Science.gov

Sample records for beam loss localization

  1. Collimation system design for beam loss localization with slipstacking injection in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Brown, B.C.; Johnson, D.E.; Koba, K.; Kourbanis, I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; Sidorov, V.I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Results of modeling with the 3-D STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss localization and related radiation effects are presented for the slipstacking injection to the Fermilab Main Injector. Simulations of proton beam loss are done using multi-turn tracking with realistic accelerator apertures, nonlinear fields in the accelerator magnets and time function of the RF manipulations to explain the results of beam loss measurements. The collimation system consists of one primary and four secondary collimators. It intercepts a beam power of 1.6 kW at a scraping rate of 5% of 5.5E+13 ppp, with a beam loss rate in the ring outside the collimation region of 1 W/m or less. Based on thorough energy deposition and radiation modeling, a corresponding collimator design was developed that satisfies all the radiation and engineering constraints.

  2. Collimation system for beam loss localization with slip stacking injection in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce C.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Slip stacking injection for high intensity operation of the Fermilab Main Injector produces a small fraction of beam which is not captured in buckets and accelerated. A collimation system has been implemented with a thin primary collimator to define the momentum aperture at which this beam is lost and four massive secondary collimators to capture the scattered beam. The secondary collimators define tight apertures and thereby capture a fraction of other lost beam. The system was installed in 2007 with commissioning continuing in 2008. The collimation system will be described including simulation, design, installation, and commissioning. Successful operation and operational limitations will be described.

  3. Local compensation-rematch for major element failures in superconducting linacs with very high reliability and low beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Biao; Tang, Jingyu; Yan, Fang; Li, Zhihui; Meng, Cai; Pei, Shilun

    2015-06-01

    In order to achieve the extremely high reliability and availability in superconducting linacs required by some applications such as in accelerator-driven systems (ADS), a fault tolerance design is usually pursued. With the example of the China-ADS main linac, the failure effects of key elements such as RF cavities and focusing elements in different locations along the linac have been studied and the schemes of compensation by means of the local compensation-rematch method have been proposed. For cavity failures, by adjusting the settings of the neighboring cavities and focusing elements one can make sure that the Twiss parameters and beam energy are recovered to the nominal ones at the matching point. For solenoid failures in the low energy section, a novel method by using a neighbor cavity with reverse phase is used to maintain simultaneous acceleration and focusing in both the transverse and longitudinal phase planes. For quadrupole failures in the warm transitions in the high energy section, triplet focusing structure is adopted which can be converted locally into a doublet focusing in case of one quadrupole failure and the rematch method is proven very effective. With macro-particle simulations by TraceWin, it is found that the normalized rms emittance has no obvious growth and the halo emittance has modest growth after applying the local compensation-rematch in the cases mentioned above. In addition, a self-made code based on MATLAB has been developed to double check the simulations by TraceWin for the local compensation and rematch method.

  4. Preliminary comments about beam loss

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, D.

    1985-10-01

    A variety of beam loss questions are being investigated. They affect several design issues, ranging from machine-associated background in the detectors to the radiation lifetime of the main-ring magnets: (1) Muons. Oppositely directed muon beams from prompt muon production, primary meson decay, and a variety of other processes radiate from each IR. If they were not fanned by the insertion dipoles, the beams would be sufficiently intense and energetic that they would present a radiation hazard even after penetrating 2 km of soil or rock. (2) Machine-associated background in the IR`s. About 30 mb of the total cross section is elastic or quasi-elastic, and most of the protons are in a Gaussian spot with sigma = 9 mr. These particles are well within the machine acceptance, but there is a grey area in the tail of the distributions in which the scattered particles `almost` remain in orbit - they continue for some distance but eventually hit a wall. (3) Cryogenic load. This problem has been addressed to some degree in the RDS, but considerably more detail is needed. It appears that a very large fraction of the inelastic particle energy will be deposited here. (4) Radiation damage in the ring. The lifetime of both magnets and electronics in the tunnel might be limited by radiation due to particle loss. Early results are not reassuring. Tevatron measurements, reported to the authors by John Elias, indicate that most of the tunnel background comes from particle loss due to beam-gas collisions.

  5. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  6. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  7. Beam Loss Control for the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Choi, J.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II storage ring is designed for the full injected beam losses in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but for the remainder of the ring its shielded for {le} 10% top-off injection beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed these levels for time sufficient to cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring (LCM) system will control the beam losses to the more heavily shielded injection region while monitoring the losses outside this region. To achieve this scrapers are installed in the injection region to intercept beam particles that might be lost outside this region. The scrapers will be thin (< 1Xrad) that will allow low energy electrons to penetrate and the subsequent dipole will separate them from the stored beam. These thin scrapers will reduce the radiation from the scraper compared to thicker scrapers. The dipole will provide significant local shielding for particles that hit inside the gap and a source for the loss monitor system that will measure the amount of beam lost in the injection region.

  8. Beam Loss Monitoring for LHC Machine Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Eva Barbara; Dehning, Bernd; Effnger, Ewald; Emery, Jonathan; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Hajdu, Csaba; Jackson, Stephen; Kurfuerst, Christoph; Marsili, Aurelien; Misiowiec, Marek; Nagel, Markus; Busto, Eduardo Nebot Del; Nordt, Annika; Roderick, Chris; Sapinski, Mariusz; Zamantzas, Christos

    The energy stored in the nominal LHC beams is two times 362 MJ, 100 times the energy of the Tevatron. As little as 1 mJ/cm3 deposited energy quenches a magnet at 7 TeV and 1 J/cm3 causes magnet damage. The beam dumps are the only places to safely dispose of this beam. One of the key systems for machine protection is the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. About 3600 ionization chambers are installed at likely or critical loss locations around the LHC ring. The losses are integrated in 12 time intervals ranging from 40 μs to 84 s and compared to threshold values defined in 32 energy ranges. A beam abort is requested when potentially dangerous losses are detected or when any of the numerous internal system validation tests fails. In addition, loss data are used for machine set-up and operational verifications. The collimation system for example uses the loss data for set-up and regular performance verification. Commissioning and operational experience of the BLM are presented: The machine protection functionality of the BLM system has been fully reliable; the LHC availability has not been compromised by false beam aborts.

  9. RHIC BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM INITIAL OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; MICHNOFF,R.J.; GELLER,J.M.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent beam loss quenching of the superconducting magnets, and acquire loss data. Four hundred ion chambers are located around the rings to detect losses. The required 8-decade range in signal current is compressed using an RC pre- integrator ahead of a low current amplifier. A beam abort may be triggered if fast or slow losses exceed programmable threshold levels. A micro-controller based VME module sets references and gains and reads trip status for up to 64 channels. Results obtained with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the prototype electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line are presented along with the present status of the system.

  10. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modeling for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mikkelsen; D.S. Darrow; L. Grisham; R. Akers; S. Kaye

    1999-06-01

    A numerical model, EIGOL, has been developed to calculate the loss rate of neutral beam ions from NSTX and the resultant power density on the plasma facing components. This model follows the full gyro-orbit of the beam ions, which can be a significant fraction of the minor radius. It also includes the three-dimensional structure of the plasma facing components inside NSTX. Beam ion losses from two plasma conditions have been compared: {beta} = 23%, q{sub 0} = 0.8, and {beta} = 40%, q{sub 0} = 2.6. Global losses are computed to be 4% and 19%, respectively, and the power density on the rf antenna is near the maximum tolerable levels in the latter case.

  11. The ATLAS Beam Condition and Beam Loss Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenc, I.

    2010-04-01

    The primary goal of ATLAS Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) and Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) is to protect the ATLAS Inner Detector against damaging LHC beam incidents by initiating beam abort in case of beam failures. Poly-crystalline Chemical Vapour Deposition (pCVD) diamond was chosen as the sensor material for both systems. ATLAS BCM will provide real-time monitoring of instantaneous particle rates close to the interaction point (IP) of ATLAS spectrometer. Using fast front-end and signal processing electronics the time-of-flight and pulse amplitude measurements will be performed to distinguish between normal collisions and background events due to natural or accidental beam losses. Additionally, BCM will also provide coarse relative luminosity information. A second system, the ATLAS BLM, is an independent system which was recently added to complement the BCM. It is a current measuring system and was partially adopted from the BLM system developed by the LHC beam instrumentation group with pCVD diamond pad sensors replacing the ionisation chambers. The design of both systems and results of operation in ATLAS framework during the commissioning with cosmic rays will be reported in this contribution.

  12. RHIC beam loss monitor system design

    SciTech Connect

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-07-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized for data logging. The output is also applied to an analog multiplier which compensates the energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. High and low pass filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent programmable trip levels. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer (FEC) for real-time operation. Results with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line will be presented.

  13. Calculation of prompt loss and toroidal field ripple loss under neutral beam injection on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Hao, Baolong; White, Roscoe; Wang, Jinfang; Zang, Qing; Han, Xiaofeng; Hu, Chundong

    2017-02-01

    Neutral beam injection is a major auxiliary heating method in the EAST experimental campaign. This paper gives detailed calculations of beam loss with different plasma equilibria using the guiding center code ORBIT and NUBEAM/TRANSP. Increasing plasma current can dramatically lower the beam ion prompt loss and ripple loss. Countercurrent beam injection gives a much larger prompt loss fraction than co-injection, and ripple-induced collisionless stochastic diffusion is the dominant loss channel.

  14. Calculation of prompt loss and toroidal field ripple loss under neutral beam injection on EAST

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Bin; Hao, Baolong; White, Roscoe; ...

    2016-12-09

    Here, neutral beam injection is a major auxiliary heating method in the EAST experimental campaign. This paper gives detailed calculations of beam loss with different plasma equilibria using the guiding center code ORBIT and NUBEAM/TRANSP. Increasing plasma current can dramatically lower the beam ion prompt loss and ripple loss. Countercurrent beam injection gives a much larger prompt loss fraction than co-injection, and ripple-induced collisionless stochastic diffusion is the dominant loss channel.

  15. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  16. BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

  17. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  18. Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

  19. A Flexible, Low Cost, Beam Loss Monitor Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyes, George Garnet; Pimol, Piti; Juthong, Nawin; Attaphibal, Malee

    2007-01-19

    A flexible, low cost, Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) Evaluation System based on Bergoz BLMs has been developed. Monitors can easily be moved to any location for beam loss investigations and/or monitor usefulness evaluations. Different PC pulse counting cards are compared and tested for this application using the display software developed based on LabVIEW. Beam problems uncovered with this system are presented.

  20. BEAM LOSS ESTIMATES AND CONTROL FOR THE BNL NEUTRINO FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    WENG, W.-T.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPARIA, D.; TSOUPAS, N.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.

    2005-05-16

    The requirement for low beam loss is very important both to protect the beam component, and to make the hands-on maintenance possible. In this report, the design considerations to achieving high intensity and low loss will be presented. We start by specifying the beam loss limit at every physical process followed by the proper design and parameters for realizing the required goals. The process considered in this paper include the emittance growth in the linac, the H{sup -} injection, the transition crossing, the coherent instabilities and the extraction losses.

  1. Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

  2. H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Galambos, John D; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

  3. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Sonato, P.

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  4. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Veltri, P.

    2014-02-01

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  5. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Agostinetti, P; Dal Bello, S; Marcuzzi, D; Serianni, G; Sonato, P; Veltri, P

    2014-02-01

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  6. Beam Loss Monitors in the NSLS Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer,S.L.; Fedurin, M.

    2009-05-04

    Beam loss monitors (BLM) have been used for more than two decades in the VUV ring at the NSLS. These have proved useful for optimizing injection and operation of the ring. Recently similar monitors have been installed in the X-ray ring and are being used to better understand injection, as well as operation of the ring. These units have been compared with the Bergoz BLMs, which have been mostly useful for understanding operating beam losses.

  7. Beam Losses in the NLC Extraction Line for High Luminosity Beam Parameters (LCC-0049)

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y

    2004-03-19

    In this note we present results of beam tracking in the NLC extraction line for the NLC option with high luminosity beam parameters (option H). Particle losses for 0.5 TeV and 1 TeV cms energy beams have been computed and examined as a function of beam offset at the interaction point (IP). Updated tracking results for the NLC option A are presented as well.

  8. Analysis ob beam losses at PSR (Proton Storage Ring)

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Plum, M.A.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Beam losses and the resulting component activation at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have limited operating currents to about 30..mu..A average at a repetition rate of 15 Hz. Loss rates were found to be approximately proportional to the circulating current and can be understood by a detailed accounting of emittance growth in the two step injection process along with Coulomb scattering of the stored beam during multiple traversals of the injection foil. Calculations and simulations of the losses are in reasonable agreement with measurements.

  9. MHD Induced Neutral Beam Ion Loss from NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, A.L. Roquemore, and K. Shinohara

    2007-12-13

    Bursts of ~60 kHz activity on Mirnov coils occur frequently in NSTX plasmas and these are accompanied by bursts of neutral beam ion loss over a range in pitch angles. These losses have been measured with a scintillator type loss probe imaged with a high speed (>10,000 frames/s) video camera, giving the evolution of the energy and pitch angle distributions of the lost neutral beam ions over the course of the events. The instability occurs below the TAE frequency in NSTX (~100 kHz) in high beta plasmas and may be a beta driven Alfvén acoustic (BAAE) mode.

  10. Implementation of Beam-Loss Monitor systems for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.G.

    1994-07-01

    Beam-Loss Monitors (BLM) are used with each accelerator in the Superconducting Super Collider complex. The primary purpose of these detectors is to protect the accelerators from damage due to the loss of protons. Although the range of primary beam energies to be covered is very large, 20 MeV to 20 TeV, we plan to maintain commonality of detectors and electronics as much as possible. In this report the plans for developing and implementing BLM systems for each of the accelerators will be discussed. Possible solutions to problems that have been identified are presented.

  11. beam loss scenarios for MuCool Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; Johnstone, Carol; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets, gas-filled RF cavities, and other apparatus being developed to cool intense, large-emittance muon beams. In this study the results of Monte Carlo modeling of several beam loss scenarios are presented. The MTA facility was designed to test targets and other muon cooling apparatus using the intense Fermilab Linac beam. The requested intensity of the proton beam for the MTA is essentially full Linac capability, or 1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse and an energy of 400 MeV. Two modes of operation will be supported in the MuCOOL beamline: one mode for emittance measurements (and beamline studies) and a second mode for MTA experiments. Maximum beam intensity for these two modes is: 9.6 x 10{sup 15} protons/hr - 600 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity (1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) to the emittance beam absorber and 9.6 x 10{sup 14} protons/hour - 60 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity to experiments in the MTA experimental hall. This extremely high intensity implies careful investigation into and application of proper shielding materials and configuration in order to satisfy the following two requirements: (i) to reduce the instantaneous dose rate outside of the experimental enclosure to prescribed levels appropriate for the area considered; (ii) to ensure the civil construction of the hall is capable of additional shielding and, further, that the weight of the shielding is commensurate with the loading specifications of the enclosure, notably the ceiling. A number of scenarios for beam loss at different locations were studied in order to determine the maximum beam intensity which is in compliance with the existing shielding. The modeling was performed with the MARS15 code.

  12. New Beam Loss Monitor for 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Kelly Mahoney

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes a new VME based machine protection Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) signal processing board designed at Jefferson Lab to replace the current CAMAC based BLM board. The new eight-channel BLM signal processor has linear, logarithmic, and integrating amplifiers that simultaneously provide the optimal signal processing for each application. Amplified signals are digitized and then further processed through a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Combining both the diagnostic and machine protection functions in each channel allows the operator to tune-up and monitor beam operations while the machine protection is integrating the same signal. Other features include extensive built-in-self-test, fast shutdown interface (FSD), and 16-Mbit buffers for beam loss transient play-back. The new VME BLM board features high sensitivity, high resolution, and low cost per channel.

  13. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental

  14. Beam Loss and Longitudinal Emittance Growth in SIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M.; Hofmann, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Spiller, P.; Hülsmann, P.; Franchetti, G.; Damerau, H.; König, H. Günter; Klingbeil, H.; Kumm, M.; Moritz, P.; Schütt, P.; Redelbach, A.

    2005-06-01

    Beam losses of several percent occur regularly in SIS. The onset occurs during the RF capture of the beam. Previous studies have revealed that the losses can come from the RF bucket at the start of acceleration being over filled due to the longitudinal bucket acceptance being too small, or due to the mismatch between the mean energy from the UNILAC and synchronous energy of the SIS. The beam losses as measured by a DC beam transformer however show in addition to the sharp initial drop, for the above reasons, a much slower decay in the beam intensity. The speculated cause comes from the incoherent transverse tune shift of the bunched beam, which forces particles into transverse resonant conditions. The longitudinal emittance growth is also another important issue for SIS. Past measurements from Schottky-noise pick-ups have shown a factor of 3-5 increase in the longitudinal emittance depending on the extraction energy; a large factor when compared against expectations from theory. These factors were calculated from the ratio between the normalized relative momentum spread of the DC beam before RF capture and after debunching. In this present work, tomographical techniques have been used to reconstruct the phasespace from a series of bunch profile measurements from a Beam Position Monitor (BPM). Therefore one can find the rate of growth in the longitudinal emittance from a series of high resolution BPM measurements along the RF ramp. Furthermore the initial phasespace density matrix from these reconstructions has been used to generate the initial population of macroparticles for the ESME longitudinal dynamics Particle-In-Cell code, thereby enabling a comparison between the longitudinal emittance growth of the beam under ideal conditions and that of the experiment. The longitudinal emittance growth (rms) during the acceleration (˜540ms) was approximately 20%, and that during the RF capture was estimated to have an upper limit of about 40%. Later measurements have also

  15. RFQ Designs and Beam-Loss Distributions for IFMIF

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    The IFMIF 125 mA cw 40 MeV accelerators will set an intensity record. Minimization of particle loss along the accelerator is a top-level requirement and requires sophisticated design intimately relating the accelerated beam and the accelerator structure. Such design technique, based on the space-charge physics of linear accelerators (linacs), is used in this report in the development of conceptual designs for the Radio-Frequency-Quadrupole (RFQ) section of the IFMIF accelerators. Design comparisons are given for the IFMIF CDR Equipartitioned RFQ, a CDR Alternative RFQ, and new IFMIF Post-CDR Equipartitioned RFQ designs. Design strategies are illustrated for combining several desirable characteristics, prioritized as minimum beam loss at energies above ~ 1 MeV, low rf power, low peak field, short length, high percentage of accelerated particles. The CDR design has ~0.073% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7,is 12.3 m long, and accelerates ~89.6% of the input beam. A new Post-CDR design has ~0.077% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7 and ~8 m length, and accelerates ~97% of the input beam. A complete background for the designs is given, and comparisons are made. Beam-loss distributions are used as input for nuclear physics simulations of radioactivity effects in the IFMIF accelerator hall, to give information for shielding, radiation safety and maintenance design. Beam-loss distributions resulting from a ~1M particle input distribution representative of the IFMIF ECR ion source are presented. The simulations reported were performed with a consistent family of codes. Relevant comparison with other codes has not been possible as their source code is not available. Certain differences have been noted but are not consistent over a broad range of designs and parameter range. The exact transmission found by any of these codes should be treated as indicative, as each has various sensitivities in

  16. Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  17. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  18. Human local and total heat losses in different temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Yin, Hui; Di, Yuhui; Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of operative temperature on the local and total heat losses, and the relationship between the heat loss and thermal sensation. 10 local parts of head, neck, chest, abdomen, upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg and foot are selected. In all these parts, convection, radiation, evaporation, respiration, conduction and diffusion heat losses are analyzed when operative temperature is 23, 28, 33 and 37 °C. The local heat losses show that the radiation and convection heat losses are mainly affected by the area of local body, and the heat loss of the thigh is the most in the ten parts. The evaporation heat loss is mainly affected by the distribution of sweat gland, and the heat loss of the chest is the most. The total heat loss of the local body shows that in low temperature, the thigh, leg and chest have much heat loss, while in high temperature, the chest, abdomen, thigh and head have great heat loss, which are useful for clothing design. The heat losses of the whole body show that as the operative temperature increases, the radiation and convection heat losses decrease, the heat losses of conduction, respiration, and diffusion are almost constant, and the evaporation heat loss increases. By comparison, the heat loss ratios of the radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, are in agreement with the previous researches. At last, the formula about the heat loss ratio of convection and radiation is derived. It's useful for thermal comfort evaluation and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) design.

  19. The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System

    SciTech Connect

    Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

  20. Beam loss ion chamber system upgrade for experimental halls

    SciTech Connect

    D. Dotson; D. Seidman

    2005-08-01

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  1. Beam Loss Ion Chamber System Upgrade for Experimental Halls

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Dotson; D.J. Seidman

    2005-05-16

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  2. Moyer model approximations for point and extended beam losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaslin, Joseph B.; Swanson, William P.; Thomas, Ralph H.

    1987-05-01

    The use of the empirical Moyer model for the determination of transverse neutron shielding for high-energy proton accelerators is described and discussed. It is shown that an important advantage of the Moyer Model is the physical insight it offers towards understanding the complex interactions that comprise the shielding processes. Calculations for pointlike and extended uniform beam loss distributions are discussed and their relationship to practical shielding conditions developed. The calculations required by the model are readily performed on small programmable calculators and thus are widely accessible. Program listings for practical calculations using a Hewlett-Packard HP-97 calculator are available on request.

  3. Three-dimensional particle trajectories and waste beam losses in injection dump beam line of SNS accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Plum, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The SNS ring injection dump beam line has been suffering high beam losses since its commissioning. In order to understand the mechanisms of the beam losses, we have performed 3D simulation studies of the beam line. The 3D models consist of three injection chicane dipoles and one injection dump septum magnet. 3D particle trajectories in the models are computed. We then extend particle optics calculations to the injection dump. Our studies have clearly shown some design and operation problems, that cause beam losses in the injection dump beam line. These include incorrect chicane dipole settings, incorrect position of a chicane dipole, too small aperture of injection dump septum, and inadequate focusing downstream. This paper reports our findings and the remedies to the injection beam loss problems.

  4. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  5. Loss of accuracy using smeared properties in composite beam modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning

    Advanced composite materials have broad, proven applications in many engineering systems ranging from sports equipment sectors to components on the space shuttle because of their lightweight characteristics and significantly high stiffness. Together with this merit of composite materials is the challenge of improving computational simulation process for composites analysis. Composite structures, particularly composite laminates, usually consist of many layers with different lay-up angles. The anisotropic and heterogeneous features render 3D finite element analysis (FEA) computationally expensive in terms of the computational time and the computing power. At the constituent level, composite materials are heterogeneous. But quite often one homogenizes each layer of composites, i.e. lamina, and uses the homogenized material properties as averaged (smeared) values of those constituent materials for analysis. This is an approach extensively used in design and analysis of composite laminates. Furthermore, many industries tempted to use smeared properties at the laminate level to further reduce the model of composite structures. At this scale, smeared properties are averaged material properties that are weighted by the layer thickness. Although this approach has the advantage of saving computational time and cost of modeling significantly, the prediction of the structural responses may not be accurate, particularly the pointwise stress distribution. Therefore, it is important to quantify the loss of accuracy when one uses smeared properties. In this paper, several different benchmark problems are carefully investigated in order to exemplify the effect of the smeared properties on the global behavior and pointwise stress distribution of the composite beam. In the classical beam theory, both Newtonian method and variational method include several ad hoc assumptions to construct the model, however, these assumptions are avoided if one uses variational asymptotic method. VABS

  6. Calibration of Fast Fiber-Optic Beam Loss Monitors for the Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Superconducting Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Dooling, J.; Harkay, K.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Sajaev, V.; Xiao, A.; Vella, Andrea K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the calibration and use of fast fiber-optic (FO) beam loss monitors (BLMs) in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring (SR). A superconducting undulator prototype (SCU0) has been operating in SR Sector 6 (“ID6”) since the beginning of CY2013, and another undulator SCU1 (a 1.1-m length undulator that is three times the length of SCU0) is scheduled for installation in Sector 1 (“ID1”) in 2015. The SCU0 main coil often quenches during beam dumps. MARS simulations have shown that relatively small beam loss (<1 nC) can lead to temperature excursions sufficient to cause quenchingwhen the SCU0windings are near critical current. To characterize local beam losses, high-purity fused-silica FO cables were installed in ID6 on the SCU0 chamber transitions and in ID1 where SCU1 will be installed. These BLMs aid in the search for operating modes that protect the SCU structures from beam-loss-induced quenching. In this paper, we describe the BLM calibration process that included deliberate beam dumps at locations of BLMs. We also compare beam dump events where SCU0 did and did not quench.

  7. Beam loss by collimation in a neutralizer duct

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, G.W.; Willmann, P.A.

    1980-04-03

    Beam fractions lost by collimation in a neutralizer duct are computed in x-x' phase space by using three examples of slab beam distributions under a broad range of duct dimensions, beam half-widths, and beam divergences. The results can be used to design compact neutralizers and to specify beam requirements. The computer code ILOST can be used under a broad range of beam conditions to compute the fraction lost by collimation.

  8. Large-aperture interferometer using local reference beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A large-aperture interferometer was devised by adding a local-reference-beam-generating optical system to a schlieren system. Two versions of the interferometer are demonstrated, one employing 12.7 cm (5 in.) diameter schlieren optics, the other employing 30.48 cm (12 in.) diameter parabolic mirrors in an off-axis system. In the latter configuration a cylindrical lens is introduced near the light source to correct for astigmatism. A zone plate is a satisfactory decollimating element in the reference-beam arm of the interferometer. Attempts to increase the flux and uniformity of irradiance in the reference beam by using a diffuser are discussed.

  9. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses [Shielding Synchrotron Light Sources: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-08-10

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. Lastly, the principles used to provide

  10. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  11. Ribbon Ion Beam with Controlled Directionality and Local Reactive Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biloiu, Costel; Gilchrist, Glen; Kontos, Alex; Basame, Solomon; Rockwell, Tyler; Campbell, Chris; Daniels, Kevin; Allen, Ernest; Wallace, Jay; Ballou, Jon; Hertel, Richard; Chen, Tsung-Liang; Liang, Shurong; Singh, Vikram

    2016-09-01

    A plasma processing technology designed for etch of 3D semiconductor structures is presented. The technology is characterized by controllable ion directionality and local reactive chemistry and it is based on proprietary Applied Materials - Varian Semiconductor Equipment ribbon ion beam architecture. It uses a combination of inert gas ion beam and injection of reactive chemical species at the Point-of-Use (PoU), i.e., at the wafer surface. The ion source uses an inductively coupled plasma source and a diode-type extraction optics. A beam shaping electrode allows extraction of two symmetrical ribbon-like beamlets. The ion beam has in situ controllable ion angular distribution in both mean angle and angular spread. The beam has a uniform distribution of beam current and angles over a waist exceeding 300 mm, allowing full wafer processing in one pass. Chemical compounds are delivered at PoU through linear shower heads. The reactive chemical compound delivered in this fashion maintains its molecular integrity. This result in protection of the trench side walls from deposition of etch residue and facilitates formation of volatile byproducts. The technology was used successfully for mitigation of Magnetic Tunel Junction etch residue. Other applications were this technology differentiate from present technologies are contact liner etch, Co recess, and 1D hole elongation.

  12. Modeling Extraction of VLF Energy from Localized Ion Ring Beams for Space Based Active Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scales, Wayne; Ganguli, Gurudas; Crabtree, Chris; Rudakov, Leonid; Mithaiwala, Manish

    2012-07-01

    Waves in the VLF range are of considerable interest in the magnetosphere since they are responsible for transporting energy and momentum and therefore impacting space weather. Ion ring beams can efficiently generate waves in the VLF frequency range between the electron and ion gyro-frequency (Mithaiwala et al., 2010). Generation of VLF waves by infinite extent ion ring beams have been extensively treated for a broad range of space plasma applications. However, ion ring distributions created by chemical release experiments in the ionosphere (Koons and Pongratz, 1981) and those that occur naturally during storms/substorms or solar-wind comet interactions are localized over a spatial extent. This presentation will consider a new computational model for the nonlinear evolution of VLF waves generated by a spatially localized ion ring beam. The model, though quite general, will have application to generation of VLF waves in the radiation belts by localized creation of an ion ring beam. The model includes the convective loss of energy through phenomenological electron-ion collisions, which models nonlinear scattering of electrostatic lower hybrid waves into large group velocity electromagnetic whistler/magnetosonic waves (Ganguli et al., 2010). Therefore the model, though electrostatic, includes critical electromagnetic effects in a computationally efficient fashion. An emphasis is placed on the determining the efficiency of extraction of VLF energy from the ion ring beam due to the spatial localization of the ion ring beam. It is shown that due to the convection of the VLF waves out of the source region, the efficiency of wave energy extraction is greatly enhanced. This is accompanied by a reduction in background and ion ring beam heating. The results will be used to highlight the importance of non-linear scattering to future active experiments in space. Mithaiwala et al. Phys. Plasma, doi.org/10.1063/1.3372842, 2010 Koons and Pongratz, JGR, 1981. Ganguli et al., Phys

  13. Issues and experience with controlling beam loss at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Gerald; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Controlling beam loss in the Tevatron collider is of great importance because of the delicate nature of the cryogenic magnet system and the collider detectors. Maximizing the physics potential requires optimized performance as well as protection of all equipment. The operating history of the Tevatron has significantly influenced the way losses are managed. The development of beam loss management in the Tevatron will be presented.

  14. Particle Rate and Host Accelerator Beam Loss on the MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Adam James

    2011-10-01

    A study is presented of particle rates in the MICE Muon Beamline and their relationship to beam loss produced in ISIS. A brief overview of neutrino physics is presented, together with a discussion on the Neutrino Factory as a motivation for MICE. An overview of MICE itself is then presented, highlighting the need for a systematic understanding of the relationship between the MICE target parameters, ISIS beam loss, and MICE particle rate. The variation of beam loss with target depth is examined and observed to be non-linear. The variation of beam loss with respect to the target dip time in the ISIS cycle is examined and observed to be approximately linear for dip times between 11.1 ms and 12.6 ms after ISIS injection, before tailing at earlier dip times. The variation of beam loss with particle rate is also observed to follow an approximately linear relationship from 0.05 V.ms to 4.7 V.ms beam loss, with a further strong indication that this continues up to 7.1 V.ms. Particle identification using time-of-flight data is used to give an insight into the relative abundances of each particle species present in the MICE beam. Estimates of muon rate are then produced as a function of beam loss. At a level of 2 V.ms beam loss ~10.9 muons per spill for a 3.2 ms spill with negative π → μ optics, and ~31.1 muons per 1 ms spill with positive π → μ optics are observed. Simulations using the ORBIT particle tracking code of the beam loss distributions around the ISIS ring, caused by the MICE target, are also presented and the implications for MICE running discussed.

  15. Parametric Modeling of Electron Beam Loss in Synchrotron Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.; Hartman, E.; Corbett, J.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Paterson, E.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Synchrotron light is used for a wide variety of scientific disciplines ranging from physical chemistry to molecular biology and industrial applications. As the electron beam circulates, random single-particle collisional processes lead to decay of the beam current in time. We report a simulation study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to capture the decay in beam current due to Touschek, Bremsstrahlung, and Coulomb effects. The FP block in the combined model is a parametric description of the beam current decay where model parameters vary as a function of beam operating conditions (e.g. vertical scraper position, RF voltage, number of the bunches, and total beam current). The NN block provides the parameters of the FP model and is trained (through constrained nonlinear optimization) to capture the variation in model parameters as operating condition of the beam changes. Simulation results will be presented to demonstrate that the proposed combined framework accurately models beam decay as well as variation to model parameters without direct access to parameter values in the model.

  16. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  17. Local wave particle resonant interaction causing energetic particle prompt loss in DIII-D plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. B.; Fu, G. Y.; White, R. B.; Wang, X. G.

    2015-11-01

    A new wave particle resonance mechanism is found explaining the first-orbit prompt neutral beam-ion losses induced by shear Alfvén Eigenmodes (AEs) in the DIII-D tokamak. Because of the large banana width, a typical trapped beam ion can only interact locally with a core localised Alfvén Eigenmode for a fraction of its orbit, i.e. part of its inner leg of the banana orbit. These trapped beam ions can experience substantial radial kick within one bounce as long as the phases of the wave seen by the particles are nearly constant during this local interaction. A wave particle resonant condition is found based on the locally averaged particle orbit frequencies over the interaction part of the particle orbit. It is further found that the frequency width of the local resonance is quite large because the interaction time is short. This implies that particles over a considerable region of phase space can interact effectively with the localised AEs and experience large radial kicks within one bounce orbit. The radial kick size is found numerically and analytically to scale linearly in AE amplitude and is about 5 cm for typical experimental parameters. These results are consistent with experimental measurement.

  18. Convective contributions to local power loss in a Bumpy Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroe, S.; Haste, G.R. Jr.; Tolliver, J.S.; Quon, B.H.; Goyer, J.R.; Solensten, L.; Conner, K.A.

    1986-12-01

    Power flow in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (Tokyo, 1974) (IAEA, Vienna, 1975) Vol. 2, p. 141; Plasma Phys. 25, 597 (1983)) was investigated by measuring the power received by a limiter. Selective removal of heating power from various cavities, including the cavity with the limiter, has demonstrated that the majority of the power is lost locally. Observations of the potential structure demonstrate that asymmetric potential contours are present which can lead to enhanced plasma loss.

  19. Damage localization in beam-like structures using changes in modal strain energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouali, M.; Mellel, N.; Dougdag, M.

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates the application and reliability of using modal strain energy in damage localization estimation of beam-like structures. This is based on the fact that damage often cause a loss of stiffness that increase the modal displacement of two ends of beam element containing the damage, So the modal strain energy after damage will be increased and Modal Strain Energy Change Ratio (MSECR) in this element is larger than other elements and the location of damage is detected by finding the element with higher MSECR. To conduct this investigation, an experimental modal analysis program was carried out on a cantilever beam subjected to a controlled crack levels and the first seven mode shapes were extracted and used to calculate the modal strain energy change. The experimental MSECR was computed and the location of the damage was accurately identified especially for crack sizing as small as 10% of the beam height. Finally, finite elements models were built and validated, MSE change method was applied and the results demonstrate that the method is capable of localizing the damage for beam structure.

  20. Recording PEP2 Ring Beam Losses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Hendrickson, L.; Krauter, K.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    The PEP2 (e+)(e-) storage rings contain many complex interrelated systems. When the beam aborts, examining a record of the orbit from the time just before the abort can help identify the root cause. At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a system has been developed to continuously record beam orbits from Beam Position Monitors (BPMS) into a circular buffer. When the beam is aborted the buffers are frozen and their contents are stored for later analysis. BPM orbits are saved on a turn by turn basis for 2800 turns in both the high energy ring (HER) and the low energy ring (LER). Each BPM Processor (BPMP) can either monitor the HER or the LER, but not both as the readout of the two rings is multiplexed into a single readout channel. Tools exist as part of the SLAC Control Program (SCP) to collect, display, and save the data. A physicist or operator can choose a few BPMS in which to view all 2800 turns to identify the turn in which the beam went awry; then ask for that specific orbit from all of the BPMS in the storage ring to determine the root cause of the abort.

  1. Beam loss and backgrounds in the CDF and D0 detectors due to nuclear elastic beam-gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Valery A. Lebedev; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-05-27

    Detailed simulations were performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the Tevatron Collider detectors due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions. It turns out that this component can drive the accelerator-related background rates in the CDF and D0 detectors, exceeding those due to outscattering from collimation system, inelastic beam-gas interactions and other processes [1, 2]. Results of realistic simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes are presented for the interaction region components and the CDF and D0 detectors. It is shown that a steel mask placed upstream of the detectors can reduce the background rates by almost an order of magnitude.

  2. RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, James R; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2010-01-01

    Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

  3. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates without energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yingli; Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Mingwu; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Yuezhao; Cai, Xiaohong

    2015-12-21

    Using a pair of grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800–2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams.

  4. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF THE BEAM LOSS MONITORING SYSTEM FOR THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.; GASSNER,D.

    2002-05-06

    The SNS to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide a high average intensity 1 GeV beam to produce spallation neutrons. Loss of a even small percentage of this intense beam would result in high radiation. The Beam Loss Monitor (ELM) system must detect such small, long term losses yet be capable of measuring infrequent short high losses. The large dynamic range presents special problems for the system design. Ion chambers will be used as the detectors. A detector originally designed for the FNAL Tevatron, was considered but concerns about ion collection times and low collection efficiency at high loss rates favor a new design. The requirements and design concepts of the proposed approach will be presented. Discussion of the design and testing of the ion chambers and the analog j-Point end electronics will be presented. The overall system design will be described.

  5. Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

    2011-03-28

    A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

  6. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses [Shielding Synchrotron Light Sources: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing thismore » dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. Lastly, the principles used to provide

  7. H- Beam Loss and Evidence for Intrabeam Stripping in the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Kelsey, Charles T. IV; McCrady, Rodney C.; Pang, Xiaoying

    2012-05-15

    The LANSCE accelerator complex is a multi-beam, multi-user facility that provides high-intensity H{sup +} and H{sup -} particle beams for a variety of user programs. At the heart of the facility is a room temperature linac that is comprised of 100-MeV drift tube and 800-MeV coupled cavity linac (CCL) structures. Although both beams are similar in intensity and emittance at 100 MeV, the beam-loss monitors along the CCL show a trend of increased loss for H{sup -} that is not present for H{sup +}. This difference is attributed to stripping mechanisms that affect H{sup -} and not H{sup +}. We present the results of an analysis of H{sup -} beam loss along the CCL that incorporates beam spill measurements, beam dynamics simulations, analytical models and radiation transport estimates using the MCNPX code. The results indicate a significant fraction of these additional losses result from intrabeam stripping.

  8. The upgraded data acquisition system for beam loss monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbaugh, A.; Briegel, C.; Brown, B. C.; Capista, D.; Drennan, C.; Fellenz, B.; Knickerbocker, K.; Lewis, J. D.; Marchionni, A.; Needles, C.; Olson, M.; Pordes, S.; Shi, Z.; Still, D.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Utes, M.; Wu, J.

    2011-11-01

    A VME-based data acquisition system for beam-loss monitors has been developed and is in use in the Tevatron and Main Injector accelerators at the Fermilab complex. The need for enhanced beam-loss protection when the Tevatron is operating in collider-mode was the main driving force for the new design. Prior to the implementation of the present system, the beam-loss monitor system was disabled during collider operation and protection of the Tevatron magnets relied on the quench protection system. The new Beam-Loss Monitor system allows appropriate abort logic and thresholds to be set over the full set of collider operating conditions. The system also records a history of beam-loss data prior to a beam-abort event for post-abort analysis. Installation of the Main Injector system occurred in the fall of 2006 and the Tevatron system in the summer of 2007. Both systems were fully operation by the summer of 2008. In this paper we report on the overall system design, provide a description of its normal operation, and show a number of examples of its use in both the Main Injector and Tevatron.

  9. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2005-06-08

    The increase of beam energy and beam intensity, together with the use of super conducting magnets, opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system, and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data has been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis spaces from the components data to the system configuration.

  10. Stochastic Orbit Loss of Neutral Beam Ions From NSTX Due to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode Avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; Gorelenkova, M; Kubota, S; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Shi, L

    2012-07-11

    Short toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and sometimes a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions occurs. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding center code that incorporates plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are similar to those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary.

  11. Bending, longitudinal and torsional wave transmission on Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beams with high propagation losses.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Hopkins, C

    2016-10-01

    Advanced Statistical Energy Analysis (ASEA) is used to predict vibration transmission across coupled beams which support multiple wave types up to high frequencies where Timoshenko theory is valid. Bending-longitudinal and bending-torsional models are considered for an L-junction and rectangular beam frame. Comparisons are made with measurements, Finite Element Methods (FEM) and Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA). When beams support at least two local modes for each wave type in a frequency band and the modal overlap factor is at least 0.1, measurements and FEM have relatively smooth curves. Agreement between measurements, FEM, and ASEA demonstrates that ASEA is able to predict high propagation losses which are not accounted for with SEA. These propagation losses tend to become more important at high frequencies with relatively high internal loss factors and can occur when there is more than one wave type. At such high frequencies, Timoshenko theory, rather than Euler-Bernoulli theory, is often required. Timoshenko theory is incorporated in ASEA and SEA using wave theory transmission coefficients derived assuming Euler-Bernoulli theory, but using Timoshenko group velocity when calculating coupling loss factors. The changeover between theories is appropriate above the frequency where there is a 26% difference between Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko group velocities.

  12. Object localization using a biosonar beam: how opening your mouth improves localization

    PubMed Central

    Arditi, G.; Weiss, A. J.; Yovel, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the location of a sound source is crucial for survival. Both predators and prey usually produce sound while moving, revealing valuable information about their presence and location. Animals have thus evolved morphological and neural adaptations allowing precise sound localization. Mammals rely on the temporal and amplitude differences between the sound signals arriving at their two ears, as well as on the spectral cues available in the signal arriving at a single ear to localize a sound source. Most mammals rely on passive hearing and are thus limited by the acoustic characteristics of the emitted sound. Echolocating bats emit sound to perceive their environment. They can, therefore, affect the frequency spectrum of the echoes they must localize. The biosonar sound beam of a bat is directional, spreading different frequencies into different directions. Here, we analyse mathematically the spatial information that is provided by the beam and could be used to improve sound localization. We hypothesize how bats could improve sound localization by altering their echolocation signal design or by increasing their mouth gape (the size of the sound emitter) as they, indeed, do in nature. Finally, we also reveal a trade-off according to which increasing the echolocation signal's frequency improves the accuracy of sound localization but might result in undesired large localization errors under low signal-to-noise ratio conditions. PMID:26361552

  13. Object localization using a biosonar beam: how opening your mouth improves localization.

    PubMed

    Arditi, G; Weiss, A J; Yovel, Y

    2015-08-01

    Determining the location of a sound source is crucial for survival. Both predators and prey usually produce sound while moving, revealing valuable information about their presence and location. Animals have thus evolved morphological and neural adaptations allowing precise sound localization. Mammals rely on the temporal and amplitude differences between the sound signals arriving at their two ears, as well as on the spectral cues available in the signal arriving at a single ear to localize a sound source. Most mammals rely on passive hearing and are thus limited by the acoustic characteristics of the emitted sound. Echolocating bats emit sound to perceive their environment. They can, therefore, affect the frequency spectrum of the echoes they must localize. The biosonar sound beam of a bat is directional, spreading different frequencies into different directions. Here, we analyse mathematically the spatial information that is provided by the beam and could be used to improve sound localization. We hypothesize how bats could improve sound localization by altering their echolocation signal design or by increasing their mouth gape (the size of the sound emitter) as they, indeed, do in nature. Finally, we also reveal a trade-off according to which increasing the echolocation signal's frequency improves the accuracy of sound localization but might result in undesired large localization errors under low signal-to-noise ratio conditions.

  14. Beam Loss due to Foil Scattering in the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the contribution of scattering from the primary stripper foil to losses in the SNS ring, we have carried out calculations using the ORBIT Code aimed at evaluating these losses. These calculations indicate that the probability of beam loss within one turn following a foil hit is ~1.8 10-8 , where is the foil thickness in g/cm2, assuming a carbon foil. Thus, for a typical SNS stripper foil of thickness = 390 g/cm2, the probability of loss within one turn of a foil hit is ~7.0 10-6. This note describes the calculations used to arrive at this result, presents the distribution of these losses around the SNS ring, and compares the calculated results with observed ring losses for a well-tuned production beam.

  15. Location of Maximum Credible Beam Losses in LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Stan

    2010-12-13

    The memo describes the maximum credible beam the LCLS injector can produce and lose at various locations along the beamline. The estimation procedure is based upon three previous reports [1, 2, 3]. While specific numbers have been updated to accurately reflect the present design parameters, the conclusions are very similar to those given in Ref 1. The source of the maximum credible beam results from the explosive electron emission from the photocathode if the drive laser intensity exceeds the threshold for plasma production. In this event, the gun's RF field can extract a large number of electrons from this plasma which are accelerated out of the gun and into the beamline. This electron emission persists until it has depleted the gun of all its energy. Hence the number of electrons emitted per pulse is limited by the amount of stored RF energy in the gun. It needs to be emphasized that this type of emission is highly undesirable, as it causes permanent damage to the cathode.

  16. Model for nonlinear evolution of localized ion ring beam in magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Scales, W. A.; Ganguli, G.; Mithaiwala, M.; Rudakov, L.

    2012-06-15

    An electrostatic hybrid model, which investigates the nonlinear evolution of a localized ion ring beam in a magnetoplasma, is described and applied to the generation and evolution of turbulence in the very low frequency (VLF) ({Omega}{sub ci}<{omega}<{Omega}{sub ce}) range, where {Omega}{sub ci(e)} is the ion (electron) gyro frequency. Electrons are treated as a fluid and the ions with the particle-in-cell method. Although the model is electrostatic, it includes the effects of energy loss by convection of electromagnetic VLF waves out of the instability region by utilizing a phenomenological model for effective collisions with the fluid electrons. In comparison with a more conventional electrostatic hybrid model, the new model shows much more efficient extraction of energy from the ion ring beam and reduced background plasma heating over a range of parameters.

  17. An investigation of acoustic beam patterns for the sonar localization problem using a beam based method.

    PubMed

    Guarato, Francesco; Windmill, James; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerald

    2013-06-01

    Target localization can be accomplished through an ultrasonic sonar system equipped with an emitter and two receivers. Time of flight of the sonar echoes allows the calculation of the distance of the target. The orientation can be estimated from knowledge of the beam pattern of the receivers and the ratio, in the frequency domain, between the emitted and the received signals after compensation for distance effects and air absorption. The localization method is described and, as its performance strongly depends on the beam pattern, the search of the most appropriate sonar receiver in order to ensure the highest accuracy of target orientation estimations is developed in this paper. The structure designs considered are inspired by the ear shapes of some bat species. Parameters like flare rate, truncation angle, and tragus are considered in the design of the receiver structures. Simulations of the localization method allow us to state which combination of those parameters could provide the best real world implementation. Simulation results show the estimates of target orientations are, in the worst case, 2° with SNR = 50 dB using the receiver structure chosen for a potential practical implementation of a sonar system.

  18. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    DOE PAGES

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; ...

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while inmore » other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.« less

  19. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while in other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.

  20. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  1. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E.J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas (P{sub NBI}=15 thinspthinspMW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14thinspthinspMeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40{percent} beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length {Delta}t=70 thinspthinspms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita {ital et al.,} Nucl.thinspthinspFusion {bold 37}, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R. V.; McCune, D. C.; Medley, S. S.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E. J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R. B.; Zweben, S. J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas ( PNBI = 15 MW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14 MeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40% beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length Δt = 70 ms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita et al., Nucl. Fusion 37, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly.

  3. Electron beam loss assumptions for ELI-NPMEGa-ray radioprotection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, G A

    2011-10-06

    The ELI-NP project is now working on the design of their conventional facility. Dr. Gheorghe Cata-Danil recently requested that I provide them with information on the location and amount of electron-beam loss in the MEGa-ray source they have proposed for ELI-NP. This memo is intended to document that information, for transmission to ELI-NP. The ELI-NP MEGa-ray source, as presently proposed, consists of two x-band accelerator sections separated by a large chicane, as show in figure 1. The basic parameters of the machine that are pertinent for specifying the radiation source terms are shown in table 1. These are the parameters of the intentionall-produced photobeam. In addition to the photobeam, the electron gun and accelerator will produce 'dark current' that originates throughout the RF structures (that is, distributed along the accelerator axis) and therefore has a distribution of energy below the energy of the photobeam. Because it is emitted from surfaces inside the RF structures, much of it is not transported through the accelerator and is lost in the accelerator RF structures. A large fraction of the total dark current is produced in the photogun and lost at the entrance of the 1st accelerator RF structure. Important sources of radiation during operation are beam alignment screens that are used for observing the image of the electron beam, during adjustment of beam steering and for general diagnostic purposes. Each screen consists of a 1 mm thick Ce:YAG plate that is moved into the path of the beam when desired. This destroys the electron beam, spraying all beam current into the structures downstream of the screen. Only one screen is inserted at a time. These screens may be located after each accelerator RF structure, and after each set of bend magnets, as shown in figure 3. The photobeam energy and currents at each location are listed in table 2; for simplicity, the dark current energy is (conseratively) assumed to be the same as the photobeam energy. In

  4. Broadband source localization using horizontal-beam acoustic intensity striations.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Altan; Orr, Marshall; Rouseff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Waveguide invariant theory is applied to horizontal line array (HLA) beamformer output to localize moving broadband noise sources from measured acoustic intensity striation patterns. Acoustic signals emitted by ships of opportunity (merchant ships) were simultaneously recorded on a HLA and three hydrophones separated by 10 km during the RAGS03 (relationship between array gain and shelf-break fluid processes) experiment. Hough transforms are used to estimate both the waveguide invariant parameter "beta" and the ratio of source range at the closest point of approach to source speed from the observed striation patterns. Broadband (50-150-Hz) acoustic data-sets are used to demonstrate source localization capability as well as inversion capability of waveguide invariant parameter beta. Special attention is paid to bathymetric variability since the acoustic intensity striation patterns seem to be influenced by range-dependent bathymetry of the experimental area. The Hough transform method is also applied to the HLA beam-time record data and to the acoustic intensity data from three distant receivers to validate the estimation results from HLA beamformer output. Good agreement of the results from all three approaches suggests the feasibility of locating broadband noise sources and estimating waveguide invariant parameter beta in shallow waters.

  5. Radiation losses in PLT during neutral beam and ICRF heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Hinnov, E.; Hwang, D.

    1981-02-01

    Radiation and charge exchange losses in the PLT tokamak are compared for discharges with ohmic heating only (OH), and with additional heating by neutral beams (NB) or RF in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). Spectroscopic, bolometric and soft x-ray diagnostics were used. The effects of discharge cleaning, vacuum wall gettering, and rate of gas inlet on radiation losses from OH plasmas and the correlation between radiation from plasma core and edge temperatures are discussed.

  6. Distributed beam loss monitor based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Yu; Emanov, F. A.; Petrenko, A. V.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses a distributed beam loss monitor which is based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber and which has been installed at the VEPP-5 Injection Complex at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The principle of the device operation consists in detecting the Cherenkov radiation generated in an optical fiber by relativistic charged particles that are produced in an electromagnetic shower when highly relativistic beam particles (electrons or positrons) hit the accelerator vacuum chamber wall. Our experiments used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to detect the Cherenkov light. Knowing when the PMT signal arrives tells us where the beam loss occurs. Using a 20-m-long optical fiber allowed a detector spatial resolution of 3 m. The way to improve the resolution is to optimize the monitor working conditions and optical fiber and PMT parameters, potentially leading to a resolution of as fine as 0.5 m according to our estimates.

  7. Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2014-12-01

    There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy nuclei. We calculate the cross sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times 1032/cm2/s .

  8. Observations of neutral beam and ICRF tail ion losses due to Alfven modes in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Chang, Z.

    1996-04-01

    Fast ion losses resulting from MHD modes at the Alfven frequency, such as the TAE, have been observed in TFTR. The modes have been driven both by neutral beam ions, at low B{sub T}, and by H-minority ICRF tail ions at higher B{sub T}. The measurements indicate that the loss rate varies linearly with the mode amplitude, and that the fast ion losses during the mode activity can be significant, e.g. up to 10% of the input power is lost in the worst case.

  9. Loss of balance during balance beam walking elicits a multifocal theta band electrocortical response

    PubMed Central

    Gwin, Joseph T.; Makeig, Scott; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the neural correlates of loss of balance during walking could lead to improved clinical assessment and treatment for individuals predisposed to falls. We used high-density electroencephalography (EEG) combined with independent component analysis (ICA) to study loss of balance during human walking. We examined 26 healthy young subjects performing heel-to-toe walking on a treadmill-mounted balance beam as well as walking on the treadmill belt (both at 0.22 m/s). ICA identified clusters of electrocortical EEG sources located in or near anterior cingulate, anterior parietal, superior dorsolateral-prefrontal, and medial sensorimotor cortex that exhibited significantly larger mean spectral power in the theta band (4–7 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. Left and right sensorimotor cortex clusters produced significantly less power in the beta band (12–30 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. For each source cluster, we also computed a normalized mean time/frequency spectrogram time locked to the gait cycle during loss of balance (i.e., when subjects stepped off the balance beam). All clusters except the medial sensorimotor cluster exhibited a transient increase in theta band power during loss of balance. Cluster spectrograms demonstrated that the first electrocortical indication of impending loss of balance occurred in the left sensorimotor cortex at the transition from single support to double support prior to stepping off the beam. These findings provide new insight into the neural correlates of walking balance control and could aid future studies on elderly individuals and others with balance impairments. PMID:23926037

  10. Loss of balance during balance beam walking elicits a multifocal theta band electrocortical response.

    PubMed

    Sipp, Amy R; Gwin, Joseph T; Makeig, Scott; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-11-01

    Determining the neural correlates of loss of balance during walking could lead to improved clinical assessment and treatment for individuals predisposed to falls. We used high-density electroencephalography (EEG) combined with independent component analysis (ICA) to study loss of balance during human walking. We examined 26 healthy young subjects performing heel-to-toe walking on a treadmill-mounted balance beam as well as walking on the treadmill belt (both at 0.22 m/s). ICA identified clusters of electrocortical EEG sources located in or near anterior cingulate, anterior parietal, superior dorsolateral-prefrontal, and medial sensorimotor cortex that exhibited significantly larger mean spectral power in the theta band (4-7 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. Left and right sensorimotor cortex clusters produced significantly less power in the beta band (12-30 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. For each source cluster, we also computed a normalized mean time/frequency spectrogram time locked to the gait cycle during loss of balance (i.e., when subjects stepped off the balance beam). All clusters except the medial sensorimotor cluster exhibited a transient increase in theta band power during loss of balance. Cluster spectrograms demonstrated that the first electrocortical indication of impending loss of balance occurred in the left sensorimotor cortex at the transition from single support to double support prior to stepping off the beam. These findings provide new insight into the neural correlates of walking balance control and could aid future studies on elderly individuals and others with balance impairments.

  11. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2004-11-10

    The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration.

  12. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between Pb ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; Bocian, D.; Gilardoni, S.; Jowett, J.M.; /CERN

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the alice interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  13. Duration of memory loss due to electron beam exposure. Final report Jan-May 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Tilton, B.M.

    1983-08-01

    Electron beam exposure has been shown to produce retrograde amnesia (RA). The objective of this study was to determine the duration of memory loss upon electron beam exposure. It is important to know if exposure produces a memory loss of the events which occurred in the preceding 1 sec or memory loss of the preceding minute's events. The task was a single-trial avoidance paradigm. The animal was placed in a small aversive chamber. After a 90-sec adaptation period, a door opened that provided access to a large, dark, preferred chamber. The time required for the animal to enter the preferred chamber was the measure of interest (T). Once inside the preferred chamber, a 1-sec footshock was delivered. Following the footshock by some preset delay (delta T), the animal was exposed to a 10-microsec, 10-rad electron beam (or X-ray). A second trial on the task was run 2 hr postexposure. The second trial consisted of placing the animal in the aversive chamber and monitoring the time (T') required to enter the preferred chamber. If the electron beam exposure interfered with the animal's ability to recall the shock, T' would be greatly reduced as compared with the sham controls. The exposure delay times used were delta T = 1, 3, 5, and 10 sec.

  14. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  15. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  16. Modeling of beam loss in Tevatron and backgrounds in the BTeV detector

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2004-07-07

    Detailed STRUCT simulations are performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the BTeV detector in the Tevatron CO interaction region due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions and out-scattering from the collimation system. Corresponding showers induced in the machine components and background rates in BTeV are modeled with the MARS14 code. It is shown that the combination of a steel collimator and concrete shielding wall located in front of the detector can reduce the accelerator-related background rates in the detector by an order of magnitude.

  17. Polarisation splitting of laser beams by large angles with minimal reflection losses

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, B L

    2006-05-31

    New crystal anisotropic prisms for splitting orthogonally polarised components of laser radiation by large angles with minimal reflection losses caused by the Brewster refraction and total internal reflection of polarised waves from the crystal-air interface are considered and the method for their calculation is described. It is shown that, by assembling glue-free combinations of two or three prisms, thermally stable beamsplitters can be fabricated, which are free from the beam astigmatism and the wave dispersion of the output angles of the beams. The parameters and properties of new beamsplitters are presented in a convenient form in figures and tables. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Measuring correlations between beam loss and residual radiation in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce C.; Wu, Guan Hong; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    In order to control beam loss for high intensity operation of the Fermilab Main Injector, electronics has been implemented to provide detailed loss measurements using gas-filled ionization monitors. Software to enhance routine operation and studies has been developed and losses are logged for each acceleration cycle. A systematic study of residual radiation at selected locations in the accelerator tunnel have been carried out by logging residual radiation at each of 142 bar-coded locations. We report on fits of the residual radiation measurements to half-life weighted sums of the beam loss data using a few characteristic lifetimes. The data are now available over a multi-year period including residual radiation measurements repeated multiple times during three extended facility shutdown periods. Measurement intervals of a few weeks combined with variable delays between beam off time and the residual measurement permits sensitivity to lifetimes from hours to years. The results allow planning for work in radiation areas to be based on calibrated analytic models.

  19. Localized buckling of a heavy beam on a contacting surface: A model for beam mode buckling of buried pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, H.D.; Kyriakides, S.

    1984-06-01

    The paper presents an attempt at modeling the so called 'Beam Mode Buckling' exhibited under compression in pipelines. The line is modeled as a long heavy beam on a contacting surface. The reacting surface is modeled first as an elastic and subsequently as a rigid foundation with the additional constraint that it only reacts to compressive loads. The problem is assumed to possess a localized imperfection. Under compressive axial load a section of the beam lifts off the foundation. The problem is studied through a large deflection extensional beam nonlinear formulation. The large deflection response of the beam is found to exhibit a limit load which is shown to be very imperfection sensitive. A parametric study of the problem as well as a number of examples with actual pipeline parameters are presented.

  20. Analysis of detectability loss through fan-beam x-ray computed tomography reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-03-01

    We consider detection of a small signal in fan-beam x-ray computed tomography (CT). In order to characterize the loss of intrinsic signal detectability from the projection data (sinogram) domain to the reconstructed image, we analyze the Hotelling observer SNR in each domain. Further, we characterize the loss of Hotelling observer SNR through decomposition into two components: loss of signal detectability which arises due to unequal variance in the noise of separate detector elements and loss of detectability arising from the fact that some noiseless signals have components which lie in the nullspace of a given reconstruction operator. The proposed methodology is investigated for the back-projection ltration (BPF) algorithm developed by our group [2].

  1. Accidental beam loss in superconducting accelerators: Simulations, consequences of accidents and protective measures

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.; Mokhov, N.; Parker, B.

    1994-02-01

    The consequences of an accidental beam loss in superconducting accelerators and colliders of the next generation range from the mundane to rather dramatic, i.e., from superconducting magnet quench, to overheating of critical components, to a total destruction of some units via explosion. Specific measures are required to minimize and eliminate such events as much as practical. In this paper we study such accidents taking the Superconducting Supercollider complex as an example. Particle tracking, beam loss and energy deposition calculations were done using the realistic machine simulation with the Monte-Carlo codes MARS 12 and STRUCT. Protective measures for minimizing the damaging effects of prefire and misfire of injection and extraction kicker magnets are proposed here.

  2. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  3. Reducing the extraction loss via laser notching the H- beam at the Booster injection revolution frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    With the requirement for more protons per hour from Booster, the radiation is a limiting factor. Laser notching the H{sup -} beam at the Booster injection revolution frequency and properly aligning those notches on top of each other at the injection and relative to the trigger of firing extraction kickers can remove most of the extraction loss caused by the slow rise time of the kicker field.

  4. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    SciTech Connect

    Malumbela, Goitseone; Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  5. Dynamic plasmonic beam shaping by vector beams with arbitrary locally linear polarization states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Zhongsheng; Du, Luping; Min, Changjun; Zhang, Yuquan; Zhang, Chonglei; Zhu, Siwei; Paul Urbach, H.; Yuan, X.-C.

    2014-07-01

    Vector beams, which have space-variant state of polarization (SOP) comparing with scalar beams with spatially homogeneous SOP, are used to manipulate surface plasmon polarizations (SPPs). We find that the excitation, orientation, and distribution of the focused SPPs excited in a high numerical aperture microscopic configuration highly depend on the space-variant polarization of the incident vector beam. When it comes to vector beam with axial symmetry, multi-foci of SPPs with the same size and uniform intensity can be obtained, and the number of foci is depending on the polarization order n. Those properties can be of great value in biological sensor and plasmonic tweezers applications.

  6. Dynamic plasmonic beam shaping by vector beams with arbitrary locally linear polarization states

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Yuquan; Zhang, Chonglei; Du, Luping; Min, Changjun E-mail: xcyuan@szu.edu.cn; Yuan, X.-C. E-mail: xcyuan@szu.edu.cn; Zhu, Siwei; Paul Urbach, H.

    2014-07-07

    Vector beams, which have space-variant state of polarization (SOP) comparing with scalar beams with spatially homogeneous SOP, are used to manipulate surface plasmon polarizations (SPPs). We find that the excitation, orientation, and distribution of the focused SPPs excited in a high numerical aperture microscopic configuration highly depend on the space-variant polarization of the incident vector beam. When it comes to vector beam with axial symmetry, multi-foci of SPPs with the same size and uniform intensity can be obtained, and the number of foci is depending on the polarization order n. Those properties can be of great value in biological sensor and plasmonic tweezers applications.

  7. Spin entanglement loss by local correlation transfer to the momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Lamata, Lucas; Leon, Juan; Salgado, David

    2006-05-15

    We show the decrease of spin-spin entanglement between two s=(1/2) fermions or two photons due to local transfer of correlations from the spin to the momentum degree of freedom of one of the two particles. We explicitly show how this phenomenon operates in the case where one of the two fermions (photons) passes through a local homogeneous magnetic field (optically active medium), losing its spin correlations with the other particle.

  8. The applications of in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy to the study of electron beam nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiahn J; Howitt, David G; Gierhart, Brian C; Smith, Rosemary L; Collins, Scott D

    2009-06-01

    An in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) technique has been developed to investigate the dynamic processes associated with electron-beam nanofabrication on thin membranes. In this article, practical applications germane to e-beam nanofabrication are illustrated with a case study of the drilling of nanometer-sized pores in silicon nitride membranes. This technique involves successive acquisitions of the plasmon-loss and the core-level ionization-loss spectra in real time, both of which provide the information regarding the hole-drilling kinetics, including two respective rates for total mass loss, individual nitrogen and silicon element depletion, and the change of the atomic bonding environment. In addition, the in situ EELS also provides an alternative method for endpoint detection with a potentially higher time resolution than by imaging. On the basis of the time evolution of in situ EELS spectra, a qualitative working model combining knock-on sputtering, irradiation-induced mass transport, and phase separation can be proposed.

  9. Loss-proof self-accelerating beams and their use in non-paraxial manipulation of particles' trajectories.

    PubMed

    Schley, Ran; Kaminer, Ido; Greenfield, Elad; Bekenstein, Rivka; Lumer, Yaakov; Segev, Mordechai

    2014-10-30

    Self-accelerating beams--shape-preserving bending beams--are attracting great interest, offering applications in many areas such as particle micromanipulation, microscopy, induction of plasma channels, surface plasmons, laser machining, nonlinear frequency conversion and electron beams. Most of these applications involve light-matter interactions, hence their propagation range is limited by absorption. We propose loss-proof accelerating beams that overcome linear and nonlinear losses. These beams, as analytic solutions of Maxwell's equations with losses, propagate in absorbing media while maintaining their peak intensity. While the power such beams carry decays during propagation, the peak intensity and the structure of their main lobe region are maintained over large distances. We use these beams for manipulation of particles in fluids, steering the particles to steeper angles than ever demonstrated. Such beams offer many additional applications, such as loss-proof self-bending plasmons. In transparent media these beams show exponential intensity growth, which facilitates other novel applications in micromanipulation and ignition of nonlinear processes.

  10. Interacting ultracold atomic kicked rotors: loss of dynamical localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Pinquan; Andreanov, Alexei; Park, Hee Chul; Flach, Sergej

    2017-01-01

    We study the fate of dynamical localization of two quantum kicked rotors with contact interaction, which relates to experimental realizations of the rotors with ultra-cold atomic gases. A single kicked rotor is known to exhibit dynamical localization, which takes place in momentum space. The contact interaction affects the evolution of the relative momentum k of a pair of interacting rotors in a non-analytic way. Consequently the evolution operator U is exciting large relative momenta with amplitudes which decay only as a power law 1/k4. This is in contrast to the center-of-mass momentum K for which the amplitudes excited by U decay superexponentially fast with K. Therefore dynamical localization is preserved for the center-of-mass momentum, but destroyed for the relative momentum for any nonzero strength of interaction.

  11. Interacting ultracold atomic kicked rotors: loss of dynamical localization

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Pinquan; Andreanov, Alexei; Park, Hee Chul; Flach, Sergej

    2017-01-01

    We study the fate of dynamical localization of two quantum kicked rotors with contact interaction, which relates to experimental realizations of the rotors with ultra-cold atomic gases. A single kicked rotor is known to exhibit dynamical localization, which takes place in momentum space. The contact interaction affects the evolution of the relative momentum k of a pair of interacting rotors in a non-analytic way. Consequently the evolution operator U is exciting large relative momenta with amplitudes which decay only as a power law 1/k4. This is in contrast to the center-of-mass momentum K for which the amplitudes excited by U decay superexponentially fast with K. Therefore dynamical localization is preserved for the center-of-mass momentum, but destroyed for the relative momentum for any nonzero strength of interaction. PMID:28117347

  12. Improving the Fermilab Booster Notching Efficiency, Beam Losses and Radiation Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.L.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Sidorov, V.I.; Tropin, I.S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    A fast vertical 1.08-m long kicker (notcher) located in the Fermilab Booster Long-05 straight section is currently used to remove 3 out of 84 circulating bunches after injection to generate an abort gap. With the maximum magnetic field of 72.5 Gauss, it removes only 87% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400 MeV, with 75% loss on pole tips of the focusing Booster magnets, 11% on the Long-06 collimators, and 1% in the rest of the ring. We propose to improve the notching efficiency and reduce beam loss in the Booster by using three horizontal kickers in the Long-12 section. STRUCT calculations show that using horizontal notchers, one can remove up to 96% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400-700 MeV, directing 95% of it to a new beam dump at the Long-13 section. This fully decouples notching and collimation. The beam dump absorbs most of the impinging proton energy in its jaws. The latter are encapsulated into an appropriate radiation shielding that reduces impact on the machine components, personnel and environment to the tolerable levels. MARS simulations show that corresponding prompt and residual radiation levels can be reduced ten times compared to the current ones.

  13. A Local Coordinate Approach in the MLPG Method for Beam Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2002-01-01

    System matrices for Euler-Bernoulli beam problems for the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method deteriorate as the number of nodes in the beam models are consistently increased. The reason for this behavior is explained. To overcome this difficulty and improve the accuracy of the solutions, a local coordinate approach for the evaluation of the generalized moving least squares shape functions and their derivatives is proposed. The proposed approach retains the accuracy of the MLPG methods.

  14. Stochastic orbit loss of neutral beam ions from NSTX due to toroidal Alfvén eigenmode avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D. S.; Crocker, N.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Gorelenkova, M.; Kubota, S.; Medley, S. S.; Podestà, M.; Shi, L.; White, R. B.

    2012-12-17

    Short toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and could also cause a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions takes place. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding centre code that incorporates the plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are like those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary and the trajectories along which modes may transport particles extend from the deposition volume to the loss boundary.

  15. Loss of beam ions to the inside of the PDX (Poloidal Divertor Experiment) tokamak during the fishbone instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    1986-11-01

    Using data from two vertical charge-exchange detectors on the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), we have identified a set of conditions for which loss of beam ions inward in major radius is observed during the fishbone instability. Previously, it was reported that beam ions were lost only to the outside of the PDX tokamak.

  16. Local Deplanation Of Double Reinforced Beam Cross Section Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltov, Anguel; Yanakieva, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Bending of beams, double reinforced by means of thin composite layers, is considered in the study. Approximate numerical solution is proposed, considering transitional boundary areas, where smooth quadratic transition of the elasticity modulus and deformations take place. Deplanation of the cross section is also accounted for in the areas. Their thickness is found equalizing the total stiffness of the cross section and the layer stiffness. Deplanation of the cross section of the transitional area is determined via the longitudinal deformation in the reinforcing layer, accounting for the equilibrium between the internal and the external moment, generated by the longitudinal stresses in the cross section. A numerical example is given as an illustration demonstrating model's plausibility. The model allows the design and the calculation of recycled concrete beams double reinforced by means of thin layers. The approach is in agreement with modern design of nearly zero energy buildings (NZEB).

  17. Localization Training Results in Individuals with Unilateral Severe to Profound Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Firszt, Jill B.; Reeder, Ruth M.; Dwyer, Noël Y.; Burton, Harold; Holden, Laura K.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with unilateral hearing loss often demonstrate decreased sound localization ability and report that situations requiring spatial hearing are especially challenging. Few studies have evaluated localization abilities combined with training in this population. The present pilot study examined whether localization of two sound types would improve after training, and explored the relation between localization ability or training benefit and demographic factors. Eleven participants with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss attended five training sessions; localization cues gradually decreased across sessions. Localization ability was assessed pre- and post-training. Assessment stimuli were monosyllabic words and spectral and temporal random spectrogram sounds. Root mean square errors for each participant and stimulus type were used in group and correlation analyses; individual data were examined with ordinary least squares regression. Mean pre- to post-training test results were significantly different for all stimulus types. Among the participants, eight significantly improved following training on at least one localization measure, whereas three did not. Participants with the poorest localization ability improved the most and likewise, those with the best pre-training ability showed the least training benefit. Correlation results suggested that test age, age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss and better ear high frequency audibility may contribute to localization ability. Results support the need for continued investigation of localization training efficacy and consideration of localization training within rehabilitation protocols for individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss. PMID:25457655

  18. Localization training results in individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Dwyer, Noël Y; Burton, Harold; Holden, Laura K

    2015-01-01

    Adults with unilateral hearing loss often demonstrate decreased sound localization ability and report that situations requiring spatial hearing are especially challenging. Few studies have evaluated localization abilities combined with training in this population. The present pilot study examined whether localization of two sound types would improve after training, and explored the relation between localization ability or training benefit and demographic factors. Eleven participants with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss attended five training sessions; localization cues gradually decreased across sessions. Localization ability was assessed pre- and post-training. Assessment stimuli were monosyllabic words and spectral and temporal random spectrogram sounds. Root mean square errors for each participant and stimulus type were used in group and correlation analyses; individual data were examined with ordinary least squares regression. Mean pre-to post-training test results were significantly different for all stimulus types. Among the participants, eight significantly improved following training on at least one localization measure, whereas three did not. Participants with the poorest localization ability improved the most and likewise, those with the best pre-training ability showed the least training benefit. Correlation results suggested that test age, age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss and better ear high frequency audibility may contribute to localization ability. Results support the need for continued investigation of localization training efficacy and consideration of localization training within rehabilitation protocols for individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss.

  19. A COMPACTRIO-BASED BEAM LOSS MONITOR FOR THE SNS RF TEST CAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Armstrong, Gary A

    2009-01-01

    An RF Test Cave has been built at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be able to test RF cavities without interfering the SNS accelerator operations. In addition to using thick concrete wall to minimize radiation exposure, a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) must abort the operation within 100 usec when the integrated radiation within the cave exceeds a threshold. We choose the CompactRIO platform to implement the BLM based on its performance, cost-effectiveness, and rapid development. Each in/output module is connected through an FPGA to provide point-by-point processing. Every 10 usec the data is acquired analyzed and compared to the threshold. Data from the FPGA is transferred using DMA to the real-time controller, which communicates to a gateway PC to talk to the SNS control system. The system includes diagnostics to test the hardware and integrates the losses in real-time. In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and results

  20. Prompt Loss of Energetic Ions during Early Neutral Beam Injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley; D.S. Darrow; D. Liu; A.L. Roquemore

    2005-03-25

    Early neutral-beam injection is used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to heat the electrons and slow current penetration which keeps q(0) elevated to avoid deleterious MHD activity and at the same time reduces Ohmic flux consumption, all of which aids long-pulse operation. However, the low plasma current (I{sub p} {approx} 0.5 MA) and electron density (n{sub e} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) attending early injection lead to elevated orbit and shine through losses. The inherent orbit losses are aggravated by large excursions in the outer gap width during current ramp-up. An investigation of this behavior using various energetic particle diagnostics on NSTX and TRANSP code analysis is presented.

  1. Accuracy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Detection of Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi Pour, Daryoush; Soleimani Shayesteh, Yadollah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bone assessment is essential for diagnosis, treatment planning and prediction of prognosis of periodontal diseases. However, two-dimensional radiographic techniques have multiple limitations, mainly addressed by the introduction of three-dimensional imaging techniques such as cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). This study aimed to assess the accuracy of CBCT for detection of marginal bone loss in patients receiving dental implants. Materials and Methods: A study of diagnostic test accuracy was designed and 38 teeth from candidates for dental implant treatment were selected. On CBCT scans, the amount of bone resorption in the buccal, lingual/palatal, mesial and distal surfaces was determined by measuring the distance from the cementoenamel junction to the alveolar crest (normal group: 0–1.5mm, mild bone loss: 1.6–3mm, moderate bone loss: 3.1–4.5mm and severe bone loss: >4.5mm). During the surgical phase, bone loss was measured at the same sites using a periodontal probe. The values were then compared by McNemar’s test. Results: In the buccal, lingual/palatal, mesial and distal surfaces, no significant difference was observed between the values obtained using CBCT and the surgical method. The correlation between CBCT and surgical method was mainly based on the estimation of the degree of bone resorption. CBCT was capable of showing various levels of resorption in all surfaces with high sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value compared to the surgical method. Conclusion: CBCT enables accurate measurement of bone loss comparable to surgical exploration and can be used for diagnosis of bone defects in periodontal diseases in clinical settings. PMID:26877741

  2. Energy loss of proton, alpha particle, and electron beams in hafnium dioxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Behar, Moni; Fadanelli, Raul C.; Nagamine, Luiz C. C. M.; Abril, Isabel; Denton, Cristian D.; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Arista, Nestor R.

    2009-12-15

    The electronic stopping power, S, of HfO{sub 2} films for proton and alpha particle beams has been measured and calculated. The experimental data have been obtained by the Rutherford backscattering technique and cover the range of 120-900 and 120-3000 keV for proton and alpha particle beams, respectively. Theoretical calculations of the energy loss for the same projectiles have been done by means of the dielectric formalism using the Mermin energy loss function--generalized oscillator strength (MELF-GOS) model for a proper description of the HfO{sub 2} target on the whole momentum-energy excitation spectrum. At low projectile energies, a nonlinear theory based on the extended Friedel sum rule has been employed. The calculations and experimental measurements show good agreement for protons and a quite good one for alpha particles. In particular, the experimental maximums of both stopping curves (around 120 and 800 keV, respectively) are well reproduced. On the basis of this good agreement, we have also calculated the inelastic mean-free path (IMFP) and the stopping power for electrons in HfO{sub 2} films. Our results predict a minimum value of the IMFP and a maximum value of the S for electrons with energies around 120 and 190 eV, respectively.

  3. Flexural vibration bandgaps in local resonance beam with a novel two-degree-of-freedom local resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kuan; Wu, Jiu Hui; Jing, Li; Guan, Dong

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an elastic metamaterial beam with a novel two-degree-of-freedom local resonator is investigated theoretically, and the dispersion relation is calculated by using transfer matrix (TM). In order to confirm the existence of band gaps, the transmission spectrum of flexural wave are also studied by using finite element method. The formation mechanism of the flexural vibration bandgaps (FVBGs) are further analyzed by studying the displacement fields of the eigenmodes at the band-gap edges. At last, the evolution of the dispersion relations with the increasing of the distance from the one side rubber to the center of the local resonance mass are discussed in detail, and the effects of the outside diameter of the Cu ring and the equivalent stiffness k of the rubbers on the FVBGs are also investigated. Through the above analysis, we can draw the following conclusions, due to the unequal of the torques provided by the two rubbers, two different rotational vibrations of local resonance mass with two different local resonance frequencies are introduced in the local resonance system, thus the elastic metamaterial beam shows two FVBGs at low frequencies. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the numerical results. The magnitude of torques introduced in the local resonance system can obviously affect the locations of the FVBGs. With the asymmetry decreasing, the frequency region of the first FVBG moves to the higher value, while that of the second FVBG tends to the lower value, and when the two torques are equal, the two FVBGs coupled into one wider gap. For the elastic metamaterial beam with heavy resonance mass and weak rubbers is appropriate to obtain a lower band gap, and the total width of the FVBGs becomes wider. However, it does just the opposite under the condition of the case with light Cu ring and strong rubbers, but the total width of the band gaps also becomes wider. The propagation properties of the flexural wave in the designed local

  4. Effects on the photon beam from an electromagnetic array used for patient localization and tumor tracking.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Betancourt, Ricardo; Yin, Lingshu; Metz, James; Avery, Stephen; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-05-06

    One of the main components in a Calypso 4D localization and tracking system is an electromagnetic array placed above patients that is used for target monitoring during radiation treatment. The beam attenuation and beam spoiling properties of the Calypso electromagnetic array at various beam angles were investigated. Measurements were performed on a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator with 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. The narrow beam attenuation properties were measured under a field size of 1 cm × 1 cm, with a photon diode placed in a cylindrical graphite buildup cap. The broad beam attenuation properties were measured under a field size of 10 cm × 10 cm, with a 0.6 cc cylindrical Farmer chamber placed in a polystyrene buildup cap. Beam spoiling properties of the array were studied by measuring depth-dose change from the array under a field size of 10 cm × 10 cm in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with an embedded Markus parallel plate chamber. Change in depth doses were measured with the array placed at distances of 2, 5, and 10 cm from the phantom surface. Narrow beam attenuation and broad beam attenuation from the array were found to be less than 2%-3% for both 6 MV and 15 MV beams at angles less than 40°, and were more pronounced at more oblique angles. Spoiling effects are appreciable at beam buildup region, but are insignificant at depths beyond dmax. Dose measurements in a QA phantom using patient IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were shown to have less than 2.5% dose difference with the Calypso array. The results indicate that the dose difference due to the placement of Calypso array is clinically insignificant.

  5. Readout process and noise elimination firmware for the Fermilab beam loss system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Baumbaugh, Alan; Drennan, Craig; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Lewis, Jonathan; Shi, Zonghan; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    In the Fermilab Beam Loss Monitor System, inputs from ion chambers are integrated for a short period of time, digitized and processed to create the accelerator abort request signals. The accelerator power supplies employing 3-phase 60Hz AC cause noise at various harmonics on our inputs which must be eliminated for monitoring purposes. During accelerator ramping, both the sampling frequency and the amplitudes of the noise components change. As such, traditional digital filtering can partially reduce certain noise components but not all. A nontraditional algorithm was developed in our work to eliminate remaining ripples. The sequencing in the FPGA firmware is conducted by a micro-sequencer core we developed: the Enclosed Loop Micro-Sequencer (ELMS). The unique feature of the ELMS is that it supports the ''FOR'' loops with pre-defined iterations at the machine code level, which provides programming convenience and avoids many micro-complexities from the beginning.

  6. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: causal parameters and duration of memory loss. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron beam exposure has been investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task across a 10/sup 4/ dose range for 10-, 1-, and 0.1-..mu..sec pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 10/sup 6/ rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (10/sup 6/ rad/sec) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli.

  7. Effects of Optical Loss Factors on Heliostat Field Layout for Beam-Down Solar Concentrating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Takamatsu, Tadahiko; Yuasa, Minoru; Kajita, Rina; Yamamoto, Takashi

    A methodology to give an optimal layout of a group of heliostats has been developed for beam-down concentrating solar tower systems. Given the maximum solar power together with optical parameters, the method determines an optimal configuration of a heliostat field around a tower. Various optical losses such as cosine factor, shadowing and blocking at heliostats are considered in the calculation. Furthermore, spillage at the receiver is taken into account due to the spread of light caused by the effects of a finite solar disk, flat facet and various stochastic errors in optical hardware and control. It is found the effect of spillage becomes significant at heliostats from the tower at the distance farther than four times of upper focus height of the reflector when receiver diameter is one fifteenth of the height and dominates the configuration of the optimal heliostat layout.

  8. Nonlinear localized modes in PT-symmetric optical media with competing gain and loss

    SciTech Connect

    Midya, Bikashkali; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2014-02-15

    The existence and stability of the nonlinear spatial localized modes are investigated in parity-time symmetric optical media characterized by a generic complex hyperbolic refractive index distribution with competing gain and loss profile. The exact analytical expression of the localized modes are found for all values of the competing parameter and in the presence of both the self-focusing and self-defocusing Kerr nonlinearity. The effects of competing gain/loss profile on the stability structure of these localized modes are discussed with the help of linear stability analysis followed by the direct numerical simulation of the governing equation. The spatial localized modes in two-dimensional geometry as well as the transverse power-flow density associated with these localized modes are also examined. -- Highlights: • Existence of localized modes is investigated in PT-symmetric complex potentials. • Exact analytical expression of the localized modes is obtained. • Effect of gain/loss profile on the stability of these localized modes is discussed. • Localized modes in 2D and associated transverse power-flow density are also examined.

  9. Modeling the Effects of Sensorineural Hearing Loss on Sound Localization in the Median Plane

    PubMed Central

    Majdak, Piotr; Laback, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Listeners use monaural spectral cues to localize sound sources in sagittal planes (along the up-down and front-back directions). How sensorineural hearing loss affects the salience of monaural spectral cues is unclear. To simulate the effects of outer-hair-cell (OHC) dysfunction and the contribution of different auditory-nerve fiber types on localization performance, we incorporated a nonlinear model of the auditory periphery into a model of sagittal-plane sound localization for normal-hearing listeners. The localization model was first evaluated in its ability to predict the effects of spectral cue modifications for normal-hearing listeners. Then, we used it to simulate various degrees of OHC dysfunction applied to different types of auditory-nerve fibers. Predicted localization performance was hardly affected by mild OHC dysfunction but was strongly degraded in conditions involving severe and complete OHC dysfunction. These predictions resemble the usually observed degradation in localization performance induced by sensorineural hearing loss. Predicted localization performance was best when preserving fibers with medium spontaneous rates, which is particularly important in view of noise-induced hearing loss associated with degeneration of this fiber type. On average across listeners, predicted localization performance was strongly related to level discrimination sensitivity of auditory-nerve fibers, indicating an essential role of this coding property for localization accuracy in sagittal planes. PMID:27659486

  10. Development of silicon detectors for Beam Loss Monitoring at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Zabrodskii, A.; Bogdanov, A.; Shepelev, A.; Dehning, B.; Bartosik, M. R.; Alexopoulos, A.; Glaser, M.; Ravotti, F.; Sapinski, M.; Härkönen, J.; Egorov, N.; Galkin, A.

    2017-03-01

    Silicon detectors were proposed as novel Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) for the control of the radiation environment in the vicinity of the superconductive magnets of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The present work is aimed at enhancing the BLM sensitivity and therefore the capability of triggering the beam abort system before a critical radiation load hits the superconductive coils. We report here the results of three in situ irradiation tests of Si detectors carried out at the CERN PS at 1.9–4.2 K. The main experimental result is that all silicon detectors survived irradiation up to 1.22× 1016 p/cm2. The third test, focused on the detailed characterization of the detectors with standard (300 μm) and reduced (100 μm) thicknesses, showed only a marginal difference in the sensitivity of thinned detectors in the entire fluence range and a smaller rate of signal degradation that promotes their use as BLMs. The irradiation campaigns produced new information on radiation damage and carrier transport in Si detectors irradiated at the temperatures of 1.9–4.2 K. The results were encouraging and permitted to initiate the production of the first BLM prototype modules which were installed at the end of the vessel containing the superconductive coil of a LHC magnet immersed in superfluid helium to be able to test the silicon detectors in real operational conditions.

  11. Calculating the Loss factor of the LCLS Beam Line Elements for Ultra-Shrot Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2009-10-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE 1.5-15 {angstrom} x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility. Since an ultra-short intense bunch is used in the LCLS operation one might suggest that wake fields, generated in the vacuum chamber, may have an effect on the x-ray production because these fields can change the beam particle energies thereby increasing the energy spread in a bunch. At LCLS a feedback system precisely controls the bunch energy before it enters a beam transport line after the linac. However, in the transport line and later in the undulator section the bunch energy and energy spread are not under feedback control and may change due to wake field radiation, which depends upon the bunch current or on a bunch length. The linear part of the energy spread can be compensated in the upstream linac; the energy loss in the undulator section can be compensated by varying the K-parameter of the undulators, however we need a precise knowledge of the wake fields in this part of the machine. Resistive wake fields are known and well calculated. We discuss an additional part of the wake fields, which comes from the different vacuum elements like bellows, BPMs, transitions, vacuum ports, vacuum valves and others. We use the code 'NOVO' together with analytical estimations for the wake potential calculations.

  12. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Petra; Booth, Nicola; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Labate, Luca; Levato, Tadzio; Li, Bin; Makita, Mikako; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev; Riley, David; Woolsey, Nigel; Gizzi, Leonida A.

    2015-02-01

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 1019 W/cm2. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  13. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  14. Loss of anatomical landmarks with eutectic mixture of local anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision.

    PubMed

    Plank, Rebeca M; Kubiak, David W; Abdullahi, Rasak Bamidele; Ndubuka, Nnamdi; Nkgau, Maggie M; Dapaah-Siakwan, Fredrick; Powis, Kathleen M; Lockman, Shahin

    2013-02-01

    We report two cases of newborns who developed marked local edema after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) topical anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision (NMC). Although local edema and erythema are known potential side effects of EMLA cream, a common anesthetic used for NMC, the loss of landmarks precluding safe NMC has not previously been reported, and is described here. Although we cannot recommend an alternate local anesthetic for neonates with this reaction to EMLA, based on a review of the published data we think that serious systemic adverse events related to EMLA are extremely rare.

  15. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  16. Mixed beam radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy in localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma - preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Bukowski, R.M.; Gahbauer, R.; Rodriquez-Antunez, A.; Hermann, R.

    1982-07-01

    A pilot study of mixed beam radiotherapy (fast neutrons alternating with photons) followed by combination chemotherapy with SMF (streptozotocin, 5-flouoruracil, mitomycin C) in localized pancreatic cancer was performed. Thirteen patients were treated and a median survival of 10.0 months was noted (range 5-30+). Toxicity was mild to moderate. Further studies of radiation and chemotherapy are indicated.

  17. Suppression of stimulated Raman scattering due to localization of electron plasma wave in laser beam filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Prerana; Sharma, R. P.

    2009-03-15

    The filamentation of the high power laser beam by taking off-axial contribution is investigated when ponderomotive nonlinearity is taken into account. The splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. It is observed that the weak electron plasma wave (EPW) propagating in the z direction is nonlinearly coupled in the modified filamentary regions of the laser beam. The semianalytical solution of the nonlinear coupled EPW equation in the presence of laser beam filaments has been found and it is observed that the nonlinear coupling between these two waves leads to localization of the EPW. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of this EPW is studied and backreflectivity has been calculated. Further, the localization of EPW affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave. As a result of this, mismatch and modified enhanced Landau damping lead to the disruption of SRS process and a substantial reduction in the backreflectivity. For the typical laser beam and plasma parameters with wavelength ({lambda}=1064 nm), power flux ({approx_equal}10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2}), and plasma density (n/n{sub cr})=0.2; the backreflectivity was found to be suppressed by a factor of around 20%.

  18. Suppression of stimulated Raman scattering due to localization of electron plasma wave in laser beam filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prerana; Sharma, R. P.

    2009-03-01

    The filamentation of the high power laser beam by taking off-axial contribution is investigated when ponderomotive nonlinearity is taken into account. The splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. It is observed that the weak electron plasma wave (EPW) propagating in the z direction is nonlinearly coupled in the modified filamentary regions of the laser beam. The semianalytical solution of the nonlinear coupled EPW equation in the presence of laser beam filaments has been found and it is observed that the nonlinear coupling between these two waves leads to localization of the EPW. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of this EPW is studied and backreflectivity has been calculated. Further, the localization of EPW affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave. As a result of this, mismatch and modified enhanced Landau damping lead to the disruption of SRS process and a substantial reduction in the backreflectivity. For the typical laser beam and plasma parameters with wavelength (λ =1064 nm), power flux (≈1016 W cm-2), and plasma density (n /ncr)=0.2; the backreflectivity was found to be suppressed by a factor of around 20%.

  19. Suppression of stimulated Raman scattering due to localization of electron plasma wave in laser beam filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prerana; Sharma, Rampal

    2009-11-01

    The filamentation of the high power laser beam by taking off-axial contribution is investigated when ponderomotive nonlinearity is taken into account. The splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. It is observed that the weak electron plasma wave (EPW) propagating in the z direction is nonlinearly coupled in the modified filamentary regions of the laser beam. The semi-analytical solution of the nonlinear coupled EPW equation in the presence of laser beam filaments has been found and it is observed that the nonlinear coupling between these two waves leads to localization of the EPW. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of this EPW is studied and back reflectivity has been calculated. Further, the localization of EPW affects the eigen frequency and damping of plasma wave. As a result of this, mismatch and modified enhanced Landau damping lead to the disruption of SRS process and a substantial reduction in the back reflectivity. For the typical laser beam and plasma parameters with wavelength (λ=1064nm), power flux ( 10^16 W cm-2), and plasma density (n/ncr) = 0.2; the back reflectivity was found to be suppressed by a factor of around 20%.

  20. Cyclic capacity of tubular beam-columns with local buckling: Numerical and experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Skallerud, B.; Amdahl, J.; Johansen, A.; Eide, O.I.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation addresses the cyclic capacity of tubular members subjected to both local and global buckling during cyclic loading. Diameter to thickness ratios of 45 and 60 are studied. The performance of FE models, both a beam model and shell model, is compared to test results in terms of load versus displacement behavior and energy accumulation. Some problems regarding the prediction of local strain histories in the local buckle zone are pointed out. Damage accumulation models in terms of energy per cycle are discussed, aiming at possible member detachment criteria.

  1. A Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Method for Euler-Bernoulli Beam Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Phillips, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    An accurate and yet simple Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) formulation for analyzing beam problems is presented. In the formulation, simple weight functions are chosen as test functions. The use of these functions shows that the weak form can be integrated with conventional Gaussian integration. The MLPG method was evaluated by applying the formulation to a variety of patch test and thin beam problems. The formulation successfully reproduced exact solutions to machine accuracy when test functions with C2 continuity and an appropriate order of basis functions are used.

  2. Measurement profiles of nano-scale ion beam for optimized radiation energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, T. H.; Cho, H. S.

    2011-10-01

    The behavior of charged particles is investigated for nano-scale ion beam therapy using a medical accelerator. Computational work is performed for the Bragg-peak simulation, which is focused on human organ material of pancreas and thyroid. The Results show that the trends of the dose have several different kinds of distributions. Before constructing a heavy ion collider, this study can give us the reliability of the therapeutic effect. Realistic treatment using human organs is calculated in a simple and cost effective manner using the computational code, the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter 2008 (SRIM 2008). Considering the safety of the therapy, it is suggested to give a patient orient planning of the cancer therapy. The energy losses in ionization and phonon are analyzed, which are the behaviors in the molecular level nano-scopic investigation. The different fluctuations are shown at 150 MeV, where the lowest temperature is found in proton and pancreas case. Finally, the protocol for the radiation therapy is constructed by the simulation in which the procedure for a better therapy is selected. An experimental measurement incorporated with the simulations could be programmed by this protocol.

  3. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  4. Synapse loss and axon retraction in response to local muscle degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hegstrom, C D; Truman, J W

    1996-10-01

    During metamorphosis in the moth, Manduca sexta, the abdominal body-wall muscle DEO1 is remodeled to form the adult muscle DE5. As the larval muscle degenerates, its motoneuron loses its end plates and retracts axon branches from the degenerating muscle. Muscle degeneration is under the control of the insect hormones, the ecdysteroids. Topical application of an ecdysteroid mimic resulted in animals that produced a localized patch of pupal cuticle. Muscle fibers underlying the patch showed a gradient of degeneration. The motoneuron showed end-plate loss and axon retraction from degenerating regions of a given fiber but maintained its fine terminal branches and end plates on intact regions. The results suggest that local steroid treatments that result in local muscle degeneration bring about a loss of synaptic contacts from regions of muscle degeneration.

  5. Object representation for multi-beam sonar image using local higher-order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haisen; Gao, Jue; Du, Weidong; Zhou, Tian; Xu, Chao; Chen, Baowei

    2017-01-01

    Multi-beam sonar imaging has been widely used in various underwater tasks such as object recognition and object tracking. Problems remain, however, when the sonar images are characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio, low resolution, and amplitude alterations due to viewpoint changes. This paper investigates the capacity of local higher-order statistics (HOS) to represent objects in multi-beam sonar images. The Weibull distribution has been used for modeling the background of the image. Local HOS involving skewness is estimated using a sliding computational window, thus generating the local skewness image of which a square structure is associated with a potential object. The ability of object representation with different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between object and background is analyzed, and the choice of the computational window size is discussed. In the case of the object with high SNR, a novel algorithm based on background estimation is proposed to reduce side lobe and retain object regions. The performance of object representation has been evaluated using real data that provided encouraging results in the case of the object with low amplitude, high side lobes, or large fluctuant amplitude. In conclusion, local HOS provides more reliable and stable information relating to the potential object and improves the object representation in multi-beam sonar image.

  6. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-07-06

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration.

  7. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration. PMID:27381641

  8. Investigation of in-body path loss in different human subjects for localization of capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Ara, Perzila; Cheng, Shaokoon; Heimlich, Michael; Dutkiewicz, Eryk

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in capsule endoscopy have highlighted the need for accurate techniques to estimate the location of a capsule endoscope. A highly accurate location estimation of a capsule endoscope in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in the range of several millimeters is a challenging task. This is mainly because the radio-frequency signals encounter high loss and a highly dynamic channel propagation environment. Therefore, an accurate path-loss model is required for the development of accurate localization algorithms. This paper presents an in-body path-loss model for the human abdomen region at 2.4 GHz frequency. To develop the path-loss model, electromagnetic simulations using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method were carried out on two different anatomical human models. A mathematical expression for the path-loss model was proposed based on analysis of the measured loss at different capsule locations inside the small intestine. The proposed path-loss model is a good approximation to model in-body RF propagation, since the real measurements are quite infeasible for the capsule endoscopy subject.

  9. High-power terahertz lasers with excellent beam quality for local oscillator sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin

    Many molecular species that compose the interstellar medium have strong spectral features in the 2-5 THz range, and heterodyne spectroscopy is required to obtain ~km/s velocity resolution to resolve their complicated lineshapes and disentangle them from the background. Understanding the kinetics and energetics within the gas clouds of the interstellar medium is critical to understanding star formation processes and validating theories of galactic evolution. Herschel Observatory's heterodyne HIFI instrument provided several years of high-spectral-resolution measurements of the interstellar medium, although only up to 1.9 THz. The next frontier for heterodyne spectroscopy is the 2-6 THz region. However, development of heterodyne receivers above 2 THz has been severely hindered by a lack of convenient coherent sources of sufficient power to serve as local oscillators (LOs). The recently developed quantum-cascade (QC) lasers are emerging as candidates for LOs in the 1.5-5 THz range. The current generation of single-mode THz QC-lasers can provide a few milliwatts of power in a directive beam, and will be sufficient to pump single pixels and small-format heterodyne arrays (~10 elements). This proposal looks beyond the state-of-the-art, to the development of large format heterodyne arrays which contain on the order of 100-1000 elements. LO powers on the order of 10-100 mW delivered in a high-quality Gaussian beam will be needed to pump the mixer array - not only because of the microwatt mixer power requirement, but to account for large anticipated losses in LO coupling and distribution. Large format heterodyne array instruments are attractive for a dramatic speedup of mapping of the interstellar medium, particularly on airborne platforms such as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), and on long duration balloon platforms such as the Stratospheric Terahertz Observatory (STO), where observation time is limited. The research goal of this proposal is

  10. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-03-30

    We report on a method for “direct-write” conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  11. Localization of deformation and loss of macroscopic ellipticity in microstructured solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santisi d'Avila, M. P.; Triantafyllidis, N.; Wen, G.

    2016-12-01

    Localization of deformation, a precursor to failure in solids, is a crucial and hence widely studied problem in solid mechanics. The continuum modeling approach of this phenomenon studies conditions on the constitutive laws leading to the loss of ellipticity in the governing equations, a property that allows for discontinuous equilibrium solutions. Micro-mechanics models and nonlinear homogenization theories help us understand the origins of this behavior and it is thought that a loss of macroscopic (homogenized) ellipticity results in localized deformation patterns. Although this is the case in many engineering applications, it raises an interesting question: is there always a localized deformation pattern appearing in solids losing macroscopic ellipticity when loaded past their critical state? In the interest of relative simplicity and analytical tractability, the present work answers this question in the restrictive framework of a layered, nonlinear (hyperelastic) solid in plane strain and more specifically under axial compression along the lamination direction. The key to the answer is found in the homogenized post-bifurcated solution of the problem, which for certain materials is supercritical (increasing force and displacement), leading to post-bifurcated equilibrium paths in these composites that show no localization of deformation for macroscopic strain well above the one corresponding to loss of ellipticity.

  12. Study of local in-homogeneity in ion beam mixing using SIMS ion imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ch. Kishan; Ilango, S.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-05

    The local in-homogeneity in ion beam mixing of Mo/Si system subjected to 110keV Ar{sup +} ion implantation is studied using secondary ion imaging. Sequences of images are recorded across the interface and depth profiles are constructed from different regions of the image planes. Our results show a significant variation in decay length indicative of in-homogeneity in mixing.

  13. High performance quantum cascade lasers: Loss, beam stability, and gain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzi, Pierre Michel

    Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers are semiconductor devices emitting in the mid-infrared (3-30 micron) and terahertz (30-300 micron) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since their first demonstration by Jerome Faist et. al. in 1994, they have evolved very quickly into high performance devices and given rise to many applications such as trace-gas sensing, medical diagnosis, free-space communication, and light detection and ranging (LIDAR). In this thesis, we investigate a further increase of the performance of QC devices and, through meticulous device modeling and characterizations, gain a deeper understanding of several of their unique characteristics, especially their carrier transport and lifetime, their characteristic temperature, their waveguide loss and modal gain, their leakage current, and their transverse mode profile. First, in our quest to achieve higher performance, we investigate the effect of growth asymmetries on device transport characteristics. This investigation stems from recent studies on the role of interface roughness on intersubband scattering and device performance. Through a symmetric active core design, we find that interface roughness and ionized impurity scattering induced by dopant migration play a significant role in carrier transport through the device. Understanding how interface roughness affects intersubband scattering, in turn, we engineer the gain in QC devices by placing monolayer barriers at specific locations within the device band structure. These strategically placed additional thin barrier layers introduce roughness scattering into the device active region, thereby selectively decreasing the lower laser state lifetime and increasing population inversion necessary for laser action. Preliminary measurement results from modified devices reveal a 50% decrease in the emission broadening compared to the control structures, which should lead to a two-fold increase in gain. A special class of so-called "strong coupling" QC lasers

  14. An ultra-compact and low loss passive beam-forming network integrated on chip with off chip linear array

    SciTech Connect

    Lepkowski, Stefan Mark

    2015-05-01

    The work here presents a review of beam forming architectures. As an example, the author presents an 8x8 Butler Matrix passive beam forming network including the schematic, design/modeling, operation, and simulated results. The limiting factor in traditional beam formers has been the large size dictated by transmission line based couplers. By replacing these couplers with transformer-based couplers, the matrix size is reduced substantially allowing for on chip compact integration. In the example presented, the core area, including the antenna crossover, measures 0.82mm×0.39mm (0.48% the size of a branch line coupler at the same frequency). The simulated beam forming achieves a peak PNR of 17.1 dB and 15dB from 57 to 63GHz. At the 60GHz center frequency the average insertion loss is simulated to be 3.26dB. The 8x8 Butler Matrix feeds into an 8-element antenna array to show the array patterns with single beam and adjacent beam isolation.

  15. Motion correction for improved target localization with on-board cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Schreibmann, E; Yang, Y; Xing, L

    2006-01-21

    On-board imager (OBI) based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become available in radiotherapy clinics to accurately identify the target in the treatment position. However, due to the relatively slow gantry rotation (typically about 60 s for a full 360 degrees scan) in acquiring the CBCT projection data, the patient's respiratory motion causes serious problems such as blurring, doubling, streaking and distortion in the reconstructed images, which heavily degrade the image quality and the target localization. In this work, we present a motion compensation method for slow-rotating CBCT scans by incorporating into image reconstruction a patient-specific motion model, which is derived from previously obtained four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning CT images of the same patient via deformable registration. The registration of the 4D CT phases results in transformations representing a temporal sequence of three-dimensional (3D) deformation fields, or in other words, a 4D model of organ motion. The algorithm was developed heuristically in two-dimensional (2D) parallel-beam geometry and extended to 3D cone-beam geometry. By simulations with digital phantoms capable of translational motion and other complex motion, we demonstrated that the algorithm can reduce the motion artefacts locally, and restore the tumour size and shape, which may thereby improve the accuracy of target localization and patient positioning when CBCT is used as the treatment guidance.

  16. Refraction of nonlinear beams by localized refractive index changes in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Assanto, Gaetano; Minzoni, Antonmaria A.; Smyth, Noel F.; Worthy, Annette L.

    2010-11-15

    The propagation of solitary waves in nematic liquid crystals in the presence of localized nonuniformities is studied. These nonuniformities can be caused by external electric fields, other light beams, or any other mechanism which results in a modified director orientation in a localized region of the liquid-crystal cell. The net effect is that the solitary wave undergoes refraction and trajectory bending. A general modulation theory for this refraction is developed, and particular cases of circular, elliptical, and rectangular perturbations are considered. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical solutions.

  17. Adaptive Environmental Source Localization and Tracking with Unknown Permittivity and Path Loss Coefficients †

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Barış; Umay, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    Accurate signal-source and signal-reflector target localization tasks via mobile sensory units and wireless sensor networks (WSNs), including those for environmental monitoring via sensory UAVs, require precise knowledge of specific signal propagation properties of the environment, which are permittivity and path loss coefficients for the electromagnetic signal case. Thus, accurate estimation of these coefficients has significant importance for the accuracy of location estimates. In this paper, we propose a geometric cooperative technique to instantaneously estimate such coefficients, with details provided for received signal strength (RSS) and time-of-flight (TOF)-based range sensors. The proposed technique is integrated to a recursive least squares (RLS)-based adaptive localization scheme and an adaptive motion control law, to construct adaptive target localization and adaptive target tracking algorithms, respectively, that are robust to uncertainties in aforementioned environmental signal propagation coefficients. The efficiency of the proposed adaptive localization and tracking techniques are both mathematically analysed and verified via simulation experiments. PMID:26690441

  18. Effect of Local Junction Losses in the Optimization of T-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    T-shaped channels are extensively used in flow distribution applications such as irrigation, chemical dispersion, gas pipelines and space heating and cooling. The geometry of T-shaped channels can be optimized to reduce the overall pressure drop in stem and branch sections. Results of such optimizations are in the form of geometric parameters such as the length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. The traditional approach of this optimization accounts for the pressure drop across the stem and branch sections, however, ignores the pressure drop in the T-junction. In this paper, we conduct geometry optimization while including the effect of local junction losses in laminar flows. From the results, we are able to identify a non-dimensional parameter that can be used to predict the optimal geometric configurations. This parameter can also be used to identify the conditions in which the local junction losses can be ignored during the optimization.

  19. Analysis of the Pipe Heat Loss of the Water Flow Calorimetry System in EAST Neutral Beam Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chundong; Chen, Yu; Xu, Yongjian; Yu, Ling; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Weitang

    2016-11-01

    Neutral beam injection heating is one of the main auxiliary heating methods in controllable nuclear fusion research. In the EAST neutral beam injector, a water flow calorimetry (WFC) system is applied to measure the heat load on the electrode system of the ion source and the heat loading components of the beamline. Due to the heat loss in the return water pipe, there are some measuring errors for the current WFC system. In this paper, the errors were measured experimentally and analyzed theoretically, which lay a basis for the exact calculation of beam power deposition distribution and neutralization efficiency. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB101001) and the International Science & Technology Cooperation Program of China (No. 2014DFG61950)

  20. Methodology for nonlinear quantification of a flexible beam with a local, strong nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Christopher A.; McFarland, D. Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2017-02-01

    This study presents a methodology for nonlinear quantification, i.e., the identification of the linear and nonlinear regimes and estimation of the degree of nonlinearity, for a cantilever beam with a local, strongly nonlinear stiffness element. The interesting feature of this system is that it behaves linearly in the limits of extreme values of the nonlinear stiffness. An Euler-Bernoulli cantilever beam with two nonlinear configurations is used to develop and demonstrate the methodology. One configuration considers a cubic spring attached at a distance from the beam root to achieve a smooth nonlinear effect. The other configuration considers a vibro-impact element that generates non-smooth effects. Both systems have the property that, in the limit of small and large values of a configuration parameter, the system is almost linear and can be modeled as such with negligible error. For the beam with a cubic spring attachment, the forcing amplitude is the varied parameter, while for the vibro-impact beam, this parameter is the clearance between the very stiff stops and the beam at static equilibrium. Proper orthogonal decomposition is employed to obtain an optimal orthogonal basis used to describe the nonlinear system dynamics for varying parameter values. The frequencies of the modes that compose the basis are then estimated using the Rayleigh quotient. The variations of these frequencies are studied to identify parameter values for which the system behaves approximately linearly and those for which the dynamical response is highly nonlinear. Moreover, a criterion based on the Betti-Maxwell reciprocity theorem is used to verify the existence of nonlinear behavior for the set of parameter values suggested by the described methodology. The developed methodology is general and applicable to discrete or continuous systems with smooth or nonsmooth nonlinearities.

  1. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-01-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H[sup +] for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 [mu]g/cm[sup 2], were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H[sub 0] atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  2. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-06-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H{sup +} for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H{sub 0} atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  3. Predicting phosphorus losses with the PLEASE model on a local scale in Denmark and the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Salm, Caroline; Dupas, Remi; Grant, Ruth; Heckrath, Goswin; lversen, Bo V; Kronvang, Brian; Levi, Clémentine; Rubaek, Gitte; Schoumans, Oscar F

    2011-01-01

    To reduce losses from agricultural soils to surface water, mitigation options have to be implemented as a local scale. For a cost-effective implementation of these measures, an instrument to identify critical areas for P leaching is indispensable. In many countries, P-index methods are used to identify areas as risk for P losses to surface water. In flat areas, where losses by leaching are dominant, these methods have their limitations because leaching is often not described in detail, PLEASE, is a simple mechanistic model designed to stimulate P Losses by leaching at the field scale using a limited amount of local field data. In this study, PLEASE, was applied to 17 lowland sites in Denmark and 14 lowland sites in the Netherlands. Results show that the simple model simulated measured fluxes and concentrations in water from pipe drains, suction cups, and groundwater quite well. The modeling efficiency ranged from 0.92 for modeling total-P fluxes to 0.36 fr modeling concentrations in groundwater. Poor results were obtained for heavy clay soils and eutrophic peat soils, where fluxes and concentration were strongly underestimated by the model. The poot performance for the heavy clay soil can be explained by the transport of P through macropores to the drain pipes and the underestimation of overland flow on this heavy-textured soil. In the eutrophic peat soils, fluxes were underestimated due to the release of P from deep soil layers.

  4. Local Residents Perception of Benefits and Losses From Protected Areas in India and Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanth, Krithi K.; Nepal, Sanjay K.

    2012-02-01

    High densities of people living around protected areas (PAs) in South Asia require management strategies to balance conservation goals and livelihood needs. Based on a survey of 777 households around five PAs in India and Nepal, this paper provides a comparative perspective of Indian and Nepali households' views of protected area benefits and costs, their attitude toward conservation in general, and attitude toward protected area staff. Results indicate mixed responses towards tourism, varying from very favorable in Nepal to less favorable in India. The majority (81%) held positive attitudes towards the existence and importance of PAs but had negative perceptions of PA staff (69%). Most residents perceived benefits from access to fuel wood, fodder and other PA resources including benefits from tourism, while crop and livestock losses from wildlife were the main costs. Households overall positive attitudes towards the PAs and conservation despite high losses from living around PAs suggests that local residents may support conservation if their livelihood needs are met. Comparisons of household attitudes and perceptions suggest that locally based strategies rather than top-down approaches are likely to be more effective. Extending PA benefits to smaller landholders, households that are highly resource-dependent or experiencing higher income losses from human-wildlife conflicts, and less educated residents are particularly important to balance costs and losses from living around protected areas.

  5. Local residents perception of benefits and losses from protected areas in India and Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Krithi K; Nepal, Sanjay K

    2012-02-01

    High densities of people living around protected areas (PAs) in South Asia require management strategies to balance conservation goals and livelihood needs. Based on a survey of 777 households around five PAs in India and Nepal, this paper provides a comparative perspective of Indian and Nepali households' views of protected area benefits and costs, their attitude toward conservation in general, and attitude toward protected area staff. Results indicate mixed responses towards tourism, varying from very favorable in Nepal to less favorable in India. The majority (81%) held positive attitudes towards the existence and importance of PAs but had negative perceptions of PA staff (69%). Most residents perceived benefits from access to fuel wood, fodder and other PA resources including benefits from tourism, while crop and livestock losses from wildlife were the main costs. Households overall positive attitudes towards the PAs and conservation despite high losses from living around PAs suggests that local residents may support conservation if their livelihood needs are met. Comparisons of household attitudes and perceptions suggest that locally based strategies rather than top-down approaches are likely to be more effective. Extending PA benefits to smaller landholders, households that are highly resource-dependent or experiencing higher income losses from human-wildlife conflicts, and less educated residents are particularly important to balance costs and losses from living around protected areas.

  6. BEAM-LOSS DRIVEN DESIGN OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; DANBY,G.; GARDNER,C.J.; JACKSON,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; LUDEWIG,H.; MALITSKY,N.; RAPARIA,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; WENG,W.T.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes three-stage design optimization for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring: linear machine design (lattice, aperture, injection, magnet field errors and misalignment), beam core manipulation (painting, space charge, instabilities, RF requirements), and beam halo consideration (collimation, envelope variation, e-p issues etc.).

  7. A novel digitization scheme with FPGA-base TDC for beam loss monitors operating at cryogenic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Warner, Arden; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Recycling integrators are common current-to-frequency converting circuits for measurements of low current such as that produced by Fermilab's cryogenic ionization chambers. In typical digitization/readout schemes, a counter is utilized to accumulate the number of pulses generated by the recycling integrator to adequately digitize the total charge. In order to calculate current with reasonable resolution (e.g., 7-8 bits), hundreds of pulses must be accumulated which corresponds to a long sampling period, i.e., a very low sampling rate. In our new scheme, an FPGA-based Time-to-Digital Convertor (TDC) is utilized to measure the time intervals between the pulses output from the recycling integrator. Using this method, a sample point of the current can be made with good resolution (>10 bits) for each pulse. This effectively increases the sampling rates by hundreds of times for the same recycling integrator front-end electronics. This scheme provides a fast response to the beams loss and is potentially suitable for accelerator protection applications. Moreover, the method is also self-zero-suppressed, i.e., it produces more data when the beam loss is high while it produces significantly less data when the beam loss is low.

  8. Improved SPGD algorithm to avoid local extremum for incoherent beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guoqing; Liu, Lisheng; Jiang, Zhenhua; Wang, Tingfeng; Guo, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm and the fast steering mirrors (FSM) are applied for incoherent beam combining in this paper. An equation is derived to calculate the wavefront reflected from the FSM under certain control voltages and the relationship between the strength of random disturbances and the combing efficiency is discussed via simulations, indicating that the combining efficiency is inversely proportional to the square of the strength of disturbance. The maximum value of the acceptable disturbance can be determined though the fitting curve which presents an instructional way to reduce the disturbance in advance. Besides, the SPGD algorithm is improved to overcome the weakness of tending to be trapped in the local extremum in incoherent beam combining. In the proposed algorithm, pattern recognition is used to check whether the algorithm is trapped and an "additional move" can be applied to get out of local extremum. The results of simulations show that the proposed algorithm can improve the performance of the incoherent beam combining. Comparative simulations are conducted where the value of evaluation function is increased about 60% compared to the conventional algorithm under the same conditions. The threshold of disturbance also increases about 15% when the accepted value of evaluation function set to 0.8 in the normalized form showing the feasibility of the method. Also, statistical data shows the proposed method depends less on the gain coefficient.

  9. Acute toxicity during external-beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: Comparison of different techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, S.; Awan, A.; Karrison, T.; Culbert, H.; Chan, S.; Kolker, J.; Low, N.; Halpern, H.; Rubin, S.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Weicheselbaum, R.R. )

    1993-01-15

    The chronic and acute toxicities associated with conventional radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer are well documented. However, the degree and incidence of toxicities with conformal techniques are not known. Studying side effects associated with modern radiotherapeutic techniques is more important now since there has been a general trend to use computerized tomography-based techniques in recent years; beam's eye view-based conformal techniques are also becoming more commonplace. It is possible that the local disease control can be improved with the delivery of higher doses than currently used. Conformation of the treatment volume to the target volume may facilitate such dose-escalation. However, prior to such dose-escalation, it is important to know the toxicities associated with such techniques with conventional doses. We have compared week-by-week acute toxicities associated with conventional (Group A, 16 patients), computerized tomography-based, manual (Group B, 57 patients) and beam's eye view-based (Group C, 43 patients) techniques during 7 weeks of radiotherapy. Group B and C patients were treated contemporaneously (1988-1990). The incidence of acute toxicities was significantly less with the beams eye view-based technique than with the other two methods. A trend suggesting increased severity of toxicity with increase in the volume of treatment was seen.

  10. Prediction of local losses of low Re flows in elastic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Sid; Gasow, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    An isotropic elastic porous structure whose pore scale geometry is regular (periodically uniform) will experience non-uniform deformation when a viscous fluid flows through the matrix under the influence of an externally applied pressure difference. In such a case, the flow field will experience a non uniform pressure gradient whose magnitude increases in the direction of bulk flow. In this study, a method is presented that predicts local losses of the flow through a porous matrix whose geometry varies in the direction of flow. Employing an asymptotic expansion about the deformation provides an expression relating local hydraulic permeability to local pore geometry. In this way the pressure field is able to be determined without requiring the explicit solution of the flow field. In this study a test case is presented showing that the local pressure losses are predicted to be within 0.5% those of the solution to the Navier-Stokes Equations. The approach can be used to simplify the coupled fluid-solid problem of flow through elastic porous media by replacing the need to explicitly solve the flow field.

  11. Energy Loss of High Intensity Focused Proton Beams Penetrating Metal Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Evans, M.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Canning, D.; Mastrosimone, D.; Foord, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Shortpulse-laser-driven intense ion beams are appealing for applications in probing and creating high energy density plasmas. Such a beam isochorically heats and rapidly ionizes any target it enters into warm dense matter with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we present experimental measurements taken with the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP BL shortpulse laser of the proton and carbon spectra after passing through metal foils. The laser irradiated spherically curved C targets with intensity 4×1018 W/cm2, producing proton beams with 3 MeV slope temperature and a sharp low energy cutoff at 5 MeV which has not been observed on lower energy, shorter pulse intense lasers. The beam either diverged freely or was focused to estimated 1016 p +/cm2 ps by a surrounding structure before entering the metal foils (Al or Ag and a Cu tracer layer). The proton and ion spectra were altered by the foil depending on material and whether or not the beam was focused. Transverse proton radiography probed the target with ps temporal and 10 micron spatial resolution, indicating an electrostatic field on the foil may also have affected the beam. We present complementary particle-in-cell simulations of the beam generation and transport to the foils. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA National Laser User Facility program, Contract DE-SC0001265.

  12. Local Recurrence After Uveal Melanoma Proton Beam Therapy: Recurrence Types and Prognostic Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre; Paoli, Vincent; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Maschi, Celia; Baillif, Stéphanie; Herault, Joël; Gastaud, Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean Michel

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To study the prognosis of the different types of uveal melanoma recurrences treated by proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 61 cases of uveal melanoma local recurrences on a total of 1102 patients treated by PBT between June 1991 and December 2010. Survival rates have been determined by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Prognostic factors have been evaluated by using log-rank test or Cox model. Results: Our local recurrence rate was 6.1% at 5 years. These recurrences were divided into 25 patients with marginal recurrences, 18 global recurrences, 12 distant recurrences, and 6 extrascleral extensions. Five factors have been identified as statistically significant risk factors of local recurrence in the univariate analysis: large tumoral diameter, small tumoral volume, low ratio of tumoral volume over eyeball volume, iris root involvement, and safety margin inferior to 1 mm. In the local recurrence-free population, the overall survival rate was 68.7% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 83.6% at 10 years. In the local recurrence population, the overall survival rate was 43.1% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 55% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis of death risk factors has shown a better prognosis for marginal recurrences. Conclusion: Survival rate of marginal recurrences is superior to that of the other recurrences. The type of recurrence is a clinical prognostic value to take into account. The influence of local recurrence retreatment by proton beam therapy should be evaluated by novel studies.

  13. Modeling of Local BEAM Structure for Evaluation of MMOD Impacts to Support Development of a Health Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes initial modeling of the local response of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) to micrometeorite and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts using a structural, non-linear, transient dynamic finite element code. Complementary test results for a local BEAM structure are presented for both hammer and projectile impacts. Review of these data provided guidance for the transient dynamic model development. The local model is intended to support predictions using the global BEAM model, described in a companion report. Two types of local models were developed. One mimics the simplified Soft-Goods (fabric envelop) part of the BEAM NASTRAN model delivered by the project. The second investigates through-the-thickness modeling challenges for MMOD-type impacts. Both the testing and the analysis summaries contain lessons learned and areas for future efforts.

  14. Filamentation of laser beam and suppression of stimulated Raman scattering due to localization of electron plasma wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Gunjan; Sharma, Prerana; Sharma, R. P.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser beam filamentation on the localization of electron plasma wave (EPW) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in unmagnetized plasma when relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are operative. The splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. The semi-analytical solution of the nonlinearly coupled EPW equation in the presence of laser beam filaments has been found. It is observed that due to this nonlinear coupling between these two waves, localization of EPW takes place. Stimulated Raman scattering of this EPW is studied and back reflectivity has been calculated. Further, the localization of EPW affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave. The new enhanced damping of the plasma wave has been calculated and it is found that the SRS process gets suppressed due to the localization of plasma wave in laser beam filamentary structures.

  15. Estimation of propagation losses for infrared laser beam in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaponov, A. E.; Sakharov, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    In present work, the radiation propagation in atmosphere from laser source to the receiver is considered by taking into account deviations of optical beam due to turbulence. The photon flux density on the receiver has been evaluated.

  16. Enhanced needle localization in ultrasound using beam steering and learning-based segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Charles R; Ng, Gary; Parthasarathy, Vijay

    2015-04-01

    Segmentation of needles in ultrasound images remains a challenging problem. In this paper, we introduce a machine learning-based method for needle segmentation in 2D beam-steered ultrasound images. We used a statistical boosting approach to train a pixel-wise classifier for needle segmentation. The Radon transform was then used to find the needle position and orientation from the segmented image. We validated our method with data from ex vivo specimens and clinical nerve block procedures, and compared the results to those obtained using previously reported needle segmentation methods. Results show improved localization success and accuracy using the proposed method. For the ex vivo datasets, assuming that the needle orientation was known a priori, the needle was successfully localized in 86.2% of the images, with a mean targeting error of 0.48mm. The robustness of the proposed method to a lack of a priori knowledge of needle orientation was also demonstrated. For the clinical datasets, assuming that the needle orientation was closely aligned with the beam steering angle selected by the physician, the needle was successfully localized in 99.8% of the images, with a mean targeting error 0.19mm. These results indicate that the learning-based segmentation method may allow for increased targeting accuracy and enhanced visualization during ultrasound-guided needle procedures.

  17. Micro-nanopores fabricated by high-energy electron beam irradiation: suitable structure for controlling pesticide loss.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yubin; Wang, Ning; Song, Jimei; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2013-06-05

    Pesticide sprayed onto crop leaves tends to be washed off by rainwater and discharge into the environment through leaching and runoff, resulting in severe pollution to both soil and water. Here, to control pesticide loss, we developed a loss-control pesticide (LCP) by adding modified natural nanoclay (diatomite) through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) to traditional pesticide. After HEEB treatment, the originally clogged pores in diatomite opened, resulting in plenty of micro-nanopores in diatomite, which are beneficial for the pesticide molecules to access and be adsorbed. This pesticide-diatomite complex tended to be retained by the rough surface of crop leaves, displaying a high adhesion performance onto the leaves, so that the pesticide loss reduced, sufficient pesticide for crops was supplied, and the pollution risk of the pesticide could be substantially lowered.

  18. Processes governing phytoplankton blooms in estuaries. I: The local production-loss balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, L.V.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Cloern, J.E.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Thompson, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    The formation and spatial distribution of phytoplankton blooms in estuaries are controlled by (1) local mechanisms, which determine the production-loss balance for a water column at a particular spatial location (i.e. control if a bloom is possible), and (2) transport-related mechanisms, which govern biomass distribution (i.e. control if and where a bloom actually occurs). In this study, the first of a 2-paper series, we use a depth-averaged numerical model as a theoretical tool to describe how interacting local conditions (water column height, light availability, benthic grazing) influence the local balance between phytoplankton sources and sinks. We also explore trends in the spatial variability of the production-loss balance across the topographic gradients between deep channels and lateral shoals which are characteristic of shallow estuaries. For example, under conditions of high turbidity and slow benthic grazing the highest rates of phytoplankton population growth are found in the shallowest regions. On the other hand, with low turbidity and rapid benthic grazing the highest growth rates occur in the deeper areas. We also explore the effects of semidiurnal tidal variation in water column height, as well as spring-neap variability. Local population growth in the shallowest regions is very sensitive to tidal-scale shallowing and deepening of the water column, especially in the presence of benthic grazing. A spring-neap signal in population growth rate is also prominent in the shallow areas. Population growth in deeper regions is less sensitive to temporal variations in tidal elevation. These results show that both shallow and deep regions of estuaries can act as sources or sinks for phytoplankton biomass, depending on the local conditions of mean water column height, tidal amplitude, light-limited growth rate, and consumption by grazers.

  19. Analysis of local strain in aluminum interconnects by convergent beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Stephan; Mayer, Joachim

    1999-11-01

    Energy filtered convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) was used to investigate localized strain in aluminum interconnects. An analysis of the higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) line positions in CBED patterns makes it possible to measure the lattice strain with high accuracy (˜104) and high spatial resolution (10 to 100 nm). The strain development in a single grain was measured during thermal cycling between -170 °C and +100 °C. The grain showed reversible, elastic behavior over the whole temperature range building up large strains at low temperatures. By comparing with finite element simulations, a detailed understanding of the tri-axial strain state could be achieved.

  20. Impact of inward turbulence spreading on energy loss of edge-localized modesa)

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, C. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Xi, P. W.; ...

    2015-05-18

    Nonlinear two-fluid and gyrofluid simulations show that an edge localized modes(ELM) crash has two phases: fast initial crash of ion temperature perturbation on the Alfvén time scale and slow turbulence spreading. The turbulencetransport phase is a slow encroachment of electron temperature perturbation due to the ELM event into pedestal region. Because of the inward turbulence spreading effect, the energy loss of an ELM decreases when density pedestal height increases. The Landau resonance yields the different cross phase-shift of ions and electrons. A 3 + 1 gyro-Landau-fluid model is implemented in BOUT++ framework. As a result, the gyrofluid simulations show thatmore » the kinetic effects have stabilizing effects on the ideal ballooning mode and the energy loss increases with the pedestal height.« less

  1. Impact of inward turbulence spreading on energy loss of edge-localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.; Xia, T. Y.; Snyder, P. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2015-05-15

    Nonlinear two-fluid and gyrofluid simulations show that an edge localized modes (ELM) crash has two phases: fast initial crash of ion temperature perturbation on the Alfvén time scale and slow turbulence spreading. The turbulence transport phase is a slow encroachment of electron temperature perturbation due to the ELM event into pedestal region. Because of the inward turbulence spreading effect, the energy loss of an ELM decreases when density pedestal height increases. The Landau resonance yields the different cross phase-shift of ions and electrons. A 3 + 1 gyro-Landau-fluid model is implemented in BOUT++ framework. The gyrofluid simulations show that the kinetic effects have stabilizing effects on the ideal ballooning mode and the energy loss increases with the pedestal height.

  2. Rehabilitation of molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH) complicated with localized tooth surface loss: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lam, Walter Y H; Ho, Edward H T; Pow, Edmond H N

    2014-05-01

    Molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental enamel hypomineralized condition characteristically involving the first permanent molars and sometimes also the incisors. The affected teeth are predisposed to tooth surface loss (TSL) which may not only compromise the esthetics and function but also endanger the pulp and longevity of the teeth. This report describes the management of a patient with MIH complicated with localized TSL and lack of occlusal clearance due to dentoalveolar compensation. The atypical TSL pattern involved all anterior teeth and required the placement of Dahl appliances on both arches.

  3. Cone-Beam CT Localization of Internal Target Volumes for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhiheng Wu, Q. Jackie; Marks, Lawrence B.; Larrier, Nicole; Yin Fangfang

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: In this study, we investigate a technique of matching internal target volumes (ITVs) in four-dimensional (4D) simulation computed tomography (CT) to the composite target volume in free-breathing on-board cone-beam (CB) CT. The technique is illustrated by using both phantom and patient cases. Methods and Materials: A dynamic phantom with a target ball simulating respiratory motion with various amplitude and cycle times was used to verify localization accuracy. The dynamic phantom was scanned using simulation CT with a phase-based retrospective sorting technique. The ITV was then determined based on 10 sets of sorted images. The size and epicenter of the ITV identified from 4D simulation CT images and the composite target volume identified from on-board CBCT images were compared to assess localization accuracy. Similarly, for two clinical cases of patients with lung cancer, ITVs defined from 4D simulation CT images and CBCT images were compared. Results: For the phantom, localization accuracy between the ITV in 4D simulation CT and the composite target volume in CBCT was within 1 mm, and ITV was within 8.7%. For patient cases, ITVs on simulation CT and CBCT were within 8.0%. Conclusion: This study shows that CBCT is a useful tool to localize ITV for targets affected by respiratory motion. Verification of the ITV from 4D simulation CT using on-board free-breathing CBCT is feasible for the target localization of lung tumors.

  4. A dynamic model of a cantilever beam with a closed, embedded horizontal crack including local flexibilities at crack tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhu, W. D.; Charalambides, P. G.; Shao, Y. M.; Xu, Y. F.; Fang, X. M.

    2016-11-01

    As one of major failure modes of mechanical structures subjected to periodic loads, embedded cracks due to fatigue can cause catastrophic failure of machineries. Understanding the dynamic characteristics of a structure with an embedded crack is helpful for early crack detection and diagnosis. In this work, a new three-segment beam model with local flexibilities at crack tips is developed to investigate the vibration of a cantilever beam with a closed, fully embedded horizontal crack, which is assumed to be not located at its clamped or free end or distributed near its top or bottom side. The three-segment beam model is assumed to be a linear elastic system, and it does not account for the nonlinear crack closure effect; the top and bottom segments always stay in contact at their interface during the beam vibration. It can model the effects of local deformations in the vicinity of the crack tips, which cannot be captured by previous methods in the literature. The middle segment of the beam containing the crack is modeled by a mechanically consistent, reduced bending moment. Each beam segment is assumed to be an Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the compliances at the crack tips are analytically determined using a J-integral approach and verified using commercial finite element software. Using compatibility conditions at the crack tips and the transfer matrix method, the nature frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam are obtained. The three-segment beam model is used to investigate the effects of local flexibilities at crack tips on the first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam. A stationary wavelet transform (SWT) method is used to process the mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam; jumps in single-level SWT decomposition detail coefficients can be used to identify the length and location of an embedded horizontal crack.

  5. The effect of local land use and loss of forests on bats and nocturnal insects.

    PubMed

    Treitler, Julia T; Heim, Olga; Tschapka, Marco; Jung, Kirsten

    2016-07-01

    Land-use intensification at local and landscape level poses a serious threat to biodiversity and affects species interactions and ecosystem function. It is thus important to understand how interrelated taxa respond to land-use intensification and to consider the importance of different spatial scales. We investigated whether and how local land-use intensity and landscape features affect the predator-prey interaction of bats and insects. Bats and nocturnal insects were assessed on 50 grassland sites in the Schorfheide-Chorin. We analyzed the effect of local land use and distance to forested areas as a proxy for site accessibility on bats and insects and their biological interaction measured in bat's feeding activity. Insect abundance increased with higher land-use intensity, while size and diversity of insects decreased. In contrast, bat activity, diversity, and species composition were determined by the distance to forested areas and only slightly by land-use intensity. Feeding attempts of bats increased with higher insect abundance and diversity but decreased with insect size and distance to forested areas. Finally, our results revealed that near forested areas, the number of feeding attempts was much lower on grassland sites with high, compared to those with low land-use intensity. In contrast, far from forests, the feeding attempts did not differ significantly between intensively and extensively managed grassland sites. We conclude that the two interrelated taxa, bats and insects, respond to land-use intensification on very different scales. While insects respond to local land use, bats are rather influenced by surrounding landscape matrix. Hereby, proximity to forests reveals to be a prerequisite for higher bat species diversity and a higher rate of feeding attempts within the area. However, proximity to forest is not sufficient to compensate local high land-use intensity. Thus, local land-use intensification in combination with a loss of forest remnants

  6. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  7. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 2: with Beam Shutdown Only

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. This report documents the results of simulations of a Loss-of-Flow Accident (LOFA) where power is lost to all of the pumps that circulate water in the blanket region, the accelerator beam is shut off and neither the residual heat removal nor cavity flood systems operate.

  8. Site-selective local fluorination of graphene induced by focused ion beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hu; Daukiya, Lakshya; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Lindblad, Andreas; Sanyal, Biplab; Eriksson, Olle; Aubel, Dominique; Hajjar-Garreau, Samar; Simon, Laurent; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The functionalization of graphene remains an important challenge for numerous applications expected by this fascinating material. To keep advantageous properties of graphene after modification or functionalization of its structure, local approaches are a promising road. A novel technique is reported here that allows precise site-selective fluorination of graphene. The basic idea of this approach consists in the local radicalization of graphene by focused ion beam (FIB) irradiation and simultaneous introduction of XeF2 gas. A systematic series of experiments were carried out to outline the relation between inserted defect creation and the fluorination process. Based on a subsequent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, a 6-fold increase of the fluorine concentration on graphene under simultaneous irradiation was observed when compared to fluorination under normal conditions. The fluorine atoms are predominately localized at the defects as indicated from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The experimental findings are confirmed by density functional theory which predicts a strong increase of the binding energy of fluorine atoms when bound to the defect sites. The developed technique allows for local fluorination of graphene without using resists and has potential to be a general enabler of site-selective functionalization of graphene using a wide range of gases. PMID:26822900

  9. Site-selective local fluorination of graphene induced by focused ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Daukiya, Lakshya; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Lindblad, Andreas; Sanyal, Biplab; Eriksson, Olle; Aubel, Dominique; Hajjar-Garreau, Samar; Simon, Laurent; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-01-29

    The functionalization of graphene remains an important challenge for numerous applications expected by this fascinating material. To keep advantageous properties of graphene after modification or functionalization of its structure, local approaches are a promising road. A novel technique is reported here that allows precise site-selective fluorination of graphene. The basic idea of this approach consists in the local radicalization of graphene by focused ion beam (FIB) irradiation and simultaneous introduction of XeF2 gas. A systematic series of experiments were carried out to outline the relation between inserted defect creation and the fluorination process. Based on a subsequent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, a 6-fold increase of the fluorine concentration on graphene under simultaneous irradiation was observed when compared to fluorination under normal conditions. The fluorine atoms are predominately localized at the defects as indicated from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The experimental findings are confirmed by density functional theory which predicts a strong increase of the binding energy of fluorine atoms when bound to the defect sites. The developed technique allows for local fluorination of graphene without using resists and has potential to be a general enabler of site-selective functionalization of graphene using a wide range of gases.

  10. Local reduction of decadal glacier thickness loss through mass balance management in ski resorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Andrea; Helfricht, Kay; Stocker-Waldhuber, Martin

    2016-11-01

    For Austrian glacier ski resorts, established in the 1970s and 1980s during a period of glacier advance, negative mass balances with resulting glacier area loss and decrease in surface elevation present an operational challenge. Glacier cover, snow farming, and technical snow production were introduced as adaptation measures based on studies on the effect of these measures on energy and mass balance. After a decade of the application of the various measures, we studied the transition from the proven short-term effects of the measures on mass balance to long-term effects on elevation changes. Based on lidar digital elevation models and differential GPS measurements, decadal surface elevation changes in 15 locations with mass balance management were compared to those without measures (apart from piste grooming) in five Tyrolean ski resorts on seven glaciers. The comparison of surface elevation changes presents clear local differences in mass change, and it shows the potential to retain local ice thickness over 1 decade. Locally up to 21.1 m ± 0.4 m of ice thickness was preserved on mass balance managed areas compared to non-maintained areas over a period of 9 years. In this period, mean annual thickness loss in 15 of the mass balance managed profiles is 0.54 ± 0.04 m yr-1 lower (-0.23 ± 0.04 m yr-1on average) than in the respective reference areas (-0.78 ± 0.04 m yr-1). At two of these profiles the surface elevation was preserved altogether, which is promising for a sustainable maintenance of the infrastructure at glacier ski resorts. In general the results demonstrate the high potential of the combination of mass balance management by snow production and glacier cover, not only in the short term but also for multi-year application to maintain the skiing infrastructure.

  11. [Effect of cochlear implantation on sound localization for patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Liu, J F; Dai, J S; Wang, N Y

    2016-08-07

    The aim of this review was to examine the current literature regarding application of cochlear implantation on patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL) for improvement on sound localization. The literature were searched in the PubMed database with 'cochlear implantation AND single-sided deafness' or 'cochlear implantation AND unilateral deafness' as keywords. The publication date of the articles was up to 2015-2-12. A total of 12 articles were included. The results show that the ability of sound localization for most of the USNHL subjects (90%) with cochlear implantation was significantly improved than that without CI, which suggests that CI is a superior auditory rehabilitation treatment than BAHA and CROS hearing aids for patients with USNHL, because of the re-establishment of the benefits of binaural hearing. In addition, the benefit of CI for USNHL requires a period of auditory experience or training. About 30% subjects showed significantly improvement on sound localization ability after CI worked for three months. For most of the patients (90%), the sound localization ability improved after CI worked for six months. When CI worked for nine months, all the subjects would show improvement on sound localization ability. Sound localization of the USNHL subjects with a CI is based primarily on interaural level differences (ILD) while interaural time differences (ITD) provide little advantage or probably not perceptible at all. The younger subject suffers from USNHL, the stronger the plasticity of the auditory center shows, which results in more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side of the auditory pathway. Similarly, the longer duration of USNHL lead to more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side. An adaptive enhancement of auditory pathway corresponding to the healthy ear will rely more on the monaural spatial cues that available to the

  12. Edge localized mode characteristics during edge localized mode mitigation by supersonic molecular beam injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. Y.; Hong, J. H.; Jang, J. H.; Park, J. S.; Choe, Wonho; Hahn, S. H.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, J. H.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, K. D.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. H.; Juhn, J.-W.; Kim, H. S.; Yoon, S. W.; Han, H.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2015-12-15

    It has been reported that supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) is an effective means of edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation. This paper newly reports the changes in the ELM, plasma profiles, and fluctuation characteristics during ELM mitigation by SMBI in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. During the mitigated ELM phase, the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 2–3 and the ELM size, which was estimated from the D{sub α} amplitude, the fractional changes in the plasma-stored energy and the line-averaged electron density, and divertor heat flux during an ELM burst, decreased by a factor of 0.34–0.43. Reductions in the electron and ion temperatures rather than in the electron density were observed during the mitigated ELM phase. In the natural ELM phase, frequency chirping of the plasma fluctuations was observed before the ELM bursts; however, the ELM bursts occurred without changes in the plasma fluctuation frequency in the mitigated ELM phase.

  13. A new approach for beam hardening correction based on the local spectrum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulpour, Naser; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Hemmati, Hamidreza

    2015-09-01

    Energy dependence of material absorption and polychromatic nature of x-ray beams in the Computed Tomography (CT) causes a phenomenon which called "beam hardening". The purpose of this study is to provide a novel approach for Beam Hardening (BH) correction. This approach is based on the linear attenuation coefficients of Local Spectrum Distributions (LSDs) in the various depths of a phantom. The proposed method includes two steps. Firstly, the hardened spectra in various depths of the phantom (or LSDs) are estimated based on the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm for arbitrary thickness interval of known materials in the phantom. The performance of LSD estimation technique is evaluated by applying random Gaussian noise to transmission data. Then, the linear attenuation coefficients with regarding to the mean energy of LSDs are obtained. Secondly, a correction function based on the calculated attenuation coefficients is derived in order to correct polychromatic raw data. Since a correction function has been used for the conversion of the polychromatic data to the monochromatic data, the effect of BH in proposed reconstruction must be reduced in comparison with polychromatic reconstruction. The proposed approach has been assessed in the phantoms which involve less than two materials, but the correction function has been extended for using in the constructed phantoms with more than two materials. The relative mean energy difference in the LSDs estimations based on the noise-free transmission data was less than 1.5%. Also, it shows an acceptable value when a random Gaussian noise is applied to the transmission data. The amount of cupping artifact in the proposed reconstruction method has been effectively reduced and proposed reconstruction profile is uniform more than polychromatic reconstruction profile.

  14. Neutral Beam Source and Target Plasma for Development of a Local Electric Field Fluctuation Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, M. R.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Rhodes, A. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    A new diagnostic measuring local E-> (r , t) fluctuations is being developed for plasma turbulence studies in tokamaks. This is accomplished by measuring fluctuations in the separation of the π components in the Hα motional Stark spectrum. Fluctuations in this separation are expected to be Ẽ / ẼEMSE 10-3EMSE 10-3 . In addition to a high throughput, high speed spectrometer, the project requires a low divergence (Ω 0 .5°) , 80 keV, 2.5 A H0 beam and a target plasma test stand. The beam employs a washer-stack arc ion source to achieve a high species fraction at full energy. Laboratory tests of the ion source demonstrate repeatable plasmas with Te 10 eV and ne 1.6 ×1017 m-3, sufficient for the beam ion optics requirements. Te and ne scalings of the ion source plasma are presented with respect to operational parameters. A novel three-phase resonant converter power supply will provide 6 mA/cm2 of 80 keV H0 at the focal plane for pulse lengths up to 15 ms, with low ripple δV / 80 keV 0.05 % at 280 kHz. Diagnostic development and validation tests will be performed on a magnetized plasma test stand with 0.5 T field. The test chamber will utilize a washer-stack arc source to produce a target plasma comparable to edge tokamak plasmas. A bias-plate with programmable power supply will be used to impose Ẽ within the target plasma. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  15. Effect of local buckling on hysteretic behavior of beam-column with circular cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yukio; Murakawa, Hidekazu; Shaker, R.E.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, the hysteretic behavior of beam-column member having circular cross-section under simultaneously acting constant compressive axial load and cyclic lateral load is investigated. Elasto-plastic large deformation analysis by means of Finite Element Method (FEM) is utilized in this research. An emphasis is placed on the effect of the axial compressive load and geometrical parameters on the deterioration of the ultimate strength, the stiffness and the energy-dissipation capacity. Also, effect of the tangent modulus in the strain hardening region and different hardening rules are discussed. From this study, it is found that, in the absence of the axial compressive load, no deterioration in the strength, the stiffness and the absorbed energy are observed in all investigated members having different geometries. Meanwhile, in the case of the presence of axial load, local buckling (locally accumulated deflection under cyclic loading) may be induced depending on the geometrical parameters, namely, diameter-to-thickness ratio D/t and slenderness parameter {lambda} as well as the value of axial load ratio. Such local buckling reduces the ultimate strength and the stiffness of the member. The strength and the stiffness of the member are improved with smaller values of D/t and {lambda} and larger tangent modulus in the strain hardening region of the material.

  16. A local and iterative neural reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Ignazio

    2010-04-01

    This work presents a new neural algorithm designed for the reconstruction of tomographic images from Cone Beam data. The main objective of this work is the search of a new reconstruction method, able to work locally, more robust in presence of noisy data and in situations with a small number of projections. This study should be intended as the first step to evaluate the potentialities of the proposed algorithm. The algorithm is iterative and based on a set of neural networks that are working locally and sequentially. All the x-rays passing through a cell of the volume to be reconstructed, give origin to a neural network which is a single-layer perceptron network. The network does not need a training set but uses the line integral of a single x-ray as ground-truth of each output neuron. The neural network uses a gradient descent algorithm in order to minimize a local cost function by varying the value of the cells to be reconstructed. The proposed strategy was first evaluated in conditions where the quality and quantity of input data varies widely, using a the Shepp-Logan Phantom. The algorithm was also compared with the iterative ART algorithm and the well known filtered backprojection method. The results show how the proposed algorithm is much more accurate even in the presence of noise and under conditions of lack of data. In situations with little noise the reconstruction, after a few iterations, is almost identical to the original.

  17. Impact of inward turbulence spreading on energy loss of edge-localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chenhao

    2014-10-01

    BOUT++ six-field Landau-fluid simulations show that an ELM crash has two phases: fast initial crash of ion temperature profile on the order of Alfven time scale near the peak gradient region and slow electron inward turbulence spreading from the ELM crash event. Both of them contribute to the ELM energy loss. However, the conducted ELM energy loss dominates over the convected ELM energy loss, which remains almost constant after the initial crash. The total ELM energy loss is mainly determined by the MHD turbulence spreading when the pedestal temperature height is large. The inward front propagation of electron temperature perturbation spreads into the linearly stable zone, while the ion perturbation front has much less spreading. The electron temperature fluctuation peaks on the rational surfaces and the front jumps gradually inwards towards neighboring rational surfaces. The electron wave-particle resonances via Landau closure provide a relatively strong parallel damping effect on the electron temperature perturbation and induce a large cross-phase shift of about π / 2 angle between ExB velocity and the ion temperature, which yields almost no spreading for ion temperature and density fluctuation. When pedestal temperature height increases, the cross-phase shift of electron decreases and is close to π / 4 angle which yields a large turbulence spreading and generates the large electron conducted energy loss. The front propagation stops at the position where the radial turbulent correlation length is shorter than the magnetic surface spacing. The energy burst of an ELM is controlled by the magnetic shear profile, the characteristic front propagating velocity and the turbulence correlation time. The inward turbulence spreading is mainly driven by (1) a series of micro-crashes due to a localized steepening of profile and (2) the magnetic flutter. The impact of other kinetic effects, such as full FLR effect and toroidal resonance, will be presented via simulations of

  18. [Localization of lumbar epidural space by loss of resistance and using the Episensor: a comparative study].

    PubMed

    de Andrés, J; Gomar, C; Calatrava, P; Gutiérrez, M H; Rojas, R; Nalda, M A

    1990-01-01

    Since the existence of negative pressure in the epidural space was reported, its technique of localization has undergone changes directed to improve objectivity, reliability and safety. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new electronic divide to localize the epidural space, i.e. the Episensor (Palex, Spain). To this end, 71 patients, both males and females, undergoing elective urological surgery and in whom catheterization of the lumbar epidural space had been planned, were prospectively evaluated and randomly assigned to two homogeneous groups. In group I (n = 35) the epidural space was localized by the classical technique of loss of resistance, while in group II the Episensor was used. In both groups several technical parameters, the qualification of the operator and the complications of the procedure were evaluated. There were no significant differences between both groups regarding the quality of epidural blockade or the subjective technical difficulty of the operator. The incidence of complications of the technique of puncture was significantly higher in group II (p less than 0.05); the most common were dura mater puncture in 13 group II patients and in one group I patient (p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the qualification of the operator and the development of complications. It was concluded that the use of Episensor to localize lumbar epidural space did not improve the effectiveness of blockade but increased the iatrogenic effects of the puncture. Our lack of experience with this new technique and the low negative pressure of lumbar epidural space might have been the causes of the poor results, that we consider as initial in the evaluation of this new method.

  19. Fine-tuned Remote Laser Welding of Aluminum to Copper with Local Beam Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Florian; Jarwitz, Michael; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    Local beam oscillation in remote laser welding of aluminum to copper was investigated. Sheets of 1 mm thickness were welded in overlap configuration with aluminum as top material. The laser beam was scanned in a sinusoidal mode perpendicular to the direction of feed and the influence of the oscillation parameters frequency and amplitude on the weld geometry was investigated. Scanning frequencies up to 1 kHz and oscillation amplitudes in the range from 0.25 mm to 1 mm were examined. Throughout the experiments the laser power and the feed rate were kept constant. A decrease of welding depth with amplitude and frequency is found. The scanning amplitude had a strong influence and allowed coarse setting of the welding depth into the lower material, while the frequency allowed fine tuning in the order of 10% of the obtained depth. The oscillation parameters were found to act differently on the aluminum sheet compared to copper sheet regarding the amount of fused material. It is possible to influence the geometry of the fused zones separately for both sheets. Therefore the average composition in the weld can be set with high precision via the oscillation parameters. A setting of the generated intermetallics in the weld zone is possible without adjustment of laser power and feed rate.

  20. Acute canine distemper encephalitis is associated with rapid neuronal loss and local immune activation.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Penny A; Bastien-Hamel, Louis-Etienne; von Messling, Veronika

    2010-04-01

    For most virus infections of the central nervous system (CNS), immune-mediated damage, the route of inoculation and death of infected cells all contribute to the pathology observed. To investigate the role of these factors in early canine distemper neuropathogenesis, we infected ferrets either intranasally or intraperitoneally with the neurovirulent canine distemper virus strain Snyder Hill. Regardless of the route of inoculation, the virus primarily targeted the olfactory bulb, brainstem, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas only occasional foci were detected in the cortex. The infection led to widespread neuronal loss, which correlated with the clinical signs observed. Increased numbers of activated microglia, reactive gliosis and different pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected in the infected areas, suggesting that the presence and ultimate death of infected cells at early times after infection trigger strong local immune activation, despite the observed systemic immunosuppression.

  1. Review of energy confinement and local transport scaling results in neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    Over the past several years, tokamak neutral beam injection experiments have evolved from the brute force study of the effects of global discharge characteristics (I/sub p/, anti n/sub e/, P/sub heat/, etc.) on energy confinement to the appreciation that there are effects more subtle, yet controllable, that may influence confinement dramatically. While this evolution from first to second generation experiments is derived from an empirical understanding of low and high energy confinement modes and how to achieve them operationally, the underlying physics is still unknown. Several theories with different physical bases appear to describe the global scaling of the low confinement mode discharges quite well. On the other hand, little agreement has been found between theoretical and experimentally deduced values of local transport coefficients. While it is known operationally how to achieve any one of several types of high confinement mode discharges, here too, the underlying physics of the transport associated with these modes is poorly understood.

  2. Increased EZH2 and decreased osteoblastogenesis during local irradiation-induced bone loss in rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changjun; Li, Changwei; Yang, Kai; Kang, Hui; Xu, Xiaoya; Xu, Xiangyang; Deng, Lianfu

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat cancer patients but exhibits adverse effects, including insufficiency fractures and bone loss. Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Here, we reported local bone changes after single-dose exposure to 137CS irradiation in rats. Femur bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone volume in the tibia were significantly decreased at 12 weeks after irradiation. Micro-CT results showed that tBMD, Tb.h and Tb.N were also significantly reduced at 12 weeks after irradiation exposure. ALP-positive OB.S/BS was decreased by 42.3% at 2 weeks after irradiation and was decreased by 50.8% at 12 weeks after exposure. In contrast to the decreased expression of Runx2 and BMP2, we found EZH2 expression was significantly increased at 2 weeks after single-dose 137CS irradiation in BMSCs. Together, our results demonstrated that single-dose 137CS irradiation induces BMD loss and the deterioration of bone microarchitecture in the rat skeleton. Furthermore, EZH2 expression increased and osteoblastogenesis decreased after irradiation. The underlying mechanisms warrant further investigation. PMID:27499068

  3. Uncontrolled admixture and loss of genetic diversity in a local Vietnamese pig breed.

    PubMed

    Berthouly-Salazar, Cécile; Thévenon, Sophie; Van, Thu Nhu; Nguyen, Binh Trong; Pham, Lan Doan; Chi, Cuong Vu; Maillard, Jean-Charles

    2012-05-01

    The expansion of intensive livestock production systems in developing countries has increased the introduction of highly productive exotic breeds facilitating indiscriminate crossbreeding with local breeds. In this study, we set out to investigate the genetic status of the Vietnamese Black H'mong pig breed by evaluating (1) genetic diversity and (2) introgression from exotic breeds. Two exotic breeds, namely Landrace and Yorkshire used for crossbreeding, and the H'mong pig population from Ha Giang (HG) province were investigated using microsatellite markers. Within the province, three phenotypes were observed: a White, a Spotted and a Black phenotype. Genetic differentiation between phenotypes was low (0.5-6.1%). The White phenotypes showed intermediate admixture values between exotic breeds and the Black HG population (0.53), indicating a crossbreed status. Management practices were used to predict the rate of private diversity loss due to exotic gene introgressions. After 60 generations, 100% of Black private alleles will be lost. This loss is accelerated if the admixture rate is increased but can be slowed down if the mortality rate (e.g., recruitment rate) is decreased. Our study showed that a large number of markers are needed for accurately identifying hybrid classes for closely related populations. While our estimate of admixture still seems underestimated, genetic erosion can occur very fast even through indiscriminate crossbreeding.

  4. Uncontrolled admixture and loss of genetic diversity in a local Vietnamese pig breed

    PubMed Central

    Berthouly-Salazar, Cécile; Thévenon, Sophie; Van, Thu Nhu; Nguyen, Binh Trong; Pham, Lan Doan; Chi, Cuong Vu; Maillard, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of intensive livestock production systems in developing countries has increased the introduction of highly productive exotic breeds facilitating indiscriminate crossbreeding with local breeds. In this study, we set out to investigate the genetic status of the Vietnamese Black H’mong pig breed by evaluating (1) genetic diversity and (2) introgression from exotic breeds. Two exotic breeds, namely Landrace and Yorkshire used for crossbreeding, and the H’mong pig population from Ha Giang (HG) province were investigated using microsatellite markers. Within the province, three phenotypes were observed: a White, a Spotted and a Black phenotype. Genetic differentiation between phenotypes was low (0.5–6.1%). The White phenotypes showed intermediate admixture values between exotic breeds and the Black HG population (0.53), indicating a crossbreed status. Management practices were used to predict the rate of private diversity loss due to exotic gene introgressions. After 60 generations, 100% of Black private alleles will be lost. This loss is accelerated if the admixture rate is increased but can be slowed down if the mortality rate (e.g., recruitment rate) is decreased. Our study showed that a large number of markers are needed for accurately identifying hybrid classes for closely related populations. While our estimate of admixture still seems underestimated, genetic erosion can occur very fast even through indiscriminate crossbreeding. PMID:22837841

  5. Modelling of local modification of chemical composition generated by artificial beam injection in stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oraevsky, V.; Ruzhin, Y.; Borisov, N.; Nesterov, I.

    The physical/chemical processes that are occurring in the middle atmosphere, are very complex and knowledge of them are obviously poor. At the same time the understanding of these processes is necessary, in particular, for an explanation of ozone dynamics and influencing on it of the different factors, for example, impurities of anthropogenous nature. In the present activity the capability of creation of noticeable local disturbances of concentration of ozone and other minor neutral components in stratosphere si theoretically modeled for artificial injection of high energy electron beams from a high-altitude balloon. With the help of numerical simulations (31 reactions) the quantitative assessments of expected effect for different altitudes (range of 35-45 km) and different values of eddy diffusion factor are obtained and presented. It is shown the considered means has a number of advantages in comparison with method of artificial action on stratosphere ozone by VHF generation of ionized area in atmosphere. At first, it is much more friend and precisely to conduct diagnostic of effect, which one arises due to "in -situ" onboard measurements from a balloon. Secondly, it is possible to inject any impurities (freons) to study directly in stratosphere their affect on ozone. The method, tendered here, requires considerably smaller material costs and can be realized already now. Based on presented modeling results it is important to note that in our method an integral disturbance in stratosphere (full quantity of created molecules of ozone, nitric oxides etc.) is rather insignificant, as the effect is localized near to injected electron beam. Therefore there is no hazard of deposition of unchecked injury to environment. At the same time realization of tendered experiment will allow essentially to deepen our representations about composite physical/chemical processes occurring in middle atmosphere (stratosphere).

  6. A Bench Measurement of the Energy Loss of a Stored Beam to a Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, M.; Rees, J.

    2016-12-19

    A rather simple electronic bench experiment is proposed for obtaining a measure of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch to an rf cavity or other vacuum-chamber structure--the so-called "cavity radiation". The proposed method is analyzed in some detail.

  7. A Bench Measurement of the Energy Loss of a Stored Beam to a Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, M.; Rees, John R.; /SLAC

    2005-08-08

    A rather simple electronic bench experiment is proposed for obtaining a measure of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch to an rf cavity or other vacuum-chamber structure--the so-called ''cavity radiation''. The proposed method is analyzed in some detail.

  8. External Beam Radiation Therapy Enhances Local Control in Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis

    SciTech Connect

    Horoschak, Melissa; Tran, Phuoc T. Bachireddy, Pavan; West, Robert B.; Mohler, David; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Kapp, Daniel S.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare proliferative disorder of the synovium with locally aggressive behavior. We reviewed our experience using radiation therapy in the treatment of PVNS. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with 18 sites of PVNS were treated with radiation between 1993 and 2007. Cases were retrospectively reviewed for patient information, treatment parameters, complications, and outcome. Seven sites were primary presentations and 11 were recurrent with an average of 2.5 prior surgical interventions. The most common location was the knee joint (67%). Cytoreductive surgery was performed before radiation therapy in 16/18 sites with all having proven or suspected residual disease. Radiation was delivered using 4-15 MV photons with an average total dose 34 Gy (range, 20-36 Gy). Seventeen of 18 sites (94%) had postradiotherapy imaging. Results: With average follow-up of 46 months (range, 8-181 months), initial local control was achieved in 75% (12/16) of the sites with prior cytoreductive surgery (mean time to recurrence, 38 months). Ultimate local control was 100% after repeat resection (mean follow-up, 61 months). Two additional sites without prior cytoreductive surgery showed growth after radiotherapy (mean time to documented growth, 10.5 months). Seventeen of the 18 involved joints (94%) were scored as excellent or good PVNS-related function, one site (5%) as fair function, and no site with poor function. No patient required amputation; and there were no Grade 3/4 treatment-related complications. Conclusion: Postoperative external beam radiation is effective in preventing disease recurrence and should be offered following maximal cytoreduction to enhance local control in PVNS.

  9. Assessment of Local Biodiversity Loss in Uranium Mining-Tales And Its Projections On Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharshenova, D.; Zhamangulova, N.

    2015-12-01

    In Min-Kush, northern Kyrgyzstan there are 8 mining tales with an estimate of 1 961 000 tones of industrial Uranium. Local ecosystem services have declined rapidly. We analyzed a terrestrial assemblage database of Uranium mine-tale to quantify local biodiversity responses to land use and environmental changes. In the worst-affected habitats species richness reduced by 95.7%, total abundance by 60.9% and rarefaction-based richness by 72.5%. We estimate that, regional mountain ecosystem affected by this pressure reduced average within-sample richness (by 17.01%), total abundance (16.5%) and rarefaction-based richness (14.5%). Business-as-usual scenarios are the widely practiced in the region and moreover, due to economic constraints country can not afford any mitigation scenarios. We project that biodiversity loss and ecosystem service impairment will spread in the region through ground water, soil, plants, animals and microorganisms at the rate of 1km/year. Entire Tian-Shan mountain chain will be in danger within next 5-10 years. Our preliminary data shows that local people live in this area developed various forms of cancer, and the rate of premature death is as high as 40%. Strong international scientific and socio-economic partnership is needed to develop models and predictions.

  10. High frequency core localized modes in neutral beam heated plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.

    1995-11-01

    A band of high frequency modes in the range 50--150 kHz with intermediate toroidal mode numbers 4 < n < 10 are commonly observed in the core of supershot plasmas on TFTR. Two distinct varieties of MHD modes are identified corresponding to a flute-like mode predominantly appearing around the q = 1 surface and an outward ballooning mode for q > 1. The flute-like modes have nearly equal amplitude on the high field and low field side of the magnetic axis and are mostly observed in moderate performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub E} < 2{tau}{sub L} while the ballooning-like modes have enhanced amplitude on the low field side of the magnetic axis and tend to appear in higher performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub E} > 2{tau}{sub L}, where {tau}{sub L} is the equivalent L-mode confinement time. The modes propagate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction and are highly localized with radial widths {Delta}r {approximately} 5--10 cm, fluctuation levels {tilde n}/n, {tilde T}{sub e}/T{sub e} < 0.01, and radial displacements {zeta}{sub r} {approximately} 0.1 cm. Unlike the toroidally localized high-n activity observed just prior to major and minor disruptions on TFTR, these modes are typically much weaker, more benign, and may be indicative of kinetic ballooning modes destabilized by resonant circulating neutral beam ions.

  11. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  12. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: casual parameters and duration of memory loss. Final report for November 84

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron-beam exposure was investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task for 10, 1, and 0.1 microsecond pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 1,000,000 rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (1,000,000 rad/s) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory system activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli.

  13. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Via, Riccardo Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Ciocca, Mario; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Methods: Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Results: Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. Conclusions: A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring

  14. Strain localization parameters of AlCu4MgSi processed by high-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lunev, A. G. Nadezhkin, M. V.; Konovalov, S. V.; Teresov, A. D.

    2015-10-27

    The influence of the electron beam surface treatment of AlCu4MgSi on the strain localization parameters and on the critical strain value of the Portevin–Le Chatelier effect has been considered. The strain localization parameters were measured using speckle imaging of the specimens subjected to the constant strain rate uniaxial tension at a room temperature. Impact of the surface treatment on the Portevin–Le Chatelier effect has been investigated.

  15. Electron beam induced local crystallization of HfO2 nanopores for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jiwook; Rivera, Jose A.; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-10-01

    We report the development of single, locally crystallized nanopores in HfO2 membranes for biosensing applications. HfO2 is chosen for its isoelectric point of 7.0, mechanical and chemical stability in solution, and for its potential as a high-k material for nanopore ionic field effect transistor applications. The HfO2 membrane is deposited on a graphene layer suspended over a 300 nm FIB hole, where graphene is used as the mechanical support. Exposure of the membrane to a focused electron beam causes crystallization in the vicinity of the nanopore during pore formation. We investigate the effects of crystallization on the electrical and surface properties of HfO2 films. Our surface analysis of HfO2 reveals improved hydrophilicity of crystallized HfO2, a notable advantage over the hydrophobicity of as-deposited HfO2. We also demonstrate detection of dsDNA translocation through HfO2 nanopores under various applied bias levels. In addition, our device architecture also presents a promising first step toward the realization of high-k HfO2 nanopore transistors.We report the development of single, locally crystallized nanopores in HfO2 membranes for biosensing applications. HfO2 is chosen for its isoelectric point of 7.0, mechanical and chemical stability in solution, and for its potential as a high-k material for nanopore ionic field effect transistor applications. The HfO2 membrane is deposited on a graphene layer suspended over a 300 nm FIB hole, where graphene is used as the mechanical support. Exposure of the membrane to a focused electron beam causes crystallization in the vicinity of the nanopore during pore formation. We investigate the effects of crystallization on the electrical and surface properties of HfO2 films. Our surface analysis of HfO2 reveals improved hydrophilicity of crystallized HfO2, a notable advantage over the hydrophobicity of as-deposited HfO2. We also demonstrate detection of dsDNA translocation through HfO2 nanopores under various applied

  16. 3D localization of electrophysiology catheters from a single x-ray cone-beam projection

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Normand Polack, George G.; Sethi, Benu; Rowlands, John A.; Crystal, Eugene

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: X-ray images allow the visualization of percutaneous devices such as catheters in real time but inherently lack depth information. The provision of 3D localization of these devices from cone beam x-ray projections would be advantageous for interventions such as electrophysiology (EP), whereby the operator needs to return a device to the same anatomical locations during the procedure. A method to achieve real-time 3D single view localization (SVL) of an object of known geometry from a single x-ray image is presented. SVL exploits the change in the magnification of an object as its distance from the x-ray source is varied. The x-ray projection of an object of interest is compared to a synthetic x-ray projection of a model of said object as its pose is varied. Methods: SVL was tested with a 3 mm spherical marker and an electrophysiology catheter. The effect of x-ray acquisition parameters on SVL was investigated. An independent reference localization method was developed to compare results when imaging a catheter translated via a computer controlled three-axes stage. SVL was also performed on clinical fluoroscopy image sequences. A commercial navigation system was used in some clinical image sequences for comparison. Results: SVL estimates exhibited little change as x-ray acquisition parameters were varied. The reproducibility of catheter position estimates in phantoms denoted by the standard deviations, (σ{sub x}, σ{sub y}, σ{sub z}) = (0.099 mm,  0.093 mm,  2.2 mm), where x and y are parallel to the detector plane and z is the distance from the x-ray source. Position estimates (x, y, z) exhibited a 4% systematic error (underestimation) when compared to the reference method. The authors demonstrated that EP catheters can be tracked in clinical fluoroscopic images. Conclusions: It has been shown that EP catheters can be localized in real time in phantoms and clinical images at fluoroscopic exposure rates. Further work is required to characterize

  17. Combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy losses in solids irradiated with a dual-ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, Lionel; Debelle, Aurelien; Garrido, Frederico; Trocellier, Patrick; Serruys, Yves; Miro, Sandrine

    2013-04-08

    Single and dual-beam irradiations of oxide (c-ZrO{sub 2}, MgO, Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}) and carbide (SiC) single crystals were performed to study combined effects of nuclear (S{sub n}) and electronic (S{sub e}) energy losses. Rutherford backscattering experiments in channeling conditions show that the S{sub n}/S{sub e} cooperation induces a strong decrease of the irradiation-induced damage in SiC and MgO and almost no effects in c-ZrO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The healing process is ascribed to electronic excitations arising from the electronic energy loss of swift ions. These results present a strong interest for both fundamental understanding of the ion-solid interactions and technological applications in the nuclear industry where expected cooperative S{sub n}/S{sub e} effects may lead to the preservation of the integrity of nuclear devices.

  18. Deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT with local intensity matching.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyoun; Plishker, William; Quon, Harry; Wong, John; Shekhar, Raj; Lee, Junghoon

    2017-02-07

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality in image-guided radiotherapy and surgery. A short scan followed by a filtered-backprojection is typically used for CBCT reconstruction. While data on the mid-plane (plane of source-detector rotation) is complete, off-mid-planes undergo different information deficiency and the computed reconstructions are approximate. This causes different reconstruction artifacts at off-mid-planes depending on slice locations, and therefore impedes accurate registration between CT and CBCT. In this paper, we propose a method to accurately register CT and CBCT by iteratively matching local CT and CBCT intensities. We correct CBCT intensities by matching local intensity histograms slice by slice in conjunction with intensity-based deformable registration. The correction-registration steps are repeated in an alternating way until the result image converges. We integrate the intensity matching into three different deformable registration methods, B-spline, demons, and optical flow that are widely used for CT-CBCT registration. All three registration methods were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient parallel computation. We tested the proposed methods on twenty five head and neck cancer cases and compared the performance with state-of-the-art registration methods. Normalized cross correlation (NCC), structural similarity index (SSIM), and target registration error (TRE) were computed to evaluate the registration performance. Our method produced overall NCC of 0.96, SSIM of 0.94, and TRE of 2.26 → 2.27 mm, outperforming existing methods by 9%, 12%, and 27%, respectively. Experimental results also show that our method performs consistently and is more accurate than existing algorithms, and also computationally efficient.

  19. Variation in Adherence to External Beam Radiotherapy Quality Measures Among Elderly Men With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E. Zelefsky, Michael J.; Jang, Thomas L.; Basch, Ethan M.; Schrag, Deborah

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the variation in adherence to quality measures of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer and its relation to patient and provider characteristics in a population-based, representative sample of U.S. men. Methods and Materials: We evaluated EBRT quality measures proposed by a RAND expert panel of physicians among men aged {>=}65 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 with localized prostate cancer and treated with primary EBRT using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare program. We assessed the adherence to five EBRT quality measures that were amenable to analysis using SEER-Medicare data: (1) use of conformal RT planning; (2) use of high-energy (>10-MV) photons; (3) use of custom immobilization; (4) completion of two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist in the year after therapy; and (5) radiation oncologist board certification. Results: Of the 11,674 patients, 85% had received conformal RT planning, 75% had received high-energy photons, and 97% had received custom immobilization. One-third of patients had completed two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist, although 91% had at least one visit with a urologist or radiation oncologist. Most patients (85%) had been treated by a board-certified radiation oncologist. Conclusions: The overall high adherence to EBRT quality measures masked substantial variation in geography, socioeconomic status in the area of residence, and teaching affiliation of the RT facility. Future research should examine the reasons for the variations in these measures and whether the variation is associated with important clinical outcomes.

  20. Deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT with local intensity matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Plishker, William; Quon, Harry; Wong, John; Shekhar, Raj; Lee, Junghoon

    2017-02-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality in image-guided radiotherapy and surgery. A short scan followed by a filtered-backprojection is typically used for CBCT reconstruction. While data on the mid-plane (plane of source-detector rotation) is complete, off-mid-planes undergo different information deficiency and the computed reconstructions are approximate. This causes different reconstruction artifacts at off-mid-planes depending on slice locations, and therefore impedes accurate registration between CT and CBCT. In this paper, we propose a method to accurately register CT and CBCT by iteratively matching local CT and CBCT intensities. We correct CBCT intensities by matching local intensity histograms slice by slice in conjunction with intensity-based deformable registration. The correction-registration steps are repeated in an alternating way until the result image converges. We integrate the intensity matching into three different deformable registration methods, B-spline, demons, and optical flow that are widely used for CT-CBCT registration. All three registration methods were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient parallel computation. We tested the proposed methods on twenty five head and neck cancer cases and compared the performance with state-of-the-art registration methods. Normalized cross correlation (NCC), structural similarity index (SSIM), and target registration error (TRE) were computed to evaluate the registration performance. Our method produced overall NCC of 0.96, SSIM of 0.94, and TRE of 2.26 → 2.27 mm, outperforming existing methods by 9%, 12%, and 27%, respectively. Experimental results also show that our method performs consistently and is more accurate than existing algorithms, and also computationally efficient.

  1. Deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT by local CBCT intensity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Plishker, William; Shekhar, Raj; Quon, Harry; Wong, John; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to accurately register CT to cone-beam CT (CBCT) by iteratively correcting local CBCT intensity. CBCT is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality in image-guided radiotherapy and surgery. A short scan followed by a filtered-backprojection is typically used for CBCT reconstruction. While data on the mid-plane (plane of source-detector rotation) is complete, off-mid-planes undergo different information deficiency and the computed reconstructions are approximate. This causes different reconstruction artifacts at off-mid-planes depending on slice locations, and therefore impedes accurate registration between CT and CBCT. To address this issue, we correct CBCT intensities by matching local intensity histograms slice by slice in conjunction with intensity-based deformable registration. This correction-registration step is repeated until the result image converges. We tested the proposed method on eight head-and-neck cancer cases and compared its performance with state-of-the-art registration methods, Bspline, demons, and optical flow, which are widely used for CT-CBCT registration. Normalized mutual-information (NMI), normalized cross-correlation (NCC), and structural similarity (SSIM) were computed as similarity measures for the performance evaluation. Our method produced overall NMI of 0.59, NCC of 0.96, and SSIM of 0.93, outperforming existing methods by 3.6%, 2.4%, and 2.8% in terms of NMI, NCC, and SSIM scores, respectively. Experimental results show that our method is more consistent and roust than existing algorithms, and also computationally efficient with faster convergence.

  2. Hypofractionated proton boost combined with external beam radiotherapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Silvia; Aström, Lennart; Sandin, Fredrik; Isacsson, Ulf; Montelius, Anders; Turesson, Ingela

    2012-01-01

    Proton boost of 20 Gy in daily 5 Gy fractions followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 50 Gy in daily 2 Gy fractions were given to 278 patients with prostate cancer with T1b to T4N0M0 disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT). The medium followup was 57 months. The 5-year PSA progression-free survival was 100%, 95%, and 74% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. The toxicity evaluation was supported by a patient-reported questionnaire before every consultant visit. Cumulative probability and actuarial prevalence of genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities are presented according to the RTOG classification. N-ADT did not influence curability. Mild pretreatment GU-symptoms were found to be a strong predictive factor for GU-toxicity attributable to treatment. The actuarial prevalence declined over 3 to 5 years for both GU and GI toxicities, indicating slow resolution of epithelial damage to the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract. Bladder toxicities rather than gastrointestinal toxicities seem to be dose limiting. More than 5-year followup is necessary to reveal any sign of true progressive late side effects of the given treatment. Hypofractionated proton-boost combined with EBRT is associated with excellent curability of localized PC and acceptable frequencies of treatment toxicity.

  3. Localization of impacted maxillary canines using cone beam computed tomography. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Giulia; Cavallini, Costanza; Cassetta, Michele; Galluccio, Gabriella; Barbato, Ersilia

    2012-01-01

    Summary This review analyzed the literature focused on Cone- Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) diagnostic accuracy and efficacy in detecting impacted maxillary canines, and evaluated the possible advantages in using CBCT technique compared with traditional radiographs. PubMed and Embase searches were performed selecting papers since 1998 up to September 2011, moreover reference lists were hand searched. Two reviewers selected relevant publications on the basis of predetermined inclusion criteria. The literature search yielded 94 titles, of which 5 were included in the review. Three studies used CBCT technique to 3D localize maxillary impacted canines and assess root resorption of adjacent teeth. Other two publications compared traditional radiographs with CBCT images in the diagnosis of maxillary impacted canines. Only three studies presented the results using statistical analysis. The present review highlighted that the use of CBCT has a potential diagnostic effect and may influence the outcome of treatment when compared with traditional panoramic radiography for the assessment of impacted maxillary canines. Furthermore it underlines the need of future studies performed according with high level methodological standards, investigating diagnostic accuracy and effectiveness of CBCT in the diagnosis of maxillary impacted teeth. PMID:22783450

  4. Local lattice strain measurements in semiconductor devices by using convergent-beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akio; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Ono, Haruhiko

    2000-03-01

    We examined the lattice strain distribution around local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) in a semiconductor device by using highly accurate (1.8×10 -4 standard deviation) convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) at a nanometer-scale spatial resolution (10 nm in diameter). The nanometer-scale measurement was done by reducing the elastic relaxation using a thick (about 600 nm) sample and by removing the inelastically scattered electrons by means of an electron energy filter. A highly accurate measurement was achieved through the analysis of higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) patterns using the least-squares fitting of HOLZ line intersection distances between the observations and calculations. Our examination showed that the LOCOS structure gave singularities in strain distributions at the field edge. That is, compressive strain exists in both the vertical and horizontal directions of the substrate, and the shear strain increased there. Most notably, two-dimensional measurements revealed that the singularity of the normal strain in the horizontal direction of the substrate generated at the field edge propagated into the substrate.

  5. Hypofractionated Proton Boost Combined with External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Silvia; Åström, Lennart; Sandin, Fredrik; Isacsson, Ulf; Montelius, Anders; Turesson, Ingela

    2012-01-01

    Proton boost of 20 Gy in daily 5 Gy fractions followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 50 Gy in daily 2 Gy fractions were given to 278 patients with prostate cancer with T1b to T4N0M0 disease. Fifty-three percent of the patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT). The medium followup was 57 months. The 5-year PSA progression-free survival was 100%, 95%, and 74% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. The toxicity evaluation was supported by a patient-reported questionnaire before every consultant visit. Cumulative probability and actuarial prevalence of genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities are presented according to the RTOG classification. N-ADT did not influence curability. Mild pretreatment GU-symptoms were found to be a strong predictive factor for GU-toxicity attributable to treatment. The actuarial prevalence declined over 3 to 5 years for both GU and GI toxicities, indicating slow resolution of epithelial damage to the genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract. Bladder toxicities rather than gastrointestinal toxicities seem to be dose limiting. More than 5-year followup is necessary to reveal any sign of true progressive late side effects of the given treatment. Hypofractionated proton-boost combined with EBRT is associated with excellent curability of localized PC and acceptable frequencies of treatment toxicity. PMID:22848840

  6. Local intensity feature tracking and motion modeling for respiratory signal extraction in cone beam CT projections.

    PubMed

    Dhou, Salam; Motai, Yuichi; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2013-02-01

    Accounting for respiration motion during imaging can help improve targeting precision in radiation therapy. We propose local intensity feature tracking (LIFT), a novel markerless breath phase sorting method in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan images. The contributions of this study are twofold. First, LIFT extracts the respiratory signal from the CBCT projections of the thorax depending only on tissue feature points that exhibit respiration. Second, the extracted respiratory signal is shown to correlate with standard respiration signals. LIFT extracts feature points in the first CBCT projection of a sequence and tracks those points in consecutive projections forming trajectories. Clustering is applied to select trajectories showing an oscillating behavior similar to the breath motion. Those "breathing" trajectories are used in a 3-D reconstruction approach to recover the 3-D motion of the lung which represents the respiratory signal. Experiments were conducted on datasets exhibiting regular and irregular breathing patterns. Results showed that LIFT-based respiratory signal correlates with the diaphragm position-based signal with an average phase shift of 1.68 projections as well as with the internal marker-based signal with an average phase shift of 1.78 projections. LIFT was able to detect the respiratory signal in all projections of all datasets.

  7. Massive Bone Loss Due to Orchidectomy and Localized Disuse: Preventive Effects of a Biosphonsphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libouban, H.; Moreau, M. F.; Chappard, D.

    2008-06-01

    Orchidectomy (ORX) and hindlimb paralysis induced by botulinum neurotoxin (BTX) were combined to see if their effects were cumulative and if bone loss could be prevented by an antiresorptive agent (risedronate) or testosterone. Four groups of mature rats were studied for 1 month: SHAM operated; ORX and right hindlimb immobilization (BTX); ORX+BTX+risedronate or testosterone. Bone loss and microarchitecture deterioration were maximized on the immobilized bone. Risedronate but not testosterone prevented trabecular bone loss but was less effective on cortical bone loss. ORX and BTX had additive effects on bone loss which can be prevented by risedronate but not testosterone.

  8. A beam based method for target localization: inspiration from bats' directivity and binaural reception for ultrasonic sonar.

    PubMed

    Guarato, Francesco; Windmill, James; Gachagan, Anthony

    2013-06-01

    The process of echolocation is accomplished by bats partly using the beam profiles associated with their ear shapes that allow for discrimination between different echo directions. Indeed, knowledge of the emitted signal characteristic and measurement of the echo travel time from a target make it possible to compensate for attenuation due to distance, and to focus on filtering through the receivers' beam profiles by comparing received echoes to the original signal at all frequencies in the spectrum of interest. From this basis, a beam profile method to localize a target in three-dimensional space for an ultrasonic sensor system equipped with an emitter and two receivers is presented. Simulations were conducted with different noise levels, and only the contribution of the receivers' beam profiles was considered to estimate the orientation of the target with respect to the receivers. The beam pattern of the Phyllostomus discolor's ear was adopted as that of a receiver. Analyses of beam resolution and frequency ranges were conducted to enhance the accuracy of orientation estimates. The choice of appropriate resolution and frequency ranges guarantee that error mean values for most of the orientations are within [0.5°, 1.5°], even in noisy situations: Signal-to-noise ratio values considered in this work are 35 and 50 dB.

  9. Synchronous heating of two local regions of a biological tissue phantom using automated targeting of phase conjugate ultrasound beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyansky, L. M.; Brysev, A. P.; Klopotov, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous heating of two local regions of an absorbing medium by phase conjugate ultrasound beams focused on them has been experimentally demonstrated. A polymeric biological tissue phantom with two small air cavities scattering sound has been used as the medium irradiated by a 5-MHz "probe" ultrasound beam. The scattered field is incident on a parametric device for ultrasonic wave phase conjugation. The conjugate and amplified field is self-adaptive focused on scatterers and heats the medium owing to the absorption of the ultrasonic energy. In this case, these regions are heated by about 5°C in 70 s. Only an insignificant increase in the temperature owing to the heat conduction effect is observed in the remaining volume of the phantom. The implemented effect can be used in medical applications of phase conjugate ultrasound beams.

  10. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yimei Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  11. Monitoring Dosimetric Impact of Weight Loss With Kilovoltage (KV) Cone Beam CT (CBCT) During Parotid-Sparing IMRT and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Kean Fatt; Marchant, Tom; Moore, Chris; Webster, Gareth; Rowbottom, Carl; Penington, Hazel; Lee, Lip; Yap, Beng; Sykes, Andrew; Slevin, Nick

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Parotid-sparing head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce long-term xerostomia. However, patients frequently experience weight loss and tumor shrinkage during treatment. We evaluate the use of kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for dose monitoring and examine if the dosimetric impact of such changes on the parotid and critical neural structures warrants replanning during treatment. Methods and materials: Ten patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were treated with contralateral parotid-sparing IMRT concurrently with platinum-based chemotherapy. Mean doses of 65 Gy and 54 Gy were delivered to clinical target volume (CTV)1 and CTV2, respectively, in 30 daily fractions. CBCT was prospectively acquired weekly. Each CBCT was coregistered with the planned isocenter. The spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, larynx, and oral cavity were outlined on each CBCT. Dose distributions were recalculated on the CBCT after correcting the gray scale to provide accurate Hounsfield calibration, using the original IMRT plan configuration. Results: Planned contralateral parotid mean doses were not significantly different to those delivered during treatment (p > 0.1). Ipsilateral and contralateral parotids showed a mean reduction in volume of 29.7% and 28.4%, respectively. There was no significant difference between planned and delivered maximum dose to the brainstem (p = 0.6) or spinal cord (p = 0.2), mean dose to larynx (p = 0.5) and oral cavity (p = 0.8). End-of-treatment mean weight loss was 7.5 kg (8.8% of baseline weight). Despite a {>=}10% weight loss in 5 patients, there was no significant dosimetric change affecting the contralateral parotid and neural structures. Conclusions: Although patient weight loss and parotid volume shrinkage was observed, overall, there was no significant excess dose to the organs at risk. No replanning was felt necessary for this patient cohort, but a larger patient sample will be investigated

  12. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Li, Yexiong; Feng, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhihui; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhang, Shuisheng; Tang, Xiaolong; Huang, Xianghui; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Jianghu; Sun, Yuemin; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Chengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess prognostic benefits of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment after IOERT. A retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data was conducted at the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Cancer Center. Two hundred forty-seven consecutive patients with nonmetastatic LAPC who underwent IOERT between January 2008 and May 2015 were identified and included in the study. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of IOERT. Prognostic factors were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40%, 14%, and 7.2%, respectively, with a median OS of 9.0 months. On multivariate analysis, an IOERT applicator diameter < 6 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47–0.97), no intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32–0.66), and receipt of postoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04–0.25) were significantly associated with improved OS. Pain relief after IOERT was achieved in 111 of the 117 patients, with complete remission in 74 and partial remission in 37. Postoperative complications rate and mortality were 14.0% and 0.4%, respectively. Nonmetastatic LAPC patients with smaller size tumors could achieve positive long-term survival outcomes with a treatment strategy incorporating IOERT and postoperative adjuvant treatment. Chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy might be a recommended adjuvant treatment strategy for well-selected cases. Intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy should not be recommended for patients with nonmetastatic LAPC. PMID:27661028

  13. Mars Express observations of high altitude planetary ion beams and their relation to the "energetic plume" loss channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Johnson, Blake C.; Fränz, Markus; Barabash, Stas

    2014-12-01

    This study presents observational evidence of high-energy (ions >2 keV) beams of planetary ions above Mars' induced magnetospheric boundary (IMB) and relates them with the energetic plume loss channel calculated from numerical models. A systematic search of the Mars Express (MEX) ion data using an orbit filtering criteria is described, using magnetometer data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) to determine the solar wind motional electric field (Esw) direction. Two levels of statistical survey are presented, one focused on times when the MEX orbit was directly in line with the Esw and another for all angles between the MEX location and the Esw. For the first study, within the 3 year overlap of MGS and MEX, nine brief intervals were found with clear and unambiguous high-energy O+ observations consistent with the energetic plume loss channel. The second survey used a point-by-point determination of MEX relative to the E-field and contained many thousands of 192 s measurements. This study yielded only a weak indication for an Esw-aligned plume. Furthermore, the y-z components of the weighted average velocities in the bins of this y-z spatial domain survey do not systematically point in the Esw direction. The first survey implies the existence of this plume and shows that its characteristics are seemingly consistent with the expected energy and flight direction from numerical studies; the second study softens the finding and demonstrates that there are many planetary ions beyond the IMB moving in unexpected directions. Several possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed.

  14. Enhanced localized energetic ion losses resulting from first-orbit linear and non-linear interactions with Alfvén eigenmodes in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Podesta, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Fisher, R. K.; Zeng, L.; Austin, M. E.

    2014-08-15

    Two key insights into interactions between Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) and energetic particles in the plasma core are gained from measurements and modeling of first-orbit beam-ion loss in DIII-D. First, the neutral beam-ion first-orbit losses are enhanced by AEs and a single AE can cause large fast-ion displacement. The coherent losses are from born trapped full energy beam-ions being non-resonantly scattered by AEs onto loss orbits within their first poloidal transit. The loss amplitudes scale linearly with the mode amplitude but the slope is different for different modes. The radial displacement of fast-ions by individual AEs can be directly inferred from the measurements. Second, oscillations in the beam-ion first-orbit losses are observed at the sum, difference, and harmonic frequencies of two independent AEs. These oscillations are not plasma modes and are absent in magnetic, density, and temperature fluctuations. The origin of the non-linearity as a wave-particle coupling is confirmed through bi-coherence analysis, which is clearly observed because the coherences are preserved by the first-orbit loss mechanism. An analytic model and full orbit simulations show that the non-linear features seen in the loss signal can be explained by a non-linear interaction between the fast ions and the two independent AEs.

  15. Age-related hearing loss and ear morphology affect vertical but not horizontal sound-localization performance.

    PubMed

    Otte, Rik J; Agterberg, Martijn J H; Van Wanrooij, Marc M; Snik, Ad F M; Van Opstal, A John

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have attributed deterioration of sound localization in the horizontal (azimuth) and vertical (elevation) planes to an age-related decline in binaural processing and high-frequency hearing loss (HFHL). The latter might underlie decreased elevation performance of older adults. However, as the pinnae keep growing throughout life, we hypothesized that larger ears might enable older adults to localize sounds in elevation on the basis of lower frequencies, thus (partially) compensating their HFHL. In addition, it is not clear whether sound localization has already matured at a very young age, when the body is still growing, and the binaural and monaural sound-localization cues change accordingly. The present study investigated sound-localization performance of children (7-11 years), young adults (20-34 years), and older adults (63-80 years) under open-loop conditions in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We studied the effect of age-related hearing loss and ear size on localization responses to brief broadband sound bursts with different bandwidths. We found similar localization abilities in azimuth for all listeners, including the older adults with HFHL. Sound localization in elevation for the children and young adult listeners with smaller ears improved when stimuli contained frequencies above 7 kHz. Subjects with larger ears could also judge the elevation of sound sources restricted to lower frequency content. Despite increasing ear size, sound localization in elevation deteriorated in older adults with HFHL. We conclude that the binaural localization cues are successfully used well into later stages of life, but that pinna growth cannot compensate the more profound HFHL with age.

  16. Measurement of Absolute Excitation Cross Sections in Highly-Charged Ions Using Electron Energy Loss and Merged Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Smith, Steven J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis during this decade on understanding energy balance and phenomena observed in high electron temperature plasmas. The UV spectral return from FUSE, the X-ray spectral return from the HETG on Chandra and the LETGS 011 XMM-Newton are just beginning. Line emissions are almost entirely from highly-charged ions (HCIs) of C, N, 0, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ca, and Fe. The Constellation-X mission will provide X-ray spectroscopy up to photon energies of 0.12 nm (10 keV) where primary line emitters will be HCIs. A variety of atomic parameters are required to model the stellar and solar plasma. These include cross sections for excitation, ionization, charge-exchange, X-ray emission, direct and indirect recombination, lifetimes and branching ratios, and dependences on l, m mixing by external E and B fields. In almost all cases the atomic quantities are calculated, and few comparisons to experiment have been carried out. Collision strengths and Einstein A-values are required to convert the observed spectral intensities to electron temperatures and densities in the stellar plasma. The JPL electron energy-loss and merged beam approach has been used to measure absolute collision strengths in a number of ions, with critical comparison made to the best available theories.

  17. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Vollnhals, F; Lukasczyk, T; Sandmann, A; Chen, C; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-02-25

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiO(x) nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  18. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Lukasczyk, T.; Sandmann, A.; Chen, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiOx nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  19. Localized plateau beam resulting from strong nonlocal coupling in a cavity filled by metamaterials and liquid-crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlidi, M.; Fernandez-Oto, C.; Clerc, M. G.; Escaff, D.; Kockaert, P.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the formation of a localized plateau beam in the transverse section of a nonlinear optical ring cavity filled with a metamaterial and a nonlocal medium such as a nematic liquid crystal. We show that, far from the modulational instability regime, localized structures with a varying width may be stable in one and two-dimensional settings. The mechanism of stabilization is related with strong nonlocal coupling mediated by a Lorentzian type of kernel. We show that there exists stable bright and dark localized structures. A reduction of Lugiato-Lefever equation in the regime close to the nascent bistability allows us to analytically derive a simple formula for the width of localized structures in one-dimensional systems. Direct numerical simulations of the dynamical model agree with the analytical predictions.

  20. Deformable image registration with local rigidity constraints for cone-beam CT-guided spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Image-guided spine surgery (IGSS) is associated with reduced co-morbidity and improved surgical outcome. However, precise localization of target anatomy and adjacent nerves and vessels relative to planning information (e.g., device trajectories) can be challenged by anatomical deformation. Rigid registration alone fails to account for deformation associated with changes in spine curvature, and conventional deformable registration fails to account for rigidity of the vertebrae, causing unrealistic distortions in the registered image that can confound high-precision surgery. We developed and evaluated a deformable registration method capable of preserving rigidity of bones while resolving the deformation of surrounding soft tissue. The method aligns preoperative CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with constraints on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold of bone intensities. The constraints enforced three properties of a rigid transformation—namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (uFFD) and Demons registration. FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation ({ D} = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear ({ S} = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons

  1. Intrafractional prostate motion during external beam radiotherapy monitored by a real-time target localization system.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xu; Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Jinsheng; Xu, Qianqian; Lin, Mu-Han; Chen, Lili; Price, Robert A; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2015-03-08

    This paper investigates the clinical significance of real-time monitoring of intrafractional prostate motion during external beam radiotherapy using a commercial 4D localization system. Intrafractional prostate motion was tracked during 8,660 treatment fractions for 236 patients. The following statistics were analyzed: 1) the percentage of fractions in which the prostate shifted 2-7 mm for a certain duration; 2) the proportion of the entire tracking time during which the prostate shifted 2-7mm; and 3) the proportion of each minute in which the shift exceeded 2-7 mm. The ten patients exhibiting maximum intrafractional-motion patterns were analyzed separately. Our results showed that the percentage of fractions in which the prostate shifted by > 2, 3, 5, and 7 mm off the baseline in any direction for > 30 s was 56.8%, 27.2%, 4.6%, and 0.7% for intact prostate and 68.7%, 35.6%, 10.1%, and 1.8% for postprostatectomy patients, respectively. For the ten patients, these percentages were 91.3%, 72.4%, 36.3%, and 6%, respectively. The percentage of tracking time during which the prostate shifted > 2, 3, 5, and 7 mm was 27.8%, 10.7%, 1.6%, and 0.3%, respectively, and it was 56.2%, 33.7%, 11.2%, and 2.1%, respectively, for the ten patients. The percentage of tracking time for a > 3 mm posterior motion was four to five times higher than that in other directions. For treatments completed in 5 min (VMAT) and 10 min (IMRT), the proportion for the prostate to shift by > 3mm was 4% and 12%, respectively. Although intrafractional prostate motion was generally small, caution should be taken for patients who exhibit frequent large intrafractional motion. For those patients, adjustment of patient positioning may be necessary or a larger treatment margin may be used. After the initial alignment, the likelihood of prostate motion increases with time. Therefore, it is favorable to use advanced techniques (e.g., VMAT) that require less delivery time in order to reduce the treatment

  2. Localized Retroprocessing as a Model of Intron Loss in the Plant Mitochondrial Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, Argelia; Ross, T. Gregory; Graham, Sean W.; Barrett, Craig F.; Davis, Jerrold I.; Seberg, Ole; Petersen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Loss of introns in plant mitochondrial genes is commonly explained by retroprocessing. Under this model, an mRNA is reverse transcribed and integrated back into the genome, simultaneously affecting the contents of introns and edited sites. To evaluate the extent to which retroprocessing explains intron loss, we analyzed patterns of intron content and predicted RNA editing for whole mitochondrial genomes of 30 species in the monocot order Alismatales. In this group, we found an unusually high degree of variation in the intron content, even expanding the hitherto known variation among angiosperms. Some species have lost some two-third of the cis-spliced introns. We found a strong correlation between intron content and editing frequency, and detected 27 events in which intron loss is consistent with the presence of nucleotides in an edited state, supporting retroprocessing. However, we also detected seven cases of intron loss not readily being explained by retroprocession. Our analyses are also not consistent with the entire length of a fully processed cDNA copy being integrated into the genome, but instead indicate that retroprocessing usually occurs for only part of the gene. In some cases, several rounds of retroprocessing may explain intron loss in genes completely devoid of introns. A number of taxa retroprocessing seem to be very common and a possibly ongoing process. It affects the entire mitochondrial genome. PMID:27435795

  3. Intracultural Differences in Local Botanical Knowledge and Knowledge Loss among the Mexican Isthmus Zapotecs

    PubMed Central

    Saynes-Vásquez, Alfredo; Vibrans, Heike; Vergara-Silva, Francisco; Caballero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the socio-demographic and locality factors that influence ethnobiological knowledge in three communities of Zapotec indigenous people of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Mexico. It uses local botanical nomenclature as a proxy for general ethnobiological knowledge. In each of these communities (one urban and two rural), 100 adult men were interviewed aided with a field herbarium. Fifty had a background in farming, and 50 worked in the secondary or tertiary sector as their main economic activity, totaling 300 interviews. Using a field herbarium with samples of 30 common and rare wild regional species, we documented visual recognition, knowledge of the local life form, generic and specific names and uses (five knowledge levels measuring knowledge depth). The relationship between sociodemographic variables and knowledge was analyzed with simple correlations. Differences between the three communities and the five knowledge levels were then evaluated with a discriminant analysis. A general linear analysis identified factors and covariables that influenced the observed differences. Differences between the groups with different economic activities were estimated with a t-test for independent samples. Most of the relationships found between sociodemographic variables and plant knowledge were expected: age and rurality were positively related with knowledge and years of formal schooling was negatively related. However, the somewhat less rural site had more traditional knowledge due to local circumstances. The general linear model explained 70–77% of the variation, a high value. It showed that economic activity was by far the most important factor influencing knowledge, by a factor of five. The interaction of locality and economic activity followed. The discriminant analysis assigned interviewees correctly to their localities in 94% of the cases, strengthening the evidence for intracultural variation. Both sociodemographic and historic intracultural

  4. Intracultural Differences in Local Botanical Knowledge and Knowledge Loss among the Mexican Isthmus Zapotecs.

    PubMed

    Saynes-Vásquez, Alfredo; Vibrans, Heike; Vergara-Silva, Francisco; Caballero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the socio-demographic and locality factors that influence ethnobiological knowledge in three communities of Zapotec indigenous people of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Mexico. It uses local botanical nomenclature as a proxy for general ethnobiological knowledge. In each of these communities (one urban and two rural), 100 adult men were interviewed aided with a field herbarium. Fifty had a background in farming, and 50 worked in the secondary or tertiary sector as their main economic activity, totaling 300 interviews. Using a field herbarium with samples of 30 common and rare wild regional species, we documented visual recognition, knowledge of the local life form, generic and specific names and uses (five knowledge levels measuring knowledge depth). The relationship between sociodemographic variables and knowledge was analyzed with simple correlations. Differences between the three communities and the five knowledge levels were then evaluated with a discriminant analysis. A general linear analysis identified factors and covariables that influenced the observed differences. Differences between the groups with different economic activities were estimated with a t-test for independent samples. Most of the relationships found between sociodemographic variables and plant knowledge were expected: age and rurality were positively related with knowledge and years of formal schooling was negatively related. However, the somewhat less rural site had more traditional knowledge due to local circumstances. The general linear model explained 70-77% of the variation, a high value. It showed that economic activity was by far the most important factor influencing knowledge, by a factor of five. The interaction of locality and economic activity followed. The discriminant analysis assigned interviewees correctly to their localities in 94% of the cases, strengthening the evidence for intracultural variation. Both sociodemographic and historic intracultural

  5. Comparative study between cold plasma and hot plasma with ion beam and loss-cone distribution function by particle aspect approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Soniya; Varma, P.; Tiwari, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    The electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) instabilities with isotropic ion beam and general loss-cone distribution of cold and hot core plasmas are discussed. The growth rate, parallel and perpendicular resonance energies of the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves in a low β (ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure), homogeneous plasma have been obtained using the dispersion relation for cold and hot plasmas. The wave is assumed to propagate parallel to the static magnetic field. The whole plasma is considered to consist of resonant and non-resonant particles permeated by isotropic ion beam. It is assumed that resonant particles and ion beam participate in energy exchange with the wave whereas non-resonant particles support the oscillatory motion of the wave. We determined the variation in energies and growth rate in cold and hot plasmas by the energy conservation method with a general loss-cone distribution function. The thermal anisotropy of the core plasma acts as a source of free energy for EMIC wave and enhances the growth rate. It is noted that the EMIC wave emissions occur by extracting energy of perpendicularly heated ions in the presence of up flowing ion beam and steep loss-cone distribution in the anisotropic magnetosphere. The effect of the steep loss-cone distribution is to enhance the growth rate of the EMIC wave. The heating of ions perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field is discussed along with EMIC wave emission in the auroral acceleration region. The results are interpreted for the space plasma parameters appropriate to the auroral acceleration region of the earth's magnetoplasma.

  6. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and PA beam loss monitor (BLM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mei-Hang; Tian, Jian-Min; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Xu, Tao-Guang; Lu, Shuang-Tong

    2009-02-01

    Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and Proton Accelerator (PA) beam loss monitor (BLM) system is reported. The low leakage current (<0.1 pA), good plateau (approx800 V) and linearity range up to 200 Roentgen/h are obtained in the first prototype. All of these give us good experience for further improving the ionization chamber construction.

  7. Recovery effects due to the interaction between nuclear and electronic energy losses in SiC irradiated with a dual-ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Thomé, Lionel Debelle, Aurélien; Garrido, Frédérico; Sattonnay, Gaël; Mylonas, Stamatis; Velisa, Gihan; Miro, Sandrine; Trocellier, Patrick; Serruys, Yves

    2015-03-14

    Single and dual-beam ion irradiations of silicon carbide (SiC) were performed to study possible Synergetic effects between Nuclear (S{sub n}) and Electronic (S{sub e}) Energy Losses. Results obtained combining Rutherford backscattering in channeling conditions, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques show that dual-beam irradiation of SiC induces a dramatic change in the final sample microstructure with a substantial decrease of radiation damage as compared to single-beam irradiation. Actually, a defective layer containing dislocations is formed upon dual-beam irradiation (S{sub n} and S{sub e}), whereas single low-energy irradiation (S{sub n} alone) or even sequential (S{sub n} + S{sub e}) irradiations lead to full amorphization. The healing process is ascribed to the electronic excitation arising from the electronic energy loss of swift ions. These results shed new light on the long-standing puzzling problem of the existence of a possible synergy between S{sub n} and S{sub e} in ion-irradiation experiments. This work is interesting for both fundamental understanding of the ion-solid interactions and technological applications in the nuclear industry where recovery S{sub n}/S{sub e} effects may preserve the integrity of nuclear devices.

  8. Effect of Atropine on Local Skin Wettedness and Sensible Heat Loss,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    Clearance of Technical Paper (USARIEM) - TO Commander, USARIEM FROM Dir, Mi I Erg Dlv DATE 17 Dec 84 CMT I 1. Reference USARIEM Memo 360 -1, 1 rrquest...34..... • .. ..... ... .. . ". .. +•. . -..- + . * . • -• " " .’ . . -. . . -. * • " . "-. .. -. . . *.,.-. .. . • . ••+ • - . . ". " , L + j 7 compensatory cutaneous heat loss. Although several...vasodilation (i.e., dilation greater than that accounted for by control (saline) experiments which showed a net heat gain) does not reveal a complete blockade

  9. Properties of Welded Joints from Alloy Zr - 2.5 % Nb after Electron-Beam Local Thermocycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. N.; Plyshevskii, M. I.; Melyukov, V. V.; Korepanov, A. G.; Rassoshkina, N. S.; Uvarov, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    Modes of electron-beam local thermocycling treatment of welded joints of ∅ 88 × 4 mm pipes from alloy É125 (Zr - 2.5 % Nb) are tested. The structure of the welds is studied. The characteristics of mechanical properties are determined under tension and static and dynamic bending. The corrosion resistance is determined in long-term tests in an autoclave with water at 285 °C and in fast tests in an autoclave at 360 °C for 336 h in accordance with the International Standard.

  10. The loss of local HGF, an endogenous gastrotrophic factor, leads to mucosal injuries in the stomach of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahira, Rie; Mizuno, Shinya; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Nakamura, Toshikazu . E-mail: nakamura@onbich.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-03-24

    The stomach is constantly exposed to mechanical and chemical stresses. Under persistent damages, epithelial cell proliferation is required to maintain mucosal integrity. Nevertheless, which ligand system(s) is physiologically involved in gastric defense remains unclear. Herein, we provide evidence that HGF is a key 'natural ligand' to reverse gastric injury. The injection of cisplatin in mice led to the loss of HGF in the gastric interstitium, associated with the decrease in proliferating epithelium and the progression of mucotitis. When c-Met tyrosine phosphorylation was abolished by anti-HGF IgG, mucosal cell proliferation became faint, leading to delayed recovery from mucotitis, and vice versa in cases of HGF supplementation. Our findings indicate that: (1) HGF/c-Met signal on mucosa is needed to restore gastric injuries; and (2) the loss of local HGF leads to manifestation of gastric lesions. This study provides a rationale that explains why HGF supplement is useful for reversing gastric diseases.

  11. Impact of inward turbulence spreading on energy loss of edge-localized modesa)

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Xi, P. W.; Xia, T. Y.; Snyder, P. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2015-05-18

    Nonlinear two-fluid and gyrofluid simulations show that an edge localized modes(ELM) crash has two phases: fast initial crash of ion temperature perturbation on the Alfvén time scale and slow turbulence spreading. The turbulencetransport phase is a slow encroachment of electron temperature perturbation due to the ELM event into pedestal region. Because of the inward turbulence spreading effect, the energy loss of an ELM decreases when density pedestal height increases. The Landau resonance yields the different cross phase-shift of ions and electrons. A 3 + 1 gyro-Landau-fluid model is implemented in BOUT++ framework. As a result, the gyrofluid simulations show that the kinetic effects have stabilizing effects on the ideal ballooning mode and the energy loss increases with the pedestal height.

  12. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    PubMed Central

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  13. Time-resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy with sub-nanosecond beam blanking for direct evaluation of the local density of states.

    PubMed

    Moerland, Robert J; Weppelman, I Gerward C; Garming, Mathijs W H; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P

    2016-10-17

    We show cathodoluminescence-based time-resolved electron beam spectroscopy in order to directly probe the spontaneous emission decay rate that is modified by the local density of states in a nanoscale environment. In contrast to dedicated laser-triggered electron-microscopy setups, we use commercial hardware in a standard SEM, which allows us to easily switch from pulsed to continuous operation of the SEM. Electron pulses of 80-90 ps duration are generated by conjugate blanking of a high-brightness electron beam, which allows probing emitters within a large range of decay rates. Moreover, we simultaneously attain a resolution better than λ/10, which ensures details at deep-subwavelength scales can be retrieved. As a proof-of-principle, we employ the pulsed electron beam to spatially measure excited-state lifetime modifications in a phosphor material across the edge of an aluminum half-plane, coated on top of the phosphor. The measured emission dynamics can be directly related to the structure of the sample by recording photon arrival histograms together with the secondary-electron signal. Our results show that time-resolved electron cathodoluminescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool of choice for nanophotonics, within reach of a large audience.

  14. High-dose rate brachytherapy for local recurrent adenoid cystic carcinoma of the tongue base following postoperative external beam radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Young; Kim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma is a rare neoplasm commonly originating from the minor salivary glands. The clinical findings typical of this tumor include slow growth, perineural invasion and high frequency of local recurrence. In this study, a patient presented with a tongue base lesion that was treated with surgical excision and additional postoperative external beam radiotherapy. However, local recurrence occurred 8 months after radiotherapy. If recurrence occurs after radiation therapy, total glossectomy should be considered. However, the patient refused re-operation and, considering the patient's age, brachytherapy was used to ensure organ preservation. Complete remission was achieved following brachytherapy, without serious side effects. There has been no progression of the lesion during a follow-up period of 2 years. PMID:27882233

  15. An ABA-regulated and Golgi-localized protein phosphatase controls water loss during leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kewei; Xia, Xiuying; Zhang, Yanyan; Gan, Su-Sheng

    2012-02-01

    It is known that a senescing leaf loses water faster than a non-senescing leaf and that ABA has an important role in promoting leaf senescence. However, questions such as why water loss is faster, how water loss is regulated, and how ABA functions in leaf senescence are not well understood. Here we report on the identification and functional analysis of a leaf senescence associated gene called SAG113. The RNA blot and GUS reporter analyses all show that SAG113 is expressed in senescing leaves and is induced by ABA in Arabidopsis. The SAG113 expression levels are significantly reduced in aba2 and abi4 mutants. A GFP fusion protein analysis revealed that SAG113 protein is localized in the Golgi apparatus. SAG113 encodes a protein phosphatase that belongs to the PP2C family and is able to functionally complement a yeast PP2C-deficient mutant TM126 (ptc1Δ). Leaf senescence is delayed in the SAG113 knockout mutant compared with that in the wild type, stomatal movement in the senescing leaves of SAG113 knockouts is more sensitive to ABA than that of the wild type, and the rate of water loss in senescing leaves of SAG113 knockouts is significantly reduced. In contrast, inducible over-expression of SAG113 results in a lower sensitivity of stomatal movement to ABA treatment, more rapid water loss, and precocious leaf senescence. No other aspects of growth and development, including seed germination, were observed. These findings suggest that SAG113, a negative regulator of ABA signal transduction, is specifically involved in the control of water loss during leaf senescence.

  16. Dynamic modulation of electronic properties of graphene by localized carbon doping using focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Russell, M; Henry, M; Kim, S S; Naik, R R; Voevodin, A A; Jang, S S; Tsukruk, V V; Fedorov, A G

    2015-09-28

    We report on the first demonstration of controllable carbon doping of graphene to engineer local electronic properties of a graphene conduction channel using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Electrical measurements indicate that an "n-p-n" junction on graphene conduction channel is formed by partial carbon deposition near the source and drain metal contacts by low energy (<50 eV) secondary electrons due to inelastic collisions of long range backscattered primary electrons generated from a low dose of high energy (25 keV) electron beam (1 × 10(18) e(-) per cm(2)). Detailed AFM imaging provides direct evidence of the new mechanism responsible for dynamic evolution of the locally varying graphene doping. The FEBID carbon atoms, which are physisorbed and weakly bound to graphene, diffuse towards the middle of graphene conduction channel due to their surface chemical potential gradient, resulting in negative shift of Dirac voltage. Increasing a primary electron dose to 1 × 10(19) e(-) per cm(2) results in a significant increase of carbon deposition, such that it covers the entire graphene conduction channel at high surface density, leading to n-doping of graphene channel. Collectively, these findings establish a unique capability of FEBID technique to dynamically modulate the doping state of graphene, thus enabling a new route to resist-free, "direct-write" functional patterning of graphene-based electronic devices with potential for on-demand re-configurability.

  17. Accurate and Fast Localization of Prostate for External Beam Radiation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    reconstruction for CBCT using edge- preserving prior”, Medical Physics, vol. 36, pp. 252-260, 2009 3. L. Zhu, J. Wang, and L. Xing, “Noise suppression...1. J. Wang, A. Chai, L. Xing, “Noise correlation in CBCT projection data and its application for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT ”, poster...presentation in 2009 SPIE Medical Imaging conference, Orlando, FL 2. J. Wang, T. Li, and L. Xing, “Low-dose CBCT Imaging for External Beam Radiotherapy

  18. Indoor Positioning in Wireless Local Area Networks with Online Path-Loss Parameter Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Location based services are gathering an even wider interest also in indoor environments and urban canyons, where satellite systems like GPS are no longer accurate. A much addressed solution for estimating the user position exploits the received signal strengths (RSS) in wireless local area networks (WLANs), which are very common nowadays. However, the performances of RSS based location systems are still unsatisfactory for many applications, due to the difficult modeling of the propagation channel, whose features are affected by severe changes. In this paper we propose a localization algorithm which takes into account the nonstationarity of the working conditions by estimating and tracking the key parameters of RSS propagation. It is based on a Sequential Monte Carlo realization of the optimal Bayesian estimation scheme, whose functioning is improved by exploiting the Rao-Blackwellization rationale. Two key statistical models for RSS characterization are deeply analyzed, by presenting effective implementations of the proposed scheme and by assessing the positioning accuracy by extensive computer experiments. Many different working conditions are analyzed by simulated data and corroborated through the validation in a real world scenario. PMID:25165755

  19. RSS-Based Method for Sensor Localization with Unknown Transmit Power and Uncertainty in Path Loss Exponent.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiyan; Liu, Peng; Lin, Wei; Gui, Guan

    2016-09-08

    The localization of a sensor in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has now gained considerable attention. Since the transmit power and path loss exponent (PLE) are two critical parameters in the received signal strength (RSS) localization technique, many RSS-based location methods, considering the case that both the transmit power and PLE are unknown, have been proposed in the literature. However, these methods require a search process, and cannot give a closed-form solution to sensor localization. In this paper, a novel RSS localization method with a closed-form solution based on a two-step weighted least squares estimator is proposed for the case with the unknown transmit power and uncertainty in PLE. Furthermore, the complete performance analysis of the proposed method is given in the paper. Both the theoretical variance and Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) are derived. The relationships between the deterministic CRLB and the proposed stochastic CRLB are presented. The paper also proves that the proposed method can reach the stochastic CRLB.

  20. RSS-Based Method for Sensor Localization with Unknown Transmit Power and Uncertainty in Path Loss Exponent

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiyan; Liu, Peng; Lin, Wei; Gui, Guan

    2016-01-01

    The localization of a sensor in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has now gained considerable attention. Since the transmit power and path loss exponent (PLE) are two critical parameters in the received signal strength (RSS) localization technique, many RSS-based location methods, considering the case that both the transmit power and PLE are unknown, have been proposed in the literature. However, these methods require a search process, and cannot give a closed-form solution to sensor localization. In this paper, a novel RSS localization method with a closed-form solution based on a two-step weighted least squares estimator is proposed for the case with the unknown transmit power and uncertainty in PLE. Furthermore, the complete performance analysis of the proposed method is given in the paper. Both the theoretical variance and Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) are derived. The relationships between the deterministic CRLB and the proposed stochastic CRLB are presented. The paper also proves that the proposed method can reach the stochastic CRLB. PMID:27618055

  1. Single-Limb Irradiation Induces Local and Systemic Bone Loss in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wright, Laura E; Buijs, Jeroen T; Kim, Hun-Soo; Coats, Laura E; Scheidler, Anne M; John, Sutha K; She, Yun; Murthy, Sreemala; Ma, Ning; Chin-Sinex, Helen J; Bellido, Teresita M; Bateman, Ted A; Mendonca, Marc S; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A

    2015-07-01

    Increased fracture risk is commonly reported in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy, particularly at sites within the field of treatment. The direct and systemic effects of ionizing radiation on bone at a therapeutic dose are not well-characterized in clinically relevant animal models. Using 20-week-old male C57Bl/6 mice, effects of irradiation (right hindlimb; 2 Gy) on bone volume and microarchitecture were evaluated prospectively by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry and compared to contralateral-shielded bone (left hindlimb) and non-irradiated control bone. One week postirradiation, trabecular bone volume declined in irradiated tibias (-22%; p < 0.0001) and femurs (-14%; p = 0.0586) and microarchitectural parameters were compromised. Trabecular bone volume declined in contralateral tibias (-17%; p = 0.003), and no loss was detected at the femur. Osteoclast number, apoptotic osteocyte number, and marrow adiposity were increased in irradiated bone relative to contralateral and non-irradiated bone, whereas osteoblast number was unchanged. Despite no change in osteoblast number 1 week postirradiation, dynamic bone formation indices revealed a reduction in mineralized bone surface and a concomitant increase in unmineralized osteoid surface area in irradiated bone relative to contralateral and non-irradiated control bone. Further, dose-dependent and time-dependent calvarial culture and in vitro assays confirmed that calvarial osteoblasts and osteoblast-like MC3T3 cells were relatively radioresistant, whereas calvarial osteocyte and osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cell apoptosis was induced as early as 48 hours postirradiation (4 Gy). In osteoclastogenesis assays, radiation exposure (8 Gy) stimulated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cell differentiation, and coculture of irradiated RAW264.7 cells with MLO-Y4 or murine bone marrow cells enhanced this effect. These studies highlight the multifaceted nature of radiation-induced bone loss by demonstrating direct

  2. A Nanoscale-Localized Ion Damage Josephson Junction Using Focused Ion Beam and Ion Implanter.

    PubMed

    Wu, C H; Ku, W S; Jhan, F J; Chen, J H; Jeng, J T

    2015-05-01

    High-T(c) Josephson junctions were fabricated by nanolithography using focused ion beam (FIB) milling and ion implantation. The junctions were formed in a YBa2Cu3O7-x, thin film in regions defined using a gold-film mask with 50-nm-wide (top) slits, engraved by FIB. The focused ion beam system parameters for dwell time and passes were set to remove gold up to a precise depth. 150 keV oxygen ions were implanted at a nominal dose of up to 5 x 10(13) ions/cm2 into YBa2Cu3O7-x microbridges through the nanoscale slits. The current-voltage curves of the ion implantation junctions exhibit resistive-shunted-junction-like behavior at 77 K. The junction had an approximately linear temperature dependence of critical current. Shapiro steps were observed under microwave irradiation. A 50-nm-wide slit and 0-20-nm-thick buffer layers were chosen in order to make Josephson junctions due to the V-shape of the FIB-milled trench.

  3. Aeroelastic modal characteristics of mistuned blade assemblies: Mode localization and loss of eigenstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierre, Christophe; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of small mistuning on the aeroelastic modes of bladed disk assemblies with aerodynamic coupling between blades is presented. The cornerstone of the approach is the use and development of perturbation methods that exhibit the crucial role of the interblade coupling and yield general findings regarding mistuning effects. It is shown that blade assemblies with weak aerodynamic interblade coupling are highly sensitive to small blade mistuning, and that their dynamics is quantitatively altered in the following ways: the regular pattern that characterizes the root locus of the tuned aeroelastic eigenvalues in the complex plane is totally lost; the aeroelastic mode shapes becomes severely localized to only a few blades of the assembly and lose their constant interblade phase angle feature; and curve veering phenomena take place when the eigenvalues are plotted versus a mistuning parameter.

  4. Global and Local Conformation of Human IgG Antibody Variants Rationalizes Loss of Thermodynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Edgeworth, Matthew J; Phillips, Jonathan J; Lowe, David C; Kippen, Alistair D; Higazi, Daniel R; Scrivens, James H

    2015-12-07

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a major class of medicines, with high specificity and affinity towards targets spanning many disease areas. The antibody Fc (fragment crystallizable) region is a vital component of existing antibody therapeutics, as well as many next generation biologic medicines. Thermodynamic stability is a critical property for the development of stable and effective therapeutic proteins. Herein, a combination of ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) approaches have been used to inform on the global and local conformation and dynamics of engineered IgG Fc variants with reduced thermodynamic stability. The changes in conformation and dynamics have been correlated with their thermodynamic stability to better understand the destabilising effect of functional IgG Fc mutations and to inform engineering of future therapeutic proteins.

  5. Investigation of local losses as a function of material removal in a large-grain superconducting niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, P. Kneisel

    2008-01-02

    The performance of a superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavity made of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) > 200 large-grain niobium has been investigated as a function of material removal, between 70 and 240 mu-m, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP). Temperature maps of the cavity surface at 1.7 and 2 K were taken for each step of chemical etching and revealed localized losses (hot-spots), which contribute to the degradation of the cavity quality factor as a function of the RF surface field. It was found that the number of hot-spots decreased for larger material removal. Interestingly, the losses at the hot-spots at different locations evolved differently for successive material removal. The cavity achieved peak surface magnetic fields of about of 130 mT and was limited mostly by thermal quench. By measuring the temperature dependence of the surface resistance (Rs) at low field between 4.2 K and 1.7 K, the variation of material parameters such as the energy gap at 0 K, the residual resistance and the mean free path as a function of material removal could also be investigated. This contribution shows the results of the RF tests along with the temperature maps and the analysis of the losses caused by the "hot-spots."

  6. Investigation of local losses as a function of material removal in a large-grain superconducting niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2006-08-02

    The performance of a superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavity made of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) > 200 large-grain niobium has been investigated as a function of material removal, between 70 and 240 ?m, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP). Temperature maps of the cavity surface at 1.7 and 2.0 K were taken for each step of chemical etching and revealed localized losses (''hot-spots''), which contribute to the degradation of the cavity quality factor as a function of the RF surface field. It was found that the number of ''hot-spots'' decreased for larger material removal. Interestingly, the losses at the ''hot-spots'' at different locations evolved differently for successive material removal. The cavity achieved peak surface magnetic fields of about of 130 mT and was limited mostly by thermal quench. By measuring the temperature dependence of the surface resistance (Rs) at low field between 4.2 K and 1.7 K, the variation of material parameters such as the energy gap at 0 K, the residual resistance and the mean free path as a function of material removal could also be investigated. This contribution presents the results of the RF tests along with the temperature maps and the analysis of the losses caused by the ''hot-spots''.

  7. Impact of the pedestal plasma density on dynamics of edge localized mode crashes and energy loss scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.

    2014-12-29

    The latest BOUT++ studies show an emerging understanding of dynamics of edge localized mode(ELM) crashes and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELMenergy losses with the world multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT++ simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELMenergy losses vs collisionality via a density scan. Moreover, the linear results demonstrate that as the pedestal collisionality decreases, the growth rate of the peeling-ballooning modes decreases for high n but increases for low n (1 < n < 5), therefore the width of the growth rate spectrum γ(n) becomes narrower and the peak growth shifts to lower n. For nonlinear BOUT++ simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELMenergy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. Finally, the critical trend emerges as a transition (1) linearly from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collisionality with decreasing density and (2) nonlinearly from turbulence spreading dynamics at high collisionality into avalanche-like dynamics at low collisionality.

  8. Impact of the pedestal plasma density on dynamics of edge localized mode crashes and energy loss scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.

    2014-12-15

    The latest BOUT++ studies show an emerging understanding of dynamics of edge localized mode (ELM) crashes and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELM energy losses with the world multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT++ simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELM energy losses vs collisionality via a density scan. Linear results demonstrate that as the pedestal collisionality decreases, the growth rate of the peeling-ballooning modes decreases for high n but increases for low n (1 < n < 5), therefore the width of the growth rate spectrum γ(n) becomes narrower and the peak growth shifts to lower n. Nonlinear BOUT++ simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELM energy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. The critical trend emerges as a transition (1) linearly from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collisionality with decreasing density and (2) nonlinearly from turbulence spreading dynamics at high collisionality into avalanche-like dynamics at low collisionality.

  9. Impact of the pedestal plasma density on dynamics of edge localized mode crashes and energy loss scaling

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.

    2014-12-29

    The latest BOUT++ studies show an emerging understanding of dynamics of edge localized mode(ELM) crashes and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELMenergy losses with the world multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT++ simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELMenergy losses vs collisionality via a density scan. Moreover, the linear results demonstrate that as the pedestal collisionality decreases, the growth rate of the peeling-ballooning modes decreases for high n but increases for low n (1 < n < 5), therefore the width of the growth rate spectrum γ(n) becomes narrower and the peak growth shifts to lowermore » n. For nonlinear BOUT++ simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELMenergy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. Finally, the critical trend emerges as a transition (1) linearly from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collisionality with decreasing density and (2) nonlinearly from turbulence spreading dynamics at high collisionality into avalanche-like dynamics at low collisionality.« less

  10. Evaluation of three types of reference image data for external beam radiotherapy target localization using digital tomosynthesis (DTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Devon J.; Ren Lei; Yan Hui; Wu, Q.; Yoo Sua; Oldham, M.; Yin Fangfang

    2007-08-15

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a fast, low-dose three-dimensional (3D) imaging approach which yields slice images with excellent in-plane resolution, though low plane-to-plane resolution. A stack of DTS slices can be reconstructed from a single limited-angle scan, with typical scan angles ranging from 10 deg. to 40 deg. and acquisition times of less than 10 s. The resulting DTS slices show soft tissue contrast approaching that of full cone-beam CT. External beam radiotherapy target localization using DTS requires the registration of on-board DTS images with corresponding reference image data. This study evaluates three types of reference volume: original reference CT, exact reference DTS (RDTS), and a more computationally efficient approximate reference DTS (RDTS{sub approx}), as well as three different DTS scan angles (22 deg., 44 deg., and 65 deg.) for the DTS target localization task. Three-dimensional mutual information (MI) shared between reference and on-board DTS volumes was computed in a region surrounding the spine of a chest phantom, as translations spanning {+-}5 mm and rotations spanning {+-}5 deg. were simulated along each dimension in the reference volumes. The locations of the MI maxima were used as surrogates for registration accuracy, and the width of the MI peaks were used to characterize the registration robustness. The results show that conventional treatment planning CT volumes are inadequate reference volumes for direct registration with on-board DTS data. The efficient RDTS{sub approx} method also appears insufficient for MI-based registration without further refinement of the technique, though it may be suitable for manual registration performed by a human observer. The exact RDTS volumes, on the other hand, delivered a 3D DTS localization accuracy of 0.5 mm and 0.5 deg. along each axis, using only a single 44 deg. coronal on-board DTS scan of the chest phantom.

  11. Evaluation of three types of reference image data for external beam radiotherapy target localization using digital tomosynthesis (DTS).

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Devon J; Ren, Lei; Yan, Hui; Wu, Q; Yoo, Sua; Oldham, M; Yin, Fang Fang

    2007-08-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a fast, low-dose three-dimensional (3D) imaging approach which yields slice images with excellent in-plane resolution, though low plane-to-plane resolution. A stack of DTS slices can be reconstructed from a single limited-angle scan, with typical scan angles ranging from 10 degrees to 40 degrees and acquisition times of less than 10 s. The resulting DTS slices show soft tissue contrast approaching that of full cone-beam CT. External beam radiotherapy target localization using DTS requires the registration of on-board DTS images with corresponding reference image data. This study evaluates three types of reference volume: original reference CT, exact reference DTS (RDTS), and a more computationally efficient approximate reference DTS (RDTSapprox), as well as three different DTS scan angles (22 degrees, 44 degrees, and 65 degrees) for the DTS target localization task. Three-dimensional mutual information (MI) shared between reference and onboard DTS volumes was computed in a region surrounding the spine of a chest phantom, as translations spanning +/-5 mm and rotations spanning +/-5 degrees were simulated along each dimension in the reference volumes. The locations of the MI maxima were used as surrogates for registration accuracy, and the width of the MI peaks were used to characterize the registration robustness. The results show that conventional treatment planning CT volumes are inadequate reference volumes for direct registration with on-board DTS data. The efficient RDTSapprox method also appears insufficient for MI-based registration without further refinement of the technique, though it may be suitable for manual registration performed by a human observer. The exact RDTS volumes, on the other hand, delivered a 3D DTS localization accuracy of 0.5 mm and 0.50 along each axis, using only a single 44 degrees coronal on-board DTS scan of the chest phantom.

  12. Loss of PTEN expression is associated with increased risk of recurrence after prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Peskoe, Sarah B; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Schultz, Luciana; Albadine, Roula; Hicks, Jessica; De Marzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Netto, George J

    2012-11-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) is one of the most frequently lost tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and it has been described in more than two-thirds of patients with advanced/aggressive prostate cancer. Previous studies suggest that, in prostate cancer, genomic PTEN loss is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. Thus, we evaluated whether immunohistochemical PTEN expression in prostate cancer glands was associated with higher risk of recurrence, using a nested case-control study that included 451 men who recurred and 451 men who did not recur with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. Recurrence was defined as biochemical recurrence (serum prostate-specific antigen >0.2 ng/ml) or clinical recurrence (local recurrence, systemic metastases, or prostate cancer-related death). Cases and controls were matched on pathological T stage, Gleason score, race/ethnicity, and age at surgery. Odds ratios of recurrence and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression to account for the matching factors and to adjust for year of surgery, preoperative prostate-specific antigen concentrations, and status of surgical margins. Men who recurred had a higher proportion of PTEN negative expression (16 vs 11%, P=0.05) and PTEN loss (40 vs 31%, P=0.02) than controls. Men with markedly decreased PTEN staining had a higher risk of recurrence (odds ratio=1.67; 95% confidence intervals 1.09, 2.57; P=0.02) when compared with all other men. In summary, in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by prostatectomy, decreased PTEN expression was associated with an increased risk of recurrence, independent of known clinicopathological factors.

  13. Assessing electron beam sensitivity for SrTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 using electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nord, Magnus; Vullum, Per Erik; Hallsteinsen, Ingrid; Tybell, Thomas; Holmestad, Randi

    2016-10-01

    Thresholds for beam damage have been assessed for La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and SrTiO3 as a function of electron probe current and exposure time at 80 and 200kV acceleration voltage. The materials were exposed to an intense electron probe by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with simultaneous acquisition of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data. Electron beam damage was identified by changes of the core loss fine structure after quantification by a refined and improved model based approach. At 200kV acceleration voltage, damage in SrTiO3 was identified by changes both in the EEL fine structure and by contrast changes in the STEM images. However, the changes in the STEM image contrast as introduced by minor damage can be difficult to detect under several common experimental conditions. No damage was observed in SrTiO3 at 80kV acceleration voltage, independent of probe current and exposure time. In La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, beam damage was observed at both 80 and 200kV acceleration voltages. This damage was observed by large changes in the EEL fine structure, but not by any detectable changes in the STEM images. The typical method to validate if damage has been introduced during acquisitions is to compare STEM images prior to and after spectroscopy. Quantifications in this work show that this method possibly can result in misinterpretation of beam damage as changes of material properties.

  14. Numerical investigation on the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams in end-pumped solid-state lasers by introducing loss control.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ajian; Lei, Jian; Chen, Peifeng; Wang, Ying; Li, Shumo

    2014-11-20

    This paper reports a robust and systematic approach to generate high-order scalar Laguerre-Gaussian (LGp,l) beams in end-pumped solid-state lasers by introducing loss control. Based on the spatial distributions of Laguerre-Gaussian modes and the theory of transverse mode selection, the "loss control" is implemented by an amplitude mask in the resonator. This proposed mechanism can be divided into three categories: radial loss, azimuthal loss, and the combination of radial and azimuthal loss, which correspond to excite radial high-order modes (LGp,0), azimuthal high-order modes (LG0,l), and regular high-order modes (LGp,l), respectively. By controlling the locations and thicknesses of opaque rings and lines on the mask, all kinds of LGp,l modes can be obtained. With the application of mode purity, all the generated modes possess high mode purities greater than 93% in simulation.

  15. Blanket Module Boil-Off Times during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident - Case 0: with Beam Shutdown only

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports that document LBLOCA analyses for the Accelerator Production of Tritium primary blanket Heat Removal system. This report documents the analysis results of a LBLOCA where the accelerator beam is shut off without primary pump trips and neither the RHR nor the cavity flood systems operation.

  16. Study of the evolution of the atomic composition of thin NbN films under irradiation with mixed ion beams by methods of electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dement'eva, M. M.; Prikhod'ko, K. E.; Gurovich, B. A.; Kutuzov, L. V.; Komarov, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The variation in the atomic composition of ultrathin NbN films under irradiation by mixed ion beams to a doze of 4 dpa (for nitrogen) is experimentally studied by methods of electron energy loss spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope in the transmission scan mode on cross-cut samples. The behavior of the substitution of nitrogen atoms by oxygen atoms has been established; it is characterized by changing the composition of the conducting part of the film from NbN to NbNO.

  17. Absolute cascade-free cross-sections for the 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged-beams methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Man, K.-F.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.

    1991-01-01

    Absolute cascade-free excitation cross-sections in an ion have been measured for the resonance 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged electron-ion beams methods. Measurements were carried out at electron energies of below threshold to 6 times threshold. Comparisons are made with 2-, 5-, and 15-state close-coupling and distorted-wave theories. There is good agreement between experiment and the 15-state close-coupling cross-sections over the energy range of the calculations.

  18. HIFU therapy for local recurrence of prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy - 5,5 years experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovov, V. A.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.; Matysh, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation (HIFU) for local recurrence of prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and radical prostatectomy (RPE). Materials and Methods: During 2007-2013 years 47 patients with local recurrence of prostate cancer after EBRT and RPE undertook HIFU therapy on the system "Ablaterm» (EDAP, France). Relapse arose after an average of 2 years after EBRT and RPE. Median follow-up after HIFU therapy was 38 (12-60) months. The mean age was 68.5 ± 5.8 years. The median PSA level before HIFU - 15.4 (7-48) ng / mL. Results: In 34 patients (72.3%) at six months after treatment the median PSA was 0.4 (0-3.2) ng / mL, in 48 months - 0.9 (0.4-7.5) ng / mL. In 13 patients (27.7%) at 6 months was observed progression of the disease. In general, after a 5-year follow-up 72.3% of the patients had no data for the progression and recurrence. Conclusion: HIFU therapy in patients with local recurrence of prostate cancer after EBRT and RPE is minimally invasive and effective technology.

  19. Local structure of human hair spatially resolved by sub-micron X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanić, Vesna; Bettini, Jefferson; Montoro, Fabiano Emmanuel; Stein, Aaron; Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    Human hair has three main regions, the medulla, the cortex, and the cuticle. An existing model for the cortex suggests that the α-keratin- based intermediate filaments (IFs) align with the hair’s axis, but are orientationally disordered in-plane. We found that there is a new region in the cortex near the cuticle’s boundary in which the IFs are aligned with the hair’s axis, but additionally, they are orientationally ordered in-plane due to the presence of the cuticle/hair boundary. Further into the cortex, the IF arrangement becomes disordered, eventually losing all in-plane orientation. We also find that in the cuticle, a key diffraction feature is absent, indicating the presence of the β-keratin rather than that of the α-keratin phase. This is direct structural evidence that the cuticle contains β-keratin sheets. This work highlights the importance of using a sub-micron x-ray beam to unravel the structures of poorly ordered, multi-phase systems.

  20. Probing the symmetry of the potential of localized surface plasmon resonances with phase-shaped electron beams.

    PubMed

    Guzzinati, Giulio; Béché, Armand; Lourenço-Martins, Hugo; Martin, Jérôme; Kociak, Mathieu; Verbeeck, Jo

    2017-04-12

    Plasmonics, the science and technology of the interaction of light with metallic objects, is fundamentally changing the way we can detect, generate and manipulate light. Although the field is progressing swiftly, thanks to the availability of nanoscale manufacturing and analysis methods, fundamental properties such as the plasmonic excitations' symmetries cannot be accessed directly, leading to a partial, sometimes incorrect, understanding of their properties. Here we overcome this limitation by deliberately shaping the wave function of an electron beam to match a plasmonic excitations' symmetry in a modified transmission electron microscope. We show experimentally and theoretically that this offers selective detection of specific plasmon modes within metallic nanoparticles, while excluding modes with other symmetries. This method resembles the widespread use of polarized light for the selective excitation of plasmon modes with the advantage of locally probing the response of individual plasmonic objects and a far wider range of symmetry selection criteria.

  1. Focused acoustic beam imaging of grain structure and local Young's modulus with Rayleigh and surface skimming longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R. W.; Sathish, S.; Blodgett, M. P.

    2013-01-25

    The interaction of a focused acoustic beam with materials generates Rayleigh surface waves (RSW) and surface skimming longitudinal waves (SSLW). Acoustic microscopic investigations have used the RSW amplitude and the velocity measurements, extensively for grain structure analysis. Although, the presence of SSLW has been recognized, it is rarely used in acoustic imaging. This paper presents an approach to perform microstructure imaging and local elastic modulus measurements by combining both RSW and SSLW. The acoustic imaging of grain structure was performed by measuring the amplitude of RSW and SSLW signal. The microstructure images obtained on the same region of the samples with RSW and SSLW are compared and the difference in the contrast observed is discussed based on the propagation characteristics of the individual surface waves. The velocity measurements are determined by two point defocus method. The surface wave velocities of RSW and SSLW of the same regions of the sample are combined and presented as average Young's modulus image.

  2. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  3. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors act centrally to cause bone loss in mice by counteracting a local antiresorptive effect

    PubMed Central

    Ortuño, María José; Robinson, Samuel T.; Subramanyam, Prakash; Paone, Riccardo; Huang, Yung-yu; Guo, X. Edward; Colecraft, Henry M.; Mann, J. John; Ducy, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been associated with an increased risk of bone fracture, raising concerns about their increasingly broader usage. This deleterious effect is poorly understood and thus strategies to avoid this side effect remain elusive. We show here that fluoxetine (Flx), one of the most prescribed SSRI, acts on bone remodeling through two distinct mechanisms. Peripherally, Flx has antiresorptive properties, directly impairing osteoclast differentiation and function through a serotonin reuptake-independent Ca2+-calmodulin-NFATc1-dependent mechanism. With time, however, Flx also triggers a brain serotonin-dependent rise in sympathetic output that increases bone resorption sufficiently to counteract its local antiresorptive effect; thus leading to a net effect of impaired bone formation and bone loss. Accordingly, neutralizing this second mode of action through co-treatment with the β-blocker propranolol, while leaving the peripheral effect intact, prevents Flx-induced bone loss in mice. Hence, this study identifies a dual mode of action of SSRIs on bone remodeling and suggests a therapeutic strategy to block the deleterious effect on bone homeostasis from their chronic use. PMID:27595322

  4. Serotonin-reuptake inhibitors act centrally to cause bone loss in mice by counteracting a local anti-resorptive effect.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, María José; Robinson, Samuel T; Subramanyam, Prakash; Paone, Riccardo; Huang, Yung-Yu; Guo, X Edward; Colecraft, Henry M; Mann, J John; Ducy, Patricia

    2016-10-01

    The use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been associated with an increased risk of bone fracture, raising concerns about their increasingly broader usage. This deleterious effect is poorly understood, and thus strategies to avoid this side effect remain elusive. We show here that fluoxetine (Flx), one of the most-prescribed SSRIs, acts on bone remodeling through two distinct mechanisms. Peripherally, Flx has anti-resorptive properties, directly impairing osteoclast differentiation and function through a serotonin-reuptake-independent mechanism that is dependent on intracellular Ca(2+) levels and the transcription factor Nfatc1. With time, however, Flx also triggers a brain-serotonin-dependent rise in sympathetic output that increases bone resorption sufficiently to counteract its local anti-resorptive effect, thus leading to a net effect of impaired bone formation and bone loss. Accordingly, neutralizing this second mode of action through co-treatment with the β-blocker propranolol, while leaving the peripheral effect intact, prevents Flx-induced bone loss in mice. Hence, this study identifies a dual mode of action of SSRIs on bone remodeling and suggests a therapeutic strategy to block the deleterious effect on bone homeostasis from their chronic use.

  5. Iodine-125 implant and external beam irradiation in patients with localized pancreatic carcinoma. [Efficacy and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, W.U.; Nardi, G.L.; Cohen, A.M.; Ling, C.C.

    1980-02-15

    Twelve patients with biopsy-proven clinically localized ductal pancreatic cancers (less than 7 cm in greatest diameter) judged unsuitable for resection were treated by bypass surgery, an Iodine-125 implant (20 to 39 mCi), and postoperative irradiation (4000 to 4500 rads). The potential problems of significant bleeding, pancreatic fistula, or pancreatitis were not experienced. A local recurrence developed in one patient and two recurred in regional lymph nodes. The projected median survival of the group is 11 months with four of the 12 patients still surviving. For purposes of comparison all patients with pancreatic ductal carcinoma treated by radical resection during a similar time were evaluated. All ten have died with a median survival of six months. Twelve of 22 (55%) of the combined implanted and resected groups have developed distant metastasis. Further pursuit of intraoperative techniques of irradiation in combination with adjuvant multidrug chemotherapy seems indicated in an attempt to prolong patient survival which is now limited by hematogenous metastases.

  6. Identification of local phase of nanoscale BaTiO₃ powders by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sun-Min; Wang, Xiaohui; Cho, Nam-Hee

    2013-08-01

    The electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) technique was applied to investigate the local variation in the phase of barium titanate (BaTiO₃) ceramics. It was found that the fine structure of the titanium L₂,₃ edge and their satellite peaks were sensitively varied with the tetragonal-cubic phase transition. The peak splitting of Ti-L₃ edge of tetragonal-phased BaTiO₃ ceramics was widened because of the increased crystal field effect compared with that of cubic-phased BaTiO₃. In case of nanoscale BaTiO₃ powders, the L₃ edge splitting of the core region was found to be smaller than that of the shell region. The energy gap between peaks t₂g and eg varied from 2.36 to 1.94 eV with changing the probe position from 1 to 20 nm from the surface. These results suggest that the EELS technique can be used to identify the local phase of sintered BaTiO₃ ceramics.

  7. Sound transmission loss through metamaterial plate with lateral local resonators in the presence of external mean flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Sheng, Meiping; Qin, Qinghua

    2017-02-01

    In the context of sound incident upon a metamaterial plate, explicit formulas for sound transmission loss (STL) are derived in the presence of external mean flow. Metamaterial plate, consisting of homogeneous plate and lateral local resonators (LLRs), is homogenized by using effective medium method to obtain the effective mass density and facilitate the calculation of STL. Results show that (a) vigorously oscillating LLRs lead to higher STL compared with bare plate, (b) increasing Mach number of the external mean flow helps obtain higher STL below the coincidence frequency but decreases STL above the coincidence frequency due to the added mass effect of light fluid loading and aerodynamic damping effect, (c) the coincidence frequency shifts to higher frequency range for the refracted effect of the external mean flow. However, effects of the flow on STL within negative mass density range can be neglected because of the lateral local resonance occurring. Moreover, hysteretic damping from metamaterial can only smooth the transmission curves by lowering higher peaks and filling dips. Effects of incident angles on STL are also examined. It is demonstrated that increasing elevation angle can improve the sound insulation, while the azimuth angle does not.

  8. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® external-beam radiation therapy treatment planning for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, May; Mahmoud, Omar; Merrick, Gregory; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Arterbery, V Elayne; Ciezki, Jay P; Frank, Steven J; Mohler, James Lloyd; Moran, Brian J; Rosenthal, Seth A; Rossi, Carl J; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-04-01

    Image-based radiation treatment planning and localization have contributed to better targeting of the prostate and sparing of normal tissues. Guidelines are needed to address radiation dose delivery, including patient setup and immobilization, target volume definition, treatment planning, treatment delivery methods, and target localization. Guidelines for external-beam radiation treatment planning have been updated and are presented here. The use of appropriate doses, simulation techniques, and verification of field setup are essential for the accurate delivery of radiation therapy. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  9. In vivo 3D analysis of systemic effects after local heavy-ion beam irradiation in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kento; Hashimoto, Chika; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Itoh, Kazusa; Yasuda, Takako; Ohta, Kousaku; Oonishi, Hisako; Igarashi, Kento; Suzuki, Michiyo; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Oga, Atsunori; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-06-27

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment. In addition to inducing effects in the irradiated area, irradiation may induce effects on tissues close to and distant from the irradiated area. Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a small teleost fish and a model organism for evaluating the environmental effects of radiation. In this study, we applied low-energy carbon-ion (26.7 MeV/u) irradiation to adult medaka to a depth of approximately 2.2 mm from the body surface using an irradiation system at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. We histologically evaluated the systemic alterations induced by irradiation using serial sections of the whole body, and conducted a heart rate analysis. Tissues from the irradiated side showed signs of serious injury that corresponded with the radiation dose. A 3D reconstruction analysis of the kidney sections showed reductions in the kidney volume and blood cell mass along the irradiated area, reflecting the precise localization of the injuries caused by carbon-beam irradiation. Capillary aneurysms were observed in the gill in both ventrally and dorsally irradiated fish, suggesting systemic irradiation effects. The present study provides an in vivo model for further investigation of the effects of irradiation beyond the locally irradiated area.

  10. In vivo 3D analysis of systemic effects after local heavy-ion beam irradiation in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kento; Hashimoto, Chika; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Itoh, Kazusa; Yasuda, Takako; Ohta, Kousaku; Oonishi, Hisako; Igarashi, Kento; Suzuki, Michiyo; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Oga, Atsunori; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment. In addition to inducing effects in the irradiated area, irradiation may induce effects on tissues close to and distant from the irradiated area. Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a small teleost fish and a model organism for evaluating the environmental effects of radiation. In this study, we applied low-energy carbon-ion (26.7 MeV/u) irradiation to adult medaka to a depth of approximately 2.2 mm from the body surface using an irradiation system at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. We histologically evaluated the systemic alterations induced by irradiation using serial sections of the whole body, and conducted a heart rate analysis. Tissues from the irradiated side showed signs of serious injury that corresponded with the radiation dose. A 3D reconstruction analysis of the kidney sections showed reductions in the kidney volume and blood cell mass along the irradiated area, reflecting the precise localization of the injuries caused by carbon-beam irradiation. Capillary aneurysms were observed in the gill in both ventrally and dorsally irradiated fish, suggesting systemic irradiation effects. The present study provides an in vivo model for further investigation of the effects of irradiation beyond the locally irradiated area. PMID:27345436

  11. A phased array antenna with a broadly steerable beam based on a low-loss metasurface lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yahong; Jin, Xueyu; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Yang; Song, Kun; Huang, Lvhongzi; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2016-10-01

    A new concept for a gradient phase discontinuity metasurface lens integrated with a phased array antenna possessing a broadly steerable beam is presented in this paper. The metasurface lens is composed of a metallic H-shaped pattern and the metallic square split ring can achieve complete 360° transmission phase coverage at 30° phase intervals. The metasurface can refract an incident plane wave to an angle at will by varying the lattice constant. We demonstrate that the beam steering range of the phased array antenna is between 12° and 85° when the metasurface lens with a refracting electromagnetic wave is employed at 45°. Interestingly, the proposed array antenna has a much higher gain than a conventional phased array antenna at low elevation angles. It is expected that the proposed array antenna will have potential applications in wireless and satellite communications. Furthermore, the proposed array antenna is fabricated easily and is also low in cost due to its microstrip technology.

  12. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics following hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy boost as post-external beam radiotherapy versus conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics between conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy (CF-EBRT) and SBRT boost after whole pelvis EBRT (WP-EBRT) in localized prostate cancer. Methods A total of 77 patients with localized prostate cancer [T-stage, T1–T3; Gleason score (GS) 5–9; PSA < 20 ng/mL] were enrolled. A total of 35 patients were treated with SBRT boost (21 Gy in 3 fractions) after WP-EBRT and 42 patients were treated with CF-EBRT (45 Gy WP-EBRT and boost of 25.2–30.6 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). PSA nadir and rate of change in PSA (slope) were calculated and compared. Results With a median follow-up of 52.4 months (range, 14–74 months), the median PSA nadir and slope for SBRT boost were 0.29 ng/mL and −0.506, −0.235, −0.129, and −0.092 ng/mL/mo, respectively, for durations of 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years postradiotherapy. Similarly, for CF-EBRT, the median PSA nadir and slopes were 0.39 ng/mL and −0.720 ng/mL/mo, −0.204 ng/mL/mo, −0.121 ng/mL/mo, and −0.067 ng/mL/mo, respectively. The slope of CF-EBRT was significantly different with a greater median rate of change for 1 year postradiotherapy than that of SBRT boost (P = 0.018). Contrastively, the slopes of SBRT boost for durations of 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years tended to be continuously greater than that of CF-EBRT. The significantly lower PSA nadir was observed in SBRT boost (median nadir 0.29 ng/mL) compared with CF-EBRT (median nadir 0.35 ng/mL, P = 0.025). Five-year biochemical failure (BCF) free survival was 94.3% for SBRT boost and 78.6% for CF-EBRT (P = 0.012). Conclusion Patients treated with SBRT boost after WP-EBRT experienced a lower PSA nadir and there tended to be a continuously greater rate of decline of PSA for durations of 2 years, 3 years, and

  13. Evaluation of tumor localization in respiration motion-corrected cone-beam CT: Prospective study in lung

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Kincaid, Russell; Hertanto, Agung; Hu, Yu-Chi; Pham, Hai; Yorke, Ellen; Zhang, Qinghui; Mageras, Gig S.; Rimner, Andreas

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Target localization accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used in radiation treatment of respiratory disease sites is affected by motion artifacts (blurring and streaking). The authors have previously reported on a method of respiratory motion correction in thoracic CBCT at end expiration (EE). The previous retrospective study was limited to examination of reducing motion artifacts in a small number of patient cases. They report here on a prospective study in a larger group of lung cancer patients to evaluate respiratory motion-corrected (RMC)-CBCT ability to improve lung tumor localization accuracy and reduce motion artifacts in Linac-mounted CBCT images. A second study goal examines whether the motion correction derived from a respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) at simulation yields similar tumor localization accuracy at treatment. Methods: In an IRB-approved study, 19 lung cancer patients (22 tumors) received a RCCT at simulation, and on one treatment day received a RCCT, a respiratory-gated CBCT at end expiration, and a 1-min CBCT. A respiration monitor of abdominal displacement was used during all scans. In addition to a CBCT reconstruction without motion correction, the motion correction method was applied to the same 1-min scan. Projection images were sorted into ten bins based on abdominal displacement, and each bin was reconstructed to produce ten intermediate CBCT images. Each intermediate CBCT was deformed to the end expiration state using a motion model derived from RCCT. The deformed intermediate CBCT images were then added to produce a final RMC-CBCT. In order to evaluate the second study goal, the CBCT was corrected in two ways, one using a model derived from the RCCT at simulation [RMC-CBCT(sim)], the other from the RCCT at treatment [RMC-CBCT(tx)]. Image evaluation compared uncorrected CBCT, RMC-CBCT(sim), and RMC-CBCT(tx). The gated CBCT at end expiration served as the criterion standard for comparison. Using automatic rigid image

  14. Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Morris; Li, Hong; Li, Liyu ); Strachan, Denis M. )

    2003-10-15

    Gadolinium can be dissolved in sodium-alumino-borosilicate glasses up to 47 wt% in a baseline borosilicate glass (mol%) 20 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 60 SiO2,and 20 Na2O. Understanding of Gd dissolution in borosilicate melts is important in glass formulation optimization. Electron energy loss fine structure (ELFS) spectroscopy is chosen, which provides well resolved local atomic structure information for both amorphous and crystalline materials with high sensitivity to low Z elements such as Al, B, Na, O, and Si where the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique faces experimental difficulty. In this study, we report our results of boron K-edge ELFS study. Two borosilicate glass samples with 30 and 47 mass% Gd2O3, B20Gd30 and B20Gd47were chosen for B K-edge ELFS study. EEL spectra were acquired on a Philips 430 TEM equipped with Gatan PEELS system 666 and EL/P 2.1 software with Custom function AcqLong. The ELFS data analysis was performed using UWELFS, UWXAFS and FEFF software. From our Gd solubility study, the local structure of Gd in the borate environment possibly resembles double chain structure found in crystalline Gd(BO2)3 as proposed by Chakraborty et al. The B/Gd ratio's in both glasses are smaller then 3, which means the excess Gd atoms in the Si-sites would be 17 and 60 mol% of the total Gd atoms, respectively according to the model, yet the local environment of borate sites saturated with Gd should be remained. To verity above hypothesis, the double chain structure model was applied to fit boron K-edge. The model was shown to well fit experimental boron K-edge EELS spectra for both glasses with some degree of distance distortion which is understandable in amorphous structure. Therefore, it is very likely that Gd stabilized in borate sites has a local structure resembling the double chain Gd(BO2)3 structure as proposed by our solubility study and literature.

  15. PTH1-34 Alleviates Radiotherapy-induced Local Bone Loss by Improving Osteoblast and Osteocyte Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lin, Tiao; Tribble, Mary Beth; Zhu, Ji; Altman, Allison R.; Tseng, Weiju; Zhang, Yejia; Akintoye, Sunday O.; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X. Sherry; Qin, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Cancer radiotherapy is often complicated by a spectrum of changes in the neighboring bone from mild osteopenia to osteoradionecrosis. We previously reported that parathyroid hormone (PTH, 1–34), an anabolic agent for osteoporosis, reversed bone structural deterioration caused by multiple microcomputed tomography (microCT) scans in adolescent rats. To simulate clinical radiotherapy for cancer patients and to search for remedies, we focally irradiated the tibial metaphyseal region of adult rats with a newly available small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) and treated these rats with intermittent injections of PTH1–34. Using a unique 3D image registration method that we recently developed, we traced the local changes of the same trabecular bone before and after treatments, and observed that, while radiation caused a loss of small trabecular elements leading to significant decreases in bone mass and strength, PTH1–34 preserved all trabecular elements in irradiated bone with remarkable increases in bone mass and strength. Histomorphometry demonstrated that SARRP radiation severely reduced osteoblast number and activity, which were impressively reversed by PTH treatment. In contrast, suppressing bone resorption by alendronate failed to rescue radiation-induced bone loss and to block the rescue effect of PTH1–34. Furthermore, histological analyses revealed that PTH1–34 protected osteoblasts and osteocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis and attenuated radiation-induced bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, our data strongly support a robust radioprotective effect of PTH on trabecular bone integrity through preserving bone formation and shed light on further investigations of an anabolic therapy for radiation-induced bone damage. PMID:24998454

  16. PTH1-34 alleviates radiotherapy-induced local bone loss by improving osteoblast and osteocyte survival.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lin, Tiao; Tribble, Mary Beth; Zhu, Ji; Altman, Allison R; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Zhang, Yejia; Akintoye, Sunday O; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X Sherry; Qin, Ling

    2014-10-01

    Cancer radiotherapy is often complicated by a spectrum of changes in the neighboring bone from mild osteopenia to osteoradionecrosis. We previously reported that parathyroid hormone (PTH, 1-34), an anabolic agent for osteoporosis, reversed bone structural deterioration caused by multiple microcomputed tomography (microCT) scans in adolescent rats. To simulate clinical radiotherapy for cancer patients and to search for remedies, we focally irradiated the tibial metaphyseal region of adult rats with a newly available small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) and treated these rats with intermittent injections of PTH1-34. Using a unique 3D image registration method that we recently developed, we traced the local changes of the same trabecular bone before and after treatments, and observed that, while radiation caused a loss of small trabecular elements leading to significant decreases in bone mass and strength, PTH1-34 preserved all trabecular elements in irradiated bone with remarkable increases in bone mass and strength. Histomorphometry demonstrated that SARRP radiation severely reduced osteoblast number and activity, which were impressively reversed by PTH treatment. In contrast, suppressing bone resorption by alendronate failed to rescue radiation-induced bone loss and to block the rescue effect of PTH1-34. Furthermore, histological analyses revealed that PTH1-34 protected osteoblasts and osteocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis and attenuated radiation-induced bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, our data strongly support a robust radioprotective effect of PTH on trabecular bone integrity through preserving bone formation and shed light on further investigations of an anabolic therapy for radiation-induced bone damage.

  17. Deformable Image Registration with Local Rigidity Constraints for Cone-Beam CT Guided Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided spine surgery is associated with reduced co-morbidity and improved surgical outcome. However, precise localization of target anatomy and adjacent nerves and vessels relative to planning information (e.g., device trajectories) can be challenged by anatomical deformation. Rigid registration alone fails to account for deformation associated with changes in spine curvature, and conventional deformable registration fails to account for rigidity of the vertebrae, causing unrealistic distortions in the registered image that can confound high-precision surgery. We developed and evaluated a deformable registration method capable of preserving rigidity of bones while resolving the deformation of surrounding soft tissue. The method aligns preoperative CT to intraoperative CBCT using free-form deformation (FFD) with constraints on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold of bone intensities. The constraints enforced 3 properties of a rigid transformation – namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (denoted uFFD) and Demons registration. FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation (𝒟 = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear (𝒮 = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons, respectively

  18. The behavior of beams of relativistic non-thermal electrons under the influence of collisions and synchrotron losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mctiernan, James M.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1989-01-01

    For many astrophysical situations, such as in solar flares or cosmic gamma-ray bursts, continuum gamma rays with energies up to hundreds of MeV were observed, and can be interpreted to be due to bremsstrahlung radiation by relativistic electrons. The region of acceleration for these particles is not necessarily the same as the region in which the radiation is produced, and the effects of the transport of the electrons must be included in the general problem. Hence it is necessary to solve the kinetic equation for relativistic electrons, including all the interactions and loss mechanisms relevant at such energies. The resulting kinetic equation for non-thermal electrons, including the effects of Coulomb collisions and losses due to synchrotron emission, was solved analytically in some simple limiting cases, and numerically for the general cases including constant and varying background plasma density and magnetic field. New approximate analytic solutions are presented for collision dominated cases, for small pitch angles and all energies, synchrotron dominated cases, both steady-state and time dependent, for all pitch angles and energies, and for cases when both synchrotron and collisional energy losses are important, but for relativistic electrons. These analytic solutions are compared to the full numerical results in the proper limits. These results will be useful for calculation of spectra and angular distribution of the radiation (x rays, gamma-rays, and microwaves) emitted via synchrotron or bremsstrahlung processes by the electrons. These properties and their relevance to observations will be observed in subsequent papers.

  19. SU-E-T-215: Comparison of VMAT-SABR Treatment Plans with Flattened Filter (FF) Beam and Flattening Filter-Free (FFF) Beam for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Kang, S; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to access VMAT-SABR plan using flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beam, and compare the verification results for all pretreatment plans. Methods: SABR plans for 20 prostate patients were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system. A prescription dose was 42.7 Gy/7 fractions. Four SABR plans for each patient were calculated using Acuros XB algorithm with both FF and FFF beams of 6- and 10-MV. The dose-volume histograms (DVH) and technical parameters were recorded and compared. A pretreatment verification was performed and the gamma analysis was used to quantify the agreement between calculations and measurements. Results: For each patient, the DVHs are closely similar for plans of four different beams. There are small differences showed in dose distributions and corresponding DVHs when comparing the each plan related to the same patient. Sparing on bladder and rectum was slightly better on plans with 10-MV FF and FFF than with 6-MV FF and FFF, but this difference was negligible. However, there was no significance in the other OARs. The mean agreement of 3%/3mm criteria was higher than 97% in all plans. The mean MUs and deliver time employed was 1701±101 and 3.02±0.17 min for 6-MV FF, 1870±116 and 1.69±0.08 min for 6-MV FFF, 1471±86 and 2.68±0.14 min for 10-MV FF, and 1619±101 and 0.98±0.04 min for 10-MV FFF, respectively. Conclusion: Dose distributions on prostate SABR plans using FFF beams were similar to those generated by FF beams. However, the use of FFF beam offers a clear benefit in delivery time when compared to FF beam. Verification of pretreatment also represented the acceptable and comparable results in all plans using FF beam as well as FFF beam. Therefore, this study suggests that the use of FFF beam is feasible and efficient technique for prostate SABR.

  20. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Karen M.; Quan, Kimmen; Clump, David A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival, and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of previously irradiated malignant skull base tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen, which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC), progression-free survival rate, overall survival (OS) rate, and toxicities were reported. Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6–67.2 months). The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4–205 cm3). All patients received prior external beam radiation therapy with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24–75.6 Gy) delivered in 12–42 fractions. Twenty patients had surgeries prior to SABR. Nineteen patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, eight patients received concurrent cetuximab (Erbitux™) with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.3 months (range: 0–16.9 months). For the 29 patients (93.5%) who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5–41.4 months). The estimated 1-year OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base. PMID:25853093

  1. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Localization of Recurrent Prostate Cancer After External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Masoom A. Chung, Peter; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Jhaveri, Kartik; Menard, Cynthia; Warde, Padraig; Trachtenberg, John; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.; Milosevic, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of T2-weighted (T2w) imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland in the localization of recurrent prostate cancer in patients with biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: T2-weighted imaging and DCE MRI were performed in 33 patients with suspected relapse after EBRT. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed with a temporal resolution of 95 s. Voxels enhancing at 46 s after injection to a greater degree than the mean signal intensity of the prostate at 618 s were considered malignant. Results from MRI were correlated with biopsies from six regions in the peripheral zone (PZ) (base, mid, and apex). The percentage of biopsy core positive for malignancy from each region was correlated with the maximum diameter of the tumor on DCE MRI with a linear regression model. Results: On a sextant basis, DCE MRI had significantly better sensitivity (72% [21of 29] vs. 38% [11 of 29]), positive predictive value (46% [21 of 46] vs. 24% [11 of 45]) and negative predictive value (95% [144 of 152] vs. 88% [135 of 153] than T2w imaging. Specificities were high for both DCE MRI and T2w imaging (85% [144 of 169] vs. 80% [135 of 169]). There was a linear relationship between tumor diameters on DCE MRI and the percentage of cancer tissue in the corresponding biopsy core (r = 0.9, p < 0.001), with a slope of 1.2. Conclusions: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI performs better than T2w imaging in the detection and localization of prostate cancer in the peripheral zone after EBRT. This may be helpful in the planning of salvage therapy.

  2. Localized Si enrichment in coherent self-assembled Ge islands grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (001)Si single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Valvo, M.; Bongiorno, C.; Giannazzo, F.; Terrasi, A.

    2013-01-21

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) have been used to investigate the morphology, structure, and composition of self-assembled Ge islands grown on Si (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at different temperatures. Increasing the temperature from 550 Degree-Sign C to 700 Degree-Sign C causes progressive size and shape uniformity, accompanied by enhanced Si-Ge intermixing within the islands and their wetting layer. Elemental maps obtained by energy filtered-TEM (EF-TEM) clearly show pronounced Si concentration not only in correspondence of island base perimeters, but also along their curved surface boundaries. This phenomenon is strengthened by an increase of the growth temperature, being practically negligible at 550 Degree-Sign C, while very remarkable already at 650 Degree-Sign C. The resulting island shape is affected, since this localized Si enrichment not only provides strain relief near their highly stressed base perimeters but it also influences the cluster surface energy by effective alloying, so as to form Si-enriched SiGe interfaces. Further increase to 700 Degree-Sign C causes a shape transition where more homogenous Si-Ge concentration profiles are observed. The crucial role played by local 'flattened' alloyed clusters, similar to truncated pyramids with larger bases and enhanced Si enrichment at coherently stressed interfaces, has been further clarified by EF-TEM analysis of a multi-layered Ge/Si structure containing stacked Ge islands grown at 650 Degree-Sign C. Sharp accumulation of Si has been here observed not only in proximity of the uncapped island surface in the topmost layer but also at the buried Ge/Si interfaces and even in the core of such capped Ge islands.

  3. Numerical analysis of ac loss in bifilar stacks and coils of ion beam assisted deposition YBCO coated conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Doan N.; Ashworth, Stephen P.; Willis, Jeffrey O.

    2009-03-15

    In this paper we present a finite element model using the commercial COMSOL software package for calculating the ac loss in bifilar stacks of high temperature superconducting tape. In the model, the current-voltage relationship characterizing the superconducting properties is assumed to follow a power law. The calculations were performed for infinite bifilar stacks with different values of layer-to-layer separation D. With appropriate settings for the boundary conditions, the numerical results agree well with the analytical data obtained from a recently proposed model [J. R. Clem, Phys. Rev. B 77, 134506 (2008)]. The numerical approach was also used to investigate the end effects in a bifilar stack to answer the following question: how many layers away from the end of a stack are required before the environment of a given layer is identical to that in an infinite stack? We find that the answer to this question depends strongly on the value of D. Based on this study, a model for calculating the ac loss in bifilar noninductively wound coils with a finite number of turns is proposed.

  4. Contribution of monaural and binaural cues to sound localization in listeners with acquired unilateral conductive hearing loss: improved directional hearing with a bone-conduction device.

    PubMed

    Agterberg, Martijn J H; Snik, Ad F M; Hol, Myrthe K S; Van Wanrooij, Marc M; Van Opstal, A John

    2012-04-01

    Sound localization in the horizontal (azimuth) plane relies mainly on interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs). Both are distorted in listeners with acquired unilateral conductive hearing loss (UCHL), reducing their ability to localize sound. Several studies demonstrated that UCHL listeners had some ability to localize sound in azimuth. To test whether listeners with acquired UCHL use strongly perturbed binaural difference cues, we measured localization while they listened with a sound-attenuating earmuff over their impaired ear. We also tested the potential use of monaural pinna-induced spectral-shape cues for localization in azimuth and elevation, by filling the cavities of the pinna of their better-hearing ear with a mould. These conditions were tested while a bone-conduction device (BCD), fitted to all UCHL listeners in order to provide hearing from the impaired side, was turned off. We varied stimulus presentation levels to investigate whether UCHL listeners were using sound level as an azimuth cue. Furthermore, we examined whether horizontal sound-localization abilities improved when listeners used their BCD. Ten control listeners without hearing loss demonstrated a significant decrease in their localization abilities when they listened with a monaural plug and muff. In 4/13 UCHL listeners we observed good horizontal localization of 65 dB SPL broadband noises with their BCD turned off. Localization was strongly impaired when the impaired ear was covered with the muff. The mould in the good ear of listeners with UCHL deteriorated the localization of broadband sounds presented at 45 dB SPL. This demonstrates that they used pinna cues to localize sounds presented at low levels. Our data demonstrate that UCHL listeners have learned to adapt their localization strategies under a wide variety of hearing conditions and that sound-localization abilities improved with their BCD turned on.

  5. A six-site method for the evaluation of periodontal bone loss in cone-beam CT images

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu-Jiao; Ge, Zhi-pu; Ma, Ruo-han; Hou, Jian-xia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In contrast to two-dimensional planar images, a measuring point is hardly repeatedly determined in a CBCT image when alveolar bone loss is assessed. Thus, the aim of the present study was to propose a six-site measuring method, which is closely related to anatomical structure, for the evaluation of alveolar bone loss in CBCT images. Methods: 150 measuring points in 11 molars and 14 premolars from 6 patients (2 males and 4 females) were included. CBCT images of the teeth were acquired prior to periodontal surgery. Four observers measured the distances between cemento–enamel junctions and the apical bases of the periodontal bone defect at the mesio–buccal, mid-buccal, disto–buccal, mesio–lingual/palatal, mid-lingual/palatal and disto–lingual/palatal sites in CBCT images. Direct measurements of the six sites were correspondingly obtained in the subsequent periodontal surgeries. Differences between the distances measured in the CBCT images and during the surgery were analysed. Interobserver and intraobserver variances were tested. Results: No statistically significant difference was found between the surgical and CBCT measurements (p = 0.84). Diagnostic coincidence rates of four observers were 86.7%, 87.3%, 88.7% and 88.0%, respectively. The interobserver (p = 0.95) and intraobserver (p = 0.30) variances were not significant. Conclusions: The six-site measuring method validated in the present study may be a useful three-dimensional measuring method for the evaluation of periodontal disease. PMID:26509657

  6. Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Morris; Li, Hong; Li, Liyu ); Strachan, Denis M. )

    2003-12-01

    Phase separation in sodium-aluminoborosilicate glasses was systematically studied as a function of Gd2O3 concentration with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) methods. Gadolinium-induced phase separation in the three systems can be consistently explained by proposing that Gd cations partition to the borate-rich environments and subsequent agglomeration of the Gd-borate moieties, or short-range ordered structural groups, in the glass. Agglomeration of the Gd-borate rich environments is further discussed within the context of excess metal oxides,[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex=|Na2O - Al2O3|, and excess B2O3,[B2O3]ex, available for incorporating Gd cations. Results showed that agglomeration of the Gd-borate rich environments occurred at a much lower Gd2O3 concentration in the glass without[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex and at a significantly higher Gd2O3 concentration in the glass with either[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex. Assuming 1BO4 : 1Gd : 2BO3 (based on literature-reported Gd-metaborate structure) as a local Gd-borate environment in glass, we introduced the saturation index of boron, SI[B]= Gd2O3/(1/3[B2O3]ex), to examine the glass susceptibility to Gd-induced phase separation for all three alkali-aluminoborosilicate systems. While our results have provided some insight to the glass structure, they also provide insight to the mechanism by which the metal oxide is dissolved into the melt. This appears to occur predominantly through boron complexation of the metal oxide.

  7. Patient-Reported Outcomes After 3-Dimensional Conformal, Intensity-Modulated, or Proton Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Phillip J.; Paly, Jonathan J.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Sanda, Martin G.; Sandler, Howard. M.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Talcott, James A.; Coen, John J.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Shipley, William U.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent studies have suggested differing toxicity patterns for patients with prostate cancer who receive treatment with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or proton beam therapy (PBT). METHODS The authors reviewed patient-reported outcomes data collected prospectively using validated instruments that assessed bowel and urinary quality of life (QOL) for patients with localized prostate cancer who received 3DCRT (n = 123), IMRT (n = 153) or PBT (n = 95). Clinically meaningful differences in mean QOL scores were defined as those exceeding half the standard deviation of the baseline mean value. Changes from baseline were compared within groups at the first post-treatment follow-up (2–3 months from the start of treatment) and at 12 months and 24 months. RESULTS At the first post-treatment follow-up, patients who received 3DCRT and IMRT, but not those who received PBT, reported a clinically meaningful decrement in bowel QOL. At 12 months and 24 months, all 3 cohorts reported clinically meaningful decrements in bowel QOL. Patients who received IMRT reported clinically meaningful decrements in the domains of urinary irritation/obstruction and incontinence at the first post-treatment follow-up. At 12 months, patients who received PBT, but not those who received IMRT or 3DCRT, reported a clinically meaningful decrement in the urinary irritation/ obstruction domain. At 24 months, none of the 3 cohorts reported clinically meaningful changes in urinary QOL. CONCLUSIONS Patients who received 3DCRT, IMRT, or PBT reported distinct patterns of treatment-related QOL. Although the timing of toxicity varied between the cohorts, patients reported similar modest QOL decrements in the bowel domain and minimal QOL decrements in the urinary domains at 24 months. Prospective randomized trials are needed to further examine these differences. PMID:23436283

  8. Radical External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Japan: Changing Trends in the Patterns of Care Process Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Teshima, Teruki; Mitsumori, Michihide

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To delineate changing trends in radical external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: Data from 841 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT in the Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) from 1996 to 2005 were analyzed. Results: Significant increases in the proportions of patients with stage T1 to T2 disease and decrease in prostate-specific antigen values were observed. Also, there were significant increases in the percentages of patients treated with radiotherapy by their own choice. Median radiation doses were 65.0 Gy and 68.4 Gy from 1996 to 1998 and from 1999 to 2001, respectively, increasing to 70 Gy from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, conformal therapy was more frequently used from 2003 to 2005 (84.9%) than from 1996 to 1998 (49.1%) and from 1999 to 2001 (50.2%). On the other hand, the percentage of patients receiving hormone therapy from 2003 to 2005 (81.1%) was almost the same as that from 1996 to 1998 (86.3%) and from 1999 to 2001 (89.7%). Compared with the PCS in the United States, patient characteristics and patterns of treatments from 2003 to 2005 have become more similar to those in the United States than those from 1996 to 1998 and those from 1999 to 2001. Conclusions: This study indicates a trend toward increasing numbers of patients with early-stage disease and increasing proportions of patients treated with higher radiation doses with advanced equipment among Japanese prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT during 1996 to 2005 survey periods. Patterns of care for prostate cancer in Japan are becoming more similar to those in the United States.

  9. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Meusel, O. Droba, M.; Noll, D.; Schulte, K.; Schneider, P. P.; Wiesner, C.

    2016-02-15

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  10. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited).

    PubMed

    Meusel, O; Droba, M; Noll, D; Schulte, K; Schneider, P P; Wiesner, C

    2016-02-01

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  11. Study of beam-beam effects in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2010-05-23

    Beam-beam effects in eRHIC have a number of unique features, which distinguish them from both hadron and lepton colliders. Due to beam-beam interaction, both electron and hadron beams would suffer quality degradation or beam loss from without proper treatments. Those features need novel study and dedicate countermeasures. We study the beam dynamics and resulting luminosity of the characteristics, including mismatch, disruption and pinch effects on electron beam, in additional to their consequences on the opposing beam as a wake field and other incoherent effects of hadron beam. We also carry out countermeasures to prevent beam quality degrade and coherent instability.

  12. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  13. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    DOE PAGES

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; ...

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  14. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  15. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  16. RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident

    SciTech Connect

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Cone beam computed tomographic analysis of maxillary premolars and molars to detect the relationship between periapical and marginal bone loss and mucosal thickness of maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet-Ercan; Köse, Emre; Sisman, Yildiray

    2015-01-01

    Background This study assessed the relationship between mucosal thickness (MT) of the maxillary sinus and periodontal bone loss (PBL) and periapical condition of related teeth. We also aimed to identify the association between root apices and the inferior wall of the maxillary sinus using Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods In this study, CBCT images of 205 patients with 410 maxillary sinuses were examined, retrospectively. A total of 582 maxillary molars and 587 premolars were observed. The relationship of each root with maxillary sinus and apical lesions of these roots were classified, PBL was examined and the situations of adjacent teeth were estimated. The effect of these conditions on sinus mucosal thickness (MT) was evaluated. Results There was a significant correlation between MT of maxillary sinus and both PBL and age (r = 0.52, p=0.000 and r = 0.111, p= 0.002, respectively). The frequency of MT increased as the severity of apical lesion enlarged. A positive correlation was found between MT and degree of PBL and periapical lesions. To reveal the association between MT and pulpoperiapical condition bivariate correlation was done and a significant relationship between the pulpoperiapical condition and MT was found (r = 0.17, p=0.000). Conclusions This retrospective study showed that MT of the maxillary sinus was common among patients with PBL and MT was significantly associated with PBL and apical lesions. The relationship of maxillary sinus to adjacent teeth had also positive correlation with MT. CBCT imaging enabled better evaluation of maxillary sinus, posterior teeth and surrounding structures compared to other imaging tools. Key words:Maxillary sinus mucosal thickness, apical periodontitis, periodontal bone loss, CBCT. PMID:26241459

  18. Transmission-reflection analysis for localization of temporally successive multipoint perturbations in a distributed fiber-optic loss sensor based on Rayleigh backscattering.

    PubMed

    Spirin, Vasilii V

    2003-03-01

    A novel method is presented for the localization of multipoint loss-inducing perturbations in a distributed fiber-optic sensor. The proposed simple technique is based on measurement of the transmitted and the Rayleigh-backscattered powers of an unmodulated light launched into a sensing fiber. The positions of consecutive perturbations are determined by measuring the slopes of the dependence of normalized Rayleigh-backscattering power versus the square of normalized transmitted power. It is shown that these slopes uniquely depend on the positions of the disturbances along the test fiber. The method allows localization of any number of the perturbations that appear one after another at different positions along the test fiber without ambiguity. Good agreement is obtained between calculated and experimentally measured slopes for a loss that was consecutively induced near the source and remote ends of 2.844-km-long fiber.

  19. /sup 125/Iodine implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/Iodine seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with (1) advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), (2) massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and (3) locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  20. /sup 125/I implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/I seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  1. Computer Calculations of Eddy-Current Power Loss in Rotating Titanium Wheels and Rims in Localized Axial Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhall, D J; Stein, W; Gronberg, J B

    2006-05-15

    We have performed preliminary computer-based, transient, magnetostatic calculations of the eddy-current power loss in rotating titanium-alloy and aluminum wheels and wheel rims in the predominantly axially-directed, steady magnetic fields of two small, solenoidal coils. These calculations have been undertaken to assess the eddy-current power loss in various possible International Linear Collider (ILC) positron target wheels. They have also been done to validate the simulation code module against known results published in the literature. The commercially available software package used in these calculations is the Maxwell 3D, Version 10, Transient Module from the Ansoft Corporation.

  2. Geant4 simulation of the PSI LEM beam line: energy loss and muonium formation in thin foils and the impact of unmoderated muons on the μSR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaw, K. S.; Antognini, A.; Crivelli, P.; Kirch, K.; Morenzoni, E.; Salman, Z.; Suter, A.; Prokscha, T.

    2015-10-01

    The PSI low-energy μSR spectrometer is an instrument dedicated to muon spin rotation and relaxation measurements. Knowledge of the muon beam parameters such as spatial, kinetic energy and arrival-time distributions at the sample position are important ingredients to analyze the μSR spectra. We present here the measured energy losses in the thin carbon foil of the muon start detector deduced from time-of-flight measurements. Muonium formation in the thin carbon foil (10 nm thickness) of the muon start detector also affect the measurable decay asymmetry and therefore need to be accounted for. Muonium formation and energy losses in the start detector, whose relevance increase with decreasing muon implantation energy (<10 keV), have been implemented in Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation to reproduce the measured time-of-flight spectra. Simulated and measured time-of-flight and beam spot agrees only if a small fraction of so called ``unmoderated'' muons which contaminate the mono-energetic muon beam of the μSR spectrometer is introduced. Moreover the sensitivity of the beam size and related upstream-downstream asymmetry for a specially shaped ``nose'' sample plate has been studied for various beam line settings, which is of relevance for the study of thermal muonium emission into vacuum from mesoporous silica at cryogenic temperatures.

  3. Route Planning and Estimate of Heat Loss of Hot Water Transportation Piping for Fuel Cell Local Energy Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shinya; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    The method of supplying the electric power and heat energy for the energy demand of buildings by Centralized system type and distributed system type of fuel cell network is studied. The hot-water piping route planning program of fuel cell network was developed by using genetic algorithm based on the view of TSP ( Traveling salesman problem) . In this program, the piping route planning which minimizes the quantity of heat loss in hot-water piping can be performed. The residential section model of Sapporo city of 74 buildings was analyzed, and the quantity of heat loss from the hot-water piping of both systems was estimated. Consequently, the ratio of the quantity of heat loss of a distributed system to a centralized system was about 50% in the full year average. This program is introduced into the route planning of hot- Water piping system of the fuel cell network, and plan to reduce the quantity of heat loss in a distributed system will be made.

  4. Assessment of Four Passive Hearing Protection Devices for Continuous Noise Attenuation, Impulsive Noise Insertion Loss, and Auditory Localization Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-17

    their duties, and may decrease the future standard of living and career opportunities for the Soldier. Tinnitus and noise-induced hearing loss are the...tested. Volunteers were given a questionnaire to report if they were sick, suffering from allergies, experiencing tinnitus , or otherwise in poor health

  5. Impact of local strain on Ti-L₂,₃ electron energy-loss near-edge structures of BaTiO₃: a first-principles multiplet study.

    PubMed

    Ootsuki, Shirou; Ikeno, Hidekazu; Umeda, Yuji; Yonezawa, Yu; Moriwake, Hiroki; Kuwabara, Akihide; Kido, Osamu; Ueda, Satoko; Tanaka, Isao; Fujikawa, Yoshinori; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2014-06-01

    Identification of local strains is crucial because the local strains largely influence the ferroelectric property of BaTiO₃. The effects of local strains induced by external pressures on the Ti-L₂,₃ electron energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of BaTiO₃ were theoretically investigated using first-principles multiplet calculations. We revealed that the effects appear in the position of the spectral threshold, namely the spectrum shifts to lower and higher energy sides by the tensile and compressive pressures, respectively. We concluded that conventional ELNES observations can identify only large strains induced by -10 GPa, and 0.1 eV energy resolution is required to identify ±2% of strains.

  6. Neural, Endocrine and Local Mechanisms in the Effects of Environmental Stressors on the Cardiovascular Response to Blood Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    of Ang II AT1 receptors with Losartan altered the response to blood loss with or without simultaneous air jet stress. Either drug decreased the rabbits...decreased ability to defend arterial pressure, Losartan or captopril also: decreased the skeletal muscle vasoconstriction characteristic of phase 1...blockade of AT1 receptors with Losartan on the response to hypotensive hemorrhage. Consistent with our earlier results, iv Losartan (5 mg/kg) was equally

  7. Localization of a Portion of an Endorectal Balloon for Prostate Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Cone-Beam Tomosynthesis: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sook Kien; Zygmanski, Piotr; Lyatskaya, Yulia; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Cormack, Robert A.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using cone-beam tomosynthesis (CBTS) to localize the air-tissue interface for the application of prostate image-guided radiation therapy using an endorectal balloon for immobilization and localization. Methods and Materials: A Feldkamp-David-Kress-based CBTS reconstruction was applied to selected sets of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projection data to simulate volumetric imaging achievable from tomosynthesis for a limited range of scan angles. Projection data were calculated from planning CT images of 10 prostate cancer patients treated with an endorectal balloon, as were experimental CBCT projections for a pelvic phantom in two patients. More than 50 points at the air-tissue interface were objectively identified by an intensity-based interface-finding algorithm. Using three-dimensional point sets extracted from CBTS images compared with points extracted from corresponding CBCT images, the relative shift resulting from a reduced scan angle was determined. Because the CBCT and CBTS images were generated from the same projection data set, shift identified was presumed to be due to distortions introduced by the tomosynthesis technique. Results: Scans of {>=}60 Degree-Sign were shown to be able to localize an air-tissue interface near the isocenter with accuracy on the order of a millimeter. The accuracy was quantified in terms of the mean discrepancy as a function of reconstruction angle. Conclusion: This work provides an understanding of the effect of scan angle used in localization of a portion of an endorectal balloon by means of CBTS. CBTS with relatively small scan angles is capable of accurately localizing an extended interface near the isocenter and may provide clinically relevant measurements to guide IGRT treatments while reducing imaging radiation to the patient.

  8. Formation and microstructural properties of locally distributed ZnSiO3 nanoparticles embedded in a SiO2 layer by using a focused electron beam.

    PubMed

    Shin, J W; No, Y S; Kim, T W; Choi, W K

    2008-10-01

    Locally distributed crystalline ZnSiO3 nanoparticles embedded in a SiO2 layer inserted between the ZnO thin film and the Si substrate were formed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with a focused electron beam irradiation process. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) images and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) profiles showed that ZnSiO3 nanocrystals with a size of approximately 6 nm were formed in the SiO2 layer. The formation mechanisms of the ZnSiO3 nanocrystals in the SiO2 layer are described on the basis of the HRTEM images and the EDS profiles.

  9. Energy harvesting from localized dynamic transitions in post-buckled elastic beams under quasi-static loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchani, Wassim

    The deployability of structural health monitoring self-powered sensors relies on their capability to harvest energy from signals being monitored. Many of the signals required to assess the structure condition are quasi-static events which limits the levels of power that can be extracted. Several vibration-based techniques have been proposed to increase the transferred level of power and broaden the harvester operating bandwidth. However, these techniques require vibration input excitations at frequencies higher than dominant structural response frequencies which makes them inefficient and not suitable for ambient quasi-static excitations. This research proposes a novel sensing and energy harvesting technique at low frequencies using mechanical energy concentrators and triggers. These mechanisms consist of axially-loaded bilaterally-constrained beams with attached piezoelectric energy harvesters. When the quasi-static axial load reaches a certain mechanical threshold, a sudden snap-through mode-switching occurs. These transitions excite the attached piezoelectric scavengers with high-rate input accelerations, generating then electric power. The main objectives are to understand and model the post-buckling behavior of bilaterally-constrained beams, control it by tailoring geometry and material properties of the buckled elements or stacking them into system assemblies, and finally characterize the energy harvesting and sensing capability of the system under quasi-static excitations. The fundamental principle relies on the following concept. Under axial load, a straight slender beam buckles in the first buckling mode. The increased transverse deformations from a buckled shape lead to contact interaction with the lateral boundaries. The contact interaction generates transverse forces that induce the development of higher order buckling configurations. Transitions between the buckled configurations occur not only during loading, but also unloading. In this work, the post

  10. Highlights of Fire in the United States: Deaths, Injuries, Dollar Loss, and Incidents at the National, State, and Local Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Fire Prevention and Control Administration (DOC), Washington, DC. National Fire Data Center.

    This report provides fire departments, federal and state governments, and others active in the fire protection field with information which can be used to improve the efficacy and targeting of fire prevention programs. As a byproduct, it illustrates ways that state and local governments might analyze their own fire problems. The report describes…

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics of Beam-driven TAEs in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guoyong; Liu, Deyong; Wang, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Energetic particle modes and Alfvénic modes driven by super-Alfvénic beam ions were routinely observed in neutral beam heated plasmas on NSTX. These modes can significantly impact beam-ion transport, thus causing beam-ion redistribution and losses. Recent simulation results of TAEs show mode radial structure consistent with the reflectometer measurements of electron density fluctuations. In this paper we report on new simulations of multiple TAEs in NSTX plasmas using the M3D-K code. The results show strong interaction between TAEs and fishbone that either enhances or reduces saturation level of individual modes depending on mode number and other parameters. As beam ion beta increases beyond a threshold, mode saturation levels are found to increases sharply. Correspondingly the locally flattening regions merge together resulting in global particle transport and substantial particle loss. These results are similar to the TAE avalanche observed in NSTX.

  12. Proposed method to study the factors affecting local control with combined external beam and interstitial implantation of mobile tongue and floor of mouth

    SciTech Connect

    Hintz, B.L.; Kagan, A.R.; Chan, P.; Rao, A.R.; Nussbaum, H.; Ryoo, M.C.; Wollin, M.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty-seven patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the mobile tongue and floor of the mouth were treated with external beam and interstitial radiation. Good prognostic factors were T1N0, T2N0, superficial tumors, tumor shrinkage by 75% with external beam, and no apparent tumor clinically 2 months after treatment. On the other hand, T3N0, T1-3N1, and deeply necrotic tumors had a poor prognosis. We recommend using a flexible afterloading system to implant the initial local tumor volume (not just the residual nidus) that does not exceed 45 cm3. The minimum (reference) dose was prescribed to a surface 1/2 cm beyond the most peripheral rim of radioactive sources. For acceptable local control and complication rates, our suggested minimum (reference) doses are less than or equal to 7500 rads for T1 (or a time-dose-fractionation (TDF) of 131-140), less than or equal to 8000 rads for T2 (TDF of 131-140), and probably less than 8500 rads for T3 (TDF of less than or equal to 150). These guidelines should be considered preliminary.

  13. Breath-Hold Target Localization With Simultaneous Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Fast Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Arns, Anna; Lohr, Frank; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated high-dose radiotherapy for small lung tumors has typically been based on stereotaxy. Cone-beam computed tomography and breath-hold techniques have provided a noninvasive basis for precise cranial and extracranial patient positioning. The cone-beam computed tomography acquisition time of 60 s, however, is beyond the breath-hold capacity of patients, resulting in respiratory motion artifacts. By combining megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) photon sources (mounted perpendicularly on the linear accelerator) and accelerating the gantry rotation to the allowed limit, the data acquisition time could be reduced to 15 s. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Synergy 6-MV linear accelerator, with iViewGT as the MV- and XVI as the kV-imaging device, was used with a Catphan phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Both image sources performed continuous image acquisition, passing an angle interval of 90{sup o} within 15 s. For reconstruction, filtered back projection on a graphics processor unit was used. It reconstructed 100 projections acquired to a 512 x 512 x 512 volume within 6 s. Results: The resolution in the Catphan phantom (CTP528 high-resolution module) was 3 lines/cm. The spatial accuracy was within 2-3 mm. The diameters of different tumor shapes in the thorax phantom were determined within an accuracy of 1.6 mm. The signal-to-noise ratio was 68% less than that with a 180{sup o}-kV scan. The dose generated to acquire the MV frames accumulated to 82.5 mGy, and the kV contribution was <6 mGy. Conclusion: The present results have shown that fast breath-hold, on-line volume imaging with a linear accelerator using simultaneous kV-MV cone-beam computed tomography is promising and can potentially be used for image-guided radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in the near future.

  14. Refinement of Treatment Setup and Target Localization Accuracy Using Three-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhiheng Nelson, John W.; Yoo, Sua; Wu, Q. Jackie; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Yin Fangfang

    2009-02-01

    Purposes: To quantitatively compare two-dimensional (2D) orthogonal kV with three-dimensional (3D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) for target localization; and to assess intrafraction motion with kV images in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients with 58 lesions received 178 fractions of SBRT. After clinical setup using in-room lasers and skin/cradle marks placed at simulation, patients were imaged and repositioned according to orthogonal kV/MV registration of bony landmarks to digitally reconstructed radiographs from the planning CT. A subsequent CBCT was registered to the planning CT using soft tissue information, and the resultant 'residual error' was measured and corrected before treatment. Posttreatment 2D kV and/or 3D CBCT images were compared with pretreatment images to determine any intrafractional position changes. Absolute averages, statistical means, standard deviations, and root mean square (RMS) values of observed setup error were calculated. Results: After initial setup to external marks with laser guidance, 2D kV images revealed vector mean setup deviations of 0.67 cm (RMS). Cone-beam CT detected residual setup deviations of 0.41 cm (RMS). Posttreatment imaging demonstrated intrafractional variations of 0.15 cm (RMS). The individual shifts in three standard orthogonal planes showed no obvious directional biases. Conclusions: After localization based on superficial markings in patients undergoing SBRT, orthogonal kV imaging detects setup variations of approximately 3 to 4 mm in each direction. Cone-beam CT detects residual setup variations of approximately 2 to 3 mm.

  15. Microwave fixation and localization of calcium in synaptic terminals using x-ray microanalysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Mizuhira, V; Hasegawa, H

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of calcium ions is demonstrated in synaptic terminals by means of a two-step chemical precipitation of calcium ions in the rat brain. K-oxalate/K-antimonate chemical replacement with simultaneous computerized microwave irradiation was used. This precipitate in nerve cell structures was investigated by computerized electron probe x-ray microanalysis (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopic (EELS) imaging. The values obtained by EDX agreed with those of the standard sample and theoretical values of Ca-antimonate. Typical EELS spectra of Ca:L, O:K, and Sb:M were obtained from nerve terminals in the same tissue block as that used for EDX analysis. Excellent net Ca:L and Sb:M EELS digital images were obtained after their background images were subtracted. Calcium ions were distributed in the nerve terminals, synaptic vesicles, mitochondria, and synaptic membranes.

  16. Comparison of VMAT-SABR treatment plans with flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beam for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, In-Ah; Kang, Sang-Won; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam with an endorectal balloon for stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) of clinically localized prostate cancer. We assessed plans of SABR with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) that used a flattening filter (FF) beam and an FFF beam and compared the verification results of dosimetric quality assurance for all pretreatment plans. A total of 20 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. SABR plans using VMAT with two full arcs were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system. All plans prescribed 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions of 6.1 Gy each. Four SABR plans were computed for each patient: two with FF beams and two with FFF beams of 6 and 10 MV. For all plans, the cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were recorded and compared. Pretreatment quality assurance (QA) was performed using the I'mRT MatriXX system and radiochromic EBT3 film to verify treatment delivery, and gamma analysis was used to quantify the agreement between calculations and measurements. In addition, total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were investigated as technical parameters of delivery. All four plans achieved adequate dose conformity to the target volumes and had comparable dosimetric data. The DVHs of all four plans for each patient were very similar. All plans were highly conformal with CI<1.05 and CN>0.90, and the doses were homogeneous (HI = 0.08-0.15). Sparing for the bladder and rectum was slightly better with the 10 MV FF and FFF plans than with the 6 MV FF and FFF plans, but the difference was negligible. However, there was no significant difference in sparing for the other OARs. The mean agreement with the 3%/3% mm criterion was higher than 97% for verifying all plans. For the 2%/2% mm criterion, the corresponding agreement values were more than 90%, which showed that the plans were acceptable

  17. Comparison of VMAT-SABR treatment plans with flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beam for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, In-Ah; Kang, Sang-Won; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam with an endorectal balloon for stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) of clinically localized prostate cancer. We assessed plans of SABR with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) that used a flattening filter (FF) beam and an FFF beam and compared the verification results of dosimetric quality assurance for all pretreatment plans. A total of 20 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. SABR plans using VMAT with two full arcs were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system. All plans prescribed 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions of 6.1 Gy each. Four SABR plans were computed for each patient: two with FF beams and two with FFF beams of 6 and 10 MV. For all plans, the cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were recorded and compared. Pretreatment quality assurance (QA) was performed using the I'mRT MatriXX system and radiochromic EBT3 film to verify treatment delivery, and gamma analysis was used to quantify the agreement between calculations and measurements. In addition, total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were investigated as technical parameters of delivery. All four plans achieved adequate dose conformity to the target volumes and had comparable dosimetric data. The DVHs of all four plans for each patient were very similar. All plans were highly conformal with CI < 1.05 and CN > 0.90, and the doses were homogeneous (HI = 0.08-0.15). Sparing for the bladder and rectum was slightly better with the 10 MV FF and FFF plans than with the 6 MV FF and FFF plans, but the difference was negligible. However, there was no significant difference in sparing for the other OARs. The mean agreement with the 3%/3 mm criterion was higher than 97% for verifying all plans. For the 2%/2 mm criterion, the corresponding agreement values were more than 90%, which showed that the plans were acceptable

  18. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuron–astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (−astrocyte) within the same culture dish. −Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform

  19. Planar metal plasmon waveguides: frequency-dependent dispersion, propagation, localization, and loss beyond the free electron model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, J. A.; Sweatlock, L. A.; Atwater, H. A.; Polman, A.

    2005-08-01

    A numerical analysis of surface plasmon dispersion, propagation, and localization on smooth lossy films is presented. Particular attention is given to determining wavelength-dependent behavior of thin Ag slab waveguides embedded in a symmetric SiO2 environment. Rather than considering Ag as a damped free electron gas, the metal is defined by the experimentally determined optical constants of Johnson and Christy and Palik. As in free electron gas models, analytic dispersion results indicate a splitting of plasmon modes—corresponding to symmetric and antisymmetric field distributions—as film thickness is decreased below 50nm . However, unlike free electron gas models, the surface plasmon wave vector remains finite at resonance with the antisymmetric-field plasmon converging to a pure photon mode for very thin films. In addition, allowed excitation modes are found to exist between the bound and radiative branches of the dispersion curve. The propagation characteristics of all modes are determined, and for thin films (depending upon electric field symmetry), propagation distances range from microns to centimeters in the near infrared. Propagation distances are correlated with both the field decay (skin depth) and energy density distribution in the metal and surrounding dielectric. While the energy density of most long-range surface plasmons exhibits a broad spatial extent with limited confinement in the waveguide, it is found that high-field confinement does not necessarily limit propagation. In fact, enhanced propagation is observed for silver films at ultraviolet wavelengths despite strong field localization in the metal. The surface plasmon characteristics described in this paper provide a numerical springboard for engineering nanoscale metal plasmon waveguides, and the results may provide a new avenue for integrated optoelectronic applications.

  20. NEXAFS study on the local structures of DLC thin films formed by Ar cluster ion beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Teruyuki; Shimizugawa, Yutaka; Tsubakino, Harushige; Yamada, Isao; Matsui, Shinji

    2003-08-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra were measured for the optimization of synthesis conditions on the production of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films by the Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) assisted deposition of fullerene. The sp2 contents of DLC films were estimated from the analysis of the peak corresponding to the transition of the excitation electron from a carbon 1s orbital to a π* orbital in the NEXAFS spectrum of the carbon K-edge over the excitation energy range 275-320 eV. Substrate temperature and Ar cluster ion acceleration voltage in the synthesis conditions of DLC films were optimized to make the sp2 content minimum.

  1. Non-manifesting AHI1 truncations indicate localized loss-of-function tolerance in a severe Mendelian disease gene

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Solaf M.; Phillips, Jennifer B.; Heller, Raoul; Thoenes, Michaela; Elsobky, Ezzat; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Seland, Saskia; Ebermann, Inga; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Toliat, Mohammad; Körber, Friederike; Hu, Xue-Jia; Wu, Yun-Dong; Zaki, Maha S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Gleeson, Joseph; Boltshauser, Eugen; Westerfield, Monte; Bolz, Hanno J.

    2015-01-01

    Determination of variant pathogenicity represents a major challenge in the era of high-throughput sequencing. Erroneous categorization may result if variants affect genes that are in fact dispensable. We demonstrate that this also applies to rare, apparently unambiguous truncating mutations of an established disease gene. By whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a consanguineous family with congenital non-syndromic deafness, we unexpectedly identified a homozygous nonsense variant, p.Arg1066*, in AHI1, a gene associated with Joubert syndrome (JBTS), a severe recessive ciliopathy. None of four homozygotes expressed any signs of JBTS, and one of them had normal hearing, which also ruled out p.Arg1066* as the cause of deafness. Homozygosity mapping and WES in the only other reported JBTS family with a homozygous C-terminal truncation (p.Trp1088Leufs*16) confirmed AHI1 as disease gene, but based on a more N-terminal missense mutation impairing WD40-repeat formation. Morpholinos against N-terminal zebrafish Ahi1, orthologous to where human mutations cluster, produced a ciliopathy, but targeting near human p.Arg1066 and p.Trp1088 did not. Most AHI1 mutations in JBTS patients result in truncated protein lacking WD40-repeats and the SH3 domain; disease was hitherto attributed to loss of these protein interaction modules. Our findings indicate that normal development does not require the C-terminal SH3 domain. This has far-reaching implications, considering that variants like p.Glu984* identified by preconception screening (‘Kingsmore panel’) do not necessarily indicate JBTS carriership. Genomes of individuals with consanguineous background are enriched for homozygous variants that may unmask dispensable regions of disease genes and unrecognized false positives in diagnostic large-scale sequencing and preconception carrier screening. PMID:25616960

  2. Vanishing Clams on an Iberian Beach: Local Consequences and Global Implications of Accelerating Loss of Shells to Tourism

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski, Michał; Domènech, Rosa; Martinell, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Multi-decadal increase in shell removal by tourists, a process that may accelerate degradation of natural habitats, was quantified via two series of monthly surveys, conducted thirty years apart (1978–1981 and 2008–2010) in one small embayment on the Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula. Over the last three decades, the local tourist arrivals have increased almost three-fold (2.74), while the area has remained unaffected by urban encroachment and commercial fisheries. During the same time interval the abundance of mollusk shells along the shoreline decreased by a comparable factor (2.62) and was significantly and negatively correlated with tourist arrivals (r = −0.52). The strength of the correlation increased when data were restricted to months with high tourist arrivals (r = −0.72). In contrast, the maximum monthly wave energy (an indirect proxy for changes in rate of onshore shell transport) was not significantly correlated with shell abundance (r = 0.10). Similarly, rank dominance of common species, drilling predation intensity, and body size-frequency distribution patterns have all remained stable over recent decades. A four-fold increase in global tourist arrivals over the last 30 years may have induced a comparable worldwide acceleration in shell removal from marine shorelines, resulting in multiple, currently unquantifiable, habitat changes such as increased beach erosion, changes in calcium carbonate recycling, and declines in diversity and abundance of organisms, which are dependent on shell availability. PMID:24421895

  3. Vanishing clams on an Iberian beach: local consequences and global implications of accelerating loss of shells to tourism.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Michał; Domènech, Rosa; Martinell, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Multi-decadal increase in shell removal by tourists, a process that may accelerate degradation of natural habitats, was quantified via two series of monthly surveys, conducted thirty years apart (1978-1981 and 2008-2010) in one small embayment on the Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula. Over the last three decades, the local tourist arrivals have increased almost three-fold (2.74), while the area has remained unaffected by urban encroachment and commercial fisheries. During the same time interval the abundance of mollusk shells along the shoreline decreased by a comparable factor (2.62) and was significantly and negatively correlated with tourist arrivals (r = -0.52). The strength of the correlation increased when data were restricted to months with high tourist arrivals (r = -0.72). In contrast, the maximum monthly wave energy (an indirect proxy for changes in rate of onshore shell transport) was not significantly correlated with shell abundance (r = 0.10). Similarly, rank dominance of common species, drilling predation intensity, and body size-frequency distribution patterns have all remained stable over recent decades. A four-fold increase in global tourist arrivals over the last 30 years may have induced a comparable worldwide acceleration in shell removal from marine shorelines, resulting in multiple, currently unquantifiable, habitat changes such as increased beach erosion, changes in calcium carbonate recycling, and declines in diversity and abundance of organisms, which are dependent on shell availability.

  4. Valgus and varus deformity after wide-local excision, brachytherapy and external beam irradiation in two children with lower extremity synovial cell sarcoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Daniel T; Warner, William C; Neel, Michael D; Merchant, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Background Limb-salvage is a primary objective in the management of extremity soft-tissue sarcoma in adults and children. Wide-local excision combined with radiation therapy is effective in achieving local tumor control with acceptable morbidity and good functional outcomes for most patients. Case Presentation Two cases of deformity after wide-local excision, brachytherapy and external beam irradiation for lower-extremity synovial cell sarcoma are presented and discussed to highlight contributing factors, time course of radiation effects and orthopedic management. In an effort to spare normal tissues from the long-term effects of radiation therapy, more focal irradiation techniques have been applied to patients with musculoskeletal tumors including brachytherapy and conformal radiation therapy. As illustrated in this report, the use of these techniques results in the asymmetric irradiation of growth plates and contributes to the development of valgus or varus deformity and leg-length discrepancies. Conclusions Despite good functional outcomes, progressive deformity in both patients required epiphysiodesis more than 3 years after initial management. There is a dearth of information related to the effects of radiation therapy on the musculoskeletal system in children. Because limb-sparing approaches are to be highlighted in the next generation of cooperative group protocols for children with musculoskeletal tumors, documentation of the effects of surgery and radiation therapy will lead to improved decision making in the selection of the best treatment approach and in the follow-up of these patients. PMID:15333137

  5. Three-year experience with the Sophono in children with congenital conductive unilateral hearing loss: tolerability, audiometry, and sound localization compared to a bone-anchored hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Rik C; Agterberg, Martijn J H; Hol, Myrthe K S; Snik, Ad F M

    2016-10-01

    Bone conduction devices (BCDs) are advocated as an amplification option for patients with congenital conductive unilateral hearing loss (UHL), while other treatment options could also be considered. The current study compared a transcutaneous BCD (Sophono) with a percutaneous BCD (bone-anchored hearing aid, BAHA) in 12 children with congenital conductive UHL. Tolerability, audiometry, and sound localization abilities with both types of BCD were studied retrospectively. The mean follow-up was 3.6 years for the Sophono users (n = 6) and 4.7 years for the BAHA users (n = 6). In each group, two patients had stopped using their BCD. Tolerability was favorable for the Sophono. Aided thresholds with the Sophono were unsatisfactory, as they did not reach under a mean pure tone average of 30 dB HL. Sound localization generally improved with both the Sophono and the BAHA, although localization abilities did not reach the level of normal hearing children. These findings, together with previously reported outcomes, are important to take into account when counseling patients and their caretakers. The selection of a suitable amplification option should always be made deliberately and on individual basis for each patient in this diverse group of children with congenital conductive UHL.

  6. Intraoperative Localization of Tantalum Markers for Proton Beam Radiation of Choroidal Melanoma by an Opto-Electronic Navigation System: A Novel Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, Christoph A.; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E.; Foerster, Michael H.; Heufelder, Jens; Kowal, Jens H.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: External beam proton radiation therapy has been used since 1975 to treat choroidal melanoma. For tumor location determination during proton radiation treatment, surgical tantalum clips are registered with image data. This report introduces the intraoperative application of an opto-electronic navigation system to determine with high precision the position of the tantalum markers and their spatial relationship to the tumor and anatomical landmarks. The application of the technique in the first 4 patients is described. Methods and Materials: A navigated reference base was attached noninvasively to the eye, and a navigated pointer device was used to record the spatial position of the tantalum markers, the tumor, and anatomical landmarks. Measurement accuracy was assessed on ex vivo porcine eye specimen by repetitive recording of the tantalum marker positions. The method was applied intraoperatively on 4 patients undergoing routine tantalum clip surgery. The spatial position information delivered by the navigation system was compared to the geometric data generated by the EYEPLAN software. Results: In the ex vivo experiments, the maximum repetition error was 0.34 mm. For the intraoperative application, the root mean square error of paired-points matching of the marker positions from the navigation system and from the EYEPLAN software was 0.701-1.25 mm. Conclusions: Navigation systems are a feasible tool for accurate localization of tantalum markers and anatomic landmarks. They can provide additional geometric information, and therefore have the potential to increase the reliability and accuracy of external beam proton radiation therapy for choroidal melanoma.

  7. Health impact assessment and monetary valuation of IQ loss in pre-school children due to lead exposure through locally produced food.

    PubMed

    Bierkens, J; Buekers, J; Van Holderbeke, M; Torfs, R

    2012-01-01

    A case study has been performed which involved the full chain assessment from policy drivers to health effect quantification of lead exposure through locally produced food on loss of IQ in pre-school children at the population level across the EU-27, including monetary valuation of the estimated health impact. Main policy scenarios cover the period from 2000 to 2020 and include the most important Community policy developments expected to affect the environmental release of lead (Pb) and corresponding human exposure patterns. Three distinct scenarios were explored: the emission situation based on 2000 data, a business-as-usual scenario (BAU) up to 2010 and 2020 and a scenario incorporating the most likely technological change expected (Most Feasible Technical Reductions, MFTR) in response to current and future legislation. Consecutive model calculations (MSCE-HM, WATSON, XtraFOOD, IEUBK) were performed by different partners on the project as part of the full chain approach to derive estimates of blood lead (B-Pb) levels in children as a consequence of the consumption of local produce. The estimated B-Pb levels were translated into an average loss of IQ points/child using an empirical relationship based on a meta-analysis performed by Schwartz (1994). The calculated losses in IQ points were subsequently further translated into the average cost/child using a cost estimate of €10.000 per loss of IQ point based on data from a literature review. The estimated average reduction of cost/child (%) for all countries considered in 2010 under BAU and MFTR are 12.16 and 18.08% as compared to base line conditions, respectively. In 2020 the percentages amount to 20.19 and 23.39%. The case study provides an example of the full-chain impact pathway approach taking into account all foreseeable pathways both for assessing the environmental fate and the associated human exposure and the mode of toxic action to arrive at quantitative estimates of health impacts at the individual and

  8. Electron beam lithography designed silver nano-disks used as label free nano-biosensors based on localized surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Cinel, Neval A; Bütün, Serkan; Özbay, Ekmel

    2012-01-30

    We present a label-free, optical nano-biosensor based on the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) that is observed at the metal-dielectric interface of silver nano-disk arrays located periodically on a sapphire substrate by Electron-Beam Lithography (EBL). The nano-disk array was designed by finite-difference and time-domain (FDTD) algorithm-based simulations. Refractive index sensitivity was calculated experimentally as 221-354 nm/RIU for different sized arrays. The sensing mechanism was first tested with a biotin-avidin pair, and then a preliminary trial for sensing heat-killed Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 bacteria was done. Although the study is at an early stage, the results indicate that such a plasmonic structure can be applied to bio-sensing applications and then extended to the detection of specific bacteria species as a fast and low cost alternative.

  9. Prognostic Value of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Beam Radiation Therapy for Locally Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Multicentric Long-Term Outcome Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Montero, Angel; Polo, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Carmen; Cuervo, Miguel; San Julian, Mikel; and others

    2014-01-01

    Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurrent soft tissue sarcoma (LR-STS) patients treated with a multidisciplinary approach. Methods and Materials: Patients with a histologic diagnosis of LR-STS (extremity, 43%; trunk wall, 24%; retroperitoneum, 33%) and no distant metastases who underwent radical surgery and intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT; median dose, 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. In addition, 62% received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT; median dose, 50 Gy). Results: From 1986 to 2012, a total of 103 patients from 3 Spanish expert IOERT institutions were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range, 2-311 months), 5-year local control (LC) was 60%. The 5-year IORT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were 73%, 43%, and 52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, no EBRT to treat the LR-STS (P=.02) and microscopically involved margin resection status (P=.04) retained significance in relation to LC. With regard to IORT in-field control, only not delivering EBRT to the LR-STS retained significance in the multivariate analysis (P=.03). Conclusion: This joint analysis revealed that surgical margin and EBRT affect LC but that, given the high risk of distant metastases, DFS remains modest. Intensified local treatment needs to be further tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant systemic therapy.

  10. Loss of Expression and Function of SOCS3 Is an Early Event in HNSCC: Altered Subcellular Localization as a Possible Mechanism Involved in Proliferation, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rossa, Carlos; Sommer, Gunhild; Spolidorio, Luis C.; Rosenzweig, Steven A.; Watson, Dennis K.; Kirkwood, Keith L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) is an inducible endogenous negative regulator of signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Epigenetic silencing of SOCS3 has been shown in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), which is associated with increased activation of STAT3. There is scarce information on the functional role of the reduction of SOCS3 expression and no information on altered subcellular localization of SOCS3 in HNSCC. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed endogenous SOCS3 expression in different HNSCC cell lines by RT-qPCR and western blot. Immunofluorescence and western blot were used to study the subcellular localization of endogenous SOCS3 induced by IL-6. Overexpression of SOCS3 by CMV-driven plasmids and siRNA-mediated inhibition of endogenous SOCS3 were used to verify the role of SOCS3 on tumor cell proliferation, viability, invasion and migration in vitro. In vivo relevance of SOCS3 expression in HNSCC was studied by quantitative immunohistochemistry of commercially-available tissue microarrays. Endogenous expression of SOCS3 was heterogeneous in four HNSCC cell lines and surprisingly preserved in most of these cell lines. Subcellular localization of endogenous SOCS3 in the HNSCC cell lines was predominantly nuclear as opposed to cytoplasmic in non-neoplasic epithelial cells. Overexpression of SOCS3 produced a relative increase of the protein in the cytoplasmic compartment and significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas inhibition of endogenous nuclear SOCS3 did not affect these events. Analysis of tissue microarrays indicated that loss of SOCS3 is an early event in HNSCC and was correlated with tumor size and histological grade of dysplasia, but a considerable proportion of cases presented detectable expression of SOCS3. Conclusion Our data support a role for SOCS3 as a tumor suppressor gene in HNSCC with relevance on proliferation and invasion processes and suggests

  11. Further localization of the gene for nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) in 15 Australasian families: Linkage and loss of heterozygosity

    SciTech Connect

    Chenevix-Trench, G.; Wicking, C.; Berkman, J.; Sharpe, H.; Hockey, A.; Haan, E.; Oley, C.; Ravine, D.; Turner, A.; Searle, J.

    1993-09-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS; basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome) is a cancer-predisposition syndrome characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and diverse developmental defects. The gene for NBCCS has been mapped to 9q23.1-q31 in North Americal and European families. In addition, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for genetic markers in this region has been detected in sporadic BCCs, indicating that the NBCCs gene is probably a tumor-suppressor gene. In this study the authors have determined that the NBCCS gene is also linked to this region in Australasian pedigrees and that there is no significant evidence of heterogeneity. They have defined the localization of the gene by multipoint and haplotype analysis of 15 families, using four microsatellite markers. LOH at these loci was detected in 50% of sporadic BCCs, a rate that is significantly higher than that in other skin lesions used as controls. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Detection of Local, Regional, and Distant Recurrence in Patients With PSA Relapse After External-Beam Radiotherapy Using {sup 11}C-Choline Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Pruim, Jan; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Leliveld, Anna M.; Nijman, Rien J.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Jong, Igle J. de

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: An elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level cannot distinguish between local-regional recurrences and the presence of distant metastases after treatment with curative intent for prostate cancer. With the advent of salvage treatment such as cryotherapy, it has become important to localize the site of recurrence (local or distant). In this study, the potential of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) to identify site of recurrence was investigated in patients with rising PSA after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy patients with histologically proven prostate cancer treated with EBRT and showing biochemical recurrence as defined by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus statement and 10 patients without recurrence underwent a PET scan using 400 MBq {sup 11}C-choline intravenously. Biopsy-proven histology from the site of suspicion, findings with other imaging modalities, clinical follow-up and/or response to adjuvant therapy were used as comparative references. Results: None of the 10 patients without biochemical recurrence had a positive PET scan. Fifty-seven of 70 patients with biochemical recurrence (median PSA 9.1 ng/mL; mean PSA 12.3 ng/mL) showed an abnormal uptake pattern (sensitivity 81%). The site of recurrence was only local in 41 of 57 patients (mean PSA 11.1 ng/mL at scan), locoregionally and/or distant in 16 of 57 patients (mean PSA 17.7 ng/mL). Overall the positive predictive value and negative predictive value for {sup 11}C-choline PET scan were 1.0 and 0.44 respectively. Accuracy was 84%. Conclusions: {sup 11}C-choline PET scan is a sensitive technique to identify the site of recurrence in patients with PSA relapse after EBRT for prostate cancer.

  13. Energetic ion losses caused by magnetohydrodynamic activity resonant and non-resonant with energetic ions in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kunihiro; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Toi, Kazuo; Shimizu, Akihiro; Spong, Donald A.; Osakabe, Masaki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; the LHD Experiment Group

    2014-09-01

    Experiments to reveal energetic ion dynamics associated with magnetohydrodynamic activity are ongoing in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Interactions between beam-driven toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) and energetic ions have been investigated. Energetic ion losses induced by beam-driven burst TAEs have been observed using a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in neutral beam-heated high β plasmas. The loss flux of co-going beam ions increases as the TAE amplitude increases. In addition to this, the expulsion of beam ions associated with edge-localized modes (ELMs) has been also recognized in LHD. The SLIP has indicated that beam ions having co-going and barely co-going orbits are affected by ELMs. The relation between ELM amplitude and ELM-induced loss has a dispersed structure. To understand the energetic ion loss process, a numerical simulation based on an orbit-following model, DELTA5D, that incorporates magnetic fluctuations is performed. The calculation result shows that energetic ions confined in the interior region are lost due to TAE instability, with a diffusive process characterizing their loss. For the ELM, energetic ions existing near the confinement/loss boundary are lost through a convective process. We found that the ELM-induced loss flux measured by SLIP changes with the ELM phase. This relation between the ELM amplitude and measured ELM-induced loss results in a more dispersed loss structure.

  14. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eunpi; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A.; Kurland, Brenda F.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  15. Dosimetric Evaluation Between Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Body Mass Index for Intracranial, Thoracic, and Pelvic Localization

    SciTech Connect

    VanAntwerp, April E.; Raymond, Sarah M.; Addington, Mark C.; Gajdos, Stephen; Vassil, Andrew; Xia, Ping

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose for organs at risk (OAR) within the cranium, thorax, and pelvis from megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). Using a clinical treatment planning system, CBCT doses were calculated from 60 patient datasets using 27.4 x 27.4 cm{sup 2} field size and 200{sup o} arc length. The body mass indices (BMIs) for these patients range from 17.2-48.4 kg/m{sup 2}. A total of 60 CBCT plans were created and calculated with heterogeneity corrections, with monitor units (MU) that varied from 8, 4, and 2 MU per plan. The isocenters of these plans were placed at defined anatomical structures. The maximum dose, dose to the isocenter, and mean dose to the selected critical organs were analyzed. The study found that maximum and isocenter doses were weakly associated with BMI, but linearly associated with the total MU. Average maximum/isocenter doses in the cranium were 10.0 ({+-} 0.18)/7.0 ({+-} 0.08) cGy, 5.0 ({+-} 0.09)/3.5 ({+-} 0.05) cGy, and 2.5 ({+-} .04)/1.8 ({+-} 0.05) cGy for 8, 4, and 2 MU, respectively. Similar trends but slightly larger maximum/isocenter doses were found in the thoracic and pelvic regions. For the cranial region, the average mean doses with a total of 8 MU to the eye, lens, and brain were 9.7 ({+-} 0.12) cGy, 9.1 ({+-} 0.16) cGy, and 7.2 ({+-} 0.10) cGy, respectively. For the thoracic region, the average mean doses to the lung, heart, and spinal cord were 6.6 ({+-} 0.05) cGy, 6.9 ({+-} 1.2) cGy, and 4.7 ({+-} 0.8) cGy, respectively. For the pelvic region, the average mean dose to the femoral heads was 6.4 ({+-} 1.1) cGy. The MV-CBCT doses were linearly associated with the total MU but weakly dependent on patients' BMIs. Daily MV-CBCT has a cumulative effect on the total body dose and critical organs, which should be carefully considered for clinical impacts.

  16. Multivariate normal tissue complication probability modeling of gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of radio-induced gastrointestinal (GI) complications is affected by several factors other than the dose to the rectum such as patient characteristics, hormonal or antihypertensive therapy, and acute rectal toxicity. Purpose of this work is to study clinical and dosimetric parameters impacting on late GI toxicity after prostate external beam radiotherapy (RT) and to establish multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced GI complications. Methods A total of 57 men who had undergone definitive RT for prostate cancer were evaluated for GI events classified using the RTOG/EORTC scoring system. Their median age was 73 years (range 53–85). The patients were assessed for GI toxicity before, during, and periodically after RT completion. Several clinical variables along with rectum dose-volume parameters (Vx) were collected and their correlation to GI toxicity was analyzed by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (Rs). Multivariate logistic regression method using resampling techniques was applied to select model order and parameters for NTCP modeling. Model performance was evaluated through the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results At a median follow-up of 30 months, 37% (21/57) patients developed G1-2 acute GI events while 33% (19/57) were diagnosed with G1-2 late GI events. An NTCP model for late mild/moderate GI toxicity based on three variables including V65 (OR = 1.03), antihypertensive and/or anticoagulant (AH/AC) drugs (OR = 0.24), and acute GI toxicity (OR = 4.3) was selected as the most predictive model (Rs = 0.47, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.79). This three-variable model outperforms the logistic model based on V65 only (Rs = 0.28, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.69). Conclusions We propose a logistic NTCP model for late GI toxicity considering not only rectal irradiation dose but also clinical patient-specific factors. Accordingly, the risk of G1

  17. Theoretical substantiation of biological efficacy enhancement for β-delayed particle decay {sup 9}C beam: A Monte Carlo study in combination with analysis with the local effect model approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Liheng; Yan, Yuanlin; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Li, Qiang Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Fu, Tingyan; He, Pengbo

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To improve the efficacy of heavy ion therapy, β-delayed particle decay {sup 9}C beam as a double irradiation source for cancer therapy has been proposed. The authors’ previous experiment showed that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values at the depths around the Bragg peak of a {sup 9}C beam were enhanced and compared to its stable counterpart {sup 12}C beam. The purpose of this study was to explore the nature of the biological efficacy enhancement theoretically. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted in this study. First a simplified cell model was established so as to form a tumor tissue. Subsequently, the tumor tissue was imported into the Monte Carlo simulation software package GATE and then the tumor cells were virtually irradiated with comparable {sup 9}C and {sup 12}C beams, respectively, in the simulations. The transportation and particle deposition data of the {sup 9}C and {sup 12}C beams, derived from the GATE simulations, were analyzed with the authors’ local effect model implementation so as to deduce cell survival fractions. Results: The particles emitted from the decay process of deposited {sup 9}C particles around a cell nucleus increased the dose delivered to the nucleus and elicited clustered damages around the secondary particles’ trajectories. Therefore, compared to the {sup 12}C beam, the RBE value of the {sup 9}C beam increased at the depths around their Bragg peaks. Conclusions: Collectively, the increased local doses and clustered damages due to the decayed particles emitted from deposited {sup 9}C particles led to the RBE enhancement in contrast with the {sup 12}C beam. Thus, the enhanced RBE effect of a {sup 9}C beam for a simplified tumor model was shown theoretically in this study.

  18. Chest Reirradiation With External Beam Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremic, Branislav; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2011-07-15

    Lung cancer remains one of the most prevalent and deadliest malignancies worldwide. For 2008, the International Agency for the Research of Cancer (IARC) estimated 1.6 million new cancer cases of lung cancer (1.095 million in men and 0.514 million in women), with an associated 1.38 million deaths (0.95 million in men and 0.43 million in women). In the United States, lung cancer remained the number one cancer killer for both sexes in 2009, with 219,440 new cases diagnosed overall and an estimated 159,390 deaths. Recent biological and technological advances in lung cancer management notwithstanding, disease recurrence is still the dominant cause of death after initial treatment of lung cancer. This is irrespective of histology (NSCLC vs. small cell cancer), stage (early vs. locally advanced vs. metastatic), or initial treatment (surgery, RT, chemotherapy [CHT] or combinations thereof). Time to recurrence of lung cancer is not predictable, with some failures appearing early and others manifesting years later. Patterns of failure are also not easily anticipated as local (e.g., lung parenchyma, bronchial stump, or chest wall), regional (e.g., mediastinal lymph nodes), or distant (e.g., brain, liver, or bone) recurrences can appear alone or in combination. Whatever the presentation, recurrent lung cancer has historically been judged almost universally fatal as only rarely did efforts at treatment lead to control, let alone cure. More importantly, recurrence is often associated with significant distress requiring substantial supportive treatment. Recurrence leads ultimately to a significant decrease in patient quality of life, making further interventions even more limited. Because of the bleak outcome associated with recurrence, palliative retreatment has nonetheless often been attempted precisely as a means of preventing this decline in quality of life and/or reversing symptoms. However, complicating these attempts at retreatment has been the forms of initial therapy

  19. Localized Dose Enhancement to Tumor Blood Vessel Endothelial Cells via Megavoltage X-rays and Targeted Gold Nanoparticles: New Potential for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Tumor endothelial cell damage during radiation therapy may contribute significantly to tumor eradication and treatment efficacy. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) delivered preferentially to the walls of tumor blood vessels produce low-energy, short-range photoelectrons during external beam radiotherapy, boosting dose to the tumor microvasculature. In this study dosimetry at the single-cell level is used to estimate the anticipated AuNP-mediated dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells during 6-MV X-ray irradiation. Methods and Materials: Endothelial cells are modeled as thin slabs with 100-nm-diameter AuNPs attached within the blood vessel. The number of photoelectrons emitted per AuNP per gray of X-rays is computed at multiple points along the external beam central axis by use of a Monte Carlo-generated energy fluence spectrum. The energy deposited from AuNP emissions to the endothelium is calculated based on an analytic method incorporating the energy-loss formula of Cole. The endothelial dose enhancement factor (EDEF) is the ratio of the overall (externally plus internally generated) dose to endothelial cells in the presence of AuNPs to the dose without AuNPs (from the external beam only). Results: At 20-cm depth, the EDEF is 1.7 (70% dose increase) for an intravascular AuNP concentration of 30 mg/g. Most of this dose enhancement arises from the low-energy (approximately 100 keV) portion of the linear accelerator X-ray spectrum. Furthermore, for AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 140 mg/g, EDEF values of 1.2 to 4.4 (20-340% dose increase) are calculated. Conclusions: In contrast to calculations assuming that AuNPs distributed homogeneously throughout the target volume (macrodosimetry), our cellular microdosimetry calculations predict a major dose enhancement to tumor microvasculature from conventional linear accelerator X-rays. This effect may enable the delivery of ablative therapeutic doses to these sensitive microstructures while maintaining

  20. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40–47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients. PMID:26207116

  1. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study.

    PubMed

    Kukiełka, Andrzej M; Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40-47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients.

  2. Non-inductive current built-up by local electron cyclotron heating and current drive with a 28 GHz focused beam on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, Takumi; Idei, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Ohwada, Hiroaki; Zushi, Hideki; Hanada, Kazuaki; Kariya, Tsuyoshi; Mishra, Kishore; Shikama, Taichi; Quest Team

    2016-10-01

    The plasma current can be driven solely by injecting electron cyclotron waves (ECWs) in spherical tokamak (ST) configuration. A system of 28 GHz gyrotron (maximum power: 270 kW) is renewed and reinstalled on QUEST. A focused ECW beam, whose diameter is about 5 cm at the second harmonic resonance, is injected for local ECW heating and current drive. The local power density at resonance exceeds 75 MW/m2 at an injection power of 150 kW. The incident ECW polarization can be adjusted employing the phase shifter consisting of two corrugated plates. During 1.25 second pulse of ECH, plasma current is built up to Ip = 70 kA fully non-inductively with a core electron density of ne > 1018 m-3. The closed flux in such ST plasma is determined at the inboard limiter on the center stack. Energetic electrons are also responsible for the pressure and equilibrium. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI (15H04231, 15K17800), NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS13KUTR085, NIFS11KUTR069, NIFS16KUTR114).

  3. Accuracy of software designed for automated localization of the inferior alveolar nerve canal on cone beam CT images

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Ali; Kashkouli, Sadegh; Soltanimehr, Elham; Ghofrani Jahromi, Mohsen; Sanaeian Pourshirazi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to design and evaluate a new method for automated localization of the inferior alveolar nerve canal on CBCT images. Methods: The proposed method is based on traversing both panoramic and cross-sectional slices. For the panoramic slices, morphological skeletonization is imposed, and a modified Hough transform is used while traversing the cross-sectional slices. A total of 40 CBCT images were randomly selected. Two experts twice located the inferior alveolar nerve canal during two examinations set 6 weeks apart. Agreement between experts was achieved, and the result of this manual technique was considered the gold standard for our study. The distances for the automated method and those determined using the gold standard method were calculated and recorded. The mean time required for the automated detection was also recorded. Results: The average mean distance error from the baseline was 0.75 ± 0.34 mm. In all, 86% of the detected points had a mean error of <1 mm compared with those determined by the manual gold standard method. Conclusions: The proposed method is far more accurate and faster than previous methods. It also provides more accuracy than human annotation within a shorter time. PMID:26652929

  4. A phase I study on combined therapy with proton-beam radiotherapy and in situ tumor vaccination for locally advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton-beam radiotherapy (PBT) has been shown to be effective to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a nonsurgical local treatment option. However, HCC still remains as one of the most difficult cancers to be cured because of frequent recurrences. Thus, methods to inhibit the recurrence need to be explored. To prevent the HCC recurrence, we here report on a prospective phase I study of ‘in situ’ tumor vaccination using CalTUMP, a newly developed immunoadjuvant consisting of BCG extract bound to hydroxyapatite and microparticulated tuberculin, following local PBT for HCC. Methods Patients with locally advanced recurrent HCC, which had been heavily pretreated with various treatments, were enrolled. PBT was performed with the conventional method to the target HCC. Subsequently, CalTUMP was injected into the same irradiated-tumor three times at one-week intervals. Three dose-levels of CalTUMP (1/10, 1/3, and 1/1) were administered to 3 patients each. Vital signs, blood samples, ultrasound, and computed tomographic scans were monitored to evaluate the safety. Results Three intratumoral injections of CalTUMP following PBT (median dose: 72.6 GyE) were accomplished in 9 patients. Transient low-grade fever and minor laboratory changes were observed in 7 patients after CalTUMP injections. No other treatment-related adverse events were observed. Median progression-free survival was 6.0 months (range: 2.1-14.2) and 4 patients were progression-free for more than 1 year. Conclusions Intratumoral injection of CalTUMP following PBT was feasible and safe in patients with heavily pre-treated HCC. Further clinical studies to evaluate the efficacy of this in situ tumor vaccination are warranted. PMID:24131485

  5. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  6. Results of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy containing multimodality treatment for locally unresectable T4 rectal cancer: a pooled analysis of the Mayo Clinic Rochester and Catharina Hospital Eindhoven

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Fabian A.; Haddock, Michael G.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Kusters, Miranda; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A. P.; van den Berg, Hetty A.; Nelson, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to analyse the pooled results of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) containing multimodality treatment of locally advanced T4 rectal cancer, initially unresectable for cure, from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA (MCR) and Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (CHE), both major referral centers for locally advanced rectal cancer. A rectal tumor is called locally unresectable for cure if after full clinical work-up infiltration into the surrounding structures or organs has been demonstrated, which would result in positive surgical margins if resection was the initial component of treatment. This was the reason to refer these patients to the IOERT program of one of the centers. Methods In the period from 1981 to 2010, 417 patients with locally unresectable T4 rectal carcinomas at initial presentation were treated with multimodality treatment including IOERT at either one of the two centres. The preferred treatment approach was preoperative (chemo) radiation and intended radical surgery combined with IOERT. Risk factors for local recurrence (LR), cancer specific survival, disease free survival and distant metastases (DM) were assessed. Results A total of 306 patients (73%) underwent a R0 resection. LRs and metastases occurred more frequently after an R1-2 resection (P<0.001 and P<0.001 respectively). Preoperative chemoradiation (preop CRT) was associated with a higher probability of having a R0 resection. Waiting time after preoperative treatment was inversely related with the chance of developing a LR, especially after R+ resection. In 16% of all cases a LR developed. Five-year disease free survival and overall survival (OS) were 55% and 56% respectively. Conclusions An acceptable survival can be achieved in treatment of patients with initially unresectable T4 rectal cancer with combined modality therapy that includes preop CRT and IOERT. Completeness of the resection is the most important predictive and

  7. Beam Rounders for Circular Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; Ya. Derbenev

    2001-07-01

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  8. Beam rounders for circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov and S. Nagaitsev

    2002-12-10

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  9. Observability of localized magnetoplasmons in quantum dots: Scrutinizing the eligibility of far-infrared, Raman, and electron-energy-loss spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a one-component, quasi-zero dimensional, quantum plasma exposed to a parabolic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. If the size of such a system as can be realized in the semiconducting quantum dots is on the order of the de-Broglie wavelength, the electronic and optical properties become highly tunable. Then the quantum size effects challenge the observation of many-particle phenomena such as the magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron energy-loss spectrum. An exact analytical solution of the problem leads us to infer that these many-particle phenomena are, in fact, dictated by the generalized Kohn's theorem (GKT) in the long-wavelength limit. Maneuvering the confinement and/or the magnetic field furnishes the resonance energies capable of being explored with the FIR, Raman, and/or electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. This implies that either of these probes is competent in observing the localized magnetoplasmons in the system. As an application of the rigorous analytical diagnosis of the system, we have presented various pertinent single-particle, such as Fock-Darwin spectrum, Fermi energy, zigzag excitation spectrum, and magneto-optical transitions, and the many-particle phenomena, such as magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron energy-loss probability. In the latter, the energy position of the resonance peaks is observed to be independent of the electron-electron interactions and hence of the number of electrons in the quantum dot in compliance with the GKT. It is found that both confinement potential and magnetic field play a decisive role in influencing the aforementioned many-particle phenomena. Specifically, increasing (decreasing) the strength of the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots and results into a blue (red) shift in the respective spectra. Intensifying the magnetic field has two-fold effects in the resonance

  10. Robust sampling-sourced numerical retrieval algorithm for optical energy loss function based on log-log mesh optimization and local monotonicity preserving Steffen spline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglevanny, I. I.; Smolar, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new technique of interpolation of the energy-loss function (ELF) in solids sampled by empirical optical spectra. Finding appropriate interpolation methods for ELFs poses several challenges. The sampled ELFs are usually very heterogeneous, can originate from various sources thus so called "data gaps" can appear, and significant discontinuities and multiple high outliers can be present. As a result an interpolation based on those data may not perform well at predicting reasonable physical results. Reliable interpolation tools, suitable for ELF applications, should therefore satisfy several important demands: accuracy and predictive power, robustness and computational efficiency, and ease of use. We examined the effect on the fitting quality due to different interpolation schemes with emphasis on ELF mesh optimization procedures and we argue that the optimal fitting should be based on preliminary log-log scaling data transforms by which the non-uniformity of sampled data distribution may be considerably reduced. The transformed data are then interpolated by local monotonicity preserving Steffen spline. The result is a piece-wise smooth fitting curve with continuous first-order derivatives that passes through all data points without spurious oscillations. Local extrema can occur only at grid points where they are given by the data, but not in between two adjacent grid points. It is found that proposed technique gives the most accurate results and also that its computational time is short. Thus, it is feasible using this simple method to address practical problems associated with interaction between a bulk material and a moving electron. A compact C++ implementation of our algorithm is also presented.

  11. A multi-component evaporation model for beam melting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Alexander; Forster, Vera E.; Körner, Carolin

    2017-02-01

    In additive manufacturing using laser or electron beam melting technologies, evaporation losses and changes in chemical composition are known issues when processing alloys with volatile elements. In this paper, a recently described numerical model based on a two-dimensional free surface lattice Boltzmann method is further developed to incorporate the effects of multi-component evaporation. The model takes into account the local melt pool composition during heating and fusion of metal powder. For validation, the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V is melted by selective electron beam melting and analysed using mass loss measurements and high-resolution microprobe imaging. Numerically determined evaporation losses and spatial distributions of aluminium compare well with experimental data. Predictions of the melt pool formation in bulk samples provide insight into the competition between the loss of volatile alloying elements from the irradiated surface and their advective redistribution within the molten region.

  12. Continuous 7-Days-A-Week External Beam Irradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Final Results of the Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Serkies, Krystyna; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of definitive continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation without breaks between external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1998 and December 1999, 30 patients with International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Stage IIB or IIIB cervical cancer were included in a prospective Phase I/II study of continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation, to the total Manchester point B dose of 40.0-57.6 Gy. The first 13 patients (Group A) were given a daily tumor dose of 1.6 Gy, and the remaining 17 patients (Group B) were given 1.8 Gy. One or two immediate brachytherapy applications (point A dose 10-20 Gy, each) were performed in 28 cases. Results: Two patients did not complete the irradiation because of apparent early progression of disease during the irradiation. Eleven of the 28 evaluable patients (39%; 45% and 35% in Groups A and B, respectively) completed their treatment within the prescribed overall treatment time. Acute toxicity (including severe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 and 4 effects in 40%) was experienced by 83% of patients and resulted in unplanned treatment interruptions in 40% of all patients (31% and 47% of patients in Groups A and B, respectively). Severe intestinal side effects occurred in 31% and 41% of Patients in Groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.71). The 5-year overall survival probability was 33%. Cancer recurrence occurred in 63% of patients: 20% inside and 57% outside the pelvis. Cumulative incidence of late severe bowel and urinary bladder toxicity at 24 months was 15%. Conclusion: Continuous irradiation in locally advanced cervical cancer is associated with a high incidence of severe acute toxicity, resulting in unplanned treatment interruptions. Late severe effects and survival after continuous radiotherapy do not substantially differ from

  13. Hemoglobin levels do not predict biochemical outcome for localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy and external-beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Howard Huaihan . E-mail: hpai@bccancer.bc.ca; Ludgate, Charles; Pickles, Tom; Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc.; Agranovich, Alex; Berthelet, Eric; Duncan, Graeme; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Kwan, Winkle; Lim, Jan; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether hemoglobin (Hb) levels affect outcome in men with localized prostate adenocarcinoma (LPA) treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy (NAST) and external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 563 men with LPA treated with NAST (median: 5.3 months) and EBRT who had Hb levels during treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including the following Hb variables, were subjected to univariate and multivariable analyses to identify factors that predict biochemical control (bNED) and overall survival (OS): pre-EBRT Hb, Hb nadir during EBRT, and change in Hb from pre-EBRT to nadir during EBRT. Results: Median PSA follow-up was 4.25 years. Forty-nine percent of men were anemic during EBRT, with a median Hb of 13.4 g/dL, and 68% experienced a decline in Hb from pre-EBRT to during EBRT of median 0.6 g/dL. Five-year Nadir + 2 bNED and OS rates were similar for anemic and nonanemic patients during EBRT. High percent-positive biopsies, PSA and Gleason score, and use of AA monotherapy predicted worse bNED. High stage and age predicted worse OS. Hb variables were not predictive of bNED or OS. Conclusions: Anemia is a common side effect of NAST and is usually mild. Hb levels, however, do not predict biochemical control or survival.

  14. Site-Specific Preparation of Intact Solid-Liquid Interfaces by Label-Free In Situ Localization and Cryo-Focused Ion Beam Lift-Out.

    PubMed

    Zachman, Michael J; Asenath-Smith, Emily; Estroff, Lara A; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2016-12-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows atomic scale characterization of solid-solid interfaces, but has seen limited applications to solid-liquid interfaces due to the volatility of liquids in the microscope vacuum. Although cryo-electron microscopy is routinely used to characterize hydrated samples stabilized by rapid freezing, sample thinning is required to access the internal interfaces of thicker specimens. Here, we adapt cryo-focused ion beam (FIB) "lift-out," a technique recently developed for biological specimens, to prepare intact internal solid-liquid interfaces for high-resolution structural and chemical analysis by cryo-STEM. To guide the milling process we introduce a label-free in situ method of localizing subsurface structures in suitable materials by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate the depth-probing capability of the technique, and show good qualitative agreement with experiment. We also detail procedures to produce homogeneously thin lamellae, which enable nanoscale structural, elemental, and chemical analysis of intact solid-liquid interfaces by analytical cryo-STEM. This work demonstrates the potential of cryo-FIB lift-out and cryo-STEM for understanding physical and chemical processes at solid-liquid interfaces.

  15. Self-organised silicide nanodot patterning by medium-energy ion beam sputtering of Si(100): local correlation between the morphology and metal content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Galiana, B.; Lorenz, K.; Palomares, FJ; Bahena, D.; Ballesteros, C.; Hernandez-Calderón, I.; Vázquez, L.

    2016-11-01

    We have produced self-organised silicide nanodot patterns by medium-energy ion beam sputtering (IBS) of silicon targets with a simultaneous and isotropic molybdenum supply. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies show that these patterns are qualitatively similar to those produced thus far at low ion energies. We have determined the relevance of the ion species on the pattern ordering and properties. For the higher ordered patterns produced by Xe+ ions, the pattern wavelength depends linearly on the ion energy. The dot nanostructures are silicide-rich as assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and emerge in height due to their lower sputtering yield, as observed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, a long wavelength corrugation is observed on the surface which is correlated with both the Mo content and the dot pattern properties. Thus, as assessed by electron microscopy, the protrusions are Mo-rich with higher and more spaced dots on their surface whereas the valleys are Mo-poor with smaller dots that are closer to each other. These findings indicate that there is a correlation between the local metal content of the surface and the nanodot pattern properties both at the nanodot and the large corrugation scales. These results contribute to advancing the understanding of this interesting nanofabrication method and aid in developing a comprehensive theory of nanodot pattern formation and evolution.

  16. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ras, D. Schäfer, N.; Baldaz, N.; Brunken, S.; Boit, C.

    2015-07-15

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2}/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe{sub 2} layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w{sup 2} and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  17. Self-organised silicide nanodot patterning by medium-energy ion beam sputtering of Si(100): local correlation between the morphology and metal content.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Cubero, A; Galiana, B; Lorenz, K; Palomares, F J; Bahena, D; Ballesteros, C; Hernandez-Calderón, I; Vázquez, L

    2016-11-04

    We have produced self-organised silicide nanodot patterns by medium-energy ion beam sputtering (IBS) of silicon targets with a simultaneous and isotropic molybdenum supply. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies show that these patterns are qualitatively similar to those produced thus far at low ion energies. We have determined the relevance of the ion species on the pattern ordering and properties. For the higher ordered patterns produced by Xe(+) ions, the pattern wavelength depends linearly on the ion energy. The dot nanostructures are silicide-rich as assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and emerge in height due to their lower sputtering yield, as observed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, a long wavelength corrugation is observed on the surface which is correlated with both the Mo content and the dot pattern properties. Thus, as assessed by electron microscopy, the protrusions are Mo-rich with higher and more spaced dots on their surface whereas the valleys are Mo-poor with smaller dots that are closer to each other. These findings indicate that there is a correlation between the local metal content of the surface and the nanodot pattern properties both at the nanodot and the large corrugation scales. These results contribute to advancing the understanding of this interesting nanofabrication method and aid in developing a comprehensive theory of nanodot pattern formation and evolution.

  18. Beam-beam simulations for separated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-04-10

    We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong-strong gaussian code for separated beams for the LHC and RHIC. The frequency spectrum produced by the beam-beam collisions is readily obtained and offers a good opportunity for experimental comparisons. Although our results for the emittance blowup are preliminary, we conclude that, for nominal parameter values, there is no significant difference between separated beams and center-on-center collisions.

  19. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  20. The Relationship Between Local Recurrence and Radiotherapy Treatment Volume for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy and Function Preservation Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Parent, Amy L.; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Svensson, Jon; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the geometric relationship between local recurrence (LR) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) volumes for soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients treated with function-preserving surgery and RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 768 (7.8%) STS patients treated with combined therapy within our institution from 1990 through 2006 developed an LR. Thirty-two received preoperative RT, 16 postoperative RT, and 12 preoperative RT plus a postoperative boost. Treatment records, RT simulation images, and diagnostic MRI/CT data sets of the original and LR disease were retrospectively compared. For LR location analysis, three RT target volumes were defined according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 29 as follows: (1) the gross tumor or operative bed; (2) the treatment volume (TV) extending 5 cm longitudinally beyond the tumor or operative bed unless protected by intact barriers to spread and at least 1-2 cm axially (the TV was enclosed by the isodose curve representing the prescribed target absorbed dose [TAD] and accounted for target/patient setup uncertainty and beam characteristics), and (3) the irradiated volume (IRV) that received at least 50% of the TAD, including the TV. LRs were categorized as developing in field within the TV, marginal (on the edge of the IRV), and out of field (occurring outside of the IRV). Results: Forty-nine tumors relapsed in field (6.4% overall). Nine were out of field (1.1% overall), and 2 were marginal (0.3% overall). Conclusions: The majority of STS tumors recur in field, indicating that the incidence of LR may be affected more by differences in biologic and molecular characteristics rather than aberrations in RT dose or target volume coverage. In contrast, only two patients relapsed at the IRV boundary, suggesting that the risk of a marginal relapse is low when the TV is appropriately defined. These data support the accurate delivery of optimal RT volumes in the most precise way using advanced

  1. Excitation cross sections for the ns 2S yields np 2P resonance transitions in Mg(+) (n = 3) and Zn(+) (n = 4) using electron-energy-loss and merged-beams methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Mitroy, J.; Tayal, S. S.; Henry, Ronald J. W.; Man, K.-F.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-excitation cross sections are reported for the 3s 2S yields 3p 2P(h, k) resonance transition in Mg(+) at energies from threshold (4.43 eV) to approximately 9 times threshold (40.0 eV). The electron-energy-loss merged-beams technique used in these measurements is described in detail. In addition, the method of separating contributions of the elastically scattered (Coulomb) and the inelastically scattered electrons in the present Mg(+) case and previously reported Zn(+) results is described. Comparisons in the experimental energy range are made for Mg(+) with the two five-state close-coupling theoretical calculations carried out herein, and with other published close-coupling, distorted-wave, and semiempirical calculations. The present Mg(+) cross sections and Zn(+) cross sections from earlier measurements are tabulated.

  2. Coherent instabilities of a relativistic bunched beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1982-06-01

    A charge-particle beam contained in an accelerator vacuum chamber interacts electromagnetically with its environment to create a wake field. This field than acts back on the beam, perturbing the particle motion. If the beam intensity is high enough, this beam-environment interaction may lead to an instability and to subsequent beam loss. The beam and its environment form a dynamical system, and it is this system that will be studied. 84 references.

  3. BEAM LIFETIME AND EMITTANCE GROWTH MEASUREMENTS OF GOLD BEAMS IN RHIC AT STORAGE.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; DREES,A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; CONNOLLY,R.; FLILLER,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    During stores of gold beams, longitudinal and transverse beam sizes were recorded. Longitudinal profiles were obtained with a wall current monitor. Transverse profiles were reconstructed from gold-gold collision rates at various relative transverse beam positions. The total beam lifetime was measured with a beam current transformer, the bunched beam lifetime with the wall current monitor. Diffusion rates in the beam halo were determined from the change in the loss rate when a scraper is retracted. The measurements are used to determine the lifetime limiting effects. Beam growth measurements are compared with computations of beam-growth times from intra-beam scattering.

  4. A consortium of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Filifactor alocis is present in sites prior to bone loss in a longitudinal study of localized aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Fine, Daniel H; Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrendiz, Javier; Furgang, David; Paster, Bruce J; Dewhirst, Floyd E

    2013-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in African-American adolescents has been documented but is poorly understood. Two thousand fifty-eight adolescents aged 11 to 17 years were screened for their periodontal status and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in their oral cavity. Seventy-one A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative and 63 A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive periodontally healthy subjects were enrolled, sampled, examined, and radiographed yearly for 3 years. Gingival and periodontal pocket depth and attachment levels were recorded. Disease presentation was characterized by bone loss (BL). Subgingival sites were sampled every 6 months to assess (i) the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in BL and (ii) the association of A. actinomycetemcomitans and other microbes in their relationships to BL. Sixteen of 63 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans developed BL (the other 47 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans had no BL). No A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative subjects developed BL. Human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) was used for subgingival microbial assessment. On a subject level, pooled data from A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects who remained healthy had higher prevalences of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species, while A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects with BL had higher prevalences of Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus sp. human oral taxon 113 (HOT-113). At vulnerable sites, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and F. alocis levels were elevated prior to BL. In cases where the three-organism consortium (versus A. actinomycetemcomitans alone) was detected, the specificity for detecting sites of future BL increased from 62% to 99%, with a sensitivity of 89%. We conclude that detecting the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. parasanguinis, and F. alocis together indicates sites of future BL in LAP. A

  5. A Consortium of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Filifactor alocis Is Present in Sites Prior to Bone Loss in a Longitudinal Study of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrendiz, Javier; Furgang, David; Paster, Bruce J.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in African-American adolescents has been documented but is poorly understood. Two thousand fifty-eight adolescents aged 11 to 17 years were screened for their periodontal status and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in their oral cavity. Seventy-one A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative and 63 A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive periodontally healthy subjects were enrolled, sampled, examined, and radiographed yearly for 3 years. Gingival and periodontal pocket depth and attachment levels were recorded. Disease presentation was characterized by bone loss (BL). Subgingival sites were sampled every 6 months to assess (i) the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in BL and (ii) the association of A. actinomycetemcomitans and other microbes in their relationships to BL. Sixteen of 63 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans developed BL (the other 47 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans had no BL). No A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative subjects developed BL. Human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) was used for subgingival microbial assessment. On a subject level, pooled data from A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects who remained healthy had higher prevalences of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species, while A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects with BL had higher prevalences of Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus sp. human oral taxon 113 (HOT-113). At vulnerable sites, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and F. alocis levels were elevated prior to BL. In cases where the three-organism consortium (versus A. actinomycetemcomitans alone) was detected, the specificity for detecting sites of future BL increased from 62% to 99%, with a sensitivity of 89%. We conclude that detecting the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. parasanguinis, and F. alocis together indicates sites of future BL in LAP. A

  6. Structural study of the effects of mutations in proteins to identify the molecular basis of the loss of local structural fluidity leading to the onset of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ananya; Ghosh, Semanti; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-02-26

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) are crucial in most of the biological processes and PPI dysfunctions are known to be associated with the onsets of various diseases. One of such diseases is the auto-immune disease. Auto-immune diseases are one among the less studied group of diseases with very high mortality rates. Thus, we tried to correlate the appearances of mutations with their probable biochemical basis of the molecular mechanisms leading to the onset of the disease phenotypes. We compared the effects of the Single Amino Acid Variants (SAVs) in the wild type and mutated proteins to identify any structural deformities that might lead to altered PPIs leading ultimately to disease onset. For this we used Relative Solvent Accessibility (RSA) as a spatial parameter to compare the structural perturbation in mutated and wild type proteins. We observed that the mutations were capable to increase intra-chain PPIs whereas inter-chain PPIs would remain mostly unaltered. This might lead to more intra-molecular friction causing a deleterious alteration of protein's normal function. A Lyapunov exponent analysis, using the altered RSA values due to polymorphic and disease causing mutations, revealed polymorphic mutations have a positive mean value for the Lyapunov exponent while disease causing mutations have a negative mean value. Thus, local spatial stochasticity has been lost due to disease causing mutations, indicating a loss of structural fluidity. The amino acid conversion plot also showed a clear tendency of altered surface patch residue conversion propensity than polymorphic conversions. So far, this is the first report that compares the effects of different kinds of mutations (disease and non-disease causing polymorphic mutations) in the onset of autoimmune diseases.

  7. Image Registration of Cone-Beam Computer Tomography and Preprocedural Computer Tomography Aids in Localization of Adrenal Veins and Decreasing Radiation Dose in Adrenal Vein Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Busser, Wendy M. H. Arntz, Mark J.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; Deinum, Jaap; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lange, Frank de; Schultze Kool, Leo J.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeWe assessed whether image registration of cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) images indicating the locations of the adrenal veins can aid in increasing the success rate of first-attempts adrenal vein sampling (AVS) and therefore decreasing patient radiation dose.Materials and Methods CBCT scans were acquired in the interventional suite (Philips Allura Xper FD20) and rigidly registered to the vertebra in previously acquired CE-CT. Adrenal vein locations were marked on the CT image and superimposed with live fluoroscopy and digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide the AVS. Seventeen first attempts at AVS were performed with image registration and retrospectively compared with 15 first attempts without image registration performed earlier by the same 2 interventional radiologists. First-attempt AVS was considered successful when both adrenal vein samples showed representative cortisol levels. Sampling time, dose-area product (DAP), number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time, and skin dose were recorded.ResultsWithout image registration, the first attempt at sampling was successful in 8 of 15 procedures indicating a success rate of 53.3 %. This increased to 76.5 % (13 of 17) by adding CBCT and CE-CT image registration to AVS procedures (p = 0.266). DAP values (p = 0.001) and DSA runs (p = 0.026) decreased significantly by adding image registration guidance. Sampling and fluoroscopy times and skin dose showed no significant changes.ConclusionGuidance based on registration of CBCT and previously acquired diagnostic CE-CT can aid in enhancing localization of the adrenal veins thereby increasing the success rate of first-attempt AVS with a significant decrease in the number of used DSA runs and, consequently, radiation dose required.

  8. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  9. The Use of Photon Beams of a Flattening Filter-free Linear Accelerator for Hypofractionated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R.; Lang, Stephanie; Hrbacek, Jan; Glanzmann, Christoph; Kloeck, Stephan; Najafi, Yousef; Streller, Tino; Studer, Gabriela; Zaugg, Kathrin; Luetolf, Urs M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential usage of flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning was performed for 7 patients using TrueBeam{sup Registered-Sign} linear accelerator and photon beams with (X6, X10) and without (X6FFF, X10FFF) flattening filter. Prescribed dose was 19 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy = 57 Gy. One or two 360 Degree-Sign arcs with dose rate of 600 MU/min for flattened beams, and 1,200 MU/min for FFF beams were used. Results: No difference was detected between the four beams in PTV coverage, conformity, and homogeneity. Mean body dose and body volume receiving 50% of the prescribed dose decreased with increasing mean energy (r{sup 2} = 0.8275, p < 0.01). X6FFF delivered 3.6% more dose compared with the X6 (p < 0.01). X10FFF delivered 3.0% (p < 0.01), and the X10 5.8% (p < 0.01) less mean body dose compared with X6. There was a significant increase in the mean dose to the rectum for the X10 compared with X6 (2.6%, p < 0.01). Mean dose to the bladder increased by 1.3% for X6FFF and decreased by 2.3% for X10FFF. Using a single arc and FFF, treatment time was reduced by 35% (2 SD = 10%). Conclusion: FFF beams resulted in dose distributions similar to flattened beams. X10FFF beam provided the best solution, sparing rectum and bladder and minimizing whole-body dose. FFF beams lead to a time efficient treatment delivery, particularly when combined with hypofractionated VMAT.

  10. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved magnetically-confined anode plasma pulsed ion beam source. Beam rotation effects and power efficiency are improved by a magnetic design which places the separatrix between the fast field flux structure and the slow field structure near the anode of the ion beam source, by a gas port design which localizes the gas delivery into the gap between the fast coil and the anode, by a pre-ionizer ringing circuit connected to the fast coil, and by a bias field means which optimally adjusts the plasma formation position in the ion beam source.

  11. Notes on dumping gold beam in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.J.; Ahrens, L.; Thieberger, P.

    2010-08-01

    Localized losses of gold beam in the AGS during RHIC Run 8 produced vacuum leaks which required the replacement of several vacuum chambers. A review of what happened and why was given by Leif Ahrens at the Run 8 Retreat. The following notes trace the subsequent development of clean dumping of gold beam on the beam dump in the J10 straight. The novel idea of stripping Au77+ ions in order to put them directly into the upstream face of the dump was introduced by Leif Ahrens and developed by all three of us. George Mahler made the actual stripping device and Dave Gassner developed its control. Leif Ahrens successfully commissioned the device with gold beam during Run 10. The reader may find it helpful to first view the figures herein and then refer to the text for details.

  12. Stabilization of vortex beams in Kerr media by nonlinear absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, Miguel A.; Carvalho, Márcio; Leblond, Hervé; Malomed, Boris A.

    2016-11-01

    We elaborate a solution for the problem of stable propagation of transversely localized vortex beams in homogeneous optical media with self-focusing Kerr nonlinearity. Stationary nonlinear Bessel-vortex states are stabilized against azimuthal breakup and collapse by multiphoton absorption, while the respective power loss is offset by the radial influx of the power from an intrinsic reservoir. A linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulations reveal a region of stability of these vortices. Beams with multiple vorticities have their stability regions too. These beams can then form robust tubular filaments in transparent dielectrics as common as air, water, and optical glasses at sufficiently high intensities. We also show that the tubular, rotating, and specklelike filamentation regimes, previously observed in experiments with axicon-generated Bessel beams, can be explained as manifestations of the stability or instability of a specific nonlinear Bessel-vortex state, which is fully identified.

  13. BEAM CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Casey, W.; Job, P.K.

    2010-05-23

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam loss in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of {le} 10% full beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses don't exceed these levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation levels outside the shield walls. This beam containment system will measure, provide a level of control and alarm indication of the beam power losses along the beam path from the source (e-gun, linac) thru the injection system and the storage ring. This system will consist of collimators that will provide limits to (and potentially to measure) the beam miss-steering and control the loss points of the charge and monitors that will measure the average beam current losses along the beam path and alarm when this beam power loss exceeds the level set by the shielding specifications. This will require some new ideas in beam loss detection capability and collimation. The initial planning and R&D program will be presented.

  14. Extended x-ray-absorption and electron-energy-loss fine-structure studies of the local atomic structure of amorphous unhydrogenated and hydrogenated silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Rizk, Richard B.; Woodhouse, John B.

    1988-12-01

    Extended x-ray-absorption (EXAFS) and electron-energy-loss fine-structure (EXELFS) measurements have been performed on amorphous unhydrogenated silicon carbide, a-SiC, and amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide, a-SiC:H. Two hydrogenated samples with hydrogen concentrations corresponding, respectively, to H flows of 4 sccm (20% of argon flow) and 8 sccm (40% of argon flow) during the reactive sputtering process, were analyzed (sccm denotes standard cubic centimeters per minute at STP). It is found that short-range order (SRO), consisting of the same tetrahedrally coordinated units present in cubic crystalline c-SiC (zinc-blende structure), where a Si atom is surrounded by nearly four C atoms and vice versa, does exist in all the amorphous samples. This SRO, however, is detected only at a level of the first C and Si coordination shells in a-SiC and a-SiC:H. The structural disorder of the first Si and C coordination shells in all forms of amorphous SiC is somewhat greater than c-SiC, and it decreases appreciably as hydrogen is added. The a-SiC sample exhibits large Si and C coordination numbers, almost identical to c-SiC, a low atomic density, and virtually the same Si-C bond length as c-SiC. These results indicate that a relatively small concentration of large voids exist in a highly disordered a-SiC matrix. The a-SiC:H samples, on the other hand, exhibit a decrease in the C coordination number relative to a-SiC, which is independent of H concentration, low Si and C atomic densities, comparable to a-SiC, and virtually the same Si coordination number as a-SiC. These EXAFS-EXELFS results are consistent with a model where part of the H is substituting for Si in the local tetrahedra surrounding C atoms, while the rest is located inside internal voids in the a-SiC:H samples. The surface of the voids is composed of C atoms which have at least one bond to H, and of Si atoms. Finally, a straightforward computational procedure is applied to estimate the size of these voids

  15. SU-E-J-244: Development and Validation of a Knowledge Based Planning Model for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A; Larsen, E; Hayes, C; Grow, A; Bahamondes, S.; Zheng, Y; Wu, X; Choi, M; Pai, S; Li, J; Cranford, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The study aims to develop and validate a knowledge based planning (KBP) model for external beam radiation therapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: RapidPlan™ technology was used to develop a lung KBP model. Plans from 65 patients with LA-NSCLC were used to train the model. 25 patients were treated with VMAT, and the other patients were treated with IMRT. Organs-at-risk (OARs) included right lung, left lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. DVH and geometric distribution DVH were extracted from the treated plans. The model was trained using principal component analysis and step-wise multiple regression. Box plot and regression plot tools were used to identify geometric outliers and dosimetry outliers and help fine-tune the model. The validation was performed by (a) comparing predicted DVH boundaries to actual DVHs of 63 patients and (b) using an independent set of treatment planning data. Results: 63 out of 65 plans were included in the final KBP model with PTV volume ranging from 102.5cc to 1450.2cc. Total treatment dose prescription varied from 50Gy to 70Gy based on institutional guidelines. One patient was excluded due to geometric outlier where 2.18cc of spinal cord was included in PTV. The other patient was excluded due to dosimetric outlier where the dose sparing to spinal cord was heavily enforced in the clinical plan. Target volume, OAR volume, OAR overlap volume percentage to target, and OAR out-of-field volume were included in the trained model. Lungs and heart had two principal component scores of GEDVH, whereas spinal cord and esophagus had three in the final model. Predicted DVH band (mean ±1 standard deviation) represented 66.2±3.6% of all DVHs. Conclusion: A KBP model was developed and validated for radiotherapy of LA-NSCLC in a commercial treatment planning system. The clinical implementation may improve the consistency of IMRT/VMAT planning.

  16. TU-F-17A-09: Four-Dimensional Cone Beam CT Ventilation Imaging Can Detect Interfraction Lung Function Variations for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, J; Keall, P; Hugo, G; Weiss, E; Williamson, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI) is a novel functional lung imaging modality requiring validation. We hypothesize that 4D-CBCT VI satisfies a necessary condition for validity: that intrafraction variations (e.g. due to poor 4D-CBCT image quality) are substantially different to interfraction variations (e.g. due to changes in underlying function). We perform the first comparison of intrafraction (pre/post fraction) and interfraction (week-to-week) 4D-CBCT VIs for locally advanced non small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods: A total of 215 4D-CBCT scans were acquired for 19 LA NSCLC patients over 4-6 weeks of radiation therapy, including 75 pairs of pre-/post-fraction scans on the same day. 4D-CBCT VIs were obtained by applying state-of-the-art, B-spline deformable image registration to obtain the Jacobian determinant of deformation between the end-exhale and end-inhale phases. All VIs were deformably registered to the corresponding first day scan, normalized between the 10th and 90th percentile values and cropped to the ipsilateral lung only. Intrafraction variations were assessed by computing the mean and standard deviation of voxel-wise differences between all same-day pairs of pre-/post-fraction VIs. Interfraction differences were computed between first-day VIs and treatment weeks 2, 4 and 6 for all 19 patients. We tested the hypothesis by comparing cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of intrafraction and interfraction ventilation differences using two-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit tests. Results: The (mean ± std. dev.) of intrafraction differences was (−0.007 ± 0.079). Interfraction differences for weeks 2, 4 and 6 were (−0.035 ± 0.103), (−0.006 ± 0.094) and (−0.019 ± 0.127) respectively. For week 2, the changes in CDFs for intrafraction and interfraction differences approached statistical significance (p=0.099). Conclusion: We have shown that 4D-CBCT VI

  17. Multi-Institutional Phase II Study of High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Therapy in Patients With Localized, Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; McDonnell, Erin I.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Goyal, Lipika; Murphy, Janet E.; Javle, Milind M.; Wolfgang, John A.; Drapek, Lorraine C.; Arellano, Ronald S.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Mullen, John T.; Yoon, Sam S.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Ryan, David P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Crane, Christopher H.; Zhu, Andrew X.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of high-dose, hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Materials and Methods In this single-arm, phase II, multi-institutional study, 92 patients with biopsy-confirmed HCC or ICC, determined to be unresectable by multidisciplinary review, with a Child-Turcotte-Pugh score (CTP) of A or B, ECOG performance status of 0 to 2, no extrahepatic disease, and no prior radiation received 15 fractions of proton therapy to a maximum total dose of 67.5 Gy equivalent. Sample size was calculated to demonstrate > 80% local control (LC) defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.0 criteria at 2 years for HCC patients, with the parallel goal of obtaining acceptable precision for estimating outcomes for ICC. Results Eighty-three patients were evaluable: 44 with HCC, 37 with ICC, and two with mixed HCC/ICC. The CTP score was A for 79.5% of patients and B for 15.7%; 4.8% of patients had no cirrhosis. Prior treatment had been given to 31.8% of HCC patients and 61.5% of ICC patients. The median maximum dimension was 5.0 cm (range, 1.9 to 12.0 cm) for HCC patients and 6.0 cm (range, 2.2 to 10.9 cm) for ICC patients. Multiple tumors were present in 27.3% of HCC patients and in 12.8% of ICC patients. Tumor vascular thrombosis was present in 29.5% of HCC patients and in 28.2% of ICC patients. The median dose delivered to both HCC and ICC patients was 58.0 Gy. With a median follow-up among survivors of 19.5 months, the LC rate at 2 years was 94.8% for HCC and 94.1% for ICC. The overall survival rate at 2 years was 63.2% for HCC and 46.5% ICC. Conclusion High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy demonstrated high LC rates for HCC and ICC safely, supporting ongoing phase III trials of radiation in HCC and ICC. PMID:26668346

  18. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  19. Cartesian beams.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2007-12-01

    A new and very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in Cartesian coordinates is presented. We call such a field a Cartesian beam. The complex amplitude of the Cartesian beams is described by either the parabolic cylinder functions or the confluent hypergeometric functions, and the beams are characterized by three parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integration are studied in detail. Applying the general expression of the Cartesian beams, we also derive two new and meaningful beam structures that, to our knowledge, have not yet been reported in the literature. Special cases of the Cartesian beams are the standard, elegant, and generalized Hermite-Gauss beams, the cosine-Gauss beams, the Lorentz beams, and the fractional order beams.

  20. Localization of a delamination and estimation of its length in a composite laminate beam by the VSHM and pattern recognition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minak, G.; Palazzetti, R.; Trendafilova, I.; Zucchelli, A.

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the delamination damage in laminate composite beams in order to adapt the vibration-based structural health monitoring (VSHM) method for laminated structures. The analysis was concentrated on the vibration characteristics of laminated specimens, in particular, on the first several natural frequencies of a composite laminate beam with a delamination damage. The core of this work is an experimental investigation into the vibration response of a composite laminate beam and its changes caused by delaminations of different sizes and different location in the beam. The aim was to determine how the first six harmonic frequencies are changed by a delamination, and the results show that they can be successfully used to clarify the presence, location, and dimensions of delaminations in a composite beam. A pattern recognition analysis was used to locate the damage, while its detection and evaluation were performed by using changes in the harmonic frequencies. A finite-element analysis was carried out, and the variations in the natural frequencies due to delamination are found to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  1. Electron beam simulation from gun to collector: Towards a complete solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mertzig, R. Shornikov, A. Wenander, F.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2015-01-09

    An electron-beam simulation technique for high-resolution complete EBIS/T modelling is presented. The technique was benchmarked on the high compression HEC{sup 2} test-stand with an electron beam current, current density and energy of 10 A, 10 kA/cm{sup 2} and 49.2 keV, and on the immersed electron beam at REXEBIS for electron beam characteristics of 0.4 A, 200 A/cm{sup 2} and 4.5 keV. In both Brillouin-like and immersed beams the electron-beam radius varies from several millimeters at the gun, through some hundreds of micrometers in the ionization region to a few centimeters at the collector over a total length of several meters. We report on our approach for finding optimal meshing parameters, based on the local beam properties such as magnetic field-strength, electron energy and beam radius. This approach combined with dividing the problem domain into sub-domains, and subsequent splicing of the local solutions allowed us to simulate the beam propagation in EBISes from the gun to the collector using a conventional PC in about 24–36 h. Brillouin-like electron beams propagated through the complete EBIS were used to analyze the beam behavior within the collector region. We checked whether elastically reflected paraxial electrons from a Brillouin-like beam will escape from the collector region and add to the loss current. We have also studied the power deposition profiles as function of applied potentials using two electrode geometries for a Brillouin-like beam including the effects of backscattered electrons.

  2. 6-D weak-strong beam-beam simulation study of proton lifetime in presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the calculated particle loss of a proton bunch in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in the RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run, we are introducing a DC electron beam with the same transverse profile as the proton beam to collide with the proton beam. Such a device is called an electron lens (e-lens). In this note we first present the optics and beam parameters and the tracking setup. Then we calculate and compare the particle loss of a proton bunch with head-on beam-beam compensation, phase advance of k{pi} between IP8 and the center of the e-lens and second order chromaticity correction. We scanned the proton beam's linear chromaticity, working point and bunch intensity. We also scanned the electron beam's intensity, transverse beam size. The effect of the electron-proton transverse offset in the e-lens was studied. In the study 6-D weak-strong beam-beam interaction model a la Hirata is used for proton collisions at IP6 and IP8. The e-lens is modeled as 8 slices. Each slice is modeled with as drift - (4D beam-beam kick) - drift.

  3. Evaluation of the local hadronic calibration with combined beam-test data for the endcap and forward calorimeters of ATLAS in the pseudorapidity region 2.5<|η|<4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfold, J.; Soukup, J.; Archambault, J. P.; Cojocaru, C.; Khakzad, M.; Oakham, G.; Schram, M.; Vincter, M. G.; Datskov, V.; Drobin, V.; Fedorov, A.; Golubykh, S.; Javadov, N.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kakurin, S.; Kazarinov, M.; Kukhtin, V.; Ladygin, E.; Lazarev, A.; Neganov, A.; Petrova, L.; Pisarev, I.; Rousakovitch, N.; Serochkin, E.; Shilov, S.; Shalyugin, A.; Usov, Yu.; Pecsy, M.; Stavina, P.; Strizenec, P.; Barreiro, F.; Gabaldon, C.; Labarga, F.; Nebot, E.; Oliver, C.; Rodier, S.; Del Peso, J.; Belkin, A.; Heldmann, M.; Koepke, L.; Othegraven, R.; Schliephake, T.; Schroff, D.; Secker, H.; Thomas, J.; Benchouk, C.; Djama, F.; Hubaut, F.; Monnier, E.; Niess, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Raymond, M.; Resende, B.; Sauvage, D.; Serfon, C.; Tisserant, S.; Toth, J.; Azuelos, G.; Delsart, P.; Leroy, C.; Mehdiyev, R.; Akimov, A.; Blagov, M.; Komar, A.; Snesarev, A.; Speransky, M.; Sulin, V.; Yakimenko, M.; Epshtein, V.; Khovansky, V.; Shatalov, P.; Barillari, T.; Erdmann, J.; Kiryunin, A.; Kurchaninov, L.; Menke, S.; Nagel, M.; Oberlack, H.; Pospelov, G.; Salihagic, D.; Schacht, P.; Chen, T.; Ping, J.; Qi, M.; Maslennikov, A.; Soukharev, A.; Talyshev, A.; Tikhonov, Yu.; Cavalleri, P.; Schwemling, P.; Chekulaev, S.; Denisov, S.; Evdokimov, V.; Levitsky, M.; Minaenko, A.; Mitrofanov, G.; Moiseev, A.; Pleskatch, A.; Stoyanova, D.; Zakamsky, L.; Bieri, M.; Rani, J.; Schouten, D.; Vetterli, M.; Loch, P.; Rutherfoord, J.; Savin, A.; Shaver, L.; Shupe, M.; Galt, C.; Gorbounov, P.; Knecht, N.; Krieger, P.; Ma, L.; Mazini, R.; Orr, R.; Losty, M.; Oram, C. J.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Hughes, T.; Kanaya, N.; Keeler, R. K.; Langstaff, R.; Lefebvre, M.; McPherson, R.; Shaw, W.; Wielers, M.; Braun, H. M.; Thadome, J.; Zeitnitz, Ch.; Atlas Liquid Argon Endcap Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The local hadronic calibration scheme developed for the reconstruction and calibration of jets and missing transverse energy in ATLAS has been evaluated using data obtained during combined beam tests of modules of the ATLAS liquid argon endcap and forward calorimeters. These tests covered the pseudorapidity range of 2.5<|η|<4.0. The analysis has been performed using special sets of calibration weights and corrections obtained with the GEANT4 simulation of a detailed beam-test setup. The evaluation itself has been performed through the careful study of specific calorimeter performance parameters such as e.g. energy response and resolution, shower shapes, as well as different physics lists of the GEANT4 simulation.

  4. Intra-beam scattering and its application to ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.

    2011-10-16

    Treatment of Coulomb collisions within the beam requires consideration of both large and small angle scattering. Such collisions lead to the Touschek effect and Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). The Touschek effect refers to particle loss as a result of a single collision, where only transfer from the transverse direction into longitudinal plays a role. It is important to consider this effect for ERL design to have an appropriate choice of collimation system. The IBS is a diffusion process which leads to changes of beam distribution but does not necessarily result in a beam loss. Evaluation of IBS in ERLs, where beam distribution is non-Gaussian, requires special treatment. Here we describe the IBS and Touschek effects with application to ERLs. In circular accelerators both the Touschek effect and IBS were found important. The generalized formulas for Touschek calculations are available and are already being used in advanced tracking simulations of several ERL-based projects. The IBS (which is diffusion due to multiple Coulomb scattering) is not expected to cause any significant effect on beam distribution in ERLs, unless one considers very long transport of high-brightness beams at low energies. Both large and small-angle Coulomb scattering can contribute to halo formation in future ERLs with high-brightness beams, as follows from simple order-of-magnitude estimates. In this report, a test comparison between 'local' and 'sliced' IBS models within the BET ACOOL code was presented for an illustrative ERL distribution. We also presented accumulated current loss distribution due to Touschek scattering for design parameters of ERL proposed for the eRHIC project, as well as scaling for multi-pass ERLs.

  5. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.; Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cristofaro, S.

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  6. Evaluation of the cone beam CT for internal target volume localization in lung stereotactic radiotherapy in comparison with 4D MIP images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiaoming; Lin, Mu-Han; Lin, Teh; Fan, Jiajin; Jin, Lihui; Ma, Charlie M.; Xue, Jun

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the three-dimensional cone-beam CT (CBCT) is clinically equivalent to the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed images for internal target volume (ITV) localization in image-guided lung stereotactic radiotherapy.Methods: A ball-shaped polystyrene phantom with built-in cube, sphere, and cone of known volumes was attached to a motor-driven platform, which simulates a sinusoidal movement with changeable motion amplitude and frequency. Target motion was simulated in the patient in a superior-inferior (S-I) direction with three motion periods and 2 cm peak-to-peak amplitudes. The Varian onboard Exact-Arms kV CBCT system and the GE LightSpeed four-slice CT integrated with the respiratory-position-management 4DCT scanner were used to scan the moving phantom. MIP images were generated from the 4DCT images. The clinical equivalence of the two sets of images was evaluated by comparing the extreme locations of the moving objects along the motion direction, the centroid position of the ITV, and the ITV volumes that were contoured automatically by Velocity or calculated with an imaging gradient method. The authors compared the ITV volumes determined by the above methods with those theoretically predicted by taking into account the physical object dimensions and the motion amplitudes. The extreme locations were determined by the gradient method along the S-I axis through the center of the object. The centroid positions were determined by autocenter functions. The effect of motion period on the volume sizes was also studied.Results: It was found that the extreme locations of the objects determined from the two image modalities agreed with each other satisfactorily. They were not affected by the motion period. The average difference between the two modalities in the extreme locations was 0.68% for the cube, 1.35% for the sphere, and 0.5% for the cone, respectively. The maximum difference in the

  7. The degree of 5f electron localization in URu2Si2: electron energy-loss spectroscopy and spin-orbit sum rule analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, J R; Moore, K T; Butch, N P; Maple, M B

    2010-05-19

    We examine the degree of 5f electron localization in URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} using spin-orbit sum rule analysis of the U N{sub 4,5} (4d {yields} 5f) edge. When compared to {alpha}-U metal, US, USe, and UTe, which have increasing localization of the 5f states, we find that the 5f states of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are more localized, although not entirely. Spin-orbit analysis shows that intermediate coupling is the correct angular momentum coupling mechanism for URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} when the 5f electron count is between 2.6 and 2.8. These results have direct ramifications for theoretical assessment of the hidden order state of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, where the degree of localization of the 5f electrons and their contribution to the Fermi surface are critical.

  8. A crossed molecular beam and ab-initio investigation of the reaction of boron monoxide (BO; X2Σ+) with methylacetylene (CH3CCH; X1A1): competing atomic hydrogen and methyl loss pathways.

    PubMed

    Maity, Surajit; Parker, Dorian S N; Dangi, Beni B; Kaiser, Ralf I; Fau, Stefan; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2013-11-21

    The gas-phase reaction of boron monoxide ((11)BO; X(2)Σ(+)) with methylacetylene (CH3CCH; X(1)A1) was investigated experimentally using crossed molecular beam technique at a collision energy of 22.7 kJ mol(-1) and theoretically using state of the art electronic structure calculation, for the first time. The scattering dynamics were found to be indirect (complex forming reaction) and the reaction proceeded through the barrier-less formation of a van-der-Waals complex ((11)BOC3H4) followed by isomerization via the addition of (11)BO(X(2)Σ(+)) to the C1 and/or C2 carbon atom of methylacetylene through submerged barriers. The resulting (11)BOC3H4 doublet radical intermediates underwent unimolecular decomposition involving three competing reaction mechanisms via two distinct atomic hydrogen losses and a methyl group elimination. Utilizing partially deuterated methylacetylene reactants (CD3CCH; CH3CCD), we revealed that the initial addition of (11)BO(X(2)Σ(+)) to the C1 carbon atom of methylacetylene was followed by hydrogen loss from the acetylenic carbon atom (C1) and from the methyl group (C3) leading to 1-propynyl boron monoxide (CH3CC(11)BO) and propadienyl boron monoxide (CH2CCH(11)BO), respectively. Addition of (11)BO(X(2)Σ(+)) to the C1 of methylacetylene followed by the migration of the boronyl group to the C2 carbon atom and/or an initial addition of (11)BO(X(2)Σ(+)) to the sterically less accessible C2 carbon atom of methylacetylene was followed by loss of a methyl group leading to the ethynyl boron monoxide product (HCC(11)BO) in an overall exoergic reaction (78 ± 23 kJ mol(-1)). The branching ratios of these channels forming CH2CCH(11)BO, CH3CC(11)BO, and HCC(11)BO were derived to be 4 ± 3%, 40 ± 5%, and 56 ± 15%, respectively; these data are in excellent agreement with the calculated branching ratios using statistical RRKM theory yielding 1%, 38%, and 61%, respectively.

  9. Local control of magnetic damping in ferromagnetic/non-magnetic bilayers by interfacial intermixing induced by focused ion-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    King, J. A.; Burn, D. M.; Sallabank, E. A.; Hindmarch, A. T.; Atkinson, D. E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in; Ganguly, A.; Pal, S.; Barman, A. E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in; Hase, T. P. A.

    2014-06-16

    The influence of interfacial intermixing on the picosecond magnetization dynamics of ferromagnetic/non-magnetic thin-film bilayers was studied. Low-dose focused-ion-beam irradiation was used to induce intermixing across the interface between a 10 nm Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} layer and a 2–3 nm capping layer of either Au or Cr. Time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect was used to study magnetization dynamics as a function of ion-beam dose. With an Au cap, the damping of the un-irradiated bilayer was comparable with native Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} and increased with increasing ion dose. In contrast, for Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}/Cr the damping was higher than that for native Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}, but the damping decreased with increasing dose.

  10. Comparison of Localization Performance with Implanted Fiducial Markers and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for On-line Image-Guided Radiotherapy of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Douglas J; White, Elizabeth A; Wiltshire, Kirsty L; Rosewall, Tara; Sharpe, Michael B; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles N; Jaffray, David A

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To assess the accuracy of kV cone-beam CT (CBCT) based setup corrections as compared to orthogonal MV portal image-based corrections for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Method and Materials Daily cone-beam CT volumetric images were acquired after setup for patients with three intra-prostatic fiducial markers. The estimated couch shifts were compared retrospectively to patient adjustments based on two orthogonal MV portal images (the current clinical standard of care in our institution). The CBCT soft-tissue based shifts were also estimated by digitally removing the gold markers in each projection to suppress the artifacts in the reconstructed volumes. A total of 256 volumetric images for 15 patients were analyzed. Results The Pearson coefficient of correlation for the patient position shifts using fiducial markers in MV vs kV was (R2 = 0.95, 0.84, 0.81) in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions respectively. The correlation using soft-tissue matching was ((R2 = 0.90, 0.49, 0.51) in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions. A Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant trends in the data. The percentage of shifts within a +/−3mm tolerance (the clinical action level) was (99.7, 95.5, 91.3) for fiducial marker matching and (99.5, 70.3, 78.4) for soft-tissue matching. Conclusions Cone-beam CT is an accurate and precise tool for image-guidance. It provides an equivalent means of patient setup correction for prostate patients with implanted gold fiducial markers. Use of the additional information provided by the visualization of soft-tissue structures is an active area of research. PMID:17293243

  11. Comparison of localization performance with implanted fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography for on-line image-guided radiotherapy of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, Douglas J. . E-mail: douglas.moseley@rmp.uhn.on.ca; White, Elizabeth A.; Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Rosewall, Tara; Sharpe, Michael B.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to assess the accuracy of kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based setup corrections as compared with orthogonal megavoltage (MV) portal image-based corrections for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Daily cone-beam CT volumetric images were acquired after setup for patients with three intraprostatic fiducial markers. The estimated couch shifts were compared retrospectively to patient adjustments based on two orthogonal MV portal images (the current clinical standard of care in our institution). The CBCT soft-tissue based shifts were also estimated by digitally removing the gold markers in each projection to suppress the artifacts in the reconstructed volumes. A total of 256 volumetric images for 15 patients were analyzed. Results: The Pearson coefficient of correlation for the patient position shifts using fiducial markers in MV vs. kV was (R{sup 2} = 0.95, 0.84, 0.81) in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively. The correlation using soft-tissue matching was as follows: R{sup 2} = 0.90, 0.49, 0.51 in the LR, AP and SI directions. A Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant trends in the data. The percentage of shifts within a {+-}3-mm tolerance (the clinical action level) was 99.7%, 95.5%, 91.3% for fiducial marker matching and 99.5%, 70.3%, 78.4% for soft-tissue matching. Conclusions: Cone-beam CT is an accurate and precise tool for image guidance. It provides an equivalent means of patient setup correction for prostate patients with implanted gold fiducial markers. Use of the additional information provided by the visualization of soft-tissue structures is an active area of research.

  12. Stability of cooled beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosser, J.; Carli, C.; Chanel, M.; Madsen, N.; Maury, S.; Möhl, D.; Tranquille, G.

    2000-02-01

    Because of their high density together with extremely small spreads in betatron frequency and momentum, cooled beams are very vulnerable to incoherent and coherent space-charge effects and instabilities. Moreover, the cooling system itself, i.e. the electron beam in the case of e-cooling, presents large linear and non-linear "impedances" to the circulating ion beam, in addition to the usual beam-environment coupling impedances of the storage ring. Beam blow-up and losses, attributed to such effects, have been observed in virtually all the existing electron cooling rings. The adverse effects seem to be more pronounced in those rings, like CELSIUS, that are equipped with a cooler capable of reaching the presently highest energy (100-300 keV electrons corresponding to 180-560 MeV protons). The stability conditions will be revisited with emphasis on the experience gained at LEAR. It will be argued that for all present coolers, three conditions are necessary (although probably not sufficient) for the stability of intense cold beams: (i) operation below transition energy, (ii) active damping to counteract coherent instability, and (iii) careful control of the e-beam neutralisation. An extrapolation to the future "medium energy coolers", planned to work for (anti)protons of several GeV, will also be attempted.

  13. Mass loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Leo

    1987-01-01

    Observational evidence for mass loss from cool stars is reviewed. Spectra line profiles are used for the derivation of mass-loss rates with the aid of the equation of continuity. This equation implies steady mass loss with spherical symmetry. Data from binary stars, Mira variables, and red giants in globular clusters are examined. Silicate emission is discussed as a useful indicator of mass loss in the middle infrared spectra. The use of thermal millimeter-wave radiation, Very Large Array (VLA) measurement of radio emission, and OH/IR masers are discussed as a tool for mass loss measurement. Evidence for nonsteady mass loss is also reviewed.

  14. Beam-beam collisions and crossing angles in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1999-06-01

    This paper evaluates the strength of head on and parasitic beam-beam collisions in RHIC when the crossing angle is zero. A non-zero crossing angle is not required in normal operation with 120 bunches, thanks to the early separation of the two beams. The RHIC lattice is shown to easily accommodate even conservatively large crossing angles, for example in beam dynamics studies, or in future operational upgrades to as many as 360 bunches per ring. A modest loss in luminosity is incurred when gold ions collide at an angle after 10 hours of storage.

  15. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  16. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haitao Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-15

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  17. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  18. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set.

  19. Gas Cluster Ion Beam Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry High-Resolution Imaging of Cardiolipin Speciation in the Brain: Identification of Molecular Losses after Traumatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Sparvero, Louis J; Amoscato, Andrew A; Bloom, Anna; Bayır, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E; Winograd, Nicholas

    2017-03-29

    Gas cluster ion beam-secondary ion mass spectrometry (GCIB-SIMS) has shown the full potential of mapping intact lipids in biological systems with better than 10 μm lateral resolution. This study investigated further the capability of GCIB-SIMS in imaging high-mass signals from intact cardiolipin (CL) and gangliosides in normal brain and the effect of a controlled cortical impact model (CCI) of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on their distribution. A combination of enzymatic and chemical treatments was employed to suppress the signals from the most abundant phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)) and enhance the signals from the low-abundance CLs and gangliosides to allow their GCIB-SIMS detection at 8 and 16 μm spatial resolution. Brain CLs have not been observed previously using other contemporary imaging mass spectrometry techniques at better than 50 μm spatial resolution. High-resolution images of naive and injured brain tissue facilitated the comparison of CL species across three multicell layers in the CA1, CA3, and DG regions of the hippocampus. GCIB-SIMS also reliably mapped losses of oxidizable polyunsaturated CL species (but not the oxidation-resistant saturated and monounsaturated gangliosides) to regions including the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus after CCI. This work extends the detection range for SIMS measurements of intact lipids to above m/z 2000, bridging the mass range gap compared with MALDI. Further advances in high-resolution SIMS of CLs, with the potential for single cell or supra-cellular imaging, will be essential for the understanding of CL's functional and structural organization in normal and injured brain.

  20. Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid disease , can interfere with hair production and cause hair loss. People with lupus can also lose hair. The hormone imbalance that happens in polycystic ovary syndrome can cause hair loss in teen girls as well as ...

  1. Long-Term Results of an RTOG Phase II Trial (00-19) of External-Beam Radiation Therapy Combined With Permanent Source Brachytherapy for Intermediate-Risk Clinically Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Yan, Yan; Lee, W. Robert; Gillin, Michael; Firat, Selim; Baikadi, Madhava; Crook, Juanita; Kuettel, Michael; Morton, Gerald; Sandler, Howard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy combined with low-doserate permanent brachytherapy are commonly used to treat men with localized prostate cancer. This Phase II trial was performed to document late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity as well as biochemical control for this treatment in a multi-institutional cooperative group setting. This report defines the long-term results of this trial. Methods and Materials: All eligible patients received external-beam radiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions) followed 2-6 weeks later by a permanent iodine 125 implant of 108 Gy. Late toxicity was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. Biochemical control was defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus definition and the ASTRO Phoenix definition. Results: One hundred thirty-eight patients were enrolled from 20 institutions, and 131 were eligible. Median follow-up (living patients) was 8.2 years (range, 2.7-9.3 years). The 8-year estimate of late grade >3 genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity was 15%. The most common grade >3 toxicities were urinary frequency, dysuria, and proctitis. There were two grade 4 toxicities, both bladder necrosis, and no grade 5 toxicities. In addition, 42% of patients complained of grade 3 impotence (no erections) at 8 years. The 8-year estimate of biochemical failure was 18% and 21% by the Phoenix and ASTRO consensus definitions, respectively. Conclusion: Biochemical control for this treatment seems durable with 8 years of follow-up and is similar to high-dose external beam radiation alone or brachytherapy alone. Late toxicity in this multi-institutional trial is higher than reports from similar cohorts of patients treated with high-dose external-beam radiation alone or permanent low-doserate brachytherapy alone, perhaps suggesting further attention to strategies that limit doses to

  2. Correlation analysis for energy losses, waiting times and durations of type I edge-localized modes in the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabbir, A.; Verdoolaege, G.; Hornung, G.; Kardaun, O. J. W. F.; Zohm, H.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    Several important ELM control techniques are in large part motivated by the empirically observed inverse relationship between average ELM energy loss and ELM frequency in a plasma. However, to ensure a reliable effect on the energy released by the ELMs, it is important that this relation is verified for individual ELM events. Therefore, in this work the relation between ELM energy loss ≤ft({{W}\\text{ELM}}\\right) and waiting time ≤ft(Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}}\\right) is investigated for individual ELMs in a set of ITER-like wall plasmas in JET. A comparison is made with the results from a set of carbon-wall and nitrogen-seeded ITER-like wall JET plasmas. It is found that the correlation between W ELM and Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}} for individual ELMs varies from strongly positive to zero. Furthermore, the effect of the extended collapse phase often accompanying ELMs from unseeded JET ILW plasmas and referred to as the slow transport event (STE) is studied on the distribution of ELM durations, and on the correlation between W ELM and Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}} . A high correlation between W ELM and Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}} , comparable to CW plasmas is only found in nitrogen-seeded ILW plasmas. Finally, a regression analysis is performed using plasma engineering parameters as predictors for determining the region of the plasma operational space with a high correlation between W ELM and Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}} .

  3. Beam-Beam Diagnostics from Closed-Orbit Distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.; Chin, Y.-H.; Eden, J.; Kozanecki, W.; Tennyson, J.; Ziemann, V.

    1992-07-01

    The authors study the applicability of beam-beam deflection techniques as a tuning tool for asymmetric B factories, focusing on PEP-II as an example. Assuming that the closed orbits of the two beams are separated vertically at the interaction point by a local orbit bump that is nominally closed, they calculate the residual beam orbit distortions due to the beam-beam interaction. Difference orbit measurements, performed at points conveniently distant from the interaction point (IP), provide distinct signatures that can be used to maintain the beams in collision and perform detailed optical diagnostics at the IP. A proposal to test this method experimentally at the TRISTAN ring is briefly discussed. Because of their two-ring structure, asymmetric B factories are likely to require more diagnostics and feedback mechanisms than single-ring colliders in order to guarantee head-on collisions. In addition to the traditional techniques, however, the independence of the two beams allows one to envisage other kinds of beam diagnostics. In this article they investigate one such possibility, by looking at the closed orbit distortion produced by the beam-beam interaction when the beams do not collide exactly head-on. They base this investigation on an analytic model and strong-strong multiparticle simulations. Although the discussion uses the PEP-II design as an example, the conclusion is that this technique is quite a promising diagnostics tool for asymmetric colliders in general.

  4. Closed orbit distortion and the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.; Chin, Y.H.; Eden, J.; Kozanecki, W. |; Tennyson, J.; Ziemann, V.

    1992-06-01

    We study the applicability of beam-beam deflection techniques as a tuning tool for the SLAC/LBL/LLNL B factory, PEP-II. Assuming that the closed orbits of the two beams are separated vertically at the interaction point by a local orbit bump that is nominally closed, we calculate the residual beam orbit distortions due to the beam-beam interaction. Difference orbit measurements, performed at points conveniently distant from the IP, provide distinct coordinate- or frequency-space signatures that can be used to maintain the beams in collision and perform detailed optical diagnostics at the IP. A proposal to test this method experimentally at the TRISTAN ring is briefly discussed.

  5. Closed Orbit Distortion and the Beam-Beam Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.; Chin, Y.; Eden, J.; Kozanecki, W.; Tennyson, J.L.; Ziemann, V.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    We study the applicability of beam-beam deflection techniques as a tuning tool for the SLAC/LBL/LLNL B factory, PEP-II. Assuming that the closed orbits of the two beams are separated vertically at the interaction point by a local orbit bump that is nominally closed, we calculate the residual beam orbit distortions due to the beam-beam interaction. Difference orbit measurements, performed at points conveniently distant from the IP, provide distinct coordinate- or frequency-space signatures that can be used to maintain the beams in collision and perform detailed optical diagnostics at the IP. A proposal to test this method experimentally at the TRISTAN ring is briefly discussed.

  6. Rac1-mediated membrane raft localization of PI3K/p110β is required for its activation by GPCRs or PTEN loss.

    PubMed

    Cizmecioglu, Onur; Ni, Jing; Xie, Shaozhen; Zhao, Jean J; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-10-04

    We aimed to understand how spatial compartmentalization in the plasma membrane might contribute to the functions of the ubiquitous class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoforms, p110α and p110β. We found that p110β localizes to membrane rafts in a Rac1-dependent manner. This localization potentiates Akt activation by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus genetic targeting of a Rac1 binding-deficient allele of p110β to rafts alleviated the requirement for p110β-Rac1 association for GPCR signaling, cell growth and migration. In contrast, p110α, which does not play a physiological role in GPCR signaling, is found to reside in nonraft regions of the plasma membrane. Raft targeting of p110α allowed its EGFR-mediated activation by GPCRs. Notably, p110β dependent, PTEN null tumor cells critically rely upon raft-associated PI3K activity. Collectively, our findings provide a mechanistic account of how membrane raft localization regulates differential activation of distinct PI3K isoforms and offer insight into why PTEN-deficient cancers depend on p110β.

  7. Rac1-mediated membrane raft localization of PI3K/p110β is required for its activation by GPCRs or PTEN loss

    PubMed Central

    Cizmecioglu, Onur; Ni, Jing; Xie, Shaozhen; Zhao, Jean J; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to understand how spatial compartmentalization in the plasma membrane might contribute to the functions of the ubiquitous class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoforms, p110α and p110β. We found that p110β localizes to membrane rafts in a Rac1-dependent manner. This localization potentiates Akt activation by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus genetic targeting of a Rac1 binding-deficient allele of p110β to rafts alleviated the requirement for p110β-Rac1 association for GPCR signaling, cell growth and migration. In contrast, p110α, which does not play a physiological role in GPCR signaling, is found to reside in nonraft regions of the plasma membrane. Raft targeting of p110α allowed its EGFR-mediated activation by GPCRs. Notably, p110β dependent, PTEN null tumor cells critically rely upon raft-associated PI3K activity. Collectively, our findings provide a mechanistic account of how membrane raft localization regulates differential activation of distinct PI3K isoforms and offer insight into why PTEN-deficient cancers depend on p110β. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17635.001 PMID:27700986

  8. Loss of Centromere Cohesion in Aneuploid Human Oocytes Correlates with Decreased Kinetochore Localization of the Sac Proteins Bub1 and Bubr1

    PubMed Central

    Lagirand-Cantaloube, Julie; Ciabrini, Cendrine; Charrasse, Sophie; Ferrieres, Alice; Castro, Anna; Anahory, Tal; Lorca, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    In human eggs, aneuploidy increases with age and can result in infertility and genetic diseases. Studies in mouse oocytes suggest that reduced centromere cohesion and spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activity could be at the origin of chromosome missegregation. Little is known about these two features in humans. Here, we show that in human eggs, inter-kinetochore distances of bivalent chromosomes strongly increase with age. This results in the formation of univalent chromosomes during metaphase I (MI) and of single chromatids in metaphase II (MII). We also investigated SAC activity by checking the localization of BUB1 and BUBR1. We found that they localize at the kinetochore with a similar temporal timing than in mitotic cells and in a MPS1-dependent manner, suggesting that the SAC signalling pathway is active in human oocytes. Moreover, our data also suggest that this checkpoint is inactivated when centromere cohesion is lost in MI and consequently cannot inhibit premature sister chromatid separation. Finally, we show that the kinetochore localization of BUB1 and BUBR1 decreases with the age of the oocyte donors. This could contribute to oocyte aneuploidy. PMID:28287092

  9. Compositional dependence of the local structure of Se{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys: Electron energy-loss spectra, real-space multiple-scattering calculations, and first-principles molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Katcho, N. A.; Lomba, E.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Otero-Diaz, L. C.; Landa-Canovas, A. R.

    2006-06-01

    In this work we present an investigation on the composition dependence of the local structure in Se{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} crystalline alloys analyzing their experimental energy-loss spectra with the aid of a real-space multiple-scattering modeling approach and first-principles molecular dynamics. The concourse of this latter technique is essential for a proper modeling of the alloy spectra. From our results, it can be inferred that Se{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys exhibit a high degree of substitutional disorder ruling out the existence of fully ordered alternating copolymer chains of Se and Te atoms.

  10. Dual wavelength fiber-optic polarimeter for path-integrated strain sensing: Application to the measurement of local slope on a flexible beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Roderick David

    1990-10-01

    An all-optical fiber, single-ended, polarimetric sensor system has been developed and characterized for applications in structural strain measurement, particularly in the aerospace field. Laser diode optical sources were operated at multiple wavelengths to achieve interferometric quadrature, and hence provide a linear sensor strain response. System behavior for path-integral strain measurements under DC conditions was determined for two sensors surface-adhered to aluminum cantilever beams. Linear strain responses were obtained which agreed well with theoretical sensitivities. The strain sensitivity of the polarimetric sensor at temperatures from 25 to 60 C was also found to be consistent with theory. One sensor was tested up to the 14-Hz second mode of beam vibration as a novel point-slope measuring device. The sensor responded linearly to changes in the relative orientation of its endpoints, as predicted by theory. Excellent angular tracking was demonstrated. The experimental observations are interpreted in terms of a comprehensive theoretical discussion of the polarimetric sensor's behavior, taking into account the effects of strain, temperature, and wavelength. A detailed analysis of the limitations of the sensor system is included, and recommendations are made as to the optimum practical implementation of this sensor for real applications.

  11. Dual wavelength fiber-optic polarimeter for path-integrated strain sensing: Application to the measurement of local slope on a flexible beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Roderick David

    1990-10-01

    Recent applications for in-situ structural behavior monitoring include robotic and satellite shape sensing. An all optical fiber polarimetric sensor system was developed and characterized for applications in structural strain measurement. Laser diode optical sources were operated at multiple wavelengths to achieve interferometric quadrature, and hence provide a linear sensor strain response. The system represents the first all-fiber, dual wavelength, single-ended polarimetric sensor. System behavior for path-integral strain measurements under DC conditions was determined for two sensors of length 18.4 and 102 cm, surface adhered to aluminum cantilever beams. The longer sensor was tested under AC conditions (up to 14 Hz second mode of beam vibration) as a novel direction of pointing or point slope measurement device. The sensor responded linearly to changes in the relative orientation of its endpoints, as predicted by theory. Excellent angular tracking to +/-1 deg of orientation change, with a resolution of less than or equal 0.02 deg, was demonstrated. A comprehensive theoretical discussion of the polarimetric sensor's behavior is presented, taking into account the effects of strain, temperature and wavelength. A detailed analysis of the limitations of the sensor system is included, and recommendations are made as to the optimum practical implementation of the sensor for real applications.

  12. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  13. Heat Loss Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Infrared scanning devices are being used to produce images that show, by color or black-and-white shading differences, which buildings and homes are losing heat to the outdoors, and how much. Heat loss surveys done by Texas Instruments, Daedalus Enterprises, Inc. and other companies have growing acceptance of their services among industrial firms, utilities, local governments, and state and federal agencies interested in promoting heat loss awareness and inspiring corrective actions.

  14. Conservative treatment of a recto-urethral fistula due to salvage HIFU for local recurrence of prostate cancer, 5 years after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Topazio, Luca; Perugia, Claudio; Finazzi-Agro, Enrico

    2012-11-09

    Recto-urethral fistula is one of the most serious complications caused by high-intensity-focused ultrasound used as salvage treatment for recurrence of prostate cancer after brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We report the case of a recto-urethral fistula in a 68-year-old patient, who previously had undergone radical prostatectomy and EBRT for prostate cancer (pT3 N0 Mx). The fistula was treated conservatively by an indwelling Foley catheter, without the creation of an intestinal diversion. The fistula was assessed initially by a retrograde and a CT scan of the pelvis with contrast medium and reassessed periodically by means of retrograde urethrograms. To date, 24 months after this episode, no evidence of recurrence of the fistula has been found.

  15. Detection of local chemical states of lithium and their spatial mapping by scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy and hyperspectral image analysis.

    PubMed

    Muto, Shunsuke; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi

    2017-02-08

    Advancements in the field of renewable energy resources have led to a growing demand for the analysis of light elements at the nanometer scale. Detection of lithium is one of the key issues to be resolved for providing guiding principles for the synthesis of cathode active materials, and degradation analysis after repeated use of those materials. We have reviewed the different techniques currently used for the characterization of light elements such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). In the present study, we have introduced a methodology to detect lithium in solid materials, particularly for cathode active materials used in lithium-ion battery. The chemical states of lithium were isolated and analyzed from the overlapping multiple spectral profiles, using a suite of STEM, EELS and hyperspectral image analysis. The method was successfully applied in the chemical state analyses of hetero-phases near the surface and grain boundary regions of the active material particles formed by chemical reactions between the electrolyte and the active materials.

  16. Dual Wavelength Fiber-Optic Polarimeter for Path - Strain Sensing: Application to the Measurement of Local Slope on a Flexible Beam.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Roderick David

    1990-01-01

    An all optical fiber polarimetric sensor system has been developed and characterized for applications in structural strain measurement. Laser diode optical sources were operated at multiple wavelengths to achieve interferometric quadrature, and hence provide a linear sensor strain response. The system represents the first all-fiber dual-wavelength, single-ended polarimetric sensor. System behavior of path-integral strain measurements under DC conditions was determined for two sensors surface -adhered to aluminium cantilever beams. Linear strain responses of 0.049 and 0.051 deg muepsilon ^{-1} cm^{-1} were obtained for the two sensors, of length 18.4 and 102 cm respectively. These results agreed well with theoretical sensitivities. The strain sensitivity of the polarimetric sensor at temperatures from 25-60^circ C was found to be constant to within +/- 0.002 deg muepsilon^ {-1} cm^{-1}, also consistent with theory. The longer sensor was tested under AC conditions (up to the 14 Hz second mode of beam vibration) as a novel 'direction of pointing', or 'point-slope' measurement device. The sensor responded linearly to changes in the relative orientation of its endpoints, as predicted by theory. Excellent angular tracking to +/-1 degree of orientation change, with a resolution of <=0.02 degrees, was demonstrated. The first comprehensive theoretical discussion of the polarimetric sensor's behavior is presented, taking into account the effects of strain, temperature, and wavelength. Experimental observations are interpreted in terms of this theory. A detailed analysis of the limitations of the sensor system is included, and recommendations are made as to the optimum practical implementation of this sensor for real applications.

  17. Oberst beam test technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasana, Alessandro; Garibaldi, Luigi; Giorcelli, Ermanno; Ruzzene, Massimo

    1998-06-01

    The definition of the mechanical properties of viscoelastic materials, i.e. the elastic modulus and the loss factor, is carried out, according to many national and international standards, with many different techniques, both of the resonant and non-resonant type. In this paper we focus our attention on the pros and cons of the resonant technique based on the classical Oberst beam method. When the damping material to be tested is not self-supporting, its properties are determined taking start from the measured modal frequencies and loss factors of a laminated beam, constituted by one or two metallic strips, ideally undamped, and one or two viscoelastic layers. The formulae specified on the standards hold valid under the assumptions of the theory developed by Kerwin, Ungar and Ross and we try in this paper to quantify witch deviation of the results should be expected when moving away from their ideal hypotheses.

  18. Beam-Beam Interaction Simulations with Guinea Pig (LCC-0125)

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, C

    2003-11-20

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. A study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam cross-sections ({sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, {sigma}{sub z}) and number of particles per bunch (N). Finally, this same study revealed luminosity maxima at large N and small {sigma}{sub y} which may merit further investigation.

  19. Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss in teens: Illnesses or medical conditions. Endocrine (hormonal) conditions, such as uncontrolled diabetes or thyroid disease , can interfere with hair production and cause hair loss. People with lupus can also lose hair. The hormone imbalance that happens in polycystic ovary syndrome can cause ...

  20. Pregnancy Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... and painful this loss can be. You might wonder if you'll ever have a baby to hold and call your own. But surviving the emotional impact of pregnancy loss is possible. And many women go on to have successful pregnancies. Expand all | ...

  1. Opto-acoustic measurement of the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media: 1. Monte-Carlo simulation of laser fluence distribution at the beam axis beneath the surface of a turbid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Pelivanov, Ivan M; Barskaya, M I; Podymova, N B; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Karabutov, Aleksander A

    2009-09-30

    A new method for measuring the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media, for example, biological tissues, is proposed. The method is based on the fact that the amplitude of the excited opto-acoustic (OA) signal is proportional to the absorbed laser power density (the product of the light absorption coefficient and the laser fluence) at the medium interface. In the first part of the paper, the influence of the laser beam diameter, the light absorption and reduced scattering coefficients on the maximal amplitude of the laser fluence at the laser beam axis in the near-surface layer of the turbid medium is studied by using the Monte-Carlo simulation. The conditions are predicted under which the amplitude of the OA signal detected in a transparent medium in contact with the scattering medium should remain proportional to the light absorption coefficient of the medium under study, when the scattering coefficient in it changes more than twice. The results of the numerical simulation are used for the theoretical substantiation of the OA method being proposed. (measurement of parametrs of laser radiation)

  2. Measuring Fast Ion Losses in a Reversed Field Pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonofiglo, P. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Almagri, A. F.; Kim, J.; Clark, J.; Capecchi, W.; Sears, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) provides a unique environment to study fast ion confinement and transport. The RFP's weak toroidal field, strong magnetic shear, and ability to enter a 3D state provide a wide range of dynamics to study fast ions. Core-localized, 25 keV fast ions are sourced into MST by a tangentially injected hydrogen/deuterium neutral beam. Neutral particle analysis and measured fusion neutron flux indicate enhanced fast ion transport in the plasma core. Past experiments point to a dynamic loss of fast ions associated with the RFP's transition to a 3D state and with beam-driven, bursting magnetic modes. Consequently, fast ion transport and losses in the RFP have garnered recent attention. Valuable information on fast-ion loss, such as energy and pitch distributions, are sought to provide a better understanding of the transport mechanisms at hand. We have constructed and implemented two fast ion loss detectors (FILDs) for use on MST. The FILDs have two, independent, design concepts: collecting particles as a function of v⊥ or with pitch greater than 0.8. In this work, we present our preliminary findings and results from our FILDs on MST. This research is supported by US DOE.

  3. The Rate of Secondary Malignancies After Radical Prostatectomy Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Study on 17,845 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bhojani, Naeem; Capitanio, Umberto; Suardi, Nazareno; Jeldres, Claudio; Isbarn, Hendrik; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Graefen, Markus; Arjane, Philippe; Duclos, Alain; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Saad, Fred; Valiquette, Luc; Montorsi, Francesco; Perrotte, Paul; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) may predispose to secondary malignancies that include bladder cancer (BCa), rectal cancer (RCa), and lung cancer (LCa). We tested this hypothesis in a large French Canadian population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Overall, 8,455 radical prostatectomy (RP) and 9,390 EBRT patients treated between 1983 and 2003 were assessed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. Three endpoints were examined: (1) diagnosis of secondary BCa, (2) LCa, or (3) RCa. Covariates included age, Charlson comorbidity index, and year of treatment. Results: In multivariable analyses that relied on incident cases diagnosed 60 months or later after RP or EBRT, the rates of BCa (hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; p = 0.02), LCa (HR, 2.0; p = 0.004), and RCa (HR 2.1; p <0.001) were significantly higher in the EBRT group. When incident cases diagnosed 120 months or later after RP or EBRT were considered, only the rates of RCa (hazard ratio 2.2; p = 0.003) were significantly higher in the EBRT group. In both analyses, the absolute differences in incident rates ranged from 0.7 to 5.2% and the number needed to harm (where harm equaled secondary malignancies) ranged from 111 to 19, if EBRT was used instead of RP. Conclusions: EBRT may predispose to clinically meaningfully higher rates of secondary BCa, LCa and RCa. These rates should be included in informed consent consideration.

  4. A low diffraction beam technique for scanning in the shallow ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.K.

    1994-12-01

    The Localized Wave pulse project has created the concept of highly localized, pulsed wave energy. We have confirmed, and developed the technique in a series of experimental and numerical tests. This technique generates radiation, mechanical or electromagnetic, from an array. LW generation sends a broad frequency bandwidth pulse of energy along the array axis. The pulse has no sidelobes and maintains the frequency bandwidth and pulse amplitude better than any other method proposed to date. Confirmation of the theory by acoustic experiments show that the effect is real, and that the advantages of the technique can be realized in a laboratory environment. Numerical studies have shown that this effect is extendible to the microwave (vector field) and elastodynamic (tensor field) regimes as well as the stratified ocean environment. The main features of the LW beam are (1) the pulses are broad bandwidth and maintain that bandwidth over their entire working range; (2) the beam generates no side lobes; (3) the LW effect is accomplished in the linear regime, so that small errors in beam generation result in a less effective beam not the loss of the effect; and (4) the beam can be generated using present technology in the acoustic realm. The LW beam has a wide range of applications. As an active source, it offers a unique method of variable beam forming from spatially wide to the narrowest possible beam. Its uses include oceanographic sound velocity profile estimation and attenuation measurements. Since the pulse characteristics are changeable through the source signal parameters, it also offers the possibility of adaptive beam forming in real time. Passively, the LW array can use a wide spatial width listening pattern until something of interest occurs. Instantaneously, the listening pattern could be changed to a very narrow, steerable beam with a broad bandwidth. These uses also apply in the electromagnetic realm.

  5. Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro; Gómez-Espí, Marina; Blanco, Jose; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

  6. Beam-energy inequality in the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Siemann, R. )

    1990-03-01

    Conditions for energy transparency,'' unequal-energy beams having the same beam-beam behavior, are derived for round beams from a Hamiltonian model of the beam-beam interaction. These conditions are equal fractional betatron tunes, equal synchrotron tunes, equal beam-beam strength parameters, equal nominal sizes, equal {beta}{sup *}'s and equal bunch lengths. With these conditions the only way to compensate for unequal energies is with the number of particles per bunch.

  7. Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gulley, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

  8. Intra-beam Scattering Theory and RHIC Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Malitsky, N.; Parzen, G.; Qiang, J.

    2005-06-08

    Intra-beam scattering is the leading mechanism limiting the luminosity in heavy-ion storage rings like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The multiple Coulomb scattering among the charged particles causes transverse emittance growth and longitudinal beam de-bunching and beam loss, compromising machine performance during collision. Theoretically, the original theories developed by Piwinski, Bjorken, and Mtingwa only describe the rms beam size growth of an unbounded Gaussian distribution. Equations based on the Fokker-Planck approach are developed to further describe the beam density profile evolution and beam loss. During the 2004 RHIC heavy-ion operation, dedicated IBS experiments were performed to bench-mark the rms beam size growth, beam loss, and profile evolution both for a Gaussian-like and a longitudinal hollow beam. This paper summarizes the IBS theory and discusses the experimental bench-marking results.

  9. Memory loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003257.htm Memory loss To use the sharing features on this ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  10. Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... topic was provided by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Topic last reviewed: December ... a total loss of hearing. It can be hereditary or it can result from disease, trauma, certain ...

  11. Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well- ...

  12. Measurements of Transverse Beam Diffusion Rates in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The transverse beam diffusion rate vs. particle oscillation amplitude was measured in the Tevatron using collimator scans. All collimator jaws except one were retracted. As the jaw of interest was moved in small steps, the local shower rates were recorded as a function of time. By using a diffusion model, the time evolution of losses could be related to the diffusion rate at the collimator position. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  13. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-09-11

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles. At Fermilab, we are planning to install an electron lens in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA, a 40-m ring for 150-MeV electrons) as one of the proof-of-principle implementations of nonlinear integrable optics to achieve large tune spreads and more stable beams without loss of dynamic aperture.

  14. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  15. Radiation and internal loss engineering of high-stress silicon nitride nanobeams.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dalziel Joseph; Kippenberg, Tobias J; Ghadimi, Amir Hossein

    2017-03-31

    High-stress Si3N4 nanoresonators have become an attractive choice for electro- and optomechanical devices. Membrane resonators can achieve quality factor (Q) - frequency (f) products exceeding 10(13) Hz, enabling (in principle) quantum coherent operation at room temperature. String-like beam resonators possess smaller Q·f products; however, on account of their significantly lower mass and mode density, they remain a canonical choice for precision force, mass, and charge sensing, and have recently enabled Heisenberg-limited position measurements at cryogenic temperatures. Here we explore two techniques to enhance the Q-factor of a nanomechanical beam. The techniques relate to two main loss mechanisms: internal loss, which dominates for high aspect ratios and f<100 MHz, and radiation loss, which dominates for low aspect ratios and f>100 MHz. First we show that by embedding a nanobeam in a 1D phononic crystal (PnC), it is possible to localize its flexural motion and shield it against radiation loss. Using this method, we realize f>100 MHz modes with Q∽10 (4), consistent with internal loss and contrasting sharply with unshielded beams of similar dimensions. We then study the Q·f product of high-order modes of mm-long nanobeams. Taking advantage of the mode-shape dependence of stress-induced `loss-dilution', we realize a f ≈ 4 MHz mode with Q·f≈9·10(12) Hz. Our results complement recent work on PnC-based `soft-clamping' of nanomembranes, in which mode-localization is used to enhance loss dilution. Combining these strategies should enable ultra-low-mass 1D nanomechanical oscillators which which operate deep in the quantum coherent regime at room temperature.

  16. Synchrotron radiation damping, intrabeam scattering and beam-beam simulations for HE-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The proposed High-Energy LHC project presents an unusual combination of strong synchrotron radiation damping and intrabeam scattering, which is not seen in present-day hadron colliders. The subject of investigation reported in this paper was the simulation of beam-beam effect for the HE-LHC parameters. Parameters of SR and IBS are calculated, and the luminosity evolution is simulated in the absence of beam-beam interaction. Then, a weak-strong numerical simulation is used to predict the effect of beam-beam interaction on particle losses and emittance evolution.

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Montserrat Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  18. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Christina L.; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S.; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L.; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y.; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2−/− mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2−/− SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations. PMID:23591991

  19. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Papke, Christina L; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2(-/-) mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2(-/-) SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations.

  20. Practical beam transport for PFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozurkewich, David; Young, John; Ireland, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) is a future kilometric-baseline infrared interferometer to image the complex physical processes of planet formation. Technologies that could be used to transport starlight to a central beam-combining laboratory in PFI include free-space propagation in air or vacuum, and optical fibres. This paper addresses the design and cost issues associated with free-space propagation in vacuum pipes. The signal losses due to diffraction over long differential paths are evaluated, and conceptual beam transport designs employing pupil management to ameliorate these losses are presented and discussed.

  1. Foldable beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Coyner, J. V.; Crawford, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A foldable beam possessing superior qualities of light weight, compactness for transportation, quick deployment with minimum use of force, and high strength is described. These qualities are achieved through the use of a series of longitudinally rigid segments, hinged along one side and threaded by one or two cables along the opposite side. Tightening the cables holds the beam extended. Loosening the cables permits the segments to fold away from the threaded side. In one embodiment the segments are connected by canted hinges with the result that the beam may be folded in a helix-like configuration around a cylinder. In another embodiment the segments themselves may be hinged to fold flat laterally as the beam is folded, resulting in a configuration that may be helixed around a shorter cylinder.

  2. [New methods in the treatment of localized prostate cancer: use of dynamic arc therapy and kV cone-beam CT positioning].

    PubMed

    Szappanos, Szabolcs; Farkas, Róbert; Lőcsei, Zoltán; László, Zoltán; Kalincsák, Judit; Bellyei, Szabolcs; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Csapó, László; Sebestyén, Klára; Halász, Judit; Musch, Zoltán; Beöthe, Tamás; Farkas, László; Mangel, László

    2014-08-10

    Bevezetés: A prosztatarák az idősebb életkor és a fejlett világ daganatos megbetegedése. Lokalizált prosztatarák esetében a műtéti ellátás mellett komoly szerepe van a definitív sugárkezelésnek. Célkitűzés: A szerzők intézetében telepített Novalis TX gyorsító segítségével úgynevezett intenzitásmodulált sugárterápia, annak dinamikus ívbesugárzással elvégzett formája, illetve verifikáció során háromdimenziós lágy szöveti képellenőrzést biztosító, integrált kilovoltos cone-beam komputertomográfiával végzett képvezérelt sugárterápia került bevezetésre, amely módszerekkel szerzett első tapasztalataikat ismertetik a szerzők. Módszer: 2011 decembere és 2013 februárja között, dóziseszkalációt követően, 102 dinamikus ívbesugárzással elvégzett kezelést végeztek, majd 10-10 szelektált, alacsony és magas kockázatú betegnél (átlagéletkor 72,5 év) elkészítették a háromdimenziós konformális besugárzási terveket is. Azonos célterület-lefedettség mellett összevetették a rizikószervek dózisterhelését. Eredmények: A dinamikus ívbesugárzással elvégzett kezelések mellett a rizikószervek szignifikánsan alacsonyabb dózisterhelését érték el, amelyet a kedvező korai mellékhatásprofil is alátámaszt. Következtetések: Az intenzitásmodulált sugárterápia dinamikus ívbesugárzással elvégzett formája biztonsággal alkalmazott standard kezelési módozattá vált a szerzők intézetében. Késői mellékhatások és lokális kontroll további vizsgálata szükséges. Orv. Hetil., 2014, 155(32), 1265–1272.

  3. Beam-beam deflection and signature curves for elliptic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1990-10-22

    In this note we will present closed expressions for the beam-beam deflection angle for arbitrary elliptic beams including tilt. From these expressions signature curves, i.e., systematic deviations from the round beam deflection curve due to ellipticity or tilt are derived. In the course of the presentation we will prove that it is generally impossible to infer individual beam sizes from beam-beam deflection scans. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Local atomic structure of chromium bearing precipitates in chromia doped uranium dioxide investigated by combined micro-beam X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Mieszczynski, C.; Martin, M.; Bertsch, J.; Borca, C. N.; Delafoy, Ch.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental studies have evidenced the presence of some chromium oxide precipitates in chromia (Cr2O3) doped UO2 fuels, currently being used in many light water reactors. The main objective of this study was to analyze the atomic scale microstructure of these precipitates in a non-destructive way employing modern synchrotron-based X-ray radiation. To investigate UO2 microstructures and chemical compositions of the precipitates an industrial grade fresh Cr2O3-doped UO2 pellet (produced with an initial amount of 0.16 wt.% Cr2O3 powder) was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe micro analysis (EPMA). Average grain diameter of the UO2 matrix was measured by SEM image analysis method. Precipitates were detected by EPMA. For all precipitates of micrometer scale analyzed by EPMA the composition was determined to be very close to Cr2O3. The structural property and the next neighbor Cr atomic environment in these precipitates were studied by a combination of more sensitive tools such as micro-focused X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) and absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS). According to the XRD data, the chromia precipitates contain structural disorder and have a somewhat distorted lattice structure as compared to that of standard and crystalline α-Cr2O3 hexagonal crystal unit cell. The μ-XAS results provide insight into the local atomic environment of chromium including the oxidation state assignment.

  5. Concrete cover cracking with reinforcement corrosion of RC beam during chloride-induced corrosion process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ruijin; Castel, Arnaud; Francois, Raoul

    2010-03-15

    This paper deals with the evolution of the corrosion pattern based on two beams corroded by 14 years (beam B1CL1) and 23 years (beam B2CL1) of conservation in a chloride environment. The experimental results indicate that, at the cracking initiation stage and the first stage of cracking propagation, localized corrosion due to chloride ingress is the predominant corrosion pattern and pitting corrosion is the main factor that influences the cracking process. As corrosion cracking increases, general corrosion develops rapidly and gradually becomes predominant in the second stage of cracking propagation. A comparison between existing models and experimental results illustrates that, although Vidal et al.'s model can better predict the reinforcement corrosion of beam B1CL1 under localized corrosion, it cannot predict the corrosion of beam B2CL1 under general corrosion. Also, Rodriguez's model, derived from the general corrosion due to electrically accelerated corrosion experiments, cannot match natural chloride corrosion irrespective of whether corrosion is localized or general. Thus, for natural general corrosion in the second stage of cracking propagation, a new model based on the parameter of average steel cross-section loss is put forward to predict steel corrosion from corrosion cracking.

  6. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    SciTech Connect

    I. L. Rakhno; N. V. Mokhov; A. I. Drozhdin

    2003-12-10

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  7. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the

  8. A transmission-loss monitor using current transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J.F.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Jason, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    A system for measuring the amount of beam-charge loss in a linear-accelerator structure has been developed that uses a pair of beam-current transformers, otherwise used to monitor the linac beam current. This system is necessary to enable the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) fast-protect system to shut off the accelerated beam in the event of a beam loss that would deposit sufficient energy to damage the accelerator structure. The present GTA accelerator consists of a 2.5-MeV, H{sup {minus}} RFQ, an intermediate matching section (IMS) and a single DTL cavity with an output energy of 3.2-MeV and transmitted current of 35 mA. Based on the RFQ output beam, melting of the copper structures will occur when about 40 nC of beam is deposited in a point loss. For a grazing angle of 30 mrad, up to 640 nC may be tolerated. The beam-current-transmission-loss monitor (BCTLM) system in conjunction with the fast-protect system measures the amount of beam loss between two toroidal beam-current monitors and automatically terminates the macropulse when the integrated loss reaches a predetermined set point. The design and operation of the BCTLM system used in the IMS and DTL section of the accelerator is described.

  9. Self-trapping of optical beams through thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lamhot, Yuval; Barak, Assaf; Peleg, Or; Segev, Mordechai

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, self-trapping of optical beams in nanoparticle suspensions by virtue of thermophoresis. We use light to control the local concentration of nanoparticles, and increase their density at the center of the optical beam, thereby increasing the effective refractive index in the beam vicinity, causing the beam to self-trap.

  10. ICRH induced particle losses in Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustin, J. M.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Pfefferlé, D.; Geiger, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fast ions in W7-X will be produced either by neutral beam injection (NBI) or by ion-cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH). The latter presents the advantage of depositing power locally and does not suffer from core accessibility issues (Drevlak et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 073002). This work assesses the possibility of using ICRH as a fast ion source in W7-X relevant conditions. The SCENIC package is used to resolve the full wave propagation and absorption in a three-dimensional plasma equilibrium. The source of the ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) wave is modelled in this work by an antenna formulation allowing its localisation in both the poloidal and toroidal directions. The actual antenna dimension and localization is therefore approximated with good agreement. The local wave deposition breaks the five-fold periodicity of W7-X. It appears that generation of fast ions is hindered by high collisionality and significant particle losses. The particle trapping mechanism induced by ICRH is found to enhance drift induced losses caused by the finite orbit width of trapped particles. The inclusion of a neoclassically resolved radial electric field is also investigated and shows a significant reduction of particle losses.

  11. Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain diseases, such as thyroid problems, diabetes, or lupus. If you take certain medicines or have chemotherapy for cancer, you may also lose your hair. Other causes are stress, a low protein diet, a family history, or poor nutrition. Treatment for hair loss depends ...

  12. Limb Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... limb. Learning how to use it takes time. Physical therapy can help you adapt. Recovery from the loss of a limb can be hard. Sadness, anger, and frustration are common. If you are having a tough time, talk to your doctor. Treatment with medicine or counseling can help.

  13. Weight Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Show Your Support! Help stop diabetes with these promotions that give back. Healthy Recipes: Delicious Recipe Kits ... to Give Do-It-Yourself Fundraising & Local Events Promotions that Give Back Donate Your Collectibles Donate Stocks ...

  14. Improved Gaussian Beam-Scattering Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The localized model of the beam-shape coefficients for Gaussian beam-scattering theory by a spherical particle provides a great simplification in the numerical implementation of the theory. We derive an alternative form for the localized coefficients that is more convenient for computer computations and that provides physical insight into the details of the scattering process. We construct a FORTRAN program for Gaussian beam scattering with the localized model and compare its computer run time on a personal computer with that of a traditional Mie scattering program and with three other published methods for computing Gaussian beam scattering. We show that the analytical form of the beam-shape coefficients makes evident the fact that the excitation rate of morphology-dependent resonances is greatly enhanced for far off-axis incidence of the Gaussian beam.

  15. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; CAMERON,P.R.; SHEA,T.J.; CONNOLLY,R.C.; KESSELMAN,M.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be constructed by a multi-laboratory collaboration with BNL responsible for the transfer lines and ring. [1] The 1 MW beam power necessitates careful monitoring to minimize un-controlled loss. This high beam power will influence the design of the monitors in the high energy beam transport line (HEBT) from linac to ring, in the ring, and in the ring-to-target transfer line (RTBT). The ring instrumentation must cover a 3-decade range of beam intensity during accumulation. Beam loss monitoring will be especially critical since un-controlled beam loss must be kept below 10{sup -4}. A Beam-In-Gap (BIG) monitor is being designed to assure out-of-bucket beam will not be lost in the ring.

  16. Use of radial self-field geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation above 6 MeV on Hermes III.

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Ginn, William Craig; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Schall, Michael; Cooper, Gary Wayne

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the generation and propagation of intense pulsed ion beams at the 6 MeV level and above using the Hermes III facility at Sandia National Laboratories. While high-power ion beams have previously been produced using Hermes III, we have conducted systematic studies of several ion diode geometries for the purpose of maximizing focused ion energy for a number of applications. A self-field axial-gap diode of the pinch reflex type and operated in positive polarity yielded beam power below predicted levels. This is ascribed both to power flow losses of unknown origin upstream of the diode load in Hermes positive polarity operation, and to anomalies in beam focusing in this configuration. A change to a radial self-field geometry and negative polarity operation resulted in greatly increased beam voltage (> 6 MeV) and estimated ion current. A comprehensive diagnostic set was developed to characterize beam performance, including both time-dependent and time-integrated measurements of local and total beam power. A substantial high-energy ion population was identified propagating in reverse direction, i.e. from the back side of the anode in the electron beam dump. While significant progress was made in increasing beam power, further improvements in assessing the beam focusing envelope will be required before ultimate ion generation efficiency with this geometry can be completely determined.

  17. Dependence of extrinsic loss on group velocity in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    O'Faolain, Liam; White, Thomas P; O'Brien, David; Yuan, Xiadong; Settle, Michael D; Krauss, Thomas F

    2007-10-01

    We examine the effects of disorder on propagation loss as a function of group velocity for W1 photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides. Disorder is deliberately and controllably introduced into the photonic crystal by pseudo-randomly displacing the holes of the photonic lattice. This allows us to clearly distinguish two types of loss. Away from the band-edge and for moderately slow light (group velocity c/20-c/30) loss scales sub-linearly with group velocity, whereas near the band-edge, reflection loss increases dramatically due to the random and local shift of the band-edge. The optical analysis also shows that the random fabrication errors of our structures, made on a standard e-beam lithography system, are below 1 nm root mean square.

  18. Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons by electron beam with graphene ribbon arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as an alternative material to support surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with its excellent properties such as the tight electromagnetic field localization, low dissipative loss, and versatile tunability. Thus, graphene surface plasmon polaritons (GSPs) provide an exciting platform to develop a series of novel devices and systems from the optical band to the terahertz (THz) band. In this paper, theoretical and simulated studies about the excitation of SPPs by an injected electron beam with periodic graphene ribbon arrays deposited on a dielectric medium are presented. The analytical dispersion expression of the GSP mode on the graphene ribbon arrays is obtained by using a modal expansion method along with periodic boundary conditions in the structure. With this result, the dispersion relation, propagation loss, and field pattern of the propagating GSPs for both periodic graphene microribbon arrays and the complete graphene sheet are investigated and analyzed in the THz band. It is shown that the electromagnetic field with a better concentration on the interface can be realized with graphene ribbon arrays compared with the graphene sheet for a given frequency. Besides, the excitation of GSPs by an injected electron beam with graphene ribbon arrays is modeled and implemented by the particle-in-cell simulation based on the finite difference time domain algorithm. GSPs can be excited effectively when the dispersion line of the electron beam and SPPs on the graphene ribbon arrays is matched with each other well. Besides, the dependences of output power on electron beam parameters such as the distance of the electron beam above the graphene ribbon surface and beam voltage are studied and analyzed. Finally, the tunability of graphene conductivity via biased voltage with a ground metal is considered and the tunable excitation of GSPs on the structure with biased drive voltage by the injected electron beam is also realized. The present work can find a

  19. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-12-01

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II {ital B} Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center ({gt}20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-12-10

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II B Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center (>20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts.

  1. Coherent beam-beam interaction with four colliding beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, B.; Siemann, R. H.

    1995-09-01

    The coherent beam-beam interaction in the absence of Landau damping is studied with a computer simulation of four space-charge-compensated colliding beams. Results are presented for the modes, phase space structures, widths, and growth rates of coherent beam-beam resonances. These results are compared with solutions of the Vlasov equation, and with measurements made at the Dispositif de Collisions dans l'Igloo (DCI) storage ring in Orsay, France, which operated with space-charge-compensated colliding beams.

  2. Local zone wise elastic and plastic properties of electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy using digital image correlation technique: A comparative study between uniform stress and virtual fields method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranath, K. M.; Ramji, M.

    2015-05-01

    Joining of materials using welding results in the formation of material zones with varying microstructure across the weld. Extraction of the mechanical properties of those individual heterogeneous zones are important in designing components and structures comprised of welds. In this study, the zone wise local extraction of the elastic and plastic properties of an electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy has been carried out using both the uniform stress method (USM) and the virtual fields method (VFM) involving digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The surface strain field obtained using DIC technique from a transverse weld specimen tensile testing is used for extracting the zone wise strain evolution. Initially, using uniform stress assumption, zone wise full range stress-strain curves are extracted. In USM methodology, the elastic and plastic material models are fitted to the zone wise stress-strain curves and required parameters are extracted from it. But inherent disadvantage is lot of images need to be processed for the parameter extraction. Recently, VFM is gaining lot of popularity in characterization domain as it is robust, accurate and faster. VFM is based on the principle of virtual work where, the weak form of local equilibrium equations and kinematically admissible virtual displacement fields are utilized for parameter extraction. Hollomon's power law is used here as the hardening rule. Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, strength coefficient and strain hardening exponent are the parameters extracted zone wise using both USM and VFM. A Vicker's microhardness measurement is also conducted across the weld zone towards mapping the strength behavior. Fusion zone has reported higher yield strength, strength coefficient and Poisson's ratio. Young's modulus value is found decreasing from base metal towards the fusion zone. The trend observed in parameter variation across the weld zone obtained by both USM and VFM compares very well. Due

  3. Localized External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) to the Pelvis Induces Systemic IL-1Beta and TNF-Alpha Production: Role of the TNF-Alpha Signaling in EBRT-Induced Fatigue.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Tasha L; Hung, Arthur Y; Thomas, Charles R; Wood, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients undergoing localized external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) can experience a progressive increase in fatigue, which can affect physical functioning and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to develop a mouse EBRT prostate cancer treatment model with which to determine the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the genesis of EBRT-related fatigue. We assessed voluntary wheel-running activity (VWRA) as a proxy for fatigue, food intake and body weight in male C57BL/6 mice undergoing EBRT to the pelvis. In the first experiment, anesthetized male C57BL/6 mice underwent fractionated EBRT to the pelvis for a total dose of 68.2 Gy, thereby mimicking a clinically relevant therapeutic dose and frequency. The day after the last treatment, levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in plasma along with mRNA levels in liver, colon and whole brain were measured. EBRT-induced fatigue resulted in reduced body weight, diminished food intake, and increased plasma and tissue levels of IL-1β and TNF-α. In a follow-up experiment, we used TNF-α-deficient mice to further delineate the role of TNF-α signaling in EBRT-induced sickness behavior. EBRT-induced changes in fatigue, food intake and body weight were no different between TNF-α deficient mice and their wild-type counterparts. Taken together our data demonstrate that a clinically relevant localized irradiation of the pelvis induces a systemic IL-1β and TNF-α response and sickness behavior in mice, but the TNF-α signaling pathway alone does not independently mediate these effects.

  4. Localized External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) to the Pelvis Induces Systemic IL-1Beta and TNF-Alpha Production: Role of the TNF-Alpha Signaling in EBRT-Induced Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Tasha L.; Hung, Arthur Y.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wood, Lisa J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients undergoing localized external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) can experience a progressive increase in fatigue, which can affect physical functioning and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to develop a mouse EBRT prostate cancer treatment model with which to determine the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the genesis of EBRT-related fatigue. We assessed voluntary wheel-running activity (VWRA) as a proxy for fatigue, food intake and body weight in male C57BL/6 mice undergoing EBRT to the pelvis. In the first experiment, anesthetized male C57BL/6 mice underwent fractionated EBRT to the pelvis for a total dose of 68.2 Gy, thereby mimicking a clinically relevant therapeutic dose and frequency. The day after the last treatment, levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in plasma along with mRNA levels in liver, colon and whole brain were measured. EBRT-induced fatigue resulted in reduced body weight, diminished food intake, and increased plasma and tissue levels of IL-1β and TNF-α. In a follow-up experiment, we used TNF-α-deficient mice to further delineate the role of TNF-α signaling in EBRT-induced sickness behavior. EBRT-induced changes in fatigue, food intake and body weight were no different between TNF-α deficient mice and their wild-type counterparts. Taken together our data demonstrate that a clinically relevant localized irradiation of the pelvis induces a systemic IL-1β and TNF-α response and sickness behavior in mice, but the TNF-α signaling pathway alone does not independently mediate these effects. PMID:26720802

  5. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  6. Linac Coherent Light Source Electron Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2007-04-27

    This paper describes the design and simulation of the electron beam collimation system in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Dark current is expected from the gun and some of the accelerating cavities. Particle tracking of the expected dark current through the entire LCLS linac, from gun through FEL undulator, is used to estimate final particle extent in the undulator as well as expected beam loss at each collimator or aperture restriction. A table of collimators and aperture restrictions is listed along with halo particle loss results, which includes an estimate of average continuous beam power lost. In addition, the transverse wakefield alignment tolerances are calculated for each collimator.

  7. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brett B; Stanford, Michael G; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lester, Kevin; Plank, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IV)Me3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. In addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention. PMID:25977862

  8. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IV)Me3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. Finally, in addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhancesmore » the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.« less

  9. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Lester, Kevin; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IV)Me3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. Finally, in addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.

  10. Electron Cooling of Intense Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, J.; Kamerdjiev, V.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stein, J.; Stockhorst, H.; Korotaev, Yu.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-03-20

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) are presented. Intensity of the proton beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Results of the instability investigations performed at COSY during last years are presented in this report in comparison with previous results from HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) CELSIUS (Uppsala, Sweden) and LEAR (CERN). Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described. This work is supported by RFBR grant no. 05-02-16320 and INTAS grant no. 03-54-5584.

  11. A beam scraper using a linear motor

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.; Rodger, E.S.; Thern, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    A beam scraper using a linear motor drive has been developed for use in the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The device is used to measure beam size by moving a target to a predetermined location and measuring the intercepted beam with nearby loss monitors or by noting the decrease in the circulating beam current. This device has excellent vacuum characteristics, as the motor and sensor coils are outside the vacuum, coupled magnetically to the moving par