Science.gov

Sample records for beam phase error

  1. Beam-pointing errors of planar-phased arrays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Cooper, W. K.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Using both analytical and Monte Carlo techniques, beam-pointing errors of planar-phased arrays are analyzed. The obtained simple formulas for rms pointing errors are applicable to uniform planar arrays with both uniform and Gaussian uncorrelated phase-error distributions and for any arbitrary scan angle.

  2. Influence of nonhomogeneous earth on the rms phase error and beam-pointing errors of large, sparse high-frequency receiving arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of ground-based high-frequency (HF) receiving arrays is reduced when the array elements have electrically small ground planes. The array rms phase error and beam-pointing errors, caused by multipath rays reflected from a nonhomogeneous Earth, are determined for a sparse array of elements that are modeled as Hertzian dipoles in close proximity to Earth with no ground planes. Numerical results are presented for cases of randomly distributed and systematically distributed Earth nonhomogeneities where one-half of vertically polarized array elements are located in proximity to one type of Earth and the remaining half are located in proximity to a second type of Earth. The maximum rms phase errors, for the cases examined, are 18 deg and 9 deg for randomly distributed and systematically distributed nonhomogeneities, respectively. The maximum beampointing errors are 0 and 0.3 beam widths for randomly distributed and systematically distributed nonhomogeneities, respectively.

  3. Bit error rate analysis of Gaussian, annular Gaussian, cos Gaussian, and cosh Gaussian beams with the help of random phase screens.

    PubMed

    Eyyuboğlu, Halil T

    2014-06-10

    Using the random phase screen approach, we carry out a simulation analysis of the probability of error performance of Gaussian, annular Gaussian, cos Gaussian, and cosh Gaussian beams. In our scenario, these beams are intensity-modulated by the randomly generated binary symbols of an electrical message signal and then launched from the transmitter plane in equal powers. They propagate through a turbulent atmosphere modeled by a series of random phase screens. Upon arriving at the receiver plane, detection is performed in a circuitry consisting of a pin photodiode and a matched filter. The symbols detected are compared with the transmitted ones, errors are counted, and from there the probability of error is evaluated numerically. Within the range of source and propagation parameters tested, the lowest probability of error is obtained for the annular Gaussian beam. Our investigation reveals that there is hardly any difference between the aperture-averaged scintillations of the beams used, and the distinctive advantage of the annular Gaussian beam lies in the fact that the receiver aperture captures the maximum amount of power when this particular beam is launched from the transmitter plane.

  4. Phase Errors and the Capture Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J., and Machorro, E.

    2011-11-01

    This slide-show presents analysis of spectrograms and the phase error of filtered noise in a signal. When the filtered noise is smaller than the signal amplitude, the phase error can never exceed 90{deg}, so the average phase error over many cycles is zero: this is called the capture effect because the largest signal captures the phase and frequency determination.

  5. Errors of phase and data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, W. G.; Hansen, J.

    2003-04-01

    Strong, localized weather events like tropical cyclones and squall lines are important to predict well. However, this is difficult because their compact nature readily allows for appreciable error growth in both amplitude and phase. Ensemble methods allow model states to disperse in both amplitude and phase, but traditional ensemble data assimilation (DA) schemes (like the ensemble Kalman filter) are only equipped to handle errors in amplitude; they are not suited to correct errors in phase, i.e. position. To get around this problem, forecasters currently resort to practices like bogussing which are messy and arbitrary. Towards finding an objective method to handle errors of phase, we have developed a method that separates the assimilation process into two steps, one to address phase errors and the other amplitude errors. The idea is to eliminate errors of phase across the ensemble members before attempting to do typical Eulerian DA to correct amplitudes. This is accomplished by distorting and shifting the localized events within ensemble members to an agreed upon location (either an analyzed position or the observed position), doing the traditional DA, and then restoring and shifting the features back to an analyzed location. In this way, each ensemble member retains its localized event, and the ensemble mean reflects a probabilistic expression of possible model states.

  6. Homodyne laser interferometer involving minimal quadrature phase error to obtain subnanometer nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Junning; He, Zhangqiang; Jiu, Yuanwei; Tan, Jiubin; Sun, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The demand for minimal cyclic nonlinearity error in laser interferometry is increasing as a result of advanced scientific research projects. Research shows that the quadrature phase error is the main effect that introduces cyclic nonlinearity error, and polarization-mixing cross talk during beam splitting is the main error source that causes the quadrature phase error. In this paper, a new homodyne quadrature laser interferometer configuration based on nonpolarization beam splitting and balanced interference between two circularly polarized laser beams is proposed. Theoretical modeling indicates that the polarization-mixing cross talk is elaborately avoided through nonpolarizing and Wollaston beam splitting, with a minimum number of quadrature phase error sources involved. Experimental results show that the cyclic nonlinearity error of the interferometer is up to 0.6 nm (peak-to-valley value) without any correction and can be further suppressed to 0.2 nm with a simple gain and offset correction method. PMID:27607285

  7. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-03-28

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention from the promise of transform-limited pulses in the soft X-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  8. Beam induced vacuum measurement error in BEPC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Xiao, Qiong; Peng, XiaoHua; Wang, HaiJing

    2011-12-01

    When the beam in BEPCII storage ring aborts suddenly, the measured pressure of cold cathode gauges and ion pumps will drop suddenly and decrease to the base pressure gradually. This shows that there is a beam induced positive error in the pressure measurement during beam operation. The error is the difference between measured and real pressures. Right after the beam aborts, the error will disappear immediately and the measured pressure will then be equal to real pressure. For one gauge, we can fit a non-linear pressure-time curve with its measured pressure data 20 seconds after a sudden beam abortion. From this negative exponential decay pumping-down curve, real pressure at the time when the beam starts aborting is extrapolated. With the data of several sudden beam abortions we have got the errors of that gauge in different beam currents and found that the error is directly proportional to the beam current, as expected. And a linear data-fitting gives the proportion coefficient of the equation, which we derived to evaluate the real pressure all the time when the beam with varied currents is on.

  9. Beam line error analysis, position correction, and graphic processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuhua; Mao, Naifeng

    1993-12-01

    A beam transport line error analysis and beam position correction code called ``EAC'' has been enveloped associated with a graphics and data post processing package for TRANSPORT. Based on the linear optics design using TRANSPORT or other general optics codes, EAC independently analyzes effects of magnet misalignments, systematic and statistical errors of magnetic fields as well as the effects of the initial beam positions, on the central trajectory and upon the transverse beam emittance dilution. EAC also provides an efficient way to develop beam line trajectory correcting schemes. The post processing package generates various types of graphics such as the beam line geometrical layout, plots of the Twiss parameters, beam envelopes, etc. It also generates an EAC input file, thus connecting EAC with general optics codes. EAC and the post processing package are small size codes, that are easy to access and use. They have become useful tools for the design of transport lines at SSCL.

  10. Momentum errors in an RF separated beam

    SciTech Connect

    T. Kobilarcik

    2002-09-19

    The purity of an RF separated beam is affected by the difference in mass of the particle types and the momentum bite of the beam. The resulting time-of-flight difference between different types allows separation to occur; the finite momentum bite results in chromatic aberration. Both these features also give rise to a particle type dependent velocity bite, which must also be taken into account. This memo demonstrates a generalizable method for calculating the effect.

  11. Beam Tomography in Longitudinal Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mane, V.; Wei, J.; Peggs, S.

    1997-05-01

    Longitudinal particle motion in circular accelerators is typically monitored by one dimensional (1-D) profiles. Adiabatic particle motion in 2-D phase space can be reconstructed with tomographic techniques, using 1-D profiles. In this paper, we discuss a filtered backprojection algorithm, with a high pass ramp or Hann filter, for phase space reconstruction. The algorithm uses several projections of the beam at equally spaced angles over half a synchrotron period. A computer program RADON has been developed to process digitized mountain range data and do the phase space reconstruction for the AGS, and later for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Analysis has been performed to determine the sensitivity to machine parameters and data acquisition errors. During the Sextant test of RHIC in early 1997, this program has been successfully employed to reconstruct the motion of Au^77+ beam in the AGS.

  12. Laser beam complex amplitude measurement by phase diversity.

    PubMed

    Védrenne, Nicolas; Mugnier, Laurent M; Michau, Vincent; Velluet, Marie-Thérèse; Bierent, Rudolph

    2014-02-24

    The control of the optical quality of a laser beam requires a complex amplitude measurement able to deal with strong modulus variations and potentially highly perturbed wavefronts. The method proposed here consists in an extension of phase diversity to complex amplitude measurements that is effective for highly perturbed beams. Named camelot for Complex Amplitude MEasurement by a Likelihood Optimization Tool, it relies on the acquisition and processing of few images of the beam section taken along the optical path. The complex amplitude of the beam is retrieved from the images by the minimization of a Maximum a Posteriori error metric between the images and a model of the beam propagation. The analytical formalism of the method and its experimental validation are presented. The modulus of the beam is compared to a measurement of the beam profile, the phase of the beam is compared to a conventional phase diversity estimate. The precision of the experimental measurements is investigated by numerical simulations.

  13. Error-Induced Beam Degradation in Fermilab's Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-Young Phil

    2008-01-01

    In Part I, three independent models of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron are presented. All three models are constructed to investigate and explore the effects of unavoidable machine errors on a proton beam under the influence of space-charge effects. The first is a stochastic noise model. Electric current fluctuations arising from power supplies are ubiquitous and unavoidable and are a source of instabilities in accelerators of all types. A new noise module for generating the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) stochastic noise is first created and incorporated into the existing Object-oriented Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT-FNAL) package. After being convinced with a preliminary model that the noise, particularly non-white noise, does matter to beam quality, we proceeded to measure directly current ripples and common-mode voltages from all four Gradient Magnet Power Supplies (GMPS). Then, the current signals are Fourier-analyzed. Based upon the power spectra of current signals, we tune up the Ornstein-Uhlnbeck noise model. As a result, we are able to closely match the frequency spectra between current measurements and the modeled O-U stochastic noise. The stochastic noise modeled upon measurements is applied to the Booster beam in the presence of the full space-charge effects. This noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the stochastic noise, impinging upon the beam and coupled to the space-charge effects, can substantially enhance the beam degradation process throughout the injection period. The second model is a magnet misalignment model. It is the first time to utilize the latest beamline survey data for building a magnet-by-magnet misalignment model. Given as-found survey fiducial coordinates, we calculate all types of magnet alignment errors (station error, pitch, yaw, roll, twists, etc.) are implemented in the model. We then follow up with statistical analysis to understand how each type of alignment errors are

  14. Beam masking to reduce cyclic error in beam launcher of interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Lawrence L. (Inventor); Bell, Raymond Mark (Inventor); Dutta, Kalyan (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed to reducing cyclic error in the beam launcher of an interferometer. In one embodiment, an interferometry apparatus comprises a reference beam directed along a reference path, and a measurement beam spatially separated from the reference beam and being directed along a measurement path contacting a measurement object. The reference beam and the measurement beam have a single frequency. At least a portion of the reference beam and at least a portion of the measurement beam overlapping along a common path. One or more masks are disposed in the common path or in the reference path and the measurement path to spatially isolate the reference beam and the measurement beam from one another.

  15. Phasing piston error in segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junlun; Zhao, Weirui

    2016-08-22

    To achieve a diffraction-limited imaging, the piston errors between the segments of the segmented primary mirror telescope should be reduced to λ/40 RMS. We propose a method to detect the piston error by analyzing the intensity distribution on the image plane according to the Fourier optics principle, which can capture segments with the piston errors as large as the coherence length of the input light and reduce these to 0.026λ RMS (λ = 633nm). This method is adaptable to any segmented and deployable primary mirror telescope. Experiments have been carried out to validate the feasibility of the method. PMID:27557192

  16. Phasing piston error in segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junlun; Zhao, Weirui

    2016-08-22

    To achieve a diffraction-limited imaging, the piston errors between the segments of the segmented primary mirror telescope should be reduced to λ/40 RMS. We propose a method to detect the piston error by analyzing the intensity distribution on the image plane according to the Fourier optics principle, which can capture segments with the piston errors as large as the coherence length of the input light and reduce these to 0.026λ RMS (λ = 633nm). This method is adaptable to any segmented and deployable primary mirror telescope. Experiments have been carried out to validate the feasibility of the method.

  17. Annular beam with segmented phase gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shubo; Wu, Liang; Tao, Shaohua

    2016-08-01

    An annular beam with a single uniform-intensity ring and multiple segments of phase gradients is proposed in this paper. Different from the conventional superposed vortices, such as the modulated optical vortices and the collinear superposition of multiple orbital angular momentum modes, the designed annular beam has a doughnut intensity distribution whose radius is independent of the phase distribution of the beam in the imaging plane. The phase distribution along the circumference of the doughnut beam can be segmented with different phase gradients. Similar to a vortex beam, the annular beam can also exert torques and rotate a trapped particle owing to the orbital angular momentum of the beam. As the beam possesses different phase gradients, the rotation velocity of the trapped particle can be varied along the circumference. The simulation and experimental results show that an annular beam with three segments of different phase gradients can rotate particles with controlled velocities. The beam has potential applications in optical trapping and optical information processing.

  18. Phase control of the microwave radiation in free electron laser two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Sessler, A.M.

    1987-07-01

    A phase control system for the FEL portion of Two-Beam Accelerator is proposed. The control keeps the phase error within acceptable bounds. The control mechanism is analyzed, both analytically in a ''resonant particle'' approximation and numerically in a multi-particle simulation code. Sensitivity of phase errors to the FEL parameters has been noticed.

  19. Method and apparatus for optical phase error correction

    DOEpatents

    DeRose, Christopher; Bender, Daniel A.

    2014-09-02

    The phase value of a phase-sensitive optical device, which includes an optical transport region, is modified by laser processing. At least a portion of the optical transport region is exposed to a laser beam such that the phase value is changed from a first phase value to a second phase value, where the second phase value is different from the first phase value. The portion of the optical transport region that is exposed to the laser beam can be a surface of the optical transport region or a portion of the volume of the optical transport region. In an embodiment of the invention, the phase value of the optical device is corrected by laser processing. At least a portion of the optical transport region is exposed to a laser beam until the phase value of the optical device is within a specified tolerance of a target phase value.

  20. Error analysis in post linac to driver linac transport beam line of RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effects of magnet errors in the beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator in Korea (RAON). The P2DT beam line is bent by 180-degree to send the radioactive Isotope Separation On-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in Linac-3 to Linac-2. This beam line transports beams with multi-charge state 132Sn45,46,47. The P2DT beam line includes 42 quadrupole, 4 dipole and 10 sextupole magnets. We evaluate the effects of errors on the trajectory of the beam by using the TRACK code, which includes the translational and the rotational errors of the quadrupole, dipole and sextupole magnets in the beam line. The purpose of this error analysis is to reduce the rate of beam loss in the P2DT beam line. The distorted beam trajectories can be corrected by using six correctors and seven monitors.

  1. Compensation of body shake errors in terahertz beam scanning single frequency holography for standoff personnel screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Chao; Sun, Zhao-Yang; Zhao, Yu; Wu, Shi-You; Fang, Guang-You

    2016-08-01

    In the terahertz (THz) band, the inherent shake of the human body may strongly impair the image quality of a beam scanning single frequency holography system for personnel screening. To realize accurate shake compensation in imaging processing, it is quite necessary to develop a high-precision measure system. However, in many cases, different parts of a human body may shake to different extents, resulting in greatly increasing the difficulty in conducting a reasonable measurement of body shake errors for image reconstruction. In this paper, a body shake error compensation algorithm based on the raw data is proposed. To analyze the effect of the body shake on the raw data, a model of echoed signal is rebuilt with considering both the beam scanning mode and the body shake. According to the rebuilt signal model, we derive the body shake error estimated method to compensate for the phase error. Simulation on the reconstruction of point targets with shake errors and proof-of-principle experiments on the human body in the 0.2-THz band are both performed to confirm the effectiveness of the body shake compensation algorithm proposed. Project supported by the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. YYYJ-1123).

  2. Phase measurement error in summation of electron holography series.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robert A; Bergen, Michael; Malac, Marek

    2014-06-01

    Off-axis electron holography is a method for the transmission electron microscope (TEM) that measures the electric and magnetic properties of a specimen. The electrostatic and magnetic potentials modulate the electron wavefront phase. The error in measurement of the phase therefore determines the smallest observable changes in electric and magnetic properties. Here we explore the summation of a hologram series to reduce the phase error and thereby improve the sensitivity of electron holography. Summation of hologram series requires independent registration and correction of image drift and phase wavefront drift, the consequences of which are discussed. Optimization of the electro-optical configuration of the TEM for the double biprism configuration is examined. An analytical model of image and phase drift, composed of a combination of linear drift and Brownian random-walk, is derived and experimentally verified. The accuracy of image registration via cross-correlation and phase registration is characterized by simulated hologram series. The model of series summation errors allows the optimization of phase error as a function of exposure time and fringe carrier frequency for a target spatial resolution. An experimental example of hologram series summation is provided on WS2 fullerenes. A metric is provided to measure the object phase error from experimental results and compared to analytical predictions. The ultimate experimental object root-mean-square phase error is 0.006 rad (2π/1050) at a spatial resolution less than 0.615 nm and a total exposure time of 900 s. The ultimate phase error in vacuum adjacent to the specimen is 0.0037 rad (2π/1700). The analytical prediction of phase error differs with the experimental metrics by +7% inside the object and -5% in the vacuum, indicating that the model can provide reliable quantitative predictions.

  3. Multi-beam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Romisch, S.; Popovic, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Many of NASA's future missions require multiple accesses to work together as a single system. To accomplish these missions, multi-beam phased array antennas are required to communicate between satellites flying in fixed formation. In this paper, a comparison of different multi-beam systems will be given followed by detailed discussions of the lens array architecture and test results.

  4. An algorithm based on carrier squeezing interferometry for multi-beam phase extraction in Fizeau interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jinlong; Gao, Zhishan; Wang, Kailiang; Yang, Zhongming; Wang, Shuai; Yuan, Qun

    2015-10-01

    Multi-beam interference will exist in the cavity of Fizeau interferometer due to the high reflectivity of test optics. The random phase shift error will be generated by some factors such as the environmental vibration, air turbulence, etc. Both these will cause phase retrieving error. We proposed a non-iterative approach called Carrier Squeezing Multi-beam Interferometry (CSMI) algorithm, which is based on the Carrier squeezing interferometry (CSI) technique to retrieve the phase distribution from multiple-beam interferograms with random phase shift errors. The intensity of multiple-beam interference was decomposed into fundamental wave and high-order harmonics, by using the Fourier series expansion. Multi-beam phase shifting interferograms with linear carrier were rearranged by row or column, to fuse one frame of spatial-temporal fringes. The lobe of the fundamental component related to the phase and the lobes of high-order harmonics and phase shift errors were separated in the frequency domain, so the correct phase was extracted by filtering out the fundamental component. Suppression of the influence from high-order harmonic components, as well as random phase shift error is validated by numerical simulations. Experiments were also executed by using the proposed CSMI algorithm for mirror with high reflection coefficient, showing its advantage comparing with normal phase retrieving algorithms.

  5. Phase shifter for antenna beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ravi; Razban, Tchanguiz

    2016-03-01

    Wide band Array Antenna operates in Ku-band (10.7-12.7 GHz) frequency composed of N×N radiating elements. This antenna aims at the reception of television satellite signals. The goal of this research is to provide better possibility of electronic beam control instead of manual or mechanical control, and design compact and low cost phase shifters to be inserted in the feeding network of this antenna. The electronic control of the phase shifter will allow the control of beam steering. The emphasis of this project will be done at the beginning on the design of a good phase shifter in Ku band. The aim of this research is to define, simulate, release and measure a continuous phase shifter. Better reflection loss, low transmission loss, low Cost of array antennas, large range of phase-shifter, phase flatness and bandwidth will be achieved by providing better gain.

  6. Phase error analysis and compensation considering ambient light for phase measuring profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Liu, Xinran; He, Yi; Zhu, Tongjing

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of phase measuring profilometry (PMP) system based on phase-shifting method is susceptible to gamma non-linearity of the projector-camera pair and uncertain ambient light inevitably. Although many researches on gamma model and phase error compensation methods have been implemented, the effect of ambient light is not explicit all along. In this paper, we perform theoretical analysis and experiments of phase error compensation taking account of both gamma non-linearity and uncertain ambient light. First of all, a mathematical phase error model is proposed to illustrate the reason of phase error generation in detail. We propose that the phase error is related not only to the gamma non-linearity of the projector-camera pair, but also to the ratio of intensity modulation to average intensity in the fringe patterns captured by the camera which is affected by the ambient light. Subsequently, an accurate phase error compensation algorithm is proposed based on the mathematical model, where the relationship between phase error and ambient light is illustrated. Experimental results with four-step phase-shifting PMP system show that the proposed algorithm can alleviate the phase error effectively even though the ambient light is considered.

  7. Are simple IMRT beams more robust against MLC error? Exploring the impact of MLC errors on planar quality assurance and plan quality for different complexity beams.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiazhou; Jin, Xiance; Peng, Jiayuan; Xie, Jiang; Chen, Junchao; Hu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of beam complexities on planar quality assur-ance and plan quality robustness by introducing MLC errors in intensity-modulate radiation therapy. Forty patients' planar quality assurance (QA) plans were enrolled in this study, including 20 dynamic MLC (DMLC) IMRT plans and 20 static MLC (SMLC) IMRT plans. The total beam numbers were 150 and 160 for DMLC and SMLC, respectively. Six different magnitudes of MLC errors were introduced to these beams. Gamma pass rates were calculated by comparing error-free fluence and error-induced fluence. The plan quality variation was acquired by comparing PTV coverage. Eight complexity scores were calculated based on the beam flu-ence and the MLC sequence. The complexity scores include fractal dimension, monitor unit, modulation index, fluence map complexity, weighted average of field area, weighted average of field perimeter, and small aperture ratio (< 5 cm2 and < 50cm2). The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze the correlation between these scores and gamma pass rate and plan quality varia-tion. For planar QA, the most significant complexity index was fractal dimension for DMLC (p = -0.40) and weighted segment area for SMLC (p = 0.27) at low magnitude MLC error. For plan quality, the most significant complexity index was weighted segment perimeter for DMLC (p = 0.56) and weighted segment area for SMLC (p= 0.497) at low magnitude MLC error. The sensitivity of planar QA was weakly associated with the field complexity with low magnitude MLC error, but the plan quality robustness was associated with beam complexity. Plans with simple beams were more robust to MLC error.

  8. SYSTEMATIC ERROR REDUCTION: NON-TILTED REFERENCE BEAM METHOD FOR LONG TRACE PROFILER.

    SciTech Connect

    QIAN,S.; QIAN, K.; HONG, Y.; SENG, L.; HO, T.; TAKACS, P.

    2007-08-25

    Systematic error in the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) has become the major error source as measurement accuracy enters the nanoradian and nanometer regime. Great efforts have been made to reduce the systematic error at a number of synchrotron radiation laboratories around the world. Generally, the LTP reference beam has to be tilted away from the optical axis in order to avoid fringe overlap between the sample and reference beams. However, a tilted reference beam will result in considerable systematic error due to optical system imperfections, which is difficult to correct. Six methods of implementing a non-tilted reference beam in the LTP are introduced: (1) application of an external precision angle device to measure and remove slide pitch error without a reference beam, (2) independent slide pitch test by use of not tilted reference beam, (3) non-tilted reference test combined with tilted sample, (4) penta-prism scanning mode without a reference beam correction, (5) non-tilted reference using a second optical head, and (6) alternate switching of data acquisition between the sample and reference beams. With a non-tilted reference method, the measurement accuracy can be improved significantly. Some measurement results are presented. Systematic error in the sample beam arm is not addressed in this paper and should be treated separately.

  9. Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission Commissioning Phase Orbit Determination Error Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Lauren R.; Novak, Stefan; Long, Anne; Gramling, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission commissioning phase starts in a 185 km altitude x 12 Earth radii (RE) injection orbit and lasts until the Phase 1 mission orbits and orientation to the Earth-Sun li ne are achieved. During a limited time period in the early part of co mmissioning, five maneuvers are performed to raise the perigee radius to 1.2 R E, with a maneuver every other apogee. The current baseline is for the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Facility to p rovide MMS orbit determination support during the early commissioning phase using all available two-way range and Doppler tracking from bo th the Deep Space Network and Space Network. This paper summarizes th e results from a linear covariance analysis to determine the type and amount of tracking data required to accurately estimate the spacecraf t state, plan each perigee raising maneuver, and support thruster cal ibration during this phase. The primary focus of this study is the na vigation accuracy required to plan the first and the final perigee ra ising maneuvers. Absolute and relative position and velocity error hi stories are generated for all cases and summarized in terms of the ma ximum root-sum-square consider and measurement noise error contributi ons over the definitive and predictive arcs and at discrete times inc luding the maneuver planning and execution times. Details of the meth odology, orbital characteristics, maneuver timeline, error models, and error sensitivities are provided.

  10. Phase error statistics of a phase-locked loop synchronized direct detection optical PPM communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, Suresh; Gardner, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Receiver timing synchronization of an optical Pulse-Position Modulation (PPM) communication system can be achieved using a phased-locked loop (PLL), provided the photodetector output is suitably processed. The magnitude of the PLL phase error is a good indicator of the timing error at the receiver decoder. The statistics of the phase error are investigated while varying several key system parameters such as PPM order, signal and background strengths, and PPL bandwidth. A practical optical communication system utilizing a laser diode transmitter and an avalanche photodiode in the receiver is described, and the sampled phase error data are presented. A linear regression analysis is applied to the data to obtain estimates of the relational constants involving the phase error variance and incident signal power.

  11. Developing beam phasing on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.B.; Amendt, P.A.; Dixit, S.N.; Hammel, B.A.; Kalantar, D.H.; Pennington, D.M.; Weiland, T.L.

    1997-03-10

    We are presently adding the capability to irradiate indirectly-driven Nova targets with two rings of illumination inside each end of the hohlraum for studies of time-dependent second Legendre (P2) and time- integrated fourth Legendre (P4) flux asymmetry control. The rings will be formed with specially designed kinoform phase plates (KPPs), which will direct each half of each beam into two separate rings that are nearly uniform azimuthally. The timing and temporal pulse shape of the outer rings will be controlled independently from those of the inner rings, allowing for phasing of the pulse shapes to control time dependent asymmetry. Modifications to the incident beam diagnostics (IBDS) will enable us to verify that acceptable levels of power balance among the contributing segments of each ring have been achieved on each shot. Current techniques for precision beam pointing and timing are expected to be sufficiently accurate for these experiments. We present a design for an affordable retrofit to achieve beam phasing on Nova, results of a simplified demonstration, and calculations highlighting the anticipated benefits.

  12. Experimental analysis of beam pointing system based on liquid crystal optical phase array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yubin; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate an elementary non-mechanical beam aiming and steering system with a single liquid crystal optical phase array (LC-OPA) and charge-coupled device (CCD). With the conventional method of beam steering control, the LC-OPA device can realize one dimensional beam steering continuously. An improved beam steering strategy is applied to realize two dimensional beam steering with a single LC-OPA. The whole beam aiming and steering system, including an LC-OPA and a retroreflective target, is controlled by the monitor. We test the feasibility of beam steering strategy both in one dimension and in two dimension at first, then the whole system is build up based on the improved strategy. The experimental results show that the max experimental pointing error is 56 µrad, and the average pointing error of the system is 19 µrad.

  13. Electron beam targets vapor-phase contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Electron-beam bombardment has long been known to break down complex molecules. Zapit Technology, Inc. (Santa Clara, California) is in the process of commercializing a treatment system, tested in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses electron beams to destroy vapor-phase toxic wastes. Drawing relatively low-power beams, the system is said to offer a low-cost way to oxidize chlorinated and non-chlorinated organic compounds. The unit has been developed to treat vapor-phase organic wastes at temperatures less than 400 F, and at ambient pressures. Candidates streams include process of gases, and organics collected during soil-vapor extraction or stripped from wastewater and groundwater streams. Inside the Zapit treatment unit, a continuous stream of ionizing electrons is generated by a cathode and is accelerated to nearly the speed of light through a metal grid. As the pollutant stream passes through the reaction chamber, it is bombarded by this electron beam. In the process, complex organic molecules are broken down into water, carbon dioxide, and, if chlorinated compounds are present, hydrochloric acid. During groundwater treatment, an air stripper converts dissolved organics in a vapor phase, which is passed through the electron-beam unit. The offgases from the Zapit unit are passed through an acid scrubber (using sodium hydroxide) to neutralize any byproduct HCl and through a carbon-adsorption unit for final polishing. Industrial offgases can be fed directly into the Zapit treatment unit, without the intermediate air stripper. Electrical power requirements are relatively low.

  14. Error-reduction techniques and error analysis for fully phase- and amplitude-based encryption.

    PubMed

    Javidi, B; Towghi, N; Maghzi, N; Verrall, S C

    2000-08-10

    The performance of fully phase- and amplitude-based encryption processors is analyzed. The effects of noise perturbations on the encrypted information are considered. A thresholding method of decryption that further reduces the mean-squared error (MSE) for the fully phase- and amplitude-based encryption processes is provided. The proposed thresholding scheme significantly improves the performance of fully phase- and amplitude-based encryption, as measured by the MSE metric. We obtain analytical MSE bounds when thresholding is used for both decryption methods, and we also present computer-simulation results. These results show that the fully phase-based method is more robust. We also give a formal proof of a conjecture about the decrypted distribution of distorted encrypted information. This allows the analytical bounds of the MSE to be extended to more general non-Gaussian, nonadditive, nonstationary distortions. Computer simulations support this extension.

  15. Numerical phase retrieval from beam intensity measurements in three planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruel, Laurent

    2003-05-01

    A system and method have been developed at CEA to retrieve phase information from multiple intensity measurements along a laser beam. The device has been patented. Commonly used devices for beam measurement provide phase and intensity information separately or with a rather poor resolution whereas the MIROMA method provides both at the same time, allowing direct use of the results in numerical models. Usual phase retrieval algorithms use two intensity measurements, typically the image plane and the focal plane (Gerschberg-Saxton algorithm) related by a Fourier transform, or the image plane and a lightly defocus plane (D.L. Misell). The principal drawback of such iterative algorithms is their inability to provide unambiguous convergence in all situations. The algorithms can stagnate on bad solutions and the error between measured and calculated intensities remains unacceptable. If three planes rather than two are used, the data redundancy created confers to the method good convergence capability and noise immunity. It provides an excellent agreement between intensity determined from the retrieved phase data set in the image plane and intensity measurements in any diffraction plane. The method employed for MIROMA is inspired from GS algorithm, replacing Fourier transforms by a beam-propagating kernel with gradient search accelerating techniques and special care for phase branch cuts. A fast one dimensional algorithm provides an initial guess for the iterative algorithm. Applications of the algorithm on synthetic data find out the best reconstruction planes that have to be chosen. Robustness and sensibility are evaluated. Results on collimated and distorted laser beams are presented.

  16. The effect of electron beam geometric deformation errors on the small-signal characteristic of ECRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongjian, Yu

    1993-08-01

    In this paper is studied the effect of electron beam geometric deformation errors on the small — signal characteristics of the TE{mn/o} mode Electron Cyclotron Resonance Maser (ECRM), based on the elliptically cross—sectional e—beam deformation model. As an example, the effect of small geometric deformation errors on the TE{01/o} mode fundamental ECRM coupling coefficient is quantitatively shown.

  17. Active and passive compensation of APPLE II-introduced multipole errors through beam-based measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Huang, Szu-Jung; Fu, Huang-Wen; Chang, Ho-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2016-08-01

    The effect of an APPLE II-type elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) on the beam dynamics were investigated using active and passive methods. To reduce the tune shift and improve the injection efficiency, dynamic multipole errors were compensated using L-shaped iron shims, which resulted in stable top-up operation for a minimum gap. The skew quadrupole error was compensated using a multipole corrector, which was located downstream of the EPU for minimizing betatron coupling, and it ensured the enhancement of the synchrotron radiation brightness. The investigation methods, a numerical simulation algorithm, a multipole error correction method, and the beam-based measurement results are discussed.

  18. Correction of beam errors in high power laser diode bars and stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monjardin, J. F.; Nowak, K. M.; Baker, H. J.; Hall, D. R.

    2006-09-01

    The beam errors of an 11 bar laser diode stack fitted with fast-axis collimator lenses have been corrected by a single refractive plate, produced by laser cutting and polishing. The so-called smile effect is virtually eliminated and collimator aberration greatly reduced, improving the fast-axis beam quality of each bar by a factor of up to 5. The single corrector plate for the whole stack ensures that the radiation from all the laser emitters is parallel to a common axis. Beam-pointing errors of the bars have been reduced to below 0.7 mrad.

  19. Correction of beam errors in high power laser diode bars and stacks.

    PubMed

    Monjardin, J F; Nowak, K M; Baker, H J; Hall, D R

    2006-09-01

    The beam errors of an 11 bar laser diode stack fitted with fast-axis collimator lenses have been corrected by a single refractive plate, produced by laser cutting and polishing. The so-called smile effect is virtually eliminated and collimator aberration greatly reduced, improving the fast-axis beam quality of each bar by a factor of up to 5. The single corrector plate for the whole stack ensures that the radiation from all the laser emitters is parallel to a common axis. Beam-pointing errors of the bars have been reduced to below 0.7 mrad.

  20. Some effects of quantization on a noiseless phase-locked loop. [sampling phase errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    If the VCO of a phase-locked receiver is to be replaced by a digitally programmed synthesizer, the phase error signal must be sampled and quantized. Effects of quantizing after the loop filter (frequency quantization) or before (phase error quantization) are investigated. Constant Doppler or Doppler rate noiseless inputs are assumed. The main result gives the phase jitter due to frequency quantization for a Doppler-rate input. By itself, however, frequency quantization is impractical because it makes the loop dynamic range too small.

  1. Phase errors in gossamer membrane primary objective gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; Ritter, Joseph M.

    2008-07-01

    A ribbon-shaped primary objective grating (POG) telescope lends itself to deployment in space, because it can be stowed for transport on a roll. Unlike mirrors which need to be segmented for sizes beyond the diameter of the fairing or payload bay, the ribbon is a continuous integral surface transported on a drum and unfurled during deployment. A flat POG membrane abandons a standard three dimensional figure requirement of mirrors and solves the problem of making primary objectives from tensile structures. Moreover, POG telescopes enjoy relaxed surface dimensional tolerances compared with mirrors. We have demonstrated mathematically and empirically that the tolerance for flatness relaxes as the receiving angle increases toward grazing exodus where the magnification of the POG is greatest. At the same time, the tolerance for phase error is worsened as the angle of reconstruction moves toward grazing exodus. The problem will be aggravated by the rigors of the space deployment environment. We give a mathematical treatment for the flatness and phase error. We mention engineering methods that could ameliorate the error.

  2. Active retrodirective arrays for SPS beam pointing. [phase conjugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-01-01

    The basic requirement of the SPS beam pointing system is that it deliver a certain amount of S-band (lambda = 12.5 cm) power to a 9.6 km diameter receiving rectenna on the ground. The power is transmitted from a 1.0 km diameter antenna array on the SPS, which is, for a rectenna at about plus or minus 40 deg. latitude, some 37.5x10 to the 6th power km distant. At the present time ARA's appear to be the best bet to realize this very stringent beam pointing requirement. An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam towards the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The array produces, not merely reflects, RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the "conjugate" of that received by the element. Phase conjugate circuits and pointing errors in ARA's are described. Results obtained using a 2-element X-band ARA and an 8-element S-band ARA are included.

  3. Wide-aperture laser beam measurement using transmission diffuser: errors modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsak, Ivan S.

    2015-06-01

    Instrumental errors of measurement wide-aperture laser beam diameter were modeled to build measurement setup and justify its metrological characteristics. Modeled setup is based on CCD camera and transmission diffuser. This method is appropriate for precision measurement of large laser beam width from 10 mm up to 1000 mm. It is impossible to measure such beams with other methods based on slit, pinhole, knife edge or direct CCD camera measurement. The method is suitable for continuous and pulsed laser irradiation. However, transmission diffuser method has poor metrological justification required in field of wide aperture beam forming system verification. Considering the fact of non-availability of a standard of wide-aperture flat top beam modelling is preferred way to provide basic reference points for development measurement system. Modelling was conducted in MathCAD. Super-Lorentz distribution with shape parameter 6-12 was used as a model of the beam. Using theoretical evaluations there was found that the key parameters influencing on error are: relative beam size, spatial non-uniformity of the diffuser, lens distortion, physical vignetting, CCD spatial resolution and, effective camera ADC resolution. Errors were modeled for 90% of power beam diameter criteria. 12-order Super-Lorentz distribution was primary model, because it precisely meets experimental distribution at the output of test beam forming system, although other orders were also used. The analytic expressions were obtained analyzing the modelling results for each influencing data. Attainability of <1% error based on choice of parameters of expression was shown. The choice was based on parameters of commercially available components of the setup. The method can provide up to 0.1% error in case of using calibration procedures and multiple measurements.

  4. Parallel-quadrature phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy using polarization beam splitter

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bhargab; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Rao, DVGLN

    2012-01-01

    We present a digital holography microscopy technique based on parallel-quadrature phase-shifting method. Two π/2 phase-shifted holograms are recorded simultaneously using polarization phase-shifting principle, slightly off-axis recording geometry, and two identical CCD sensors. The parallel phase-shifting is realized by combining circularly polarized object beam with a 45° degree polarized reference beam through a polarizing beam splitter. DC term is eliminated by subtracting the two holograms from each other and the object information is reconstructed after selecting the frequency spectrum of the real image. Both amplitude and phase object reconstruction results are presented. Simultaneous recording eliminates phase errors caused by mechanical vibrations and air turbulences. The slightly off-axis recording geometry with phase-shifting allows a much larger dimension of the spatial filter for reconstruction of the object information. This leads to better reconstruction capability than traditional off-axis holography. PMID:23109732

  5. Parallel-quadrature phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy using polarization beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhargab; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Rao, Dvgln

    2012-11-01

    We present a digital holography microscopy technique based on parallel-quadrature phase-shifting method. Two π/2 phase-shifted holograms are recorded simultaneously using polarization phase-shifting principle, slightly off-axis recording geometry, and two identical CCD sensors. The parallel phase-shifting is realized by combining circularly polarized object beam with a 45° degree polarized reference beam through a polarizing beam splitter. DC term is eliminated by subtracting the two holograms from each other and the object information is reconstructed after selecting the frequency spectrum of the real image. Both amplitude and phase object reconstruction results are presented. Simultaneous recording eliminates phase errors caused by mechanical vibrations and air turbulences. The slightly off-axis recording geometry with phase-shifting allows a much larger dimension of the spatial filter for reconstruction of the object information. This leads to better reconstruction capability than traditional off-axis holography.

  6. EFFECT OF SOLENOID FIELD ERRORS ON ELECTRON BEAM TEMPERATURES IN THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.KEWISCH,J.

    2003-05-12

    As part of a future upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), electron cooling is foreseen to decrease ion beam emittances. Within the electron cooling section, the ''hot'' ion beam is immersed in a ''cold'' electron beam. The cooling effect is further enhanced by a solenoid field in the cooling section, which forces the electrons to spiral around the field lines with a (Larmor) radius of 10 micrometers, reducing the effective transverse temperature by orders of magnitude. Studies of the effect of solenoid field errors on electron beam temperatures are reported.

  7. Error Field in Ideal Magnetically Symmetric Tokamaks Generated through Asymmetric Shadows Cast by Neutral Beams on Divertor Floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hironori; Fredrickson, Eric; Gerhardt, Stefan

    2012-10-01

    The neutral beam intersects open field lines as it traverses the Scrape-Off-Layer (SOL), and casts its ``shadows'' on the divertor floor, where beam particles and heat lost in transit are deposited. These shadows are toroidally asymmetric in shape, reflecting the localized nature of the beam geometry and, unlike in the main plasma, a lack of symmetrizing field-line property (irrational surfaces) in the SOL. Thermoelectrically driven Scrape-Off-Layer Current (SOLC) due to a Te difference between these shadows is also toroidally asymmetric, and, when considered on a single flux-surface basis, generates an error field in an otherwise ideal magnetically symmetric tokamak. Spreading of the SOLC over flux surfaces has a symmetrizing effect on magnetic field produced due to field-line shear, except around a ``sweet spot'' midway between primary and secondary separatrices, necessitating calculations along the entire SOL beam path for a reliable field estimate. This study explores the possibility that error field due to a SOLC in the beam shadows may contribute to strong plasma rotation braking often observed when the SOL magnetic structure rapidly evolves in an early discharge phase. Similar considerations may apply to pellet paths, gas puff clouds, and other operational asymmetries.

  8. Investigation of phase error correction for digital sinusoidal phase-shifting fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Quan, C.; Zhu, R.; Tay, C. J.

    2012-08-01

    Digital sinusoidal phase-shifting fringe projection profilometry (DSPFPP) is a powerful tool to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) surface of diffuse objects. However, a highly accurate profile is often hindered by nonlinear response, color crosstalk and imbalance of a pair of digital projector and CCD/CMOS camera. In this paper, several phase error correction methods, such as Look-Up-Table (LUT) compensation, intensity correction, gamma correction, LUT-based hybrid method and blind phase error suppression for gray and color-encoded DSPFPP are described. Experimental results are also demonstrated to evaluate the effectiveness of each method.

  9. Iterative Phase Optimization of Elementary Quantum Error Correcting Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Rivas, A.; Martínez, E. A.; Nigg, D.; Schindler, P.; Monz, T.; Blatt, R.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    Performing experiments on small-scale quantum computers is certainly a challenging endeavor. Many parameters need to be optimized to achieve high-fidelity operations. This can be done efficiently for operations acting on single qubits, as errors can be fully characterized. For multiqubit operations, though, this is no longer the case, as in the most general case, analyzing the effect of the operation on the system requires a full state tomography for which resources scale exponentially with the system size. Furthermore, in recent experiments, additional electronic levels beyond the two-level system encoding the qubit have been used to enhance the capabilities of quantum-information processors, which additionally increases the number of parameters that need to be controlled. For the optimization of the experimental system for a given task (e.g., a quantum algorithm), one has to find a satisfactory error model and also efficient observables to estimate the parameters of the model. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a method to optimize the encoding procedure for a small quantum error correction code in the presence of unknown but constant phase shifts. The method, which we implement here on a small-scale linear ion-trap quantum computer, is readily applicable to other AMO platforms for quantum-information processing.

  10. Acousto-optic liquid-crystal analog beam former for phased-array antennas.

    PubMed

    Riza, N A

    1994-06-10

    A compact phased-array antenna acousto-optic beam former with element-level analog phase (0-2π) and amplitude control using nematic-liquid-crystal display-type technology is experimentally demonstrated. Measurements indicate > 6-bit phase control and 52.6 dB of amplitude-attenuation control. High-quality error calibration and antenna sidelobe-level control is possible with this low-control-power analog beam former. Optical system options using rf Bragg cells or wideband Bragg cells are discussed, with the rf design being the current preferred approach. Transmit-receive beam forming based on frequency upconversion-downconversion by electronic mixing is introduced for the rf Bragg-cell beam former, and comparisons with digital beam forming are highlighted. A millimeter-wave signal generation and control optical architecture is described.

  11. Wavefront-sensor-induced beam size error: physical mechanism, sensitivity-analysis and correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koek, Wouter D.; van Zwet, Erwin J.

    2015-03-01

    When using a commonly-used quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer wavefront sensor (QWLSI WFS) for beam size measurements on a high power CO2 laser, artefacts have been observed in the measured irradiance distribution. The grating in the QWLSI WFS not only generates the diffracted first orders that are required for introducing the shear, but also diffracts significantly into higher orders. Consequently, in the few millimeters of free space propagation between the QWLSI WFS grating and its imaging device, the beam size may increase significantly (particularly for infrared wavelengths). This error is typically not accounted for in the subsequent processing of measurement data. To gain insight in this undesirable behavior, physical models of the QWLSI WFS using both complex wave propagation and analytic propagation of the D4sigma beam diameter (and its associated M2) throughout the system have been developed. These models show excellent agreement to experimental data, and indicate that in typical situations the sensor-induced beam size error can easily be 40% or more. Although the QWLSI WFS may not originally be intended for beam size measurements, in most industrial applications cost- and volume limitations will often lead to multiple use of sensor data. To aid in the adequate implementation of a QWLSI WFS for determining beam size, the dependence of the sensor-induced beam size error on various system parameters has been determined (e.g. incoming beam size, grating-to-imager distance, grating geometry, wavelength). Using the presented models and guidelines, the sensor-induced beam size error may be minimized and corrected for.

  12. Measurement of the parallelism error of a double crystal monochromator by the pencil beam interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jun; Rah, Seungyu

    2005-06-15

    For the precise measurement of the parallelism error between the two crystals in a double crystal monochromator, we suggest a new method that utilizes the pencil beam interferometer. The wave front-splitting pencil beam interferometer was modified, and applied to the measurement. The method overcomes the limitations of the precedent methods that using an autocollimator. Moreover, we can measure the parallelism error continuously through the full scan range with a simple setup. Especially, it should be noted that the angular sensitivity of this method is about 0.07 arcsec rms.

  13. The beam filling error in the Nimbus 5 electronically scanning microwave radiometer observations of Global Atlantic Tropical Experiment rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.; North, Gerald R.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison of rain rates retrieved from the Nimbus 5 electronically scanning microwave radiometer brightness temperatures and observed from shipboard radars during the Global Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) phase I shows that the beam filling error is the major source of discrepancy between the two. When averaged over a large scene (the GATE radar array, 400 km in diameter), the beam filling error is quite stable, being 50 percent of the observed rain rate. This suggests the simple procedure of multiplying retrieved rain rates by 2 (correction factor). A statistical model of the beam filling error is developed by envisioning an idealized instrument field-of-view that encompasses an entire gamma distribution of rain rates. A modeled correction factor near 2 is found for rain rate and temperature characteristics consistent with GATE conditions. The statistical model also suggests that the correction factor varies from 1.5 to 2.5 for suppressed to enhanced tropical convective regimes, and decreases to 1.5 as the freezing level and average depth of the rain column decreases to 2.5 km.

  14. Signal distortion due to beam-pointing error in a chopper modulated laser system.

    PubMed

    Eklund, H

    1978-01-15

    The detector output has been studied for a long-distance system with a chopped cw laser as transmitter source. It is shown experimentally that the pulse distortion of the detected signal is dependent on the beam-pointing error. Parameters reflecting the pulse distortion are defined. The beam deviation in 1-D is found to be strongly related to these parameters. The result is in agreement with a theoretical model based upon the Fresnel diffraction theory. Possible applications in beam-tracking systems, communications systems, and atmospheric studies are discussed. PMID:20174398

  15. Ion beam machining error control and correction for small scale optics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xuhui; Zhou, Lin; Dai, Yifan; Li, Shengyi

    2011-09-20

    Ion beam figuring (IBF) technology for small scale optical components is discussed. Since the small removal function can be obtained in IBF, it makes computer-controlled optical surfacing technology possible to machine precision centimeter- or millimeter-scale optical components deterministically. Using a small ion beam to machine small optical components, there are some key problems, such as small ion beam positioning on the optical surface, material removal rate, ion beam scanning pitch control on the optical surface, and so on, that must be seriously considered. The main reasons for the problems are that it is more sensitive to the above problems than a big ion beam because of its small beam diameter and lower material ratio. In this paper, we discuss these problems and their influences in machining small optical components in detail. Based on the identification-compensation principle, an iterative machining compensation method is deduced for correcting the positioning error of an ion beam with the material removal rate estimated by a selected optimal scanning pitch. Experiments on ϕ10 mm Zerodur planar and spherical samples are made, and the final surface errors are both smaller than λ/100 measured by a Zygo GPI interferometer.

  16. Reduction of the lateral localization error of targets moving through a LIDAR beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzl, Konrad; Ruser, Heinrich; Kargel, Christian

    2013-04-01

    To track walking persons inside a surveillance area we use LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) sensors with a small number N of spatially stationary LIDAR beams in order to keep the sensor costs to a minimum. To achieve high target detectability and tracking performance, the coverage of the surveillance area by the N LIDAR beams must be large, which is why the beamwidth is to be set to a practically feasible maximum. As a result, the lateral localization error inside these wide LIDAR beams is high while the area of surveillance can still not be entirely covered by LIDAR beams. Thus, the accurate tracking of persons walking inside the area of surveillance is challenging. In the classical tracking approach, the axial position of a target inside a LIDAR beam is obtained from time-of- ight measurements. However, the lateral deviation of the target position from the optical beam axis remains unknown. In this paper, a novel approach to reduce the lateral localization error is proposed and investigated. From consecutively measured (axial) distances to the target while it moves through a LIDAR beam the target velocity vector is estimated and used as observation for a Kalman-based tracking algorithm. The localization and tracking performances of the novel approach are determined and compared with those of the classical approach.

  17. SU-E-T-377: Inaccurate Positioning Might Introduce Significant MapCheck Calibration Error in Flatten Filter Free Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S; Chao, C; Chang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the calibration error of detector sensitivity for MapCheck due to inaccurate positioning of the device, which is not taken into account by the current commercial iterative calibration algorithm. We hypothesize the calibration is more vulnerable to the positioning error for the flatten filter free (FFF) beams than the conventional flatten filter flattened beams. Methods: MapCheck2 was calibrated with 10MV conventional and FFF beams, with careful alignment and with 1cm positioning error during calibration, respectively. Open fields of 37cmx37cm were delivered to gauge the impact of resultant calibration errors. The local calibration error was modeled as a detector independent multiplication factor, with which propagation error was estimated with positioning error from 1mm to 1cm. The calibrated sensitivities, without positioning error, were compared between the conventional and FFF beams to evaluate the dependence on the beam type. Results: The 1cm positioning error leads to 0.39% and 5.24% local calibration error in the conventional and FFF beams respectively. After propagating to the edges of MapCheck, the calibration errors become 6.5% and 57.7%, respectively. The propagation error increases almost linearly with respect to the positioning error. The difference of sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams was small (0.11 ± 0.49%). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the positioning error is not handled by the current commercial calibration algorithm of MapCheck. Particularly, the calibration errors for the FFF beams are ~9 times greater than those for the conventional beams with identical positioning error, and a small 1mm positioning error might lead to up to 8% calibration error. Since the sensitivities are only slightly dependent of the beam type and the conventional beam is less affected by the positioning error, it is advisable to cross-check the sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams to detect

  18. Orbit error correction on the high energy beam transport line at the KHIMA accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chawon; Yim, Heejoong; Hahn, Garam; An, Dong Hyun

    2016-09-01

    For the purpose of treatment of various cancers and medical research, a synchrotron based medical machine has been developed under the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project and is scheduled for use to treat patient at the beginning of 2018. The KHIMA synchrotron is designed to accelerate and extract carbon ion (proton) beams with various energies from 110 to 430 MeV/u (60 to 230 MeV). Studies on the lattice design and beam optics for the High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) line at the KHIMA accelerator system have been carried out using the WinAgile and the MAD-X codes. Because magnetic field errors and misalignments introduce deviations from the design parameters, these error sources should be treated explicitly, and the sensitivity of the machine's lattice to different individual error sources should be considered. Various types of errors, both static and dynamic, have been taken into account and have been consequentially corrected with a dedicated correction algorithm by using the MAD-X program. Based on the error analysis, the optimized correction setup is decided, and the specifications for the correcting magnets of the HEBT lines are determined.

  19. Sensitivity analysis and optimization method for the fabrication of one-dimensional beam-splitting phase gratings

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Shaun; Brand, Jonathan F.; Zaverton, Melissa; Milster, Tom; Liang, Rongguang

    2015-01-01

    A method to design one-dimensional beam-spitting phase gratings with low sensitivity to fabrication errors is described. The method optimizes the phase function of a grating by minimizing the integrated variance of the energy of each output beam over a range of fabrication errors. Numerical results for three 1x9 beam splitting phase gratings are given. Two optimized gratings with low sensitivity to fabrication errors were compared with a grating designed for optimal efficiency. These three gratings were fabricated using gray-scale photolithography. The standard deviation of the 9 outgoing beam energies in the optimized gratings were 2.3 and 3.4 times lower than the optimal efficiency grating. PMID:25969268

  20. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Harder, R.; Xiao, X.; Fuoss, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  1. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Fuoss, P. H.; Harder, R.; Xiao, X.

    2010-12-15

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  2. Digital detection method design of the optic error of the beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Liu, Bingqi; Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Shiying; Ying, Jiaju

    2014-12-01

    The beam expander is a device used for extending the action radius of the optical system by removing the optical axis parallel. It is usually composed by a pair of plane mirror or two total reflection prism which is installed parallel. However, limited by manufacturing and installation progress, optical axis parallelism errors can be generated while it is hardly to guarantee the two plane mirror or the two total reflection prism installed completely parallel to each other. To detect the optical axis parallelism error of the beam expander quantitatively, a digital optical axis parallelism error detection method for the beam expander is designed taking advantage of the CCD technology and the Image processing technology. In this method, the reticule of the collimator is regarded as the target at infinity. Firstly, the reticule of the collimator images on the CCD camera directly. Keep the pose of the CCD camera unchanged. Then the parallel optical beam is shifted into the beam expander detected by removing of the pentaprism, and the reticule of the collimator images on the same CCD camera again. The location of the collimator reticule center image on the CCD camera is determined respectively through the corresponding image processing. The error of the beam expander is calculated by comparing the coordinate of the collimator reticule center image. An experiment platform is set up based on and the feasibility of this method is verified that the accuracy of the detection method is less than 3''; this method has the advantage of simple operation, high practicality and high accuracy.

  3. Superconducting resonator used as a beam phase detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharamentov, S. I.; Pardo, R. C.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Clifft, B. E.; Zinkann, G. P.; Physics

    2003-05-01

    Beam-bunch arrival time has been measured for the first time by operating superconducting cavities, normally part of the linac accelerator array, in a bunch-detecting mode. The very high Q of the superconducting cavities provides high sensitivity and allows for phase-detecting low-current beams. In detecting mode, the resonator is operated at a very low field level comparable to the field induced by the bunched beam. Because of this, the rf field in the cavity is a superposition of a 'pure' (or reference) rf and the beam-induced signal. A new method of circular phase rotation (CPR), allowing extraction of the beam phase information from the composite rf field was developed. Arrival time phase determination with CPR is better than 1{sup o} (at 48 MHz) for a beam current of 100 nA. The electronics design is described and experimental data are presented.

  4. Steady-state phase error for a phase-locked loop subjected to periodic Doppler inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-C.; Win, M. Z.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a carrier phase locked loop (PLL) driven by a periodic Doppler input is studied. By expanding the Doppler input into a Fourier series and applying the linearized PLL approximations, it is easy to show that, for periodic frequency disturbances, the resulting steady state phase error is also periodic. Compared to the method of expanding frequency excursion into a power series, the Fourier expansion method can be used to predict the maximum phase error excursion for a periodic Doppler input. For systems with a large Doppler rate fluctuation, such as an optical transponder aboard an Earth orbiting spacecraft, the method can be applied to test whether a lower order tracking loop can provide satisfactory tracking and thereby save the effect of a higher order loop design.

  5. Optical synthetic-aperture radar processor archietecture with quadratic phase-error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Mason, J.J. )

    1990-10-15

    Uncompensated phase errors limit the image quality of synthetic-aperture radar. We present an acousto-optic synthetic-aperture radar processor architecture capable of measuring the quadratic phase error. This architecture allows for the error signal to be fed back to the processor to generate the corrected image.

  6. Optical synthetic-aperture radar processor architecture with quadratic phase-error correction.

    PubMed

    Dickey, F M; Mason, J J

    1990-10-15

    Uncompensated phase errors limit the image quality of synthetic-aperture radar. We present an acousto-optic synthetic-aperture radar processor architecture capable of measuring the quadratic phase error. This architecture allows for the error signal to be fed back to the processor to generate the corrected image.

  7. Canceling the momentum in a phase-shifting algorithm to eliminate spatially uniform errors.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Kenichi; Kim, Yangjin

    2016-08-10

    In phase-shifting interferometry, phase modulation nonlinearity causes both spatially uniform and nonuniform errors in the measured phase. Conventional linear-detuning error-compensating algorithms only eliminate the spatially variable error component. The uniform error is proportional to the inertial momentum of the data-sampling weight of a phase-shifting algorithm. This paper proposes a design approach to cancel the momentum by using characteristic polynomials in the Z-transform space and shows that an arbitrary M-frame algorithm can be modified to a new (M+2)-frame algorithm that acquires new symmetry to eliminate the uniform error. PMID:27534475

  8. Highly efficient electron vortex beams generated by nanofabricated phase holograms

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Mafakheri, Erfan; Frabboni, Stefano

    2014-01-27

    We propose an improved type of holographic-plate suitable for the shaping of electron beams. The plate is fabricated by a focused ion beam on a silicon nitride membrane and introduces a controllable phase shift to the electron wavefunction. We adopted the optimal blazed-profile design for the phase hologram, which results in the generation of highly efficient (25%) electron vortex beams. This approach paves the route towards applications in nano-scale imaging and materials science.

  9. Autofocus of SAR imagery degraded by ionospheric-induced phase errors

    SciTech Connect

    Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Eichel, P.H.; Ghiglia, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    It has been suggested that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images obtained from platforms such as SEASAT are subject to potential degradation by ionospheric-induced phase errors. This premise is based upon data from various satellite experiments that indicate large levels of phase scintillation in auroral zone data. Current models for phase errors induced by the ionosphere suggest that the phase error power spectrum is power law. This implies that the resulting phase errors contain significant components up to the Nyquist limit. Traditional sub-aperture based autofocus techniques, designed to correct uncompensated platform motion errors, are inadequate due to their inability to estimate higher order error terms. A new non-parametric phase error correction scheme developed at Sandia National Laboratories, however, has been demonstrated to remove phase errors of arbitrary structure. Consequently, our new algorithm is a viable candidate for correcting ionospheric phase errors. In this paper we show examples of SAR images degraded by simulated ionospheric phase errors. These images demonstrate that such errors cause smearing with complicated sidelobe structure. Restoration of these images via the new algorithm illustrates its superiority to classical sub-aperture based autofocus techniques.

  10. Phased laser array for generating a powerful laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2004-02-17

    A first injection laser signal and a first part of a reference laser beam are injected into a first laser element. At least one additional injection laser signal and at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are injected into at least one additional laser element. The first part of a reference laser beam and the at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are amplified and phase conjugated producing a first amplified output laser beam emanating from the first laser element and an additional amplified output laser beam emanating from the at least one additional laser element. The first amplified output laser beam and the additional amplified output laser beam are combined into a powerful laser beam.

  11. Effects of voltage errors caused by gap-voltage and automatic-frequency tuning in an alternating-phase-focused linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Y.; Yamada, S.; Murakami, T.; Fujimoto, T.; Fujisawa, T.; Ogawa, H.; Miyahara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Hojo, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Muramatsu, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Mitsumoto, T.; Tsutsui, H.; Watanabe, T.; Ueda, T.

    2008-05-01

    A compact injector for a heavy-ion medical-accelerator complex was developed. It consists of an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source (ECRIS) and two linacs, which are a radio-frequency-quadrupole (RFQ) linac and an Interdigital H-mode drift-tube-linac (IH-DTL). Beam acceleration tests of the compact injector were performed, and the designed beam quality was verified by the measured results, as reported earlier. Because the method of alternating-phase-focusing (APF) was used for beam focusing of the IH-DTL, the motion of beam ions would be sensitive to gap-voltage errors, caused during tuning of the gap-voltage distribution and by automatic-frequency tuning in actual operation. To study the effects of voltage errors to beam quality, further measurements were performed during acceleration tests. In this report, the effects of voltage errors for the APF IH-DTL are discussed.

  12. A phase-space beam position monitor for synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Martinson, Mercedes; Belev, George; Dallin, Les; de Jong, Mark; Chapman, Dean

    2015-07-01

    The stability of the photon beam position on synchrotron beamlines is critical for most if not all synchrotron radiation experiments. The position of the beam at the experiment or optical element location is set by the position and angle of the electron beam source as it traverses the magnetic field of the bend-magnet or insertion device. Thus an ideal photon beam monitor would be able to simultaneously measure the photon beam's position and angle, and thus infer the electron beam's position in phase space. X-ray diffraction is commonly used to prepare monochromatic beams on X-ray beamlines usually in the form of a double-crystal monochromator. Diffraction couples the photon wavelength or energy to the incident angle on the lattice planes within the crystal. The beam from such a monochromator will contain a spread of energies due to the vertical divergence of the photon beam from the source. This range of energies can easily cover the absorption edge of a filter element such as iodine at 33.17 keV. A vertical profile measurement of the photon beam footprint with and without the filter can be used to determine the vertical centroid position and angle of the photon beam. In the measurements described here an imaging detector is used to measure these vertical profiles with an iodine filter that horizontally covers part of the monochromatic beam. The goal was to investigate the use of a combined monochromator, filter and detector as a phase-space beam position monitor. The system was tested for sensitivity to position and angle under a number of synchrotron operating conditions, such as normal operations and special operating modes where the photon beam is intentionally altered in position and angle at the source point. The results are comparable with other methods of beam position measurement and indicate that such a system is feasible in situations where part of the synchrotron beam can be used for the phase-space measurement.

  13. Effects and correction of magneto-optic spatial light modulator phase errors in an optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Hine, Butler P.; Reid, Max B.

    1992-01-01

    The optical phase errors introduced into an optical correlator by the input and filter plane magnetooptic spatial light modulators have been studied. The magnitude of these phase errors is measured and characterized, their effects on the correlation results are evaluated, and a means of correction by a design modification of the binary phase-only optical-filter function is presented. The efficacy of the phase-correction technique is quantified and is found to restore the correlation characteristics to those obtained in the absence of errors, to a high degree. The phase errors of other correlator system elements are also discussed and treated in a similar fashion.

  14. Model studies of the beam-filling error for rain-rate retrieval with microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Eunho; North, Gerald R.

    1995-01-01

    Low-frequency (less than 20 GHz) single-channel microwave retrievals of rain rate encounter the problem of beam-filling error. This error stems from the fact that the relationship between microwave brightness temperature and rain rate is nonlinear, coupled with the fact that the field of view is large or comparable to important scales of variability of the rain field. This means that one may not simply insert the area average of the brightness temperature into the formula for rain rate without incurring both bias and random error. The statistical heterogeneity of the rain-rate field in the footprint of the instrument is key to determining the nature of these errors. This paper makes use of a series of random rain-rate fields to study the size of the bias and random error associated with beam filling. A number of examples are analyzed in detail: the binomially distributed field, the gamma, the Gaussian, the mixed gamma, the lognormal, and the mixed lognormal ('mixed' here means there is a finite probability of no rain rate at a point of space-time). Of particular interest are the applicability of a simple error formula due to Chiu and collaborators and a formula that might hold in the large field of view limit. It is found that the simple formula holds for Gaussian rain-rate fields but begins to fail for highly skewed fields such as the mixed lognormal. While not conclusively demonstrated here, it is suggested that the notionof climatologically adjusting the retrievals to remove the beam-filling bias is a reasonable proposition.

  15. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  16. Overview of Phase Space Manipulations of Relativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-08-31

    Phase space manipulation is a process to rearrange beam's distribution in 6-D phase space. In this paper, we give an overview of the techniques for tailoring beam distribution in 2D, 4D, and 6D phase space to meet the requirements of various applications. These techniques become a new focus of accelerator physics R&D and very likely these advanced concepts will open up new opportunities in advanced accelerators and the science enabled by them.

  17. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  18. [A phase error correction method for the new Fourier transforms spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Gong, Tian-Cheng; Chen, Jian-Jun; Li, Yang; Yang, Yi-Ning; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Wei-Min

    2014-11-01

    To decrease the distortion of the recovered spectrum, improve the quantity of the recovered spectrum and decrease the influence of the phase error of the new spectrum detection system based on MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) micro-mirrors, a new phase error correction method for this system is proposed in the present paper. The source of phase error of the spectrum detection system based on MEMS micro-mirrors is analyzed firstly. The analyzed result indicated that the phase error of the new spectral Fourier transform detection system is the zero drift of the optical path difference, and the phase error can be corrected by Zero-crossing sampling which is realized by improving the structure of the interferometer system and Mertz product The spectrum detection system is set up and the phase error correction method is verified by this system. The experiment result is show that the quantity of the recovered spectrum of the spectrum detection is improved obviously by using the improved interferometer system and Mertz product, and the recovered spectrum has no negative peaks and the side lobes is suppressed markedly. This correction method can reduce the influence caused by phase error to the system performance well and improve the spectral detection performance effectively. In this paper, the origin of the system phase error based on the new MEMS micromirror Fourier transform spectroscopy detection system is analyzed, and the phase error correction method is proposed. This method can improve the performance of the spectrum detection system.

  19. [A phase error correction method for the new Fourier transforms spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Gong, Tian-Cheng; Chen, Jian-Jun; Li, Yang; Yang, Yi-Ning; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Wei-Min

    2014-11-01

    To decrease the distortion of the recovered spectrum, improve the quantity of the recovered spectrum and decrease the influence of the phase error of the new spectrum detection system based on MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) micro-mirrors, a new phase error correction method for this system is proposed in the present paper. The source of phase error of the spectrum detection system based on MEMS micro-mirrors is analyzed firstly. The analyzed result indicated that the phase error of the new spectral Fourier transform detection system is the zero drift of the optical path difference, and the phase error can be corrected by Zero-crossing sampling which is realized by improving the structure of the interferometer system and Mertz product The spectrum detection system is set up and the phase error correction method is verified by this system. The experiment result is show that the quantity of the recovered spectrum of the spectrum detection is improved obviously by using the improved interferometer system and Mertz product, and the recovered spectrum has no negative peaks and the side lobes is suppressed markedly. This correction method can reduce the influence caused by phase error to the system performance well and improve the spectral detection performance effectively. In this paper, the origin of the system phase error based on the new MEMS micromirror Fourier transform spectroscopy detection system is analyzed, and the phase error correction method is proposed. This method can improve the performance of the spectrum detection system. PMID:25752034

  20. High precision capacitive beam phase probe for KHIMA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ji-Gwang; Yang, Tae-Keun; Forck, Peter

    2016-11-01

    In the medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line of KHIMA project, a high precision beam phase probe monitor is required for a precise tuning of RF phase and amplitude of Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator and IH-DTL linac. It is also used for measuring a kinetic energy of ion beam by time-of-flight (TOF) method using two phase probes. The capacitive beam phase probe has been developed. The electromagnetic design of the high precision phase probe was performed to satisfy the phase resolution of 1° (@200 MHz). It was confirmed by the test result using a wire test bench. The measured phase accuracy of the fabricated phase probe is 1.19 ps. The pre-amplifier electronics with the 0.125 ∼ 1.61 GHz broad-band was designed and fabricated for amplifying the signal strength. The results of RF frequency and beam energy measurement using a proton beam from the cyclotron in KIRAMS is presented.

  1. A review of setup error in supine breast radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Holloway, Lois; Delaney, Geoff P

    2016-01-01

    Setup error in breast radiotherapy (RT) measured with 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming more common. The purpose of this study is to review the literature relating to the magnitude of setup error in breast RT measured with CBCT. The different methods of image registration between CBCT and planning computed tomography (CT) scan were also explored. A literature search, not limited by date, was conducted using Medline and Google Scholar with the following key words: breast cancer, RT, setup error, and CBCT. This review includes studies that reported on systematic and random errors, and the methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan. A total of 11 relevant studies were identified for inclusion in this review. The average magnitude of error is generally less than 5mm across a number of studies reviewed. The common registration methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan are based on bony anatomy, soft tissue, and surgical clips. No clear relationships between the setup errors detected and methods of registration were observed from this review. Further studies are needed to assess the benefit of CBCT over electronic portal image, as CBCT remains unproven to be of wide benefit in breast RT.

  2. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa. Conclusions: There is a lack of correlation between

  3. Sparse Auto-Calibration for Radar Coincidence Imaging with Gain-Phase Errors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a high-resolution staring imaging technique without the limitation of relative motion between target and radar. The sparsity-driven approaches are commonly used in RCI, while the prior knowledge of imaging models needs to be known accurately. However, as one of the major model errors, the gain-phase error exists generally, and may cause inaccuracies of the model and defocus the image. In the present report, the sparse auto-calibration method is proposed to compensate the gain-phase error in RCI. The method can determine the gain-phase error as part of the imaging process. It uses an iterative algorithm, which cycles through steps of target reconstruction and gain-phase error estimation, where orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) and Newton’s method are used, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed method can improve the imaging quality significantly and estimate the gain-phase error accurately. PMID:26528981

  4. Radar coincidence imaging with phase error using Bayesian hierarchical prior modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a high-resolution imaging technique without the limitation of relative motion between target and radar. In sparsity-driven RCI, the prior knowledge of imaging model requires to be known accurately. However, the phase error generally exists as a model error, which may cause inaccuracies of the model and defocus the image. The problem is formulated using Bayesian hierarchical prior modeling, and the self-calibration variational message passing (SC-VMP) algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of RCI with phase error. The algorithm determines the phase error as part of the imaging process. The scattering coefficient and phase error are iteratively estimated using VMP and Newton's method, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can estimate the phase error accurately and improve the imaging quality significantly.

  5. Radio metric errors due to mismatch and offset between a DSN antenna beam and the beam of a troposphere calibration instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linfield, R. P.; Wilcox, J. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Two components of the error of a troposphere calibration measurement were quantified by theoretical calculations. The first component is a beam mismatch error, which occurs when the calibration instrument senses a conical volume different from the cylindrical volume sampled by a Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna. The second component is a beam offset error, which occurs if the calibration instrument is not mounted on the axis of the DSN antenna. These two error sources were calculated for both delay (e.g., VLBI) and delay rate (e.g., Doppler) measurements. The beam mismatch error for both delay and delay rate drops rapidly as the beamwidth of the troposphere calibration instrument (e.g., a water vapor radiometer or an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer) is reduced. At a 10-deg elevation angle, the instantaneous beam mismatch error is 1.0 mm for a 6-deg beamwidth and 0.09 mm for a 0.5-deg beam (these are the full angular widths of a circular beam with uniform gain out to a sharp cutoff). Time averaging for 60-100 sec will reduce these errors by factors of 1.2-2.2. At a 20-deg elevation angle, the lower limit for current Doppler observations, the beam-mismatch delay rate error is an Allan standard deviation over 100 sec of 1.1 x 10(exp -14) with a 4-deg beam and 1.3 x 10(exp -l5) for a 0.5-deg beam. A 50-m beam offset would result in a fairly modest (compared to other expected error sources) delay error (less than or equal to 0.3 mm for 60-sec integrations at any elevation angle is greater than or equal to 6 deg). However, the same offset would cause a large error in delay rate measurements (e.g., an Allan standard deviation of 1.2 x 10(exp -14) over 100 sec at a 20-deg elevation angle), which would dominate over other known error sources if the beamwidth is 2 deg or smaller. An on-axis location is essential for accurate troposphere calibration of delay rate measurements. A half-power beamwidth (for a beam with a tapered gain profile) of 1.2 deg or smaller is

  6. Channel calibration for digital array radar in the presence of amplitude-phase and mutual coupling errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weixing; Zhang, Yue; Lin, Jianzhi; Chen, Zengping

    2015-10-01

    Amplitude-phase errors and mutual coupling errors among multi-channels in digital array radar (DAR) will seriously deteriorate the performance of signal processing such as digital beam-forming (DBF) and high resolution direction finding. In this paper, a combined algorithm for error calibration in DAR has been demonstrated. The algorithm firstly estimates the amplitude-phase errors of each channel using interior calibration sources with the help of the calibration network. Then the signals from far field are received and the amplitude-phase errors are compensated. According to the subspace theories, the relationship between the principle eigenvectors and distorted steering vectors is expressed, and the cost function containing the mutual coupling matrix (MCM) and incident directions is established. Making use of the properties of MCM of uniform linear array, Gauss-Newton method is implied to iteratively compute the MCM and the direction of arrival (DOA). Simulation results have shown the effectiveness and performance of proposed algorithm. Based on an 8-elements DAR test-bed, experiments are carried out in anechoic chamber. The results illustrate that the algorithm is feasible in actual systems.

  7. Beam-phase monitoring with non-destructive pickup

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.

    1995-08-01

    An intensity and phase-sensitive capacitive pickup was installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device is based on an extension of the design of the Beam Current Monitor developed as part of the ATLAS radiation safety system. The purpose of the pickup is to allow the arrival phase of the beam from the ECR source at the entrance to the PII linac to be set to a standard which reproduces previous tune conditions and establishes a standard. The new pickups and associated electronics demonstrated sensitivity well below 1 electrical nanoamp but can handle beam currents of many electrical microamps as well. In addition to phase information, beam current is also measured by the units thus providing a continuous, non-intercepting current readout as well. From the very first use of PII, we established a few {open_quotes}reference tunes{close_quotes} for the linac and scaled those tunes for any other beam desired. For such scaling to work properly, the velocity and phase of the beam from the ion source must be fixed and reproducible. In last year`s FWP the new ATLAS Master Oscillator System was described. The new system has the ability of easily adjusting the beam arrival phase at the entrance to each of the major sections of the facility - PII, Booster, ATLAS. Our present techniques for establishing the beam arrival phase at the entrance of each of the linac sections are cumbersome and, sometimes, intellectually challenging. The installation of these capacitative pickups at the entrance to each of the linac sections will make the determination and setting of the beam arrival phase direct, simple, and dynamic. This should dramatically shorten our setup time for {open_quotes}old-tune{close_quotes} configurations and increase useful operating hours. Permanent electronics for the PII entrance pickup is under construction.

  8. Soliton-guided phase shifter and beam splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Steiglitz, Ken

    2010-03-15

    We propose, analyze, and study numerically a phase shifter for light wave packets trapped by Kerr solitons in a nonlinear medium. We also study numerically a previously proposed soliton-guided nonpolarizing beam splitter.

  9. Interferometer phase noise due to beam misalignment on diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, Deepali; Brown, Daniel; Brückner, Frank; Carbone, Ludovico; Fulda, Paul; Kokeyama, Keiko; Freise, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    All-reflective interferometer configurations have been proposed for the next generation of gravitational wave detectors, with diffractive elements replacing transmissive optics. However, an additional phase noise creates more stringent conditions for alignment stability. A framework for alignment stability with the use of diffractive elements was required using a Gaussian model. We successfully create such a framework involving modal decomposition to replicate small displacements of the beam (or grating) and show that the modal model does not contain the phase changes seen in an otherwise geometric planewave approach. The modal decomposition description is justified by verifying experimentally that the phase of a diffracted Gaussian beam is independent of the beam shape, achieved by comparing the phase change between a zero-order and first-order mode beam. To interpret our findings we employ a rigorous time-domain simulation to demonstrate that the phase changes resulting from a modal decomposition are correct, provided that the coordinate system which measures the phase is moved simultaneously with the effective beam displacement. This indeed corresponds to the phase change observed in the geometric planewave model. The change in the coordinate system does not instinctively occur within the analytical framework, and therefore requires either a manual change in the coordinate system or an addition of the geometric planewave phase factor.

  10. Direct focusing error correction with ring-wide TBT beam position data

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Turn-By-Turn (TBT) betatron oscillation data is a very powerful tool in studying machine optics. Hundreds and thousands of turns of free oscillations are taken in just few tens of milliseconds. With beam covering all positions and angles at every location TBT data can be used to diagnose focusing errors almost instantly. This paper describes a new approach that observes focusing error collectively over all available TBT data to find the optimized quadrupole strength, one location at a time. Example will be shown and other issues will be discussed. The procedure presented clearly has helped to reduce overall deviations significantly, with relative ease. Sextupoles, being a permanent feature of the ring, will need to be incorporated into the model. While cumulative effect from all sextupoles around the ring may be negligible on turn-to-turn basis it is not so in this transfer line analysis. It should be noted that this procedure is not limited to looking for quadrupole errors. By modifying the target of minimization it could in principle be used to look for skew quadrupole errors and sextupole errors as well.

  11. Scintillation index and bit error rate of hollow Gaussian beams in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Na; Zhang, Bin; Pan, Pingping; Dan, Youquan

    2011-06-01

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle and Rytov method, the on-axis scintillation index is derived for hollow Gaussian beams (HGBs) in weak turbulence. The relationship between bit error rate (BER) and scintillation index is found by only considering the effect of atmosphere turbulence based on the probability distribution of intensity fluctuation, and the expression of the BER is obtained. Furthermore, the scintillation and the BER properties of HGBs in turbulence are discussed in detail. The results show that the scintillation index and BER of HGBs depend on the propagation length, the structure constant of the refractive index fluctuations of turbulence, the wavelength, the beam order and the waist width of the fundamental Gaussian beam. The scintillation index, increasing with the propagation length in turbulence, for the HGB with higher beam order increases more slowly. The BER of the HGBs increases rapidly against the propagation length in turbulence. For propagating the same distance, the BER of the fundamental Gaussian beam is the greatest, and that of the HGB with higher order is smaller.

  12. Beam Position-Phase Monitors for SNS Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    Electromagnetic modeling with MAFIA of the combined beam position-phase monitors (BPPMs) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac has been performed. Time-domain 3-D simulations are used to compute the signal amplitudes and phases on the BPPM electrodes for a given processing frequency, 402.5 MHz or 805 MHz, as functions of the beam transverse position. Working with a summed signal from all the BPPM electrodes provides a good way to measure accurately the beam phase. While for an off-axis beam the signal phases on the individual electrodes can differ from those for a centered beam by a few degrees, the phase of the summed signal is found to be independent of the beam transverse position inside the device. Based on the analysis results, an optimal BPPM design with 4 one-end-shorted 60-degree electrodes has been chosen. It provides a good linearity and sufficient signal power for both position and phase measurements, while satisfying the linac geometrical constrains and mechanical requirements.

  13. Error analysis of the phase-shifting technique when applied to shadow moire

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Changwoon; Han Bongtae

    2006-02-20

    An exact solution for the intensity distribution of shadow moire fringes produced by a broad spectrum light is presented. A mathematical study quantifies errors in fractional fringe orders determined by the phase-shifting technique, and its validity is corroborated experimentally. The errors vary cyclically as the distance between the reference grating and the specimen increases. The amplitude of the maximum error is approximately 0.017 fringe, which defines the theoretical limit of resolution enhancement offered by the phase-shifting technique.

  14. Beam-Switch Transient Effects in the RF Path of the ICAPA Receive Phased Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sands, O. Scott

    2003-01-01

    When the beam of a Phased Array Antenna (PAA) is switched from one pointing direction to another, transient effects in the RF path of the antenna are observed. Testing described in the report has revealed implementation-specific transient effects in the RF channel that are associated with digital clocking pulses that occur with transfer of data from the Beam Steering Controller (BSC) to the digital electronics of the PAA under test. The testing described here provides an initial assessment of the beam-switch phenomena by digitally acquiring time series of the RF communications channel, under CW excitation, during the period of time that the beam switch transient occurs. Effects are analyzed using time-frequency distributions and instantaneous frequency estimation techniques. The results of tests conducted with CW excitation supports further Bit-Error-Rate (BER) testing of the PAA communication channel.

  15. Generic nonsinusoidal phase error correction for three-dimensional shape measurement using a digital video projector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Song; Yau, S.-T

    2007-01-01

    A structured light system using a digital video projector is widely used for 3D shape measurement. However, the nonlinear {gamma} of the projector causes the projected fringe patterns to be nonsinusoidal, which results in phase error and therefore measurement error. It has been shown that, by using a small look-up table (LUT), this type of phase error can be reduced significantly for a three-step phase-shifting algorithm. We prove that this algorithm is generic for any phase-shifting algorithm. Moreover, we propose a new LUT generation method by analyzing the captured fringe image of a flat board directly. Experiments show that this error compensation algorithm can reduce the phase error to at least 13 times smaller.

  16. Effects of systematic phase errors on optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Chao; Bao, Wan-Su; Wang, Xiang; Fu, Xiang-Qun

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of systematic errors in phase inversions on the success rate and number of iterations in the optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm. Using the geometric description of this algorithm, a model of the algorithm with phase errors is established, and the relationship between the success rate of the algorithm, the database size, the number of iterations, and the phase error is determined. For a given database size, we obtain both the maximum success rate of the algorithm and the required number of iterations when phase errors are present in the algorithm. Analyses and numerical simulations show that the optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm is more robust against phase errors than Grover’s algorithm. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB338002).

  17. Controllable Airy-like beams induced by tunable phase patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Qian, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally observe a novel family of Airy-like beams. First, we theoretically investigate the physical generation of our proposed controllable Airy-like beams by introducing a rotation angle factor into the phase function, which can regulate and flexibly control the beam wavefront. Meanwhile we can also readily control the main lobes of these beams to follow appointed parabolic trajectories using the rotation angle factor. We also demonstrate that the controllable Airy-like beams lack the properties of being diffraction-free and self-healing. The experiments are performed and the results are in accord with the theoretical simulations. We believe that the intriguing characteristics of our proposed Airy-like beams could provide more degrees of freedom, and are likely to give rise to new applications and lend versatility to the emerging field.

  18. The Pancharatnam-Berry phase in polarization singular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2013-04-01

    Space-variant inhomogeneously polarized field formed due to superposition of orthogonally polarized Gaussian (LG00) and Laguerre-Gaussian (LG01) beams results in polarization singular beams with different morphology structures such as lemon, star and dipole patterns around the C-point in the beam cross-section. The Pancharatnam-Berry phase plays a critical role in the formation and characteristics of these spatially inhomogeneous fields. We present our experimental results wherein we measure the variable geometric phase by tracking the trajectory of the component vortices in the beam cross-section, by interfering with selective polarization states and by tracking different latitudes on the Poincaré sphere without the effect of a dynamic phase.

  19. Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

  20. Simple Array Beam-Shaping Using Phase-Only Adjustments.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-07-01

    Conventional beam-shaping for array antennas is accomplished via an amplitude-taper on the elemental radiators. It is well known that proper manipulation of the elemental phases can also shape the antenna far-field pattern. A fairly simple transformation from a desired amplitude-taper to a phase-taper can yield nearly equivalent results.

  1. Calibrations of phase and ratio errors of current and voltage channels of energy meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlejnek, P.; Kaspar, P.

    2013-06-01

    This paper deals with measurement of phase and ratio errors of current and voltage channels of a new produced energy meter. This fully digitally controlled energy meter combines the classical static energy meter with power quality analyzer. The calibration of phase and ratio errors in wide frequency range is then necessary. Paper shows the results of error measurement, introduces the mathematical approximations and describes the calibration constants. It allows error compensation and power calculation of particular harmonics. The electric power of the higher harmonics can be interesting information of distributed electric energy quality.

  2. Progress toward a general grating patterning technology using phase-locked scanning beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattenburg, Mark L.; Chen, Carl G.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Konkola, Paul T.; Pati, G. S.

    2002-01-01

    The fabrication of large high-quality diffraction gratings remains one of the most challenging tasks in optical fabrication. Traditional direct-write methods, such as diamond ruling or electron-beam lithography, can be extremely slow and result in gratings with undesired phase errors. Holographic methods, while generally resulting in gratings with smoother phase, frequently require large aspheres and lengthy optical setup in order to achieve desired period chirps. In this paper we describe a novel interference lithography method called scanning-beam interference lithography (SBIL) that utilizes small phase-locked scanning beams to write general periodic patterns onto large substrates. Small mutually coherent beams are phase controlled by high-bandwidth electro-optic components and caused to overlap and interfere, generating a small grating image. The image is raster-scanned over the substrate by use of a high-precision interferometer-controlled air bearing stage, resulting in large grating patterns. We will describe a prototype system in our laboratory designed to write gratings with extremely low phase distortion. The system is being generalized to pattern gratings with arbitrary period progressions (chirps). This technology, with extensions, will allow the rapid, low cost patterning of high-fidelity periodic patterns of arbitrary geometry on large substrates that could be of great interest to astronomers.

  3. Effect of Random Circuit Fabrication Errors on Small Signal Gain and Phase in Helix Traveling Wave Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengvanich, P.; Chernin, D. P.; Lau, Y. Y.; Luginsland, J. W.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2007-11-01

    Motivated by the current interest in mm-wave and THz sources, which use miniature, difficult-to-fabricate circuit components, we evaluate the statistical effects of random fabrication errors on a helix traveling wave tube amplifier's small signal characteristics. The small signal theory is treated in a continuum model in which the electron beam is assumed to be monoenergetic, and axially symmetric about the helix axis. Perturbations that vary randomly along the beam axis are introduced in the dimensionless Pierce parameters b, the beam-wave velocity mismatch, C, the gain parameter, and d, the cold tube circuit loss. Our study shows, as expected, that perturbation in b dominates the other two. The extensive numerical data have been confirmed by our analytic theory. They show in particular that the standard deviation of the output phase is linearly proportional to standard deviation of the individual perturbations in b, C, and d. Simple formulas have been derived which yield the output phase variations in terms of the statistical random manufacturing errors. This work was supported by AFOSR and by ONR.

  4. Quantitative cell imaging using single beam phase retrieval method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Arun; Chhaniwal, Vani; Javidi, Bahram

    2011-06-01

    Quantitative three-dimensional imaging of cells can provide important information about their morphology as well as their dynamics, which will be useful in studying their behavior under various conditions. There are several microscopic techniques to image unstained, semi-transparent specimens, by converting the phase information into intensity information. But most of the quantitative phase contrast imaging techniques is realized either by using interference of the object wavefront with a known reference beam or using phase shifting interferometry. A two-beam interferometric method is challenging to implement especially with low coherent sources and it also requires a fine adjustment of beams to achieve high contrast fringes. In this letter, the development of a single beam phase retrieval microscopy technique for quantitative phase contrast imaging of cells using multiple intensity samplings of a volume speckle field in the axial direction is described. Single beam illumination with multiple intensity samplings provides fast convergence and a unique solution of the object wavefront. Three-dimensional thickness profiles of different cells such as red blood cells and onion skin cells were reconstructed using this technique with an axial resolution of the order of several nanometers.

  5. A phase-space beam position monitor for synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Martinson, Mercedes; Belev, George; Dallin, Les; de Jong, Mark; Chapman, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the photon beam position on synchrotron beamlines is critical for most if not all synchrotron radiation experiments. The position of the beam at the experiment or optical element location is set by the position and angle of the electron beam source as it traverses the magnetic field of the bend-magnet or insertion device. Thus an ideal photon beam monitor would be able to simultaneously measure the photon beam’s position and angle, and thus infer the electron beam’s position in phase space. X-ray diffraction is commonly used to prepare monochromatic beams on X-ray beamlines usually in the form of a double-crystal monochromator. Diffraction couples the photon wavelength or energy to the incident angle on the lattice planes within the crystal. The beam from such a monochromator will contain a spread of energies due to the vertical divergence of the photon beam from the source. This range of energies can easily cover the absorption edge of a filter element such as iodine at 33.17 keV. A vertical profile measurement of the photon beam footprint with and without the filter can be used to determine the vertical centroid position and angle of the photon beam. In the measurements described here an imaging detector is used to measure these vertical profiles with an iodine filter that horizontally covers part of the monochromatic beam. The goal was to investigate the use of a combined monochromator, filter and detector as a phase-space beam position monitor. The system was tested for sensitivity to position and angle under a number of synchrotron operating conditions, such as normal operations and special operating modes where the photon beam is intentionally altered in position and angle at the source point. The results are comparable with other methods of beam position measurement and indicate that such a system is feasible in situations where part of the synchrotron beam can be used for the phase-space measurement. PMID:26134798

  6. Compact and phase-error-robust multilayered AWG-based wavelength selective switch driven by a single LCOS.

    PubMed

    Sorimoto, Keisuke; Tanizawa, Ken; Uetsuka, Hisato; Kawashima, Hitoshi; Mori, Masahiko; Hasama, Toshifumi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-15

    A novel liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS)-based wavelength selective switch (WSS) is proposed, fabricated, and demonstrated. It employs a multilayered arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) as a wavelength multiplex/demultiplexer. The LCOS deflects spectrally decomposed beams channel by channel and switches them to desired waveguide layers of the multilayered AWG. In order to obtain the multilayered AWG with high yield, phase errors of the AWG is externally compensated for by an additional phase modulation with the LCOS. This additional phase modulation is applied to the equivalent image of the facet of the AWG, which is projected by a relay lens. In our previously-reported WSS configuration, somewhat large footprint and increased cost were the drawbacks, since two LCOSs were required: one LCOS was driven for the inter-port switching operation, and the other was for the phase-error compensation. In the newly proposed configuration, on the other hand, both switching and compensation operations are performed using a single LCOS. This reduction of the component count is realized by introducing the folded configuration with a reflector. The volume of the WSS optics is 80 × 100 × 60 mm3, which is approximately 40% smaller than the previous configuration. The polarization-dependent loss and inter-channel crosstalk are less than 1.5 dB and -21.0 dB, respectively. An error-free transmission of 40-Gbit/s NRZ-OOK signal through the WSS is successfully demonstrated.

  7. Compact and phase-error-robust multilayered AWG-based wavelength selective switch driven by a single LCOS.

    PubMed

    Sorimoto, Keisuke; Tanizawa, Ken; Uetsuka, Hisato; Kawashima, Hitoshi; Mori, Masahiko; Hasama, Toshifumi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-15

    A novel liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS)-based wavelength selective switch (WSS) is proposed, fabricated, and demonstrated. It employs a multilayered arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) as a wavelength multiplex/demultiplexer. The LCOS deflects spectrally decomposed beams channel by channel and switches them to desired waveguide layers of the multilayered AWG. In order to obtain the multilayered AWG with high yield, phase errors of the AWG is externally compensated for by an additional phase modulation with the LCOS. This additional phase modulation is applied to the equivalent image of the facet of the AWG, which is projected by a relay lens. In our previously-reported WSS configuration, somewhat large footprint and increased cost were the drawbacks, since two LCOSs were required: one LCOS was driven for the inter-port switching operation, and the other was for the phase-error compensation. In the newly proposed configuration, on the other hand, both switching and compensation operations are performed using a single LCOS. This reduction of the component count is realized by introducing the folded configuration with a reflector. The volume of the WSS optics is 80 × 100 × 60 mm3, which is approximately 40% smaller than the previous configuration. The polarization-dependent loss and inter-channel crosstalk are less than 1.5 dB and -21.0 dB, respectively. An error-free transmission of 40-Gbit/s NRZ-OOK signal through the WSS is successfully demonstrated. PMID:23938561

  8. Poster — Thur Eve — 08: Rotational errors with on-board cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; Webb, R.; Nyiri, B.

    2014-08-15

    The focus of this study is on the Elekta XVI on-board cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system. A rotational mismatch as large as 0.5° is observed between clockwise (CW) and counter-clockwise (CCW) CBCT scans. The error could affect non-isocentric treatments (e.g., lung SBRT and acoustic neuroma), as well as off-axis organs-at-risk. The error is caused by mislabeling of the projections with a lagging gantry angle, which is caused by the finite image acquisition time and delays in the imaging system. A 30 cm diameter cylindrical phantom with 5 mm diameter holes is used for the scanning. CW and CCW scans are acquired for five gantry speeds (360 to 120 deg./min.) on six linacs from three generations (MLCi, MLCi2, and Agility). Additional scans are acquired with different x-ray pulse widths for the same mAs. In the automated CBCT analysis (using ImageJ), the CW/CCW mismatch in a series of line profiles is identified and used to calculate the rotational error. Results are consistent among all linacs and indicate that the error varies linearly with gantry speed. The finite width of the x-ray pulses is a major but predictable contributor to the delay causing the error. For 40 ms pulses, the delay is 34 ± 1 ms. A simple solution applied in our clinic is adjusting the gantry angle offset to make the CCW one-minute scans correct. A more involved approach we are currently investigating includes adjustments of pulse width and mA, resulting in focal spot changes, with potential impact on image quality.

  9. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Number Errors and Consequences for Radiotherapy Planning: An Investigation of Correction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Poludniowski, Gavin G.; Evans, Philip M.; Webb, Steve

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: The potential of keV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for guiding adaptive replanning is well-known. There are impediments to this, one being CBCT number accuracy. The purpose of this study was to investigate CBCT number correction methods and the affect of residual inaccuracies on dose deposition. Four different correction strategies were applied to the same patient data to compare performance and the sophistication of correction-method needed for acceptable dose errors. Methods and Materials: Planning CT and CBCT reconstructions were used for 12 patients (6 brain, 3 prostate, and 3 bladder cancer patients). All patients were treated using Elekta linear accelerators and XVI imaging systems. Two of the CBCT number correction methods investigated were based on an algorithm previously proposed by the authors but only previously applied to phantoms. Two further methods, based on an approach previously suggested in the research literature, were also examined. Dose calculations were performed using scans of a 'worst' subset of patients using the Pinnacle{sup 3} version 9.0 treatment planning system and the patients' clinical plans. Results: All mean errors in CBCT number were <50 HU, and all correction methods performed well or adequately in dose calculations. The worst single dose discrepancy identified for any of the examined methods or patients was 3.0%. Mean errors in the doses to treatment volumes or organs at risk were negatively correlated with the mean error in CT number. That is, a mean CT number that was too large, averaged over the entire CBCT volume, implied an underdosing in a volume-of-interest and vice versa. Conclusions: Results suggest that (1) the correction of CBCT numbers to within a mean error of 50 HU in the scan volume provides acceptable discrepancies in dose (<3%) and (2) this is achievable with even quite unsophisticated correction methods.

  10. ACTION AND PHASE ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE SEXTUPOLE ERRORS IN RHIC AND THE SPS.

    SciTech Connect

    CARDONA,J.PEGGS,S.SATOGATA,T.TOMAS,R.

    2003-05-12

    Success in the application of the action and phase analysis to find linear errors at RHIC Interaction Regions [1] has encouraged the creation of a technique based on the action and phase analysis to find non linear errors. In this paper we show the first attempt to measure the sextupole components at RHIC interaction regions using the action and phase method. Experiments done by intentionally activating sextupoles in RHIC and in SPS [2] will also be analyzed with this method. First results have given values for the sextupole errors that at least have the same order of magnitude as the values found by an alternate technique during the RHIC 2001 run [3].

  11. Blind phase error suppression for color-encoded digital fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Zhu, R.; Quan, C.; Li, B.; Tay, C. J.; Chen, L.

    2012-04-01

    Color-encoded digital fringe projection profilometry (CDFPP) has the advantage of fast speed, non-contact and full-field testing. It is one of the most important dynamic three-dimensional (3D) profile measurement techniques. However, due to factors such as color cross-talk and gamma distortion of electro-optical devices, phase errors arise when conventional phase-shifting algorithms with fixed phase shift values are utilized to retrieve phases. In this paper, a simple and effective blind phase error suppression approach based on isotropic n-dimensional fringe pattern normalization (INFPN) and carrier squeezing interferometry (CSI) is proposed. It does not require pre-calibration for the gamma and color-coupling coefficients or the phase shift values. Simulation and experimental works show that our proposed approach is able to effectively suppress phase errors and achieve accurate measurement results in CDFPP.

  12. Beam Position and Phase Monitor - Wire Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Heath A; Shurter, Robert B.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin

    2012-04-10

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) deploys many cylindrical beam position and phase monitors (BPPM) throughout the linac to measure the beam central position, phase and bunched-beam current. Each monitor is calibrated and qualified prior to installation to insure it meets LANSCE requirements. The BPPM wire mapping system is used to map the BPPM electrode offset, sensitivity and higher order coefficients. This system uses a three-axis motion table to position the wire antenna structure within the cavity, simulating the beam excitation of a BPPM at a fundamental frequency of 201.25 MHz. RF signal strength is measured and recorded for the four electrodes as the antenna position is updated. An effort is underway to extend the systems service to the LANSCE facility by replacing obsolete electronic hardware and taking advantage of software enhancements. This paper describes the upgraded wire positioning system's new hardware and software capabilities including its revised antenna structure, motion control interface, RF measurement equipment and Labview software upgrades. The main purpose of the wire mapping system at LANSCE is to characterize the amplitude response versus beam central position of BPPMs before they are installed in the beam line. The wire mapping system is able to simulate a beam using a thin wire and measure the signal response as the wire position is varied within the BPPM aperture.

  13. Compensation of errors due to incident beam drift in a 3 DOF measurement system for linear guide motion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pengcheng; Mao, Shuai; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2015-11-01

    A measurement system with three degrees of freedom (3 DOF) that compensates for errors caused by incident beam drift is proposed. The system's measurement model (i.e. its mathematical foundation) is analyzed, and a measurement module (i.e. the designed orientation measurement unit) is developed and adopted to measure simultaneously straightness errors and the incident beam direction; thus, the errors due to incident beam drift can be compensated. The experimental results show that the proposed system has a deviation of 1 μm in the range of 200 mm for distance measurements, and a deviation of 1.3 μm in the range of 2 mm for straightness error measurements.

  14. Integrated phased array for wide-angle beam steering.

    PubMed

    Yaacobi, Ami; Sun, Jie; Moresco, Michele; Leake, Gerald; Coolbaugh, Douglas; Watts, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate an on-chip optical phased array fabricated in a CMOS compatible process with continuous, fast (100 kHz), wide-angle (51°) beam-steering suitable for applications such as low-cost LIDAR systems. The device demonstrates the largest (51°) beam-steering and beam-spacing to date while providing the ability to steer continuously over the entire range. Continuous steering is enabled by a cascaded phase shifting architecture utilizing, low power and small footprint, thermo-optic phase shifters. We demonstrate these results in the telecom C-band, but the same design can easily be adjusted for any wavelength between 1.2 and 3.5 μm.

  15. A multimode DLL with trade-off between multiphase and static phase error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandan, Zhang; Wenrui, Zhu; Wei, Li; Zhihong, Huang; Lijiang, Gao; Haigang, Yang

    2014-05-01

    A multimode DLL with trade-off between multiphase and static phase error is presented. By adopting a multimode control circuit to regroup the delay line, a better static phase error performance can be achieved while reducing the number of output phases. The DLL accomplishes three operation modes: mode1 with a four-phase output, mode2 with a two-phase output and a better static phase error performance, and mode3 with only a one-phase output but the best static phase error performance. The proposed DLL has been fabricated in 0.13 μm CMOS technology and measurement results show that the static phase errors of mode1, mode2 and mode3 are -18.2 ps, 11.8 ps and -6:44 ps, respectively, at 200 MHz. The measured RMS and peak-to-peak jitters of mode1, mode2 and mode3 are 2.0 ps, 2.2 ps, 2.1 ps and 10 ps, 9.3 ps, 10 ps respectively.

  16. Low-phase-error offset-compensated switched-capacitor integrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ki, W.-H.; Temes, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    A modification of the offset-compensated switched-capacitor integrator is described. The resulting circuit has a reduced delay and low gain distortion. It also retains the simplicity and low phase errors of earlier schemes.

  17. Improved beam smoothing with SSD using generalized phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The smoothing of the spatial illumination of an inertial confinement fusion target is examined by its spatial frequency content. It is found that the smoothing by spectral dispersion method, although efficient for glass lasers, can yield poor smoothing at low spatial frequency. The dependence of the smoothed spatial spectrum on the characteristics of phase modulation and dispersion is examined for both sinusoidal and more general phase modulation. It is shown that smoothing with non-sinusoidal phase modulation can result in spatial spectra which are substantially identical to that obtained with the induced spatial incoherence or similar method where random phase plates are present in both methods and identical beam divergence is assumed.

  18. Influence of beam wander on bit-error rate in a ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Jiang, Yijun; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan; Du, Wenhe

    2008-11-15

    Based on weak fluctuation theory and the beam-wander model, the bit-error rate of a ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system is analyzed, in comparison with the condition in which beam wander is not taken into account. Considering the combined effect of scintillation and beam wander, optimum divergence angle and transmitter beam radius for a communication system are researched. Numerical results show that both of them increase with the increment of total link margin and transmitted wavelength. This work can benefit the ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system design.

  19. A log-likelihood-gain intensity target for crystallographic phasing that accounts for experimental error.

    PubMed

    Read, Randy J; McCoy, Airlie J

    2016-03-01

    The crystallographic diffraction experiment measures Bragg intensities; crystallographic electron-density maps and other crystallographic calculations in phasing require structure-factor amplitudes. If data were measured with no errors, the structure-factor amplitudes would be trivially proportional to the square roots of the intensities. When the experimental errors are large, and especially when random errors yield negative net intensities, the conversion of intensities and their error estimates into amplitudes and associated error estimates becomes nontrivial. Although this problem has been addressed intermittently in the history of crystallographic phasing, current approaches to accounting for experimental errors in macromolecular crystallography have numerous significant defects. These have been addressed with the formulation of LLGI, a log-likelihood-gain function in terms of the Bragg intensities and their associated experimental error estimates. LLGI has the correct asymptotic behaviour for data with large experimental error, appropriately downweighting these reflections without introducing bias. LLGI abrogates the need for the conversion of intensity data to amplitudes, which is usually performed with the French and Wilson method [French & Wilson (1978), Acta Cryst. A35, 517-525], wherever likelihood target functions are required. It has general applicability for a wide variety of algorithms in macromolecular crystallography, including scaling, characterizing anisotropy and translational noncrystallographic symmetry, detecting outliers, experimental phasing, molecular replacement and refinement. Because it is impossible to reliably recover the original intensity data from amplitudes, it is suggested that crystallographers should always deposit the intensity data in the Protein Data Bank. PMID:26960124

  20. A log-likelihood-gain intensity target for crystallographic phasing that accounts for experimental error

    PubMed Central

    Read, Randy J.; McCoy, Airlie J.

    2016-01-01

    The crystallographic diffraction experiment measures Bragg intensities; crystallo­graphic electron-density maps and other crystallographic calculations in phasing require structure-factor amplitudes. If data were measured with no errors, the structure-factor amplitudes would be trivially proportional to the square roots of the intensities. When the experimental errors are large, and especially when random errors yield negative net intensities, the conversion of intensities and their error estimates into amplitudes and associated error estimates becomes nontrivial. Although this problem has been addressed intermittently in the history of crystallographic phasing, current approaches to accounting for experimental errors in macromolecular crystallography have numerous significant defects. These have been addressed with the formulation of LLGI, a log-likelihood-gain function in terms of the Bragg intensities and their associated experimental error estimates. LLGI has the correct asymptotic behaviour for data with large experimental error, appropriately downweighting these reflections without introducing bias. LLGI abrogates the need for the conversion of intensity data to amplitudes, which is usually performed with the French and Wilson method [French & Wilson (1978 ▸), Acta Cryst. A35, 517–525], wherever likelihood target functions are required. It has general applicability for a wide variety of algorithms in macromolecular crystallography, including scaling, characterizing anisotropy and translational noncrystallographic symmetry, detecting outliers, experimental phasing, molecular replacement and refinement. Because it is impossible to reliably recover the original intensity data from amplitudes, it is suggested that crystallographers should always deposit the intensity data in the Protein Data Bank. PMID:26960124

  1. Power Spectrum of Uplink Array Signals with Random Phase and Delay Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    2011-01-01

    Link Array signals emanating from different antennas must be compensated for Doppler and delay in order to achieve the N(sup 2) array gain predicted by theory. However compensation is never perfect, leaving residual errors that cause losses in array gain and degradation in signal quality. Here we develop a mathematical model for Uplink Array signals in the presence of phase and delay errors, similar to well-known multipath analyses but with features unique to this problem. The resulting losses and distortions are described, and the power spectral density of the array signal derived first conditioned on a given error vector, then averaged over distributions deemed suitable for Uplink Array applications. The impact of phase and delay errors on array gain and signal distortion are addressed, and the maximum data throughput is quantified in terms of the assumed error statistics.

  2. Reducing bit-error rate with optical phase regeneration in multilevel modulation formats.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Graham; Horak, Peter

    2013-12-15

    We investigate theoretically the benefits of using all-optical phase regeneration in a long-haul fiber optic link. We also introduce a design for a device capable of phase regeneration without phase-to-amplitude noise conversion. We simulate numerically the bit-error rate of a wavelength division multiplexed optical communication system over many fiber spans with periodic reamplification and compare the results obtained with and without phase regeneration at half the transmission distance when using the new design or an existing design. Depending on the modulation format, our results suggest that all-optical phase regeneration can reduce the bit-error rate by up to two orders of magnitude and that the amplitude preserving design offers a 50% reduction in bit-error rate relative to existing technology.

  3. The suppression of phase error by applying window functions to digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Facai; Yan, Hao; Yu, Yingjie; Zhou, Wenjing; Asundi, Anand

    2016-11-01

    Digital holography (DH) is a 3D imaging technique with a theoretical axial accuracy of around 1-2 nm. However, in practice, the axial error is generally quoted as tens of nanometers. Previous studies on sources of axial error mainly focused on the phase error introduced by lens. However, it was later shown that other factors such as the limited CCD aperture size also contribute to axial error. Based on this study, further investigation approaches to suppress the axial error caused by the limited CCD aperture size is discussed in this paper. Use of a window function to modify the shape of the hologram aperture after the recording process is proposed to reduce the axial error. The mechanism of how this window function reduces axial/phase error is analyzed. Specific features of this window function related to the axial error, namely the side lobe energy to main lobe energy ratio (SMER), is postulated. Both simulation and experiment are performed to validate that the selection of an appropriate window function helps to reduce the axial error of digital holography and SMER is an effective indicator in selection of an appropriate window function.

  4. Neural network calibration of a snapshot birefringent Fourier transform spectrometer with periodic phase errors.

    PubMed

    Luo, David; Kudenov, Michael W

    2016-05-16

    Systematic phase errors in Fourier transform spectroscopy can severely degrade the calculated spectra. Compensation of these errors is typically accomplished using post-processing techniques, such as Fourier deconvolution, linear unmixing, or iterative solvers. This results in increased computational complexity when reconstructing and calibrating many parallel interference patterns. In this paper, we describe a new method of calibrating a Fourier transform spectrometer based on the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs). In this way, it is demonstrated that a simpler and more straightforward reconstruction process can be achieved at the cost of additional calibration equipment. To this end, we provide a theoretical model for general systematic phase errors in a polarization birefringent interferometer. This is followed by a discussion of our experimental setup and a demonstration of our technique, as applied to data with and without phase error. The technique's utility is then supported by comparison to alternative reconstruction techniques using fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) and linear unmixing.

  5. Neural network calibration of a snapshot birefringent Fourier transform spectrometer with periodic phase errors.

    PubMed

    Luo, David; Kudenov, Michael W

    2016-05-16

    Systematic phase errors in Fourier transform spectroscopy can severely degrade the calculated spectra. Compensation of these errors is typically accomplished using post-processing techniques, such as Fourier deconvolution, linear unmixing, or iterative solvers. This results in increased computational complexity when reconstructing and calibrating many parallel interference patterns. In this paper, we describe a new method of calibrating a Fourier transform spectrometer based on the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs). In this way, it is demonstrated that a simpler and more straightforward reconstruction process can be achieved at the cost of additional calibration equipment. To this end, we provide a theoretical model for general systematic phase errors in a polarization birefringent interferometer. This is followed by a discussion of our experimental setup and a demonstration of our technique, as applied to data with and without phase error. The technique's utility is then supported by comparison to alternative reconstruction techniques using fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) and linear unmixing. PMID:27409947

  6. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE PAGES

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stablemore » growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.« less

  7. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stable growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.

  8. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, A. Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V.; Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.; Dubey, S. K.; Javidi, B.

    2014-03-10

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  9. Optical pupil relay design for SILEX - Optimising wavefront error and transmit/receive beams co-alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Reginald P.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes some of the key parameters that have been considered for the European Satellite Interorbital Link EXperiment (SILEX) optical relay lens design. Particular attention has been given to the specific requirement of transmit/receive beams co-alignment. The method of evaluating co-alignment errors is described and the effect of manufacturing tolerances and environmental long term stability on the co-alignment error investigated.

  10. The Influence of Training Phase on Error of Measurement in Jump Performance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kristie-Lee; Hopkins, Will G; Chapman, Dale W; Cronin, John B

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate the coefficients of variation in jump performance for individual participants in multiple trials over time to determine the extent to which there are real differences in the error of measurement between participants. The effect of training phase on measurement error was also investigated. Six subjects participated in a resistance-training intervention for 12 wk with mean power from a countermovement jump measured 6 d/wk. Using a mixed-model meta-analysis, differences between subjects, within-subject changes between training phases, and the mean error values during different phases of training were examined. Small, substantial factor differences of 1.11 were observed between subjects; however, the finding was unclear based on the width of the confidence limits. The mean error was clearly higher during overload training than baseline training, by a factor of ×/÷ 1.3 (confidence limits 1.0-1.6). The random factor representing the interaction between subjects and training phases revealed further substantial differences of ×/÷ 1.2 (1.1-1.3), indicating that on average, the error of measurement in some subjects changes more than in others when overload training is introduced. The results from this study provide the first indication that within-subject variability in performance is substantially different between training phases and, possibly, different between individuals. The implications of these findings for monitoring individuals and estimating sample size are discussed.

  11. Breast Patient Setup Error Assessment: Comparison of Electronic Portal Image Devices and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Matching Results

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Nijkamp, Jasper; Rasch, Coen; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the differences in setup errors measured with the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and electronic portal image devices (EPID) in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Repeat CBCT scan were acquired for routine offline setup verification in 20 breast cancer patients. During the CBCT imaging fractions, EPID images of the treatment beams were recorded. Registrations of the bony anatomy for CBCT to planning CT and EPID to digitally reconstructed-radiographs (DRRs) were compared. In addition, similar measurements of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were acquired. Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis were performed for clinical and phantom registrations. Systematic and random setup errors were quantified for CBCT and EPID-driven correction protocols in the EPID coordinate system (U, V), with V parallel to the cranial-caudal axis and U perpendicular to V and the central beam axis. Results: Bland-Altman analysis of clinical EPID and CBCT registrations yielded 4 to 6-mm limits of agreement, indicating that both methods were not compatible. The EPID-based setup errors were smaller than the CBCT-based setup errors. Phantom measurements showed that CBCT accurately measures setup error whereas EPID underestimates setup errors in the cranial-caudal direction. In the clinical measurements, the residual bony anatomy setup errors after offline CBCT-based corrections were {Sigma}{sub U} = 1.4 mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 1.7 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.6 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 3.1 mm. Residual setup errors of EPID driven corrections corrected for underestimation were estimated at {Sigma}{sub U} = 2.2mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 3.3 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.9 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 2.9 mm. Conclusion: EPID registration underestimated the actual bony anatomy setup error in breast cancer patients by 20% to 50%. Using CBCT decreased setup uncertainties significantly.

  12. Optics for Phase Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Johnson; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev

    2006-06-26

    The realization of a muon collider requires a reduction of the 6D normalized emittance of an initially generated muon beam by a factor of more than 106. Analytical and simulation studies of 6D muon beam ionization cooling in a helical channel filled with pressurized gas or liquid hydrogen absorber indicate that a factor of 106 is possible. Further reduction of the normalized 4D transverse emittance by an additional two orders of magnitude is envisioned using Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC). To realize the phase shrinkage effect in the parametric resonance method, one needs to design a focusing channel free of chromatic and spherical aberrations. We report results of our study of a concept of an aberration-free wiggler transport line with an alternating dispersion function. Resonant beam focusing at thin beryllium wedge absorber plates positioned near zero dispersion points then provides the predicted PIC effect.

  13. Error analysis of cine phase contrast MRI velocity measurements used for strain calculation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Elisabeth R; Morrow, Duane A; Felmlee, Joel P; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    Cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI offers unique insight into localized skeletal muscle behavior by providing the ability to quantify muscle strain distribution during cyclic motion. Muscle strain is obtained by temporally integrating and spatially differentiating CPC-encoded velocity. The aim of this study was to quantify CPC measurement accuracy and precision and to describe error propagation into displacement and strain. Using an MRI-compatible jig to move a B-gel phantom within a 1.5 T MRI bore, CPC-encoded velocities were collected. The three orthogonal encoding gradients (through plane, frequency, and phase) were evaluated independently in post-processing. Two systematic error types were corrected: eddy current-induced bias and calibration-type error. Measurement accuracy and precision were quantified before and after removal of systematic error. Through plane- and frequency-encoded data accuracy were within 0.4 mm/s after removal of systematic error - a 70% improvement over the raw data. Corrected phase-encoded data accuracy was within 1.3 mm/s. Measured random error was between 1 to 1.4 mm/s, which followed the theoretical prediction. Propagation of random measurement error into displacement and strain was found to depend on the number of tracked time segments, time segment duration, mesh size, and dimensional order. To verify this, theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally calculated displacement and strain error. For the parameters tested, experimental and theoretical results aligned well. Random strain error approximately halved with a two-fold mesh size increase, as predicted. Displacement and strain accuracy were within 2.6 mm and 3.3%, respectively. These results can be used to predict the accuracy and precision of displacement and strain in user-specific applications.

  14. Error Analysis of Cine Phase Contrast MRI Velocity Measurements used for Strain Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Elisabeth R.; Morrow, Duane A.; Felmlee, Joel P.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2014-01-01

    Cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI offers unique insight into localized skeletal muscle behavior by providing the ability to quantify muscle strain distribution during cyclic motion. Muscle strain is obtained by temporally integrating and spatially differentiating CPC-encoded velocity. The aim of this study was to quantify measurement accuracy and precision and to describe error propagation into displacement and strain. Using an MRI-compatible jig to move a B-gel phantom within a 1.5T MRI bore, CPC-encoded velocities were collected. The three orthogonal encoding gradients (through plane, frequency, and phase) were evaluated independently in post-processing. Two systematic error types were corrected: eddy current-induced bias and calibration-type error. Measurement accuracy and precision were quantified before and after removal of systematic error. Through plane- and frequency-encoded data accuracy were within 0.4mm/s after removal of systematic error – a 70% improvement over the raw data. Corrected phase-encoded data accuracy was within 1.3mm/s. Measured random error was between 1 to 1.4mm/s, which followed the theoretical prediction. Propagation of random measurement error into displacement and strain was found to depend on the number of tracked time segments, time segment duration, mesh size, and dimensional order. To verify this, theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally calculated displacement and strain error. For the parameters tested, experimental and theoretical results aligned well. Random strain error approximately halved with a two-fold mesh size increase, as predicted. Displacement and strain accuracy were within 2.6mm and 3.3%, respectively. These results can be used to predict the accuracy and precision of displacement and strain in user-specific applications. PMID:25433567

  15. Phase-Demodulation Error of a Fiber-Optic Fabry Perot Sensor with Complex Reflection Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, James M.; MacPherson, William N.; Barton, James S.; Jones, Julian D. C.

    2000-03-01

    The influence of reflector losses attracts little discussion in standard treatments of the Fabry Perot interferometer yet may be an important factor contributing to errors in phase-stepped demodulation of fiber optic Fabry Perot (FFP) sensors. We describe a general transfer function for FFP sensors with complex reflection coefficients and estimate systematic phase errors that arise when the asymmetry of the reflected fringe system is neglected, as is common in the literature. The measured asymmetric response of higher-finesse metal dielectric FFP constructions corroborates a model that predicts systematic phase errors of 0.06 rad in three-step demodulation of a low-finesse FFP sensor ( R 0 . 05 ) with internal reflector losses of 25%.

  16. Signal window minimum average error algorithm for multi-phase level computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bouz, Marwa; Heggarty, Kevin

    2000-06-01

    This paper extends the article "Signal window minimum average error algorithm for computer-generated holograms" (JOSA A 1998) to multi-phase level CGHs. We show that using the same rule for calculating the complex error diffusion weights, iterative-algorithm-like low-error signal windows can be obtained for any window shape or position (on- or off-axis) and any number of CGH phase levels. Important algorithm parameters such as amplitude normalisation level and phase freedom diffusers are described and investigated to optimize the algorithm. We show that, combined with a suitable diffuser, the algorithm makes feasible the calculation of high performance CGHs far larger than currently practical with iterative algorithms yet now realisable with modern fabrication techniques. Preliminary experimental optical reconstructions are presented.

  17. Digital Mirror Device Application in Reduction of Wave-front Phase Errors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Yan; Wang, Shuxue

    2009-01-01

    In order to correct the image distortion created by the mixing/shear layer, creative and effectual correction methods are necessary. First, a method combining adaptive optics (AO) correction with a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) is presented. Second, performance of an AO system using the Phase Diverse Speckle (PDS) principle is characterized in detail. Through combining the DMD method with PDS, a significant reduction in wavefront phase error is achieved in simulations and experiments. This kind of complex correction principle can be used to recovery the degraded images caused by unforeseen error sources. PMID:22574016

  18. Detection of overlay error in double patterning gratings using phase-structured illumination.

    PubMed

    Peterhänsel, Sandy; Gödecke, Maria Laura; Paz, Valeriano Ferreras; Frenner, Karsten; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-09-21

    With the help of simulations we study the benefits of using coherent, phase-structured illumination to detect the overlay error in resist gratings fabricated by double patterning. Evaluating the intensity and phase distribution along the focused spot of a high numerical aperture microscope, the capability of detecting magnitude and direction of overlay errors in the range of a few nanometers is investigated for a wide range of gratings. Furthermore, two measurement approaches are presented and tested for their reliability in the presence of white Gaussian noise.

  19. Effects of aperture averaging and beam width on a partially coherent Gaussian beam over free-space optical links with turbulence and pointing errors.

    PubMed

    Lee, It Ee; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Ng, Wai Pang; Khalighi, Mohammad-Ali; Liaw, Shien-Kuei

    2016-01-01

    Joint effects of aperture averaging and beam width on the performance of free-space optical communication links, under the impairments of atmospheric loss, turbulence, and pointing errors (PEs), are investigated from an information theory perspective. The propagation of a spatially partially coherent Gaussian-beam wave through a random turbulent medium is characterized, taking into account the diverging and focusing properties of the optical beam as well as the scintillation and beam wander effects. Results show that a noticeable improvement in the average channel capacity can be achieved with an enlarged receiver aperture in the moderate-to-strong turbulence regime, even without knowledge of the channel state information. In particular, it is observed that the optimum beam width can be reduced to improve the channel capacity, albeit the presence of scintillation and PEs, given that either one or both of these adverse effects are least dominant. We show that, under strong turbulence conditions, the beam width increases linearly with the Rytov variance for a relatively smaller PE loss but changes exponentially with steeper increments for higher PE losses. Our findings conclude that the optimal beam width is dependent on the combined effects of turbulence and PEs, and this parameter should be adjusted according to the varying atmospheric channel conditions. Therefore, we demonstrate that the maximum channel capacity is best achieved through the introduction of a larger receiver aperture and a beam-width optimization technique.

  20. Influence of standing wave phase error on super-resolution optical inspection for periodic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Usuki, S.; Takahashi, S.; Takamasu, K.

    2012-05-01

    The miniaturization of microfabricated structures such as patterned semiconductor wafers continues to advance, thereby increasing the demand for a high-speed, nondestructive and high-resolution measurement technique. We propose a novel optical inspecting method for a microfabricated structure using the standing wave illumination (SWI) shift as such a measurement technique. This method is based on a super-resolution algorithm in which the inspection system's resolution exceeds the diffraction limit by shifting the SWI. Resolution beyond the diffraction limit has previously been studied theoretically and realized experimentally. The influence of various experimental error factors needs to be investigated and calibration needs to be performed accordingly when actual applications that utilize the proposed method are constructed. These error factors include errors related to the phase, pitch and shift step size of the standing wave. Identifying the phase accurately is extremely difficult and greatly influences the resolution result. Hence, the SWI phase was focused upon as an experimental error factor. The effect of the phase difference between the actual experimental standing wave and the computationally set standing wave was investigated using a computer simulation. The periodic structure characteristic of a microfabricated structure was analyzed. The following findings were obtained as a result. The influence of an error is divided into three modes depending on the pitch of the periodic structure: (1) if the pitch is comparatively small, the influence of the error is cancelled, allowing the structure of a sample to be resolved correctly; (2) if the pitch of the structure is from 150 to 350 nm, the reconstructed solution shifts in a transverse direction corresponding to a phase gap of SWI; and (3) if it is a comparatively large pitch, then it is difficult to reconstruct the right pitch. Verification was experimentally attempted for mode (2), and the same result as

  1. An Agile Beam Transmit Array Using Coupled Oscillator Phase Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald S.; Scaramastra, Rocco P.; Huang, John; Beckon, Robert J.; Petree, Steve M.; Chavez, Cosme

    1993-01-01

    A few years ago York and colleagues suggested that injection locking of voltage controlled oscillators could be used to implement beam steering in a phased array [I]. The scheme makes use of the fact that when an oscillator is injection locked to an external signal, the phase difference between the output of the oscillator and the injection signal is governed by the difference between the injection frequency and the free running frequency of the oscillator (the frequency to which the oscillator is tuned). Thus, if voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs) are used, this phase difference is controlled by an applied voltage. Now, if a set of such oscillators are coupled to nearest neighbors, they can be made to mutually injection lock and oscillate as an ensemble. If they are all tuned to the same frequency, they will all oscillate in phase. Thus, if the outputs are connected to radiating elements forming a linear array, the antenna will radiate normal to the line of elements. Scanning is accomplished by antisymmetrically detuning the end oscillators in the array by application of a pair of appropriate voltages to their tuning ports. This results in a linear phase progression across the array which is just the phasing required to scan the beam. The scan angle is determined by the degree of detuning. We have constructed a seven element one dimensional agile beam array at S-band based on the above principle. Although, a few such arrays have been built in the past, this array possesses two unique features. First, the VCO MMICs have buffer amplifiers which isolate the output from the tuning circuit, and second, the oscillators are weakly coupled to each other at their resonant circuits rather than their outputs. This results in a convenient isolation between the oscillator array design and the radiating aperture design. An important parameter in the design is the so called coupling phase which determines the phase shift of the signals passing from one oscillator to its

  2. Error Analysis in a Device to Test Optical Systems by Using Ronchi Test and Phase Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera-Perez, Brasilia; Castro-Ramos, Jorge; Gordiano-Alvarado, Gabriel; Vazquez y Montiel, Sergio

    2008-04-15

    In optical workshops, Ronchi test is used to determine the optical quality of any concave surface, while it is in the polishing process its quality is verified. The Ronchi test is one of the simplest and most effective methods used for evaluating and measuring aberrations. In this work, we describe a device to test converging mirrors and lenses either with small F/numbers or large F/numbers, using LED (Light-Emitting Diode) that has been adapted in the Ronchi testing as source of illumination. With LED used the radiation angle is bigger than common LED. It uses external power supplies to have well stability intensity to avoid error during the phase shift. The setup also has the advantage to receive automatic input and output data, this is possible because phase shifting interferometry and a square Ronchi ruling with a variable intensity LED were used. Error analysis of the different parameters involved in the test of Ronchi was made. For example, we analyze the error in the shifting of phase, the error introduced by the movement of the motor, misalignments of x-axis, y-axis and z-axis of the surface under test, error in the period of the grid used.

  3. Transparent stepped phase measurement using two illuminating beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Behnam; Sharif, Farnaz; Jafarfard, Mohammad Reza; Kim, Dug Young

    2014-07-01

    We propose a single shot and single wavelength phase imaging technique for measuring phase of the transparent objects without using unwrapping process. A grating between a laser and the object is used to make beams with different angle, which determines the measurement range of the microscope. The grating pitch and magnification of the lens system before the sample affect the angle. The angle inside the object is changed according to Snell's law; therefore, final angle is related to the refractive index of the object. Magnification of the lens system after sample will control the modulation frequency of microscope. The interference pattern is constructed at CCD plane and convey information of the sample. For a phase below the measurement range of the microscope, the reconstructed phase is not wrapped. By increasing the measurement range accuracy of the system will drop; therefore the magnification of the lenses must choose carefully to obtain optimal phase. The ability of this technique is demonstrated by reconstructing phases of two transparent step objects with 150 and 510 μm height. Their refractive indexes for red light are 1.515 and 1.508 , respectively. Therefore, total optical path length difference is 336 micrometers that is 500 times more than the laser wavelength. The phase is successfully reconstructed without using unwrapping algorithms.

  4. Patient safety in external beam radiotherapy - guidelines on risk assessment and analysis of adverse error-events and near misses: introducing the ACCIRAD project.

    PubMed

    Malicki, Julian; Bly, Ritva; Bulot, Mireille; Godet, Jean-Luc; Jahnen, Andreas; Krengli, Marco; Maingon, Philippe; Martin, Carlos Prieto; Przybylska, Kamila; Skrobała, Agnieszka; Valero, Marc; Jarvinen, Hannu

    2014-08-01

    In 2011 the European Commission launched a tender to develop guidelines for risk analysis of accidental and unintended exposures in external beam radiotherapy. This tender was awarded to a consortium of 6 institutions, including the ESTRO, in late 2011. The project, denominated "ACCIRAD", recently finished the data collection phase. Data were collected by surveys administered in 38 European countries. Results indicate non-uniform implementation of event registration and classification, as well as incomplete or zero implementation of risk assessment and events analysis. Based on the survey results and analysis thereof, project leaders are currently drafting proposed guidelines entitled "Guidelines for patient safety in external beam radiotherapy - Guidelines on risk assessment and analysis of adverse-error events and near misses". The present article describes the aims and current status of the project, including results of the surveys. PMID:25245556

  5. Longitudinal phase space setup for the SLC beams

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.; Bane, K.L.F.; Minty, M.G.; Raimondi, P.; Holtzapple, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    The longitudinal phase space distribution of the SLC beams is affected by many different machine parameters and constraints. By using a technique of over-compression in the ring to linac transfer line, a small energy spread of 0.12% can be achieved at the end of the linac for a bunch length of 1.2 mm ({sigma}). In the final focus a small energy spread is desirable to reduce emittance dilution due to chromatic effects. Optimization of the bunch length is also important as a longer bunch of 1.2 mm can contribute up to 40% luminosity enhancement due to disruption. If there is a correlated energy variation along the bunch, for example due to mistuning of the optimal rf phase with respect to the beam, the bunch will be further compressed as it passes through the SLC Arcs. The resulting bunch can be too short to produce the desired disruption enhancement, but will radiate more beam-strahlung during collisions giving a false indication of higher luminosity. This paper discusses the interplay of these issues from the damping ring to the interaction point.

  6. Characterizing the phase profile of a vortex beam with angular-double-slit interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Long, Junling; Wang, Feiran; Wang, Yunlong; Zhang, Pei; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2013-12-01

    The diffracted intensity distribution of a Laguerre-Gaussian beam is studied with an angular-double-slit interferometer. We experimentally demonstrate that the spiral phase structure of a vortex beam can be clearly revealed in this interference geometry, and it gives us an efficient way to distinguish different orders of Laguerre-Gaussian beams. This angular-double-slit interferometer gives us a better understanding of the phase structure of a vortex beam and the interference phenomenon of vortex beams.

  7. The effects of digitizing rate and phase distortion errors on the shock response spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the methods used for acquisition and digitization of high-frequency transients in the analysis of pyrotechnic events, such as explosive bolts for spacecraft separation, are discussed with respect to the reduction of errors in the computed shock response spectrum. Equations are given for maximum error as a function of the sampling rate, phase distortion, and slew rate, and the effects of the characteristics of the filter used are analyzed. A filter is noted to exhibit good passband amplitude, phase response, and response to a step function is a compromise between the flat passband of the elliptic filter and the phase response of the Bessel filter; it is suggested that it be used with a sampling rate of 10f (5 percent).

  8. Phase error analysis and compensation for phase shifting profilometry with projector defocusing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dongliang; Da, Feipeng; Kemao, Qian; Seah, Hock Soon

    2016-07-20

    Phase shifting profilometry (PSP) using binary fringe patterns with projector defocusing is promising for high-speed 3D shape measurement. To obtain a high-quality phase, the projector usually requires a high defocusing level, which leads to a drastic fall in fringe contrast. Due to its convenience and high speed, PSP using squared binary patterns with small phase shifting algorithms and slight defocusing is highly desirable. In this paper, the phase accuracies of the classical phase shifting algorithms are analyzed theoretically, and then compared using both simulation and experiment. We also adapt two algorithms for PSP using squared binary patterns, which include a Hilbert three-step PSP and a double three-step PSP. Both algorithms can increase phase accuracy, with the latter featuring additional invalid point detection. The adapted algorithms are also compared with the classical algorithms. Based on our analysis and comparison results, proper algorithm selection can be easily made according to the practical requirement. PMID:27463929

  9. Environment-assisted error correction of single-qubit phase damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Helm, Julius; Strunz, Walter T.

    2011-12-01

    Open quantum system dynamics of random unitary type may in principle be fully undone. Closely following the scheme of environment-assisted error correction proposed by Gregoratti and Werner [J. Mod. Opt.10.1080/09500340308234541 50, 915 (2003)], we explicitly carry out all steps needed to invert a phase-damping error on a single qubit. Furthermore, we extend the scheme to a mixed-state environment. Surprisingly, we find cases for which the uncorrected state is closer to the desired state than any of the corrected ones.

  10. Environment-assisted error correction of single-qubit phase damping

    SciTech Connect

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Helm, Julius; Strunz, Walter T.

    2011-12-15

    Open quantum system dynamics of random unitary type may in principle be fully undone. Closely following the scheme of environment-assisted error correction proposed by Gregoratti and Werner [J. Mod. Opt. 50, 915 (2003)], we explicitly carry out all steps needed to invert a phase-damping error on a single qubit. Furthermore, we extend the scheme to a mixed-state environment. Surprisingly, we find cases for which the uncorrected state is closer to the desired state than any of the corrected ones.

  11. Transmitted wavefront error of a volume phase holographic grating at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Lee, David; Taylor, Gordon D; Baillie, Thomas E C; Montgomery, David

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the results of transmitted wavefront error (WFE) measurements on a volume phase holographic (VPH) grating operating at a temperature of 120 K. The VPH grating was mounted in a cryogenically compatible optical mount and tested in situ in a cryostat. The nominal root mean square (RMS) wavefront error at room temperature was 19 nm measured over a 50 mm diameter test aperture. The WFE remained at 18 nm RMS when the grating was cooled. This important result demonstrates that excellent WFE performance can be obtained with cooled VPH gratings, as required for use in future cryogenic infrared astronomical spectrometers planned for the European Extremely Large Telescope. PMID:22660099

  12. Optimization of finite-size errors in finite-temperature calculations of unordered phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Deepak; Srednicki, Mark; Rigol, Marcos

    It is common knowledge that the microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical ensembles are equivalent in thermodynamically large systems. Here, we study finite-size effects in the latter two ensembles. We show that contrary to naive expectations, finite-size errors are exponentially small in grand canonical ensemble calculations of translationally invariant systems in unordered phases at finite temperature. Open boundary conditions and canonical ensemble calculations suffer from finite-size errors that are only polynomially small in the system size. We further show that finite-size effects are generally smallest in numerical linked cluster expansions. Our conclusions are supported by analytical and numerical analyses of classical and quantum systems.

  13. Impedance-based analysis and study of phase sensitivity in slow-wave two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, J.S. ); Whittum, D.H. , Tsukuba, Oho, Ibaraki, 305 ); Sessler, A.M. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A coupling impedance'' for both the RK and SWFEWL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. Expressions are derived for the phase and amplitude sensitivities of the TBA schemes to errors (shot-to-shot jitter) in current and energy. The analysis allows, for the first time, relative comparisons of the RK and the SWFEL TBAs.

  14. Impedance-based analysis and study of phase sensitivity in slow-wave two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, J.S.; Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A ``coupling impedance`` for both the RK and SWFEWL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. Expressions are derived for the phase and amplitude sensitivities of the TBA schemes to errors (shot-to-shot jitter) in current and energy. The analysis allows, for the first time, relative comparisons of the RK and the SWFEL TBAs.

  15. Quantitative, comparable coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy: correcting errors in phase retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Charles H., Jr.; Lee, Young Jong; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2016-04-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy has demonstrated significant potential for biological and materials imaging. To date, however, the primary mechanism of disseminating CARS spectroscopic information is through pseudocolor imagery, which explicitly neglects a vast majority of the hyperspectral data. Furthermore, current paradigms in CARS spectral processing do not lend themselves to quantitative sample-to-sample comparability. The primary limitation stems from the need to accurately measure the so-called nonresonant background (NRB) that is used to extract the chemically-sensitive Raman information from the raw spectra. Measurement of the NRB on a pixel-by-pixel basis is a nontrivial task; thus, reference NRB from glass or water are typically utilized, resulting in error between the actual and estimated amplitude and phase. In this manuscript, we present a new methodology for extracting the Raman spectral features that significantly suppresses these errors through phase detrending and scaling. Classic methods of error-correction, such as baseline detrending, are demonstrated to be inaccurate and to simply mask the underlying errors. The theoretical justification is presented by re-developing the theory of phase retrieval via the Kramers-Kronig relation, and we demonstrate that these results are also applicable to maximum entropy method-based phase retrieval. This new error-correction approach is experimentally applied to glycerol spectra and tissue images, demonstrating marked consistency between spectra obtained using different NRB estimates, and between spectra obtained on different instruments. Additionally, in order to facilitate implementation of these approaches, we have made many of the tools described herein available free for download.

  16. The backward phase flow and FBI-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beams for the Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Leung Shingyu; Qian Jianliang

    2010-11-20

    We propose the backward phase flow method to implement the Fourier-Bros-Iagolnitzer (FBI)-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beam method for solving the Schroedinger equation in the semi-classical regime. The idea of Eulerian Gaussian beams has been first proposed in . In this paper we aim at two crucial computational issues of the Eulerian Gaussian beam method: how to carry out long-time beam propagation and how to compute beam ingredients rapidly in phase space. By virtue of the FBI transform, we address the first issue by introducing the reinitialization strategy into the Eulerian Gaussian beam framework. Essentially we reinitialize beam propagation by applying the FBI transform to wavefields at intermediate time steps when the beams become too wide. To address the second issue, inspired by the original phase flow method, we propose the backward phase flow method which allows us to compute beam ingredients rapidly. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithms.

  17. Quantifying error of lidar and sodar Doppler beam swinging measurements of wind turbine wakes using computational fluid dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Lundquist, J. K.; Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Clifton, A.

    2015-02-23

    Wind-profiling lidars are now regularly used in boundary-layer meteorology and in applications such as wind energy and air quality. Lidar wind profilers exploit the Doppler shift of laser light backscattered from particulates carried by the wind to measure a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity. The Doppler beam swinging (DBS) technique, used by many commercial systems, considers measurements of this LOS velocity in multiple radial directions in order to estimate horizontal and vertical winds. The method relies on the assumption of homogeneous flow across the region sampled by the beams. Using such a system in inhomogeneous flow, such as wind turbine wakes ormore » complex terrain, will result in errors. To quantify the errors expected from such violation of the assumption of horizontal homogeneity, we simulate inhomogeneous flow in the atmospheric boundary layer, notably stably stratified flow past a wind turbine, with a mean wind speed of 6.5 m s-1 at the turbine hub-height of 80 m. This slightly stable case results in 15° of wind direction change across the turbine rotor disk. The resulting flow field is sampled in the same fashion that a lidar samples the atmosphere with the DBS approach, including the lidar range weighting function, enabling quantification of the error in the DBS observations. The observations from the instruments located upwind have small errors, which are ameliorated with time averaging. However, the downwind observations, particularly within the first two rotor diameters downwind from the wind turbine, suffer from errors due to the heterogeneity of the wind turbine wake. Errors in the stream-wise component of the flow approach 30% of the hub-height inflow wind speed close to the rotor disk. Errors in the cross-stream and vertical velocity components are also significant: cross-stream component errors are on the order of 15% of the hub-height inflow wind speed (1.0 m s−1) and errors in the vertical velocity measurement exceed the actual

  18. Quantifying error of lidar and sodar Doppler beam swinging measurements of wind turbine wakes using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J. K.; Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Clifton, A.

    2015-02-23

    Wind-profiling lidars are now regularly used in boundary-layer meteorology and in applications such as wind energy and air quality. Lidar wind profilers exploit the Doppler shift of laser light backscattered from particulates carried by the wind to measure a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity. The Doppler beam swinging (DBS) technique, used by many commercial systems, considers measurements of this LOS velocity in multiple radial directions in order to estimate horizontal and vertical winds. The method relies on the assumption of homogeneous flow across the region sampled by the beams. Using such a system in inhomogeneous flow, such as wind turbine wakes or complex terrain, will result in errors.

    To quantify the errors expected from such violation of the assumption of horizontal homogeneity, we simulate inhomogeneous flow in the atmospheric boundary layer, notably stably stratified flow past a wind turbine, with a mean wind speed of 6.5 m s-1 at the turbine hub-height of 80 m. This slightly stable case results in 15° of wind direction change across the turbine rotor disk. The resulting flow field is sampled in the same fashion that a lidar samples the atmosphere with the DBS approach, including the lidar range weighting function, enabling quantification of the error in the DBS observations. The observations from the instruments located upwind have small errors, which are ameliorated with time averaging. However, the downwind observations, particularly within the first two rotor diameters downwind from the wind turbine, suffer from errors due to the heterogeneity of the wind turbine wake. Errors in the stream-wise component of the flow approach 30% of the hub-height inflow wind speed close to the rotor disk. Errors in the cross-stream and vertical velocity components are also significant: cross-stream component errors are on the order of 15% of the hub-height inflow wind speed (1.0 m s−1) and errors in the vertical velocity measurement

  19. A Phase Space Monitoring of Injected Beam of J-PARC MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Shuichiro; Toyama, Takeshi

    Beam power of J-PARC MR (30 GeV Proton Synchrotron Main Ring) has been improved since 2008 and now achieved over 200 kW for the user operation. A part of beam loss is localized at the beam injection phase so it is important to monitor the beam bunch behavior in the transverse direction. In this paper it is described the method how to measure the position and momentum for each injected beam bunch using Beam Position Monitors (BPMs). It is also mentioned some implementation of an operator's interface (OPI) to display the plots of injected and circulating beam bunches in phase space coordinate.

  20. Simplified formula for mean cycle-slip time of phase-locked loops with steady-state phase error.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Previous work shows that the mean time from lock to a slipped cycle of a phase-locked loop is given by a certain double integral. Accurate numerical evaluation of this formula for the second-order loop is extremely vexing because the difference between exponentially large quantities is involved. The presented article demonstrates a method in which a much-reduced precision program can be used to obtain the mean first-cycle slip time for a loop of arbitrary degree tracking at a specified SNR and steady-state phase error. It also presents a simple approximate formula that is asymptotically tight at higher loop SNR.

  1. Parameter dimension of turbulence-induced phase errors and its effects on estimation in phase diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thelen, Brian J.; Paxman, Richard G.

    1994-01-01

    The method of phase diversity has been used in the context of incoherent imaging to estimate jointly an object that is being imaged and phase aberrations induced by atmospheric turbulence. The method requires a parametric model for the phase-aberration function. Typically, the parameters are coefficients to a finite set of basis functions. Care must be taken in selecting a parameterization that properly balances accuracy in the representation of the phase-aberration function with stability in the estimates. It is well known that over parameterization can result in unstable estimates. Thus a certain amount of model mismatch is often desirable. We derive expressions that quantify the bias and variance in object and aberration estimates as a function of parameter dimension.

  2. Superconducting switch concept applied to superconducting undulator phase-error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Madur, A.; Trillaud, F.; Dietderich, D.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, S.; Schlueter, R.

    2010-06-23

    Superconducting undulator (SCU) technology has the potential to significantly enhance the performance of synchrotron radiation sources for storage ring and FEL applications. Since 2002, our team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been performing R and D on superconducting undulators, including the fabrication of three Nb{sub 3}Sn prototypes. We have demonstrated experimentally the possibility to provide the prototype with trim coils that could be used for phase error correction. The research effort that we report here demonstrates the possibility to add degrees of freedom to the field correction provided by these coils in a cryogenic environment. By means of bridge of superconducting switches, we can modify the current direction through a trim coil. Here we describe the design of the experimental bridge we fabricated, the results we obtained and finally the generalized concept one could plan to apply to correct the phase errors with trim coils connected to a network of superconducting bridges.

  3. Error catastrophe and phase transition in the empirical fitness landscape of HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gregory R.; Ferguson, Andrew L.

    2015-03-01

    We have translated clinical sequence databases of the p6 HIV protein into an empirical fitness landscape quantifying viral replicative capacity as a function of the amino acid sequence. We show that the viral population resides close to a phase transition in sequence space corresponding to an "error catastrophe" beyond which there is lethal accumulation of mutations. Our model predicts that the phase transition may be induced by drug therapies that elevate the mutation rate, or by forcing mutations at particular amino acids. Applying immune pressure to any combination of killer T-cell targets cannot induce the transition, providing a rationale for why the viral protein can exist close to the error catastrophe without sustaining fatal fitness penalties due to adaptive immunity.

  4. Analytical solution of two-phase spherical Stefan problem by heat polynomials and integral error functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Stanislav N.; Sarsengeldin, Merey M.; Nouri, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    On the base of the Holm model, we represent two phase spherical Stefan problem and its analytical solution, which can serve as a mathematical model for diverse thermo-physical phenomena in electrical contacts. Suggested solution is obtained from integral error function and its properties which are represented in the form of series whose coefficients have to be determined. Convergence of solution series is proved.

  5. Effect of the spiral phase element on the radial-polarization (0, 1) ∗ LG beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machavariani, G.; Lumer, Y.; Moshe, I.; Jackel, S.

    2007-03-01

    Radially-polarized beams can be strongly amplified without significant birefringent-induced aberrations. However, radially-polarized beam is a high-order beam, and therefore has to be transformed into a fundamental Gaussian beam for reduction the beam-propagation factor M2. In effort to transform the radially-polarized beam to a nearly-Gaussian beam, we consider effect of a spiral phase element (SPE) on the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) (0, 1)∗ beam with radial polarization, and compare this with the case when the input beam is a LG (0, 1)∗ beam with spiral phase and uniform or random polarization. The LG (0, 1)∗ beam with radial polarization, despite its identity in intensity profile to the beam with spiral phase, has distinctly different properties when interacting with the SPE. With the SPE and spatial filter, we transformed the radially-polarized (0, 1)∗ mode with M2 = 2.8 to a nearly-Gaussian beam with M2 = 1.7. Measured transformation efficiency was 50%, and the beam brightness P/(M2)2 was practically unchanged. The SPE affects polarization state of the radially-polarized beam, leading to appearance of spin angular momentum in the beam center at the far-field.

  6. Errors incurred in a plane-wave-type expansion of a Gaussian beam. [in laser force calculations on light scattering aerosol experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    The multipole expansion obtained by Morita et al. (1968) of the Gaussian laser beam used to levitate an aerosol particle in order that its complete phase matrix may be measured is compared with that of Tsai and Pogorzelski (1975) in order to demonstrate the effect of the incorrect expansion used by Morita. Errors incurred by the use of an equation in which one side satisfies the scalar wave equation while the other side does not and can be reduced to a plane wave amplitude are calculated as functions of the inverse of the wave number times the beam waist, the wave number times the radial spherical coordinate and the angular spherical coordinate. Errors on the order of a few percent, considered undetectable are obtained in the squared-field amplitudes due to the expansion, however, they are found to become significant (several tens of percent) when the angle is zero. It is concluded that the expansion of Morita should only be used in the regions where the spherical angle is less than 0.01 and its product with the wave number and the radial spherical coordinate is less than unity.

  7. The study of the structural stability of the spiral laser beams propagation through inhomogeneous phase medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchik, Alexander A.; Muzychenko, Yana B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses theoretical and experimental results of the investigation of light beams that retain their intensity structure during propagation and focusing. Spiral laser beams are a family of laser beams that preserve the structural stability up to scale and rotation with the propagation. Properties of spiral beams are of practical interest for laser technology, medicine and biotechnology. Researchers use a spiral beams for movement and manipulation of microparticles. Functionality laser manipulators can be significantly enhanced by using spiral beams whose intensity remains invariable. It is well known, that these beams has non-zero orbital angular momentum. Spiral beams have a complicated phase distribution in cross section. In this paper we investigate the structural stability of the laser beams having a spiral phase structure by passing them through an inhomogeneous phase medium. Laser beam is passed through a medium is characterized by a random distribution of phase in the range 0..2π. The modeling was performed using VirtualLab 5.0 (manufacturer LightTrans GmbH). Compared the intensity distribution of the spiral and ordinary laser beam after the passage of the inhomogeneous medium. It is shown that the spiral beams exhibit a significantly better structural stability during the passage phase heterogeneous environments than conventional laser beams. The results obtained in the simulation are tested experimentally. Experimental results show good agreement with the theoretical results.

  8. Phase Rotation of Muon Beams for Producing Intense Low-Energy Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Bao, Y.; Hansen, G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for rare decay searches, which provide access to new physics that cannot be addressed at high-energy colliders. However, muons are produced within a broad energy spread unmatched to the low-energy required. In this paper we outline a phase rotation method to significantly increase the intensity of low-energy muons. The muons are produced from a short pulsed proton driver, and develop a time-momentum correlation in a drift space following production. A series of rf cavities is used to bunch the muons and phase-energy rotate the bunches to a momentum of around 100 MeV/c. Then another group of rf cavities is used to decelerate the muon bunches to low-energy. This obtains ~0.1 muon per 8 GeV proton, which is significantly higher than currently planned Mu2e experiments, and would enable a next generation of rare decay searches, and other intense muon beam applications.

  9. Beam phase measurement system for the K130 cyclotron in Jyväskylä

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, J.; Kotilainen, P.; Nieminen, V.; Liukkonen, E.; Kaski, K.

    1993-11-01

    A phase measurement system for Jyväskylä new K = 130 heavy ion cyclotron has been designed and realized. The phase measurement is done using a set of capacitive probes to detect phase information from the internal ion beam. This data is vital for tuning purposes to obtain an isochronous magnetic field and to maximize the ion beam intensity.

  10. Efficient generation of Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams through kinoform phase elements.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Olivas, Dilia; Mellado-Villaseñor, Gabriel; Sánchez-de-la-Llave, David; Arrizón, Victor

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the generation of Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams employing phase elements whose transmittances coincide with the phase modulations of such beams. A scaled version of the desired field appears, distorted by marginal optical noise, at the element's Fourier domain. The motivation to perform this study is that, in the context of the proposed approach, the desired beams are generated with the maximum possible efficiency. A disadvantage of the method is the distortion of the desired beams by the influence of several nondesired beam modes generated by the phase elements. We evaluate such distortion employing the root mean square deviation as a figure of merit. PMID:26479622

  11. Beam Mode Expansion of Corrugated Conical Horns with Phase Correcting Lens: Application to Radioastronomy Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, E.; de Haro, L.; O'Sullivan, C.; Cahill, G.; López Fernández, J. A.; Tercero, F.; Galocha, B.; Besada, J. L.

    2003-06-01

    A classical radioastronomy receiver is fed with a corrugated horn and an independent lens, both placed in a cryostat to lower the noise temperature. The beam is focused and directed using a combination of elliptical and plane mirrors. This paper proposes modifying the initial feeding system by placing the lens onto the horn aperture, thereby allowing a size reduction of the horn and lens, and a simplification of their mechanical design. The profiled lens is shaped to correct the phase error on the horn aperture. A quasi-optical model of the horn-plus-lens system has been developed using a Beam Mode Expansion (BME). Results using both a hyperbolic-planar lens and a spherical-elliptical lens, as well as results obtained by using Geometrical Optics (GO) with a Kirchoff Huygens integration to get the far-field pattern, have been compared with measurements. As a direct application, a full focusing system for the new 40-m radiotelescope at the “Centro Astronómico de Yebes” is presented for the 22, 30 and 45 GHz bands. This paper has developed a QO model for a corrugated conical horn with a phase-correcting lens.

  12. Time-delayed directional beam phased array antenna

    DOEpatents

    Fund, Douglas Eugene; Cable, John William; Cecil, Tony Myron

    2004-10-19

    An antenna comprising a phased array of quadrifilar helix or other multifilar antenna elements and a time-delaying feed network adapted to feed the elements. The feed network can employ a plurality of coaxial cables that physically bridge a microstrip feed circuitry to feed power signals to the elements. The cables provide an incremental time delay which is related to their physical lengths, such that replacing cables having a first set of lengths with cables having a second set of lengths functions to change the time delay and shift or steer the antenna's main beam. Alternatively, the coaxial cables may be replaced with a programmable signal processor unit adapted to introduce the time delay using signal processing techniques applied to the power signals.

  13. Optimal design and efficiency of two-phase case-control studies with error-prone and error-free exposure measures.

    PubMed

    McNamee, R

    2005-10-01

    This paper addresses optimal design and efficiency of two-phase (2P) case-control studies in which the first phase uses an error-prone exposure measure, Z, while the second phase measures true, dichotomous exposure, X, in a subset of subjects. Optimal design of a separate second phase, to be added to a preexisting study, is also investigated. Differential misclassification is assumed throughout. Results are also applicable to 2P cohort studies with error-prone and error-free measures of disease status but error-free exposure measures. While software based on the mean score method of Reilly and Pepe (1995, Biometrika 82, 299--314) can find optimal designs given pilot data, the lack of simple formulae makes it difficult to generalize about efficiency compared to one-phase (1P) studies based on X alone. Here, formulae for the optimal ratios of cases to controls and first- to second-phase sizes, and the optimal second-phase stratified sampling fractions, given a fixed budget, are given. The maximum efficiency of 2P designs compared to a 1P design is deduced and is shown to be bounded from above by a function of the sensitivities and specificities of Z. The efficiency of 'balanced' separate second-phase designs (Breslow and Cain, 1988, Biometrika 75, 11--20)-in which equal numbers of subjects are chosen from each first-phase strata-compared to optimal design is deduced, enabling situations where balanced designs are nearly optimal to be identified.

  14. Analysis of counting errors in the phase/Doppler particle analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, John R.

    1987-01-01

    NASA is investigating the application of the Phase Doppler measurement technique to provide improved drop sizing and liquid water content measurements in icing research. The magnitude of counting errors were analyzed because these errors contribute to inaccurate liquid water content measurements. The Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer counting errors due to data transfer losses and coincidence losses were analyzed for data input rates from 10 samples/sec to 70,000 samples/sec. Coincidence losses were calculated by determining the Poisson probability of having more than one event occurring during the droplet signal time. The magnitude of the coincidence loss can be determined, and for less than a 15 percent loss, corrections can be made. The data transfer losses were estimated for representative data transfer rates. With direct memory access enabled, data transfer losses are less than 5 percent for input rates below 2000 samples/sec. With direct memory access disabled losses exceeded 20 percent at a rate of 50 samples/sec preventing accurate number density or mass flux measurements. The data transfer losses of a new signal processor were analyzed and found to be less than 1 percent for rates under 65,000 samples/sec.

  15. Effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation for a focused laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kunwar Pal; Arya, Rashmi; Malik, Anil K.

    2015-09-14

    We have investigated the effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation to study electron acceleration by a focused laser pulse in vacuum using a three dimensional test-particle simulation code. The error is obtained by comparing the energy of the electron for paraxial approximation and seventh-order correction description of the fields of Gaussian laser. The paraxial approximation predicts wrong laser divergence and wrong electron escape time from the pulse which leads to prediction of higher energy. The error shows strong phase dependence for the electrons lying along the axis of the laser for linearly polarized laser pulse. The relative error may be significant for some specific values of initial phase even at moderate values of laser spot sizes. The error does not show initial phase dependence for a circularly laser pulse.

  16. Electromagnetic modeling of beam position and phase monitors for SNS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2000-11-01

    Electromagnetic modeling of the beam position monitors (BPMs) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac has been performed with MAFIA. The signal amplitudes and phases on the BPM electrodes are computed as functions of the beam transverse position using time-domain 3-D simulations with an ultra-relativistic beam. An analytical model is then applied to extrapolate the results to lower beam velocities. It is shown that while the signal phases on the individual electrodes for an off-axis beam can differ from those for a centered beam by a few degrees, the phase of the summed signal from all electrodes is insensitive to the beam transverse position inside the device. Based on the analysis results, an optimal BPM design with 4 one-end-shorted 60-degree electrodes has been chosen. It provides a very good linearity and sufficient signal power for both position and phase measurements, while satisfying the linac geometrical constrains and mechanical requirements.

  17. SITE project. Phase 1: Continuous data bit-error-rate testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) Project at NASA LeRC encompasses a number of research and technology areas of satellite communications systems. Phase 1 of this project established a complete satellite link simulator system. The evaluation of proof-of-concept microwave devices, radiofrequency (RF) and bit-error-rate (BER) testing of hardware, testing of remote airlinks, and other tests were performed as part of this first testing phase. This final report covers the test results produced in phase 1 of the SITE Project. The data presented include 20-GHz high-power-amplifier testing, 30-GHz low-noise-receiver testing, amplitude equalization, transponder baseline testing, switch matrix tests, and continuous-wave and modulated interference tests. The report also presents the methods used to measure the RF and BER performance of the complete system. Correlations of the RF and BER data are summarized to note the effects of the RF responses on the BER.

  18. Using Lambert W function and error function to model phase change on microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez Garcia, Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Solidification and melting modeling on microfluidics are solved using Lambert W's function and error's functions. Models are formulated using the heat's diffusion equation. The generic posed case is the melting of a slab with time dependent surface temperature, having a micro or nano-fluid liquid phase. At the beginning the solid slab is at melting temperature. A slab's face is put and maintained at temperature greater than the melting limit and varying in time. Lambert W function and error function are applied via Maple to obtain the analytic solution evolution of the front of microfluidic-solid interface, it is analytically computed and slab's corresponding melting time is determined. It is expected to have analytical results to be useful for food engineering, cooking engineering, pharmaceutical engineering, nano-engineering and bio-medical engineering.

  19. Using a short-pulse diffraction-limited laser beam to probe filamentation of a random phase plate smoothed beam.

    PubMed

    Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Flippo, K A; Johnson, R P; Rose, H A; Shimada, T; Williams, E A

    2008-10-01

    A short pulse (few picoseconds) laser probe provides high temporal resolution measurements to elucidate details of fast dynamic phenomena not observable with typical longer laser pulse probes and gated diagnostics. Such a short pulse laser probe (SPLP) has been used to measure filamentation of a random phase plate (RPP) smoothed laser beam in a gas-jet plasma. The plasma index of refraction due to driven density and temperature fluctuations by the RPP beam perturbs the phase front of a SPLP propagating at a 90 degree angle with respect to the RPP interaction beam. The density and temperature fluctuations are quasistatic on the time scale of the SPLP (approximately 2 ps). The transmitted near-field intensity distribution from the SPLP provides a measure of the phase front perturbation. At low plasma densities, the transmitted intensity pattern is asymmetric with striations across the entire probe beam in the direction of the RPP smoothed beam. As the plasma density increases, the striations break up into smaller sizes along the direction of the RPP beam propagation. The breakup of the intensity pattern is consistent with self-focusing of the RPP smoothed interaction beam. Simulations of the experiment using the wave propagation code, PF3D, are in qualitative agreement demonstrating that the asymmetric striations can be attributed to the RPP driven density fluctuations. Quantification of the beam breakup measured by the transmitted SPLP could lead to a new method for measuring self-focusing of lasers in underdense plasmas.

  20. Experimental study of the phase-shift miscalibration error in phase-shifting interferometry: use of a spectrally resolved white-light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Sanjit K; Kothiyal, Mahendra P

    2007-08-01

    The white-light interferogram in a spectrally resolved white-light interferometer is decomposed in its constituent spectral components by a spectrometer and displayed along its chromaticity axis. A piezoelectric transducer phase shifter in such an interferometer can give a desired phase shift of pi/2 only at one wavelength. The phase shift varies continuously at all other wavelengths along the chromaticity axis. This situation is ideal for an experimental study of the phase error due to the phase-shift error in the phase-shifting technique, as it will be shown in this paper.

  1. Creating Ruddlesden-Popper phases by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haislmaier, Ryan C.; Stone, Greg; Alem, Nasim; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis of a 50 unit cell thick n = 4 Srn+1TinO3n+1 (Sr5Ti4O13) Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phase film is demonstrated by sequentially depositing SrO and TiO2 layers in an alternating fashion using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), where Ti was supplied using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). A detailed calibration procedure is outlined for determining the shuttering times to deposit SrO and TiO2 layers with precise monolayer doses using in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as feedback. Using optimized Sr and TTIP shuttering times, a fully automated growth of the n = 4 RP phase was carried out over a period of >4.5 h. Very stable RHEED intensity oscillations were observed over the entire growth period. The structural characterization by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that a constant periodicity of four SrTiO3 perovskite unit cell blocks separating the double SrO rocksalt layer was maintained throughout the entire film thickness with a very little amount of planar faults oriented perpendicular to the growth front direction. These results illustrate that hybrid MBE is capable of layer-by-layer growth with atomic level precision and excellent flux stability.

  2. Positioning Errors of Pencil-beam Interferometers for Long TraceProfilers

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2006-07-12

    We analyze the random noise and the systematic errors of the positioning of the interference patterns in the long trace profilers (LTP). The analysis, based on linear regression methods, allows the estimation of the contributions to the positioning error of a number of effects, including non-uniformity of the detector photo-response and pixel pitch, read-out and dark signal noise, ADC resolution, as well as signal shot noise. The dependence of the contributions on pixel size and on total number of pixels involved in positioning is derived analytically. The analysis, when applied to the LTP II available at the ALS optical metrology laboratory, has shown that the main source for the random positioning error of the interference pattern is the read-out noise estimated to be {approx}0.2 rad. The photo-diode-array photo-response and pixel pitch non-uniformity determine the magnitude of the systematic positioning error and are found to be {approx}0.3 rad for each of the effects. Recommendations for an optimal fitting strategy, detector selection and calibration are provided. Following these recommendations will allow the reduction of the error of LTP interference pattern positioning to a level adequate for the slope measurement with 0.1-rad accuracy.

  3. Design, performance, and calculated error of a Faraday cup for absolute beam current measurements of 600-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    A mobile self-contained Faraday cup system for beam current measurments of nominal 600 MeV protons was designed, constructed, and used at the NASA Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. The cup is of reentrant design with a length of 106.7 cm and an outside diameter of 20.32 cm. The inner diameter is 15.24 cm and the base thickness is 30.48 cm. The primary absorber is commercially available lead hermetically sealed in a 0.32-cm-thick copper jacket. Several possible systematic errors in using the cup are evaluated. The largest source of error arises from high-energy electrons which are ejected from the entrance window and enter the cup. A total systematic error of -0.83 percent is calculated to be the decrease from the true current value. From data obtained in calibrating helium-filled ion chambers with the Faraday cup, the mean energy required to produce one ion pair in helium is found to be 30.76 + or - 0.95 eV for nominal 600 MeV protons. This value agrees well, within experimental error, with reported values of 29.9 eV and 30.2 eV.

  4. Combining the switched-beam and beam-steering capabilities in a 2-D phased array antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yi-Che; Chen, Yin-Bing; Hwang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development, fabrication, and measurement of a novel beam-forming system consisting of 16 subarray antennas, each containing four aperture-coupled patch antennas, and the application of this system in smart wireless communication systems. The beam patterns of each of the subarray antennas can be switched toward one of nine zones over a half space by adjusting the specific phase delay angles among the four antenna elements. Furthermore, when all subarrays are pointed at the same zone, slightly continuous beam steering in around 1° increments can be achieved by dynamically altering the progressive phase delay angle among the subarrays. Phase angle calibration was implemented by coupling each transmitter output and down converter into the in-phase/quadrature baseband to calculate the correction factor to the weight. In addition, to validate the proposed concepts and the fabricated 2-D phased array antenna system, this study measured the far-field radiation patterns of the aperture-coupled patch array integrated with feeding networks and a phase-calibration system to carefully verify its spatially switched-beam and beam-steering characteristics at a center frequency of 2.4 GHz which can cover the industrial, scientific, and medical band and some long-term evolution applications. In addition, measured results were compared with calculated results, and agreement between them was observed.

  5. Impacts of double-ended beam-pointing error on system performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horkin, Phil R.

    2000-05-01

    Optical Intersatellite links have been investigated for many years, but to date have enjoyed few spaceborne applications. The literature is rich in articles describing system issues such as jitter and pointing effects, but this author believes that simplifications generally made lead to significant errors. Simplifications made, for example, due to the complexity of joint distribution functions are easily overcome with widely available computer tools. Satellite- based data transport systems must offer similar Quality of Service (QoS) parameters as fiber-based transport. The movement to packet-based protocols adds additional constraints not often considered in past papers. BER may no longer be the dominant concern; packet loss, misdelivery, or severely corrupted packets can easily dominate the error budgets. The aggregation of static and dynamic pointing errors on both ends of such a link dramatically reduces the QoS. The approach described in this paper provides the terminal designer the methodology to analytically balance the impacts of these error sources against implementation solutions.

  6. Relative position determination of a lunar rover using the biased differential phase delay of same-beam VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Qinghui; Wu, Yajun; Zhao, Rongbing; Dai, Zhiqiang

    2011-12-01

    When only data transmission signals with a bandwidth of 1 MHz exist in the rover, the position can be obtained using the differential group delay data of the same-beam very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). The relative position between a lunar rover and a lander can be determined with an error of several hundreds of meters. When the guidance information of the rover is used to determine relative position, the rover's wheel skid behavior and integral movement may influence the accuracy of the determined position. This paper proposes a new method for accurately determining relative position. The differential group delay and biased differential phase delay are obtained from the same-beam VLBI observation, while the modified biased differential phase delay is obtained using the statistic mean value of the differential group delay and the biased phase delay as basis. The small bias in the modified biased phase delay is estimated together with other parameters when the relative position of the rover is calculated. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed using the same-beam VLBI observation data of SELENE. The radio sources onboard the rover and the lander are designed for same-beam VLBI observations. The results of the simulations of the differential delay of the same-beam VLBI observation between the rover and the lander show that the differential delay is sensitive to relative position. An approach to solving the relative position and a strategy for tracking are also introduced. When the lunar topography data near the rover are used and the observations are scheduled properly, the determined relative position of the rover may be nearly as accurate as that solved using differential phase delay data.

  7. Arbitrary polarized beams generated and detected by one phase-only LC-SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Qi, Junli; Wang, Weihua; Chen, Yu; Gu, Guohua; Chu, Delin; Zhang, Qianghua; Deng, Haifei; Zhao, Sugui; Han, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfei

    2014-09-01

    Arbitrary polarized beams, including homogeneously polarized beams and cylindrical vector beams, have been generated by an experimental setup with one phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator, and a four-path method was demonstrated to measure the polarization degree of detected beams. Besides, another method was proposed to measure the polarization directions of cylindrical vector beams. The polarized states can be calculated by controlling the spatial light modulator and optical intensity obtained from a CCD. The generation setup and detection methods have simple structure and low cost, and they are available for multi wavelength input beams, and the detection methods can realize real-time and on-line measurement.

  8. Age estimation in forensic anthropology: quantification of observer error in phase versus component-based methods.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Natalie R; Ramirez Montes, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess observer error in phase versus component-based scoring systems used to develop age estimation methods in forensic anthropology. A method preferred by forensic anthropologists in the AAFS was selected for this evaluation (the Suchey-Brooks method for the pubic symphysis). The Suchey-Brooks descriptions were used to develop a corresponding component-based scoring system for comparison. Several commonly used reliability statistics (kappa, weighted kappa, and the intraclass correlation coefficient) were calculated to assess observer agreement between two observers and to evaluate the efficacy of each of these statistics for this study. The linear weighted kappa was determined to be the most suitable measure of observer agreement. The results show that a component-based system offers the possibility for more objective scoring than a phase system as long as the coding possibilities for each trait do not exceed three states of expression, each with as little overlap as possible.

  9. Simultaneous optical image compression and encryption using error-reduction phase retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Zhengjun; Liu, Shutian

    2015-12-01

    We report a simultaneous image compression and encryption scheme based on solving a typical optical inverse problem. The secret images to be processed are multiplexed as the input intensities of a cascaded diffractive optical system. At the output plane, a compressed complex-valued data with a lot fewer measurements can be obtained by utilizing error-reduction phase retrieval algorithm. The magnitude of the output image can serve as the final ciphertext while its phase serves as the decryption key. Therefore the compression and encryption are simultaneously completed without additional encoding and filtering operations. The proposed strategy can be straightforwardly applied to the existing optical security systems that involve diffraction and interference. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the validity and security of the proposal.

  10. On detector linearity and precision of beam shift detection for quantitative differential phase contrast applications.

    PubMed

    Zweck, Josef; Schwarzhuber, Felix; Wild, Johannes; Galioit, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Differential phase contrast is a STEM imaging mode where minute sideways deflections of the electron probe are monitored, usually by using a position sensitive device (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Lohr et al., 2012 [2]) or, alternatively in some cases, a fast camera (Müller et al., 2012 [3,4]; Yang et al., 2015 [5]; Pennycook et al., 2015 [6]) as a pixelated detector. While traditionally differential phase contrast electron microscopy was mainly focused on investigations of micro-magnetic domain structures and their specific features, such as domain wall widths, etc. (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Chapman et al., 1978, 1981, 1985 [7-9]; Sannomiya et al., 2004 [10]), its usage has recently been extended to mesoscopic (Lohr et al., 2012, 2016 [2,12]; Bauer et al., 2014 [11]; Shibata et al., 2015 [13]) and nano-scale electric fields (Shibata et al., 2012 [14]; Mueller et al., 2014 [15]). In this paper, the various interactions which can cause a beam deflection are reviewed and expanded by two so far undiscussed mechanisms which may be important for biological applications. As differential phase contrast microscopy strongly depends on the ability to detect minute beam deflections we first treat the linearity problem for an annular four quadrant detector and then determine the factors which limit the minimum measurable deflection angle, such as S/N ratio, current density, dwell time and detector geometry. Knowing these factors enables the experimenter to optimize the set-up for optimum performance of the microscope and to get a clear figure for the achievable field resolution error margins.

  11. Quantification and Assessment of Interfraction Setup Errors Based on Cone Beam CT and Determination of Safety Margins for Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos Mesías, Macarena; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Thoelking, Johannes; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Wertz, Hansjoerg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To quantify interfraction patient setup-errors for radiotherapy based on cone-beam computed tomography and suggest safety margins accordingly. Material and Methods Positioning vectors of pre-treatment cone-beam computed tomography for different treatment sites were collected (n = 9504). For each patient group the total average and standard deviation were calculated and the overall mean, systematic and random errors as well as safety margins were determined. Results The systematic (and random errors) in the superior-inferior, left-right and anterior-posterior directions were: for prostate, 2.5(3.0), 2.6(3.9) and 2.9(3.9)mm; for prostate bed, 1.7(2.0), 2.2(3.6) and 2.6(3.1)mm; for cervix, 2.8(3.4), 2.3(4.6) and 3.2(3.9)mm; for rectum, 1.6(3.1), 2.1(2.9) and 2.5(3.8)mm; for anal, 1.7(3.7), 2.1(5.1) and 2.5(4.8)mm; for head and neck, 1.9(2.3), 1.4(2.0) and 1.7(2.2)mm; for brain, 1.0(1.5), 1.1(1.4) and 1.0(1.1)mm; and for mediastinum, 3.3(4.6), 2.6(3.7) and 3.5(4.0)mm. The CTV-to-PTV margins had the smallest value for brain (3.6, 3.7 and 3.3mm) and the largest for mediastinum (11.5, 9.1 and 11.6mm). For pelvic treatments the means (and standard deviations) were 7.3 (1.6), 8.5 (0.8) and 9.6 (0.8)mm. Conclusions Systematic and random setup-errors were smaller than 5mm. The largest errors were found for organs with higher motion probability. The suggested safety margins were comparable to published values in previous but often smaller studies. PMID:26930196

  12. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Cuprate Superconductors and Related Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlom, Darrell Galen

    The discovery of a class of new layered crystalline materials which exhibit superconductivity at unprecedented temperatures has opened new possibilities for the future of electronic devices and for molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) as a potential method to grow device structures containing these materials. The low growth temperature and atomic layering capability that MBE has demonstrated for the growth of semiconductors suggests that the MBE growth of non-equilibrium layered structures and metastable phases within oxide systems encompassing the high transition temperature (T _{rm c}) superconductors might be possible. If available, such a growth technique would be useful not only for device fabrication, but would offer an unparalleled technique to fabricate metastable superlattice mixtures to test high T_{ rm c} theories, which might then allow the growth of even higher temperature superconducting compounds. In contrast to the simplicity of the materials systems to which MBE has been successfully applied, the growth of fully oxidized, multi-element compounds by MBE involves significant challenges. This thesis describes research to develop in situ growth techniques allowing the growth of layered superconducting cuprates and related phases by MBE, and characterization of grown films. The conditions necessary to achieve this in situ ability, including the use of highly oxidizing species in order to maintain a long mean free path necessary for MBE, appropriate substrate temperature, precise composition control, and suitable substrates are discussed. The MBE apparatus used and design improvements made during the course of this research are described. The experimental results of films grown in the Dy-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O systems demonstrate the ability of this shuttered, layer-by-layer MBE technique to grow smooth, layered, metastable compounds, including ordered superlattices, in situ using ozone. Both cross -sectional TEM images and a comparison of the observed x -ray

  13. Error-compensating phase-shifting algorithm for surface shape measurement of transparent plate using wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yangjin; Hibino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2016-11-01

    When measuring the surface shape of a transparent sample using wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometry, the calculated phase is critically determined by not only phase-shift errors, but also by coupling errors between higher harmonics and phase-shift errors. This paper presents the derivation of a 13-sample phase-shifting algorithm that can compensate for miscalibration and first-order nonlinearity of phase shift, coupling errors, and bias modulation of the intensity, and has strong suppression of the second reflective harmonic effect. The characteristics of the 13-sample algorithm are estimated with respect to Fourier representation in the frequency domain. The phase error of measurement performed using the 13-sample algorithm is discussed and compared with those of measurements obtained using other conventional phase-shifting algorithms. Finally, the surface shape of a fused silica wedge plate obtained using a wavelength tuning Fizeau interferometer and the 13-sample algorithm are presented. The experimental results indicate that the surface shape measurement accuracy for a transparent fused silica plate is 3 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is discussed by comparing the amplitudes of the crosstalk noise calculated using other conventional algorithms.

  14. Periodic inversion and phase transition of finite energy Airy beams in a medium with parabolic potential.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R; Zhang, Lei; Zhong, Weiping; Zhu, Dayu; Wang, Ruimin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-04-20

    We study periodic inversion and phase transition of normal, displaced, and chirped finite energy Airy beams propagating in a parabolic potential. This propagation leads to an unusual oscillation: for half of the oscillation period the Airy beam accelerates in one transverse direction, with the main Airy beam lobe leading the train of pulses, whereas in the other half of the period it accelerates in the opposite direction, with the main lobe still leading - but now the whole beam is inverted. The inversion happens at a critical point, at which the beam profile changes from an Airy profile to a Gaussian one. Thus, there are two distinct phases in the propagation of an Airy beam in the parabolic potential - the normal Airy and the single-peak Gaussian phase. The length of the single-peak phase is determined by the size of the decay parameter: the smaller the decay, the smaller the length. A linear chirp introduces a transverse displacement of the beam at the phase transition point, but does not change the location of the point. A quadratic chirp moves the phase transition point, but does not affect the beam profile. The two-dimensional case is discussed briefly, being equivalent to a product of two one-dimensional cases.

  15. Analysis and reduction of errors caused by Poisson noise for phase diversity technique.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongli; Yang, Chengliang; Xu, Zihao; Zhang, Peiguang; Xu, Huanyu; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Xuan, Li

    2016-09-19

    An effective method for reducing the sensitivity of phase diversity (PD) technique to Poisson noise is proposed. The denoising algorithm based on blocking-matching and 3D filtering is first introduced in the wavefront sensing field as a preprocessing stage. Then, the PD technique is applied to the denoised images. Results of the numerical simulations and experiments demonstrate that our approach is better than the traditional PD technique in terms of both the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of phase estimates and the structural similarity index metrics (SSIM). The RMSEs of phase estimates on synthetic data are decreased by approximately 40% across noise levels within the range of 58.7-18.8 dB in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). Meanwhile, the overall decline range of SSIM is significantly decreased from 49% to 9%. The experiment and simulation results are in good agreement. The approach may be widely used in various domains, such as the measurements of intrinsic aberrations in optical systems and compensations for atmospheric turbulence. PMID:27661938

  16. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  17. Propagation of a radial phased-locked Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2011-11-21

    A radial phased-locked (PL) Lorentz beam array provides an appropriate theoretical model to describe a coherent diode laser array, which is an efficient radiation source for high-power beaming use. The propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and some mathematical techniques, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a radial PL Lorentz beam array are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are numerically calculated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are discussed in detail.

  18. Evolution of phase singularities of vortex beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao-Lu; Wang, Ben-Yi; Guo, Cheng-Shan

    2015-05-01

    Optical vortex beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence are studied by numerical modeling, and the phase singularities of the vortices existing in the turbulence-distorted beams are calculated. It is found that the algebraic sum of topological charges (TCs) of all the phase singularities existing in test aperture is approximately equal to the TC of the input vortex beam. This property provides us a possible approach for determining the TC of the vortex beam propagating through the atmospheric turbulence, which could have potential application in optical communication using optical vortices.

  19. Complex phase error and motion estimation in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, M.; Yang, H.

    1991-06-01

    Attention is given to a SAR wave equation-based system model that accurately represents the interaction of the impinging radar signal with the target to be imaged. The model is used to estimate the complex phase error across the synthesized aperture from the measured corrupted SAR data by combining the two wave equation models governing the collected SAR data at two temporal frequencies of the radar signal. The SAR system model shows that the motion of an object in a static scene results in coupled Doppler shifts in both the temporal frequency domain and the spatial frequency domain of the synthetic aperture. The velocity of the moving object is estimated through these two Doppler shifts. It is shown that once the dynamic target's velocity is known, its reconstruction can be formulated via a squint-mode SAR geometry with parameters that depend upon the dynamic target's velocity.

  20. Hermite-Gaussian beams with self-forming spiral phase distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchik, Alexander A.; Muzychenko, Yana B.

    2014-05-01

    Spiral laser beams is a family of laser beams that preserve the structural stability up to scale and rotate with the propagation. Properties of spiral beams are of practical interest for laser technology, medicine and biotechnology. Researchers use a spiral beams for movement and manipulation of microparticles. Spiral beams have a complicated phase distribution in cross section. This paper describes the results of analytical and computer simulation of Hermite-Gaussian beams with self-forming spiral phase distribution. In the simulation used a laser beam consisting of the sum of the two modes HG TEMnm and TEMn1m1. The coefficients n1, n, m1, m were varied. Additional phase depending from the coefficients n, m, m1, n1 imposed on the resulting beam. As a result, formed the Hermite Gaussian beam phase distribution which takes the form of a spiral in the process of distribution. For modeling was used VirtualLab 5.0 (manufacturer LightTrans GmbH).

  1. Controlling the optical fiber output beam profile by focused ion beam machining of a phase hologram on fiber tip.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiho; Sparkes, Martin; O'Neill, William

    2015-02-01

    A phase hologram was machined on an optical fiber tip using a focused ion beam (FIB) system so that a ring-shaped beam emerges from the fiber tip. The fiber used for this work was a commercial single-mode optical fiber patch cable for a design wavelength of 633 nm with a germanosilicate core. The ring-shaped beam was chosen to ensure a simple geometry in the required phase hologram, though the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm can be used to calculate a hologram for an arbitrary beam shape. The FIB machining took approximately 45 min at 30 kV and 200 pA. The radius of the resulting ring beam was 0.083 m at 1 m standoff, as compared to 0.1 m as was initially desired. Results suggest that this imaging technique may provide a basis for a beam-shaping method with several advantages over the current commercial solutions, having permanent alignment, compactness, and mechanical robustness. However, it would appear that minimizing the speckle pattern will remain a critical challenge for this technique to become widely implemented.

  2. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.

    1994-01-01

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

  3. Amplitude and phase beam characterization using a two-dimensional wavefront sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Warren, M.E.

    1996-09-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor that uses binary optic lenslet arrays to directly measure the wavefront slope (phase gradient) and amplitude of the laser beam. This sensor uses an array of lenslets that dissects the beam into a number of samples. The focal spot location of each of these lenslets (measured by a CCD camera) is related to the incoming wavefront slope over the lenslet. By integrating these measurements over the laser aperture, the wavefront or phase distribution can be determined. Since the power focused by each lenslet is also easily determined, this allows a complete measurement of the intensity and phase distribution of the laser beam. Furthermore, all the information is obtained in a single measurement. Knowing the complete scalar field of the beam allows the detailed prediction of the actual beam`s characteristics along its propagation path. In particular, the space- beamwidth product M{sup 2}, can be obtained in a single measurement. The intensity and phase information can be used in concert with information about other elements in the optical train to predict the beam size, shape, phase and other characteristics anywhere in the optical train. We present preliminary measurements of an Ar{sup +} laser beam and associated M{sup 2} calculations.

  4. The conversion of phase structure of singular beams spreading in uniaxial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolenko, B.; Poletaev, D.; Rubass, A.; Volyar, A.

    2016-08-01

    The transformation of the intensity and phase of paraxial optical beams passed uniaxial crystal strictly orthogonal to the optical axis is analysed. Imbedded optical vortex in such case imputes structural disturbance to the phase and intensity distribution after anisotropic media. Considering Left and Right circular polarized components of light, we theoretically and numerically shown the dynamics of phase shaping within the rotating birefringent crystal due to anisotropic diffraction effect. Off-axial vortex experienced tangential shift at the beam component and stimulates appearance of topological pairs in vicinity of beam axis.

  5. Longitudinal phase-space coating of beam in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, I report on a novel scheme for beam stacking without any beam emittance dilution using a barrier rf system in synchrotrons. The general principle of the scheme called longitudinal phase-space coating, validation of the concept via multi-particle beam dynamics simulations applied to the Fermilab Recycler, and its experimental demonstration are presented. In addition, it has been shown and illustrated that the rf gymnastics involved in this scheme can be used in measuring the incoherent synchrotron tune spectrum of the beam in barrier buckets and in producing a clean hollow beam in longitudinal phase space. The method of beam stacking in synchrotrons presented here is the first of its kind.

  6. Nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam models and measurement models for phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Gang, Tie

    2009-01-01

    A nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model is proposed in order to overcome the limitation that paraxial Gaussian beam models lose accuracy in simulating the beam steering behavior of phased array transducers. Using this nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model, the focusing and steering sound fields generated by an ultrasonic linear phased array transducer are calculated and compared with the corresponding results obtained by paraxial multi-Gaussian beam model and more exact Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral model. In addition, with help of this novel nonparaxial method, an ultrasonic measurement model is provided to investigate the sensitivity of linear phased array transducers versus steering angles. Also the comparisons of model predictions with experimental results are presented to certify the accuracy of this provided measurement model.

  7. Phasing surface emitting diode laser outputs into a coherent laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.

    2006-10-10

    A system for generating a powerful laser beam includes a first laser element and at least one additional laser element having a rear laser mirror, an output mirror that is 100% reflective at normal incidence and <5% reflective at an input beam angle, and laser material between the rear laser mirror and the output mirror. The system includes an injector, a reference laser beam source, an amplifier and phase conjugater, and a combiner.

  8. Phase Space Tomography: A Simple, Portable and Accurate Technique to Map Phase Spaces of Beams with Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Kishek, R. A.; Bernal, S.; Walter, M.; Haber, I.; Fiorito, R.; Thangaraj, J. C. T.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; O'Shea, P. G.; Li, H.

    2006-11-27

    In order to understand the charged particle dynamics, e.g. the halo formation, emittance growth, x-y energy transfer and coupling, knowledge of the actual phase space is needed. Other the past decade there is an increasing number of articles who use tomography to map the beam phase space and measure the beam emittance. These studies where performed at high energy facilities where the effect of space charge was neglible and therefore not considered in the analysis. This work extends the tomography technique to beams with space charge. In order to simplify the analysis linear forces where assumed. By carefully modeling the tomography process using the particle-in-cell code WARP we test the validity of our assumptions and the accuracy of the reconstructed phase space. Finally, we report experimental results of phase space mapping at the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) using tomography.

  9. The design and initial testing of a beam phase and energy measurement for LEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J.; Stettler, M.

    1998-12-10

    A diagnostic system being designed to measure the beam phase and beam energy of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) is described and the characterization of the prototype presented. The accelerator, being built at LANL, is a 350 MHz proton linac with a 100 mA beam. In the first beam experiments, the 6.7 MeV RFQ will be characterized. Signals received from an rf cavity probe in the RFQ and capacitive pick-ups along the high-energy beam transport line will be compared in phase in order to calculate the beam phase and energy. The 350 MHz signals from four pick-ups will be converted to 2 MHz in a VXI-based down converter module. A second VXI phase processor module makes two, differential-phase measurements based on its four 2 MHz inputs. The heart of this system is the phase processor module. The phase processor consists of an analog front end (AFE), digital front end (DFE), digital signal processing (DSP) modules and the VXI bus interface. The AFE has an AGC circuit with a >60 dB dynamic range with a few degrees of phase shift. Following the AFE is the DFE which uses an in-phase and quadrature-phase (I and Q) technique to make the phase measurement. The DSP is used to correct the real-time data for phase variations as a function of dynamic range and system offsets. The prototype phase module gives an absolute accuracy of {+-}0.5 degrees with a resolution of <0.1 degrees and a bandwidth of 200 kHz.

  10. The design and initial testing of a beam phase and energy measurement for LEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J.; Stettler, M.

    1998-12-01

    A diagnostic system being designed to measure the beam phase and beam energy of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) is described and the characterization of the prototype presented. The accelerator, being built at LANL, is a 350 MHz proton linac with a 100 mA beam. In the first beam experiments, the 6.7 MeV RFQ will be characterized. Signals received from an rf cavity probe in the RFQ and capacitive pick-ups along the high-energy beam transport line will be compared in phase in order to calculate the beam phase and energy. The 350 MHz signals from four pick-ups will be converted to 2 MHz in a VXI-based down converter module. A second VXI phase processor module makes two, differential-phase measurements based on its four 2 MHz inputs. The heart of this system is the phase processor module. The phase processor consists of an analog front end (AFE), digital front end (DFE), digital signal processing (DSP) modules and the VXI bus interface. The AFE has an AGC circuit with a {gt}60 dB dynamic range with a few degrees of phase shift. Following the AFE is the DFE which uses an in-phase and quadrature-phase (I and Q) technique to make the phase measurement. The DSP is used to correct the real-time data for phase variations as a function of dynamic range and system offsets. The prototype phase module gives an absolute accuracy of {plus_minus}0.5 degrees with a resolution of {lt}0.1 degrees and a bandwidth of 200 kHz. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Optical simulation of laser beam phase-shaping focusing optimization in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ricardo; Vieira, Pedro; Coelho, João. M. P.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we report the development of an optical simulator that can be used in the development of methodologies for compensate/decrease the light scattering effect of most biological tissues through phase-shaping methods. In fact, scattering has long been a major limitation for the medical applications of lasers where in-depth tissues concerns due to the turbid nature of most biological media in the human body. In developing the simulator, two different approaches were followed: one using multiple identical beams directed to the same target area and the other using a phase-shaped beam. In the multiple identical beams approach (used mainly to illustrate the limiting effect of scattering on the beam's propagation) there was no improvement in the beam focus at 1 mm compared to a single beam layout but, in phase-shaped beam approach, a 8x improvement on the radius of the beam at the same depth was achieved. The models were created using the optical design software Zemax and numerical algorithms created in Matlab programming language to shape the beam wavefront. A dedicated toolbox allowed communication between both programs. The use of the two software's proves to be a simple and powerful solution combining the best of the two and allowing a significant potential for adapting the simulations to new systems and thus allow to assess their response and define critical engineering parameters prior to laboratorial implementation.

  12. Transverse-transverse and transverse-longitudinal phase-space converters for enhanced beam applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.-J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    Emittance exchange and flat beam transform are two phase-space converting techniques being developed recently to enhance the performance of electron beams for various applications. We review these applications, the basic principles of the converters, and the status of experimental demonstration of these techniques.

  13. Developing an Error Model for Ionospheric Phase Distortions in L-Band SAR and InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Agram, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the recent and upcoming spaceborne SAR systems are operating in the L-band frequency range. The choice of L-band has a number of advantages especially for InSAR applications. These include deeper penetration into vegetation, higher coherence, and higher sensitivity to soil moisture. While L-band SARs are undoubtedly beneficial for a number of earth science disciplines, their signals are susceptive to path delay effects in the ionosphere. Many recent publications indicate that the ionosphere can have detrimental effects on InSAR coherence and phase. It has also been shown that the magnitude of these effects strongly depends on the time of day and geographic location of the image acquisition as well as on the coincident solar activity. Hence, in order to provide realistic error estimates for geodetic measurements derived from L-band InSAR, an error model needs to be developed that is capable of describing ionospheric noise. With this paper, we present a global ionospheric error model that is currently being developed in support of NASA's future L-band SAR mission NISAR. The system is based on a combination of empirical data analysis and modeling input from the ionospheric model WBMOD, and is capable of predicting ionosphere-induced phase noise as a function of space and time. The error model parameterizes ionospheric noise using a power spectrum model and provides the parameters of this model in a global 1x1 degree raster. From the power law model, ionospheric errors in deformation estimates can be calculated. In Polar Regions, our error model relies on a statistical analysis of ionospheric-phase noise in a large number of SAR data from previous L-band SAR missions such as ALOS PALSAR and JERS-1. The focus on empirical analyses is due to limitations of WBMOD in high latitude areas. Outside of the Polar Regions, the ionospheric model WBMOD is used to derive ionospheric structure parameters for as a function of solar activity. The structure parameters are

  14. Novel method for converting digital Fresnel hologram to phase-only hologram based on bidirectional error diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, T-C

    2013-10-01

    We report a novel and fast method for converting a digital, complex Fresnel hologram into a phase-only hologram. Briefly, the pixels in the complex hologram are scanned sequentially in a row by row manner. The odd and even rows are scanned from opposite directions, constituting to a bidirectional error diffusion process. The magnitude of each visited pixel is forced to be a constant value, while preserving the exact phase value. The resulting error is diffused to the neighboring pixels that have not been visited before. The resulting novel phase-only hologram is called the bidirectional error diffusion (BERD) hologram. The reconstructed image from the BERD hologram exhibits high fidelity as compared with those obtained with the original complex hologram.

  15. Effects of Random Circuit Fabrication Errors on Small Signal Gain and on Output Phase In a Traveling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittersdorf, I. M.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Chernin, D.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Random fabrication errors may have detrimental effects on the performance of traveling-wave tubes (TWTs) of all types. A new scaling law for the modification in the average small signal gain and in the output phase is derived from the third order ordinary differential equation that governs the forward wave interaction in a TWT in the presence of random error that is distributed along the axis of the tube. Analytical results compare favorably with numerical results, in both gain and phase modifications as a result of random error in the phase velocity of the slow wave circuit. Results on the effect of the reverse-propagating circuit mode will be reported. This work supported by AFOSR, ONR, L-3 Communications Electron Devices, and Northrop Grumman Corporation.

  16. Experimental study of phase locking of fiber collimators using internal beam-tail interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, Leonid A.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Weyrauch, Thomas; Carhart, Gary; Lachinova, Svetlana L.; Liu, Jiang

    2011-02-01

    Experimental study of internal phase locking of a seven fiber collimator array is presented. As a metric for the feedback loop the periphery areas (tails) of beams outgoing from three adjacent fiber tips are used before the beams are clipped by the lens apertures. The "intercepted" tails of beams are redirected back into the collimator array forming an interference pattern located between adjacent collimators. Optical energy from one region of the pattern is selected by a pinhole, detected with a photo-diode and used as a metric signal for an SPGD controller to lock the phase of the three adjacent beam tails. The non-common phase difference of the outgoing wavefronts from these three collimators can be manipulated by altering the position of the pinhole in focal plane of the interference pattern and is removed (set to "zero" or 2π increments) by a displacement selected to produce the expected far field interference pattern. To phase lock the beams from seven collimators arranged in a hexagonal array, three pinholes, each of which receives some light from the center collimator are used. A sum of the signals from the three photo-diodes placed behind these pinholes is used to lock the phase of the six periphery beams to the central uncontrolled reference without beam splitters or a remote target-in-theloop metric.

  17. Absorption and phase X-ray imaging using reflected beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, Jan

    2011-05-01

    The X-ray structure imaging of the soft thin biological samples is particularly difficult as they are often attached to the solid carrier, which has much higher absorption of X-rays. The highly absorbing carrier forces the use of higher energies of X-rays decreasing the achievable contrast of the sample structure. The proposed method uses a flat sample carrier (metallic, glass or even plastic) acting as a mirror. The carrier with the sample is irradiated at grazing angle and the X-ray beam is reflected from the interface between the sample and carrier. That way the beam penetrates through the sample only without entering into the carrier. The energy of the X-ray beam can be low (e.g. nanofocus X-ray tube with Cr, Fe or Cu cathode) providing good contrast for soft sample imaging. The beam path in the sample is prolonged giving more chance for absorption in very thin samples. The reflectivity of X-ray depends on the beam properties and on the refractive index of the sample (for a given carrier material). Then, it is possible to make imaging of the refractive index distribution across the sample. Sufficient spatial resolution and good sensitivity can be achieved using nanofocus X-ray tube together with a highly sensitive pixelated detector Timepix. Several experimental results obtained with such a system verifying the principles described above are presented.

  18. Laser beam collimation using a phase conjugate Twyman-Green interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, R. P.; Dokhanian, M.; George, M. C.; Venkateswarlu, Putcha

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an improved technique for testing laser beam collimation using a phase conjugate Twyman-Green interferometer. The technique is useful for measuring laser beam divergence. It is possible using this technique to detect the defocusing of the order of one micrometer for a well corrected collimating lens. A relation is derived for the defocusing that can be detected by the phase conjugate interferometer.

  19. Propagation of the power-exponent-phase vortex beam in paraxial ABCD system.

    PubMed

    Lao, Guanming; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-08-01

    The general analytical formula for the propagation of the power-exponent-phase vortex (PEPV) beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system is derived. On that basis the evolution of the intensity distribution of such a beam in free space and the focusing system is investigated. In addition, some experiments are carried out, which verify the theoretical predictions. Both of the theoretical and experimental results show that the beam's profile can be modulated by the topological charge and the power order of the PEPV beam. PMID:27505774

  20. Continuous Beam Steering From A Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Titus, Charles M.; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  1. Continuous Beam Steering From a Segmented Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Charles M.; Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Bos, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    Optical communications to and from deep space probes will require beams possessing divergence on the order of a microradian, and must be steered with sub-microradian precision. Segmented liquid crystal spatial phase modulators, a type of optical phased array, are considered for this ultra-high resolution beam steering. It is shown here that in an ideal device of this type, there are ultimately no restrictions on the angular resolution. Computer simulations are used to obtain that result, and to analyze the influence of beam truncation and substrate flatness on the performance of this type of device.

  2. Report for simultaneous, multiple independently steered beam study for Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design concepts of an array for the formation of multiple, simultaneous, independently pointed beams for satellite communication links were investigated through tradeoffs of various approaches which were conceived as possible solutions to the problem. After the preferred approach was selected, a more detailed design was configured and is presented as a candidate system that should be given further consideration for development leading to a preliminary design. This array uses an attenuator and a phase shifter with every element. The aperture excitation necessary to form the four beams is calculated and then placed across the array using these devices. Pattern analysis was performed for two beam and four beam cases with numerous patterns being presented. Parameter evaluation shown includes pointing accuracy and beam shape, sidelobe characteristics, gain control, and beam normalization. It was demonstrated that a 4 bit phase shifter and a 6 bit, 30 dB attenuator were sufficient to achieve adequate pattern performances. The phase amplitude steered multibeam array offers the flexibility of 1 to 4 beams with an increase in gain of 6 dB if only one beam is selected.

  3. Spatially varying geometric phase in classically entangled vector beams of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King-Smith, Andrew; Leary, Cody

    We present theoretical results describing a spatially varying geometric (Pancharatnam) phase present in vector modes of light, in which the polarization and transverse spatial mode degrees of freedom exhibit classical entanglement. We propose an experimental setup capable of characterizing this effect, in which a vector mode propagates through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a birefringent phase retarder present in one arm. Since the polarization state of a classically entangled light beam exhibits spatial variation across the transverse mode profile, the phase retarder gives rise to a spatially varying geometric phase in the beam propagating through it. When recombined with the reference beam from the other interferometer arm, the presence of the geometric phase is exhibited in the resulting interference pattern. We acknowledge funding from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement by means of a Cottrell College Science Award.

  4. Biometrics based key management of double random phase encoding scheme using error control codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an optical security system has been proposed in which key of the double random phase encoding technique is linked to the biometrics of the user to make it user specific. The error in recognition due to the biometric variation is corrected by encoding the key using the BCH code. A user specific shuffling key is used to increase the separation between genuine and impostor Hamming distance distribution. This shuffling key is then further secured using the RSA public key encryption to enhance the security of the system. XOR operation is performed between the encoded key and the feature vector obtained from the biometrics. The RSA encoded shuffling key and the data obtained from the XOR operation are stored into a token. The main advantage of the present technique is that the key retrieval is possible only in the simultaneous presence of the token and the biometrics of the user which not only authenticates the presence of the original input but also secures the key of the system. Computational experiments showed the effectiveness of the proposed technique for key retrieval in the decryption process by using the live biometrics of the user.

  5. Fast conversion of digital Fresnel hologram to phase-only hologram based on localized error diffusion and redistribution.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Jiao, A S M; Poon, T-C

    2014-03-10

    Past research has demonstrated that a digital, complex Fresnel hologram can be converted into a phase-only hologram with the use of the bi-direction error diffusion (BERD) algorithm. However, the recursive nature error diffusion process is lengthy and increases monotonically with hologram size. In this paper, we propose a method to overcome this problem. Briefly, each row of a hologram is partitioned into short non-overlapping segments, and a localized error diffusion algorithm is applied to convert the pixels in each segment into phase only values. Subsequently, the error signal is redistributed with low-pass filtering. As the operation on each segment is independent of others, the conversion process can be conducted at high speed with the graphic processing unit. The hologram obtained with the proposed method, known as the Localized Error Diffusion and Redistribution (LERDR) hologram, is over two orders of magnitude faster than that obtained by BERD for a 2048×2048 hologram, exceeding the capability of generating quality phase-only holograms in video rate.

  6. Adaptive optimisation of a generalised phase contrast beam shaping system

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, F.; Choi, F.S.; Glückstad, J.; Booth, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast (GPC) method provides versatile and efficient light shaping for a range of applications. We have implemented a generalised phase contrast system that used two passes on a single spatial light modulator (SLM). Both the pupil phase distribution and the phase contrast filter were generated by the SLM. This provided extra flexibility and control over the parameters of the system including the phase step magnitude, shape, radius and position of the filter. A feedback method for the on-line optimisation of these properties was also developed. Using feedback from images of the generated light field, it was possible to dynamically adjust the phase filter parameters to provide optimum contrast. PMID:26089573

  7. Transformation of phase dislocations under acousto-optic interaction of optical and acoustical Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyi, V. N.; Khilo, P. A.; Kazak, N. S.; Khilo, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    The generation of wavefront phase dislocations of vortex Bessel light beams under acousto-optic (AO) diffraction in uniaxial crystals has been investigated. For the first time the process of AO interaction is studied with participation of Bessel acoustic beams instead of plane waves. A mathematical description of AO interaction is provided, which supposes the satisfaction of two types of phase-matching condition. The acousto-optic processes of transferring optical singularities onto the wavefront of BLBs are investigated and the generation of high-order optical vortices is considered at the interaction of optical and acoustical Bessel beams. The change of Bessel function order or phase dislocation order is explained as a result of the spin–orbital interaction under acousto-optic diffraction of vortex Bessel beams.

  8. The effects of receiver tracking phase error on the performance of the concatenated Reed-Solomon/Viterbi channel coding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results are presented of the effects of receiver tracking phase error, caused by weak signal conditions on either the uplink or the downlink or both, on the performance of the concatenated Reed-Solomon (RS) Viterbi channel coding system. The test results were obtained under an emulated S band uplink and X band downlink, two way space communication channel in the telecommunication development laboratory of JPL with data rates ranging from 4 kHz to 20 kHz. It is shown that, with ideal interleaving, the concatenated RS/Viterbi coding system is capable of yielding large coding gains at very low bit error probabilities over the Viterbi decoded convolutional only coding system. Results on the effects of receiver tracking phase errors on the performance of the concatenated coding system with antenna array combining are included.

  9. Simplex method in problems of light-beam phase control.

    PubMed

    Chesnokov, S S; Davletshina, I V

    1995-12-20

    The possibility of the application of the simplex method to problems of wave-front control for light beams propagating in a nonlinear medium is investigated. A numerical analysis of simplex-method effectiveness in comparison with the gradient procedure of hill climbing is carried out. The regimes of stationary and nonstationary wind refraction are considered. The simplest optimization of the simplex size and the control basis is done. PMID:21068958

  10. Electronically controlled optical beam-steering by an active phased array of metallic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    DeRose, C T; Kekatpure, R D; Trotter, D C; Starbuck, A; Wendt, J R; Yaacobi, A; Watts, M R; Chettiar, U; Engheta, N; Davids, P S

    2013-02-25

    An optical phased array of nanoantenna fabricated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process is presented. The optical phased array is fed by low loss silicon waveguides with integrated ohmic thermo-optic phase shifters capable of 2π phase shift with ∼ 15 mW of applied electrical power. By controlling the electrical power to the individual integrated phase shifters fixed wavelength steering of the beam emitted normal to the surface of the wafer of 8° is demonstrated for 1 × 8 phased arrays with periods of both 6 and 9 μm. PMID:23482053

  11. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Mercedes; Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Gomez, Ariel; Chapman, Dean

    2015-05-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called `magic condition' that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used.

  12. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Mercedes; Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Gomez, Ariel; Chapman, Dean

    2015-05-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called `magic condition' that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used. PMID:25931100

  13. Diffractive-optics-based beam combination of a phase-locked fiber laser array.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eric C; Ho, James G; Goodno, Gregory D; Rice, Robert R; Rothenberg, Josh; Thielen, Peter; Weber, Mark; Wickham, Michael

    2008-02-15

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) is used as a beam combiner for an actively phase-locked array of fiber lasers. Use of a DOE eliminates the far-field sidelobes and the accompanying loss of beam quality typically observed in tiled coherent laser arrays. Using this technique, we demonstrated coherent combination of five fiber lasers with 91% efficiency and M2=1.04. Combination efficiency and phase locking is robust even with large amplitude and phase fluctuations on the input laser array elements. Calculations and power handling measurements suggest that this approach can scale to both high channel counts and high powers.

  14. A reconstruction method for cone-beam differential x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Velroyen, Astrid; Tan, Renbo; Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Liyuan; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-09-10

    Most existing differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) approaches are based on three kinds of scanning geometries, described by parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam. Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution, cone-beam DPC-CT has attracted significant interest. In this paper, we report a reconstruction method based on a back-projection filtration (BPF) algorithm for cone-beam DPC-CT. Due to the differential nature of phase contrast projections, the algorithm restrains from differentiation of the projection data prior to back-projection, unlike BPF algorithms commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a micro-focus x-ray tube source. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can deal with several classes of truncated cone-beam datasets. We believe that this feature is of particular interest for future medical cone-beam phase-contrast CT imaging applications.

  15. Evolution of the ring Airy Gaussian beams with a spiral phase in the Kerr medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Chen, Chidao; Peng, Xi; Peng, Yulian; Zhou, Meiling; Deng, Dongmei; Guo, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena are of great practical interest in optics. The evolution of ring Airy Gaussian beams with a spiral phase in the nonlinear Kerr medium is investigated using the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Numerical simulations indicate that the distribution factor b can influence the formation of the ring Airy Gaussian beams. Results show that the beams can be oscillating, and the light filament can be achieved under appropriate laser input power. On the other hand, the evolution of the ring Airy Gaussian beams with a spiral phase in the nonlinear Kerr medium can be implemented, and the numerical simulations of the holographic generation of the ring Airy Gaussian vortex beams propagated in the medium demonstrate that the vortex can be preserved along the propagation. The Poynting vector shows that the energy flow of the ring Airy Gaussian beams flows in the opposite direction on both sides of the focus plane; however, for beams with a spiral phase, the flow direction remains the same; the energy flow can rotate in opposite directions on both sides of the focal plane.

  16. Tomographic measurement of the phase space distribution of a space-charge-dominated beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    Many applications of accelerators, such as free electron lasers, pulsed neutron sources, and heavy ion fusion, require a good quality beam with high intensity. In practice, the achievable intensity is often limited by the dynamics at the low-energy, space-charge dominated end of the machine. Because low-energy beams can have complex distribution functions, a good understanding of their detailed evolution is needed. To address this issue, we have developed a simple and accurate tomographic method to map the beam phase using quadrupole magnets, which includes the effects from space charge. We extend this technique to use also solenoidal magnets which are commonly used at low energies, especially in photoinjectors, thus making the diagnostic applicable to most machines. We simulate our technique using a particle in cell code (PIC), to ascertain accuracy of the reconstruction. Using this diagnostic we report a number of experiments to study and optimize injection, transport and acceleration of intense space charge dominated beams. We examine phase mixing, by studying the phase-space evolution of an intense beam with a transversely nonuniform initial density distribution. Experimental measurements, theoretical predictions and PIC simulations are in good agreement each other. Finally, we generate a parabolic beam pulse to model those beams from photoinjectors, and combine tomography with fast imaging techniques to investigate the time-sliced parameters of beam current, size, energy spread and transverse emittance. We found significant differences between the slice emittance profiles and slice orientation as the beam propagates downstream. The combined effect of longitudinal nonuniform profiles and fast imaging of the transverse phase space provided us with information about correlations between longitudinal and transverse dynamics that we report within this dissertation.

  17. A dynamic plasmonic manipulation technique assisted by phase modulation of an incident optical vortex beam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wang, Q; Tan, P S; Lin, J; Yuan, X-C

    2012-09-28

    A novel phase modulation method for dynamic manipulation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with a phase engineered optical vortex (OV) beam illuminating on nanoslits is experimentally demonstrated. Because of the unique helical phase carried by an OV beam, dynamic control of SPP multiple focusing and standing wave generation is realized by changing the OV beam's topological charge constituent with the help of a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. Measurement of SPP distributions with near-field scanning optical microscopy showed an excellent agreement with numerical predictions. The proposed phase modulation technique for manipulating SPPs features has seemingly dynamic and reconfigurable advantages, with profound potential for development of SPP coupling, routing, multiplexing and high-resolution imaging devices on plasmonic chips. PMID:22948098

  18. Direction-sensitive transverse velocity measurement by phase-modulated structured light beams.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2014-09-15

    The use of structured light beams to detect the velocity of targets moving perpendicularly to the beam's propagation axis opens new avenues for remote sensing of moving objects. However, determining the direction of motion is still a challenge because detection is usually done by means of an interferometric setup, which only provides an absolute value of the frequency shift. In this Letter, we present a novel method that addresses this issue. It uses dynamic control of the phase in the transverse plane of the structured light beam so that the direction of the particles' movement can be deduced. This is done by noting the change in the magnitude of the frequency shift as the transverse phase of the structured light is moved appropriately. We demonstrate our method with rotating microparticles that are illuminated by a Laguerre-Gaussian beam with a rotating phase about its propagation axis. Our method, which only requires a dynamically configurable optical beam generator, can easily be used with other types of motion by appropriate engineering and dynamic modulation of the phase of the light beam. PMID:26466286

  19. Influence of the least-squares phase on optical vortices in strongly scintillated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Mingzhou; Roux, Filippus S.

    2009-07-15

    The optical vortices that exist in strongly scintillated beams make it difficult for conventional adaptive optics systems to remove the phase distortions. When the least-squares reconstructed phase is removed, the vortices still remain. However, we found that the removal of the least-squares phase induces a portion of the vortices to be annihilated during subsequent propagation, causing a reduction in the total number of vortices. This can be understood in terms of the restoration of equilibrium between explicit vortices, which are visible in the phase function, and vortex bound states, which are somehow encoded in the continuous phase fluctuations. Numerical simulations are provided to show that the total number of optical vortices in a strongly scintillated beam can be reduced significantly after a few steps of least-squares phase corrections.

  20. Transformation of the optical vortex light beams in holographic elements with embedded phase singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridova, S. V.; Bekshaev, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Transformations of spatial characteristics of optical vortex (OV) light beams at passing through a computer-generated hologram (CGH) that imparts an additional phase singularity ("fork" hologram) are investigated. The spatial structure of the diffracted beam is studied for different combinations of the incident OV order m, embedded topological charge of the CGH q and the diffraction order n. Variations of the intensity distribution are investigated experimentally. Due to the incident beam displacement with respect to the CGH optical axis, the diffracted beam profile is deformed, rotates in the azimuthal direction in agreement with the internal energy circulation and its 'center of gravity' is displaced orthogonally to the incident beam displacement. The results are compared with theoretical predictions based on two models of the incident OV beam. As, in experiment, the incident beam was created from the Gaussian beam passed another fork hologram, the Kummer beam model seems presumably more relevant but the standard Laguerre-Gaussian model in some cases fits the experimental data quite well.

  1. Transformation of the optical vortex light beams in holographic elements with embedded phase singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridova, S. V.; Bekshaev, A. Y.

    2011-09-01

    Transformations of spatial characteristics of optical vortex (OV) light beams at passing through a computer-generated hologram (CGH) that imparts an additional phase singularity ("fork" hologram) are investigated. The spatial structure of the diffracted beam is studied for different combinations of the incident OV order m, embedded topological charge of the CGH q and the diffraction order n. Variations of the intensity distribution are investigated experimentally. Due to the incident beam displacement with respect to the CGH optical axis, the diffracted beam profile is deformed, rotates in the azimuthal direction in agreement with the internal energy circulation and its 'center of gravity' is displaced orthogonally to the incident beam displacement. The results are compared with theoretical predictions based on two models of the incident OV beam. As, in experiment, the incident beam was created from the Gaussian beam passed another fork hologram, the Kummer beam model seems presumably more relevant but the standard Laguerre-Gaussian model in some cases fits the experimental data quite well.

  2. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  3. Quantifying errors in flow measurement using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of several boundary detection methods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Kokeny, Paul; Ying, Wang; Magnano, Chris; Zivadinov, Robert; Mark Haacke, E

    2015-02-01

    Quantifying flow from phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) data requires that the vessels of interest be segmented. The estimate of the vessel area will dictate the type and magnitude of the error sources that affect the flow measurement. These sources of errors are well understood, and mathematical expressions have been derived for them in previous work. However, these expressions contain many parameters that render them difficult to use for making practical error estimates. In this work, some realistic assumptions were made that allow for the simplification of such expressions in order to make them more useful. These simplified expressions were then used to numerically simulate the effect of segmentation accuracy and provide some criteria that if met, would keep errors in flow quantification below 10% or 5%. Four different segmentation methods were used on simulated and phantom MRA data to verify the theoretical results. Numerical simulations showed that including partial volumed edge pixels in vessel segmentation provides less error than missing them. This was verified with MRA simulations, as the best performing segmentation method generally included such pixels. Further, it was found that to obtain a flow error of less than 10% (5%), the vessel should be at least 4 (5) pixels in diameter, have an SNR of at least 10:1 and have a peak velocity to saturation cut-off velocity ratio of at least 5:3.

  4. Quantifying errors in flow measurement using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of several boundary detection methods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Kokeny, Paul; Ying, Wang; Magnano, Chris; Zivadinov, Robert; Mark Haacke, E

    2015-02-01

    Quantifying flow from phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) data requires that the vessels of interest be segmented. The estimate of the vessel area will dictate the type and magnitude of the error sources that affect the flow measurement. These sources of errors are well understood, and mathematical expressions have been derived for them in previous work. However, these expressions contain many parameters that render them difficult to use for making practical error estimates. In this work, some realistic assumptions were made that allow for the simplification of such expressions in order to make them more useful. These simplified expressions were then used to numerically simulate the effect of segmentation accuracy and provide some criteria that if met, would keep errors in flow quantification below 10% or 5%. Four different segmentation methods were used on simulated and phantom MRA data to verify the theoretical results. Numerical simulations showed that including partial volumed edge pixels in vessel segmentation provides less error than missing them. This was verified with MRA simulations, as the best performing segmentation method generally included such pixels. Further, it was found that to obtain a flow error of less than 10% (5%), the vessel should be at least 4 (5) pixels in diameter, have an SNR of at least 10:1 and have a peak velocity to saturation cut-off velocity ratio of at least 5:3. PMID:25460329

  5. Quantifying Errors in Flow Measurement Using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Comparison of Several Boundary Detection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Kokeny, Paul; Ying, Wang; Magnano, Chris; Zivadinov, Robert; Haacke, E. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying flow from phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) data requires that the vessels of interest be segmented. This estimate of the vessel area will dictate the type and magnitude of the error sources that affect the flow measurement. These sources of errors are well understood and mathematical expressions have been derived for them in previous work. However, these expressions contain many parameters that render them difficult to use for making practical error estimates. In this work, some realistic assumptions were made that allow for the simplification of such expressions in order to make them more useful. These simplified expressions were then used to numerically simulate the effect of segmentation accuracy and provide some criteria that if met, would keep errors in flow quantification below 10% or 5%. Four different segmentation methods were used on simulated and phantom MRA data to verify the theoretical results. Numerical simulations showed that including partial volumed edge pixels in vessel segmentation provides less error than missing them. This was verified with MRA simulations, as the best performing segmentation method generally included such pixels. Further, it was found that to obtain a flow error of less than 10% (5%), the vessel should be at least 4 (5) pixels in diameter, have an SNR of at least 10:1 and a peak velocity to saturation cut-off velocity ratio of at least 5:3. PMID:25460329

  6. Determination of the misalignment error of a compound zero-order waveplate using the spectroscopic phase shifting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quan; Han, Zhigang; Chen, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The spectroscopic phase shifting method was proposed to determine the misalignment error of a compound zero-order waveplate. The waveplate, which is composed of two separate multi-order quartz waveplates, was measured by a polarizer-waveplate-analyser setup with a spectrometer as the detector. The theoretical relationship between the misalignment error and the azimuth of the polarized light that emerged from the waveplate was studied by comparing two forms of the Jones matrix of the waveplate. Four spectra were obtained to determine the wavelength-dependent azimuth using a phase shifting algorithm when the waveplate was rotated to four detection angles. The misalignment error was ultimately solved from the wavelength-dependent azimuth by the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Experiments were conducted at six misalignment angles. The measured results of the misalignment angle agree well with their nominal values, indicating that the spectroscopic phase shifting method can be a reliable way to measure the misalignment error of a compound zero-order waveplate.

  7. Modulation of auroral electrojet currents using dual HF beams with ELF phase offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The modulation of naturally occuring ionospheric currents with high power radio waves in the high frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) band is a well known technique for generation of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) and very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) waves. We use the heating facility of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to investigate the effect of using dual HF beams with an ELF/VLF phase offset between the modulation waveforms. Experiments with offset HF beams confirm the model of independent ELF/VLF sources. Experiments with co-located HF beams exhibit interaction between the first and second harmonics of the modulated tones when square and sine wave modulation waveforms are employed. Using ELF/VLF phase offsets for co-loacted beams is also shown to be a potential diagnostic for the D-region ionospheric profile.

  8. Phase-conjugation and self-oscillation with copropagating cross-polarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, M.; Pinard, M.; Grynberg, G.

    1991-03-01

    We present the result of an experiment on optical phase conjugation made with a probe beam propagating in the same direction as the forward pump beam but having an orthogonal polarization. Using the difference of polarization, we separate the reflected beam from the backward pump beam. Is is shown that the amplitude of the reflected beam is the sum of two components, one proportional to the conjugate of the probe and one proportional to the amplitude of the probe. The experiment is done in sodium vapor and reflectivities larger than 350% have been observed near the D 1 transition. Weaker reflectivities due to a less efficient optical pumping are obtained near the D 2 line. We also describe the characteristics of the cw oscillation that appears between the Na cell and a mirror.

  9. Mathematic model analysis of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuzhen; Guo, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Tingfeng

    2011-09-12

    In order to research the statistical properties of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen for adaptive optics and laser communication application in the laboratory, we establish mathematic models of statistical quantities, which are based on the Rytov method and the thin phase screen model, involved in the propagation process. And the analytic results are developed for an arbitrary thickness phase screen based on the Kolmogorov power spectrum. The comparison between the arbitrary thickness phase screen and the thin phase screen shows that it is more suitable for our results to describe the generalized case, especially the scintillation index.

  10. Study of phase transitions in NbN ultrathin films under composite ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhodko, K.; Gurovich, B.; Dement'eva, M.

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates implementation of Selective Displacement of Atoms (SDA) technique to change the crystal structure and atomic composition of thin superconductive film of NbN under low dose composite ion beam irradiation. All structure investigations were performed using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) technique by the analysis of Fourier transformation of bright field HRTEM images. It was found that composite ion beam irradiation induces the formation of niobium oxynitrides phases.

  11. Assessment of residual error in liver position using kV cone-beam computed tomography for liver cancer high-precision radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, Maria A.; Brock, Kristy K.; Eccles, Cynthia; Moseley, Douglas; Jaffray, David; Dawson, Laura A. . E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual error in liver position using breath-hold kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CT) following on-line orthogonal megavoltage (MV) image-guided breath-hold liver cancer conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with liver cancer treated with 6-fraction breath-hold conformal radiotherapy were investigated. Before each fraction, orthogonal MV images were obtained during exhale breath-hold, with repositioning for offsets >3 mm, using the diaphragm for cranio-caudal (CC) alignment and vertebral bodies for medial-lateral (ML) and anterior posterior (AP) alignment. After repositioning, repeat orthogonal MV images, orthogonal kV fluoroscopic movies, and kV cone-beam CTs were obtained in exhale breath-hold. The cone-beam CT livers were registered to the planning CT liver to obtain the residual setup error in liver position. Results: After repositioning, 78 orthogonal MV image pairs, 61 orthogonal kV image pairs, and 72 kV cone-beam CT scans were obtained. Population random setup errors ({sigma}) in liver position were 2.7 mm (CC), 2.3 mm (ML), and 3.0 mm (AP), and systematic errors ({sigma}) were 1.1 mm, 1.9 mm, and 1.3 mm in the superior, medial, and posterior directions. Liver offsets >5 mm were observed in 33% of cases; offsets >10 mm and liver deformation >5 mm were observed in a minority of patients. Conclusions: Liver position after radiation therapy guided with MV orthogonal imaging was within 5 mm of planned position in the majority of patients. kV cone-beam CT image guidance should improve accuracy with reduced dose compared with orthogonal MV image guidance for liver cancer radiation therapy.

  12. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen; Sawkey, Daren

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. Methods: In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, R{sub p}, and R{sub p+} for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Results: Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, and R{sub p} were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. Conclusions: We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for

  13. Coherent beam combination using self-phase locked stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors with a rotating wedge for high power laser generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwoo; Cha, Seongwoo; Oh, Jungsuk; Lee, Hwihyeong; Ahn, Heekyung; Churn, Kil Sung; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-04-18

    The self-phase locking of a stimulated Brillouin scattering-phase conjugate mirror (SBS-PCM) allows a simple and scalable coherent beam combination of existing lasers. We propose a simple optical system composed of a rotating wedge and a concave mirror to overcome the power limit of the SBS-PCM. Its phase locking ability and the usefulness on the beam-combination laser are demonstrated experimentally. A four-beam combination is demonstrated using this SBS-PCM scheme. The relative phases between the beams were measured to be less than λ/24.7. PMID:27137299

  14. Coherent beam combination using self-phase locked stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors with a rotating wedge for high power laser generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwoo; Cha, Seongwoo; Oh, Jungsuk; Lee, Hwihyeong; Ahn, Heekyung; Churn, Kil Sung; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-04-18

    The self-phase locking of a stimulated Brillouin scattering-phase conjugate mirror (SBS-PCM) allows a simple and scalable coherent beam combination of existing lasers. We propose a simple optical system composed of a rotating wedge and a concave mirror to overcome the power limit of the SBS-PCM. Its phase locking ability and the usefulness on the beam-combination laser are demonstrated experimentally. A four-beam combination is demonstrated using this SBS-PCM scheme. The relative phases between the beams were measured to be less than λ/24.7.

  15. Optical vortex beams generated by a phase-only LC-SLM and double-slit interference analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Qi, Junli; Wang, Weihua; Yang, Jinhong; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Qianghua; Deng, Haifei; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Dewei; Shan, Huihui; Ma, Xiaomin; Shi, Bo

    2013-12-01

    Vortex beams with integral and fractional topological charges are generated by an experimental setup with one phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator which efficiently modulates the phase retardation distributions of input beam. The intensity distributions and double-slit interference of vortex beams with integral and fractional topological charges are investigated in detail. Tilt appears in double-slit interference fringes of vortex beams. The fringe tilt amounts in the intermediate region are proportional to the topological charge l of vortex beams. The double-slit interference method can be utilized to determine the topological charge of vortex beams.

  16. Phase-space analysis of charged and optical beam transport: Wigner rotation angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, Amalia

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of using the phase space formalism to establish a correspondence between the dynamical behavior of squeezed states and optical or charged beams, propagating through linear systems, has received a great deal of attention during the last years. In this connection, it has been indicated how optical experiments may be conceived to measure the Wigner rotation angle. In this paper we address the topic within the context of the paraxial propagation of optical or charged beams and suggest a possible experiment for measuring the Wigner angle using an electron beam passing through quadrupoles and drift sections. The analogous optical system is also discussed.

  17. Generation of equal-intensity coherent optical beams by binary geometrical phase on metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng-Han; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xiong, Xiang; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2016-06-01

    We report here the design and realization of a broadband, equal-intensity optical beam splitter with a dispersion-free binary geometric phase on a metasurface with unit cell consisting of two mirror-symmetric elements. We demonstrate experimentally that two identical beams can be efficiently generated with incidence of any polarization. The efficiency of the device reaches 80% at 1120 nm and keeps larger than 70% in the range of 1000-1400 nm. We suggest that this approach for generating identical, coherent beams have wide applications in diffraction optics and in entangled photon light source for quantum communication.

  18. Development of a fast scintillator based beam phase measurement system for compact superconducting cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Tanushyam; Kanti Dey, Malay; Dhara, Partha; Roy, Suvodeep; Debnath, Jayanta; Balakrishna Bhole, Rajendra; Dutta, Atanu; Pradhan, Jedidiah; Pal, Sarbajit; Pal, Gautam; Roy, Amitava; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2013-05-01

    In an isochronous cyclotron, measurements of central phase of the ion beam with respect to rf and the phase width provide a way to tune the cyclotron for maximum energy gain per turn and efficient extraction. We report here the development of a phase measurement system and the measurements carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre's (VECC's) K = 500 superconducting cyclotron. The technique comprises detecting prompt γ-rays resulting from the interaction of cyclotron ion beam with an aluminium target mounted on a radial probe in coincidence with cyclotron rf. An assembly comprising a fast scintillator and a liquid light-guide inserted inside the cyclotron was used to detect the γ-rays and to transfer the light signal outside the cyclotron where a matching photo-multiplier tube was used for light to electrical signal conversion. The typical beam intensity for this measurement was a few times 1011 pps.

  19. Experimental measurement of the 4-d transverse phase space map of a heavy ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, H S

    1997-12-01

    The development and employment of a new diagnostic instrument for characterizing intense, heavy ion beams is reported on. This instrument, the ''Gated Beam Imager'' or ''GBI'' was designed for use on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Project's ''Small Recirculator'', an integrated, scaled physics experiment and engineering development project for studying the transport and control of intense heavy ion beams as inertial fusion drivers in the production of electric power. The GBI allows rapid measurement and calculation of a heavy ion beam's characteristics to include all the first and second moments of the transverse phase space distribution, transverse emittance, envelope parameters and beam centroid. The GBI, with appropriate gating produces a time history of the beam resulting in a 4-D phase-space and time ''map'' of the beam. A unique capability of the GBI over existing diagnostic instruments is its ability to measure the ''cross'' moments between the two transverse orthogonal directions. Non-zero ''cross'' moments in the alternating gradient lattice of the Small Recirculator are indicative of focusing element rotational misalignments contributing to beam emittance growth. This emittance growth, while having the same effect on the ability to focus a beam as emittance growth caused by non-linear effects, is in principle removable by an appropriate number of focusing elements. The instrument uses the pepperpot method of introducing a plate with many pinholes into the beam and observing the images of the resulting beamlets as they interact with a detector after an appropriate drift distance. In order to produce adequate optical signal and repeatability, the detector was chosen to be a microchannel plate (MCP) with a phosphor readout screen. The heavy ions in the pepperpot beamlets are stopped in the MCP's thin front metal anode and the resulting secondary electron signal is amplified and proximity-focused onto the phosphor while maintaining

  20. Temperature- and energy-dependent phase shifts of resonant multiple-beam X-ray diffraction in germanium crystals.

    PubMed

    Liao, Po-Yu; Liu, Wen-Chung; Cheng, Chih-Hao; Chiu, Yi-Hua; Kung, Ying-Yu; Chang, Shih-Lin

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports temperature- and energy-dependent phase shifts of resonant multiple-beam X-ray diffraction in germanium crystals, involving forbidden (002) and weak (222) reflections. Phase determination based on multiple-beam diffraction is employed to estimate phase shifts from (002)-based {(002)(375)(373̅)} four-beam cases and (222)-based { (222)(5̅33̅)} three-beam cases in the vicinity of the Ge K edge for temperatures from 20 K up to 300 K. The forbidden/weak reflections enhance the sensitivity of measuring phases at resonance. At room temperature, the resonance triplet phases reach a maximum of 8° for the four-beam cases and -19° for the three-beam cases. It is found that the peak intensities and triplet phases obtained from the (002) four-beam diffraction are related to thermal motion induced anisotropy and anomalous dispersion, while the (222) three-beam diffraction depends on the aspherical covalent electron distribution and anomalous dispersion. However, the electron-phonon interaction usually affects the forbidden reflections with increasing temperatures and seems to have less effect on the resonance triplet phase shifts measured from the (002) four-beam diffraction. The resonance triplet phase shifts of the (222) three-beam diffraction versus temperature are also small. PMID:26131901

  1. Demonstration of the frequency offset errors introduced by an incorrect setting of the Zeeman/magnetic field adjustment on the cesium beam frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The fine frequency setting of a cesium beam frequency standard is accomplished by adjusting the C field control with the appropriate Zeeman frequency applied to the harmonic generator. A novice operator in the field, even when using the correct Zeeman frequency input, may mistakenly set the C field to any one of seven major Beam I peaks (fingers) represented by the Ramsey curve. This can result in frequency offset errors of as much as 2.5 parts in ten to the tenth. The effects of maladjustment are demonstrated and suggestions are discussed on how to avoid the subtle traps associated with C field adjustments.

  2. Research on the effect of coherent beam combination based on array of liquid crystal optical phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenming; Kong, Lingjiang; Xiao, Feng; Chen, Jian

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of Coherent Beam Combination(CBC) based on Array of Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Arrays(LCOPA array), two major contributions are made in this article. Firstly, grating lobes and side lobes of combined beam are analyzed. Furthermore, according to interference theory the methods to suppress grating lobes and side lobes are put forward. Secondly, a new beam quality factor Q(θ0) is proposed to evaluate the beam quality of combined beam and several influence factors are discussed. These analysis results help to obtain combined beam with better beam quality.

  3. Evolution of electron beam phase space distribution in a high-gain FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Webb,S.D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-08-23

    FEL-based coherent electron cooling (CEC) offers a new avenue to achieve high luminosities in high energy colliders such as RHIC, LHC, and eRHIC. Traditional treatments consider the FEL as an amplifier of optical waves with specific initial conditions, focusing on the resulting field. CEC requires knowledge of the phase space distribution of the electron beam in the FEL. We present 1D analytical results for the phase space distribution of an electron beam with an arbitrary initial current profile, and discuss approaches of expanding to 3D results.

  4. Improved beam steering accuracy of a single beam with a 1D phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Engström, David; Bengtsson, Jörgen; Eriksson, Emma; Goksör, Mattias

    2008-10-27

    The limited number of pixels and their quantized phase modulation values limit the positioning accuracy when a phase-only one dimensional spatial light modulator (SLM) is used for beam steering. Applying the straightforward recipe for finding the optimal setting of the SLM pixels, based on individually optimizing the field contribution from each pixel to the field in the steering position, the inaccuracy can be a significant fraction of the diffraction limited spot size. This is especially true in the vicinity of certain steering angles where precise positioning is particularly difficult. However, by including in the optimization of the SLM setting an extra degree of freedom, we show that the steering accuracy can be drastically improved by a factor proportional to the number of pixels in the SLM. The extra degree of freedom is a global phase offset of all the SLM pixels which takes on a different value for each steering angle. Beam steering experiments were performed with the SLM being set both according to the conventional and the new recipe, and the results were in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  5. Worst error analysis of batch filter and sequential filter in the approach phase of spacecraft navigation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, T.

    1974-01-01

    The worst error performance of the sequential filter is compared with the performance of the batch filter which is still in general use in the deep space tracking. An approach phase of a spacecraft on a typical mission to the planet Mars is considered. The estimated parameters include the position and the speed of the spacecraft, nongravitational acceleration acting on the spacecraft, and the locations of the tracking stations.

  6. Phase-contrast tomography with low-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.; Zawisky, M.; Dubus, F.; Bonse, U.

    2005-02-01

    In newly developed neutron phase tomography, wave properties of neutrons are exploited for the nondestructive testing of the internal structure of matter. We show how limitations due to small available intensities of present neutron sources can be overcome by using an advanced maximum-likelihood reconstruction algorithm. Unlike the standard filtered back-projection, the developed procedure gives reasonable results also when used on very noisy data or data consisting of only a few measured projections. This is demonstrated by means of simulations and also experimentally. The proposed method leads to considerably shorter measuring times and/or increased precision.

  7. Digital phase-lock loop having an estimator and predictor of error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph I. (Inventor); Hurd, William J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A digital phase-lock loop (DPLL) which generates a signal with a phase that approximates the phase of a received signal with a linear estimator. The effect of a complication associated with non-zero transport delays related to DPLL mechanization is then compensated by a predictor. The estimator provides recursive estimates of phase, frequency, and higher order derivatives, while the predictor compensates for transport lag inherent in the loop.

  8. Design of focal beam shaping system through irradiance and phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meijie; Meuret, Youri; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; Duerr, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    Focal beam shaping (FBS), or laser beam shaping at focus, is required in many laser applications. The most common approach is to use a phase element and a Fourier transform lens to generate at the focal plane of the lens the desired irradiance pattern, usually a at-top. The shaping quality depends strongly on a dimensionless parameter β. In case of long focal length and/or small focal spot, the input laser beam should be sufficiently large in order to get a large β value for a satisfying shaping quality. Therefore additional beam expansions might be needed. In this work, we propose a different approach with two plano-aspheric lenses that allows to control both irradiance and phase at focus. The two lenses are designed by an extended ray mapping technique combined with a rigorous backward wave propagation method, so that diffraction effects around laser focus can be implemented in a reliable way. With the developed approach, the shaping quality is guaranteed without the possible need for extra beam expanders, which makes the system more compact. The advantage of our design approach is demonstrated in direct comparison with the conventional Fourier approach for the same design example to transform a Gaussian beam to have a circular flat-top irradiance pattern.

  9. Recovery of absolute phases for the fringe patterns of three selected wavelengths with improved anti-error capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Jiale; Xi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhu, Ming; Cheng, Wenqing; Li, Zhongwei; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-09-01

    In a recent published work, we proposed a technique to recover the absolute phase maps of fringe patterns with two selected fringe wavelengths. To achieve higher anti-error capability, the proposed method requires employing the fringe patterns with longer wavelengths; however, longer wavelength may lead to the degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the surface measurement. In this paper, we propose a new approach to unwrap the phase maps from their wrapped versions based on the use of fringes with three different wavelengths which is characterized by improved anti-error capability and SNR. Therefore, while the previous method works on the two-phase maps obtained from six-step phase-shifting profilometry (PSP) (thus 12 fringe patterns are needed), the proposed technique performs very well on three-phase maps from three steps PSP, requiring only nine fringe patterns and hence more efficient. Moreover, the advantages of the two-wavelength method in simple implementation and flexibility in the use of fringe patterns are also reserved. Theoretical analysis and experiment results are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. ATHEANA: {open_quotes}a technique for human error analysis{close_quotes} entering the implementation phase

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.; O`Hara, J.; Luckas, W.

    1997-02-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has become an increasingly important tool in the nuclear power industry, both for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the operating utilities. The NRC recently published a final policy statement, SECY-95-126, encouraging the use of PRA in regulatory activities. Human reliability analysis (HRA), while a critical element of PRA, has limitations in the analysis of human actions in PRAs that have long been recognized as a constraint when using PRA. In fact, better integration of HRA into the PRA process has long been a NRC issue. Of particular concern, has been the omission of errors of commission - those errors that are associated with inappropriate interventions by operators with operating systems. To address these concerns, the NRC identified the need to develop an improved HRA method, so that human reliability can be better represented and integrated into PRA modeling and quantification. The purpose of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) project, entitled `Improved HRA Method Based on Operating Experience` is to develop a new method for HRA which is supported by the analysis of risk-significant operating experience. This approach will allow a more realistic assessment and representation of the human contribution to plant risk, and thereby increase the utility of PRA. The project`s completed, ongoing, and future efforts fall into four phases: (1) Assessment phase (FY 92/93); (2) Analysis and Characterization phase (FY 93/94); (3) Development phase (FY 95/96); and (4) Implementation phase (FY 96/97 ongoing).

  11. Measuring uncertainty in dose delivered to the cochlea due to setup error during external beam treatment of patients with cancer of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, M.; Lovelock, D.; Hunt, M.; Mechalakos, J.; Hu, Y.; Pham, H.; Jackson, A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To use Cone Beam CT scans obtained just prior to treatments of head and neck cancer patients to measure the setup error and cumulative dose uncertainty of the cochlea. Methods: Data from 10 head and neck patients with 10 planning CTs and 52 Cone Beam CTs taken at time of treatment were used in this study. Patients were treated with conventional fractionation using an IMRT dose painting technique, most with 33 fractions. Weekly radiographic imaging was used to correct the patient setup. The authors used rigid registration of the planning CT and Cone Beam CT scans to find the translational and rotational setup errors, and the spatial setup errors of the cochlea. The planning CT was rotated and translated such that the cochlea positions match those seen in the cone beam scans, cochlea doses were recalculated and fractional doses accumulated. Uncertainties in the positions and cumulative doses of the cochlea were calculated with and without setup adjustments from radiographic imaging. Results: The mean setup error of the cochlea was 0.04 ± 0.33 or 0.06 ± 0.43 cm for RL, 0.09 ± 0.27 or 0.07 ± 0.48 cm for AP, and 0.00 ± 0.21 or −0.24 ± 0.45 cm for SI with and without radiographic imaging, respectively. Setup with radiographic imaging reduced the standard deviation of the setup error by roughly 1–2 mm. The uncertainty of the cochlea dose depends on the treatment plan and the relative positions of the cochlea and target volumes. Combining results for the left and right cochlea, the authors found the accumulated uncertainty of the cochlea dose per fraction was 4.82 (0.39–16.8) cGy, or 10.1 (0.8–32.4) cGy, with and without radiographic imaging, respectively; the percentage uncertainties relative to the planned doses were 4.32% (0.28%–9.06%) and 10.2% (0.7%–63.6%), respectively. Conclusions: Patient setup error introduces uncertainty in the position of the cochlea during radiation treatment. With the assistance of radiographic imaging during setup

  12. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2012-04-27

    Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between transverse phase space (x,x') and longitudinal phase space (z,{delta}), where x is the transverse position, x' is the transverse divergence, and z and {delta} are relative longitudinal position and energy deviation with respect to the reference particle. Methods to achieve exact phase space exchanges, i.e., mapping x to z, x' to {delta}, z to x, and {delta} to x', are suggested. Schemes to mitigate and completely compensate for the thick-lens effect of the transverse cavity on emittance exchange are studied. Some applications of the phase space exchange for advanced beam manipulation and diagnostics are discussed.

  13. Detection of Procedural Errors with Stainless Steel and NiTi Instruments by Undergraduate Students Using Conventional Radiograph and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Regis Augusto Aleixo; Souza, João Batista; Gonçalves Alencar, Ana Helena; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Estrela, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated procedural errors made during root canal preparation using stainless steel and nickel-titanium (NiTi) instruments by undergraduate students, using two diagnostic imaging methods. Materials and Methods Sixty human molars were divided into three groups (n=20; group 1: K-Flexofile, group 2: K3, and group 3: BioRace). The root canals were filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus. Periapical radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained to detect procedural errors made by undergraduate students during root canal preparation. Two examiners evaluated the presence or absence of fractured instruments, perforations and canal transportations. The agreement between observers was assessed using the kappa coefficient. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Fisher exact, ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results There were no significant differences in detecting procedural errors between two- and three-dimensional diagnostic imaging methods. There were no significant differences in procedural errors between stainless steel and NiTi instruments. Mean preparation time was recorded in minutes, and results were significantly different between the three groups. NiTi instruments had the lowest mean preparation time. Conclusion Both periapical radiographs and CBCT identified procedural errors, however, three-dimensional images offered more diagnostic resources. The frequency of procedural errors was low for any of the endodontic instruments despite being used by inexperienced operators. PMID:24171022

  14. Determination of absolute interferometric phase using the beam-amplitude ratio technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, D.L.; Hensley, W.H.

    1996-03-01

    Determination of the absolute phase difference (i.e., not modulo 2{pi}) is a key problem in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) for topographic mapping. One way of solving this problem requires use of a technique different from the basic interferometry to resolve a `coarse` angle measurement that lies within the IFSAR ambiguity angle. The method investigated in this paper involves taking advantage of the difference in the amplitude ratio versus elevation angle that occurs when the elevation beams of the two IFSAR antennas are pointed in slightly different directions. The performance of the technique is a function of the angular separation of the two beams, the elevation beamwidth, and the symmetry of the two beam-amplitude patterns. The performance required of the technique is set by the ambiguity angle of the interferometer. This paper presents an analysis of the beam-amplitude ratio technique and shows experimental results.

  15. Update: Validation, Edits, and Application Processing. Phase II and Error-Prone Model Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Susan; And Others

    An update to the Validation, Edits, and Application Processing and Error-Prone Model Report (Section 1, July 3, 1980) is presented. The objective is to present the most current data obtained from the June 1980 Basic Educational Opportunity Grant applicant and recipient files and to determine whether the findings reported in Section 1 of the July…

  16. New asymmetric propagation invariant beams obtained by amplitude and phase modulation in frequency space

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Hernández, J.; Arroyo Carrasco, M.L.; Méndez Otero, M.M.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Iturbe Castillo, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate, numerically and experimentally that using the mask-lens setup used by Durnin to generate Bessel beams Durnin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1499 (1987)], it is possible to generate different kinds of propagation invariant beams. A modification in the amplitude or phase of the field that illuminates the annular slit is proposed that corresponds to modulation in frequency space. In particular, we characterize the new invariant beams that were obtained by modulating the amplitude of the annular mask and when the incident field was modulated with a one-dimensional quadratic or cubic phase. Experimental results using an amplitude mask are shown in order to corroborate the numerical predictions. PMID:25705088

  17. Generation of nondiffracting quasi-circular polarization beams using an amplitude modulated phase hologram.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wei, S B; Yuan, X-C

    2011-08-01

    We propose an approach to the generation of nondiffracting quasi-circularly polarized beams by a highly focusing azimuthally polarized beam using an amplitude modulated spiral phase hologram. Numerical verifications are implemented in the calculation of the electromagnetic fields and Poynting vector field near the focus based on the vector diffraction theory, and the polarization of the wavefront near the focal plane is analyzed in detail by calculating the Stokes polarization parameters. It is found that the electric field, magnetic field, and Poynting vector field can simultaneously be uniform and nondiverging over a relatively long axial range of ~7.23λ. In the transverse plane, the ellipticity and azimuthal angle of the local polarization ellipse varies from point to point. No polarization singularity and phase singularity are found at the beam center, which makes the bright spot possible. PMID:21811334

  18. On-chip silicon optical phased array for two-dimensional beam steering.

    PubMed

    Kwong, David; Hosseini, Amir; Covey, John; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Xiaochuan; Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Ray T

    2014-02-15

    A 16-element optical phased array integrated on chip is presented for achieving two-dimensional (2D) optical beam steering. The device is fabricated on the silicon-on-insulator platform with a 250 nm silicon device layer. Steering is achieved via a combination of wavelength tuning and thermo-optic phase shifting with a switching power of P(π)=20  mW per channel. Using a silicon waveguide grating with a polycrystalline silicon overlay enables narrow far field beam widths while mitigating the precise etching needed for conventional shallow etch gratings. Using this system, 2D steering across a 20°×15° field of view is achieved with a sidelobe level better than 10 dB and with beam widths of 1.2°×0.5°.

  19. Implication of spot position error on plan quality and patient safety in pencil-beam-scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Juan; Beltran, Chris J. Herman, Michael G.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively and systematically assess dosimetric effects induced by spot positioning error as a function of spot spacing (SS) on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan quality and to facilitate evaluation of safety tolerance limits on spot position. Methods: Spot position errors (PE) ranging from 1 to 2 mm were simulated. Simple plans were created on a water phantom, and IMPT plans were calculated on two pediatric patients with a brain tumor of 28 and 3 cc, respectively, using a commercial planning system. For the phantom, a uniform dose was delivered to targets located at different depths from 10 to 20 cm with various field sizes from 2{sup 2} to 15{sup 2} cm{sup 2}. Two nominal spot sizes, 4.0 and 6.6 mm of 1 σ in water at isocenter, were used for treatment planning. The SS ranged from 0.5 σ to 1.5 σ, which is 2–6 mm for the small spot size and 3.3–9.9 mm for the large spot size. Various perturbation scenarios of a single spot error and systematic and random multiple spot errors were studied. To quantify the dosimetric effects, percent dose error (PDE) depth profiles and the value of percent dose error at the maximum dose difference (PDE [ΔDmax]) were used for evaluation. Results: A pair of hot and cold spots was created per spot shift. PDE[ΔDmax] is found to be a complex function of PE, SS, spot size, depth, and global spot distribution that can be well defined in simple models. For volumetric targets, the PDE [ΔDmax] is not noticeably affected by the change of field size or target volume within the studied ranges. In general, reducing SS decreased the dose error. For the facility studied, given a single spot error with a PE of 1.2 mm and for both spot sizes, a SS of 1σ resulted in a 2% maximum dose error; a SS larger than 1.25 σ substantially increased the dose error and its sensitivity to PE. A similar trend was observed in multiple spot errors (both systematic and random errors). Systematic PE can lead to noticeable hot

  20. Measurement of in-plane strain with dual beam spatial phase-shift digital shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Chen, Xu; Li, Junrui; Wang, Yonghong; Yang, Lianxiang

    2015-11-01

    Full-field in-plane strain measurement under dynamic loading by digital shearography remains a big challenge in practice. A phase measurement for in-plane strain information within one time frame has to be achieved to solve this problem. This paper presents a dual beam spatial phase-shift digital shearography system with the capacity to measure phase distribution corresponding to in-plane strain information within a single time frame. Two laser beams with different wavelengths are symmetrically arranged to illuminate the object under test, and two cameras with corresponding filters, which enable simultaneous recording of two shearograms, are utilized for data acquisition. The phase information from the recorded shearograms, which corresponds to the in-plane strain, is evaluated by the spatial phase-shift method. The spatial phase-shift shearography system realizes a measurement of the in-plane strain through the introduction of the spatial phase-shift technique, using one frame after the loading and one frame before loading. This paper presents the theory of the spatial phase-shift digital shearography for in-plane strain measurement and its derivation, experimental results, and the technique’s potential.

  1. The spatially varying polarization of a focused Gaussian beam in quasi-phase-matched superlattice under electro-optic effect.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haibo; Chen, Lixiang; She, Weilong

    2010-11-22

    We present in this paper a wave coupling theory of linear electro-optic (EO) effect for quasi-phase matched (QPM) of focused Gaussian beam in an optical superlattice (OSL). The numerical results indicate that, due to the EO effect of an appropriate applied electric field, the output beam will form spatially inhomogeneous polarization, changing continuously in transverse section of beam; the confocal parameter has a significant impact on the output polarization of Gaussian beam and determines the half-wave voltage.

  2. Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre amplifiers with active phase control

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X L; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Y X; Ma, H T; Xu, X J; Liu, Z J; Zhao, Y J

    2011-12-31

    Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre lasers is a promising method for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining good beam quality. We propose and demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent beam combining of all-fibre pulsed amplifiers with active phase control using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. A low-pass filter is introduced to eliminate the fluctuation of the metric function caused by pulsed lasers and to extract the exact phase noise signal. Active control is thereby based on the SPGD algorithm, resulting in stable coherent beam combining at the receiving plane even in a turbulent environment. Experimental results show that the fringe visibility of the long exposure pattern increases from 0 to 0.4, and the power encircled in the main-lobe increases by 1.6 times when the system evolves from the open-loop phase-locking scheme to the closed-loop scheme. This architecture can be easily scaled up to a higher power by increasing the number of amplifying channels and the power of a single amplifier.

  3. Beam Position and Phase Monitors Characterized and Installed in the LANSCE CCL

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John D; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; McCrady, Rodney C.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Felix R.; Shurter, Robert B.; Watkins, Heath A.

    2012-04-11

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Risk Mitigation Project is in the process of replacing older Coupled-Cavity-Linac (CCL) Beam-Position Monitors (BPMs) with newer Beam Position and Phase Monitors (BPPMs) and their associated electronics and cable plants. In many locations, these older BPMs include a separate Delta-T loop for measuring the beam's central phase and energy. Thirty-one BPPMs have been installed and many have monitored the charged particle beam. The installation of these newer BPPMs is the first step to installing complete BPPM measurement systems. Prior to the installation, a characterization of each BPPM took place. The characterization procedure includes a mechanical inspection, a vacuum testing, and associated electrical tests. The BPPM electrical tests for all four electrodes include contact resistance measurements, Time Domain Reflectometer (TDR) measurements, relative 201.25-MHz phase measurements, and finally a set of position-sensitive mapping measurements were performed which included associated fitting routines. This paper will show these data for a typical characterized BPPM.

  4. Evaluation of Beam Loss and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Doyle, E.; Ferrari, A.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Smith, J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.; /CERN

    2011-11-07

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  5. Application of a transverse phase-space measurement technique for high-brightness, H{sup {minus}} beams to the GTA H{sup {minus}} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Garcia, R.C.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sander, O.R.; Sandoval, D.P.; Shinas, M.A.; Smith, M.; Yuan, V.W.; Connolly, R.C.

    1995-05-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) had the objective Of Producing a high-brightness, high-current H-beam. The major components were a 35 keV injector, a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), an intertank matching section (IMS), and a drift tube linac (DTL), consisting of 10 modules. A technique for measuring the transverse phase-space of high-power density beams has been developed and tested. This diagnostic has been applied to the GTA H-beam. Experimental results are compared to the slit and collector technique for transverse phase-space measurements and to simulations.

  6. Zernike test. I - Analytical aspects. II - Experimental aspects. [interferometric phase error test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Zernike phenomenon is interpreted in general interferometric terms to gain insight into the optimum design of disks suitable for a particular experimental situation. The design of Zernike disks for measuring small low-order aberrations is considered and evaluated; optimum parameters for disks 2, 3, 4, and 5 microns in radius are determined for an f/12 large-space-telescope system with an obscuration ratio of 0.4 at 0.6 micron. It is shown that optimization in this case provides sensitivities of better than one hundredth of a wavelength for the measurement of low-order aberrations. The procedure for manufacturing a Zernike disk is then described in detail, and results are reported for tests of a laboratory Zernike figure sensor containing a disk manufactured according to this procedure. In the tests, a laboratory wavefront-error simulator was used to introduce small aberration ranges, measurements of the changes in reimaged pupil intensity introduced by the disk were made for several aberration settings, and the measured changes were compared with the values predicted by the interferometric theory of Zernike tests. The results are found to agree within an error of one two-hundredth of a wavelength.

  7. An Error Analysis of the Phased Array Antenna Pointing Algorithm for STARS Flight Demonstration No. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Michael P.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    STARS is a multicenter NASA project to determine the feasibility of using space-based assets, such as the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) and Global Positioning System (GPS), to increase flexibility (e.g. increase the number of possible launch locations and manage simultaneous operations) and to reduce operational costs by decreasing the need for ground-based range assets and infrastructure. The STARS project includes two major systems: the Range Safety and Range User systems. The latter system uses broadband communications (125 kbps to 500 kbps) for voice, video, and vehicle/payload data. Flight Demonstration #1 revealed the need to increase the data rate of the Range User system. During Flight Demo #2, a Ku-band antenna will generate a higher data rate and will be designed with an embedded pointing algorithm to guarantee that the antenna is pointed directly at TDRS. This algorithm will utilize the onboard position and attitude data to point the antenna to TDRS within a 2-degree full-angle beamwidth. This report investigates how errors in aircraft position and attitude, along with errors in satellite position, propagate into the overall pointing vector.

  8. Influence of beam-loaded effects on phase-locking in the high power microwave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenghong; Zhou, Zhigang; Qiu, Rong

    2014-06-15

    Owing to the power limitation of a single device, much more attentions are focused on developing high power microwave (HPM) oscillators that can be phase-locked to the external signal in the recent HPM researches. Although the phase-locking is proved to be feasible in the conventional devices (such as magnetrons), challenges still exist in the HPM devices due to beam-loaded effects, which are more obvious in HPM devices because of its high current and the low Q-factor of the device. A simple structured HPM oscillator (Bitron) is introduced to study such effects on the phase-locking in the HPM oscillator. The self-consistent analysis is carried out to study such effects together with particle in cell simulations. Then the modified Adler equation is established for the phase-locking HPM oscillator. Finally, conditions for the phase-locking in the HPM oscillator are given.

  9. Influence of beam-loaded effects on phase-locking in the high power microwave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenghong; Zhou, Zhigang; Qiu, Rong

    2014-06-01

    Owing to the power limitation of a single device, much more attentions are focused on developing high power microwave (HPM) oscillators that can be phase-locked to the external signal in the recent HPM researches. Although the phase-locking is proved to be feasible in the conventional devices (such as magnetrons), challenges still exist in the HPM devices due to beam-loaded effects, which are more obvious in HPM devices because of its high current and the low Q-factor of the device. A simple structured HPM oscillator (Bitron) is introduced to study such effects on the phase-locking in the HPM oscillator. The self-consistent analysis is carried out to study such effects together with particle in cell simulations. Then the modified Adler equation is established for the phase-locking HPM oscillator. Finally, conditions for the phase-locking in the HPM oscillator are given.

  10. Bit-error-rate testing of fiber optic data links for MMIC-based phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Kunath, R. R.; Daryoush, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The measured bit-error-rate (BER) performance of a fiber optic data link to be used in satellite communications systems is presented and discussed. In the testing, the link was measured for its ability to carry high burst rate, serial-minimum shift keyed (SMSK) digital data similar to those used in actual space communications systems. The fiber optic data link, as part of a dual-segment injection-locked RF fiber optic link system, offers a means to distribute these signals to the many radiating elements of a phased array antenna. Test procedures, experimental arrangements, and test results are presented.

  11. SU-D-19A-04: Parameter Characterization of Electron Beam Monte Carlo Phase Space of TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q; Sawkey, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For TrueBeam Monte Carlo simulations, Varian does not distribute linac head geometry and material compositions, instead providing a phase space file (PSF) for the users. The PSF has a finite number of particle histories and can have very large file size, yet still contains inherent statistical noises. The purpose of this study is to characterize the electron beam PSF with parameters. Methods: The PSF is a snapshot of all particles' information at a given plane above jaws including type, energy, position, and directions. This study utilized a preliminary TrueBeam PSF, of which validation against measurement is presented in another study. To characterize the PSF, distributions of energy, position, and direction of all particles are analyzed as piece-wise parameterized functions of radius and polar angle. Subsequently, a pseudo PSF was generated based on this characterization. Validation was assessed by directly comparing the true and pseudo PSFs, and by using both PSFs in the down-stream MC simulations (BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) and comparing dose distributions for 3 applicators at 15 MeV. Statistical uncertainty of 4% was limited by the number of histories in the original PSF. Percent depth dose (PDD) and orthogonal (PRF) profiles at various depths were evaluated. Results: Preliminary results showed that this PSF parameterization was accurate, with no visible differences between original and pseudo PSFs except at the edge (6 cm off axis), which did not impact dose distributions in phantom. PDD differences were within 1 mm for R{sub 7} {sub 0}, R{sub 5} {sub 0}, R{sub 3} {sub 0}, and R{sub 1} {sub 0}, and PRF field size and penumbras were within 2 mm. Conclusion: A PSF can be successfully characterized by distributions for energy, position, and direction as parameterized functions of radius and polar angles; this facilitates generating sufficient particles at any statistical precision. Analyses for all other electron energies are under way and results will be

  12. Phase-transition oscillations induced by a strongly focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devailly, Clémence; Crauste-Thibierge, Caroline; Petrosyan, Artyom; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    We report the observation of a surprising phenomenon consisting in a oscillating phase transition which appears in a binary mixture when this is enlightened by a strongly focused infrared laser beam. The mixture is poly-methyl-meth-acrylate (PMMA)-3-octanone, which has an upper critical solution temperature at Tc=306.6 K and volume fraction ϕc=12.8 % [Crauste et al., arXiv:1310.6720, 2013]. We describe the dynamical properties of the oscillations, which are produced by a competition between various effects: the local accumulation of PMMA produced by the laser beam, thermophoresis, and nonlinear diffusion. We show that the main properties of this kind of oscillations can be reproduced in the Landau theory for a binary mixture in which a local driving mechanism, simulating the laser beam, is introduced.

  13. Geometrical Optics of Beams with Vortices: Berry Phase and Orbital Angular Momentum Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu.

    2006-07-28

    We consider propagation of a paraxial beam carrying the spin angular momentum (polarization) and intrinsic orbital angular momentum (IOAM) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic medium. It is shown that the presence of IOAM can dramatically enhance and rearrange the topological phenomena that previously were considered solely in connection to the polarization of transverse waves. In particular, the appearance of a new type of Berry phase that describes the parallel transport of the beam structure along a curved ray is predicted. We derive the ray equations demonstrating the splitting of beams with different values of IOAM. This is the orbital angular momentum Hall effect, which resembles the Magnus effect for optical vortices. Unlike the spin Hall effect of photons, it can be much larger in magnitude and is inherent to waves of any nature. Experimental means to detect the phenomena are discussed.

  14. Developmental Status of Beam Position and Phase Monitor for PEFP Proton Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungju; Park, Jangho; Yu, Inha; Kim, Dotae; Hwang, Jung-Yun; Nam, Sanghoon

    2004-11-01

    The PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) at the KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is building a high-power proton linear accelerator aiming to generate 100-MeV proton beams with 20-mA peak current. (Pulse width and max. repetition rate of 1 ms and 120 Hz respectively.) We have developed the Beam Position and Phase Monitor (BPPM) for the machine that features the button-type PU, the full-analog processing electronics, and the EPICS-based control system. The beam responses of the button-type PU have been obtained using the MAGIC (Particle-In-Cell) code. The processing electronics has been developed in collaboration with Bergoz Instrumentation. In this article, we report the present status of the system developments except the control system.

  15. Low crosstalk optical hierarchical authentication with a fixed random phase lock based on two beams interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dajiang; He, Wenqi; Peng, Xiang

    2015-09-01

    We propose a novel method to achieve the purpose of hierarchical authentication based on two beams interference. In this method, different target images indicating different authentication levels are analytically encoded into corresponding phase-only masks (phase keys) and amplitude-only masks (amplitude keys) with the help of a random phase mask, which is created in advance and acts as the fixed lock of this authentication system. For the authentication process, a legal user can obtain a specified target image at the output plane if his/her phase key, and amplitude key, which should be settled close against the fixed internal phase lock, are respectively illuminated by two coherent beams. By comparing the target image with all the standard certification images in the database, the system can thus verify the user's identity. In simple terms, this system can not only confirm the legality of a user but also distinguish his/her identity level. Moreover, in despite of the internal phase lock of this system being fixed, the crosstalk between different pairs of keys hold by different users is low. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation are both provided to demonstrate the validity of this method.

  16. Symbol error probability behaviour for continuous phase modulation with partially coherent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, A.; Aulin, T.; Sundberg, C.-E.

    1986-02-01

    Svensson et al. (1983) have considered spectrally efficient constant amplitude digital modulation schemes. The present paper provides the optimum detector for a given observation interval, taking into account a class of constant envelope signals with a continuous phase under conditions where the phase of the carrier is not known. Attention is given to the receiver and its performance, and results concerning various relations involving the minimum equivalent Euclidean distance. The results represent a generalization of the minimum equivalent Euclidean distance technique for partially coherent detected partial response CPM schemes discussed by Svensson et al.

  17. Phase shift errors in the theory and practice of surface intensity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.; Crocker, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The surface acoustical intensity method (sometimes known as the microphone-accelerometer cross-spectral method) is a relatively new noise source/path identification tool. Several researchers have had difficulties implementing this method because of instrumentation phase mis-match. A simple technique for measuring and correcting instrumentation phase mis-match has been developed. This new technique has been tested recently on a noise source identification problem of practical interest. The results of the experiments indicate that the surface acoustic intensity method produces reliable data and can be applied to a variety of noise source/path problems.

  18. Dosimetric Effect of Intrafraction Motion and Residual Setup Error for Hypofractionated Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Online Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Justus; Wu Qiuwen; Yan Di

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric effect and margins required to account for prostate intrafractional translation and residual setup error in a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Prostate position after online correction was measured during dose delivery using simultaneous kV fluoroscopy and posttreatment CBCT in 572 fractions to 30 patients. We reconstructed the dose distribution to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) using a convolution of the static dose with a probability density function (PDF) based on the kV fluoroscopy, and we calculated the minimum dose received by 99% of the CTV (D{sub 99}). We compared reconstructed doses when the convolution was performed per beam, per patient, and when the PDF was created using posttreatment CBCT. We determined the minimum axis-specific margins to limit CTV D{sub 99} reduction to 1%. Results: For 3-mm margins, D{sub 99} reduction was {<=}5% for 29/30 patients. Using post-CBCT rather than localizations at treatment delivery exaggerated dosimetric effects by {approx}47%, while there was no such bias between the dose convolved with a beam-specific and patient-specific PDF. After eight fractions, final cumulative D{sub 99} could be predicted with a root mean square error of <1%. For 90% of patients, the required margins were {<=}2, 4, and 3 mm, with 70%, 40%, and 33% of patients requiring no right-left (RL), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior margins, respectively. Conclusions: For protocols with CBCT guidance, RL, AP, and SI margins of 2, 4, and 3 mm are sufficient to account for translational errors; however, the large variation in patient-specific margins suggests that adaptive management may be beneficial.

  19. Experimental Characterization of the Transverse Phase Space of a 60-MeV Electron Beam Through a Compressor Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, F.; Kabel, A.; Rosenzweig, J.; Agustsson, R.; Andonian, G.; Cline, D.; Murokh, A.; Yakimenko, V.; /UCLA /SLAC /Brookhaven

    2007-02-12

    Space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation may deteriorate electron beam quality when the beam passes through a magnetic bunch compressor. This paper presents the transverse phase-space tomographic measurements for a compressed beam at 60 MeV, around which energy the first stage of magnetic bunch compression takes place in most advanced linacs. Transverse phase-space bifurcation of a compressed beam is observed at that energy, but the degree of the space charge-induced bifurcation is appreciably lower than the one observed at 12 MeV.

  20. High spatial and temporal resolution phase contrast imaging of shock wave using the LCLS beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae Ja; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Schropp, A.; Hastings, J. B.; Lee, R. W.; Collins, G. W.; Ping, Y.; Schroer, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    A new technique using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the x-ray free electron laser source, was developed at Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation to provide high spatial and temporal resolution phase contrast imaging of shock waves in matter. The LCLS has high peak brightness enabling a high beam current of a few mJ/pulse to be focused into a small spot to achieve high imaging resolution < 1 μm. 150 ps, 140 mJ, 800 nm short pulse laser beam was focused to produce shock waves in a material. We collected the first high resolution phase contrast movies of shock propagation inside materials. These results provide the first in-situ imaging of the shock front width, deformation length and time scale behind the shock of materials with free electron laser.

  1. Phase-only shaping algorithm for Gaussian-apodized Bessel beams.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Charles G; Gemmer, John; Moloney, Jerome V

    2013-07-01

    Gaussian-apodized Bessel beams can be used to create a Bessel-like axial line focus at a distance from the focusing lens. For many applications it is desirable to create an axial intensity profile that is uniform along the Bessel zone. In this article, we show that this can be accomplished through phase-only shaping of the wavefront in the far field where the beam has an annular ring structure with a Gaussian cross section. We use a one-dimensional transform to map the radial input field to the axial Bessel field and then optimized the axial intensity with a Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. By separating out the quadratic portion of the shaping phase the algorithm converges more rapidly. PMID:23842364

  2. TIME-DEPENDENT PHASE SPACE MEASUREMENTS OF THE LONGITUDINALLY COMPRESSING BEAM IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect

    LBNL; Lidia, S.M.; Bazouin, G.; Seidl, P.A.

    2011-03-15

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCXI) generates high intensity ion beams to explore Warm Dense Matter physics. A {approx}150 kV, {approx}500 ns modulating voltage pulse is applied to a {approx}300 kV, 5-10 {mu}s, 25 mA K+ ion beam across a single induction gap. The velocity modulated beam compresses longitudinally during ballistic transport along a space charge neutralizing plasma transport line, resulting in {approx}3A peak current with {approx}2-3 ns pulse durations (FWHM) at the target plane. Transverse final focusing is accomplished with a {approx}8 T, 10 cm long pulsed solenoid magnet. Time-dependent electrostatic focusing in the induction gap, and chromatic aberrations in the final focus optics limit the peak fluenceat the target plane for the compressed beam pulse. We report on time-dependent phase space measurements of the compressed pulse in the ballistic transport beamline, and measurement of the time-dependent radial impulses derived from the interaction of the beam and the induction gap voltage. We present results of start-to-end simulations to benchmark the experiments. Fast correction strategies are discussed with application to both NDCX-I and the soon to be commissioned NDCX-II accelerators.

  3. Single-slice reconstruction method for helical cone-beam differential phase-contrast CT.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Chen, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) can provide the internal structure information of biomedical specimens with high-quality cross-section images and has become an invaluable analysis tool. Here a simple and fast reconstruction algorithm is reported for helical cone-beam differential PC-CT (DPC-CT), which is called the DPC-CB-SSRB algorithm. It combines the existing CB-SSRB method of helical cone-beam absorption-contrast CT with the differential nature of DPC imaging. The reconstruction can be performed using 2D fan-beam filtered back projection algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter. The quality of the results for large helical pitches is surprisingly good. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam DPC-CT data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using the traditional inter-row interpolation reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. This method will push the future medical helical cone-beam DPC-CT imaging applications.

  4. Space charge and beam stability issues of the Fermilab proton driver in Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    K. Y. Ng

    2001-08-24

    Issues concerning beam stability of the proposed Fermilab Proton Driver are studied in its Phase I. Although the betatron tune shifts are dominated by space charge, these shifts are less than 0.25 and will therefore not drive the symmetric and antisymmetric modes of the beam envelope into instability. The longitudinal space charge force is large and inductive inserts may be needed to compensate for the distortion of the rf potential. Although the longitudinal impedance is space charge dominated, it will not drive any microwave instability, unless the real part of the impedance coming from the inductive inserts and wall resistivity of the beam tube are large enough. The design of the beam tube is therefore very important in order to limit the flow of eddy current and keep wall resistivity low. The transverse impedance is also space charge dominated. With the Proton Driver operated at an imaginary transition gamma, however, Landau damping will never be canceled and beam stability can be maintained with negative chromaticities.

  5. Analyzing the propagation behavior of scintillation index and bit error rate of a partially coherent flat-topped laser beam in oceanic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Masoud; Golmohammady, Shole; Mashal, Ahmad; Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, on the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, a semianalytical expression for describing on-axis scintillation index of a partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) laser beam of weak to moderate oceanic turbulence is derived; consequently, by using the log-normal intensity probability density function, the bit error rate (BER) is evaluated. The effects of source factors (such as wavelength, order of flatness, and beam width) and turbulent ocean parameters (such as Kolmogorov microscale, relative strengths of temperature and salinity fluctuations, rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature, and rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid) on propagation behavior of scintillation index, and, hence, on BER, are studied in detail. Results indicate that, in comparison with a Gaussian beam, a PCFT laser beam with a higher order of flatness is found to have lower scintillations. In addition, the scintillation index and BER are most affected when salinity fluctuations in the ocean dominate temperature fluctuations.

  6. Analyzing the propagation behavior of scintillation index and bit error rate of a partially coherent flat-topped laser beam in oceanic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Masoud; Golmohammady, Shole; Mashal, Ahmad; Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, on the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, a semianalytical expression for describing on-axis scintillation index of a partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) laser beam of weak to moderate oceanic turbulence is derived; consequently, by using the log-normal intensity probability density function, the bit error rate (BER) is evaluated. The effects of source factors (such as wavelength, order of flatness, and beam width) and turbulent ocean parameters (such as Kolmogorov microscale, relative strengths of temperature and salinity fluctuations, rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature, and rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid) on propagation behavior of scintillation index, and, hence, on BER, are studied in detail. Results indicate that, in comparison with a Gaussian beam, a PCFT laser beam with a higher order of flatness is found to have lower scintillations. In addition, the scintillation index and BER are most affected when salinity fluctuations in the ocean dominate temperature fluctuations. PMID:26560913

  7. Spiral phase plates for the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams with non-zero radial index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffato, G.; Carli, M.; Massari, M.; Romanato, F.

    2015-03-01

    The work of design, fabrication and characterization of spiral phase plates for the generation of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams with non-null radial index is presented. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography on polymethylmethacrylate layers over glass substrates. The optical response of these phase optical elements was measured and the purity of the experimental beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The farfield intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analyses. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams. A novel application consisting in the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is shown. A numerical code based on iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of the phase pattern of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under LG beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements.

  8. Phase-modulated decoupling and error suppression in qubit-oscillator systems.

    PubMed

    Green, Todd J; Biercuk, Michael J

    2015-03-27

    We present a scheme designed to suppress the dominant source of infidelity in entangling gates between quantum systems coupled through intermediate bosonic oscillator modes. Such systems are particularly susceptible to residual qubit-oscillator entanglement at the conclusion of a gate period that reduces the fidelity of the target entangling operation. We demonstrate how the exclusive use of discrete shifts in the phase of the field moderating the qubit-oscillator interaction is sufficient to both ensure multiple oscillator modes are decoupled and to suppress the effects of fluctuations in the driving field. This approach is amenable to a wide variety of technical implementations including geometric phase gates in superconducting qubits and the Molmer-Sorensen gate for trapped ions. We present detailed example protocols tailored to trapped-ion experiments and demonstrate that our approach has the potential to enable multiqubit gate implementation with a significant reduction in technical complexity relative to previously demonstrated protocols.

  9. Phase-Modulated Decoupling and Error Suppression in Qubit-Oscillator Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Todd J.; Biercuk, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a scheme designed to suppress the dominant source of infidelity in entangling gates between quantum systems coupled through intermediate bosonic oscillator modes. Such systems are particularly susceptible to residual qubit-oscillator entanglement at the conclusion of a gate period that reduces the fidelity of the target entangling operation. We demonstrate how the exclusive use of discrete shifts in the phase of the field moderating the qubit-oscillator interaction is sufficient to both ensure multiple oscillator modes are decoupled and to suppress the effects of fluctuations in the driving field. This approach is amenable to a wide variety of technical implementations including geometric phase gates in superconducting qubits and the Molmer-Sorensen gate for trapped ions. We present detailed example protocols tailored to trapped-ion experiments and demonstrate that our approach has the potential to enable multiqubit gate implementation with a significant reduction in technical complexity relative to previously demonstrated protocols.

  10. Projection phase contrast microscopy with a hard x-ray nanofocused beam: Defocus and contrast transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Salditt, T.; Giewekemeyer, K.; Fuhse, C.; Krueger, S. P.; Tucoulou, R.; Cloetens, P.

    2009-05-01

    We report a projection phase contrast microscopy experiment using hard x-ray pink beam undulator radiation focused by an adaptive mirror system to 100-200 nm spot size. This source is used to illuminate a lithographic test pattern with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function with source-to-sample distance in this holographic imaging scheme is quantified and the validity of the weak phase object approximation is confirmed for the experimental conditions.

  11. The backward phase flow and FBI-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beams for the Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Shingyu; Qian, Jianliang

    2010-11-01

    We propose the backward phase flow method to implement the Fourier-Bros-Iagolnitzer (FBI)-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beam method for solving the Schrödinger equation in the semi-classical regime. The idea of Eulerian Gaussian beams has been first proposed in [12]. In this paper we aim at two crucial computational issues of the Eulerian Gaussian beam method: how to carry out long-time beam propagation and how to compute beam ingredients rapidly in phase space. By virtue of the FBI transform, we address the first issue by introducing the reinitialization strategy into the Eulerian Gaussian beam framework. Essentially we reinitialize beam propagation by applying the FBI transform to wavefields at intermediate time steps when the beams become too wide. To address the second issue, inspired by the original phase flow method, we propose the backward phase flow method which allows us to compute beam ingredients rapidly. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithms.

  12. Cherenkov phase-matching in Raman-seeded four-wave mixing by a femtosecond Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonskyi, I.; Kadan, V.; Dmitruk, I.; Korenyuk, P.

    2012-06-01

    It is demonstrated experimentally that the angle vs. wavelength dependence of the emission generated by multi-step four-wave mixing process seeded by stimulated Raman scattering in water under femtosecond Bessel beam excitation is determined by the longitudinal phase-matching from IR to near UV. It is shown that if on-axis phase velocity of the pump Bessel beam is equal to the phase velocity of the Stokes axial wave, then, similar to Cherenkov radiation, all the other anti-Stokes beams too acquire that axial velocity.

  13. Spiral phase plates with radial discontinuities for the generation of multiring orbital angular momentum beams: fabrication, characterization, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Carli, Marta; Romanato, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    A design of spiral phase plates for the generation of multiring beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is presented. Besides the usual helical profile, these phase plates present radial π-discontinuities in correspondence of the zeros of the associated Laguerre polynomials. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography over glass substrates coated with a polymethylmethacrylate resist layer. The optical response was analyzed and the purity of the generated beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The far-field intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analysis with a Mach-Zehnder setup. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order OAM beams with nonzero radial index. An application consisting of the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is presented and described. A numerical code based on an iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under OAM beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements for anticounterfeiting applications.

  14. Control of phased-array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenko, V. I.; Shishov, Iu. A.

    Principles and algorithms for the control of phased arrays are described. Particular consideration is given to algorithms for the control of phase distribution, adaptive arrays, beam-steerable arrays, the design of phase shifters, the compensation of beam-pointing errors, and the calibration of high-gain antenna pointing.

  15. Radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array in non-Kolmogorov medium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huilong; Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Chen, Dong; He, Wei; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2016-08-22

    The analytical expressions for the cross-spectral density, the average intensity and the complex degree of spatial coherence of a radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array propagating through non-Kolmogorov medium are obtained by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The evolution behaviors of a radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array propagating through non-Kolmogorov medium are studied in detail. It is shown that the evolution behaviors of average intensity depend on beam parameters including the spatial correlation length, the radius of the beam array, as well as the propagation distance. A radial phased-locked partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam array with high coherence evolves more rapidly than that with low coherence.

  16. Structure-phase states evolution in Al-Si alloy under electron-beam treatment and high-cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, Sergey Alsaraeva, Krestina Gromov, Victor Semina, Olga; Ivanov, Yurii

    2015-10-27

    By methods of scanning and transmission electron diffraction microscopy the analysis of structure-phase states and defect substructure of silumin subjected to high-intensity electron beam irradiation in various regimes and subsequent fatigue loading up to failure was carried out. It is revealed that the sources of fatigue microcracks are silicon plates of micron and submicron size are not soluble in electron beam processing. The possible reasons of the silumin fatigue life increase under electron-beam treatment are discussed.

  17. Phase-modulated decoupling and error suppression in qubit-oscillator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Todd; Biercuk, Michael

    2015-03-01

    A key requirement for scalable QIP is the ability to controllably produce high-fidelity multi-particle entanglement on demand. This is accomplished in experimental systems using a variety of techniques, but a prominent approach relies on the realization of an indirect interaction between basic quantum systems mediated by bosonic oscillator modes. A significant source of infidelity in these experiments is the presence of residual qubit-oscillator entanglement at the conclusion of an interaction period. We demonstrate how the exclusive use of discrete phase shifts in the field moderating the qubit-oscillator interaction - easily implemented with modern synthesizers - is sufficient to both ensure multiple oscillator modes are decoupled and to suppress the effects of fluctuations in the driving field. We present detailed example protocols tailored to the execution of Molmer-Sorensen entangling gates in trapped ion systems and demonstrate that our approach allows multiqubit gate implementation with a significant reduction in technical complexity relative to previously deomstrated protocols.

  18. Two dimensional thermo-optic beam steering using a silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, Rita; Preussner, Marcel W.; Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Kozak, Dmitry A.; Ferraro, Mike S.; Murphy, James L.

    2016-03-01

    Components for free space optical communication terminals such as lasers, amplifiers, and receivers have all seen substantial reduction in both size and power consumption over the past several decades. However, pointing systems, such as fast steering mirrors and gimbals, have remained large, slow and power-hungry. Optical phased arrays provide a possible solution for non-mechanical beam steering devices that can be compact and lower in power. Silicon photonics is a promising technology for phased arrays because it has the potential to scale to many elements and may be compatible with CMOS technology thereby enabling batch fabrication. For most free space optical communication applications, two-dimensional beam steering is needed. To date, silicon photonic phased arrays have achieved two-dimensional steering by combining thermo-optic steering, in-plane, with wavelength tuning by means of an output grating to give angular tuning, out-of-plane. While this architecture might work for certain static communication links, it would be difficult to implement for moving platforms. Other approaches have required N2 controls for an NxN element phased array, which leads to complexity. Hence, in this work we demonstrate steering using the thermo-optic effect for both dimensions with a simplified steering mechanism requiring only two control signals, one for each steering dimension.

  19. Study of Optical Phase Lock Loops and the Applications in Coherent Beam Combining and Coherence Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei

    Optical Phase-Lock loops (OPLLs) have potential applications in phase coherent optics including frequency synthesis, clock distribution and recovery, jitter and noise reduction, etc. However, most implemented OPLLs are based on solid state lasers, fiber lasers, or specially designed semiconductor lasers, whose bulky size and high cost inhibit the applications of OPLLs. Semiconductor lasers have the advantages of low cost, small size, and high efficiency. In this thesis, I report on a study of OPLLs using commercial SCLs, and explore their novel applications in coherent beam combining and coherence cloning. In chapter 1-3, I will first introduce the theory of OPLLs and presents the experimental study of OPLLs made of different commercial SCLs. To improve the performance of OPLLs, electronic compensations using filter designs are also discussed and studied. In chapter 4-5, I will study the application of OPLLs in coherent beam combining. Using OPLLs, an array of slave lasers can be phase locked to the same master laser at the same frequency, their outputs can then be coherently combined. The phase variations of the element beams due to the optical path-length variations in fibers can be further corrected for by using multi-level OPLLs. This approach eliminates the use of the optical phase/frequency shifters conventionally required in a coherent beam combining system. In the proof of principle experiment, we have combined two lasers with a combining efficiency of 94% using the filled-aperture combining configuration. Furthermore, I will discuss the scalability of a cascaded filled-aperture combining system for the combination of a large number of lasers. OPLLs can also be used to reduce the phase noise of SCLs by locking them to a low noise master laser. In chapter 6, I will describe the theory of coherence cloning using OPLLs and present the experimental measurements of the linewidths and frequency noises of a low noise fiber laser, a free-running and locked slave

  20. Generation of acoustic self-bending and bottle beams by phase engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Tongcang; Zhu, Jie; Zhu, Xuefeng; Yang, Sui; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-07-03

    Directing acoustic waves along curved paths is critical for applications such as ultrasound imaging, surgery and acoustic cloaking. Metamaterials can direct waves by spatially varying the material properties through which the wave propagates. However, this approach is not always feasible, particularly for acoustic applications. Here we demonstrate the generation of acoustic bottle beams in homogeneous space without using metamaterials. Instead, the sound energy flows through a three-dimensional curved shell in air leaving a close-to-zero pressure region in the middle, exhibiting the capability of circumventing obstacles. By designing the initial phase, we develop a general recipe for creating self-bending wave packets, which can set acoustic beams propagating along arbitrary prescribed convex trajectories. The measured acoustic pulling force experienced by a rigid ball placed inside such a beam confirms the pressure field of the bottle. The demonstrated acoustic bottle and self-bending beams have potential applications in medical ultrasound imaging, therapeutic ultrasound, as well as acoustic levitations and isolations.

  1. Generation of acoustic self-bending and bottle beams by phase engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Tongcang; Zhu, Jie; Zhu, Xuefeng; Yang, Sui; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-07-01

    Directing acoustic waves along curved paths is critical for applications such as ultrasound imaging, surgery and acoustic cloaking. Metamaterials can direct waves by spatially varying the material properties through which the wave propagates. However, this approach is not always feasible, particularly for acoustic applications. Here we demonstrate the generation of acoustic bottle beams in homogeneous space without using metamaterials. Instead, the sound energy flows through a three-dimensional curved shell in air leaving a close-to-zero pressure region in the middle, exhibiting the capability of circumventing obstacles. By designing the initial phase, we develop a general recipe for creating self-bending wave packets, which can set acoustic beams propagating along arbitrary prescribed convex trajectories. The measured acoustic pulling force experienced by a rigid ball placed inside such a beam confirms the pressure field of the bottle. The demonstrated acoustic bottle and self-bending beams have potential applications in medical ultrasound imaging, therapeutic ultrasound, as well as acoustic levitations and isolations.

  2. Adaptive correction of vortex laser beam in a closed-loop system with phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haotong; Liu, Zejin; Wu, Huiyun; Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jinbao

    2012-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate the wave front correction of a vortex laser beam by using dual phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC-SLMs) and a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. One phase only LC-SLM is used to generate vortex laser beam by loading spiral phase screen onto the wave front of input quasi-Gaussian beam. The other phase only LC-SLM under SPGD controller based on the subzone control method adaptively compensates the wave front of vortex laser beam. Numerical simulation and experimental results show that after correction, vortex doughnut like beam is focused into a beam with airy disk pattern distribution in the far field. The adaptive corrections of vortex laser beam with different optical topological charges are studied. The results show that the optical topological charge has little influence on adaptive correction. The powers in the main lobe of far field intensity distributions of vortex laser beams with different optical topological charges are all greatly improved by adaptive correction. The technique proposed in this paper can be used in optical communication, relay mirror and atmospheric turbulence correction.

  3. New advancements in focused ion beam repair of alternating phase-shift masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessing, Joshua; Robinson, Tod; Brannen, Rey A.; Morrison, Troy B.; Holtermann, Theresa

    2003-08-01

    As advanced photolithography extends the ability to print feature sizes below the 100 nm technology node, various reticle enhancement techniques (RET) are being employed to improve resolution. An example of RET is the alternating phase shift mask (APSM), which currently challenges the ability of conventional repair techniques to repair even the most basic reticle defect. The phase shifting quartz bump is one defect type critical to the performance of APSM technology masks. These defects on the APSM reticle are caused by imperfections in the resist image during processing, resulting in a localized under or over etch of the quartz substrate. The integrated application of gas assisted etch (GAE), focused ion beam (FIB) reticle repair, and atomic force microscopy (AFM), provide a comprehensive solution for advanced reticle defect repair and characterization. Ion beam repair offers superior accuracy and precision for removal without significant damage to the underlying or adjacent quartz. The AFM technique provides quantitative measurement of 3D structures, including those associated with alternating phase shifters etched into quartz as well as embedded shifters. In the work presented in this paper, quartz bum defects were pre-scanned on an AFM tool and proprietary software algorithms were used to generate defect image and height map files for transfer to the FIB reticle repair tool via a network connection. The FIB tool then used these files to control selectively the ion dose during the corresponding quartz defect repair. A 193 nm APSM phase shift photomask with programmed defects in 400 nm line and space pattern was repaired using an FEI Stylus NanoProfilometer (SNP) and a FEI Accura 850 focus ion beam (FIB) tool. Using the APSM FIB repair method, the transmittance evaluated from 193 nm AIMS at the repair area was more than 90% without post-processing.

  4. Focusing field of the radial vector beams with multi-vortex phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuai; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhu, Zhuqing; Gong, Liping; Zhu, Bowen; Song, Lipei

    2016-05-01

    Based on vector diffraction theory, which was described originally by Richards and Wolf, we calculate the focusing fields of the radial vector beams loading two, three and four vortex phases. The calculations and simulations show that one, two and three optical dark-holes could be generated in the focusing field by a high numerical aperture for the two, three and four vortex phases, respectively. In addition, the distances between the optical dark-holes are positively correlated with the distances between vortex phases. Based on this study, the generation of the optical dark-hole and the manipulation of the dark-hole's distance may be used in the capture and manipulation of multiple particles.

  5. Branch-point reconstruction in laser beam projection through turbulence with finite-degree-of-freedom phase-only wave-front correction.

    PubMed

    Roggemann, M C; Koivunen, A C

    2000-01-01

    Wave-front sensing and deformable mirror control algorithms in adaptive optics systems are designed on the premise that a continuous phase function exists in the telescope pupil that can be conjugated with a deformable mirror for the purpose of projecting a laser beam. However, recent studies of coherent wave propagation through turbulence have shown that under conditions where scintillation is not negligible, a truly continuous phase function does not in general exist as a result of the presence of branch points in the complex optical field. Because of branch points and the associated branch cuts, least-squares wave-front reconstruction paradigms can have large errors. We study the improvement that can be obtained by implementing wave-front reconstructors that can sense the presence of branch points and reconstruct a discontinuous phase function in the context of a laser beam projection system. This study was conducted by fitting a finite-degree-of-freedom deformable mirror to branch-point and least-squares reconstructions of the phase of the beacon field, propagating the corrected field to the beacon plane, and evaluating performance in the beacon plane. We find that the value of implementing branch-point reconstructors with a finite-degree-of-freedom deformable mirror is significant for optical paths that cause saturated log-amplitude fluctuations.

  6. Controllable high-quality electron beam generation by phase slippage effect in layered targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Q.; Li, X. F.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kawata, S.

    2014-11-15

    The bubble structure generated by laser-plasma interactions changes in size depending on the local plasma density. The self-injection electrons' position with respect to wakefield can be controlled by tailoring the longitudinal plasma density. A regime to enhance the energy of the wakefield accelerated electrons and to improve the beam quality is proposed and achieved using layered plasmas with increasing densities. Both the wakefield size and the electron bunch duration are significantly contracted in this regime. The electrons remain in the strong acceleration phase of the wakefield, while their energy spread decreases because of their tight spatial distribution. An electron beam of 0.5 GeV with less than 1% energy spread is obtained through 2.5D particle-in-cell simulations.

  7. Phase-change recording medium that enables ultrahigh-density electron-beam data storage

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, G.A.; Chaiken, A.; Nauka, K.; Yang, C.C.; Davidson, R.; Holden, A.; Bicknell, R.; Yeh, B.S; Chen, J.; Liao, H.; Subramanian, S.; Schut, D.; Jasinski, J.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2005-01-31

    An ultrahigh-density electron-beam-based data storage medium is described that consists of a diode formed by growing an InSe/GaSe phase-change bilayer film epitaxially on silicon. Bits are recorded as amorphous regions in the InSe layer and are detected via the current induced in the diode by a scanned electron beam. This signal current is modulated by differences in the electrical properties of the amorphous and crystalline states. The success of this recording scheme results from the remarkable ability of layered III-VI materials, such as InSe, to maintain useful electrical properties at their surfaces after repeated cycles of amorphization and recrystallization.

  8. Temperature-fluctuation-sensitive accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in low-coherence interferometry in characterizing arrayed waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changyun; Wei, Bing; Yang, Longzhi; Wang, Gencheng; Wang, Yuehai; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yubo; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-09-20

    We investigate the accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in characterizing optical multipath components by low-coherence interferometry. The accumulative effect is caused by the fluctuation of the environment temperature, which leads to the variation of the refractive index of the device under test. The resulting phase measurement errors accumulate with the increasing of the phase difference between the two interferometer arms. Our experiments were carried out to demonstrate that the accumulative effect is still obvious even though the thermo-optical coefficient of the device under test is quite small. Shortening the measurement time to reduce the fluctuation of the environment temperature can effectively restrain the accumulative effect. The experiments show that when the scanning speed increases to 4.8 mm/s, the slope of the phase measurement errors decreases to 5.52×10(-8), which means the accumulative effect can be ignored.

  9. Temperature-fluctuation-sensitive accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in low-coherence interferometry in characterizing arrayed waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changyun; Wei, Bing; Yang, Longzhi; Wang, Gencheng; Wang, Yuehai; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yubo; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-09-20

    We investigate the accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in characterizing optical multipath components by low-coherence interferometry. The accumulative effect is caused by the fluctuation of the environment temperature, which leads to the variation of the refractive index of the device under test. The resulting phase measurement errors accumulate with the increasing of the phase difference between the two interferometer arms. Our experiments were carried out to demonstrate that the accumulative effect is still obvious even though the thermo-optical coefficient of the device under test is quite small. Shortening the measurement time to reduce the fluctuation of the environment temperature can effectively restrain the accumulative effect. The experiments show that when the scanning speed increases to 4.8 mm/s, the slope of the phase measurement errors decreases to 5.52×10(-8), which means the accumulative effect can be ignored. PMID:26406502

  10. Coherent beam combining using a 2D internally sensed optical phased array.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lyle E; Ward, Robert L; Sutton, Andrew J; Fleddermann, Roland; de Vine, Glenn; Malikides, Emmanuel A; Wuchenich, Danielle M R; McClelland, David E; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2014-08-01

    Coherent combination of multiple lasers using an optical phased array (OPA) is an effective way to scale optical intensity in the far field beyond the capabilities of single fiber lasers. Using an actively phase locked, internally sensed, 2D OPA we demonstrate over 95% fringe visibility of the interfered beam, λ/120 RMS output phase stability over a 5 Hz bandwidth, and quadratic scaling of intensity in the far field using three emitters. This paper presents a new internally sensed OPA architecture that employs a modified version of digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry (DEHI) based on code division multiplexing to measure and control the phase of each emitter. This internally sensed architecture can be implemented with no freespace components, offering improved robustness to shock and vibration exhibited by all-fiber devices. To demonstrate the concept, a single laser is split into three channels/emitters, each independently controlled using separate electro-optic modulators. The output phase of each channel is measured using DEHI to sense the small fraction of light that is reflected back into the fiber at the OPA's glass-air interface. The relative phase between emitters is used to derive the control signals needed to stabilize their relative path lengths and maintain coherent combination in the far field.

  11. Error localization in RHIC by fitting difference orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Liu C.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2012-05-20

    The presence of realistic errors in an accelerator or in the model used to describe the accelerator are such that a measurement of the beam trajectory may deviate from prediction. Comparison of measurements to model can be used to detect such errors. To do so the initial conditions (phase space parameters at any point) must be determined which can be achieved by fitting the difference orbit compared to model prediction using only a few beam position measurements. Using these initial conditions, the fitted orbit can be propagated along the beam line based on the optics model. Measurement and model will agree up to the point of an error. The error source can be better localized by additionally fitting the difference orbit using downstream BPMs and back-propagating the solution. If one dominating error source exist in the machine, the fitted orbit will deviate from the difference orbit at the same point.

  12. Three-dimensional phase transformation by impedance-matched dielectric slabs and generation of hollow beams based on transformation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Shuaisai; Tang, Zhixiang; Shu, Weixing

    2016-10-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) phase transformation method by an impedance-matched dielectric slab and apply it to generating hollow beams. We first employ transformation optics to establish a method for the transformation between two arbitrary 3D wavefronts through a flat dielectric and impedance-matched material. Then the method is used to convert a solid beam into a hollow beam with desired wavefront. By tuning the transformation surface, different hollow beams can be produced. The results are further validated by 3D finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  13. SU-E-J-103: Setup Errors Analysis by Cone-Beam CT (CBCT)-Based Imaged-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H; Wang, W; Hu, W; Chen, X; Wang, X; Yu, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify setup errors by pretreatment kilovolt cone-beam computed tomography(KV-CBCT) scans for middle or distal esophageal carcinoma patients. Methods: Fifty-two consecutive middle or distal esophageal carcinoma patients who underwent IMRT were included this study. A planning CT scan using a big-bore CT simulator was performed in the treatment position and was used as the reference scan for image registration with CBCT. CBCT scans(On-Board Imaging v1. 5 system, Varian Medical Systems) were acquired daily during the first treatment week. A total of 260 CBCT scans was assessed with a registration clip box defined around the PTV-thorax in the reference scan based on(nine CBCTs per patient) bony anatomy using Offline Review software v10.0(Varian Medical Systems). The anterior-posterior(AP), left-right(LR), superiorinferior( SI) corrections were recorded. The systematic and random errors were calculated. The CTV-to-PTV margins in each CBCT frequency was based on the Van Herk formula (2.5Σ+0.7σ). Results: The SD of systematic error (Σ) was 2.0mm, 2.3mm, 3.8mm in the AP, LR and SI directions, respectively. The average random error (σ) was 1.6mm, 2.4mm, 4.1mm in the AP, LR and SI directions, respectively. The CTV-to-PTV safety margin was 6.1mm, 7.5mm, 12.3mm in the AP, LR and SI directions based on van Herk formula. Conclusion: Our data recommend the use of 6 mm, 8mm, and 12 mm for esophageal carcinoma patient setup in AP, LR, SI directions, respectively.

  14. Influence of Head Motion on the Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction with Cone-Beam CT: Landmark Identification Errors in Maxillofacial Surface Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-Myoung; Cho, Jin-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of head motion on the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. Materials and Methods Fifteen dry skulls were incorporated into a motion controller which simulated four types of head motion during CBCT scan: 2 horizontal rotations (to the right/to the left) and 2 vertical rotations (upward/downward). Each movement was triggered to occur at the start of the scan for 1 second by remote control. Four maxillofacial surface models with head motion and one control surface model without motion were obtained for each skull. Nine landmarks were identified on the five maxillofacial surface models for each skull, and landmark identification errors were compared between the control model and each of the models with head motion. Results Rendered surface models with head motion were similar to the control model in appearance; however, the landmark identification errors showed larger values in models with head motion than in the control. In particular, the Porion in the horizontal rotation models presented statistically significant differences (P < .05). Statistically significant difference in the errors between the right and left side landmark was present in the left side rotation which was opposite direction to the scanner rotation (P < .05). Conclusions Patient movement during CBCT scan might cause landmark identification errors on the 3D surface model in relation to the direction of the scanner rotation. Clinicians should take this into consideration to prevent patient movement during CBCT scan, particularly horizontal movement. PMID:27065238

  15. Transcranial phase aberration correction using beam simulations and MR-ARFI

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Urvi Kaye, Elena; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery is a noninvasive technique for causing selective tissue necrosis. Variations in density, thickness, and shape of the skull cause aberrations in the location and shape of the focal zone. In this paper, the authors propose a hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to achieve aberration correction for transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. The technique uses ultrasound beam propagation simulations with MR Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI) to correct skull-caused phase aberrations. Methods: Skull-based numerical aberrations were obtained from a MR-guided focused ultrasound patient treatment and were added to all elements of the InSightec conformal bone focused ultrasound surgery transducer during transmission. In the first experiment, the 1024 aberrations derived from a human skull were condensed into 16 aberrations by averaging over the transducer area of 64 elements. In the second experiment, all 1024 aberrations were applied to the transducer. The aberrated MR-ARFI images were used in the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to find 16 estimated aberrations. These estimated aberrations were subtracted from the original aberrations to result in the corrected images. Each aberration experiment (16-aberration and 1024-aberration) was repeated three times. Results: The corrected MR-ARFI image was compared to the aberrated image and the ideal image (image with zero aberrations) for each experiment. The hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique resulted in an average increase in focal MR-ARFI phase of 44% for the 16-aberration case and 52% for the 1024-aberration case, and recovered 83% and 39% of the ideal MR-ARFI phase for the 16-aberrations and 1024-aberration case, respectively. Conclusions: Using one MR-ARFI image and noa priori information about the applied phase aberrations, the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique improved the maximum MR-ARFI phase of the beam's focus.

  16. Coherent beam combiner for a high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    2002-01-01

    A phase conjugate laser mirror employing Brillouin-enhanced four wave mixing allows multiple independent laser apertures to be phase locked producing an array of diffraction-limited beams with no piston phase errors. The beam combiner has application in laser and optical systems requiring high average power, high pulse energy, and low beam divergence. A broad range of applications exist in laser systems for industrial processing, especially in the field of metal surface treatment and laser shot peening.

  17. Propagation of structured light beams after multiple reflections in a spiral phase plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumala, Yisa S.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents propagation dynamics of structured light (complex light) containing optical vortices after it has undergone multiple reflections in a spiral phase plate (SPP) device having a nonzero surface reflection. In the calculations, the thick-plate approximation is assumed as it is expected to give a more accurate representation of the standard geometry of an SPP device from a low-surface reflection to a high-surface reflection. Calculations showing the propagation of counter-rotating optical vortices are presented, and the effect of the statistical nature of photons on the observation of the angular intensity modulation of the beam is discussed.

  18. Phase composition in NiTi near-surface layers after electron beam treatment and its variation depending on beam energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Ostapenko, Marina G.; Meisner, Ludmila L.; Lotkov, Aleksandr I. E-mail: egu@ispms.tsc.ru; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y. E-mail: egu@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    In the work, we study the mechanisms of structural phase state formation in NiTi surface layers after low-energy pulsed electron beam irradiation depending on the electron beam energy density. It is revealed that after electron beam treatment of the NiTi specimens at energy densities E{sub 1} = 15 J/cm{sup 2}, E{sub 2} = 20 J/cm{sup 2}, and E{sub 3} = 30 J/cm{sup 2}, a series of effects is observed: the absence of the Ti2Ni phase and the presence of new peaks correspond to the B19′ martensite phase with monoclinic structure. Estimation of the relative volume content of the B2 and B19′ phases from the total intensity of their peaks shows that the percentage of the martensite phase increases from ∼5 vol.% in the NiTi specimen irradiated at E{sub 1} = 15 J/cm{sup 2} to ∼80 vol.% in the NiTi specimen irradiated at E{sub 3} = 30 J/cm{sup 2}. It is found that in the NiTi specimens irradiated at E ≤ 20 J/cm{sup 2}, the layer that contains a martensite phase resides not on the surface but at some depth from it.

  19. Temporal analysis of laser beam propagation in the atmosphere using computer-generated long phase screens.

    PubMed

    Dios, Federico; Recolons, Jaume; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Batet, Oscar

    2008-02-01

    Temporal analysis of the irradiance at the detector plane is intended as the first step in the study of the mean fade time in a free optical communication system. In the present work this analysis has been performed for a Gaussian laser beam propagating in the atmospheric turbulence by means of computer simulation. To this end, we have adapted a previously known numerical method to the generation of long phase screens. The screens are displaced in a transverse direction as the wave is propagated, in order to simulate the wind effect. The amplitude of the temporal covariance and its power spectrum have been obtained at the optical axis, at the beam centroid and at a certain distance from these two points. Results have been worked out for weak, moderate and strong turbulence regimes and when possible they have been compared with theoretical models. These results show a significant contribution of beam wander to the temporal behaviour of the irradiance, even in the case of weak turbulence. We have also found that the spectral bandwidth of the covariance is hardly dependent on the Rytov variance.

  20. Generation of a twin beam at the cesium line and telecom wavelength by cavity phase matching.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y H; Xie, Z D; Ling, W; Lv, X J; Zhu, S N

    2011-08-15

    Cavity phase matching has been recently demonstrated as a phase-matching method for efficient nonlinear frequency conversion in a microcavity. Here we extend it to the Type I configuration using a sub-coherent-length optical parametric oscillator consisting of an MgO-doped lithium niobate crystal sheet. It generates a tunable single-longitudinal-mode twin beam, which covers the cesium D2 line of 852.1 nm and the extended band of optical communication. This microcavity is capable of peak output power of 58 kW with a maximum conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Broad applications in the areas of light-atom interaction, spectroscopy, optical telecommunication, and quantum optics can be expected.

  1. Determination of transverse phase-space and momentum error from size measurements along the 50-MeV H/sup -/ RCS injection line

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.A.; Takeda, H.

    1981-01-01

    The 50-MeV H/sup -/ injection line for the RCS at Argonne National Laboratory has 16 quadrupole and eight bending magnets. Horizontal and vertical profiles can be obtained at 12 wire scanner positions. Size information from these profiles can be used to determine the three ellipses parameters in each plane required to describe the transverse phase space. These locations that have dispersion permit the momentum error to be used as a fourth fitting parameter. The assumed accuracy of the size measurements provides an error matrix that predicts the rms errors of the fitted parameters.

  2. The use of the stationary phase method as a mathematical tool to determine the path of optical beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Silvânia A.; De Leo, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    We use the stationary phase method to determine the paths of optical beams that propagate through a dielectric block. In the presence of partial internal reflection, we recover the geometrical result obtained by using Snell's law. For total internal reflection, the stationary phase method overreaches Snell's law, predicting the Goos-Hänchen shift.

  3. Beam combinable, kilowatt, all-fiber amplifier based on phase-modulated laser gain competition.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Nader A; Flores, Angel; Anderson, Brian M; Dajani, Iyad

    2016-09-01

    We report power scaling results of a highly efficient narrow-linewidth monolithic Yb-doped fiber amplifier seeded with two signals, operating at 1038 and 1064 nm. With the appropriate seed power ratio applied, this technique was shown to suppress stimulated Brillouin scattering in conjunction with phase modulation, while generating the output power in predominantly the longer wavelength signal. Notably, the integration of laser gain competition with pseudo-random bit sequence phase modulation, set at a clock rate of 2.5 GHz and utilizing an optimized pattern to match the shortened effective nonlinear length, yielded 1 kW of output power. The beam quality was measured to be near the diffraction limit with no sign of transverse mode instability. Furthermore, the coherent beam combination performance of the amplifier provided a 90% combining efficiency with no indication of spectral broadening when compared to the single-tone case. Overall, the power scaling results represent a significant reduction in spectral linewidth compared to that of commercially available narrow-linewidth Yb-doped fiber amplifiers. PMID:27607948

  4. Development of Phased Array Probes for Austenitic Weld Inspections Using Multi-Gaussian Beam Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, N.; Baba, A.

    2008-02-01

    Phased array ultrasonic testing techniques have been applied to sizing of cracks in welds, especially stainless steels and nickel based alloys welds. Ultrasonic phased array probes are capable of providing high SN ratio and high resolution by means of focal beams with various depths, positions, and angles. In this study, a simple design method using numerical analysis is proposed to optimize parameters on array probes. Acoustical fields of array probes are calculated approximately based on a multi-Gaussian beam modeling for single transducers. Calculation results are compared with experimental data with a laser interferometer. Validity of the modeling for the acoustical fields of the array probes is confirmed by good agreement between simulations and experiments. In order to design array probes that satisfy inspection requirements, e.g. range and resolution, an index of focusing (focusing factor) is important in addition to the parameters of array probes. Specifications of array probes are discussed for two kinds of requirements, wide range and high resolution.

  5. Towards an intense radioactive 8Li beam at SARAF Phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsh, T. Y.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Jardin, P.; Pichard, A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Shachar, Y.; Silverman, I.

    2012-02-01

    The 8Li(α,n)11B reaction plays an important role in the r-process nucleosynthesis occurring in type II supernovae and in binary neutron stars. At high rates, this reaction can lead, despite the short 8Li half-life, to production of seed nuclei through a chain of reactions, which can then cause the formation of heavier nuclei via (n,γ) reactions. Several measurements of this reaction were carried out in the last few years using fast 8Li beams that are available at several RIB facilities at limited currents. A new production method for light Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) via fast neutron reactions is conceptually able to provide orders of magnitude higher RIB currents, up to 1012 pps. The high efficiency of the two-target production method has been experimentally proven for 6He production, in a similar manner to the 8Li production. We present a unique apparatus for 8Li production and extraction at the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility - SARAF. In 2011, it is expected that SARAF Phase-I will produce high intensity, 5 MeV deuteron beams for limited experiments. By using a LiF neutron converter, neutrons with energies of up to 20 MeV and a total yield of 1012 fast n/sec will be available per 1 mA of deuterons. As a secondary production target we are using discs of 65% porous B4C, mounted inside a high temperature furnace. 8Li, produced via the 11B(n,α)8Li reaction channel, diffuses out of the B4C target and is ionized in a thin rhenium surface ionizer. The total efficiency of 8Li RIB creation will be measured by means of alpha and beta measurements. Following the experiment at SARAF Phase I, better production and extraction schemes of light RIB, of great interest in various nuclear and astrophysics-related measurements, may become possible.

  6. Optical image hiding using double-phase retrieval algorithm based on nonlinear cryptosystem under vortex beam illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2015-03-01

    We propose a novel optical image hiding method based on a double-phase retrieval algorithm (DPRA) using iterative nonlinear double random phase encoding (NDRPE) in Fresnel domain under illumination of an optical vortex (OV) beam. The NDRPE-based DPRA is initially extended from the Fourier transform into the Fresnel domain, which makes the system more flexible and more compact. The proposed method has a faster convergence speed compared to its counterparts based on the linear double random phase encoding (LDRPE). A higher level of security also has been achieved by taking an OV mode as the illumination beam. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility and security of the proposed approach.

  7. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Chao, A.W.; Seryi, A.; Sramek, C.K.; /Rice U.

    2005-06-30

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ''banana effect''). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  8. A study of respiration-correlated cone-beam CT scans to correct target positioning errors in radiotherapy of thoracic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, J. P.; McNamara, J.; Yorke, E.; Pham, H.; Rimner, A.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: There is increasingly widespread usage of cone-beam CT (CBCT) for guiding radiation treatment in advanced-stage lung tumors, but difficulties associated with daily CBCT in conventionally fractionated treatments include imaging dose to the patient, increased workload and longer treatment times. Respiration-correlated cone-beam CT (RC-CBCT) can improve localization accuracy in mobile lung tumors, but further increases the time and workload for conventionally fractionated treatments. This study investigates whether RC-CBCT-guided correction of systematic tumor deviations in standard fractionated lung tumor radiation treatments is more effective than 2D image-based correction of skeletal deviations alone. A second study goal compares respiration-correlated vs respiration-averaged images for determining tumor deviations. Methods: Eleven stage II-IV nonsmall cell lung cancer patients are enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective off-line protocol using RC-CBCT guidance to correct for systematic errors in GTV position. Patients receive a respiration-correlated planning CT (RCCT) at simulation, daily kilovoltage RC-CBCT scans during the first week of treatment and weekly scans thereafter. Four types of correction methods are compared: (1) systematic error in gross tumor volume (GTV) position, (2) systematic error in skeletal anatomy, (3) daily skeletal corrections, and (4) weekly skeletal corrections. The comparison is in terms of weighted average of the residual GTV deviations measured from the RC-CBCT scans and representing the estimated residual deviation over the treatment course. In the second study goal, GTV deviations computed from matching RCCT and RC-CBCT are compared to deviations computed from matching respiration-averaged images consisting of a CBCT reconstructed using all projections and an average-intensity-projection CT computed from the RCCT. Results: Of the eleven patients in the GTV-based systematic correction protocol, two required no correction

  9. Structural and Magnetic Phase Transitions in Manganese Arsenide Thin-Films Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeckel, Felix Till

    Phase transitions play an important role in many fields of physics and engineering, and their study in bulk materials has a long tradition. Many of the experimental techniques involve measurements of thermodynamically extensive parameters. With the increasing technological importance of thin-film technology there is a pressing need to find new ways to study phase transitions at smaller length-scales, where the traditional methods are insufficient. In this regard, the phase transitions observed in thin-films of MnAs present interesting challenges. As a ferromagnetic material that can be grown epitaxially on a variety of technologically important substrates, MnAs is an interesting material for spintronics applications. In the bulk, the first order transition from the low temperature ferromagnetic alpha-phase to the beta-phase occurs at 313 K. The magnetic state of the beta-phase has remained controversial. A second order transition to the paramagnetic gamma-phase takes place at 398 K. In thin-films, the anisotropic strain imposed by the substrate leads to the interesting phenomenon of coexistence of alpha- and beta-phases in a regular array of stripes over an extended temperature range. In this dissertation these phase transitions are studied in films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (001). The films are confirmed to be of high structural quality and almost purely in the A0 orientation. A diverse set of experimental techniques, germane to thin-film technology, is used to probe the properties of the film: Temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction and atomic-force microscopy (AFM), as well as magnetotransport give insights into the structural properties, while the anomalous Hall effect is used as a probe of magnetization during the phase transition. In addition, reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) is used as a sensitive probe of electronic structure. Inductively coupled plasma etching with BCl3 is demonstrated to be effective for patterning MnAs. We show

  10. Dynamics of Timoshenko beam on linear and nonlinear foundation: Phase relations, significance of the second spectrum, stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manevich, A. I.

    2015-05-01

    Some controversial and unclear issues in the Timoshenko beam (TB) theory are analyzed with emphasis on features of two branches of frequencies. Taking into account the elastic foundation creates additional opportunities for comparative analysis of both the branches. Relationship between the second branch modes and so-called "thickness-shear mode" is discussed. Phase relations between the deformation and force factors in beam for both the branches are established which generalize the previously established relations. It is shown that the elastic foundation can change these relations for the first branch. Based on this analysis the significance of the second spectrum is assessed, and peculiarities of dispersion relations for frequency, phase and group velocities are explained. Free transverse waves in infinitely long beam on nonlinear (cubic) foundation are studied using the multiple scales method. The obtained nonlinear Schrödinger equation enables us to check stability of the harmonic waves in infinite beam and to determine diapasons of their modulational instability.

  11. Refinement of the crystal structural parameters of the intermediate phase of h-BaTiO3 using convergent-beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoichiro; Tsuda, Kenji; Akishige, Yukikuni; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    2004-11-01

    Crystal structural parameters (21 positional parameters and nine isotropic Debye-Waller factors) of the intermediate phase of hexagonal barium titanate (h-BaTiO3) have been refined by a structure analysis method using convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED); this method was developed by Tsuda & Tanaka [Acta Cryst. (1999), A55, 939-954]. In order to perform the analysis, a parallel computation using a computer cluster composed of 16 connected Pentium 4 PCs was introduced. A function of parallel computation has been implemented in our analysis software, MBFIT, with the aid of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). Parallel computation enabled the present refinement to be conducted using a [001] CBED pattern and a [010] CBED pattern simultaneously. Reliable errors for the refined structural parameters have been obtained from the analyses of four independent experimental data sets instead of using the errors obtained by the error-propagation rule of least-squares fitting. The parameters obtained have been found to agree well with those determined by a neutron Rietveld analysis.

  12. The application of the seam beam VLBI technique for the orbit determination of CE-5 in the rendezvous and docking phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong

    2016-07-01

    CE-5 will be launched in 2017-2018, and it is a lunar sample return mission. It is the first time for China to carry out the rendezvous and docking in the Moon. How to achieve rendezvous and docking successfully in the Moon is very important for CE-5 project. When the ascender is about 70 km farer away from the orbiter, the ground based tracking technique including range, Doppler and VLBI will be used to track the orbiter and the ascender. Later the ascender will approach the orbiter automatically. Here the application of the same beam VLBI for the orbit determination of the orbiter and the ascender in the long range of the rendezvous and docking phase is discussed. The same beam VLBI technique can be used to track the orbiter and the ascender simultaneously when they are in the same beam. Delta delay of the two probes can be derived, and the measurement accuracy is much higher than the traditional VLBI data because of the cancelation of common errors. Theoretically it can result in more accurate relative orbit between the two probes. The simulation results show that the relative position accuracy of the orbiter and ascender can reach about 1 m in CE-5 project with delta delay data of 10 ps.

  13. Simultaneous control on the intensity and phase profile of laser beam with Monge-Ampère equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaqin; Wu, Rengmao; Zheng, Zhenrong; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2014-12-01

    Laser beam shaping requires controlling the intensity and phase profile of the input laser beam simultaneously. In this paper, a method for designing double freeform surfaces is presented to solve the laser beam shaping problem. Based on Snell's law and conservation law of energy, a mathematical model is established to convert the double surfaces design problem into an elliptic Monge-Ampère equation with a nonlinear boundary problem by imposing a constraint on the optical path length between the input and output wavefronts. Two different configurations of the beam shaping system are discussed and the good results show clearly the Monge-Ampère equation method provides an effective tool in solving the challenging problem of laser beam shaping.

  14. Development of system using beam's eye view images to measure respiratory motion tracking errors in image-guided robotic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Shiomi, Hiroya; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Taguchi, Junichi; Okawa, Kohei; Kikuchi, Chie; Inada, Kosaku; Iwabuchi, Michio; Murai, Taro; Koike, Izumi; Tatewaki, Koshi; Ohta, Seiji; Inoue, Tomio

    2015-01-08

    The accuracy of the CyberKnife Synchrony Respiratory Tracking System (SRTS) is considered to be patient-dependent because the SRTS relies on an individual correlation between the internal tumor position (ITP) and the external marker position (EMP), as well as a prediction method to compensate for the delay incurred to adjust the position of the linear accelerator (linac). We aimed to develop a system for obtaining pretreatment statistical measurements of the SRTS tracking error by using beam's eye view (BEV) images, to enable the prediction of the patient-specific accuracy. The respiratory motion data for the ITP and the EMP were derived from cine MR images obtained from 23 patients. The dynamic motion phantom was used to reproduce both the ITP and EMP motions. The CyberKnife was subsequently operated with the SRTS, with a CCD camera mounted on the head of the linac. BEV images from the CCD camera were recorded during the tracking of a ball target by the linac. The tracking error was measured at 15 Hz using in-house software. To assess the precision of the position detection using an MR image, the positions of test tubes (determined from MR images) were compared with their actual positions. To assess the precision of the position detection of the ball, ball positions measured from BEV images were compared with values measured using a Vernier caliper. The SRTS accuracy was evaluated by determining the tracking error that could be identified with a probability of more than 95% (Ep95). The detection precision of the tumor position (determined from cine MR images) was < 0.2 mm. The detection precision of the tracking error when using the BEV images was < 0.2mm. These two detection precisions were derived from our measurement system and were not obtained from the SRTS. The median of Ep95 was found to be 1.5 (range, 1.0-3.5) mm. The difference between the minimum and maximum Ep95 was 2.5mm, indicating that this provides a better means of evaluating patient-specific SRTS

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of TrueBeam flattening-filter-free beams using Varian phase-space files: Comparison with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Belosi, Maria F.; Fogliata, Antonella E-mail: afc@iosi.ch; Cozzi, Luca; Clivio, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Rodriguez, Miguel; Sempau, Josep; Krauss, Harald; Khamphan, Catherine; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Puxeu, Josep; Fedele, David; Mancosu, Pietro; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-space files for Monte Carlo simulation of the Varian TrueBeam beams have been made available by Varian. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the distributed phase-space files for flattening filter free (FFF) beams, against experimental measurements from ten TrueBeam Linacs. Methods: The phase-space files have been used as input in PRIMO, a recently released Monte Carlo program based on thePENELOPE code. Simulations of 6 and 10 MV FFF were computed in a virtual water phantom for field sizes 3 × 3, 6 × 6, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} using 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3} voxels and for 20 × 20 and 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} with 2 × 2 × 2 mm{sup 3} voxels. The particles contained in the initial phase-space files were transported downstream to a plane just above the phantom surface, where a subsequent phase-space file was tallied. Particles were transported downstream this second phase-space file to the water phantom. Experimental data consisted of depth doses and profiles at five different depths acquired at SSD = 100 cm (seven datasets) and SSD = 90 cm (three datasets). Simulations and experimental data were compared in terms of dose difference. Gamma analysis was also performed using 1%, 1 mm and 2%, 2 mm criteria of dose-difference and distance-to-agreement, respectively. Additionally, the parameters characterizing the dose profiles of unflattened beams were evaluated for both measurements and simulations. Results: Analysis of depth dose curves showed that dose differences increased with increasing field size and depth; this effect might be partly motivated due to an underestimation of the primary beam energy used to compute the phase-space files. Average dose differences reached 1% for the largest field size. Lateral profiles presented dose differences well within 1% for fields up to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}, while the discrepancy increased toward 2% in the 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} cases. Gamma analysis resulted in an agreement of 100% when a 2%, 2 mm criterion

  16. Control of the Goos-Hänchen shifts of a probe light beam using phase tunability of the intracavity medium.

    PubMed

    Radmehr, Arash; Sahrai, M; Sattari, H

    2016-03-10

    This paper presents the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts of a probe light beam in a fixed cavity configuration containing the three level V-type atomic medium. We found that in the presence of decay-induced interference, the lateral shifts of both the reflected and transmitted probe light beam can easily be controlled just by the relative phase of applied fields. We also discuss the intensity of the applied field on GH shifts of the reflected and transmitted probe light beam. PMID:26974787

  17. Analysis of beam loss mechanism in the Project X linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Minimization of the beam losses in a multi-MW H{sup -} linac such as ProjectX to a level below 1 W/m is a challenging task. The impact of different mechanism of beam stripping, including stripping in electric and magnetic fields, residual gas, blackbody radiation and intra-beam stripping, is analyzed. Other sources of beam losses are misalignements of beamline elements and errors in RF fields and phases. We present in this paper requirements for dynamic errors and correction schemes to keep beam losses under control.

  18. Enhanced 4D cone-beam CT with inter-phase motion model.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianfang; Koong, Albert; Xing, Lei

    2007-09-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) is commonly obtained by respiratory phase binning of the projections, followed by independent reconstructions of the rebinned data in each phase bin. Due to the significantly reduced number of projections per reconstruction, the quality of the 4DCBCT images is often degraded by view-aliasing artifacts easily seen in the axial view. Acquisitions using multiple gantry rotations or slow gantry rotation can increase the number of projections and substantially improve the 4D images. However, the extra cost of the scan time may set fundamental limits to their applications in clinics. Improving the trade-off between image quality and scan time is the key to making 4D onboard imaging practical and more useful. In this article, we present a novel technique toward high-quality 4DCBCT imaging without prolonging the acquisition time, referred to as the "enhanced 4DCBCT". The method correlates the data in different phase bins and integrates the internal motion into the 4DCBCT image formulation. Several strategies of the motion derivation are discussed, and the resultant images are assessed with numerical simulations as well as a clinical case.

  19. Structural phase states in NiTi near-surface layers modified by electron and ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Ludmila Meisner, Stanislav; Mironov, Yurii Kashin, Oleg Lotkov, Aleksandr; Kudryashov, Andrey

    2014-11-14

    The paper considers the effects arising on X-ray diffraction patterns taken in different diffraction geometries and how these effects can be interpreted to judge structural states in NiTi near-surface regions after electron and ion beam treatment. It is shown that qualitative and quantitative analysis of phase composition, lattice parameters of main phases, elastic stress states, and their in-depth variation requires X-ray diffraction patterns in both symmetric Bragg–Brentano and asymmetric Lambot–Vassamilleta geometries with variation in X-ray wavelengths and imaging conditions (with and with no β-filter). These techniques of structural phase analysis are more efficient when the thickness of modified NiTi surface layers is 1–10 μm (after electron beam treatment) and requires special imaging conditions when the thickness of modified NiTi surface layers is no greater than 1 μm (after ion beam treatment)

  20. On-shot laser beam diagnostics for high-power laser facility with phase modulation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X.; Veetil, S. P.; Liu, C.; Tao, H.; Jiang, Y.; Lin, Q.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.

    2016-05-01

    A coherent-modulation-imaging-based (CMI) algorithm has been employed for on-shot laser beam diagnostics in high-power laser facilities, where high-intensity short-pulsed lasers from terawatt to petawatt are designed to realize inertial confinement fusion (ICF). A single-shot intensity measurement is sufficient for wave-front reconstruction, both for the near-field and far-field at the same time. The iterative reconstruction process is computationally very efficient and was completed in dozens of seconds by the additional use of a GPU device to speed it up. The compact measurement unit—including a CCD and a piece of pre-characterized phase plate—makes it convenient for focal-spot intensity prediction in the target chamber. It can be placed almost anywhere in high-power laser facilities to achieve near-field wave-front diagnostics. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated by conducting a series of experiments with diagnostic beams and seed pulses with deactivated amplifiers in our high-power laser system.

  1. Proton beam lithography in negative tone liquid phase PDMS polymer resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huszank, Robert; Rajta, István; Cserháti, Csaba

    2015-04-01

    In this work we investigated the applicability of liquid PDMS polymer as a negative resist material for direct proton beam writing technique. We irradiated the polymer in liquid phase, spin-coated on different substrate materials creating various microstructures. PDMS pre-polymer was cross-linked just by PBW. As the cross-linking process increases, the irradiated area becomes more solid. The rate of the solidification strongly depends on the deposited ion dose. The effects of fluence, beam current, substrate type and developer solvent was investigated. Furthermore, at the irradiated areas the adhesion, the wettability and Young's modulus also changes due to the chemical change of the PDMS polymer. This effect makes the possibility to form microstructures in PDMS with tunable adhesion and wettability properties. In practical viewpoint, the PDMS resist can also have some advantages compared to other resists such as easy stripping, very fast developing (as the un-cross-linked PDMS is soluble in many organic solvents), not sensitive to light, high current or high fluence.

  2. Panoramic infrared-imaging spectroradiometer model with reverse phase-modulated beam broadcasting.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, A H

    1997-03-20

    The optical design of a passive remote sensor, a panoramic spectroradiometer (PANSPEC), and its computer-simulated image performance are presented. PANSPEC monitors the surrounding infrared environment for chemical clouds, detecting a presence once absorption or emission spectra characteristic of the chemical species are resolved. PANSPEC broadcasts chemical presence and cloud heading when equipped with a laser transmitter that projects a polarized laser beam source with phase encryption back through the optical system into object space. Various merit functions were programmed and accessed during computer optimization runs for shaping and positioning of the instrument's semishell entrance window, collector, collimator, interferometer, and imager. The result is a balanced near-diffraction-limited circular image, 6.3 mm across with 10-line pairs/mm spatial resolution at 50% modulation, and an f/2.3 working speed.

  3. Bismuth-induced phase control of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zhenyu; Chen, Pingping E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Shi, Suixing; Yao, Luchi; Zhou, Xiaohao; Lu, Wei E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Zhang, Zhi; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Jin

    2014-10-20

    In this work, the crystal structure of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been tailored only by bismuth without changing the growth temperature and V/III flux ratio. The introduction of bismuth can lead to the formation of zinc-blende GaAs nanowires, while the removal of bismuth changes the structure into a 4H polytypism before it turns back to the wurtzite phase eventually. The theoretical calculation shows that it is the steadiest for bismuth to adsorb on the GaAs(111){sub B} surface compared to the liquid gold catalyst surface and the interface between the gold catalyst droplet and the nanowire, and these adsorbed bismuth could decrease the diffusion length of adsorbed Ga and hence the supersaturation of Ga in the gold catalyst droplet.

  4. Influence of quantized diffractive phase element on the axial uniformity of pseudo-nondiffracting beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, Jyh-Rou; Wei, An-Chi; Wu, Wen-Hong; Chang, Chun-Li

    2015-07-01

    The analysis of the diffractive phase elements (DPEs) that synthesizes pseudo-nondiffracting beams (PNDBs) in different axial regions are described. Those elements are designed by using conjugate-gradient method algorithm. To meet the requirement of lithography fabrication process, the obtained optimum continuous surface profile of DPEs must be quantized in the multilevel structure. In order to analyze the impact of different quantization levels, the axial-illuminance RMS variance of PNDBs for each quantized DPE is calculated and compared with each other. The compared results show that the axial illuminance of the PNDB of DPE with smaller-levels quantization fluctuates more rapidly than that of DPE with larger-levels quantization. Meanwhile, the analyses also show that the axial uniformity of the PNDB of DPE with a longer focal length is less sensitive to the quantization level.

  5. SweepSAR: Beam-forming on Receive Using a Reflector-Phased Array Feed Combination for Spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Krieger, G.; Rosen, P.; Younis, M.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Huber, S.; Jordan, R.; Moreira, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an alternative approach is described that is suited for longer wavelength SARs in particular, employing a large, deployable reflector antenna and a much simpler phased array feed. To illuminate a wide swath, a substantial fraction of the phased array feed is excited on transmit to sub-illuminate the reflector. Shorter transmit pulses are required than for conventional SAR. On receive, a much smaller portion of the phased array feed is used to collect the return echo, so that a greater portion of the reflector antenna area is used. The locus of the portion of the phased array used on receive is adjusted using an analog beam steering network, to 'sweep' the receive beam(s) across the illuminated swath, tracking the return echo. This is similar in some respects to the whiskbroom approach to optical sensors, hence the name: SweepSAR.SweepSAR has advantages over conventional SAR in that it requires less transmit power, and if the receive beam is narrow enough, it is relatively immune to range ambiguities. Compared to direct radiating arrays with digital beam- forming, it is much simpler to implement, uses currently available technologies, is better suited for longer wavelength systems, and does not require extremely high data rates or onboard processing.

  6. 3D algebraic iterative reconstruction for cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications.

  7. Beam-path conditioning for high-power laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T.; Johnson, D.; Languirand, M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of mirrors and windows by high-power radiation from a laser transmitter produces turbulent density gradients in the gas near the optical surfaces. If the gradients are left uncontrolled, the resulting phase errors reduce the intensity on the target and degrade the signal returned to a receiver. Beam path conditioning maximizes the efficiency of the optical system by alleviating thermal turbulence within the beam path. Keywords: High power radiation, Beam path, Optical surface, Laser beams, Reprints. (JHD)

  8. Transformation of optical-vortex beams by holograms with embedded phase singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekshaev, A. Ya.; Orlinska, O. V.

    2010-04-01

    Spatial characteristics of diffracted beams produced by the "fork" holograms from incident circular Laguerre-Gaussian modes are studied theoretically. The complex amplitude distribution of a diffracted beam is described by models of the Kummer beam or of the hypergeometric-Gaussian beam. Physically, in most cases its structure is formed under the influence of the divergent spherical wave originating from the discontinuity caused by the hologram's groove bifurcation. Presence of this wave is manifested by the ripple structure in the near-field beam pattern and by the power-law amplitude decay at the beam periphery. Conditions when the divergent wave is not excited are discussed. The diffracted beam carries a screw wavefront dislocation (optical vortex) whose order equals to algebraic sum of the incident beam azimuthal index and the topological charge of the singularity imparted by the hologram. The input beam singularity can be healed when the above sum is zero. In such cases the diffracted beam can provide better energy concentration in the central intensity peak than the Gaussian beam whose initial distribution coincides with the Gaussian envelope of the incident beam. Applications are possible for generation of optical-vortex beams with prescribed properties and for analyzing the optical-vortex beams in problems of information processing.

  9. Calibration artefacts in radio interferometry - III. Phase-only calibration and primary beam correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobler, T. L.; Stewart, A. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Kenyon, J. S.; Smirnov, O. M.

    2016-09-01

    This is the third installment in a series of papers in which we investigate calibration artefacts. Calibration artefacts (also known as ghosts or spurious sources) are created when we calibrate with an incomplete model. In the first two papers of this series, we developed a mathematical framework which enabled us to study the ghosting mechanism itself. An interesting concomitant of the second paper was that ghosts appear in symmetrical pairs. This could possibly account for spurious symmetrization. Spurious symmetrization refers to the appearance of a spurious source (the antighost) symmetrically opposite an unmodelled source around a modelled source. The analysis in the first two papers indicates that the antighost is usually very faint, in particular, when a large number of antennas are used. This suggests that spurious symmetrization will mainly occur at an almost undetectable flux level. In this paper, we show that phase-only calibration produces an antighost that is N-times (where N denotes the number of antennas in the array) as bright as the one produced by phase and amplitude calibration and that this already bright ghost can be further amplified by the primary beam correction.

  10. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Wang, An; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J.

    2013-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (-1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  11. Interaction-Point Phase-Space Characterization using Single-Beam and Luminous-Region Measurements at PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kozanecki, W; Bevan, A.J.; Viaud, B.F.; Cai, Y.; Fisher, A.S.; O'Grady, C.; Lindquist, B.; Roodman, A.; J.M.Thompson, M.Weaver; /SLAC

    2008-09-09

    We present an extensive experimental characterization of the e{sup {+-}} phase space at the interaction point of the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory, that combines a detailed mapping of luminous-region observables using the BABAR detector, with stored-beam measurements by accelerator techniques.

  12. Intrinsic spontaneous emission-induced fluctuations of the output optical beam power and phase in a diode amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatov, A. P.; Drakin, A. E.; D'yachkov, N. V.; Gushchik, T. I.

    2016-08-01

    Output optical beam intensity and phase fluctuations are analysed in a classical approach to describing the propagation and amplification of spontaneous emission in the active region of a laser diode with a gain saturated by input monochromatic light. We find their spectral densities and dispersion and the correlation coefficient of the two-dimensional probability distribution function of the fluctuations.

  13. Optical BEAMTAP beam-forming and jammer-nulling system for broadband phased-array antennas.

    PubMed

    Kriehn, G; Kiruluta, A; Silveira, P E; Weaver, S; Kraut, S; Wagner, K; Weverka, R T; Griffiths, L

    2000-01-10

    We present an approach to receive-mode broadband beam forming and jammer nulling for large adaptive antenna arrays as well as its efficient and compact optical implementation. This broadband efficient adaptive method for true-time-delay array processing (BEAMTAP) algorithm decreases the number of tapped delay lines required for processing an N-element phased-array antenna from N to only 2, producing an enormous savings in delay-line hardware (especially for large broadband arrays) while still providing the full NM degrees of freedom of a conventional N-element time-delay-and-sum beam former that requires N tapped delay lines with M taps each. This allows the system to adapt fully and optimally to an arbitrarily complex spatiotemporal signal environment that can contain broadband signals of interest, as well as interference sources and narrow-band and broadband jammers--all of which can arrive from arbitrary angles onto an arbitrarily shaped array--thus enabling a variety of applications in radar, sonar, and communication. This algorithm is an excellent match with the capabilities of radio frequency (rf) photonic systems, as it uses a coherent optically modulated fiber-optic feed network, gratings in a photorefractive crystal as adaptive weights, a traveling-wave detector for generating time delay, and an acousto-optic device to control weight adaptation. Because the number of available adaptive coefficients in a photorefractive crystal is as large as 10(9), these photonic systems can adaptively control arbitrarily large one- or two-dimensional antenna arrays that are well beyond the capabilities of conventional rf and real-time digital signal processing techniques or alternative photonic techniques.

  14. Phase I Trial of Bortezomib and Concurrent External Beam Radiation in Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Chen Changhu; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Swing, Robyn; Raben, David

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated dose of bortezomib with concurrent external beam radiation therapy in patients with incurable solid malignant tumors requiring palliative therapy. Methods and Materials: An open label, dose escalation, phase I clinical trial evaluated the safety of three dose levels of bortezomib administered intravenously (1.0 mg/m{sup 2}, 1.3 mg/m{sup 2}, and 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}/ dose) once weekly with concurrent radiation in patients with histologically confirmed solid tumors and a radiographically appreciable lesion suitable for palliative radiation therapy. All patients received 40 Gy in 16 fractions to the target lesion. Dose-limiting toxicity was the primary endpoint, defined as any grade 4 hematologic toxicity, any grade {>=}3 nonhematologic toxicity, or any toxicity requiring treatment to be delayed for {>=}2 weeks. Results: A total of 12 patients were enrolled. Primary sites included prostate (3 patients), head and neck (3 patients), uterus (1 patient), abdomen (1 patient), breast (1 patient), kidney (1 patient), lung (1 patient), and colon (1 patient). The maximum tolerated dose was not realized with a maximum dose of 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}. One case of dose-limiting toxicity was appreciated (grade 3 urosepsis) and felt to be unrelated to bortezomib. The most common grade 3 toxicity was lymphopenia (10 patients). Common grade 1 to 2 events included nausea (7 patients), infection without neutropenia (6 patients), diarrhea (5 patients), and fatigue (5 patients). Conclusions: The combination of palliative external beam radiation with concurrent weekly bortezomib therapy at a dose of 1.6 mg/m{sup 2} is well tolerated in patients with metastatic solid tumors. The maximum tolerated dose of once weekly bortezomib delivered concurrently with radiation therapy is greater than 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}.

  15. Optical BEAMTAP Beam-Forming and Jammer-Nulling System for Broadband Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriehn, Gregory; Kiruluta, Andrew; Silveira, Paulo E. X.; Weaver, Sam; Kraut, Shawn; Wagner, Kelvin; Weverka, R. Ted; Griffiths, Lloyd

    2000-01-01

    We present an approach to receive-mode broadband beam forming and jammer nulling for large adaptive antenna arrays as well as its efficient and compact optical implementation. This broadband efficient adaptive method for true-time-delay array processing (BEAMTAP) algorithm decreases the number of tapped delay lines required for processing an N -element phased-array antenna from N to only 2, producing an enormous savings in delay-line hardware (especially for large broadband arrays) while still providing the full NM degrees of freedom of a conventional N -element time-delay-and-sum beam former that requires N tapped delay lines with M taps each. This allows the system to adapt fully and optimally to an arbitrarily complex spatiotemporal signal environment that can contain broadband signals of interest, as well as interference sources and narrow-band and broadband jammers all of which can arrive from arbitrary angles onto an arbitrarily shaped array thus enabling a variety of applications in radar, sonar, and communication. This algorithm is an excellent match with the capabilities of radio frequency (rf) photonic systems, as it uses a coherent optically modulated fiber-optic feed network, gratings in a photorefractive crystal as adaptive weights, a traveling-wave detector for generating time delay, and an acousto-optic device to control weight adaptation. Because the number of available adaptive coefficients in a photorefractive crystal is as large as 10 9 , these photonic systems can adaptively control arbitrarily large one- or two-dimensional antenna arrays that are well beyond the capabilities of conventional rf and real-time digital signal processing techniques or alternative photonic techniques.

  16. Field error lottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James Elliott, C.; McVey, Brian D.; Quimby, David C.

    1991-07-01

    The level of field errors in a free electron laser (FEL) is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is use of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond convenient mechanical tolerances of ± 25 μm, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure using direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time.

  17. Field error lottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. James; McVey, Brian D.; Quimby, David C.

    1990-11-01

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement, and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of (plus minus)25(mu)m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time.

  18. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. ); Quimby, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Measuring Cyclic Error in Laser Heterodyne Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Abramovici, Alexander; Zhao, Feng; Dekens, Frank; An, Xin; Azizi, Alireza; Chapsky, Jacob; Halverson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus have been devised for measuring cyclic errors in the readouts of laser heterodyne interferometers that are configured and operated as displacement gauges. The cyclic errors arise as a consequence of mixing of spurious optical and electrical signals in beam launchers that are subsystems of such interferometers. The conventional approach to measurement of cyclic error involves phase measurements and yields values precise to within about 10 pm over air optical paths at laser wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. The present approach, which involves amplitude measurements instead of phase measurements, yields values precise to about .0.1 microns . about 100 times the precision of the conventional approach. In a displacement gauge of the type of interest here, the laser heterodyne interferometer is used to measure any change in distance along an optical axis between two corner-cube retroreflectors. One of the corner-cube retroreflectors is mounted on a piezoelectric transducer (see figure), which is used to introduce a low-frequency periodic displacement that can be measured by the gauges. The transducer is excited at a frequency of 9 Hz by a triangular waveform to generate a 9-Hz triangular-wave displacement having an amplitude of 25 microns. The displacement gives rise to both amplitude and phase modulation of the heterodyne signals in the gauges. The modulation includes cyclic error components, and the magnitude of the cyclic-error component of the phase modulation is what one needs to measure in order to determine the magnitude of the cyclic displacement error. The precision attainable in the conventional (phase measurement) approach to measuring cyclic error is limited because the phase measurements are af-

  20. Kinetic Description of Intense Beam Propagation Through a Periodic Focusing Field for Uniform Phase-Space Density

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Davidson; Hong Qin; Stephan I. Tzenov; Edward A. Startsev

    2003-02-26

    The Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate the nonlinear evolution of an intense sheet beam with distribution function f{sub b}(x,x{prime},s) propagating through a periodic focusing lattice k{sub x}(s+S) = k{sub x}(s), where S = const is the lattice period. The analysis considers the special class of distribution functions with uniform phase-space density f{sub b}(x,x{prime},s) = A = const inside of the simply connected boundary curves, x{prime}{sub +}(x,s) and x{prime}{sub -}(x,s), in the two-dimensional phase space (x,x{prime}). Coupled nonlinear equations are derived describing the self-consistent evolution of the boundary curves, x{prime}{sub +}(x,s) and x{prime}{sub -}(x,s), and the self-field potential {psi}(x,s) = e{sub b}{phi}(x,s)/{gamma}{sub b}m{sub b}{beta}{sub g}{sup 2}c{sup 2}. The resulting model is shown to be exactly equivalent to a (truncated) warm-fluid description with zero heat flow and triple-adiabatic equation-of-state with scalar pressure P{sub b}(x,s) = const x [n{sub b}(x,s)]. Such a fluid model is amenable to direct analysis by transforming to Lagrangian variables following the motion of a fluid element. Specific examples of periodically focused beam equilibria are presented, ranging from a finite-emittance beam in which the boundary curves in phase space (x,x{prime}) correspond to a pulsating parallelogram, to a cold beam in which the number density of beam particles, n{sub b}(x,s), exhibits large-amplitude periodic oscillations. For the case of a sheet beam with uniform phase-space density, the present analysis clearly demonstrates the existence of periodically focused beam equilibria without the undesirable feature of an inverted population in phase space that is characteristic of the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij beam distribution.

  1. Phase and Structural States Formed in Titanium Nickelide Subsurface Layers Exposed to High-Current Pulsed Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyman, A. A.; Meisner, L. L.; Lotkov, A. I.; Semin, V. O.

    2015-06-01

    The behavior of the non-equilibrium states formed in the subsurface layers of a titanium nickelide-based alloy exposed to electron beams operated in the pulsed surface layer melting mode is investigated experimentally. Using methods of an x-ray diffraction analysis, and optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopies, an 8-10 μm thick surface layer is shown to exhibit В2 phase-based structure undergoing inhomogeneous lattice microstrain. The core layer located at a depth of 10-20 μm below the irradiated surface contains a small amount (up to 5 vol.%) of a phase with В19' martensite structure along with a slightly distorted lattice and unmelted Ti2Ni phase particles. Electron beam treatment brings about changes in the chemical composition of the surface-modified layer which becomes enriched in titanium owing to the dissolution of the Ti2Ni phase particles therein. Transmission electron microscopy has not revealed martensite phases in the modified layer. The electron beam exposure of the titanium nickelide surface is assumed to give rise to nonequilibrium highly distorted bcc structure.

  2. Generation of phase - matched coherent point source in plasma media by propagated X-ray laser seeded beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, T.; Faenov, A.; Magnitskiy, S.; Nagorskiy, N.; Tanaka, M.; Ishino, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kando, M.; Kato, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant interest in developing the coherent table-top X-ray lasers. Advent of plasma-based transient collisional excitation x-ray laser and particular, injection of coherent seeded beam, especially high-order harmonics, has tremendously improved the spatial coherence of such lasers, what allowed them to be the same widely used as synchrotron sources. Here we report experimental founding of unknown interference structure in a spatial profile of the output beam of the two-stage plasma X-ray laser. That allowed us experimental and theoretical discovering a new phenomenon consisted in a generation of phase-matched coherent point source in a laser plasma media by propagated X-ray laser seeded beam. This phenomenon could extend the applications of such x-ray lasers. For explanation of the observed phenomenon a new method of solving the standard system of Maxwell-Bloch equations has been developed. It was found that the interference pattern in the output laser beam was formed due to an emergence of phase-matched coherent virtual point source in the XRL amplifier and could be treated as the first observation of mirage phenomenon, analogous to the optical mirage, but in X-rays. The obtained results bring new comprehension into the physical nature of amplification of X-ray radiation in laser-induced plasma amplifiers and opening new opportunities for X-ray interferometry, holography and other applications, which requiring multiple rigidly phased sources of coherent radiation.

  3. Symmetry control using beam phasing in ~0.2 NIF scale high temperature Hohlraum experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Delamater, Norman D; Wilson, Goug C; Kyrala, George A; Seifter, Achim; Hoffman, N M; Dodd, E; Glebov, V

    2009-01-01

    Results are shown from recent experiments at the Omega laser facility, using 40 Omega beams driving the hohlraum with 3 cones from each side and up to 19.5 kJ of laser energy. Beam phasing is achieved by decreasing the energy separately in each of the three cones, by 3 kJ, for a total drive energy of 16.5kJ. This results in a more asymmetric drive, which will vary the shape of the imploded symmetry capsule core from round to oblate or prolate in a systematic and controlled manner. These results would be the first demonstration of beam phasing for implosions in such 'high temperature' (275 eV) hohlraums at Omega. Dante measurements confirmed the predicted peak drive temperatures of 275 eV. Implosion core time dependent x-ray images were obtained from framing camera data which show the expected change in symmetry due to beam phasing and which also agree well with post processed hydro code calculations. Time resolved hard x-ray data has been obtained and it was found that the hard x-rays are correlated mainly with the low angle 21{sup o} degree cone.

  4. MIMO based optical phased array technology with electronic beam steering for laser radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neha; Zmuda, Henry

    2010-04-01

    This paper will address the analysis and design of an electronically scanned phased array laser radar (ladar) system utilizing the techniques of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) array design. MIMO radar is has attracted much attention recently from both researchers and practitioners alike due to its significant potential for advancing the state-of-the-art RF radar technology. The laser radar architecture presented stands to gain significant inroads on the ability to apply RF array processing methods to laser radar systems in several ways. Specifically, using MIMO array design concepts, it is shown that the resolution of the ladar array can substantially exceed the diffraction limited resolution of a conventional array. Additionally, the use of array methods provides the capability to electronically steer the aperture, thus avoiding the mechanical beam scanning methods generally encountered in laser radar systems. Finally, by using an array of radiators, an increase in total radiated power is achieved, relieving the power burden on a single laser. The problems traditionally encountered in applying conventional array techniques to laser/detector arrays, for example, the inability to achieve half-wavelength spacing or the surfacing of source coherence issues, actually work to one's advantage when viewed in the MIMO paradigm. It is anticipated that the successful implementation of this system will significantly advance the state-of-the-art of laser radar capabilities for high speed imaging, target detection, tracking, and signature analysis.

  5. Volume phase holographic grating used for beams combination of RGB primary colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xizhao; Tang, Minxue

    2013-12-01

    Volume phase holographic grating (VPHG) has the characteristics of high diffraction efficiency, high signal to noise ratio, high wavelength and angular selectivity, low scattering , low absorption and low cost. It has been widely used in high resolution spectrometer, wavelength division multiplexing and pulse compression technique. In this paper, a novel kind of RGB primary colors beams combiner which is consisted of a transmission VPHG and a reflection VPHG as core components is proposed. The design idea of the element is described in detail. Based on the principle of VPHG, the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) and Kogelnik's coupled wave theory, diffraction properties of the transmission and reflection VPHG are studied theoretically. As an example, three primary colors at wavelengths of 632.8nm, 532nm and 476.5nm are taken into account. Dichromated gelatin (DCG) is used as the holographic recording material. The grating parameters are determined by the Bragg conditions. The TE and TM wave diffraction efficiency, the wavelength selectivity and the angular selectivity of the transmission and reflection VPHG are calculated and optimized by setting the amplitude of the index modulation (Δn) and the thickness of the gelatin layer (d) by applying Kogelnik's coupled wave theory and G-solver software, respectively. The theoretical calculating results give guidance for further manufacture of the element.

  6. Decomposition of gas-phase diphenylether at 473 K by electron beam generated plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Ha; Hakoda, Teruyuki; Kojima, Takuji

    2003-03-01

    Decomposition of gas-phase diphenylether (DPE) in the order of several parts per million by volume (ppmv) was studied as a model compound of dioxin using a flow-type electron-beam reactor at an elevated temperature of 473 K. The ground state oxygen (3P) atoms played an important role in the decomposition of DPE resulting in the formation of 1,4-hydroquinone (HQ) as a major ring retaining product. The high yield of hydroquinone indicated that the breakage of ether bond (C-O) is important in the initial step of DPE decomposition. Ring cleavage products were CO and CO2, and NO2 was also produced from background N2-O2. The sum of the yields of HQ, CO2 and CO accounts for over 90% of the removed DPE. Hydroxyl radicals (OH) were less important in the dilute DPE decomposition at a high water content, and were mostly consumed by recombination reactions to form hydrogen peroxide. The smaller the initial DPE concentrations, the higher the decomposition efficiency and the lower the yields of primary products. NO scavenges oxygen atoms and decreases the DPE decomposition, while the addition of n-butane causes positive effect on the decomposition of DPE due to the several secondary radicals (HO2, alkyl and alkoxy radicals) produced during the decomposition of n-butane.

  7. Tumor volume measurement error using computed tomography imaging in a phase II clinical trial in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Henschke, Claudia I; Yankelevitz, David F; Yip, Rowena; Archer, Venice; Zahlmann, Gudrun; Krishnan, Karthik; Helba, Brian; Avila, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    To address the error introduced by computed tomography (CT) scanners when assessing volume and unidimensional measurement of solid tumors, we scanned a precision manufactured pocket phantom simultaneously with patients enrolled in a lung cancer clinical trial. Dedicated software quantified bias and random error in the [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] dimensions of a Teflon sphere and also quantified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and volume measurements using both constant and adaptive thresholding. We found that underestimation bias was essentially the same for [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] dimensions using constant thresholding and had similar values for adaptive thresholding. The random error of these length measurements as measured by the standard deviation and coefficient of variation was 0.10 mm (0.65), 0.11 mm (0.71), and 0.59 mm (3.75) for constant thresholding and 0.08 mm (0.51), 0.09 mm (0.56), and 0.58 mm (3.68) for adaptive thresholding, respectively. For random error, however, [Formula: see text] lengths had at least a fivefold higher standard deviation and coefficient of variation than [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Observed [Formula: see text]-dimension error was especially high for some 8 and 16 slice CT models. Error in CT image formation, in particular, for models with low numbers of detector rows, may be large enough to be misinterpreted as representing either treatment response or disease progression.

  8. Tumor volume measurement error using computed tomography imaging in a phase II clinical trial in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Henschke, Claudia I; Yankelevitz, David F; Yip, Rowena; Archer, Venice; Zahlmann, Gudrun; Krishnan, Karthik; Helba, Brian; Avila, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    To address the error introduced by computed tomography (CT) scanners when assessing volume and unidimensional measurement of solid tumors, we scanned a precision manufactured pocket phantom simultaneously with patients enrolled in a lung cancer clinical trial. Dedicated software quantified bias and random error in the [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] dimensions of a Teflon sphere and also quantified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and volume measurements using both constant and adaptive thresholding. We found that underestimation bias was essentially the same for [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] dimensions using constant thresholding and had similar values for adaptive thresholding. The random error of these length measurements as measured by the standard deviation and coefficient of variation was 0.10 mm (0.65), 0.11 mm (0.71), and 0.59 mm (3.75) for constant thresholding and 0.08 mm (0.51), 0.09 mm (0.56), and 0.58 mm (3.68) for adaptive thresholding, respectively. For random error, however, [Formula: see text] lengths had at least a fivefold higher standard deviation and coefficient of variation than [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Observed [Formula: see text]-dimension error was especially high for some 8 and 16 slice CT models. Error in CT image formation, in particular, for models with low numbers of detector rows, may be large enough to be misinterpreted as representing either treatment response or disease progression. PMID:27660808

  9. Rapid Measurement and Correction of Phase Errors from B0 Eddy Currents: Impact on Image Quality for Non-Cartesian Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Ethan K.; Klaers, Jessica L.; Samsonov, Alexey A.; Kijowski, Richard; Block, Walter F.

    2014-01-01

    Non-Cartesian imaging sequences and navigational methods can be more sensitive to scanner imperfections that have little impact on conventional clinical sequences, an issue which has repeatedly complicated the commercialization of these techniques by frustrating transitions to multi-center evaluations. One such imperfection is phase errors caused by resonant frequency shifts from eddy currents induced in the cryostat by time-varying gradients, a phenomemon known as B0 eddy currents. These phase errors can have a substantial impact on sequences that use ramp sampling, bipolar gradients, and readouts at varying azimuthal angles. We present a method for measuring and correcting phase errors from B0 eddy currents and examine the results on two different scanner models. This technique yields significant improvements in image quality for high-resolution joint imaging on certain scanners. The results suggest that correction of short time B0 eddy currents in manufacturer provided service routines would simplify adoption of non-Cartesian sampling methods. PMID:22488532

  10. Delayed-Phase Cone-Beam CT Improves Detectability of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma During Conventional Transarterial Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Lin, MingDe; Duran, Rafael; Chapiro, Julius; Wang, Zhijun; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the detectability of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) on dual-phase cone-beam CT (DPCBCT) during conventional transarterial chemoembolization (cTACE) compared to that of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with respect to pre-procedure contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) of the liver.MethodsThis retrospective study included 17 consecutive patients (10 male, mean age 64) with ICC who underwent pre-procedure CE-MRI of the liver, and DSA and DPCBCT (early-arterial phase (EAP) and delayed-arterial phase (DAP)) just before cTACE. The visibility of each ICC lesion was graded by two radiologists on a three-rank scale (complete, partial, and none) on DPCBCT and DSA images, and then compared to pre-procedure CE-MRI.ResultsOf 61 ICC lesions, only 45.9 % were depicted by DSA, whereas EAP- and DAP-CBCT yielded a significantly higher detectability rate of 73.8 % and 93.4 %, respectively (p < 0.01). Out of the 33 lesions missed on DSA, 18 (54.5 %) and 30 (90.9 %) were revealed on EAP- and DAP-CBCT images, respectively. DSA depicted only one lesion that was missed by DPCBCT due to streak artifacts caused by a prosthetic mitral valve. DAP-CBCT identified significantly more lesions than EAP-CBCT (p < 0.01). Conversely, EAP-CBCT did not detect lesions missed by DAP-CBCT. For complete lesion visibility, DAP-CBCT yielded significantly higher detectability (78.7 %) compared to EAP (31.1 %) and DSA (21.3 %) (p < 0.01).ConclusionDPCBCT, and especially the DAP-CBCT, significantly improved the detectability of ICC lesions during cTACE compared to DSA. We recommend the routine use of DAP-CBCT in patients with ICC for per-procedure detectability and treatment planning in the setting of TACE.

  11. Tunable beam shaping with a phased array acousto-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Grinenko, A; MacDonald, M P; Courtney, C R P; Wilcox, P D; Demore, C E M; Cochran, S; Drinkwater, B W

    2015-01-12

    We demonstrate the generation of Bessel beams using an acousto-optic array based on a liquid filled cavity surrounded by a cylindrical multi-element ultrasound transducer array. Conversion of a Gaussian laser mode into a Bessel beam with tunable order and position is shown. Also higher-order Bessel beams up to the fourth order are successfully generated with experimental results very closely matching simulations.

  12. A high-speed, high-efficiency phase controller for coherent beam combining based on SPGD algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zh M; Liu, C L; Li, J F; Zhang, D Y

    2014-04-28

    A phase controller for coherent beam combining (CBC) of fibre lasers has been designed and manufactured based on a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The theoretical analysis shows that the iteration rate is higher than 1.9 MHz, and the average compensation bandwidth of CBC for 5 or 20 channels is 50 kHz or 12.5 kHz, respectively. The tests show that the phase controller ensures reliable phase locking of lasers: When the phases of five lasers are locked by the improved control strategy with a variable gain, the energy encircled in the target is increased by 23 times than that in the single output, the phase control accuracy is better than λ/20, and the combining efficiency is 92%. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  13. Localization and migration of phase singularities in the edge-diffracted optical-vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr; Chernykh, Aleksey; Khoroshun, Anna; Mikhaylovskaya, Lidiya

    2016-02-01

    When a circularly-symmetric light beam with optical vortex (OV) diffracts at an opaque screen with the sharp edge, the OV core is displaced from the beam axis and, in case of the m-charged incident OV, decomposed into |m| single-charged ones. By means of numerical simulations and based on examples of incident beams with topological charges |m| = 1, 2, 3 we show that, while the screen edge monotonously advances towards the beam axis, the OVs in the diffracted beam cross section move away from the incident beam axis along spiral-like trajectories. The trajectories contain fine structure details that reflect the nature and peculiar spatial configuration of the diffracting beam. For the Kummer beams’ diffraction, the trajectories contain self-crossings and regions of ‘backward’ rotation (loops); in the case of Laguerre-Gaussian beams, the trajectories are smoother. The numerical results are supported by analytical approximations and conform to experiments. The general shape of the trajectories and their local behavior show high sensitivity to the diffraction conditions (spatial structure of the diffracting beam, its disposition with respect to the screen edge, etc), which can be used in diverse metrological applications.

  14. Beam-based analysis of day-night performance variations at the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.; Akre, R.; Assmann, R.; Bane, K.L.F.; Minty, M.G.; Phinney, N.; Spence, W.L.

    1998-07-01

    Diurnal temperature variations in the linac gallery of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) can affect the amplitude and phase of the rf used to accelerate the beam. The SLC employs many techniques for stabilization and compensation of these effects, but residual uncorrected changes still affect the quality of the delivered beam. This paper presents methods developed to monitor and investigate these errors through the beam response. Variations resulting from errors in the rf amplitude or phase can be distinguished by studying six different beam observables: betatron phase advance, oscillation amplitude growth, rms jitter along the linac, measurements of the beam phase with respect to the rf, changes in the required injection phase, and the global energy correction factor. By quantifying the beam response, an uncorrected variation of 14{sup o} (S-band) during 28 F temperature swings was found in the main rf drive line system between the front and end of the linac.

  15. A phased array antenna with a broadly steerable beam based on a low-loss metasurface lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yahong; Jin, Xueyu; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Yang; Song, Kun; Huang, Lvhongzi; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2016-10-01

    A new concept for a gradient phase discontinuity metasurface lens integrated with a phased array antenna possessing a broadly steerable beam is presented in this paper. The metasurface lens is composed of a metallic H-shaped pattern and the metallic square split ring can achieve complete 360° transmission phase coverage at 30° phase intervals. The metasurface can refract an incident plane wave to an angle at will by varying the lattice constant. We demonstrate that the beam steering range of the phased array antenna is between 12° and 85° when the metasurface lens with a refracting electromagnetic wave is employed at 45°. Interestingly, the proposed array antenna has a much higher gain than a conventional phased array antenna at low elevation angles. It is expected that the proposed array antenna will have potential applications in wireless and satellite communications. Furthermore, the proposed array antenna is fabricated easily and is also low in cost due to its microstrip technology.

  16. Power combination of two phase-locked high power microwave beams from a new coaxial microwave source based on dual beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jiande; Dang, Fangchao; Yan, Xiaolu

    2014-10-01

    The new coaxial high power microwave source based on dual beams has demonstrated two phase-locked output microwave beams generated by its two sub-sources. In order to achieve a single higher output power, we present a three-port waveguide-based power combiner to combine the two microwave beams. Particle-in-cell simulation results show that when the diode voltage is 675 kV and the guiding magnetic field is 0.8 T, a combined microwave with an average power of about 4.0 GW and a frequency of 9.74 GHz is generated; the corresponding power conversion efficiency is 29%. The combination effect of the combiner is further validated in the diode voltage range from 675 kV to 755 kV as well as in the pulse regime. The simulations indicate that the maximum surface axial electric field strength of the electrodynamic structure is 720 kV/cm, which is relatively low corresponding to an output power of 4.0 GW. The stable combined output suggests the probability of long-pulse operation for the combined source.

  17. Power combination of two phase-locked high power microwave beams from a new coaxial microwave source based on dual beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yangmei; Zhang, Xiaoping Zhang, Jiande; Dang, Fangchao; Yan, Xiaolu

    2014-10-15

    The new coaxial high power microwave source based on dual beams has demonstrated two phase-locked output microwave beams generated by its two sub-sources. In order to achieve a single higher output power, we present a three-port waveguide-based power combiner to combine the two microwave beams. Particle-in-cell simulation results show that when the diode voltage is 675 kV and the guiding magnetic field is 0.8 T, a combined microwave with an average power of about 4.0 GW and a frequency of 9.74 GHz is generated; the corresponding power conversion efficiency is 29%. The combination effect of the combiner is further validated in the diode voltage range from 675 kV to 755 kV as well as in the pulse regime. The simulations indicate that the maximum surface axial electric field strength of the electrodynamic structure is 720 kV/cm, which is relatively low corresponding to an output power of 4.0 GW. The stable combined output suggests the probability of long-pulse operation for the combined source.

  18. Real-time monitoring of thermal and mechanical tissue response to modulated phased-array HIFU beams in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ballard, John R.; Haritonova, Alyona; Choi, Jeungwan; Bischof, John; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2012-10-01

    An integrated system employing real-time ultrasound thermography and strain imaging in monitoring tissue response to phased-array heating patterns has been developed. The imaging system is implemented on a commercially available scanner (SonixRP) at frame rates > 500 fps with limited frame sizes covering the vicinity of the HIFU focal spot. These frame rates are sufficient to capture tissue motion and deformation even in the vicinity of large arteries. With the high temporal and spatial resolution of our strain imaging system, we are able to capture and separate tissue strains due to natural motion (breathing and pulsation) from HIFU induced strains (thermal and mechanical). We have collected in vivo strain imaging during sub-therapeutic and therapeutic HIFU exposure in swine and rat model. A 3.5-MHz phased array was used to generate sinusoidally-modulated pHIFU beams at different intensity levels and durations near blood vessels of different sizes (e.g. femoral in the swine and rat models). The results show that our approach is capable of characterizing the thermal and mechanical tissue response to sub-therapeutic pHIFU beam. For therapeutic pHIFU beams, the approach is still capable of localizing the therapeutic beam, but the results at the focal spot are complicated by bubble generation.

  19. Stokes parameters of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array laser beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmohammady, Sh; Ghafary, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, generalized Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the unified theory of coherence and polarization have been reported. Analytical formulas for 2  ×  2 cross-spectral density matrix elements, and consequently Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam propagating through the turbulent atmosphere have been formulated. Effects of many physical attributes such as wavelength, turbulence strength, flatness order and other source parameters on the Stokes parameters, and therefore spectral degree of polarization upon propagation have been studied thoroughly. The behaviour of the spectral degree of coherence of a delineated beam for different source conditions has been investigated. It can be shown that four generalized Stokes parameters increase by raising the flatness order at the same propagation distance. Increasing the number of beams leads to a decrease in the Stokes parameters to zero slowly. The results are of utmost importance for optical communications.

  20. Stokes parameters of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array laser beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmohammady, Sh; Ghafary, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, generalized Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam based on the extended Huygens–Fresnel principle and the unified theory of coherence and polarization have been reported. Analytical formulas for 2  ×  2 cross-spectral density matrix elements, and consequently Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam propagating through the turbulent atmosphere have been formulated. Effects of many physical attributes such as wavelength, turbulence strength, flatness order and other source parameters on the Stokes parameters, and therefore spectral degree of polarization upon propagation have been studied thoroughly. The behaviour of the spectral degree of coherence of a delineated beam for different source conditions has been investigated. It can be shown that four generalized Stokes parameters increase by raising the flatness order at the same propagation distance. Increasing the number of beams leads to a decrease in the Stokes parameters to zero slowly. The results are of utmost importance for optical communications.

  1. DETERMINING PHASE-SPACE PROPERTIES OF THE LEDA RFQ OUTPUT BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    W. LYSENKO; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    Quadruple scans were used to characterize the LEDA RFQ beam. Experimental data were fit to computer simulation models for the rms beam size. The codes were found to be inadequate in accurately reproducing details of the wire scanner data. When this discrepancy is resolved, we plan to fit using all the data in wire scanner profiles, not just the rms value.

  2. Broadband THz-wave generation by satisfying the noncollinear phase-matching condition with a reflected signal beam.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Takuya; Akimoto, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Motoaki; Suizu, Koji; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige; Takayanagi, Jun; Takada, Tomoya; Kawase, Kodo

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrated broadband terahertz (THz) wave generation by satisfying the noncollinear phase-matching condition with a reflected signal beam. We constructed a dual-wavelength optical parametric oscillator with two potassium titanium oxide phosphate crystals pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The collinear pump and signal waves were irradiated into a lithium niobate crystal. The pump and the signal waves were reflected at the crystal surface. Because the pump and the signal waves have a finite beam diameter, when the reflected signal wave and unreflected pump wave were irradiated at the correct angle, the noncollinear phase-matching condition was satisfied. By changing the incident angle to the crystal, broadband THz-wave generation with a range of over 0.2-7.2 THz was achieved.

  3. Combined Phase SpaceCharacterization at the PEP-II IP using Single-beam and Luminous-region Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, A.; Kozanecki, W.; Viaud, B.; Cai, Y.; Fisher, A.; O'Grady, C.; Thompson, J.; Weaver, M.; /SLAC

    2006-06-23

    We present a novel method to characterize the e{sup {+-}} phase space at the IP of the SLAC B-factory, that combines single-beam measurements with a detailed mapping of luminous-region observables. Transverse spot sizes are determined in the two rings with synchrotron-light monitors and extrapolated to the IP using measured lattice functions. The specific luminosity, which is proportional to the inverse product of the overlap IP beam sizes, is continuously monitored using radiative/Bhabha events. The spatial variation of the luminosity and of the transverse-boost distribution of the colliding e{sup {+-}}, are measured using e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} events reconstructed in the BABAR detector. The combination of these measurements provide constraints on the emittances, horizontal and vertical spot sizes, angular divergences and {beta} functions of both beams at the IP during physics data-taking. Preliminary results of this combined spot-size analysis are confronted with independent measurements of IP {beta}-functions and overlap IP beam sizes at low beam current.

  4. 6D phase space electron beam analysis and machine sensitivity studies for ELI-NP GBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giribono, A.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Drebot, I.; Palumbo, L.; Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vannozzi, A.; Variola, A.

    2016-09-01

    The ELI-NP Gamma Beam Source (GBS) is now under construction in Magurele-Bucharest (RO). Here an advanced source of gamma photons with unprecedented specifications of brilliance (>1021), monochromaticity (0.5%) and energy tunability (0.2-19.5 MeV) is being built, based on Inverse Compton Scattering in the head-on configuration between an electron beam of maximum energy 750 MeV and a high quality high power ps laser beam. These requirements make the ELI-NP GBS an advanced and challenging gamma ray source. The electron beam dynamics analysis and control regarding the machine sensitivity to the possible jitter and misalignments are presented. The effects on the beam quality are illustrated providing the basis for the alignment procedure and jitter tolerances.

  5. Two-dimensional optical architecture for time-delay beam forming in a phased-array antenna.

    PubMed

    Dolfi, D; Michel-Gabriel, F; Bann, S; Huignard, J P

    1991-02-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new two-dimensional optical architecture based on polarization switching by N spatial light modulators that provides 2(N) time delays to a phased-array antenna of p x p radiating elements. Moreover the 0 to 2pi phase of the microwave signals is optically controlled by a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator that operates in the birefringent mode. The microwave signal originates from the coherent detection of a dual-frequency laser beam obtained with an acousto-optic frequency shifter. Preliminary experimental results obtained at a microwave frequency f = 1.85 GHz are presented.

  6. Two-dimensional optical architecture for time-delay beam forming in a phased-array antenna.

    PubMed

    Dolfi, D; Michel-Gabriel, F; Bann, S; Huignard, J P

    1991-02-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new two-dimensional optical architecture based on polarization switching by N spatial light modulators that provides 2(N) time delays to a phased-array antenna of p x p radiating elements. Moreover the 0 to 2pi phase of the microwave signals is optically controlled by a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator that operates in the birefringent mode. The microwave signal originates from the coherent detection of a dual-frequency laser beam obtained with an acousto-optic frequency shifter. Preliminary experimental results obtained at a microwave frequency f = 1.85 GHz are presented. PMID:19773900

  7. Phase-matching analysis of high-order harmonics generated by truncated Bessel beams in the sub-10-fs regime

    SciTech Connect

    Altucci, C.; Bruzzese, R.; De Lisio, C.; Nisoli, M.; Priori, E.; Stagira, S.; Pascolini, M.; Poletto, L.; Villoresi, P.; Tosa, V.; Midorikawa, K.

    2003-09-01

    We describe a very simple physical model that allows the analysis of high-order harmonic generation in gases when the pumping laser beam has an intensity profile that is not Gaussian but truncated Bessel. This is the typical experimental condition when sub-10-fs pump-laser pulses, generated by the hollow fiber compression technique, are used. This model is based on the analysis of the phase-matching conditions for the harmonic generation process revisited in view of the new spatial mode of the fundamental beam. In particular, the role of the atomic dipole phase and the geometric phase terms are evidenced both for harmonics generated in the plateau and in the cutoff spectral regions. The influence of dispersion introduced by free electrons produced by laser ionization has also been discussed in some detail. Spatial patterns of far-field harmonics are then obtained by means of a simplified algorithm which allows one to avoid the numerical integration of the harmonic beam propagation equation. Experimental spatial distributions and divergence angles of high-order harmonics generated in Ne with 7-fs titanium-sapphire pulses are compared with numerical simulations in various experimental conditions. The agreement between measurements and calculated results is found to be very satisfactory.

  8. Dielectric multilayer beam splitter with differential phase shift on transmission and reflection for division-of-amplitude photopolarimeter.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenjia; Shen, Weidong; Zhang, Yueguang; Liu, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Dielectric multilayer beam splitter with differential phase shift on transmission and reflection for division-of-amplitude photopolarimeter (DOAP) was presented for the first time to our knowledge. The optimal parameters for the beam splitter are Tp = 78.9%, Ts = 21.1% and Δr - Δt = π/2 at 532nm at an angle of incidence of 45°. Multilayer anti-reflection coating with low phase shift was applied to reduce the backside reflection. Different design strategies that can achieve all optimal targets at the wavelength were tested. Two design methods were presented to optimize the differential phase shift. The samples were prepared by ion beam sputtering (IBS). The experimental results show good agreement with those of the design. The ellipsometric parameters of samples were measured in reflection (ψr, Δr) = (26.5°, 135.1°) and (28.2°, 133.5°), as well as in transmission (ψt, Δt) = (62.5°, 46.1°) and (63.5°, 46°) at 532.6nm. The normalized determinant of instrument matrix to evaluate the performance of samples is respectively 0.998 and 0.991 at 532.6nm.

  9. An interferometer-based phase control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A system for focusing and pointing the SPS power beam is discussed. The system is ground based and closed loop. One receiving antenna is required on earth. A conventional uplinked data channel transmits an 8-bit phase error correction back to the SPS for sequential calibration of each power module. Beam pointing resolution is better than 140 meters at the rectenna.

  10. An interferometer-based phase control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A system for focusing and pointing the SPS power beam is discussed. The system is ground based and closed loop. One receiving antenna is required on Earth. A conventional uplink data channel transmits an 8-bit phase error correlation back to the SPS for sequential calibration of each power module. Beam pointing resolution is better than 140 meters at the Rectenna.

  11. Phase Transformations During Solidification of a Laser-Beam-Welded TiAl Alloy—An In Situ Synchrotron Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Staron, Peter; Riekehr, Stefan; Stark, Andreas; Schell, Norbert; Huber, Norbert; Schreyer, Andreas; Müller, Martin; Kashaev, Nikolai

    2016-09-01

    An in situ highly time-resolved, high-energy X-ray diffraction investigation was carried out to observe the phase transformations of a TiAl alloy during laser beam welding. The diffraction patterns are recorded every 0.1 seconds by a fast area two-dimensional detector and plotted according to time, yielding the solidification pathway, the solid phase volume fraction, and the lattice parameter variation of different phases during the solidification and cooling process. Moreover, it is the first study that can demonstrate that the α phase without any Burgers orientation relationship, the so-called non-Burgers α, precipitates appear earlier than the Burgers α. The non-Burgers α grains are found to nucleate on the primary borides.

  12. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  13. Non-destructive characterisation of polymers and Al-alloys by polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Johann; Plank, Bernhard; Requena, Guillermo

    2012-02-15

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important tool for the non-destructive characterisation of materials. Continuous improvements in the quality and performance of X-ray tubes and detectors have led to cone-beam XCT systems that can now achieve spatial resolutions down to 1 {mu}m and even below. Since not only the amplitude but also the phase of an X-ray beam is altered while passing through an object, phase contrast effects can occur even for polychromatic sources when the spatial coherence due to a small focal spot size is high enough. This can lead to significant improvements over conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography. Phase contrast can increase by edge enhancement the visibility of small structures and of features which are only slightly different in attenuation. We report on the possibilities of polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography for non-destructive characterisation of materials. A carbon fibre-reinforced polymer and the Al-alloys AlMg5Si7 and AlSi18 were investigated with high resolution cone-beam X-ray computed tomography with a polychromatic tube source. Under certain conditions strong phase contrast resulting in an upward and downward overshooting of the grey values across edges was observed. The phase effects are much stronger for the polymer than for the Al-alloys. The influence on the phase contrast of the parameters, including source-detector distance, focal spot size and tube acceleration voltage is presented. Maximum phase contrast was observed for a maximum distance between the source and the detector, for a low voltage and a minimum focal spot size at the X-ray source. The detectability of the different phases is improved by the edge enhancement and the resulting improvement of sharpness. Thus, a better segmentation of the carbon fibres in the fibre-reinforced polymer and of the Mg{sub 2}Si-phase in the AlMg5Si7-alloy is achieved. Primary and eutectic Si cannot be detected by attenuation-based X

  14. An Exploratory Statistical Analysis of a Planet Approach-Phase Guidance Scheme Using Angular Measurements with Significant Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, Alan L.; Harry, David P., III

    1960-01-01

    An exploratory analysis of vehicle guidance during the approach to a target planet is presented. The objective of the guidance maneuver is to guide the vehicle to a specific perigee distance with a high degree of accuracy and minimum corrective velocity expenditure. The guidance maneuver is simulated by considering the random sampling of real measurements with significant error and reducing this information to prescribe appropriate corrective action. The instrumentation system assumed includes optical and/or infrared devices to indicate range and a reference angle in the trajectory plane. Statistical results are obtained by Monte-Carlo techniques and are shown as the expectation of guidance accuracy and velocity-increment requirements. Results are nondimensional and applicable to any planet within limits of two-body assumptions. The problem of determining how many corrections to make and when to make them is a consequence of the conflicting requirement of accurate trajectory determination and propulsion. Optimum values were found for a vehicle approaching a planet along a parabolic trajectory with an initial perigee distance of 5 radii and a target perigee of 1.02 radii. In this example measurement errors were less than i minute of arc. Results indicate that four corrections applied in the vicinity of 50, 16, 15, and 1.5 radii, respectively, yield minimum velocity-increment requirements. Thrust devices capable of producing a large variation of velocity-increment size are required. For a vehicle approaching the earth, miss distances within 32 miles are obtained with 90-percent probability. Total velocity increments used in guidance are less than 3300 feet per second with 90-percent probability. It is noted that the above representative results are valid only for the particular guidance scheme hypothesized in this analysis. A parametric study is presented which indicates the effects of measurement error size, initial perigee, and initial energy on the guidance

  15. Compact-beam stable-unstable resonator for free-electron laser. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, A.H.; White, C.J.; Boyd, T.L.; Schmitt, M.J.; Aldrich, C.H.

    1991-10-01

    A significant problem in the design of high-energy free-electron lasers (FELs) centers on the technique for outcoupling the output beam. FELs with currently achievable output power usually include a conventional stable resonator with output through a partially transmitting mirror which will not work for arbitrarily high average power. An alternate scheme must be found for high-energy FELs. A high- efficiency grating outcoupler is an attractive possibility, but it is difficult to manufacture. Other suggestions include unstable resonators with an intracavity focus and unstable resonators with an intracavity focus and beam rotation. The intensity distribution at the intracavity focus of a negative-branch unstable resonator has side-lobes that would be scraped off by the faces of the wiggler magnets or by the beam tube through the wiggler. The resulting power loss would be significant. Therefore, it is desirable to develop another type of resonator for use with FELs. The resonator that we have developed is the compact-beam stable-unstable ring resonator. It is a stable resonator in one transverse dimension and an unstable resonator with an intracavity focus in the orthogonal transverse dimension. A scraper mirror outcouples the output beam from one side of the mode only. The resonator can be configured so that it has a small beam waist at the center of the wiggler in the stable direction and has an intracavity focus in the unstable direction. The half- width of the central lobe of the focus is approximately the size of the stable beam waist. In the stable direction, the Gaussian amplitude distribution results in a small loss on the wiggler magnets, or on a beam tube that will fit within the wiggler, if one is used. The beam tube can have an elliptical shape to permit the passage of several side lobes in the unstable dimension. A mode of the CBSUR is a product of the mode of a strip stable resonator with a strip compact-beam negative-branch unstable resonator.

  16. Rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber filled with electron beam modified surface treated dual phase fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugharaj, A. M.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2004-01-01

    The rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) loaded with dual phase filler were measured using Monsanto Processability Tester (MPT) at three different temperatures (100°C, 110°C and 130°C) and four different shear rates (61.3, 306.3, 613, and 1004.5 s -1). The effect of electron beam modification of dual phase filler in absence and presence of trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) or triethoxysilylpropyltetrasulphide (Si-69) on melt flow properties of SBR was also studied. The viscosity of all the systems decreases with shear rate indicating their pseudoplastic or shear thinning nature. The higher shear viscosity for the SBR loaded with the electron beam modified filler is explained in terms of variation in structure of the filler upon electron beam irradiation. Die swell of the modified filler loaded SBR is slightly higher than that of the unmodified filler loaded rubber, which is explained by calculating normal stress difference for the systems. Activation energy of the modified filler loaded SBR systems is also slightly higher than that of the control filler loaded SBR system.

  17. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users’ Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center

    PubMed Central

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  18. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users' Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center.

    PubMed

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  19. Effect of crosslinking agent functionality and curing beam intensity on the phase separation kinetics of a photopolymerizing PDLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Nathan; Dadmun, Mark

    2004-03-01

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC's) are used to construct a variety of electro-optical devices, including privacy windows and holographic diffraction gratings. The final morphology of a given PDLC device depends not only on the initial syrup composition but also the polymerization and phase separation rate. In this work we report time-resolved light scattering results that monitor the phase separation kinetics of PDLC syrups undergoing photo-polymerization. Both the intensity of the curing beam and the composition of the syrups were allowed to vary. The presence of an intensity maximum at a given wave vector, q, during the early stages of polymerization appear to support spinodal decomposition (SD) as the phase separation mechanism. This process is analyzed to provide quantification of the interphase periodic distance and the mobility of the components in this process.

  20. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and lens of your eye helps you focus. Refractive errors are vision problems that happen when the shape ... cornea, or aging of the lens. Four common refractive errors are Myopia, or nearsightedness - clear vision close up ...

  1. Temperature and frequency compensated array beam steering unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claborn, K. D.; Bailey, W. C.

    1986-04-01

    Beam pointing errors and sidelobes resulting from temperature variations on the aperture and power divider of a series phased array antenna operating at a plurality of selected operating channel frequencies and having uniformly spaced elements are compensated for by placing a temperature sensor on both the aperture and power divider and converting the respective temperature outputs to digital signals which are fed to a digital beam steering unit. A pair of programmed memories are included in the beam steering unit which respond to an address or pointer corresponding to the digitized temperature values and the selected operating frequency to read out stored digitized beam steering phase gradients and feed phase correction which are combined and sequentially applied at regular intervals to symmetrically located phase shifter pairs. A uniformly compensated beam is thereafter radiated at a predetermined phase angle.

  2. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-20

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location.

  3. Investigation of Moiré pattern-based phase retrieval approach for differential phase-contrast cone beam CT imaging using a hospital-grade tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Yang; Liu, Jiangkun; Conover, David

    2012-03-01

    The phase stepping algorithm is commonly used for phase retrieval in grating-based differential phase-contrast (DPC) imaging, which requires multiple intensity images to compute one DPC image. It is not efficient for data acquisition, especially in the case of dynamic imaging using either DPC imaging or DPC-based come beam CT (DPC-CBCT) imaging. A Fourier transform-based approach has been developed for fringe pattern analysis in optics, and it was recently implemented into a synchrotron-based DPC tomography system. In this research, this approach is further developed for a bench-top DPC-CBCT imaging system with a hospital-grade x-ray tube. The key idea is to separate carrier fringes and object information in Fourier domain of the interferogram and to reconstruct the differentiated phase information using the object information. Only one interferogram is required for phase retrieval at a cost of spatial resolution. The fringes of moiré patterns are used as the carrier fringes, and a phantom is scanned to evaluate the approach. Various interferograms with different carrier fringe frequencies are investigated and the reconstruction image quality is evaluated in terms of contrast, noise and sharpness. The results indicated that the DPC images can be effectively retrieved using the Fourier transform-based approach and the reconstructed phase coefficient showed better contrast compared to that of attenuation-based contrast. The spatial resolution is acceptable in the phantom studies although it is not as good as the results of phase-stepping approach. The Fourier transform-based phase retrieval approach is able to greatly simplify data acquisition, to improve the temporal resolution and to make it possible for dynamic DPC-CBCT imaging. It is promising for perfusion imaging where spatial resolution is not a concern.

  4. On the (Frequency) Modulation of Coupled Oscillator Arrays in Phased Array Beam Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, R.; Acorn, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown that arrays of voltage controlled oscillators coupled to nearest neighbors can be used to produce useful aperture phase distributions for phased array antennas. However, placing information of the transmitted signal requires that the oscillations be modulated.

  5. Large aperture kinoform phase plates in fused silica for spatial beam smoothing on Nova and the Beamlet Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, M.C.; Dixit, S.N.; Thomas, I.M.; Martin, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1997-03-01

    It is now widely recognized that spatial beam smoothing (homogenization) is essential in coupling the laser energy to the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. For the indirect drive approach to ICF, it is desirable to distribute the laser energy into a uniformly speckled profile that has a flat-top super-Gaussian envelope (8th power or higher) and contains greater than 95% of the energy inside the super-Gaussian profile. Spatial smoothing is easily achieved by introducing a binary random phase plate (RPP) in the beam. This produces a homogenized far-field pattern which consists of an overall envelope function determined by the RPP element superimposed with a fine scale speckle pattern arising due to the interference among the various RPP elements. Although easy to fabricate and currently in routine use in many fusion laboratories, the binary RPPs do not meet the ICF requirements stated above since the far-field intensity profile is restricted to essentially an Airy function containing only 84% (an upper limit) of the energy inside the central spot. Approaches using lenslet arrays (refractive or diffractive) have limited use since they operate in the quasi-far-field and have a short depth of focus. The limitations of the RPPs can be overcome by relaxing the binary phase constraint. We have recently presented 5 continuously varying phase screens for tailoring the focal plane irradiance profiles. Called kinoform phase plates (KPPs), these phase screens offer complete flexibility in tailoring the focal plane envelope and, at the same time, increasing the energy efficiency inside the focal spot. In this paper we discuss the design and fabrication of such kinoform phase plates in fused silica for spatial beam smoothing on the Nova and the Beamlet lasers. Since the phase plates are used at the end of the laser chain, KPPs on Nova and Beamlet have to be fabricated on large aperture optics (65-cm diameter and 40-cm square substrates respectively). The following

  6. X–ray absorption, phase and dark–field tomography through a beam tracking approach

    PubMed Central

    Vittoria, Fabio A.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Zamir, Anna; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We present a development of the beam–tracking approach that allows its implementation in computed tomography. One absorbing mask placed before the sample and a high resolution detector are used to track variations in the beam intensity distribution caused by the sample. Absorption, refraction, and dark–field are retrieved through a multi–Gaussian interpolation of the beam. Standard filtered back projection is used to reconstruct three dimensional maps of the real and imaginary part of the refractive index, and of the dark–field signal. While the method is here demonstrated using synchrotron radiation, its low coherence requirements suggest a possible implementation with laboratory sources. PMID:26541117

  7. Dual-axis beam correction for an array of single-mode diode laser emitters using a laser-written custom phase-plate.

    PubMed

    Trela, Natalia; Baker, Howard J; Wendland, Jozef J; Hall, Denis R

    2009-12-21

    A single optical component for a diode laser bar combines fast-axis smile and lens error correction with slow-axis collimation. Produced by laser-machining/polishing, it provides 0.9 mm focal length, 200 microm pitch slow-axis collimation on the same surface that corrects fast-axis errors. Custom fabrication enables fill-factor optimization for the 49 single-mode beams and gives parallel collimation with rms pointing errors of 3% and 6% of the far-field divergence for the fast- and slow-axis array respectively. Sub-micron pitch mismatch between the slow-axis lens and emitter arrays, and beam pointing changes by thermal expansion of the laser bar are detected. PMID:20052066

  8. Residual stress measurement in thin films using a slitting method with geometric phase analysis under a dual beam (FIB/SEM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ronghua; Xie, Huimin; Dai, Xianglu; Zhu, Jianguo; Jin, Aizi

    2014-09-01

    Stress generated during thin film deposition is a critical issue for many applications. In general, the possible origins of the residual stress include intrinsic and extrinsic stresses. Since high residual stresses can cause detrimental effects on the film, such as delamination and wrinkle, it is of great importance to quantify the residual stress for the optimal design and the evaluation of its mechanical behavior. In this study, a method combining focused ion beam (FIB) milling and geometric phase analysis (GPA) is developed to assess the residual stress of thin films. The procedures of the residual stress measurement using this method include grating fabrication and slot milling by FIB, high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of the grating before and after stress relaxation, and deformation analysis by GPA. The residual stress can be inferred from the released deformation using the reference displacements of the finite element model. As an application, this method was utilized to measure the residual stress in a TiAlSiN film, and the measured result is in good agreement with that obtained by the curvature method. In order to analyze the measurement error, the influence factors of Ga+ bombardment and the deposited platinum layer on the stress calculation are also discussed in detail.

  9. Real-Time Correction of Rigid-Body-Motion-Induced Phase Errors for Diffusion-Weighted Steady State Free Precession Imaging

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, R; Aksoy, M; Aboussouan, E; Peterson, E; Van, A; Bammer, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion contrast in diffusion-weighted steady state free precession MRI is generated through the constructive addition of signal from many coherence pathways. Motion-induced phase causes destructive interference which results in loss of signal magnitude and diffusion contrast. In this work, a 3D navigator-based real-time correction of the rigid-body-motion-induced phase errors is developed for diffusion-weighted steady state free precession MRI. Methods The efficacy of the real-time prospective correction method in preserving phase coherence of the steady-state is tested in 3D phantom experiments and 3D scans of healthy human subjects. Results In nearly all experiments, the signal magnitude in images obtained with proposed prospective correction was higher than the signal magnitude in images obtained with no correction. In the human subjects the mean magnitude signal in the data was up to 30 percent higher with prospective motion correction than without. Prospective correction never resulted in a decrease in mean signal magnitude in either the data or in the images. Conclusions The proposed prospective motion correction method is shown to preserve the phase coherence of the steady state in diffusion-weighted steady state free precession MRI, thus mitigating signal magnitude losses that would confound the desired diffusion contrast. PMID:24715414

  10. Growth and phase transition characteristics of pure M-phase VO{sub 2} epitaxial film prepared by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L. L.; Chen, S.; Wu, Y. F.; Chen, F. H.; Chu, W. S.; Chen, X.; Zou, C. W.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2013-09-23

    VO{sub 2} epitaxial film with large size has been prepared by oxide-molecular beam epitaxy method on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) substrate. The VO{sub 2} film shows a perfect crystal orientation, uniformity, and distinct metal-insulator phase transition (MIT) characteristics. It is observed that the MIT character is closely associated with the crystal defects such as oxygen vacancies. By controlling the growth condition, the MIT temperature can be tuned through modifying the content of oxygen vacancies. The role of the oxygen vacancies on the phase transition behavior of this VO{sub 2} film is discussed in the framework of the hybridization theory and the valence state of vanadium.

  11. Beam pattern improvement by compensating array nonuniformities in a guided wave phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyu-Sang; Lee, Seung-Seok; Kim, Jin-Yeon

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a simple data processing algorithm which can improve the performance of a uniform circular array based on guided wave transducers. The algorithm, being intended to be used with the delay-and-sum beamformer, effectively eliminates the effects of nonuniformities that can significantly degrade the beam pattern. Nonuniformities can arise intrinsically from the array geometry when the circular array is transformed to a linear array for beam steering and extrinsically from unequal conditions of transducers such as element-to-element variations of sensitivity and directivity. The effects of nonuniformities are compensated by appropriately imposing weight factors on the elements in the projected linear array. Different cases are simulated, where the improvements of the beam pattern, especially the level of the highest sidelobe, are clearly seen, and related issues are discussed. An experiment is performed which uses A0 mode Lamb waves in a steel plate, to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method. The discrepancy between theoretical and experimental beam patterns is explained by accounting for near-field effects.

  12. Transverse to longitudinal phase space coupling in an electron beam for suppression of microbunching instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dazhang; Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Gu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhentang

    2016-10-01

    The microbunching instability developed during the beam compression process in the linear accelerator (LINAC) of a free-electron laser (FEL) facility has always been a problem that degrades the lasing performance, and even no FEL is able to be produced if the beam quality is destroyed too much by the instability. A common way to suppress the microbunching instability is to introduce extra uncorrelated energy spread by the laser heater that heats the beam through the interaction between the electron and laser beam, as what has been successfully implemented in the Linac Coherent Light Source and Fermi@Elettra. In this paper, a simple and effective scheme is proposed to suppress the microbunching instability by adding two transverse gradient undulators (TGU) before and after the magnetic bunch compressor. The additional uncorrelated energy spread and the density mixing from the transverse spread brought up by the first TGU results in significant suppression of the instability. Meanwhile, the extra slice energy spread and the transverse emittance can also be effectively recovered by the second TGU. The magnitude of the suppression can be easily controlled by varying the strength of the magnetic fields of the TGUs. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate the capability of the proposed technique in the LINAC of an x-ray free-electron laser facility.

  13. Comparative Study of Solid-Phase Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD, Plasma-Enhanced CVD, and Electron-Beam Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Stradins, P.; Kunz, O.; Young, D. L.; Yan, Y.; Jones, K. M.; Xu, Y.; Reedy, R. C.; Branz, H. M.; Aberle, A. G.; Wang, Q.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-phase crystallization (SPC) rates are compared in amorphous silicon films prepared by three different methods: hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and electron-beam physical vapor deposition (e-beam). Random SPC proceeds approximately 5 and 13 times slower in PECVD and e-beam films, respectively, as compared to HWCVD films. Doping accelerates random SPC in e-beam films but has little effect on the SPC rate of HWCVD films. In contrast, the crystalline growth front in solid-phase epitaxy experiments propagates at similar speed in HWCVD, PECVD, and e-beam amorphous Si films. This strongly suggests that the observed large differences in random SPC rates originate from different nucleation rates in these materials while the grain growth rates are relatively similar. The larger grain sizes observed for films that exhibit slower random SPC support this suggestion.

  14. Heating and ionization of stellar chromospheres by nonthermal proton beams: Implications for impulsive phase, redshifted Lyman-alpha radiation in stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Robinson, Richard D.; Maran, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the physical basis for the timescale of impulsive-phase, redshifted Lyman-alpha emission in stellar flares on the assumption that it is determined by energy losses in a nonthermal proton beam that is penetrating the chromosphere from above. The temporal evolution of ionization and heating in representative model chromospheres subjected to such beams is calculated. The treatment of 'stopping' of beam protons takes into account their interactions with (1) electrons bound in neutral hydrogen, (2) nuclei of neutral hydrogen, (3) free electrons, and (4) ambient thermal protons. We find that, for constant incident beam flux, the system attains an equilibrium with the beam energy input to the chromosphere balanced by radiative losses. In equilibrium, the beam penetration depth is constant, and erosion of the chromosphere ceases. If the redshifted, impulsive-phase stellar flare Lyman-alpha emission is produced by downstreaming hydrogen formed through charge exchange between beam protons and ambient hydrogen, then the emission should end when the beam no longer reaches neutral hydrogen. The durations of representative emission events calculated on this assumption range from 0.1 to 14 s. The stronger the beam, the shorter the timescale over which the redshifted Lyman-alpha emission can be observed.

  15. Synthesis of dynamic phase profile by the correlation technique for spatial control of optical beams in multiplexing and switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaychuk, Svitlana A.; Gnatovskyy, Vladimir O.; Sidorenko, Andrey V.; Pryadko, Igor I.; Negriyko, Anatoliy M.

    2015-11-01

    New approach for the correlation technique, which is based on multiple periodic structures to create a controllable angular spectrum, is proposed and investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The transformation of an initial laser beam occurs due to the actions of consecutive phase periodic structures, which may differ by their parameters. Then, after the Fourier transformation of a complex diffraction field, the output diffraction orders will be changed both by their intensities and by their spatial position. The controllable change of output angular spectrum is carried out by a simple control of the parameters of the periodic structures. We investigate several simple examples of such management.

  16. Metastability in pixelation patterns of coexisting fluid lipid bilayer phases imposed by e-beam patterned substrates

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyankin, Maria O.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2013-01-01

    We study the dynamic evolution of pixilation patterns of the liquid-ordered (Lo) phase in coexistence with the liquid-disordered phase in lipid multibilayers. The pixilation patterns were formed by imposing lattice patterns of localized high curvature on phase-separating multibilayers using curvature-patterned regions of an underlying support. The projected radius of underlying hemisphere-like features, that provided the local curvature, was varied from 60 nm to 100 nm and the square lattice spacing between the features was varied between 200 nm and 400 nm using standard electron (e) -beam lithography. Over time, the area fraction of the Lo phase on the patterned regions of the substrate decreased toward zero at room temperature. This apparent metastability of the pattern derives from the high line energy of a pixelation pattern where a Boltzmann distribution shows near zero equilibrium partitioning of the Lo phase in the patterned regions. Kinetic rate analysis identifies two pattern-dependent mechanisms that dominate the transition to zero Lo area fraction; diffusion limited dissolution of the Lo phase driven by an Ostwald ripening-type process or the cooperative formation of vesicles containing Lo phase lipids. Interestingly, we observed the spontaneous formation of tubules in the corners of the array due to the high local curvature applied to the membrane. Furthermore we show that it is possible to regenerate pixilation patterns on the curvature-patterned regions by cooling below room temperature. Regenerated area fractions are in agreement with a room-temperature composition of primarily Ld phase and the high degree of overlap with the original patterns is suggestive of fixed nucleation sites. PMID:23483871

  17. Oblique incidence effect on steering efficiency of liquid crystal polarization gratings used for optical phased array beam steering amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiangjie, Zhao; Jiazhu, Duan; Dayong, Zhang; Cangli, Liu; Yongquan, Luo

    2016-10-01

    A liquid crystal polarization grating (LCPG) is proposed that amplifies the steering angle of a liquid crystal optical phased array for non-mechanical beam steering, taking advantage of its high steering efficiency under normal incidence. However, oblique incidence may play an important role in the overall steering efficiency. The effect of oblique incidence on steering efficiency of a LCPG was analyzed by numerically solving the extended Jones matrix and considering propagation crosstalk. The results indicate that the outgoing laser beam is amplitude-modulated under the effect of oblique incidence and behaves as a sinusoidal-modulated amplitude grating, which diffracts certain energies to non-blazed orders. Over-oblique incidence may even eliminate the steering effect of the incident beam. The modulation depth of the induced amplitude grating was found to be proportional to the product of sinusoidal value of oblique incidence angle and the LC layer thickness, and inversely proportional to the periodic pitch length of the LCPG. Both in-plane incidence and out-of-plane incidence behave similarly to influence the steering efficiency. Finally, the overall steering efficiency for cascaded LCPGs was analyzed and a difference of up to 11 % steering efficiency can be induced between different LCPG configurations, even without considering the over-oblique incidence effect. Both the modulation depth and final steering efficiency can be optimized by varying the LC birefringence and layer thickness.

  18. Oblique incidence effect on steering efficiency of liquid crystal polarization gratings used for optical phased array beam steering amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiangjie, Zhao; Jiazhu, Duan; Dayong, Zhang; Cangli, Liu; Yongquan, Luo

    2016-07-01

    A liquid crystal polarization grating (LCPG) is proposed that amplifies the steering angle of a liquid crystal optical phased array for non-mechanical beam steering, taking advantage of its high steering efficiency under normal incidence. However, oblique incidence may play an important role in the overall steering efficiency. The effect of oblique incidence on steering efficiency of a LCPG was analyzed by numerically solving the extended Jones matrix and considering propagation crosstalk. The results indicate that the outgoing laser beam is amplitude-modulated under the effect of oblique incidence and behaves as a sinusoidal-modulated amplitude grating, which diffracts certain energies to non-blazed orders. Over-oblique incidence may even eliminate the steering effect of the incident beam. The modulation depth of the induced amplitude grating was found to be proportional to the product of sinusoidal value of oblique incidence angle and the LC layer thickness, and inversely proportional to the periodic pitch length of the LCPG. Both in-plane incidence and out-of-plane incidence behave similarly to influence the steering efficiency. Finally, the overall steering efficiency for cascaded LCPGs was analyzed and a difference of up to 11 % steering efficiency can be induced between different LCPG configurations, even without considering the over-oblique incidence effect. Both the modulation depth and final steering efficiency can be optimized by varying the LC birefringence and layer thickness.

  19. Dynamics of Longitudinal Phase-Space Modulations in an rf Compressor for Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-21

    Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the UV or x-ray radiation spectrum require peak beam currents that are generally higher than those obtainable by present electron sources, thus making bunch compression necessary. Compression, however, may heighten the effects of collective forces and degrade the beam quality. In this paper they provide a framework for investigating some of these effects in rf compressors by focusing on the longitudinal dynamics of small-amplitude density perturbations, which have the potential to cause the disruptive appearance of the so-called microbunching instability. They develop a linear theory valid for low-to-moderate compression factors under the assumption of a 1D impedance model of longitudinal space charge and provide validation against macroparticle simulations.

  20. High-efficiency beam manipulation combining geometric phase with anisotropic Huygens surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Jiang, Huan; Liu, Bingyi; Song, Jie; Jiang, Yongyuan

    2016-05-01

    Conventional geometric metasurfaces relying on space-variant metal antennas for beam manipulation suffer from strong Ohmic loss and incomplete polarization conversion. The efficiency is often limited to rather small values, especially when operating in transmission mode. Here, we tackle this challenge by deliberately constructing an equivalent sheet with anisotropic surface electric and magnetic polarizabilities using cross-shaped dielectric antennas. An incident circularly polarized light can be almost fully converted to a transmitted light of opposite helicity with an unprecedented efficiency up to 98%. Such a transmissive metasurface possessing the merits of high-efficiency, non-dispersion, and robust against variations can serve as an outstanding candidate for flat optics, such as anomalous refraction and beam focusing.

  1. Rapid phase-correlated rescanning irradiation improves treatment time in carbon-ion scanning beam treatment under irregular breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji

    2016-05-01

    To shorten treatment time in pencil beam scanning irradiation, we developed rapid phase-controlled rescanning (rPCR), which irradiates two or more isoenergy layers in a single gating window. Here, we evaluated carbon-ion beam dose distribution with rapid and conventional PCR (cPCR). 4 dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) imaging was performed on 12 subjects with lung or liver tumors. To compensate for intrafractional range variation, the field-specific target volume (FTV) was calculated using 4DCT within the gating window (T20–T80). We applied an amplitude-based gating strategy, in which the beam is on when the tumor is within the gating window defined by treatment planning. Dose distributions were calculated for layered phase-controlled rescanning under an irregular respiratory pattern, although a single 4DCT data set was used. The number of rescannings was eight times. The prescribed doses were 48 Gy(RBE)/1 fr (where RBE is relative biological effectiveness) delivered via four beam ports to the FTV for the lung cases and 45 Gy(RBE)/2 fr delivered via two beam ports to the FTV for the liver cases. In the liver cases, the accumulated dose distributions showed an increased magnitude of hot/cold spots with rPCR compared with cPCR. The results of the dose assessment metrics for the cPCR and rPCR were very similar. The D 95, D max, and D min values (cPCR/rPCR) averaged over all the patients were 96.3  ±  0.9%/96.0  ±  1.2%, 107.3  ±  3.6%/107.1  ±  2.9%, and 88.8  ±  3.2%/88.1  ±  3.1%, respectively. The treatment times in cPCR and rPCR were 110.7 s and 53.5 s, respectively. rPCR preserved dose conformation under irregular respiratory motion and reduced the total treatment time compared with cPCR.

  2. Rapid phase-correlated rescanning irradiation improves treatment time in carbon-ion scanning beam treatment under irregular breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji

    2016-05-01

    To shorten treatment time in pencil beam scanning irradiation, we developed rapid phase-controlled rescanning (rPCR), which irradiates two or more isoenergy layers in a single gating window. Here, we evaluated carbon-ion beam dose distribution with rapid and conventional PCR (cPCR). 4 dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) imaging was performed on 12 subjects with lung or liver tumors. To compensate for intrafractional range variation, the field-specific target volume (FTV) was calculated using 4DCT within the gating window (T20-T80). We applied an amplitude-based gating strategy, in which the beam is on when the tumor is within the gating window defined by treatment planning. Dose distributions were calculated for layered phase-controlled rescanning under an irregular respiratory pattern, although a single 4DCT data set was used. The number of rescannings was eight times. The prescribed doses were 48 Gy(RBE)/1 fr (where RBE is relative biological effectiveness) delivered via four beam ports to the FTV for the lung cases and 45 Gy(RBE)/2 fr delivered via two beam ports to the FTV for the liver cases. In the liver cases, the accumulated dose distributions showed an increased magnitude of hot/cold spots with rPCR compared with cPCR. The results of the dose assessment metrics for the cPCR and rPCR were very similar. The D 95, D max, and D min values (cPCR/rPCR) averaged over all the patients were 96.3  ±  0.9%/96.0  ±  1.2%, 107.3  ±  3.6%/107.1  ±  2.9%, and 88.8  ±  3.2%/88.1  ±  3.1%, respectively. The treatment times in cPCR and rPCR were 110.7 s and 53.5 s, respectively. rPCR preserved dose conformation under irregular respiratory motion and reduced the total treatment time compared with cPCR.

  3. An interferometer based phase control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer based phase control system for focusing and pointing the solar power satellite (SPS) power beam is discussed. The system is ground based and closed loop. One receiving antenna is required on Earth. A conventional uplink data channel transmits an 8 bit phase error correction back to the SPS for sequential calibration of each power module. Beam pointing resolution is better than 140 meters at the rectenna.

  4. Interferometer-based phase control system

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, J.H.; Rice, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer-based phase control system for focusing and pointing the SPS power beam is discussed. The system is ground based and closed loop. One receiving antenna is required on earth. A conventional uplink data channel transmits an 8-bit phase error correction back to the SPS for sequential calibration of each power module. Beam pointing resolution is better than 140 meters at the Rectenna. 1 ref.

  5. Beam test characterization of CMS silicon pixel detectors for the phase-1 upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, I.

    2015-10-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector forms the innermost part of the CMS tracking system and is critical to track and vertex reconstruction. Being in close proximity to the beam interaction point, it is exposed to the highest radiation levels in the silicon tracker. In order to preserve the tracking performance with the LHC luminosity increase which is foreseen for the next years, the CMS collaboration has decided to build a new pixel detector with four barrel layers mounted around a reduced diameter beam pipe, as compared to the present three layer pixel detector in the central region. A new digital version of the front-end readout chip has been designed and tested; it has increased data buffering and readout link speed to maintain high efficiency at increasing occupancy. In addition, it offers lower charge thresholds that will improve the tracking efficiency and position resolution. Single chip modules have been evaluated in the DESY electron test beam in terms of charge collection, noise, tracking efficiency and position resolution before and after irradiation with 24 GeV protons from the CERN Proton Synchroton equivalent to the fluence expected after 500 fb-1 of integrated luminosity in the fourth layer of the pixel tracker. High efficiency and an excellent position resolution have been observed which are well maintained even after the proton irradiation. The results are well described by the CMS pixel detector simulation.

  6. Formation of structure, phase composition and properties of electro explosion resistant coatings using electron-beam processing

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Denis A. E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru Sosnin, Kirill V. E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru Budovskikh, Evgenij A. E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru Gromov, Viktor E. E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru Semin, Alexander P. E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru

    2014-11-14

    For the first time, the high intensity electron beam modification of electroexplosion composite coatings of MoCu, MoCCu, WCu, WCCu and TiB{sub 2}Cu systems was done. The studies of phase and elemental composition, defective structure conditions of these coatings were carried out. The regimes of electron-beam processing making possible to form the dense, specular luster surface layers having a submicrocrystalline structure were revealed. It was established that electron-beam processing of elecroexplosion spraying of layer of elecroexplosion spraying carried out in the regime of melting results in the formation of structurally and contrationally homogeneous surface layer. Investigation of the effect of electron-beam processing of electroexplosion electroerosion resistant coatings on their tribological properties (wear resistanse and coefficient of friction) and electroerosion resistance was done. It was shown that all the examined costings demonstrate the increase of electroerosion resistance in spark erosion up to 10 times.

  7. High-Speed Tracking Method Using Zero Phase Error Tracking-Feed-Forward (ZPET-FF) Control for High-Data-Transfer-Rate Optical Disk Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Daiichi; Yanagisawa, Hitoshi; Tokumaru, Haruki; Nakamura, Shoichi; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Inomata, Koichi; Miyazaki, Toshimasa

    2004-07-01

    We describe the effectiveness of feed-forward control using the zero phase error tracking method (ZPET-FF control) of the tracking servo for high-data-transfer-rate optical disk drives, as we are developing an optical disk system to replace the conventional professional videotape recorder for recording high-definition television signals for news gathering or producing broadcast contents. The optical disk system requires a high-data-transfer-rate of more than 200 Mbps and large recording capacity. Therefore, fast and precise track-following control is indispensable. Here, we compare the characteristics of ZPET-FF control with those of conventional feedback control or repetitive control. Experimental results show that ZPET-FF control is more precise than feedback control, and the residual tracking error level is achieved with a tolerance of 10 nm at a linear velocity of 26 m/s in the experimental setup using a blue-violet laser optical head and high-density media. The feasibility of achieving precise ZPET-FF control at 15000 rpm is also presented.

  8. Research of beam conditioning technologies using continuous phase plate, Multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Jia, Huaiting; Tian, Xiaocheng; Yuan, Haoyu; Zhu, Na; Su, Jingqin; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-10-01

    In the research of inertial confinement fusion, laser plasma interaction (LPI) is becoming a key problem that affects ignition. Here, multi-frequency modulation (Multi-FM) smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), continuous phase plate (CPP) and polarization smoothing (PS) were experimentally studied and implemented on the SG-III laser facility. After using these techniques, the far field distribution of SG-Ⅲ laser facility can be adjusted, controlled and repeated accurately. The output spectrums of the cascade phase modulators used for Multi-FM SSD were stable and the FM-to-AM effect can be restrained. Experiments on SG-III laser facility indicate that when the number of color cycles adopts 1, imposing SSD with 3.3 times diffraction limit (TDL) did not lead to pinhole closure in the spatial filters of preamplifier and main amplifiers with 30-TDL pinhole size. The nonuniformity of the focal spots using Multi-FM SSD, CPP and PS drops to 0.18, comparing to 0.26 with CPP+SSD, 0.57 with CPP+PS and 0.84 with only CPP and wedged lens. Polarization smoothing using flat birefringent plate in the convergent beam of final optics assembly (FOA) was studied. The PS plates were manufactured and equipped on SG-III laser facility for LPI research. Combined beam smoothing and polarization manipulation were also studied to solve the LPI problem. Results indicate that through adjusting dispersion directions of SSD beams in a quad, two dimensional SSD can be obtained. Using polarization control plate (PCP), polarization on the near field and far field can be manipulated, providing new method to solve LPI problem in indirect drive laser fusion.

  9. Beam lifetime and limitations during low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Kayran, D.; Montag, C.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Wang, G.

    2011-03-28

    The low-energy physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation at low energies. At these energies, large nonlinear magnetic field errors and large beam sizes produce low beam lifetimes. A variety of beam dynamics effects such as Intrabeam Scattering (IBS), space charge and beam-beam forces also contribute. All these effects are important to understand beam lifetime limitations in RHIC at low energies. During the low-energy RHIC physics run in May-June 2010 at beam {gamma} = 6.1 and {gamma} = 4.1, gold beam lifetimes were measured for various values of space-charge tune shifts, transverse acceptance limitation by collimators, synchrotron tunes and RF voltage. This paper summarizes our observations and initial findings.

  10. Pattern manipulation via on-chip phase modulation between orbital angular momentum beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huanlu; Strain, Michael J.; Meriggi, Laura; Sorel, Marc; Chen, Lifeng; Zhu, Jiangbo; Cicek, Kenan; Wang, Jianwei; Thompson, Mark G.; Cai, Xinlun; Yu, Siyuan

    2015-08-03

    An integrated approach to thermal modulation of relative phase between two optical vortices with opposite chirality has been demonstrated on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. The device consists of a silicon-integrated optical vortex emitter and a phase controlled 3 dB coupler. The relative phase between two optical vortices can be actively modulated on chip by applying a voltage on the integrated heater. The phase shift is shown to be linearly proportional to applied electrical power, and the rotation angle of the interference pattern is observed to be inversely proportional to topological charge. This scheme can be used in lab-on-chip, communications and sensing applications. It can be intentionally implemented with other modulation elements to achieve more complicated applications.

  11. Influence of forward and multiple light scatter on the measurement of beam attenuation in highly scattering marine environments.

    PubMed

    Piskozub, Jacek; Stramski, Dariusz; Terrill, Eric; Melville, W Kendall

    2004-08-20

    Using three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations, we examine the effect of beam transmissometer geometry on the relative error in the measurement of the beam-attenuation coefficient in an aquatic environment characterized by intense light scattering, especially within submerged bubble clouds entrained by surface-wave breaking. We discuss the forward-scattering error associated with the detection of photons scattered at small angles (< 1 degrees) and the multiple-scattering error associated with the detection of photons scattered more than once along the path length of the instrument. Several scattering phase functions describing bubble clouds at different bubble void fractions in the water are considered. Owing to forward-scattering error, a beam-attenuation meter (beam transmissometer) with a half-angle of receiver acceptance of 1.0 degrees and a path length of 0.1 m can underestimate the true beam attenuation within the bubble cloud by more than 50%. For bubble clouds with a beam attenuation of as much as 100 m(-1), the multiple-scattering error is no more than a few percent. These results are compared with simulations for some example phase functions that are representative of other scattering regimes found in natural waters. The forward-scattering error for the Petzold phase function of turbid waters is 16% for a typical instrument geometry, whereas for the Henyey-Greenstein phase function with the asymmetry parameter of 0.7 and 0.9 the error range is 8-28%.

  12. Error Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    Input data as well as the results of elementary operations have to be represented by machine numbers, the subset of real numbers which is used by the arithmetic unit of today's computers. Generally this generates rounding errors. This kind of numerical error can be avoided in principle by using arbitrary precision arithmetics or symbolic algebra programs. But this is unpractical in many cases due to the increase in computing time and memory requirements. Results from more complex operations like square roots or trigonometric functions can have even larger errors since series expansions have to be truncated and iterations accumulate the errors of the individual steps. In addition, the precision of input data from an experiment is limited. In this chapter we study the influence of numerical errors on the uncertainties of the calculated results and the stability of simple algorithms.

  13. 3D tracking and phase-contrast imaging by twin-beams digital holographic microscope in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Finizio, A.; Paturzo, M.; Merola, F.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2012-06-01

    A compact twin-beam interferometer that can be adopted as a flexible diagnostic tool in microfluidic platforms is presented. The devise has two functionalities, as explained in the follow, and can be easily integrated in microfluidic chip. The configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and, at same time, furnishes Quantitative Phase-Contrast maps of tracked micro-objects by interference microscopy. Experimental demonstration of its effectiveness and compatibility with biological field is given on for in vitro cells in microfluidic environment. Nowadays, several microfluidic configuration exist and many of them are commercially available, their development is due to the possibility for manipulating droplets, handling micro and nano-objects, visualize and quantify processes occurring in small volumes and, clearly, for direct applications on lab-on-a chip devices. In microfluidic research field, optical/photonics approaches are the more suitable ones because they have various advantages as to be non-contact, full-field, non-invasive and can be packaged thanks to the development of integrable optics. Moreover, phase contrast approaches, adapted to a lab-on-a-chip configurations, give the possibility to get quantitative information with remarkable lateral and vertical resolution directly in situ without the need to dye and/or kill cells. Furthermore, numerical techniques for tracking of micro-objects needs to be developed for measuring velocity fields, trajectories patterns, motility of cancer cell and so on. Here, we present a compact holographic microscope that can ensure, by the same configuration and simultaneously, accurate 3D tracking and quantitative phase-contrast analysis. The system, simple and solid, is based on twin laser beams coming from a single laser source. Through a easy conceptual design, we show how these two different functionalities can be accomplished by the same optical setup. The working principle, the optical setup and the mathematical

  14. Gradient changes in structural condition of the B2 phase of NiTi surface layers after electron-beam treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Ludmila L. E-mail: egu@ispms.tsc.ru; Gudimova, Ekaterina Yu. E-mail: egu@ispms.tsc.ru; Ostapenko, Marina G.; Lotkov, Aleksandr I.

    2014-11-14

    Structural conditions of the B2 phase of the Ti{sub 49.5}Ni{sub 50.5} alloy surface layers before and after electron-beam treatments (pulse duration τ = 150 μs, number of pulses n = 5, beam energy density E ≤ 20 J/cm{sup 2}) were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis. Analysis of the X-ray patterns demonstrates that surface layers modified by electron beam treatment contain phase with B2{sup surf} structure. It is revealed that the lattice parameter of the B2{sup surf} phase in the surface (modified) layer is also higher than the lattice parameter of the B2 phase in the underlying layer (a{sub B2} = 3.0159±0.0005). The values of lattice parameter of phase B2{sup surf} amounted a{sub B2}{sup surf} = 3.0316±0.0005 Å and a{sub B2}{sup surf} = 3.0252±0.0005 Å, for the specimens after electron-beam treatment at E{sub 1} = 15 J/cm{sup 2} and E{sub 2} = 20 J/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Inflated lattice parameters a{sub B2}{sup surf} are associated with changes in the chemical composition and the presence of residual stresses in the surface region of the samples after electron-beam treatments.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy convergent beam measurement of S-phase volume fraction in Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy (8090)

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.W. ): Xiaoxin, X. )

    1990-12-01

    A statistical study of S-phase particle distribution in thin foils, measuring foil thickness by a transmission electron microscopy convergent beam technique, has shown the change of S-phase average length and volume fraction by varying treatments prior to artificial aging. The investigation shows that the average length and volume fraction of S-phase particles increases with increasing degrees of predeformation in the Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy studied.

  16. Test beam campaigns for the CMS Phase I Upgrade pixel readout chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spannagel, S.; CMS Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    The current CMS silicon pixel detector as the innermost component of the CMS experiment is performing well at LHC design luminosity, but would be subject to severe inefficiencies at LHC peak luminosities of 2 × 1034 cm-2 s-1. Therefore, an upgrade of the CMS pixel detector is planned, including a new readout chip. The chip design comprises additional on-chip buffer cells as well as high-speed data links and low-threshold comparators in the pixel cells. With these changes the upgraded pixel detector will be able to maintain or even improve the efficiency of the current detector at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. The effects of these design changes on e.g. position resolution and charge collection efficiency were studied in detail using a precision tracking telescope at the DESY test beam facilities. The high telescope track resolution enables precise studies of tracking efficiency, charge sharing and collection even within single pixel cells of the device under test. This publication focuses on the improved performance and capabilities of the new pixel readout chip and summarizes results from test beam campaigns with both unirradiated and irradiated devices. The functionality of the chip design with its improved charge threshold, redesigned data transmission and buffering scheme has been verified.

  17. Ion beam induced cubic to monoclinic phase transformation of nanocrystalline yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaramu, N. J.; Lakshminarasappa, B. N.; Nagabhushana, K. R.; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-01

    Sol gel derived nanocrystalline yttria pellets are irradiated with 120 MeV Ag9+ ions for fluence in the range 1 × 1012-3 × 1013 ions cm-2. Pristine and irradiated samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. XRD pattern of pristine Y2O3 nanocrystal reveal cubic structure. A new XRD peak at 30.36° is observed in pellet irradiated with 1 × 1013 ions cm-2. The peak at 30.36° is corresponding to (4 0 2 bar) plane of monoclinic phase. The diffraction intensity of (4 0 2 bar) plane increases with Ag9+ ion fluence. Raman spectrum of pristine pellet show bands corresponding to cubic phase. And, ion irradiated sample show new peaks at 410, 514 and 641 cm-1 corresponding monoclinic phase. HR-TEM and SAED pattern of ion irradiated sample confirmed the presence of monoclinic phase. Hence, it is confirmed that, 120 MeV Ag9+ ions induce phase transformation in nanocrystalline Y2O3.

  18. Binary-phase Fresnel zone plate arrays for high-power laser beam smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepler, David A.; Danson, Colin N.; Ross, Ian N.; Rivers, S. A.; Edwards, Stanley A.; Bett, Thomas H.; Stevenson, R. M.; Jinks, P. M. R.

    1995-04-01

    Binary-phase optics have been used by a number of high-power laser laboratories in order to achieve relatively smooth focal spots. However, the intensity envelopes have in general been of a sinc form rather than `top-hat.' This paper presents work on the production of uniform `top-hat' intensity focal spot profiles obtained from Fresnel binary phase zone plate (PZP) arrays of various designs. Phase plates are used to generate large area smooth focal spots and both theoretical and experimental focal spots are presented. These demonstrate the flexibility of this technique which provides a simple method of generating both uniform `top-hat' intensity profiles and spatially shaped foci, for use with high-power lasers.

  19. Effective increase in beam emittance by phase-space expansion using asymmetric Bragg diffraction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Hung; Tang, Mau-Tsu; Chang, Shih-Lin

    2015-08-24

    We propose an innovative method to extend the utilization of the phase space downstream of a synchrotron light source for X-ray transmission microscopy. Based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, asymmetrically cut perfect crystals are applied to reshape the position-angle-wavelength space of the light source, by which the usable phase space of the source can be magnified by over one hundred times, thereby "phase-space-matching" the source with the objective lens of the microscope. The method's validity is confirmed using SHADOW code simulations, and aberration through an optical lens such as a Fresnel zone plate is examined via matrix optics for nano-resolution X-ray images.

  20. Effective increase in beam emittance by phase-space expansion using asymmetric Bragg diffraction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Hung; Tang, Mau-Tsu; Chang, Shih-Lin

    2015-08-24

    We propose an innovative method to extend the utilization of the phase space downstream of a synchrotron light source for X-ray transmission microscopy. Based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, asymmetrically cut perfect crystals are applied to reshape the position-angle-wavelength space of the light source, by which the usable phase space of the source can be magnified by over one hundred times, thereby "phase-space-matching" the source with the objective lens of the microscope. The method's validity is confirmed using SHADOW code simulations, and aberration through an optical lens such as a Fresnel zone plate is examined via matrix optics for nano-resolution X-ray images. PMID:26368150

  1. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design, and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  2. Modulation of auroral electrojet currents using dual modulated HF beams with ELF phase offset, a potential D-region ionospheric diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GołKowski, M.; Cohen, M. B.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    Experiments at the ionospheric heating facility of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) are performed employing dual HF beams amplitude modulated at ELF/VLF with a phase offset between the two modulation waveforms. The amplitude of the observed ELF/VLF waves is strongly dependent on the imposed ELF/VLF phase offset, the modulation waveform, and the orientation of the HF beams. Data from two ground stations are interpreted using simulations of modulated heating power envelopes as well as a comprehensive model of ionospheric ELF/VLF generation. It is found that two colocated vertical beams HF beams excite a single ionospheric ELF/VLF source, but independent ELF/VLF sources can be induced in the ionospheric region above the heater if the HF beams are offset from zenith to intersect at their 3 dB points. Furthermore, the use of two vertical HF beams with ELF phase offset is found to be a potential diagnostic method for the ionospheric D region.

  3. A phase screen model for simulating numerically the propagation of a laser beam in rain

    SciTech Connect

    Lukin, I P; Rychkov, D S; Falits, A V; Lai, Kin S; Liu, Min R

    2009-09-30

    The method based on the generalisation of the phase screen method for a continuous random medium is proposed for simulating numerically the propagation of laser radiation in a turbulent atmosphere with precipitation. In the phase screen model for a discrete component of a heterogeneous 'air-rain droplet' medium, the amplitude screen describing the scattering of an optical field by discrete particles of the medium is replaced by an equivalent phase screen with a spectrum of the correlation function of the effective dielectric constant fluctuations that is similar to the spectrum of a discrete scattering component - water droplets in air. The 'turbulent' phase screen is constructed on the basis of the Kolmogorov model, while the 'rain' screen model utiises the exponential distribution of the number of rain drops with respect to their radii as a function of the rain intensity. Theresults of the numerical simulation are compared with the known theoretical estimates for a large-scale discrete scattering medium. (propagation of laser radiation in matter)

  4. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce the risk of medication errors to industry and others at FDA. Additionally, DMEPA prospectively reviews ... List of Abbreviations Regulations and Guidances Guidance for Industry: Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication ...

  5. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines cure infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used ... You can help prevent errors by Knowing your medicines. Keep a list of the names of your ...

  6. Exact solutions for the static bending of Euler-Bernoulli beams using Eringen's two-phase local/nonlocal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. B.; Zhu, X. W.; Dai, H. H.

    2016-08-01

    Though widely used in modelling nano- and micro- structures, Eringen's differential model shows some inconsistencies and recent study has demonstrated its differences between the integral model, which then implies the necessity of using the latter model. In this paper, an analytical study is taken to analyze static bending of nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beams using Eringen's two-phase local/nonlocal model. Firstly, a reduction method is proved rigorously, with which the integral equation in consideration can be reduced to a differential equation with mixed boundary value conditions. Then, the static bending problem is formulated and four types of boundary conditions with various loadings are considered. By solving the corresponding differential equations, exact solutions are obtained explicitly in all of the cases, especially for the paradoxical cantilever beam problem. Finally, asymptotic analysis of the exact solutions reveals clearly that, unlike the differential model, the integral model adopted herein has a consistent softening effect. Comparisons are also made with existing analytical and numerical results, which further shows the advantages of the analytical results obtained. Additionally, it seems that the once controversial nonlocal bar problem in the literature is well resolved by the reduction method.

  7. Phase-space moment-equation model of highly relativistic electron-beams in plasma-wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, R.E.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J.

    2015-05-15

    We formulate a new procedure for modelling the transverse dynamics of relativistic electron beams with significant energy spread when injected into plasma-based accelerators operated in the blow-out regime. Quantities of physical interest, such as the emittance, are furnished directly from solution of phase space moment equations formed from the relativistic Vlasov equation. The moment equations are closed by an Ansatz, and solved analytically for prescribed wakefields. The accuracy of the analytic formulas is established by benchmarking against the results of a semi-analytic/numerical procedure which is described within the scope of this work, and results from a simulation with the 3D quasi-static PIC code HiPACE.

  8. Three-dimensional structuring inside transparent materials by a phase modulated fs laser beam with a LCOS-SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Sawano, Tsutomu; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2011-03-01

    A femtosecond laser processing system with a spatial light modulator (SLM) and its application are presented. Three-dimensional refractive index structures can be fabricated inside glasses by focusing femtosecond laser pulses. When a three-dimensional structure is created, number of processing time is necessary. In addition, fast scanning cannot be applied to shorten the processing time, because long exposure time of laser pulses is necessary to avoid a formation of cracks in the photoexcited region. Therefore, fabrication efficiency is a critical problem. Our laser processing system with an SLM can improve the fabrication efficiency, because multiple light spots can be generated by modulating the spatial phase distribution of laser beam with an SLM. In this paper, we will present the principle of the laser machining system as well as the applications for parallel writing of 3D optical waveguides, diffractive gratings, and optical data storage.

  9. Investigation of Fiber Optics Based Phased Locked Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Paul D.; Gregory, Don A.

    1997-01-01

    Optical power beaming requires a high intensity source and a system to address beam phase and location. A synthetic aperture array of phased locked sources can provide the necessary power levels as well as a means to correct for phase errors. A fiber optic phase modulator with a master oscillator and power amplifier (MOPA) using an injection-locking semiconductor optical amplifier has proven to be effective in correcting phase errors as large as 4pi in an interferometer system. Phase corrections with the piezoelectric fiber stretcher were made from 0 - 10 kHz, with most application oriented corrections requiring only 1 kHz. The amplifier did not lose locked power output while the phase was changed, however its performance was below expectation. Results of this investigation indicate fiber stretchers and amplifiers can be incorporated into a MOPA system to achieve successful earth based power beaming.

  10. Quasi-phase matching and quantum control of high harmonic generation in waveguides using counterpropagating beams

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Xiaoshi; Lytle, Amy L.; Cohen, Oren; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    2010-11-09

    All-optical quasi-phase matching (QPM) uses a train of counterpropagating pulses to enhance high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a hollow waveguide. A pump pulse enters one end of the waveguide, and causes HHG in the waveguide. The counterpropagation pulses enter the other end of the waveguide and interact with the pump pulses to cause QPM within the waveguide, enhancing the HHG.

  11. Sb-induced phase control of InAsSb nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Q D; Anyebe, Ezekiel A; Chen, R; Liu, H; Sanchez, Ana M; Rajpalke, Mohana K; Veal, Tim D; Wang, Z M; Huang, Y Z; Sun, H D

    2015-02-11

    For the first time, we report a complete control of crystal structure in InAs(1-x)Sb(x) NWs by tuning the antimony (Sb) composition. This claim is substantiated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with photoluminescence spectroscopy. The pure InAs nanowires generally show a mixture of wurtzite (WZ) and zinc-blende (ZB) phases, where addition of a small amount of Sb (∼2-4%) led to quasi-pure WZ InAsSb NWs, while further increase of Sb (∼10%) resulted in quasi-pure ZB InAsSb NWs. This phase transition is further evidenced by photoluminescence (PL) studies, where a dominant emission associated with the coexistence of WZ and ZB phases is present in the pure InAs NWs but absent in the PL spectrum of InAs0.96Sb0.04 NWs that instead shows a band-to-band emission. We also demonstrate that the Sb addition significantly reduces the stacking fault density in the NWs. This study provides new insights on the role of Sb addition for effective control of nanowire crystal structure.

  12. Characterization of the in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging beam line developed at ALLS and based on laser driven betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, S.; Otani, K.; Saraf, A.; MacLean, S.; Wesolowski, M. J.; Babyn, P. S.; Hallin, E.; Krol, A.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    The 200TW ALLS laser system (30 fs, 5J) is used to accelerate electrons through laser wakefield and generate betatron emission in the 10keV range. Single shot phase contrast images of a series of nylon fibers with diameter ranging from 10μm to 400μm have been obtained in different geometries and are interpreted with a comprehensive model of x-ray propagation integrating the properties and geometries of the imaging beam line. A simple figure of merit, which can give indication on the interface sharpness of a phase object, is used to assess the quality of the imaging beam line.

  13. Automated co-alignment of coherent fiber laser arrays via active phase-locking.

    PubMed

    Goodno, Gregory D; Weiss, S Benjamin

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel closed-loop approach for high-precision co-alignment of laser beams in an actively phase-locked, coherently combined fiber laser array. The approach ensures interferometric precision by optically transducing beam-to-beam pointing errors into phase errors on a single detector, which are subsequently nulled by duplication of closed-loop phasing controls. Using this approach, beams from five coherent fiber tips were simultaneously phase-locked and position-locked with sub-micron accuracy. Spatial filtering of the sensed light is shown to extend the control range over multiple beam diameters by recovering spatial coherence despite the lack of far-field beam overlap.

  14. Cell identification using single beam lensless imaging with pseudo-random phase encoding.

    PubMed

    Javidi, Bahram; Rawat, Siddharth; Komatsu, Satoru; Markman, Adam

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter, we propose a novel compact optical system for automated cell identification. Our system employs pseudo-random encoding of the light modulated by the cells under inspection to capture the unique opto-biological signature of the micro-organisms by an image sensor and without using a microscope objective lens to magnify the object beam. The proposed instrument can be fabricated using a compact light source, a thin diffuser, and an image sensor connected to computational hardware; thus, it can be compact and cost effective. Experiments are presented using the proposed system to identify and classify various micro-objects and demonstrate proof of concept. The captured opto-biological signature pattern can be attributed to the micro-object's morphology, size, sub-cellular complex structure, index of refraction, internal material composition, etc. Using the captured signature of the micro-object, we extract statistical features such as mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and correlation coefficients for cell identification using the random forest classifier. For comparison, similar identification experiments were repeated with a digital shearing interferometer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on automated cell identification using the proposed approach. PMID:27472644

  15. Ion Beam Driven Shock Device Using Accelerated High Density Plasmoid by Phased Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko; Aizawa, Tatsuhiko; Tsuchida, Minoru

    1997-07-01

    Different from three methods to generate high shock pressure by acceleration of high density plasma or particles (intense ion beams, plasma gun and rail gun) having their intrinsic deficiencies, new frontier is proposed to propel the shock physics and chemistry by using the high density plasma. In the present paper, new scheduled Z-pinch method is developed as a new device to generate high shock pressure. In the present method, plasma density can be compressed to the order of 10^18 to 10^19 cm-3, and high density plasma can be accelerated by zippering together with axial shock pressure, resulting in high-velocity launching of flyer. In the present paper, systematic experimental works are performed to demonstrate that high energy plasma flow can be electro-magnetically driven by the scheduled capillary Z-pinch, and to characterize the ion velocity and its current density. The estimated value of ion speed from the plasma-measurement reaches to 7 x 10^7 cm/s corresponding to 70 to 100 KeV for Ar. Copper flyer can be shot with the velocity range from 1km/s to 3km/s in the standard condition.

  16. Formation of periodic phase structures in a photopolymerizable layer by nonstationary light beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensov, S. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Polushtaitsev, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    Photopolymerization of a composite containing a nonpolymerizable component under the action of nonstationary optical radiation is studied. It is shown that the diffusion displacement of the nonpolymerizable component at the illuminated region boundary is caused by the appearance of the monomer concentration gradient, which, in turn, is induced by nonuniform photoinitiation. The action of radiation with a nonstationary intensity distribution makes it possible to form a periodic refractive index structure in the volume of the photopolymerizable material. The possibility of optical formation of polymer phase gratings by moving the shadow boundary stepwise along the polymerizable layer is studied numerically and experimentally.

  17. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N.

    2015-11-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm{sup 2}). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  18. 4D cone beam CT phase sorting using high frequency optical surface measurement during image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, G. J.; Marchant, T. E.; Parkhurst, J. M.; Sharrock, P. J.; Whitfield, G. A.; Moore, C. J.

    2011-03-01

    In image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) two of the most promising recent developments are four dimensional cone beam CT (4D CBCT) and dynamic optical metrology of patient surfaces. 4D CBCT is now becoming commercially available and finds use in treatment planning and verification, and whilst optical monitoring is a young technology, its ability to measure during treatment delivery without dose consequences has led to its uptake in many institutes. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of dynamic patient surfaces, simultaneously captured during CBCT acquisition using an optical sensor, to phase sort projection images for 4D CBCT volume reconstruction. The dual modality approach we describe means that in addition to 4D volumetric data, the system provides correlated wide field measurements of the patient's skin surface with high spatial and temporal resolution. As well as the value of such complementary data in verification and motion analysis studies, it introduces flexibility into the acquisition of the signal required for phase sorting. The specific technique used may be varied according to individual patient circumstances and the imaging target. We give details of three different methods of obtaining a suitable signal from the optical surfaces: simply following the motion of triangulation spots used to calibrate the surfaces' absolute height; monitoring the surface height in a single, arbitrarily selected, camera pixel; and tracking, in three dimensions, the movement of a surface feature. In addition to describing the system and methodology, we present initial results from a case study oesophageal cancer patient.

  19. Skylab water balance error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of the precision of the net water balance were obtained for the entire Skylab preflight and inflight phases as well as for the first two weeks of flight. Quantitative estimates of both total sampling errors and instrumentation errors were obtained. It was shown that measurement error is minimal in comparison to biological variability and little can be gained from improvement in analytical accuracy. In addition, a propagation of error analysis demonstrated that total water balance error could be accounted for almost entirely by the errors associated with body mass changes. Errors due to interaction between terms in the water balance equation (covariances) represented less than 10% of the total error. Overall, the analysis provides evidence that daily measurements of body water changes obtained from the indirect balance technique are reasonable, precise, and relaible. The method is not biased toward net retention or loss.

  20. X-ray micro-beam techniques and phase contrast tomography applied to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Bukreeva, Inna; Pelliccia, Daniele; Burghammer, Manfred; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-12-01

    A deeper comprehension of the biomineralization (BM) process is at the basis of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine developments. Several in-vivo and in-vitro studies were dedicated to this purpose via the application of 2D and 3D diagnostic techniques. Here, we develop a new methodology, based on different complementary experimental techniques (X-ray phase contrast tomography, micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence scanning technique) coupled to new analytical tools. A qualitative and quantitative structural investigation, from the atomic to the micrometric length scale, is obtained for engineered bone tissues. The high spatial resolution achieved by X-ray scanning techniques allows us to monitor the bone formation at the first-formed mineral deposit at the organic-mineral interface within a porous scaffold. This work aims at providing a full comprehension of the morphology and functionality of the biomineralization process, which is of key importance for developing new drugs for preventing and healing bone diseases and for the development of bio-inspired materials.

  1. Displacement damage in bit error ratio performance of on-off keying, pulse position modulation, differential phase shift keying, and homodyne binary phase-shift keying-based optical intersatellite communication system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Zhao, Jing; Dong, Chen; Li, Xuan

    2016-04-10

    Displacement damage (DD) effect induced bit error ratio (BER) performance degradations in on-off keying (OOK), pulse position modulation (PPM), differential phase-shift keying (DPSK), and homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) based systems were simulated and discussed under 1 MeV neutron irradiation to a total fluence of 1×1012  n/cm2 in this paper. Degradation of main optoelectronic devices included in communication systems were analyzed on the basis of existing experimental data. The system BER degradation was subsequently simulated and the variations of BER with different neutron irradiation location were also achieved. The result shows that DD on an Er-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is the dominant cause of system degradation, and a BPSK-based system performs better than the other three systems against DD. In order to improve radiation hardness of communication systems against DD, protection and enhancement of EDFA are required, and the use of a homodyne BPSK modulation scheme is a considered choice.

  2. Distributed phased array architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Variations in amplifiers and phase shifters can cause degraded antenna performance, depending also on the environmental conditions and antenna array architecture. The implementation of distributed phased array hardware was studied with the aid of the DISTAR computer program as a simulation tool. This simulation provides guidance in hardware simulation. Both hard and soft failures of the amplifiers in the T/R modules are modeled. Hard failures are catastrophic: no power is transmitted to the antenna elements. Noncatastrophic or soft failures are modeled as a modified Gaussian distribution. The resulting amplitude characteristics then determine the array excitation coefficients. The phase characteristics take on a uniform distribution. Pattern characteristics such as antenna gain, half power beamwidth, mainbeam phase errors, sidelobe levels, and beam pointing errors were studied as functions of amplifier and phase shifter variations. General specifications for amplifier and phase shifter tolerances in various architecture configurations for C band and S band were determined.

  3. Phase 1 Study of Dose Escalation in Hypofractionated Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Wei, Caimiao; Lin, Steven H.; Swanick, Cameron; Alvarado, Tina; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2013-07-15

    Background: Many patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cannot undergo concurrent chemotherapy because of comorbidities or poor performance status. Hypofractionated radiation regimens, if tolerable, may provide an option to these patients for effective local control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were enrolled in a phase 1 dose-escalation trial of proton beam therapy (PBT) from September 2010 through July 2012. Eligible patients had histologically documented lung cancer, thymic tumors, carcinoid tumors, or metastatic thyroid tumors. Concurrent chemotherapy was not allowed, but concurrent treatment with biologic agents was. The dose-escalation schema comprised 15 fractions of 3 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE])/fraction, 3.5 Gy(RBE)/fraction, or 4 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Dose constraints were derived from biologically equivalent doses of standard fractionated treatment. Results: The median follow-up time for patients alive at the time of analysis was 13 months (range, 8-28 months). Fifteen patients received treatment to hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes. Two patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity possibly related to treatment; 1 received 3.5-Gy(RBE) fractions and experienced an in-field tracheoesophageal fistula 9 months after PBT and 1 month after bevacizumab. The other patient received 4-Gy(RBE) fractions and was hospitalized for bacterial pneumonia/radiation pneumonitis 4 months after PBT. Conclusion: Hypofractionated PBT to the thorax delivered over 3 weeks was well tolerated even with significant doses to the lungs and mediastinal structures. Phase 2/3 trials are needed to compare the efficacy of this technique with standard treatment for locally advanced NSCLC.

  4. Active fiber-based retroreflector providing phase-retracing anti-parallel laser beams for precision spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beyer, A; Maisenbacher, L; Matveev, A; Pohl, R; Khabarova, K; Chang, Y; Grinin, A; Lamour, T; Shi, T; Yost, D C; Udem, Th; Hänsch, T W; Kolachevsky, N

    2016-07-25

    We present an active fiber-based retroreflector providing high quality phase-retracing anti-parallel Gaussian laser beams for precision spectroscopy of Doppler sensitive transitions. Our design is well-suited for a number of applications where implementing optical cavities is technically challenging and corner cubes fail to match the demanded requirements, most importantly retracing wavefronts and preservation of the laser polarization. To illustrate the performance of the system, we use it for spectroscopy of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen and demonstrate an average suppression of the first order Doppler shift to 4 parts in 106 of the full collinear shift. This high degree of cancellation combined with our cryogenic source of hydrogen atoms in the metastable 2S state is sufficient to enable determinations of the Rydberg constant and the proton charge radius with competitive uncertainties. Advantages over the usual Doppler cancellation based on corner cube type retroreflectors are discussed as well as an alternative method using a high finesse cavity. PMID:27464193

  5. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  6. Flow measurement by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a multi-centre multi-vendor study of background phase offset errors that can compromise the accuracy of derived regurgitant or shunt flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aims Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) allows non-invasive phase contrast measurements of flow through planes transecting large vessels. However, some clinically valuable applications are highly sensitive to errors caused by small offsets of measured velocities if these are not adequately corrected, for example by the use of static tissue or static phantom correction of the offset error. We studied the severity of uncorrected velocity offset errors across sites and CMR systems. Methods and Results In a multi-centre, multi-vendor study, breath-hold through-plane retrospectively ECG-gated phase contrast acquisitions, as are used clinically for aortic and pulmonary flow measurement, were applied to static gelatin phantoms in twelve 1.5 T CMR systems, using a velocity encoding range of 150 cm/s. No post-processing corrections of offsets were implemented. The greatest uncorrected velocity offset, taken as an average over a 'great vessel' region (30 mm diameter) located up to 70 mm in-plane distance from the magnet isocenter, ranged from 0.4 cm/s to 4.9 cm/s. It averaged 2.7 cm/s over all the planes and systems. By theoretical calculation, a velocity offset error of 0.6 cm/s (representing just 0.4% of a 150 cm/s velocity encoding range) is barely acceptable, potentially causing about 5% miscalculation of cardiac output and up to 10% error in shunt measurement. Conclusion In the absence of hardware or software upgrades able to reduce phase offset errors, all the systems tested appeared to require post-acquisition correction to achieve consistently reliable breath-hold measurements of flow. The effectiveness of offset correction software will still need testing with respect to clinical flow acquisitions. PMID:20074359

  7. Detailed analyses of dynamic and static errors in neutron radiography testing

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Glickstein, S.S.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron radiography systems are being used for real-time visualization of the dynamic behavior as well as time-averaged measurements of spatial vapor fraction distributions for two phase fluids. The extraction of quantitative data on vapor-liquid flow fields is a significant advance in the methodology of fundamental two-phase flow experimentation. The data in the form of video images are typically recorded on videotape at 30 frames per second. Image analysis of the video pictures is used to extract time-dependent or time-averaged data. The determination of the average vapor fraction requires averaging of the logarithm of time-dependent intensity measurements of the neutron beam (gray scale distribution of the image) that passes through the fluid. This could be significantly different than averaging the intensity of the transmitted beam and then taking the logarithm of that term. This is termed the dynamic error (error in the time-averaged vapor fractions due t the inherent time-dependence of the measured data) and is separate from the static error (statistical sampling uncertainty). The results provide insight into the characteristics of these errors and help to quantify achievable bounds on the limits of these errors. The static error was determined by the uncertainties of measured beam intensities. It was found that the maximum static error increases as liquid thickness increases and can be reduced by increasing the neutron source strength. The dynamic error increased with large fluctuations in the local vapor fractions and with increasing liquid thickness. Detailed analyses of both sources of errors are discussed.

  8. Optical multiple-image encryption based on the chaotic structured phase masks under the illumination of a vortex beam in the gyrator domain.

    PubMed

    Liansheng, Sui; Bei, Zhou; Xiaojuan, Ning; Ailing, Tian

    2016-01-11

    A novel multiple-image encryption scheme using the nonlinear iterative phase retrieval algorithm in the gyrator transform domain under the illumination of an optical vortex beam is proposed. In order to increase the randomness, the chaotic structured phase mask based on the logistic map, Fresnel zone plate and radial Hilbert mask is proposed. With the help of two chaotic phase masks, each plain image is encoded into two phase-only masks that are considered as the private keys by using the iterative phase retrieval process in the gyrator domain. Then, the second keys of all plain images are modulated into the ciphertext, which has the stationary white noise distribution. Due to the use of the chaotic structured phase masks, the problem of axis alignment in the optical setup can easily be solved. Two private keys are directly relative to the plain images, which makes that the scheme has high resistance against various potential attacks. Moreover, the use of the vortex beam that can integrates more system parameters as the additional keys into one phase mask can improve the security level of the cryptosystem, which makes the key space enlarged widely. Simulation results are given to verify the feasibility and robustness of the proposed encryption scheme.

  9. Optical beam shaping and diffraction free waves: A variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John A.; Venkataramani, Shankar C.; Durfee, Charles G.; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the problem of shaping radially symmetric annular beams into desired intensity patterns along the optical axis. Within the Fresnel approximation, we show that this problem can be expressed in a variational form equivalent to the one arising in phase retrieval. Using the uncertainty principle we prove various rigorous lower bounds on the functional; these lower bounds estimate the L2 error for the beam shaping problem in terms of the design parameters. We also use the method of stationary phase to construct a natural ansatz for a minimizer in the short wavelength limit. We illustrate the implications of our results by applying the method of stationary phase coupled with the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm to beam shaping problems arising in the remote delivery of beams and pulses.

  10. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  11. Ion-beam-induced magnetic and structural phase transformation of Ni-stabilized face-centered-cubic Fe films on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Gloss, Jonas; Shah Zaman, Sameena; Jonner, Jakub; Novotny, Zbynek; Schmid, Michael; Varga, Peter; Urbánek, Michal

    2013-12-23

    Metastable face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe/Cu(100) thin films are good candidates for ion-beam magnetic patterning due to their magnetic transformation upon ion-beam irradiation. However, pure fcc Fe films undergo spontaneous transformation when their thickness exceeds 10 ML. This limit can be extended to approximately 22 ML by deposition of Fe at increased CO background pressures. We show that much thicker films can be grown by alloying with Ni for stabilizing the fcc γ phase. The amount of Ni necessary to stabilize nonmagnetic, transformable fcc Fe films in dependence on the residual background pressure during the deposition is determined and a phase diagram revealing the transformable region is presented.

  12. Phase I/II study of bortezomib-BEAM and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma, transformed, or mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    William, Basem M; Allen, Mary S; Loberiza, Fausto R; Bociek, Robert Gregory; Bierman, Philip J; Armitage, James O; Vose, Julie M

    2014-04-01

    A phase I/II trial was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adding bortezomib to standard BEAM (BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Eligible patients had relapsed/refractory indolent or transformed non-Hodgkin lymphoma or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) that was relapsed/refractory or in first partial (PR) or complete remission (CR). Patients received bortezomib on days -11, -8, -5, and -2 before ASCT. Phase I had 4 dose cohorts (.8, 1, 1.3, and 1.5 mg/m(2)) and 3 patients were accrued to each. Any nonhematological ASCT-related toxicity >2 on the Bearman scale occurring between day -11 and engraftment defined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). After the MTD has been reached, another 20 patients were enrolled at this dose to determine a preliminary overall response rate (ORR). Patients who were in CR or PR at day +100 were considered responders. The study enrolled 42 patients through August 14, 2009. The median age was 58 (range, 34 to 73) years, with 33 males and 9 females. The most common diagnoses were MCL (23 patients) and follicular lymphoma (7 patients). The median number of prior therapies was 1 (range, 0 to 6). The median follow-up was 4.88 (range, 1.07 to 6.98) years. Thirteen patients were treated in phase I and 29 patients were treated in phase II. The MTD was initially determined to be 1.5 mg/m(2) but it was later decreased to 1 mg/m(2) because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity and peripheral neuropathy. The ORR was 95% at 100 days and 87% at 1 year. For all 38 evaluable patients at 1 year, responses were CR 84%, PR 1%, and progressive disease 13%. Progression-free survival (PFS) was 83% (95% CI, 68% to 92%) at 1 year, and 32% (15% to 51%) at 5 years. Overall survival (OS) was 91% (95% CI, 79% to 96%) at 1 year and 67% (50% to 79%) at 5 years. The most common National Cancer Institute grade 3 toxicities were neutropenic fever (59%), anorexia (21%), peripheral neuropathy (19

  13. Study program for design improvements of the X-3060 klystron. Phase 3: Electron gun fabrication and beam analyzer evaluation. Phase 4: Klystron prototype fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A.

    1981-01-01

    A full scale model was produced to verify suggested design changes. Through beam analyzer study, the correct electron beam diameter and cross sectional profile were established in conjunction with the desired confining magnetic field. Comparative data on the performance of the X-3060 klystron, design predictions for the improved klystron, and performance data taken during acceptance testing of the prototype VKS-8274 JPL are presented.

  14. Dynamic and static error analyses of neutron radiography testing

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Glickstein, S.S.

    1999-03-01

    Neutron radiography systems are being used for real-time visualization of the dynamic behavior as well as time-averaged measurements of spatial vapor fraction distributions for two phase fluids. The data in the form of video images are typically recorded on videotape at 30 frames per second. Image analysis of he video pictures is used to extract time-dependent or time-averaged data. The determination of the average vapor fraction requires averaging of the logarithm of time-dependent intensity measurements of the neutron beam (gray scale distribution of the image) that passes through the fluid. This could be significantly different than averaging the intensity of the transmitted beam and then taking the logarithm of that term. This difference is termed the dynamic error (error in the time-averaged vapor fractions due to the inherent time-dependence of the measured data) and is separate from the static error (statistical sampling uncertainty). Detailed analyses of both sources of errors are discussed.

  15. Application of the pencil-beam redefinition algorithm in heterogeneous media for proton beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Y.; Nishio, T.; Hotta, K.; Kohno, R.; Uesaka, M.

    2013-02-01

    In proton beam therapy, changes in the proton range due to lateral heterogeneity may cause serious errors in the dose distribution. In the present study, the pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) was applied to proton beam therapy to address the problem of lateral density heterogeneity. In the calculation, the phase-space parameters were characterized for multiple range (i.e. proton energy) bins for given pencil beams. The particles that were included in each pencil beam were transported and redefined periodically until they had stopped. The redefined beams formed a detouring path that was different from that of the non-redefined pencil beams, and the path of each redefined beam was straight. The results calculated by the PBRA were compared with measured proton dose distributions in a heterogeneous slab phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom. Through the beam redefinition process, the PBRA was able to predict the measured proton-detouring effects. Therefore, the PBRA may allow improved calculation accuracy when dealing with lateral heterogeneities in proton therapy applications.

  16. Accurate characterization of Monte Carlo calculated electron beams for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, C M; Faddegon, B A; Rogers, D W; Mackie, T R

    1997-03-01

    Monte Carlo studies of dose distributions in patients treated with radiotherapy electron beams would benefit from generalized models of clinical beams if such models introduce little error into the dose calculations. Methodology is presented for the design of beam models, including their evaluation in terms of how well they preserve the character of the clinical beam, and the effect of the beam models on the accuracy of dose distributions calculated with Monte Carlo. This methodology has been used to design beam models for electron beams from two linear accelerators, with either a scanned beam or a scattered beam. Monte Carlo simulations of the accelerator heads are done in which a record is kept of the particle phase-space, including the charge, energy, direction, and position of every particle that emerges from the treatment head, along with a tag regarding the details of the particle history. The character of the simulated beams are studied in detail and used to design various beam models from a simple point source to a sophisticated multiple-source model which treats particles from different parts of a linear accelerator as from different sub-sources. Dose distributions calculated using both the phase-space data and the multiple-source model agree within 2%, demonstrating that the model is adequate for the purpose of Monte Carlo treatment planning for the beams studied. Benefits of the beam models over phase-space data for dose calculation are shown to include shorter computation time in the treatment head simulation and a smaller disk space requirement, both of which impact on the clinical utility of Monte Carlo treatment planning.

  17. Nonlinear forced vibration response of smart two-phase nano-composite beams to external harmonic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareishi, Soraya; Kalhori, Hamed; Rafiee, Mohammad; Hosseini, Seyedeh Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for nonlinear free and forced vibration response of smart laminated nano-composite beams resting on nonlinear elastic foundation and under external harmonic excitation. The structure is under a temperature change and an electric excitation through the piezoelectric layers. Different distribution patterns of the single walled aligned and straight carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through the thickness of the beam are considered. The beam complies with Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and von Kármán geometric nonlinearity. The nonlinearity is due to the mid-plane stretching of the beam and the nonlinear stiffness of the elastic foundation. The Multiple Time Scales perturbation scheme is used to perform the nonlinear dynamical analysis of functionally graded carbon nanotube-reinforced beams. Analytical expressions of the nonlinear natural frequencies, nonlinear dynamic response and frequency response of the system in the case of primary resonance have been presented. The effects of different parameters including applied voltage, temperature change, beam geometry, the volume fraction and distribution pattern of the carbon nanotubes on the nonlinear natural frequencies and frequency-response curves are presented. It is found that the volume fractions of SWCNTs as well as their distribution pattern significantly change the behavior of the system.

  18. Beam-based monitoring of the SLC linac optics with a diagnostic pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.; Decker, F.J.; Hendrickson, L.J.; Phinney, N.; Siemann, R.H.; Underwood, K.K.; Woodley, M.

    1997-07-01

    The beam optics in a linear accelerator may be changed significantly by variations in the energy and energy spread profile along the linac. In particular, diurnal temperature swings in the SLC klystron gallery perturb the phase and amplitude of the accelerating RF fields. If such changes are not correctly characterized, the resulting errors will cause phase advance differences in the beam optics. In addition RF phase errors also affect the amplitude growth of betatron oscillations. The authors present an automated, simple procedure to monitor the beam optics in the SLC linac routinely and non-invasively. The measured phase advance and oscillation amplitude is shown as a function of time and is compared to the nominal optics.

  19. Optical phase distortion due to turbulent-fluid density fields - Quantification using the small-aperture beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumper, E. J.; Hugo, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the small-aperture beam technique, a relatively new way of experimentally quantifying optically-active, turbulent-fluid-flow-induced optical degradation. The paper lays out the theoretical basis for the technique, and the relationship of the measured jitter of the beam to optical path difference. A numerical simulation of a two-dimensional heated jet is used to explore the validity of beam jitter to obtain optical path difference in a flow region where eddy production constitutes the major character of the 'turbulent' flow field.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy studying of structural features of NiTi B2 phase formed under pulsed electron-beam impact

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Ludmila L.; Semin, Viktor O.; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y.; Neiman, Alexey A. Lotkov, Alexander I.; Ostapenko, Marina G.; Koval, Nikolai N.; Teresov, Anton D.

    2015-10-27

    By transmission electron microscopy method the evolution of structural-phase states on a depth of close to equiatomic NiTi modified layer has been studied. Modification performed by pulse impact on its surface low-energy high-current electron beam (beam energy density 10 J/sm{sup 2}, 10 pulses, pulse duration 50mks). It is established that during the treatment in the layer thickness of 8–10 μm, the melting of primary B2 phase and contained therein as Ti2Ni phase particles occurs. The result is change in the concentration ratio of titanium and nickel in the direction of increasing titanium content, which was confirmed by X-ray analysis in the form of increased unit cell parameter B2 phase. Analysis of the electron diffraction pattern showed that the modified layer is characterized as a highly distorted structure on the basis of bcc lattice. Lattice distortions are maximal near the surface and extends to a depth of melt. In subjacent layer there is gradual decline lattice distortions is observed.