital angular momentum. PMID:26906996

  18. Beam-plasma concepts for wafer charging control during ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Current, M.I.; Vella, M.C.; Lukaszek, W.

    1996-12-31

    With the development of quantitative measures of current-voltage characteristics (CHARM{reg_sign}-2) and a beam-plasma model for charge flows to and from the wafer surface, a more comprehensive view of wafer charging has emerged. A beam-plasma model has been developed which describes both positive and negative current-voltage characteristics of the beam plasma. A quantitative description has been achieved for a variety of charge control systems; including dense and dilute plasma flows, electron showers as well as for photoresist outgassing effects.

  19. Dual sensory loss: development of a dual sensory loss protocol and design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dual sensory loss (DSL) has a negative impact on health and wellbeing and its prevalence is expected to increase due to demographic aging. However, specialized care or rehabilitation programs for DSL are scarce. Until now, low vision rehabilitation does not sufficiently target concurrent impairments in vision and hearing. This study aims to 1) develop a DSL protocol (for occupational therapists working in low vision rehabilitation) which focuses on optimal use of the senses and teaches DSL patients and their communication partners to use effective communication strategies, and 2) describe the multicenter parallel randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the DSL protocol. Methods/design To develop a DSL protocol, literature was reviewed and content was discussed with professionals in eye/ear care (interviews/focus groups) and DSL patients (interviews). A pilot study was conducted to test and confirm the DSL protocol. In addition, a two-armed international multi-center RCT will evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the DSL protocol compared to waiting list controls, in 124 patients in low vision rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands and Belgium. Discussion This study provides a treatment protocol for rehabilitation of DSL within low vision rehabilitation, which aims to be a valuable addition to the general low vision rehabilitation care. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR) identifier: NTR2843 PMID:23941667

  20. Investigating the dosimetric and tumor control consequences of prostate seed loss and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Esquivel, Carlos; Stathakis, Sotirios; Swanson, Gregory; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Low dose-rate brachytherapy is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. However, once implanted, the seeds are vulnerable to loss and movement. The goal of this work is to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Five patients were used in this study. For each patient three treatment plans were created using Iodine-125, Palladium-103, and Cesium-131 seeds. The three seeds that were closest to the urethra were identified and modeled as the seeds lost through the urethra. The three seeds closest to the exterior of prostatic capsule were identified and modeled as those lost from the prostate periphery. The seed locations and organ contours were exported from Prowess and used by in-house software to perform the dosimetric and radiobiological evaluation. Seed loss was simulated by simultaneously removing 1, 2, or 3 seeds near the urethra 0, 2, or 4 days after the implant or removing seeds near the exterior of the prostate 14, 21, or 28 days after the implant. Results: Loss of one, two or three seeds through the urethra results in a D{sub 90} reduction of 2%, 5%, and 7% loss, respectively. Due to delayed loss of peripheral seeds, the dosimetric effects are less severe than for loss through the urethra. However, while the dose reduction is modest for multiple lost seeds, the reduction in tumor control probability was minimal. Conclusions: The goal of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. The results presented show that loss of multiple seeds can cause a substantial reduction of D{sub 90} coverage. However, for the patients in this study the dose reduction was not seen to reduce tumor control probability.

  1. Observer-based H(infinity) control for networked nonlinear systems with random packet losses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian Guo; Yuan, Jing Qi; Lu, Jun Guo

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the observer-based H(infinity) control problem of networked nonlinear systems with global Lipschitz nonlinearities and random communication packet losses. The random packet loss is modelled as a Bernoulli distributed white sequence with a known conditional probability distribution. In the presence of random packet losses, sufficient conditions for the existence of an observer-based feedback controller are derived, such that the closed-loop networked nonlinear system is exponentially stable in the mean-square sense, and a prescribed H(infinity) disturbance-rejection-attenuation performance is also achieved. Then a linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach for designing such an observer-based H(infinity) controller is presented. Finally, a simulation example is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Mechanisms and control of beam halo formation in intense microwave sources and accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Pakter, R.

    2000-05-01

    Halo formation and control in space-charge-dominated electron and ion beams are investigated in parameter regimes relevant to the development of high-power microwave (HPM) sources and high-intensity electron and ion linear accelerators. In particular, a mechanism for electron beam halo formation is identified in high-power periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing klystron amplifiers. It is found in self-consistent simulations that large-amplitude current oscillations induce mismatched beam envelope oscillations and electron beam halo formation. Qualitative agreement is found between simulations and the 50 MW 11.4 GHz PPM focusing klystron experiment at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) (D. Sprehn, G. Caryotakis, E. Jongewaard, and R. M. Phillips, "Periodic permanent magnetic development for linear collider X-band klystrons," Proceedings of the XIXth International Linac Conference, Argonne National Laboratory Report ANL-98/28, 1998, p. 689). Moreover, a new class of cold-fluid corkscrewing elliptic beam equilibria is discovered for ultrahigh-brightness, space-charge dominated electron or ion beam propagation through a linear focusing channel consisting of uniform solenoidal magnetic focusing fields, periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing fields, and/or alternating-gradient quadrupole magnetic focusing fields in an arbitrary arrangement including field tapering. As an important application of such new cold-fluid corkscrewing elliptic beam equilibria, a technique is developed and demonstrated for controlling of halo formation and beam hollowing in a rms-matched ultrahigh-brightness ion beam as it is injected from an axisymmetric Pierce diode into an alternating-gradient magnetic quadrupole focusing channel.

  3. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and PA beam loss monitor (BLM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mei-Hang; Tian, Jian-Min; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Xu, Tao-Guang; Lu, Shuang-Tong

    2009-02-01

    Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and Proton Accelerator (PA) beam loss monitor (BLM) system is reported. The low leakage current (<0.1 pA), good plateau (approx800 V) and linearity range up to 200 Roentgen/h are obtained in the first prototype. All of these give us good experience for further improving the ionization chamber construction.

  4. Recovery effects due to the interaction between nuclear and electronic energy losses in SiC irradiated with a dual-ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Thomé, Lionel Debelle, Aurélien; Garrido, Frédérico; Sattonnay, Gaël; Mylonas, Stamatis; Velisa, Gihan; Miro, Sandrine; Trocellier, Patrick; Serruys, Yves

    2015-03-14

    Single and dual-beam ion irradiations of silicon carbide (SiC) were performed to study possible Synergetic effects between Nuclear (S{sub n}) and Electronic (S{sub e}) Energy Losses. Results obtained combining Rutherford backscattering in channeling conditions, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques show that dual-beam irradiation of SiC induces a dramatic change in the final sample microstructure with a substantial decrease of radiation damage as compared to single-beam irradiation. Actually, a defective layer containing dislocations is formed upon dual-beam irradiation (S{sub n} and S{sub e}), whereas single low-energy irradiation (S{sub n} alone) or even sequential (S{sub n} + S{sub e}) irradiations lead to full amorphization. The healing process is ascribed to the electronic excitation arising from the electronic energy loss of swift ions. These results shed new light on the long-standing puzzling problem of the existence of a possible synergy between S{sub n} and S{sub e} in ion-irradiation experiments. This work is interesting for both fundamental understanding of the ion-solid interactions and technological applications in the nuclear industry where recovery S{sub n}/S{sub e} effects may preserve the integrity of nuclear devices.

  5. Beam damage suppression of low-kappa porous Si-O-C films by cryo-electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuji; Shimizu, Yumiko; Tanaka, Isao

    2009-04-01

    Porous Si-O-C films with lower dielectric constant (kappa) relative to silicon dioxide have been widely studied as inter-layer dielectrics in new-generation microelectronic devices. On the analysis of the film by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it is susceptible of beam damage during both sample preparation by a focused ion beam (FIB) technique and TEM observation. We use electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to quantify the magnitude of the beam damage during these processes. The intensity of the 285-eV peak in C-K electron energy loss near edge structures (ELNES) is enhanced by the damage, which can be ascribed to the formation of the C=C double bonds as a result of the decomposition of the methyl groups by the beam. The use of cryo-holder for TEM at 100 K is found to be essential to reduce the damage of the low-kappa layers. The lowering of the acceleration voltage of FIB down to 5 keV does not change the spectra. Since the FIB damage is localized at the surface, the use of thick regions in the TEM foil such as 130 nm is preferred to reduce the superposition of EELS of the damaged region on those from the sample of interest.

  6. On the failure of the `Similar Piezoelectric Control' in preventing loss of stability by nonconservative positional forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Annibale, Francesco; Rosi, Giuseppe; Luongo, Angelo

    2015-08-01

    A control strategy for continuous, autonomous, linear mechanical systems, controlled via piezoelectric devices, and suffering Hopf bifurcations, triggered by positional nonconservative forces, is discussed. The strategy is based on the `principle of similarity', proved in the literature to be successful in controlling externally excited systems. A continuous metamodel of Piezo-Electro-Mechanical system, loaded by position-dependent forces, is derived via the Extended Hamilton Principle. The similarity principle is introduced in the model, demanding for certain relations among mechanical and piezoelectric properties to be satisfied. A stability analysis is carried out via perturbation methods, also accounting for small deviations from similarity. It is shown that the similar control has always a detrimental effect in preventing the loss of stability of the mechanical systems and that this effect is robust under slight imperfections. As an example, a Generalized Beck beam is studied, internally and externally damped, under the simultaneous action of a follower and a dead load, for which the previous asymptotic results are corroborated by an exact analysis.

  7. Model predictive control of non-linear systems over networks with data quantization and packet loss.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jimin; Nan, Liangsheng; Tang, Xiaoming; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the approach of model predictive control (MPC) for the non-linear systems under networked environment where both data quantization and packet loss may occur. The non-linear controlled plant in the networked control system (NCS) is represented by a Tagaki-Sugeno (T-S) model. The sensed data and control signal are quantized in both links and described as sector bound uncertainties by applying sector bound approach. Then, the quantized data are transmitted in the communication networks and may suffer from the effect of packet losses, which are modeled as Bernoulli process. A fuzzy predictive controller which guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system is obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Model predictive control of non-linear systems over networks with data quantization and packet loss.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jimin; Nan, Liangsheng; Tang, Xiaoming; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the approach of model predictive control (MPC) for the non-linear systems under networked environment where both data quantization and packet loss may occur. The non-linear controlled plant in the networked control system (NCS) is represented by a Tagaki-Sugeno (T-S) model. The sensed data and control signal are quantized in both links and described as sector bound uncertainties by applying sector bound approach. Then, the quantized data are transmitted in the communication networks and may suffer from the effect of packet losses, which are modeled as Bernoulli process. A fuzzy predictive controller which guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system is obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26341070

  9. COFS 1: Beam dynamics and control technology overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, John L.

    1986-01-01

    The Control of Flexible Structures (COFS) 1 Project provides the invaluable opportunity to test, validate, and measure the effectiveness of theories, structural concepts, control systems, and flight certification processes for future missions through a research program focusing on multiple issues in large flexible structures, dynamics, and controls. The COFS 1 Project consists of a series of ground and flight activities building progressively from modeling and dynamic characterization of large space systems to the more complex issues of flexible-body control. The program objectives are to: determine the degree to which theory and ground testing can predict flight performance of next-generation low-frequency structures; evaluate structural fidelity of representative next-generation large deployable precision structure; assess math modeling requirements for large lightweight complex systems on which ground test results are questionable; determine degree to which scale model analysis and tests can be correlated to full-scale performance; evaluate system identification and state estimation algorithms on complex lightweight structures in the space environment; evaluate and verify controls/structures modeling capability; evaluate control laws and control systems; and evaluate damping effects in micro-g environment.

  10. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Previtali, Valentina; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  11. Beam loss caused by edge focusing of injection bump magnets and its mitigation in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchi, H.; Tani, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Harada, H.; Kato, S.; Okabe, K.; Saha, P. K.; Tamura, F.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, transverse injection painting is utilized not only to suppress space-charge induced beam loss in the low energy region but also to mitigate foil scattering beam loss during charge-exchange injection. The space-charge induced beam loss is well minimized by the combination of modest transverse painting and full longitudinal painting. But, for sufficiently mitigating the foil scattering part of beam loss, the transverse painting area has to be further expanded. However, such a wide-ranging transverse painting had not been realized until recently due to beta function beating caused by edge focusing of pulsed injection bump magnets during injection. This beta function beating additionally excites random betatron resonances through a distortion of the lattice superperiodicity, and its resultant deterioration of the betatron motion stability causes significant extra beam loss when expanding the transverse painting area. To solve this issue, we newly installed pulse-type quadrupole correctors to compensate the beta function beating. This paper presents recent experimental results on this correction scheme for suppressing the extra beam loss, while discussing the beam loss and its mitigation mechanisms with the corresponding numerical simulations.

  12. Static deflection control of flexible beams by piezo-electric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A. M.

    1986-01-01

    This study deals with the utilization of piezo-electric actuators in controlling the static deformation of flexible beams. An optimum design procedure is presented to enable the selection of the optimal location, thickness and excitation voltage of the piezo-electric actuators in a way that would minimize the deflection of the beam to which these actuators are bonded. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the developed optimization procedure in minimizing the structural deformation of beams of different materials when subjected to different loading and end conditions using ceramic or polymeric piezo-electric actuators. The results obtained emphasize the importance of the devised rational procedure in designing beam-actuator systems with minimal elastic distortions.

  13. Ethics of Placebo Control in Trials for Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Maldonado Fernández, Miguel; Kornetsky, Susan; Rubio Rodriguez, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) involves sudden loss of hearing from cochlear or retrocochlear origin of unknown cause. Systemic corticosteroids may be considered in the management of ISSNHL. However, an updated Cochrane systematic review concludes that "the value of steroids in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss remains unclear since the evidence obtained from randomized controlled trials is contradictory in outcome." Therefore, a new clinical trial that addresses this question is mandatory. A first step in its design is to determine if placebo control would be ethically acceptable. We conclude that there is equipoise (uncertainty) about the use of corticosteroids for ISSHL. A new trial is justified-but with the inclusion of interim analyses to detect early imbalances on efficacy or safety and with the ability to stop the trial if needed.

  14. Ethics of Placebo Control in Trials for Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Maldonado Fernández, Miguel; Kornetsky, Susan; Rubio Rodriguez, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) involves sudden loss of hearing from cochlear or retrocochlear origin of unknown cause. Systemic corticosteroids may be considered in the management of ISSNHL. However, an updated Cochrane systematic review concludes that "the value of steroids in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss remains unclear since the evidence obtained from randomized controlled trials is contradictory in outcome." Therefore, a new clinical trial that addresses this question is mandatory. A first step in its design is to determine if placebo control would be ethically acceptable. We conclude that there is equipoise (uncertainty) about the use of corticosteroids for ISSHL. A new trial is justified-but with the inclusion of interim analyses to detect early imbalances on efficacy or safety and with the ability to stop the trial if needed. PMID:27371619

  15. Instrumentation and control of the Doublet III Neutral Beam Injector System

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, J.C.; Moore, C.D.; Drobnis, D.D.; Elischer, V.P.; Kilgore, R.; Uber, D.

    1980-03-01

    The hardware and software required for the operation of the Doublet III Neutral Beam Injector System (NBIS) are described. Development and implementation of this Instrumentation and Control System was divided between the major participants - General Atomic Company and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The subdivision of responsibilities and the coordination of the participants' activities are described with reference to hardware and software requirements in support of the entire system. Included are a description of the operators' consoles, the interlock system and the CAMAC system. One feature of the control software is source modeling. This feature includes feedback on a shot to shot basis and adaptive control. Adaptive control permits the computer system to automatically adjust parameters after a shot, and to control the system to automatically compensate for time varying NBIS components. The Neutral Beam Power Supply features power supply modeling, fiber optic transmission of analog signals and digital control of power supply power-up/interlocks.

  16. Independent control of beam astigmatism and ellipticity using a SLM for fs-laser waveguide writing.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de la Cruz, A; Ferrer, A; Gawelda, W; Puerto, D; Sosa, M Galván; Siegel, J; Solis, J

    2009-11-01

    We have used a low repetition rate (1 kHz), femtosecond laser amplifier in combination with a spatial light modulator (SLM) to write optical waveguides with controllable cross-section inside a phosphate glass sample. The SLM is used to induce a controllable amount of astigmatism in the beam wavefront while the beam ellipticity is controlled through the propagation distance from the SLM to the focusing optics of the writing set-up. The beam astigmatism leads to the formation of two separate disk-shaped foci lying in orthogonal planes. Additionally, the ellipticity has the effect of enabling control over the relative peak irradiances of the two foci, making it possible to bring the peak irradiance of one of them below the material transformation threshold. This allows producing a single waveguide with controllable cross-section. Numerical simulations of the irradiance distribution at the focal region under different beam shaping conditions are compared to in situ obtained experimental plasma emission images and structures produced inside the glass, leading to a very satisfactory agreement. Finally, guiding structures with controllable cross-section are successfully produced in the phosphate glass using this approach.

  17. Tunable monoenergetic electron beams from independently controllable laser-wakefield acceleration and injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Banerjee, S.; Zhang, J.; Zeng, M.; Sheng, Z.; Umstadter, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of experiments on laser-wakefield acceleration in a novel two-stage gas target with independently adjustable density and atomic-composition profiles. We were able to tailor these profiles in a way that led to the separation of the processes of electron injection and acceleration and permitted independent control of both. This resulted in the generation of stable, quasimonoenergetic electron beams with central energy tunable in 50-300 MeV range. For the first time, we are able to independently control the beam charge and energy spread over the entire tunability range.

  18. Developmental Regulation with Progressive Vision Loss: Use of Control Strategies and Affective Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Oliver K.; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Boerner, Kathrin; Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.; Cimarolli, Verena R.; Brennan-Ing, Mark; Heckhausen, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The present study addresses older adults' developmental regulation when faced with progressive and irreversible vision loss. We used the motivational theory of life span development as a conceptual framework and examined changes in older adults' striving for control over everyday goal achievement, and their association with affective well-being,…

  19. The effect of sprout and disease control products on disease development and weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato industry utilizes various sprout and disease control products prior to storage and/or packing. Some of these products have not been tested for interference of wound healing and whether effects observed equate to greater disease development or weight loss. The objectives of this study we...

  20. Compliance with Homework Tasks in a Behavioral Self-Control Weight Loss Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Everett L., Jr.; Hammonds, T. Michael

    The assumption that therapeutic or homework directives enhance therapy has received little research attention. To explore compliance with homework directives in a behavioral self-control treatment of weight loss, the comparative importance of social support (S), support plus directives with no rationale (SD), support plus directives with rationale…

  1. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... the property during the practice life span. In the event of voluntary or involuntary loss of control of the land by the ECP cost-share recipient during the practice life-span, if the person...

  2. Simulation of automatic control of MFTF-B neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.

    1985-03-04

    This report describes the results obtained by using data generated at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's MFS Test Facility as input to the filtering and control programs developed at LBL. Graphs that illustrate the source models/filters performance, as well as some conditioning history are included. Probable sources of error are discussed.

  3. Quality control loop for 3D laser beam cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitznagel, Juergen

    1996-08-01

    Existing systems for computer integrated manufacturing are based on the principle of the process chain: The product runs through different production sections as design, work planning and manufacturing in a sequential order. The data generated by a production sequence are transferred via interface to the following production sequence. These tightly-packed production sequences leave little scope for responding to quality deviations. This deficit is highlighted particularly in 3D laser cutting processes. In order to achieve an optimum machining result, a series of preliminary tests is required. Quality control loops play an important role in restricting the scope of necessary testing to a minimum. The represented control loop contains a CAD- system to design the workpiece, an offline-programming system to develop working strategies and NC/RC-programs as well as a shop-floor oriented tool to record quality data of the workpiece. The systems are coupled by an integrated product model. The control loop feeds quality data back to Operations Planning in the form of rules for processing strategies and technological data, so that the quality of the production process is enhanced. It is intended to supply optimum process parameters, so that the number of preliminary tests can be reduced. On the other hand the control loop contributes quality enhancement measures which serve as rules for the designers.

  4. A closed-loop photon beam control study for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, G.; Bengtsson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The third generation Advanced Light Source (ALS) will produce extremely bright photon beams using undulators and wigglers. In order to position the photon beams accurate to the micron level, a closed-loop feedback system is being developed. Using photon position monitors and dipole corrector magnets, a closed-loop system can automatically compensate for modeling uncertainties and exogenous disturbances. The following paper will present a dynamics model for the perturbations of the closed orbit of the electron beam in the ALS storage ring including the vacuum chamber magnetic field penetration effects. Using this reference model, two closed-loop feedback algorithms will be compared -- a classical PI controller and a two degree-of-freedom approach. The two degree-of-freedom method provides superior disturbance rejection while maintaining the desired performance goals. Both methods will address the need to gain schedule the controller due to the time varying dynamics introduced by changing field strengths when scanning the insertion devices.

  5. APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING THE POSITION OF AN ION BEAM IN A CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.

    1958-01-01

    ABS>This patent relates to improvements in electric discharge devices of the calutron type for separation of the isotopes of an element from the freely occurring composition. The improvement constitutes means for the continuous control of the path of an ion beam to obtain maximum reception in a receiver compartment. Withdrawal of the ions from the source is accomplished by an accelerator electrode placed at a positive potential with respect to the receiver. The ions are projected through a magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of motion towards a receiver. In order to obtain a signal representative of the magnitude of ions received from a particular ion-beam in its compartment, an electrode is disposed in the compartment. The signal from the compartment electrode controls the voltage of the acccleratimg electrodc through appropriate circuitry to maintain the path of the particular ion beam optimum for maximum ion current in the compartment.

  6. Decentralized adaptive sliding mode control for beam synchronization of tethered InSAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinxiu; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Baolin

    2016-10-01

    Beam synchronization problem of tethered interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is addressed in this paper. Two antennas of the system are carried by separate satellites connected through a tether to obtain a preferable baseline. A Total Zero Doppler Steering (TZDS) is implemented to mother-satellite to cancel the residual Doppler. Subsequently attitude reference trajectories for the two satellites are generated to achieve the beam synchronization and TZDS. Thereafter, a decentralized adaptive sliding mode control law is proposed to track these reference trajectories in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. Finally, the stability of closed-loop system is proved by the corollary of Barbalat's Lemma. Simulation results show the proposed control law is effective to achieve beam synchronization of the system.

  7. Prospects for titanium alloy comparison control by electron beam scan frequency manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Pal, U.; Avyle, J.V.D.; Damkroger, B.

    1996-12-31

    Using mathematical modelling, the authors evaluate the prospects for using beam spot size and scan frequency to control titanium-aluminum alloy composition in electron beam melting and refining. Composition control is evaluated in terms of attainable steady-state extremes of composition, and the time scales required to change hearth and mold composition between those extremes. Mathematical models predict spot size-evaporation and frequency-evaporation relationships by simulating heat transfer in the surface of the melt, and predict overall composition change using simplifying assumptions about the fluid flow field in a melting hearth. Corroborating experiments were run on the electron beam furnace at Sandia National Laboratories in order to verify predicted relationships between frequency and evaporation and to calculate activity coefficients of aluminum and vanadium in titanium.

  8. Adaptive beam tracking and steering via electrowetting-controlled liquid prism

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, JT; Chen, CL

    2011-11-07

    We report an electrowetting-controlled optofluidic system for adaptive beam tracking and agile steering. With two immiscible fluids in a transparent cell, we can actively control the contact angle along the fluid-fluid-solid tri-junction line and hence the orientation of the fluid-fluid interface via electrowetting. The naturally formed meniscus between the two liquids can function as an optical prism. We have fabricated a liquid prism module with an aperture size of 10 mm -10mm. With 1 wt.% KCl and 1 wt.% Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate added into deionized water, the orientation of the water-silicone oil interface has been modulated between -26 degrees and 26 degrees that can deflect and steer beam within the incidence angle of 0 degrees-15 degrees. The wide-range beam tracking and steering enables the liquid prism work as an electrowetting solar cell. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi: 10.1063/1.3660578

  9. Thermomagnetic recording and magneto-optic playback system having constant intensity laser beam control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Guisinger, J. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system is developed for maintaining the intensity of a laser beam at a constant level in a thermomagnetic recording and magneto-optic playback system in which an isotropic film is heated along a continuous path by the laser beam for recording. As each successive area of the path is heated locally to the vicinity of its Curie point in the presence of a controlled magnetic field, a magneto-optic density is produced proportional to the amplitude of the controlled magnetic field. To play back the recorded signal, the intensity of the laser beam is reduced and a Faraday or Kerr effect analyzer is used, with a photodetector, as a transducer for producing an output signal.

  10. Emittance control of a beam by shaping the transverse charge distribution, using a tomography diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Malone, R.; Wang, X.J.

    1998-06-01

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested and implemented using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work the authors give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  11. EMITTANCE CONTROL OF A BEAM BY SHAPING THE TRANSVERSE CHARGE DISTRIBUTION, USING A TOMOGRAPHY DIAGNOSTIC.

    SciTech Connect

    YAKIMENKO,V.

    1998-06-26

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved [1]. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested [2] and implemented [3,4] using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  12. Instrumentation for diagnostics and control of laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P R; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C; Carroll, D C; De Martinis, C; Fiorini, Francesca; Flacco, A; Floquet, V; Fuchs, J; Gallegos, P; Giove, D; Green, J S; Green, S; Jones, B; Kirby, D; McKenna, P; Neely, D; Nuesslin, F; Prasad, R; Reinhardt, S; Roth, M; Schramm, U; Scott, G G; Ter-Avetisyan, S; Tolley, M; Turchetti, G; Wilkens, J J

    2014-05-01

    Suitable instrumentation for laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams is critical for development of integrated, laser-driven ion accelerator systems. Instrumentation aimed at beam diagnostics and control must be applied to the driving laser pulse, the laser-plasma that forms at the target and the emergent proton (ion) bunch in a correlated way to develop these novel accelerators. This report is a brief overview of established diagnostic techniques and new developments based on material presented at the first workshop on 'Instrumentation for Diagnostics and Control of Laser-accelerated Proton (Ion) Beams' in Abingdon, UK. It includes radiochromic film (RCF), image plates (IP), micro-channel plates (MCP), Thomson spectrometers, prompt inline scintillators, time and space-resolved interferometry (TASRI) and nuclear activation schemes. Repetition-rated instrumentation requirements for target metrology are also addressed.

  13. Active Nozzle Control and Integrated Design Optimization of a Beam Subject to Fluid-Dynamic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglund, D.

    1999-02-01

    Active nozzle control is used to improve the stability of a beam subject to forces induced by fluid flow through attached pipes. The control system has a significant effect on the structural stability, making both flutter and divergence type of instabilities possible. The stability analysis is carried out using a state-variable approach based on a finite element formulation of the structural dynamics. The simultaneous design of the control system and the beam shape minimizing structural mass is performed using numerical optimization. The inclusion of the control system in the optimization gives a considerable reduction of the structural mass but results in an optimal design which is very sensitive to imperfections. Using a simple model of the control system uncertainties, a more robust design is obtained by solving a modified optimization problem. Throughout the study, the theoretical findings are verified by experiments.

  14. Semi-active damping strategy for beams system with pneumatically controlled granular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajkowski, Jacek M.; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajer, Czesław I.

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with a control method for semi-active damping of a double beam system with a smart granular structure placed in a thin silicone envelope. The damping properties of the system are controlled pneumatically, by subjecting the granular material to underpressure at particular moments. A mathematical model of the layered beam with a granular damping structure is represented by the two degrees of freedom, modified Kelvin-Voigt model of two masses, a spring with controllable stiffness, and a viscous damper with a variable damping coefficient. The optimal control problem is posed, using the concept of switching of the parameters to increase the efficiency of suppressing the displacement's amplitude. The resulting control strategy was verified experimentally for free vibrations of a cantilever system. The research proved that the appropriate, periodic switching of the properties of the considered structure enables reducing the vibration more effectively than if the material is treated passively.

  15. Aircraft Loss-of-Control Accident Prevention: Switching Control of the GTM Aircraft with Elevator Jam Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Bor-Chin; Kwatny, Harry G.; Belcastro, Christine; Belcastro, Celeste

    2008-01-01

    Switching control, servomechanism, and H2 control theory are used to provide a practical and easy-to-implement solution for the actuator jam problem. A jammed actuator not only causes a reduction of control authority, but also creates a persistent disturbance with uncertain amplitude. The longitudinal dynamics model of the NASA GTM UAV is employed to demonstrate that a single fixed reconfigured controller design based on the proposed approach is capable of accommodating an elevator jam failure with arbitrary jam position as long as the thrust control has enough control authority. This paper is a first step towards solving a more comprehensive in-flight loss-of-control accident prevention problem that involves multiple actuator failures, structure damages, unanticipated faults, and nonlinear upset regime recovery, etc.

  16. Gas Transport and Density Control in the HYLIFE Heavy-Ion Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Debonnel, Christophe S.; Welch, Dale R.; Rose, David V.; Lawrence, Simon S.Yu; Peterson, Per F

    2003-05-15

    The effective propagation and focusing of heavy-ion beams in the final-focus magnet region of inertial fusion target chambers require controlling the background gas density and pressure in the beam tubes. Liquid vortexes will coat the inside of the tubes next to the beam ports and will help eliminate the need for mechanical shutters to mitigate the venting of target chamber background gas into the final-focus magnet region. Before the neutralizing region, the beam space charge is high, and ablation and target debris deposition in the final-focus magnet region may cause voltage breakdown. Previous studies focused on evaluating the amount of target chamber debris reaching the entrance of the beam ports. The TSUNAMI code has now been used to assess the density, temperature, and velocity of the vortex debris transported {approx}3 m up the beam tubes and reaching the final-focus magnet region, assuming that the liquid vortexes are perfectly absorbing surfaces. To further mitigate debris deposition in the final-focus magnet region, and prevent voltage breakdown, a 'magnetic shutter' has been envisaged to divert the debris out of the final-focus region. This shutter will prevent the hot ablation debris from reaching the magnet region and, coupled to some ionizing scheme, will conveniently suppress early ingression of debris into the final-focus magnet region.

  17. Design of focal beam shaping system through irradiance and phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meijie; Meuret, Youri; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; Duerr, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    Focal beam shaping (FBS), or laser beam shaping at focus, is required in many laser applications. The most common approach is to use a phase element and a Fourier transform lens to generate at the focal plane of the lens the desired irradiance pattern, usually a at-top. The shaping quality depends strongly on a dimensionless parameter β. In case of long focal length and/or small focal spot, the input laser beam should be sufficiently large in order to get a large β value for a satisfying shaping quality. Therefore additional beam expansions might be needed. In this work, we propose a different approach with two plano-aspheric lenses that allows to control both irradiance and phase at focus. The two lenses are designed by an extended ray mapping technique combined with a rigorous backward wave propagation method, so that diffraction effects around laser focus can be implemented in a reliable way. With the developed approach, the shaping quality is guaranteed without the possible need for extra beam expanders, which makes the system more compact. The advantage of our design approach is demonstrated in direct comparison with the conventional Fourier approach for the same design example to transform a Gaussian beam to have a circular flat-top irradiance pattern.

  18. Early pest development and loss of biological control are associated with urban warming.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Emily K; Dunn, Robert R; Frank, Steven D

    2014-11-01

    Climate warming is predicted to cause many changes in ectotherm communities, one of which is phenological mismatch, wherein one species' development advances relative to an associated species or community. Phenological mismatches already lead to loss of pollination services, and we predict that they also cause loss of biological control. Here, we provide evidence that a pest develops earlier due to urban warming but that phenology of its parasitoid community does not similarly advance. This mismatch is associated with greater egg production that likely leads to more pests on trees.

  19. Speed and Torque Control Strategies for Loss Reduction of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argent, Michael; McDonald, Alasdair; Leithead, Bill; Giles, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    This paper builds on the work into modelling the generator losses for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines from their intrinsic torque cycling to investigate the effects of aerodynamic inefficiencies caused by the varying rotational speed resulting from different torque control strategies to the cyclic torque. This is achieved by modelling the wake that builds up from the rotation of the VAWT rotor to investigate how the wake responds to a changing rotor speed and how this in turn affects the torque produced by the blades as well as the corresponding change in generator losses and any changes to the energy extracted by the wind turbine rotor.

  20. Status of Computational Aerodynamic Modeling Tools for Aircraft Loss-of-Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Atkins, Harold L.; Viken, Sally A.; Petrilli, Justin L.; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Paul, Ryan C.

    2016-01-01

    A concerted effort has been underway over the past several years to evolve computational capabilities for modeling aircraft loss-of-control under the NASA Aviation Safety Program. A principal goal has been to develop reliable computational tools for predicting and analyzing the non-linear stability & control characteristics of aircraft near stall boundaries affecting safe flight, and for utilizing those predictions for creating augmented flight simulation models that improve pilot training. Pursuing such an ambitious task with limited resources required the forging of close collaborative relationships with a diverse body of computational aerodynamicists and flight simulation experts to leverage their respective research efforts into the creation of NASA tools to meet this goal. Considerable progress has been made and work remains to be done. This paper summarizes the status of the NASA effort to establish computational capabilities for modeling aircraft loss-of-control and offers recommendations for future work.

  1. Evolution and Control of 2219 Aluminum Microstructural Features through Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) is a new layer-additive process that has been developed for near-net shape fabrication of complex structures. EBF3 uses an electron beam to create a molten pool on the surface of a substrate. Wire is fed into the molten pool and the part translated with respect to the beam to build up a 3-dimensional structure one layer at a time. Unlike many other freeform fabrication processes, the energy coupling of the electron beam is extremely well suited to processing of aluminum alloys. The layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process results in a tortuous thermal path producing complex microstructures including: small homogeneous equiaxed grains; dendritic growth contained within larger grains; and/or pervasive dendritic formation in the interpass regions of the deposits. Several process control variables contribute to the formation of these different microstructures, including translation speed, wire feed rate, beam current and accelerating voltage. In electron beam processing, higher accelerating voltages embed the energy deeper below the surface of the substrate. Two EBF3 systems have been established at NASA Langley, one with a low-voltage (10-30kV) and the other a high-voltage (30-60 kV) electron beam gun. Aluminum alloy 2219 was processed over a range of different variables to explore the design space and correlate the resultant microstructures with the processing parameters. This report is specifically exploring the impact of accelerating voltage. Of particular interest is correlating energy to the resultant material characteristics to determine the potential of achieving microstructural control through precise management of the heat flux and cooling rates during deposition.

  2. Two-axis Beam Steering Mirror Control system for Precision Pointing and Tracking Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ulander, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Precision pointing and tracking of laser beams is critical in numerous military and industrial applications. This is particularly true for systems requiring atmospheric beam propagation. Such systems are plagued by environmental influences which cause the optical signal to break up and wander. Example applications include laser communications, precision targeting, active imaging, chemical remote sensing, and laser vibrometry. The goal of this project is to build a beam steering system using a two-axis mirror to maintain precise pointing control. Ultimately, position control to 0.08% accuracy (40 {micro}rad) with a bandwidth of 200 Hz is desired. The work described encompasses evaluation of the instrumentation system and the subsequent design and implementation of an analog electronic controller for a two-axis mirror used to steer the beam. The controller operates over a wide temperature range, through multiple mirror resonances, and is independent of specific mirrors. The design was built and successfully fielded in a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory free-space optics experiment. All measurements and performance parameters are derived from measurements made on actual hardware that was built and field tested. In some cases, specific design details have been omitted that involve proprietary information pertaining to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory patent positions and claims. These omissions in no way impact the general validity of the work or concepts presented in this thesis.

  3. Control of Beam Losses in the Front End for the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.V.; Snopok, P.; Rogers, C.T.; /Rutherford

    2012-05-01

    In the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider, muons are produced by firing high energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons which are then accelerated. This method of pion production results in significant background from protons and electrons, which may result in heat deposition on superconducting materials and activation of the machine preventing manual handling. In this paper we discuss the design of a secondary particle handling system. The system comprises a solenoidal chicane that filters high momentum particles, followed by a proton absorber that reduces the energy of all particles, resulting in the rejection of low energy protons that pass through the solenoid chicane. We detail the design and optimization of the system and its integration with the rest of the muon front end.

  4. Intention, perceived control, and weight loss: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Schifter, D E; Ajzen, I

    1985-09-01

    Success at attempted weight reduction among college women was predicted on the basis of a theory of planned behavior. At the beginning of a 6-week period, participants expressed their attitudes, subjective norms, perceived control, and intentions with respect to losing weight. In addition, the extent to which they had made detailed weight reduction plans was assessed, as were a number of general attitudes and personality factors. In support of the theory, intentions to lose weight were accurately predicted on the basis of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control; perceived control and intentions were together moderately successful in predicting the amount of weight that participants actually lost over the 6-week period. Actual weight loss was also found to increase with development of a plan and with ego strength, factors that were assumed to increase control over goal attainment. Other factors, such as health locus of control, perceived competence, and action control, were found to be unrelated to weight reduction. PMID:4045706

  5. Aircraft Loss-of-Control: Analysis and Requirements for Future Safety-Critical Systems and Their Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of control remains one of the largest contributors to fatal aircraft accidents worldwide. Aircraft loss-of-control accidents are complex, resulting from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or more often in combination. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents. This paper summarizes recent analysis results in identifying worst-case combinations of loss-of-control accident precursors and their time sequences, a holistic approach to preventing loss-of-control accidents in the future, and key requirements for validating the associated technologies.

  6. Milk supplementation facilitates appetite control in obese women during weight loss: a randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jo-Anne; Joanisse, Denis R; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Miegueu, Pierre; Cianflone, Katherine; Alméras, Natalie; Tremblay, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    Dairy products provide Ca and protein which may facilitate appetite control. Conversely, weight loss is known to increase the motivation to eat. This randomised controlled trial verified the influence of milk supplementation on appetite markers during weight loss. Low Ca consumer women participated in a 6-month energy-restricted programme (-2508 kJ/d or -600 kcal/d) and received either a milk supplementation (1000 mg Ca/d) or an isoenergetic placebo (n 13 and 12, respectively). Fasting appetite sensations were assessed by visual analogue scales. Anthropometric parameters and fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, leptin, ghrelin and cortisol were measured as well. Both groups showed a significant weight loss (P < 0·0001). In the milk-supplemented group, a time x treatment interaction effect showed that weight loss with milk supplementation induced a smaller increase in desire to eat and hunger (P < 0·05). Unlike the placebo group, the milk-supplemented group showed a lower than predicted decrease in fullness (-17·1 v. -8·8; -2·7 v. 3·3 mm, P < 0·05, measured v. predicted values, respectively). Even after adjustment for fat mass loss, changes in ghrelin concentration predicted those in desire to eat (r 0·56, P < 0·01), hunger (r 0·45, P < 0·05) and fullness (r -0·40, P < 0·05). However, the study did not show a between-group difference in the change in ghrelin concentration in response to the intervention. These results show that milk supplementation attenuates the orexigenic effect of body weight loss. PMID:21205360

  7. Model-based beam control for illumination of remote objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Susan M.; Lukesh, Gordon W.; Voelz, David; Basu, Santasri; Sjogren, Jon A.

    2004-11-01

    On September 1, 2003, Nukove Scientific Consulting, together with partner New Mexico State University, began work on a Phase 1 Small Business Technology TRansfer (STTR) grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). The purpose of the grant was to show the feasibility of taking Nukove's pointing estimation technique from a post-processing tool for estimation of laser system characteristics to a real-time tool usable in the field. Nukove's techniques for pointing, shape, and OCS estimation do not require an imaging sensor nor a target board, thus estimates may be made very quickly. To prove feasibility, Nukove developed an analysis tool RHINO (Real-time Histogram Interpretation of Numerical Observations) and successfully demonstrated the emulation of real-time, frame-by-frame estimation of laser system characteristics, with data streamed into the tool and the estimates displayed as they are made. The eventual objective will be to use the frame-by-frame estimates to allow for feedback to a fielded system. Closely associated with this, NMSU developed a laboratory testbed to illuminate test objects, collect the received photons, and stream the data into RHINO. The two coupled efforts clearly demonstrate the feasibility of real-time pointing control of a laser system.

  8. Beam controlled arc therapy-a delivery concept for stationary targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. H.; Betzel, G. T.; Yi, B. Y.; D'Souza, W. D.

    2013-10-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) presupposes that it is beneficial to deliver radiation from all beam angles as the gantry rotates, requiring the multi-leaf collimator to maintain continuity in shape from one angle to another. In turn, radiation from undesirable beam angles could compromise the dose distribution. In this work, we challenge the notion that the radiation beam must be held on as the gantry rotates around the patient. We propose a new approach for delivering intensity-modulated arc therapy, beam-controlled arc therapy (BCAT), during which the radiation beam is controlled on or off and the dose rate is modulated while the gantry rotates around the patient. We employ linear-programming-based dose optimization to each aperture weight, resulting in some zero weight apertures. During delivery, the radiation beam is held off at control points with zero weights as the MLC shape transits to the next non-zero weight shape. This was tested on ten head and neck cases. Plan quality and delivery efficiency were compared with VMAT. Improvements of up to 17% (p-value 0.001) and 57% (p-value 0.018) in organ-at-risk sparing and target dose uniformity, respectively, were achieved. Compared to the fixed number of apertures used in single-arc and double-arc VMAT, the BCAT used 109 and 175 apertures on average, respectively. The difference in total MUs for VMAT and BCAT plans was less than 4%. Plan quality improvement was confirmed after delivery with γ analysis resulting in over 99% agreement, or 4 in 1099 points that failed.

  9. Taking weight-loss supplements may elicit liberation from dietary control. A laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yevvon Yi-Chi; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Given that changes in diet and exercise habits are difficult to initiate and maintain, the use of weight-loss supplements has become an appealing alternative approach to weight management for many individuals. The current research examined whether the use of weight-loss supplements induced overly optimistic assessments of progress toward weight reduction, leading to psychological abdication of dietary regulation. Participants were randomly assigned to take either an identified placebo or a purported weight-loss supplement (actually the same placebo). Each participant reported perceived progress toward weight reduction following the manipulation. Consumption of snacks in a taste test and choice of sugary drinks were recorded. The results showed that participants receiving a purported supplement ate more in a taste task and preferred larger quantities of sugar in their reward drinks than did controls. Mediation analysis supported that the perception of progress toward weight reduction contributed to the liberating effect. Using weight-loss supplements may increase perceived progress toward weight reduction but decrease dietary self-regulation. These thought-provoking findings can serve as a basis for educating the public about the myth that they are free to feel liberated from the need to regulate their eating when using weight-loss supplements.

  10. Precursors of dangerous substances formed in the loss of control of chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, V; Zanelli, S

    1999-03-01

    Article 2 of Directive 96/82/EC on the control of major accident hazards caused by dangerous substances requires to consider also the hazards due to the dangerous substances "which it is believed may be generated during loss of control of an industrial chemical process", although no generally accepted guidelines are available for the identification of these substances. In the present study, the accidents involving the unwanted formation of dangerous substances as a consequence of the loss of control of chemical systems were investigated. A specifically developed database was used, containing data on more than 400 of these accidents and on the substances involved. The hazardous substances formed in the accidents and the precursors of these substances were identified. The influence of accident characteristics on the substances formed was investigated. In the context of the application of Directive 96/82/EC, an accident severity index and a hazard rating of the precursors of dangerous substances formed in the accidents were proposed. A lumping approach was used in order to develop schemes for the preliminary identification of substances that may be formed in the loss of control of chemical system. The results of accident analysis were used to test the schemes developed. PMID:10337407

  11. Finger-specific loss of independent control of movements in musicians with focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Furuya, S; Altenmüller, E

    2013-09-01

    The loss of independent control of finger movements impairs the dexterous use of the hand. Focal hand dystonia is characterised by abnormal structural and functional changes at the cortical and subcortical regions responsible for individuated finger movements and by the loss of surround inhibition in the finger muscles. However, little is known about the pathophysiological impact of focal dystonia on the independent control of finger movements. Here we addressed this issue by asking pianists with and without focal dystonia to repetitively strike a piano key with one of the four fingers as fast as possible while the remaining digits kept the adjacent keys depressed. Using principal component analysis and cluster analysis to the derived keystroke data, we successfully classified pianists according to the presence or absence of dystonic symptoms with classification rates and cross-validation scores of approximately 90%. This confirmed the effects of focal dystonia on the individuated finger movements. Interestingly, the movement features that contributed to successful classification differed across fingers. Compared to healthy pianists, pianists with an affected index finger were characterised predominantly by stronger keystrokes, whereas pianists with affected middle or ring fingers exhibited abnormal temporal control of the keystrokes, such as slowness and rhythmic inconsistency. The selective alternation of the movement features indicates a finger-specific loss of the independent control of finger movements in focal dystonia of musicians.

  12. Loss of control increases belief in precognition and belief in precognition increases control.

    PubMed

    Greenaway, Katharine H; Louis, Winnifred R; Hornsey, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Every year thousands of dollars are spent on psychics who claim to "know" the future. The present research questions why, despite no evidence that humans are able to psychically predict the future, do people persist in holding irrational beliefs about precognition? We argue that believing the future is predictable increases one's own perceived ability to exert control over future events. As a result, belief in precognition should be particularly strong when people most desire control-that is, when they lack it. In Experiment 1 (N = 87), people who were experimentally induced to feel low in control reported greater belief in precognition than people who felt high in control. Experiment 2 (N = 53) investigated whether belief in precognition increases perceived control. Consistent with this notion, providing scientific evidence that precognition is possible increased feelings of control relative to providing scientific evidence that precognition was not possible. Experiment 3 (N = 132) revealed that when control is low, believing in precognition helps people to feel in control once more. Prediction therefore acts as a compensatory mechanism in times of low control. The present research provides new insights into the psychological functions of seemingly irrational beliefs, like belief in psychic abilities.

  13. Method and means for measurement and control of pulsed charged beams

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, R.N.

    A beam of bunches of charged particles is controlled by generating a signal in response to the passage of a bunch and adding to that signal a phase-flipped reference signal. The sum is amplified, detected, and applied to a synchronous detector to obtain a comparison of the phase of the reference signal with the phase of the signal responsive to the bunch. The comparison provides an error signal to control bunching.

  14. Role of Platelet Parameters on Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case-Control Study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirvakili, Abbas; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Atighechi, Saeid; Zand, Vahid; Ansari, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a common otological disorder characterized by a hearing loss greater than 30 dB over three consecutive frequencies, in less than 72 hours. It has been established that platelet parameters, such as mean platelet volume, are associated with ischemic heart events, whose clinical manifestations are similar to those of SSNHL. Hence, we aimed to determine if the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width are related to the occurrence and severity of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. A case-control prospective study was conducted in a teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred-eight patients with SSNHL and an equal number of healthy, age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from the subjects, and the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width were measured with an automated blood cell counter. Analysis of the audiometry and hematological test results using SPSS22 software showed no statistical correlation between the platelet parameters and the occurrence of SSNHL, but correlation coefficients showed a significant correlation between PDW and hearing loss severity in patients group. However, further investigation is required to unequivocally establish the absence of correlation between the platelet parameters and occurrence of SSNHL.

  15. Role of Platelet Parameters on Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case-Control Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a common otological disorder characterized by a hearing loss greater than 30 dB over three consecutive frequencies, in less than 72 hours. It has been established that platelet parameters, such as mean platelet volume, are associated with ischemic heart events, whose clinical manifestations are similar to those of SSNHL. Hence, we aimed to determine if the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width are related to the occurrence and severity of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. A case-control prospective study was conducted in a teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred-eight patients with SSNHL and an equal number of healthy, age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from the subjects, and the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width were measured with an automated blood cell counter. Analysis of the audiometry and hematological test results using SPSS22 software showed no statistical correlation between the platelet parameters and the occurrence of SSNHL, but correlation coefficients showed a significant correlation between PDW and hearing loss severity in patients group. However, further investigation is required to unequivocally establish the absence of correlation between the platelet parameters and occurrence of SSNHL. PMID:26829393

  16. Progress in computer-assisted diagnosis and control of neutral beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.; Elischer, V.; Fiddler, J.; Jacobs, N.J.D.; Jacobson, V.; Lawhorn, R.; Uber, D.; Wilner, D.

    1980-09-01

    This paper discusses the principles that have guided the development of a computerized diagnostic and control system for both the Neutral Beam Systems Test Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Doublet III neutral beams at the General Atomic Company. The emphasis is not on the particular details of the implementation, but on general considerations which have influenced the design criteria for the system. Foremost among these are the requirements of an appropriate human interface to the system, and effective use of a relational data base. Examples are used to illustrate how these principles are carried out in practice. A systems view of diagnostic programs is suggested in the light of our experience.

  17. Controlling X-ray beam trajectory with a flexible hollow glass fibre

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakatani, Takashi; Onitsuka, Rena; Sawada, Kei; Takahashi, Isao

    2014-01-01

    A metre-length flexible hollow glass fibre with 20 µm-bore and 1.5 mm-cladding diameters for transporting a synchrotron X-ray beam and controlling the trajectory has been examined. The large cladding diameter maintains a moderate curvature to satisfy the shallow glancing angle of total reflection. The observed transmission efficiency was more than 20% at 12.4 keV. As a demonstration, a wide-area scan of a synchrotron radiation beam was performed to identify the elements for a fixed metal film through its absorption spectra. PMID:24365917

  18. Fuzzy logic based feedback control system for laser beam pointing stabilization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjeet; Patel, Kiran; Govindarajan, J; Kumar, Ajai

    2010-09-20

    This paper reports a fuzzy logic based feedback control system for beam pointing stabilization of a high-power nanosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 30 Hz. This is achieved by generating the correcting signal for each consequent pulse from the error in the pointing position of the previous laser pulse. We have successfully achieved a reduction of beam position fluctuation from ±60 to ±5.0 μrad without the focusing optics and ±0.9 μrad with focusing optics. PMID:20856289

  19. Assessing electron beam sensitivity for SrTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 using electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nord, Magnus; Vullum, Per Erik; Hallsteinsen, Ingrid; Tybell, Thomas; Holmestad, Randi

    2016-10-01

    Thresholds for beam damage have been assessed for La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and SrTiO3 as a function of electron probe current and exposure time at 80 and 200kV acceleration voltage. The materials were exposed to an intense electron probe by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with simultaneous acquisition of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data. Electron beam damage was identified by changes of the core loss fine structure after quantification by a refined and improved model based approach. At 200kV acceleration voltage, damage in SrTiO3 was identified by changes both in the EEL fine structure and by contrast changes in the STEM images. However, the changes in the STEM image contrast as introduced by minor damage can be difficult to detect under several common experimental conditions. No damage was observed in SrTiO3 at 80kV acceleration voltage, independent of probe current and exposure time. In La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, beam damage was observed at both 80 and 200kV acceleration voltages. This damage was observed by large changes in the EEL fine structure, but not by any detectable changes in the STEM images. The typical method to validate if damage has been introduced during acquisitions is to compare STEM images prior to and after spectroscopy. Quantifications in this work show that this method possibly can result in misinterpretation of beam damage as changes of material properties. PMID:27454005

  20. Assessing electron beam sensitivity for SrTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 using electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nord, Magnus; Vullum, Per Erik; Hallsteinsen, Ingrid; Tybell, Thomas; Holmestad, Randi

    2016-10-01

    Thresholds for beam damage have been assessed for La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and SrTiO3 as a function of electron probe current and exposure time at 80 and 200kV acceleration voltage. The materials were exposed to an intense electron probe by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with simultaneous acquisition of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data. Electron beam damage was identified by changes of the core loss fine structure after quantification by a refined and improved model based approach. At 200kV acceleration voltage, damage in SrTiO3 was identified by changes both in the EEL fine structure and by contrast changes in the STEM images. However, the changes in the STEM image contrast as introduced by minor damage can be difficult to detect under several common experimental conditions. No damage was observed in SrTiO3 at 80kV acceleration voltage, independent of probe current and exposure time. In La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, beam damage was observed at both 80 and 200kV acceleration voltages. This damage was observed by large changes in the EEL fine structure, but not by any detectable changes in the STEM images. The typical method to validate if damage has been introduced during acquisitions is to compare STEM images prior to and after spectroscopy. Quantifications in this work show that this method possibly can result in misinterpretation of beam damage as changes of material properties.

  1. Beam transport experiment with a new kicker control system on the HIRFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Yu; Zhou, De-Tai; Luo, Jin-Fu; Zhang, Jian-Chuan; Zhou, Wen-Xiong; Ni, Fa-Fu; Yin, Jun; Yin, Jia; Yuan, You-Jin; Shang-Guan, Jing-Bin

    2016-04-01

    A kicker control system is used for beam extraction and injection between two cooling storage rings (CSRs) at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). To meet the requirements of special physics experiments, the kicker controller has been upgraded, with a new controller designed based on ARM+DSP+FPGA technology and monolithic circuit architecture, which can achieve a precision time delay of 2.5 ns. In September 2014, the new kicker control system was installed in the kicker field, and the test experiment using the system was completed. In addition, a pre-trigger signal was provided by the controller, which was designed to synchronize the beam diagnostic system and physics experiments. Experimental results indicate that the phenomena of “missed kick” and “inefficient kick” were not observed, and the multichannel trigger signal delay could be adjusted individually for kick power supplies in digitization; thus, the beam transport efficiency was improved compared with that of the original system. The fast extraction and injection experiment was successfully completed based on the new kicker control systems for HIRFL. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232123)

  2. Blanket Module Boil-Off Times during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident - Case 0: with Beam Shutdown only

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports that document LBLOCA analyses for the Accelerator Production of Tritium primary blanket Heat Removal system. This report documents the analysis results of a LBLOCA where the accelerator beam is shut off without primary pump trips and neither the RHR nor the cavity flood systems operation.

  3. Loss of Control Increases Belief in Precognition and Belief in Precognition Increases Control

    PubMed Central

    Greenaway, Katharine H.; Louis, Winnifred R.; Hornsey, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Every year thousands of dollars are spent on psychics who claim to “know” the future. The present research questions why, despite no evidence that humans are able to psychically predict the future, do people persist in holding irrational beliefs about precognition? We argue that believing the future is predictable increases one’s own perceived ability to exert control over future events. As a result, belief in precognition should be particularly strong when people most desire control–that is, when they lack it. In Experiment 1 (N = 87), people who were experimentally induced to feel low in control reported greater belief in precognition than people who felt high in control. Experiment 2 (N = 53) investigated whether belief in precognition increases perceived control. Consistent with this notion, providing scientific evidence that precognition is possible increased feelings of control relative to providing scientific evidence that precognition was not possible. Experiment 3 (N = 132) revealed that when control is low, believing in precognition helps people to feel in control once more. Prediction therefore acts as a compensatory mechanism in times of low control. The present research provides new insights into the psychological functions of seemingly irrational beliefs, like belief in psychic abilities. PMID:23951136

  4. Shaping plasmon beams via the controlled illumination of finite-size plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Wurtz, G A; Zayats, A V

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic crystals provide many passive and active optical functionalities, including enhanced sensing, optical nonlinearities, light extraction from LEDs and coupling to and from subwavelength waveguides. Here we study, both experimentally and numerically, the coherent control of SPP beam excitation in finite size plasmonic crystals under focussed illumination. The correct combination of the illuminating spot size, its position relative to the plasmonic crystal, wavelength and polarisation enables the efficient shaping and directionality of SPP beam launching. We show that under strongly focussed illumination, the illuminated part of the crystal acts as an antenna, launching surface plasmon waves which are subsequently filtered by the surrounding periodic lattice. Changing the illumination conditions provides rich opportunities to engineer the SPP emission pattern. This offers an alternative technique to actively modulate and control plasmonic signals, either via micro- and nano-electromechanical switches or with electro- and all-optical beam steering which have direct implications for the development of new integrated nanophotonic devices, such as plasmonic couplers and switches and on-chip signal demultiplexing. This approach can be generalised to all kinds of surface waves, either for the coupling and discrimination of light in planar dielectric waveguides or the generation and control of non-diffractive SPP beams.

  5. Shaping plasmon beams via the controlled illumination of finite-size plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bouillard, J.-S.; Segovia, P.; Dickson, W.; Wurtz, G. A.; Zayats, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic crystals provide many passive and active optical functionalities, including enhanced sensing, optical nonlinearities, light extraction from LEDs and coupling to and from subwavelength waveguides. Here we study, both experimentally and numerically, the coherent control of SPP beam excitation in finite size plasmonic crystals under focussed illumination. The correct combination of the illuminating spot size, its position relative to the plasmonic crystal, wavelength and polarisation enables the efficient shaping and directionality of SPP beam launching. We show that under strongly focussed illumination, the illuminated part of the crystal acts as an antenna, launching surface plasmon waves which are subsequently filtered by the surrounding periodic lattice. Changing the illumination conditions provides rich opportunities to engineer the SPP emission pattern. This offers an alternative technique to actively modulate and control plasmonic signals, either via micro- and nano-electromechanical switches or with electro- and all-optical beam steering which have direct implications for the development of new integrated nanophotonic devices, such as plasmonic couplers and switches and on-chip signal demultiplexing. This approach can be generalised to all kinds of surface waves, either for the coupling and discrimination of light in planar dielectric waveguides or the generation and control of non-diffractive SPP beams. PMID:25429786

  6. Absolute cascade-free cross-sections for the 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged-beams methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Man, K.-F.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.

    1991-01-01

    Absolute cascade-free excitation cross-sections in an ion have been measured for the resonance 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged electron-ion beams methods. Measurements were carried out at electron energies of below threshold to 6 times threshold. Comparisons are made with 2-, 5-, and 15-state close-coupling and distorted-wave theories. There is good agreement between experiment and the 15-state close-coupling cross-sections over the energy range of the calculations.

  7. Frequency-controls of electromagnetic multi-beam scanning by metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun Bo; Wan, Xiang; Cai, Ben Geng; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2014-11-05

    We propose a method to control electromagnetic (EM) radiations by holographic metasurfaces, including to producing multi-beam scanning in one dimension (1D) and two dimensions (2D) with the change of frequency. The metasurfaces are composed of subwavelength metallic patches on grounded dielectric substrate. We present a combined theory of holography and leaky wave to realize the multi-beam radiations by exciting the surface interference patterns, which are generated by interference between the excitation source and required radiation waves. As the frequency changes, we show that the main lobes of EM radiation beams could accomplish 1D or 2D scans regularly by using the proposed holographic metasurfaces shaped with different interference patterns. This is the first time to realize 2D scans of antennas by changing the frequency. Full-wave simulations and experimental results validate the proposed theory and confirm the corresponding physical phenomena.

  8. Frequency-Controls of Electromagnetic Multi-Beam Scanning by Metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun Bo; Wan, Xiang; Cai, Ben Geng; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to control electromagnetic (EM) radiations by holographic metasurfaces, including to producing multi-beam scanning in one dimension (1D) and two dimensions (2D) with the change of frequency. The metasurfaces are composed of subwavelength metallic patches on grounded dielectric substrate. We present a combined theory of holography and leaky wave to realize the multi-beam radiations by exciting the surface interference patterns, which are generated by interference between the excitation source and required radiation waves. As the frequency changes, we show that the main lobes of EM radiation beams could accomplish 1D or 2D scans regularly by using the proposed holographic metasurfaces shaped with different interference patterns. This is the first time to realize 2D scans of antennas by changing the frequency. Full-wave simulations and experimental results validate the proposed theory and confirm the corresponding physical phenomena. PMID:25370447

  9. Controlled intensity emission from patterned porous silicon using focused proton beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, E.J.; Mangaiyarkarasi, D.; Breese, M.B.H.; Bettiol, A.A.; Blackwood, D.J.

    2004-11-08

    We have fabricated light emitting porous silicon micropatterns with controlled emission intensity. This has been achieved by direct write irradiation in heavily doped p-type silicon (0.02 {omega} cm) using a 2 MeV proton beam, focused to a spot size of 200 nm. After electrochemical etching in hydrofluoric acid, enhanced photoluminescence is observed from the irradiated regions. The intensity of light emission is proportional to the dose of the proton beam, so the PL intensity of the micropattern can be tuned and varied between adjacent regions on a single substrate. This behavior is in contrast to previous ion beam patterning of p-type silicon, as light is preferentially created as opposed to quenched at the irradiated regions.

  10. Study on controllable LC-micro blazed grating beam deflector in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junbo; Xu, Suzhi; Zhang, Jingjing; Chang, Shengli

    2015-02-01

    A liquid crystal (LC) beam deflector with a microblazed grating produced by stepping photolithography and reactive ion etching (RIE) was reported. A homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal (NLC) materials are filled inside the microcavity of blazed grating, and sandwiched between two glass plates. An indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrode is deposited on it to provide the beam steering capability. Our LC-micro blazed grating device gives a high diffractive efficiency (about 95%) and a controllable large steering angle over 7.2° (for ne) and 1.7° (for no), respectively. It was found that this type of non-mechanical beam steering without any moving parts is ideally suited for applications in optical communication and optical interconnection network.

  11. How Past Loss of Control Accidents May Inform Safety Cases for Advanced Control Systems on Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. M.; Johnson, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes five loss of control accidents involving commercial aircraft, and derives from those accidents three principles to consider when developing a potential safety case for an advanced flight control system for commercial aircraft. One, among the foundational evidence needed to support a safety case is the availability to the control system of accurate and timely information about the status and health of relevant systems and components. Two, an essential argument to be sustained in the safety case is that pilots are provided with adequate information about the control system to enable them to understand the capabilities that it provides. Three, another essential argument is that the advanced control system will not perform less safely than a good pilot.

  12. The relationship of weight loss, locus of control, and social support.

    PubMed

    Gierszewski, S A

    1983-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between weight loss, locus of control, and social support. It was hypothesized that internals would be more successful in weight reduction than externals/powerful others or externals/chance; that participants with higher social-support scores would be more successful in weight reduction than participants with lower social support scores; and that social support would contribute more to success in weight reduction in externals/powerful others than in internals or externals/chance. Subjects were 46 female employees of a large life insurance company who had participated in a nutrition and weight control program. They were studied six months later to assess weight change, locus of control (specifically, using a multidimensional health locus of control scale and a modified weight locus of control scale) and social support (using an investigator-developed scale). Study findings did not support the hypotheses. Rather, a significant negative relationship was found between social support and weight reduction in the case of internals. Possible explanations for the findings were discussed, along with recommendations for practice and further research. For example, it was suggested that it may be most desirable for those attempting weight loss to be sufficiently internal that they believe they are capable of bringing their weight under control, yet sufficiently external that they are amenable to the advice of health professionals. PMID:6549843

  13. Economic losses due to cystic echinococcosis in India: Need for urgent action to control the disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Balbir B; Dhand, Navneet K; Ghatak, Sandeep; Gill, Jatinder P S

    2014-01-01

    Cystic ehinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus remains a neglected zoonotic disease despite its considerable human and animal health concerns. This is the first systematic analysis of the livestock and human related economic losses due to cystic echinococcosis in India. Data about human cases were obtained from a tertiary hospital. Human hydatidosis cases with and without surgical interventions were extrapolated to be 5647 and 17075 per year assuming a total human population of 1210193422 in India. Data about prevalence of hydatid cysts in important food producing animals were obtained from previously published abattoir based epidemiological surveys that reported a prevalence of 5.39% in cattle, 4.36% in buffaloes, 3.09% in pigs, 2.23% in sheep and 0.41% in goats. Animal population data were sourced from the latest census conducted by the Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries, India. Other input parameters were obtained from published scientific literature. Probability distributions were included for many input values to account for variability and uncertainty. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the effect of important parameters on the estimated economic losses. The analysis revealed a total annual median loss of Rs. 11.47 billion (approx. US $ 212.35 million). Cattle and buffalo industry accounted for most of the losses: 93.05% and 88.88% of the animal and total losses, respectively. Human hydatidosis related losses were estimated to be Rs. 472.72 million (approx. US $ 8.75 million) but are likely to be an under-estimate due to under-reporting of the disease in the country. The human losses more than quadrupled to Rs. 1953 million i.e. approx. US $ 36.17 million, when the prevalence of human undiagnosed cases was increased to 0.2% in the sensitivity analyses. The social loss and psychological distress were not taken into account for calculating human loss. The results highlight an urgent need for a science based policy

  14. Optimization and beam control in large-emittance accelerators: Neutrino factories;

    SciTech Connect

    Carol Johnstone

    2004-08-23

    Schemes for intense sources of high-energy muons require collection, rf capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large emittances must be reduced or ''cooled'' both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated. Therefore, formation of muon beams sufficiently intense to drive a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider requires multi-stage preparation. Further, because of the large beam phase space which must be successfully controlled, accelerated, and transported, the major stages that comprise such a facility: proton driver, production, capture, phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and storage are complex and strongly interlinked. Each of the stages must be consecutively matched and simultaneously optimized with upstream and downstream systems, meeting challenges not only technically in the optics and component design, but also in the modeling of both new and extended components. One design for transverse cooling, for example, employs meter-diameter solenoids to maintain strong focusing--300-500 mr beam divergences--across ultra-large momentum ranges, {ge} {+-}20% {delta}p/p, defying conventional approximations to the dynamics and field representation. To now, the interplay of the different systems and staging strategies has not been formally addressed. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the staging strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

  15. Polarization-controllable Airy beams generated via a photoaligned director-variant liquid crystal mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bing-Yan; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ji, Wei; Zheng, Li-Yang; Ge, Shi-Jun; Ming, Yang; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Researches on Airy beams have grown explosively since the first demonstration in 2007 due to the distinguishing properties of nondiffraction, transverse acceleration and self-healing. To date, a simple and compact approach for generating Airy beams in high quality and efficiency has remained challenging. Here, we propose and demonstrate a liquid crystal (LC) polarization Airy mask (PAM) featured by spatially variant LC azimuthal director. The PAM is fabricated through photoaligning LC via a polarization-sensitive alignment agent suophonic azo dye SD1. Thanks to the special design, a novel feature of polarization-controllable switch between dual Airy beams of orthogonal circular polarization is presented. The molecular-level continuity of LC director significantly improves the quality and efficiency of resultant Airy beams. Besides, the PAM can handle intense light due to the absence of absorptive electrodes. Additional merits of compact size, low cost and broad wavelength tolerance are also exhibited. This work settles a fundamental requirement for Airy beam applications of optical manipulations, biology science and even some uncharted territories.

  16. Polarization-controllable Airy beams generated via a photoaligned director-variant liquid crystal mask.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bing-Yan; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ji, Wei; Zheng, Li-Yang; Ge, Shi-Jun; Ming, Yang; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Researches on Airy beams have grown explosively since the first demonstration in 2007 due to the distinguishing properties of nondiffraction, transverse acceleration and self-healing. To date, a simple and compact approach for generating Airy beams in high quality and efficiency has remained challenging. Here, we propose and demonstrate a liquid crystal (LC) polarization Airy mask (PAM) featured by spatially variant LC azimuthal director. The PAM is fabricated through photoaligning LC via a polarization-sensitive alignment agent suophonic azo dye SD1. Thanks to the special design, a novel feature of polarization-controllable switch between dual Airy beams of orthogonal circular polarization is presented. The molecular-level continuity of LC director significantly improves the quality and efficiency of resultant Airy beams. Besides, the PAM can handle intense light due to the absence of absorptive electrodes. Additional merits of compact size, low cost and broad wavelength tolerance are also exhibited. This work settles a fundamental requirement for Airy beam applications of optical manipulations, biology science and even some uncharted territories. PMID:26626737

  17. Polarization-controllable Airy beams generated via a photoaligned director-variant liquid crystal mask

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bing-Yan; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ji, Wei; Zheng, Li-Yang; Ge, Shi-Jun; Ming, Yang; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Researches on Airy beams have grown explosively since the first demonstration in 2007 due to the distinguishing properties of nondiffraction, transverse acceleration and self-healing. To date, a simple and compact approach for generating Airy beams in high quality and efficiency has remained challenging. Here, we propose and demonstrate a liquid crystal (LC) polarization Airy mask (PAM) featured by spatially variant LC azimuthal director. The PAM is fabricated through photoaligning LC via a polarization-sensitive alignment agent suophonic azo dye SD1. Thanks to the special design, a novel feature of polarization-controllable switch between dual Airy beams of orthogonal circular polarization is presented. The molecular-level continuity of LC director significantly improves the quality and efficiency of resultant Airy beams. Besides, the PAM can handle intense light due to the absence of absorptive electrodes. Additional merits of compact size, low cost and broad wavelength tolerance are also exhibited. This work settles a fundamental requirement for Airy beam applications of optical manipulations, biology science and even some uncharted territories. PMID:26626737

  18. Polarization-controllable Airy beams generated via a photoaligned director-variant liquid crystal mask.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bing-Yan; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ji, Wei; Zheng, Li-Yang; Ge, Shi-Jun; Ming, Yang; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2015-12-02

    Researches on Airy beams have grown explosively since the first demonstration in 2007 due to the distinguishing properties of nondiffraction, transverse acceleration and self-healing. To date, a simple and compact approach for generating Airy beams in high quality and efficiency has remained challenging. Here, we propose and demonstrate a liquid crystal (LC) polarization Airy mask (PAM) featured by spatially variant LC azimuthal director. The PAM is fabricated through photoaligning LC via a polarization-sensitive alignment agent suophonic azo dye SD1. Thanks to the special design, a novel feature of polarization-controllable switch between dual Airy beams of orthogonal circular polarization is presented. The molecular-level continuity of LC director significantly improves the quality and efficiency of resultant Airy beams. Besides, the PAM can handle intense light due to the absence of absorptive electrodes. Additional merits of compact size, low cost and broad wavelength tolerance are also exhibited. This work settles a fundamental requirement for Airy beam applications of optical manipulations, biology science and even some uncharted territories.

  19. Adolescent Girls and Their Mothers Talk About Experiences of Binge and Loss of Control Eating

    PubMed Central

    Palmberg, Allison A.; Stern, Marilyn; Kelly, Nichole R.; Bulik, Cynthia; Belgrave, Faye Z.; Trapp, Stephen K.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that adolescents’ experience of binge eating (BE) might differ in important ways from that of adults. Moreover, although BE appears more common in African American women than other disordered eating behaviors, little is known about the influence of cultural factors on this behavior in adolescents. The current investigation used qualitative methodology to examine the perceptions of White and African American adolescent girls and their mothers regarding experiences of binge and loss of control eating. Five focus groups were completed with 19 adolescent girls (aged 13–17, 58 % African American, 41 % White) who endorsed loss of control eating behaviors. Their mothers (N = 19) also completed separate, concurrent focus groups addressing food and eating behaviors. Responses to focus group questions were analyzed using thematic qualitative analysis. Adolescents’ awareness of their eating behaviors varied greatly. Girls reported some awareness of how emotions influence their eating behaviors, and described using food to achieve autonomy. Mothers evidenced awareness of their daughters’ problematic eating behaviors, the effects of emotions on eating for both their daughters and themselves, and sociocultural factors influencing diet. Data from these focus groups can inform the development of innovative interventions for adolescent girls engaging in loss of control eating. PMID:25400491

  20. Weight change among people randomized to minimal intervention control groups in weight loss trials

    PubMed Central

    Johns, David J.; Hartmann‐Boyce, Jamie; Jebb, Susan A.; Aveyard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evidence on the effectiveness of behavioral weight management programs often comes from uncontrolled program evaluations. These frequently make the assumption that, without intervention, people will gain weight. The aim of this study was to use data from minimal intervention control groups in randomized controlled trials to examine the evidence for this assumption and the effect of frequency of weighing on weight change. Methods Data were extracted from minimal intervention control arms in a systematic review of multicomponent behavioral weight management programs. Two reviewers classified control arms into three categories based on intensity of minimal intervention and calculated 12‐month mean weight change using baseline observation carried forward. Meta‐regression was conducted in STATA v12. Results Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria, twenty‐nine of which had usable data, representing 5,963 participants allocated to control arms. Control arms were categorized according to intensity, as offering leaflets only, a single session of advice, or more than one session of advice from someone without specialist skills in supporting weight loss. Mean weight change at 12 months across all categories was −0.8 kg (95% CI −1.1 to −0.4). In an unadjusted model, increasing intensity by moving up a category was associated with an additional weight loss of −0.53 kg (95% CI −0.96 to −0.09). Also in an unadjusted model, each additional weigh‐in was associated with a weight change of −0.42 kg (95% CI −0.81 to −0.03). However, when both variables were placed in the same model, neither intervention category nor number of weigh‐ins was associated with weight change. Conclusions Uncontrolled evaluations of weight loss programs should assume that, in the absence of intervention, their population would weigh up to a kilogram on average less than baseline at the end of the first year of follow‐up. PMID:27028279

  1. Mimicking the cochlear amplifier in a cantilever beam using nonlinear velocity feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian cochlea exhibits a nonlinear amplification which allows mammals to detect a large range of sound pressure levels while maintaining high frequency sensitivity. This work seeks to mimic the cochlea’s nonlinear amplification in a mechanical system. A nonlinear, velocity-based feedback control law is applied to a cantilever beam with piezoelectric actuators. The control law reduces the linear viscous damping of the system while introducing a cubic damping term. The result is a system which is positioned close to a Hopf bifurcation. Modelling and experimental results show that the beam with this control law undergoes a one-third amplitude scaling near the resonance frequency and an amplitude-dependent bandwidth. Both behaviors are characteristic of data obtained from the mammalian cochlea. This work could provide insight on the biological cochlea while producing bio-inspired sensors with a large dynamic range and sharp frequency sensitivity.

  2. Controlling the electron energy distribution function of electron beam generated plasmas with molecular gas concentration: II. Numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Boris, D. R.; Petrova, Tz B.; Lock, E. H.; Fernsler, R. F.; Walton, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the second in a series of two, a spatially averaged model of an electron beam generated Ar-N2 plasma is developed to identify the processes behind the measured influence of trace amounts of N2 on the development of the electron energy distribution function. The model is based on the numerical solution of the electron Boltzmann equation self-consistently coupled to a set of rate balance equations for electrons, argon and nitrogen species. Like the experiments, the calculations cover only the low-energy portion (<50 eV) of the electron energy distribution, and therefore a source term is added to the Boltzmann equation to represent ionization by the beam. Similarly, terms representing ambipolar diffusion along and across the magnetic field are added to allow for particle loss and electrostatic cooling from the ambipolar electric field. This work focuses on the changes introduced by adding a small admixture of nitrogen to an argon background. The model predictions for the electron energy distribution function, electron density and temperature are in good agreement with the experimentally measured data reported in part I, where it was found that the electron and ion energy distributions can be controlled by adjusting the fraction of nitrogen in the gas composition.

  3. Beam control for LINC-NIRVANA: from the binocular entrance pupil to the combined focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, T.; Trowitzsch, J.; Herbst, T. M.; Ragazzoni, R.

    2012-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is the near-infrared interferometric imaging camera for the Large Binocular Telescope. Once operational, it will provide an unprecedented combination of angular resolution, sensitivity and field of view. To meet the tight requirements that result from long exposure interferometric imaging over a large field of view, active control beyond fringe tracking and adaptive optics has to be in place in the telescope and in the instrument domain. The incoming beams of the binocular telescope have to be controlled along the entire optical path, from the entrance pupil to the combined focal plane. The beams have to coincide in the focal plane of the science detector, their pointing origins, offsets, orientations, plate scales, and distortions have to match each other and must not change during the observation. Non-common path effects between AO and science channel, flexure and thermal effects have to be compensated and offioading requests from the adaptive optics and fringe tracking systems have to be arbitrated without introducing unwanted optical path length differences or changes in the geometry of the binocular entrance pupil. Beam Control aspects include pointing, co-pointing and field derotation, active optics and collimation control. In this presentation, the constraints for coherent imaging over a 1.5 arcminute field of view are discussed together with a concept for a distributed control scheme.

  4. A fast feedback controlled magnetic drive for the ASDEX Upgrade fast-ion loss detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayllon-Guerola, J.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Rivero-Rodriguez, J.; Herrmann, A.; Vorbrugg, S.; Leitenstern, P.; Zoletnik, S.; Galdon, J.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Dominguez, A. D.; Kocan, M.; Gunn, J. P.; Garcia-Vallejo, D.; Dominguez, J.

    2016-11-01

    A magnetically driven fast-ion loss detector system for the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak has been designed and will be presented here. The device is feedback controlled to adapt the detector head position to the heat load and physics requirements. Dynamic simulations have been performed taking into account effects such as friction, coil self-induction, and eddy currents. A real time positioning control algorithm to maximize the detector operational window has been developed. This algorithm considers dynamical behavior and mechanical resistance as well as measured and predicted thermal loads. The mechanical design and real time predictive algorithm presented here may be used for other reciprocating systems.

  5. Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre amplifiers with active phase control

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X L; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Y X; Ma, H T; Xu, X J; Liu, Z J; Zhao, Y J

    2011-12-31

    Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre lasers is a promising method for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining good beam quality. We propose and demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent beam combining of all-fibre pulsed amplifiers with active phase control using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. A low-pass filter is introduced to eliminate the fluctuation of the metric function caused by pulsed lasers and to extract the exact phase noise signal. Active control is thereby based on the SPGD algorithm, resulting in stable coherent beam combining at the receiving plane even in a turbulent environment. Experimental results show that the fringe visibility of the long exposure pattern increases from 0 to 0.4, and the power encircled in the main-lobe increases by 1.6 times when the system evolves from the open-loop phase-locking scheme to the closed-loop scheme. This architecture can be easily scaled up to a higher power by increasing the number of amplifying channels and the power of a single amplifier.

  6. Evolution and Control of 2219 Aluminum Microstructural Features Through Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2006-01-01

    The layer-additive nature of the electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process results in a tortuous thermal path producing complex microstructures including: small homogeneous equiaxed grains; dendritic growth contained within larger grains; and/or pervasive dendritic formation in the interpass regions of the deposits. Several process control variables contribute to the formation of these different microstructures, including translation speed, wire feed rate, beam current and accelerating voltage. In electron beam processing, higher accelerating voltages embed the energy deeper below the surface of the substrate. Two EBF3 systems have been established at NASA Langley, one with a low-voltage (10-30kV) and the other a high-voltage (30-60 kV) electron beam gun. Aluminum alloy 2219 was processed over a range of different variables to explore the design space and correlate the resultant microstructures with the processing parameters. This report is specifically exploring the impact of accelerating voltage. Of particular interest is correlating energy to the resultant material characteristics to determine the potential of achieving microstructural control through precise management of the heat flux and cooling rates during deposition.

  7. An Overview of Brazilian Developments in Beamed Energy Aerospace Propulsion and Vehicle Performance Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-01

    Beamed energy propulsion and beamed energy vehicle performance control concepts are equally promising and challenging. In Brazil, the two concepts are being currently investigated at the Prof Henry T Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, of the Institute for Advanced Studies—IEAv, in collaboration with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—RPI, Troy, NY, and the United States Air force Research Laboratory-AFRL. Until recently, only laser energy addition for hypersonic flow control was being investigated at the Laboratory using a 0.3 m nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T2, and two 7 joule CO2 TEA lasers. Flow visualization, model pressure and heat flux measurements of the laser energy addition perturbed flow around a model were produced as a result of this joint IEAv-RPI investigation. Presently, with the participation of AFRL and the newly commissioned 0.6 m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T3, a more ambitious project is underway. Two 400 Joule Lumonics 620 CO2 TEA lasers will deliver a 20 cm X 25 cm propulsive laser beam to a complete laser propelled air breather/rocket hypersonic engine, located inside T3 test section. Schlieren photographs of the flow inside de engine as well as surface and heat flux measurements will be performed for free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25. The present paper discusses past, present and future Brazilian activities on beamed energy propulsion and related technologies.

  8. Controlled Ion Acceleration in Two Crossed Laser Beams Propagating in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataronis, J. A.; Petržílka, V.; Krlín, L.

    2003-10-01

    Electron acceleration occurs in a single plane laser beam that is in the presence of a secondary perpendicularly propagating plane laser beam with a randomized phase. As the accelerated electrons are pushed away, they leave the heavier ions behind, producing thereby a charge separation electrostatic field and consequent ion flows. The power flux carried by the accelerated ions can be controlled by varying the intensity of the secondary beam. Results of a numerical study of this control process are presented here. The laser beam parameters chosen for the computations of the primary electron acceleration match the parameters available at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS)^1. For the modeling, we use an advanced version of our 3-d two-fluid numerical code^2, originally developed for the analysis of fast electron generation and subsequent ion acceleration in front of lower hybrid wave launchers in large tokamaks. [2pt] ^1K. Jungwirth et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2495 (2001). [2pt] ^2V. Petržílka et al., Proc. 29th EPS Conference, Montreux, June 2002, paper 2.105.

  9. An Overview of Brazilian Developments in Beamed Energy Aerospace Propulsion and Vehicle Performance Control

    SciTech Connect

    Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-28

    Beamed energy propulsion and beamed energy vehicle performance control concepts are equally promising and challenging. In Brazil, the two concepts are being currently investigated at the Prof Henry T Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, of the Institute for Advanced Studies--IEAv, in collaboration with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute--RPI, Troy, NY, and the United States Air force Research Laboratory-AFRL. Until recently, only laser energy addition for hypersonic flow control was being investigated at the Laboratory using a 0.3 m nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T2, and two 7 joule CO{sub 2} TEA lasers. Flow visualization, model pressure and heat flux measurements of the laser energy addition perturbed flow around a model were produced as a result of this joint IEAv-RPI investigation. Presently, with the participation of AFRL and the newly commissioned 0.6 m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T3, a more ambitious project is underway. Two 400 Joule Lumonics 620 CO{sub 2} TEA lasers will deliver a 20 cm X 25 cm propulsive laser beam to a complete laser propelled air breather/rocket hypersonic engine, located inside T3 test section. Schlieren photographs of the flow inside de engine as well as surface and heat flux measurements will be performed for free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25. The present paper discusses past, present and future Brazilian activities on beamed energy propulsion and related technologies.

  10. Plasmon Injection to Compensate and Control Losses in Negative Index Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Sadatgol, Mehdi; Özdemir, Şahin K; Yang, Lan; Güney, Durdu Ö

    2015-07-17

    Metamaterials have introduced a whole new world of unusual materials with functionalities that cannot be attained in naturally occurring material systems by mimicking and controlling the natural phenomena at subwavelength scales. However, the inherent absorption losses pose a fundamental challenge to the most fascinating applications of metamaterials. Based on a novel plasmon injection (PI or Π) scheme, we propose a coherent optical amplification technique to compensate losses in metamaterials. Although the proof of concept device here operates under normal incidence only, our proposed scheme can be generalized to an arbitrary form of incident waves. The Π scheme is fundamentally different from major optical amplification schemes. It does not require a gain medium, interaction with phonons, or any nonlinear medium. The Π scheme allows for loss-free metamaterials. It is ideally suited for mitigating losses in metamaterials operating in the visible spectrum and is scalable to other optical frequencies. These findings open the possibility of reviving the early dreams of making "magical" metamaterials from scratch.

  11. Plasmon Injection to Compensate and Control Losses in Negative Index Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Sadatgol, Mehdi; Özdemir, Şahin K; Yang, Lan; Güney, Durdu Ö

    2015-07-17

    Metamaterials have introduced a whole new world of unusual materials with functionalities that cannot be attained in naturally occurring material systems by mimicking and controlling the natural phenomena at subwavelength scales. However, the inherent absorption losses pose a fundamental challenge to the most fascinating applications of metamaterials. Based on a novel plasmon injection (PI or Π) scheme, we propose a coherent optical amplification technique to compensate losses in metamaterials. Although the proof of concept device here operates under normal incidence only, our proposed scheme can be generalized to an arbitrary form of incident waves. The Π scheme is fundamentally different from major optical amplification schemes. It does not require a gain medium, interaction with phonons, or any nonlinear medium. The Π scheme allows for loss-free metamaterials. It is ideally suited for mitigating losses in metamaterials operating in the visible spectrum and is scalable to other optical frequencies. These findings open the possibility of reviving the early dreams of making "magical" metamaterials from scratch. PMID:26230802

  12. Plasmon Injection to Compensate and Control Losses in Negative Index Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadatgol, Mehdi; Ã-zdemir, Şahin K.; Yang, Lan; Güney, Durdu Ã.-.

    2015-07-01

    Metamaterials have introduced a whole new world of unusual materials with functionalities that cannot be attained in naturally occurring material systems by mimicking and controlling the natural phenomena at subwavelength scales. However, the inherent absorption losses pose a fundamental challenge to the most fascinating applications of metamaterials. Based on a novel plasmon injection (PI or Π ) scheme, we propose a coherent optical amplification technique to compensate losses in metamaterials. Although the proof of concept device here operates under normal incidence only, our proposed scheme can be generalized to an arbitrary form of incident waves. The Π scheme is fundamentally different from major optical amplification schemes. It does not require a gain medium, interaction with phonons, or any nonlinear medium. The Π scheme allows for loss-free metamaterials. It is ideally suited for mitigating losses in metamaterials operating in the visible spectrum and is scalable to other optical frequencies. These findings open the possibility of reviving the early dreams of making "magical" metamaterials from scratch.

  13. Controllability of runoff and soil loss from small plots treated by vinasse-produced biochar.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza; Hazbavi, Zeinab; Harchegani, Mahboobeh Kiani

    2016-01-15

    Many different amendments, stabilizers, and conditioners are usually applied for soil and water conservation. Biochar is a carbon-enriched substance produced by thermal decomposition of organic material in the absence of oxygen with the goal to be used as a soil amendment. Biochar can be produced from a wide range of biomass sources including straw, wood, manure, and other organic wastes. Biochar has been demonstrated to restore soil fertility and crop production under many conditions, but less is known about the effects of its application on soil erosion and runoff control. Therefore, a rainfall simulation study, as a pioneer research, was conducted to evaluate the performance of the application of vinasse-produced biochar on the soil erosion control of a sandy clay loam soil packed in small-sized runoff 0.25-m(2) plots with 3 replicates. The treatments were (i) no biochar (control), (ii) biochar (8 tha(-1)) application at 24h before the rainfall simulation and (iii) biochar (8 tha(-1)) application at 48 h before the rainfall simulation. Rainfall was applied at 50 mm h(-1) for 15 min. The mean change of effectiveness in time to runoff could be found in biochar application at 24 and 48 h before simulation treatment with rate of +55.10% and +71.73%, respectively. In addition, the mean runoff volume 24 and 48 h before simulation treatments decreased by 98.46% and 46.39%, respectively. The least soil loss (1.12 ± 0.57 g) and sediment concentration (1.44 ± 0.48 gl(-1)) occurred in the biochar-amended soil treated 48 h before the rainfall simulation. In conclusion, the application of vinasse-produced biochar could effectively control runoff and soil loss. This study provided a new insight into the effects of biochar on runoff, soil loss, and sediment control due to water erosion in sandy clay loam soils. PMID:26410722

  14. Postural control in children with typical development and children with profound hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Aneliza Maria Monteiro; de França Barros, Jônatas; de Sousa Neto, Brígido Martins

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To describe the behavior of the postural control in children with profound sensorineural hearing loss and compare the results of experimental tests with hearing children aged 7 to 10 years. Patients and methods This is a cross-sectional study where 100 children were divided into experimental and control groups. We used a force platform, AccuSway Plus, where the tests were conducted under the experimental conditions: open base, eyes open (OBEO); open base, eyes closed (OBEC); closed base, eyes open (CBEO); closed base, eyes closed (CBEC). The body sway velocity (V) of the center of pressure, the displacement in the anteroposterior direction (COPap) and mediolateral (COPml) of the center of pressure were the parameters to evaluate the postural control. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U test, with a significance level of 5%. Results In comparisons of variables between the groups, the experimental group outperformed by at least 75% of the control group values. In terms of global trends, the experimental group shows higher values of body oscillations in all experimental conditions and variables evaluated. Children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing. The inferential analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in the balance between deaf and hearing children in the OBEC experimental condition in relation to the COPml parameter (P = 0.04). There were no statistically significant differences in comparisons between the sexes when the groups were analyzed separately. The prevalence of unknown etiology showed 58% of cases and congenital rubella in 16%. The discovery of deafness occurred in 70% of children before the age of 3 years. Conclusion In this study, children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing children. This finding confirms the need to investigate postural control through longitudinal studies to identify the area of

  15. Controllability of runoff and soil loss from small plots treated by vinasse-produced biochar.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza; Hazbavi, Zeinab; Harchegani, Mahboobeh Kiani

    2016-01-15

    Many different amendments, stabilizers, and conditioners are usually applied for soil and water conservation. Biochar is a carbon-enriched substance produced by thermal decomposition of organic material in the absence of oxygen with the goal to be used as a soil amendment. Biochar can be produced from a wide range of biomass sources including straw, wood, manure, and other organic wastes. Biochar has been demonstrated to restore soil fertility and crop production under many conditions, but less is known about the effects of its application on soil erosion and runoff control. Therefore, a rainfall simulation study, as a pioneer research, was conducted to evaluate the performance of the application of vinasse-produced biochar on the soil erosion control of a sandy clay loam soil packed in small-sized runoff 0.25-m(2) plots with 3 replicates. The treatments were (i) no biochar (control), (ii) biochar (8 tha(-1)) application at 24h before the rainfall simulation and (iii) biochar (8 tha(-1)) application at 48 h before the rainfall simulation. Rainfall was applied at 50 mm h(-1) for 15 min. The mean change of effectiveness in time to runoff could be found in biochar application at 24 and 48 h before simulation treatment with rate of +55.10% and +71.73%, respectively. In addition, the mean runoff volume 24 and 48 h before simulation treatments decreased by 98.46% and 46.39%, respectively. The least soil loss (1.12 ± 0.57 g) and sediment concentration (1.44 ± 0.48 gl(-1)) occurred in the biochar-amended soil treated 48 h before the rainfall simulation. In conclusion, the application of vinasse-produced biochar could effectively control runoff and soil loss. This study provided a new insight into the effects of biochar on runoff, soil loss, and sediment control due to water erosion in sandy clay loam soils.

  16. Fermilab booster beam collimation and shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov et al.

    2003-05-28

    The beam power in the upgraded Booster at 8 GeV and 10 Hz will be 64 kW. Beam loss can result in high radiation loads in the ring. The purpose of a new beam halo cleaning system is to localize proton losses in specially shielded regions. Calculations show that this 2-stage collimation system will localize about 99% of beam loss in straight sections 6 and 7 and immediately downstream. Beam loss in the rest of the machine will be on average 0.1W/m. Local shielding will provide tolerable prompt and residual radiation levels in the tunnel, above the tunnel at the surface and in the sump water. Results of thorough MARS calculations are presented for a new design which includes shielding integrated with the collimators, motors and controls ensuring a high performance and facilitating maintenance. First measurements of the collimation efficiency are presented.

  17. Hybrid Control of an Euler-Bernoulli Beam Using Direct Velocity Feedback and Wave-Filter-Based Active Wave Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Nobuo; Hill, Simon G.

    Active wave control strategy enables the inactivation of vibration mode, which is valid for suppressing the vibration of a distributed parameter structure. However, when active wave control is applied, new vibration modes are produced in the uncontrolled region. To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel control strategy based on a hybrid combination of direct velocity feedback (DVFB) and active wave control. The two control methods have complementary qualities; DVFB is for improving the stability, and active wave control is for its unique control effects. First, a transfer matrix method in the Laplace domain is introduced to describe wave propagation phenomena of an Euler-Bernoulli beam. Then the wave filtering method which uses point sensors is presented. Based on the filtering method, the characteristic equation and control laws of the reflected wave absorbing control are derived. Next, the independence of the two control methods in the proposed hybrid control system is investigated by a numerical simulation. This is followed by the discussion of the stability problem of the hybrid control system via a Nyquist diagram method and three types of root loci. Finally, the control effects of the proposed control system are presented, demonstrating the validity of the proposed method.

  18. Performances of PID and Different Fuzzy Methods for Controlling a Ball on Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Vu Trieu; Mart, Tamre; Moezzi, Reza; Oliver, Mets; Martin, Jurise; Ahti, Polder; Leo, Teder; Mart, Juurma

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops and analyses the performances evaluation of different control strategies applied for a nonlinear motion of a ball on a beam system. Comparison results provide in-depth comprehension on the stable ability of different controllers for this real mechanical application. The three different controllers are a conventional PID method, a Mamdani-type fuzzy rule method and a Sugeno-type fuzzy rule method. In this study, the PID shows the fastest sinuous reference tracking while the Mamdani-type fuzzy method proves the highest stability performance for tracking square wave motions.

  19. Monte Carlo Studies of the Radiation Fields in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulators and of the Corresponding Signals in the Cerenkov Beam Loss Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Santana Leitner, Mario; Fasso, Alberto; Fisher, Alan S.; Nuhn, Heinz D.; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Berg, William; Yang, Bin X.; /Argonne

    2010-09-14

    In 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center started free electron laser (FEL) operation. In order to continue to produce the bright and short-pulsed x-ray laser demanded by FEL scientists, this pioneer hard x-ray FEL requires a perfectly tailored magnetic field at the undulators, so that the photons generated at the electron wiggling path interact at the right phase with the electron beam. In such a precise system, small (>0.01%) radiation-induced alterations of the magnetic field in the permanent magnets could affect FEL performance. This paper describes the simulation studies of radiation fields in permanent magnets and the expected signal in the detectors. The transport of particles from the radiation sources (i.e. diagnostic insert) to the undulator magnets and to the beam loss monitors (BLM) was simulated with the intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. In order to accurately reproduce the optics of LCLS, lattice capabilities and magnetic fields were enabled in FLUKA and betatron oscillations were validated against reference data. All electron events entering the BLMs were printed in data files. The paper also introduces the Radioactive Ion Beam Optimizer (RIBO) Monte Carlo 3-D code, which was used to read from the event files, to compute Cerenkov production and then to simulate the optical coupling of the BLM detectors, accounting for the transmission of light through the quartz.

  20. Potential effects of vinasse as a soil amendment to control runoff and soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazbavi, Z.; Sadeghi, S. H. R.

    2016-02-01

    Application of organic materials are well known as environmental practices in soil restoration, preserving soil organic matter and recovering degraded soils of arid and semiarid lands. Therefore, the present research focused on evaluating the effectiveness of vinasse, a byproduct mainly of the sugar-ethanol industry, on soil conservation under simulated rainfall. Vinasse can be recycled as a soil amendment due to its organic matter content. Accordingly, the laboratory experiments were conducted by using 0.25 m2 experimental plots at 20 % slope and rainfall intensity of 72 mm h-1 with 0.5 h duration. The effect of vinasse was investigated on runoff and soil loss control. Experiments were set up as a control (with no amendment) and three treated plots with doses of 0.5, 1, and 1.5 L m-2 of vinasse subjected to simulated rainfall. Laboratory results indicated that vinasse at different levels could not significantly (P > 0.05) decrease the runoff amount and soil loss rate in the study plots compared to untreated plots. The average amounts of minimum runoff volume and soil loss were about 3985 mL and 46 g for the study plot at a 1 L m-2 level of vinasse application.