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Sample records for beam physics 1994 95

  1. Center for Beam Physics: 1994--95

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is a fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of particle and photon beam physics, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage, and control of systems of charged particles and photons. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s team and gives a brief review of the multifaceted activities during 1994 and 1995.

  2. 1994-95 Communications Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The 1994-1995 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Communications Plan - and the goals, objectives, strategies and actions that follow - are the products of almost a year of researching, evaluating and addressing LBL`s needs for effective internal and external communications programs. They grow from three contemporary realities undeniably bound to the future of the laboratory - (1) a diversified research mission that has splintered internal loyalties and commitments since LBL`s evolution from a one-purpose high energy physics lab; (2) a fiercely competitive science funding environment in the 1990`s; and (3) a continuing LBL identity crisis marked by public confusion over three `Lawrences; (the Livermore and Berkeley labs, plus the Berkeley campus` Hall of Science) and two `Berkeleys` (laboratory and campus).

  3. The Indigenous World, 1994-95 = El Mundo Indigena, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Marianne, Comp.; Sjorslev, Inger, Comp.

    1995-01-01

    This annual publication examines political, legal, social, and educational issues concerning indigenous peoples in various countries around the world during 1994-95. Part I highlights news events and ongoing situations in specific countries. In the United States and Canada, these include: (1) the arrest of three Canadian Inuit hunters for the…

  4. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, D.

    1995-10-01

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA`s astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th{sup 80+} can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H{sub 2} performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe{sup q+} and Th{sup q+} (35 {le} q {le} 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be {approximately} 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events.

  5. Professional Salary Schedules. Maryland Public Schools, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education. Baltimore. Div. of Planning, Results and Information Management.

    This compilation of tables presents information on educator salaries in the Maryland public schools for 1994-95. Salary information for the state's 23 counties and Baltimore City is presented in the following tables: (1) maximum salaries for 12-month professional positions; (2) salary range for 10-month teachers; (3) salary schedules for public…

  6. The Universities Grants Commission. Annual Report, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Universities Grants Commission, Winnipeg.

    This annual report describes the operations of the Manitoba Universities Grants Commission for the fiscal year 1994-95 with an audited balance sheet and statement of operating revenues and expenditures. The Commission advises the government on how much financial assistance should be given universities. It is also responsible for allocating funds…

  7. First Nations Development Institute Biennial Report, 1994/95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    First Nations Development Inst., Fredericksburg, VA.

    This report describes economic development projects that were funded during 1994-95 by the First Nations Development Institute. The Institute was established in 1980 to help tribes build sound, sustainable reservation economies. Through the Eagle Staff Fund, the Institute regrants funds for culturally viable economic development projects from a…

  8. Unified Budget Recommendations for Fiscal Year 1994-95: Alabama Commission on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    This document presents funding proposals from the Alabama Commission on Higher Education for the 1994-95 Fiscal Year. Individual sections present the following: (1) executive summary of the Unified Budget Recommendations; (2) the unified budget recommendation with program detail on 1992-93 and 1993-94 appropriations and 1994-95 requests, regional…

  9. The State of Working America, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence; Bernstein, Jared

    Numerous sources of data about family incomes, taxes, wages, unemployment, wealth, and poverty were used to analyze the impact of the economy on living standards in the United States in 1994-1995. It was discovered that most individuals in the United States are worse off in the 1990s than they were at the end of the 1970s. Between 1979 and 1989,…

  10. School-to-Work Opportunities: Employer Survey Results 1994-95. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saginaw Public Schools, MI. Dept. of Evaluation Services.

    The 1994-95 school year was the first year of the MECA (Manufacturing, Engineering, Construction, Automotive) partnership implementation in the Saginaw (Michigan) Public Schools. MECA's purpose was to nurture the potential of youth while placing them in workplace environments that had not been a traditional part of applied learning in secondary…

  11. Alcohol and Drug Defense Program (ADD) 1994-95. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulaney, Charles N.

    The Wake County Public School System used Alcohol and Drug Defense Program (ADD) federal funds in 1994-95 to reduce the impact of drugs and alcohol on the system's 12 high schools by implementing a Student Assistance Program (SAP). SAP provides intervention and support for students identified as being at risk of substance abuse because of academic…

  12. Chapter 2 Formula: 1994-95 Final Report. Publication No. 94.11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Julia

    Chapter 2 Formula provides federal funds to states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act as amended in 1988. Chapter 2 Formula funds can be used in a variety of ways to meet the educational needs of students at risk of failure or dropping out. In 1994-95, the Austin Independent School District (AISD) (Texas) received a total of…

  13. Arctic Ozone Depletion Observed by UARS MLS During the 1994-95 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Zurek, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    During the unusually cold 1994-95 Arctic winter, the Microwave Limb Sounder observed enhanced chlorine monoxide (ClO) in late Dec and throughout Feb and early Mar. Late Dec ClO was higher than during any of the previous 3 years, consistent with the colder early winter. Between late Dec 1994 and early Feb 1995, 465 K (about 50 hPa) vortex-averaged ozone (03) decreased by about 15%, with local decreases of about 30%; additional local decreases of about 5% were seen between early Feb and early Mar. Transport calculations indicate that vortex-averaged chemical loss between late Dec and early Feb was about 20% at 465 K, with about 1/4 of that masked by downward transport of O3. This Arctic chemical O3 loss is not readily detectable in MLS column O3 data.

  14. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data. Annual report, 1994-FY 95

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) has published reports of its activities since 1984. The first report covered January through June of 1984, and the second report covered July through December 1984. Since those first two semiannual reports, AEOD has published annual reports of its activities from 1985 through 1993. Beginning with the report for 1986, AEOD Annual Reports have been published as NUREG-1272. Beginning with the report for 1987, NUREG-1272 has been published in two parts, No. 1 covering power reactors and No. 2 covering nonreactors (changed to {open_quotes}nuclear materials{close_quotes} with the 1993 report). The 1993 AEOD Annual Report was NUREG-1272, Volume 8. AEOD has changed its annual report from a calendar year to a fiscal year report to be consistent with the NRC Annual Report and to conserve staff resources. NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 1 and No. 2, therefore, are combined calendar year 1994 (1994) and fiscal year 1995 (FY 95) reports which describe activities conducted between January 1, 1994, and September 30, 1995. Certain data which have historically been reported on a calendar year basis, however, are complete through calendar year 1995. Throughout this report, whenever information is presented for fiscal year 1995, it is designated as FY 95 data. Calendar year information is always designated by the four digits of the calendar year. This report, NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns associated with the use of licensed material in non-power reactor applications. A new part has been added, NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 3, which covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in FY 95 in support of the NRC`s mission.

  15. Occurrence of pesticides in ground water in the White River Basin, Indiana, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Moore, Rhett C.

    1996-01-01

    Pesticides (herbicides and insecticides) are used extensively in the White River Basin. Application of herbicides to corn and soybeans accounts for most of the use. The U.S. Geological Survey collected samples from four networks of monitoring wells in the White River Basin during 1994-95. The most frequently detected compounds in ground water were desethyl atrazine (a breakdown product of atrazine) and the commonly used herbicides, atrazine and metolachlor. Insecticides commonly used in urban and agricultural areas were not found. The highest concentration of any pesticide detected was alachlor at 0.19 micrograms per liter. Most detections of atrazine and desethyl atrazine were in agricultural areas overlying fluvial deposits, which are vulnerable to pesticide contamination, but the concentrations were small (less than 0.1 microgram per liter).

  16. Salinity in the Colorado River in the Grand Valley, western Colorado, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, David L.; von Guerard, Paul B.

    1996-01-01

    Salinity, or the dissolved-solids concentration, is the measure of salts such as sodium chloride, calcium bicarbonate, and calcium sulfate that are dissolved in water. About one-half of the salinity in the Colorado River Basin is from natural sources (U.S. Department of the Interior, 1995), such as thermal springs in the Glenwood-Dotsero area, located about 90 miles upstream from Grand Junction (fig. 1). Effects of human activities, such as irrigation, reservoir evaporation, and transbasin diversions, have increased the levels of salinity in the Colorado River. High salinity can affect industrial and municipal water users by causing increased water-treatment costs, increased deterioration of plumbing and appliances, increased soap needs, and undesirable taste of drinking water. High salinity also can cause lower crop yields by reducing water and nutrient uptake by plants and can increase agricultural production costs because of higher leaching and drainage requirements. Agricultural losses might occur when salinity reaches about 700?850 milligrams per liter (U.S Department of the Interior, 1994). Figure 1. Irrigated area in the Grand Valley and locations of sampling sites for the 1994?95 salinity study of the Colorado River. The Colorado River is the major source of irrigation water to the Grand Valley (fig. 1) and also is one source of water for the Clifton Water District, which supplies domestic water to part of the eastern Grand Valley. During spring and early summer in 1994, the Colorado River in the Grand Valley had lower than average streamflow. There was concern by water users about the effect of this low streamflow on salinity in the river. In 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado River Water Conservation District, began a study to evaluate salinity in the Colorado River. This fact sheet describes results of that study. The specific objectives of the fact sheet are to (1) compare salinity in the Colorado River among

  17. Physics Division annual report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K.J.; Henning, W.F.

    1994-08-01

    This is the Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division Annual Report for the period April 1, 1993 to March 31, 1994. It summarizes work done in a number of different fields, both on site, and at other facilities. Chapters describe heavy ion nuclear physics research, operation and development of the ATLAS accelerator, medium-energy nuclear physics research, theoretical physics, and atomic and molecular physics research.

  18. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  19. Corridors to Economic Growth and Employment: 1994-95 Final Report to the Governor and the Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helm, Phoebe

    The Economic Development Network (ED>Net) of the California Community Colleges was designed to advance the state's economic growth and competitiveness by coordinating and facilitating workforce improvement, technology deployment, and business development initiatives. This report reviews outcomes for ED>Net for 1994-95 based on reports…

  20. The Goodwill Literacy Initiative/Program for Career Information & Development: A Case Study of Program Linkages 1994/95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Margaret; And Others

    The Goodwill Literacy Initiative evaluated its services during the 1994-95 program year. This time frame was chosen because several program enhancements were implemented that reflect the literacy initiative's mission to combine adult basic education with work force development. Three developments were aimed at student retention: a formal…

  1. The Class "C" Survey 1994-95. Comparisons of Budgets, Levies and Enrollments of Class "C" Montana School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Montana Coll., Dillon. Montana Rural Education Center.

    This report presents data comparing budgets, levies, and enrollments of small, rural schools (Class "C") in Montana for fiscal year 1994-95. The average enrollment of 56 elementary schools was 136 students; the average enrollment of 56 high schools was 70 students. The average total enrollment of Class "C" schools was 190…

  2. Utah State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Summary of Statistical and Financial Data, 1994-95. Supplement to the Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    To gauge how its schools are performing, the state of Utah produces a statistical and financial data report each year; the results of the 1994-95 report are presented. The report is divided into three parts: a statistical section, statewide revenue/receipts, and statewide expenditures/disbursements. The data in the first part feature statistics on…

  3. The Academic Journey: Insights from 1994-95 and 1995-96 Graduates. Research Report 98-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcheir, Marcia J.; Gray, Nancy L.

    A survey of 1,210 Boise State University (BSU) alumni sought to discover if BSU graduates were successful and how well their courses of study had met their needs. Graduates from 1994-95 and 1995-96 were asked to rate several areas related to their major, provide information concerning their employment and other demographic factors, and offer…

  4. Nonfatal physical violence, United States, 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, L B; Sacks, J J; Kresnow, M J; Mercy, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Most surveillance and research efforts focus on severe violence, especially on homicides. Because less extreme forms of violence may be precursors to more extreme forms, the authors analyzed data from a national survey to describe the extent of nonfatal physical violence in the US. METHODS: The authors generated weighted national estimates from responses to a random-digit-dialed telephone survey. Respondents were asked if they had been "hit, slapped, pushed, or kicked by another person or hit with an object or weapon" in the preceding 12 months. Respondents were also asked how many times such incidents had occurred and, for the last such episode, their relationship with the perpetrator, whether they had been injured, and, if so, whether they had sought medical treatment. RESULTS: The authors estimate that approximately 15 million people, or 8% of the US adult population, experienced nonfatal physical violence, as defined for this study, during a 12-month period. Male gender, the 18-24-year-old age group, never having been married, being out of work or a student, and heavy drinking were associated with a higher likelihood of being assaulted. An estimated 75% of assaults were by a known person and 26% by a stranger. Women were more likely than men to be assaulted by current or former intimate partners; men were more likely than women to be assaulted by strangers. An estimated 18% of incidents resulted in injuries, and an estimated 7% required medical attention. CONCLUSIONS: Nonfatal physical violence is fairly common in the US and may lead to more than one million medical encounters each year. PMID:10501135

  5. Physics opportunities with meson beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, William J.; Döring, Michael; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D. Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I.; Swanson, Eric S.

    2015-10-01

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electroproduction data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even non-existent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state-of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  6. Physics opportunities with meson beams

    SciTech Connect

    Briscoe, William J.; Doring, Michael; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D. Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I.; Swanson, Eric S.

    2015-10-20

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. Furthermore, the present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  7. Statewide Technology Survey of New Hampshire Schools, 1994-95. Summary of Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Resource Management, Hampton, NH.

    In October 1994, the New Hampshire Department of Education, in conjunction with the Legislative Study Committee on Interactive Communications, conducted a survey to determine the technology infrastructure of New Hampshire Schools. The survey elicited information about technology plans, instructional and administrative use of personal computers and…

  8. Course Pass Rates in Fall 1994. Enrollment Analysis EA95-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    Student performance in individual courses constitutes a fundamental learning outcome, as assessed by the faculty. Examination of student outcomes at the course level is especially appropriate at community colleges, since as many as half the students in credit courses have no intention of earning a degree. Fall 1994 final course grades of students…

  9. Nonpoint-Source Pollution Issues. January 1990-November 1994. QB 95-01. Quick Bibliography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makuch, Joe

    Citations in this bibliography are intended to be a substantial resource for recent investigations (January 1990-November 1994) on nonpoint source pollution and were obtained from a search of the National Agriculture Library's AGRICOLA database. The 196 citations are indexed by author and subject. A representation of the search strategy is…

  10. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

  11. College of DuPage Information Technology Plan, Fiscal Year 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    Building upon four previous planning documents for computing at College of DuPage in Illinois, this plan for fiscal year 1995 (FY95) provides a starting point for future plans to address all activities that relate to the use of information technology on campus. The FY95 "Information Technology Plan" is divided into six sections, each…

  12. Sources and loads of nutrients in the South Platte River, Colorado and Nebraska, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litke, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The South Platte River Basin was one of 20 river basins selected in 1991 for investigation as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Nationwide, nutrients have been identified as one of the primary nationwide water-quality concerns and are of particular interest in the South Platte River Basin where nutrient concentrations are large compared to concentrations in other NAWQA river basins. This report presents estimates of the magnitude of nutrient-source inputs to the South Platte River Basin, describes nutrient concen- trations and loads in the South Platte River during different seasons, and presents comparisons of nutrient inputs to instream nutrient loads. Annual nutrient inputs to the basin were estimated to be 306,000 tons of nitrogen and 41,000 tons of phosphorus. The principal nutrient sources were wastewater-treatment plants, fertilizer and manure applications, and atmospheric deposition. To characterize nutrient concentrations and loads in the South Platte River during different seasons, five nutrient synoptic samplings were conducted during 1994 and 1995. Upstream from Denver, Colorado, during April 1994 and January 1995, total nitrogen concentrations were less than 2 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and total phosphorus concentrations were less than 0.2 mg/L. The water in the river at this point was derived mostly from forested land in the mountains west of Denver. Total nutrient concentrations increased through the Denver metropolitan area, and concentration peaks occurred just downstream from each of Denver's largest wastewater-treatment plants with maximum concentrations of 13.6 mg/L total nitrogen and 2.4 mg/L total phosphorus. Nutrient concen- concentrations generally decreased downstream from Denver. Upstream from Denver during April 1994 and January 1995, total nitrogen loads were less than 1,000 pounds per day (lb/d), and total phosphorus loads were less than 125 lb/d. Total nutrient loads increased

  13. Physics opportunities with meson beams

    DOE PAGES

    Briscoe, William J.; Doring, Michael; Haberzettl, Helmut; ...

    2015-10-20

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledgemore » in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. Furthermore, the present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.« less

  14. Mechanism for Surface Warming in the Equatorial Pacific during 1994-95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rienecker, Michele M.; Borovikov, Anna; Schopf, Paul S.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanisms controlling the variation in sea surface temperature warm event in the equatorial Pacific were investigated through ocean model simulations. In addition, the mechanisms of the climatological SST cycle were investigated. The dominant mechanisms governing the seasonal cycle of SST vary significantly across the basin. In the western Pacific the annual cycle of SST is primarily in response to external heat flux. In the central basin the magnitude of zonal advection is comparable to that of the external heat flux. In the eastern basin the role of zonal advection is reduced and the vertical mixing is more important. In the easternmost equatorial Pacific the vertical entrainment contribution is as large as that of vertical diffusion. The model estimate of the vertical mixing contribution to the mixed layer heat budget compared well with estimates obtained by analysis of observations using the same diagnostic vertical mixing scheme. During 1994- 1995 the largest positive SST anomaly was observed in the mid-basin and was related to reduced latent heat flux due to weak surface winds. In the western basin the initial warming was related to enhanced external heating and reduced cooling effects of both vertical mixing and horizontal advection associated with weaker than usual wind stress. In the eastern Pacific where winds were not significantly anomalous throughout 1994-1995, only a moderate warm surface anomaly was detected. This is in contrast to strong El Nino events where the SST anomaly is largest in the eastern basin and, as shown by previous studies, the anomaly is due to zonal advection rather than anomalous surface heat flux. The end of the warm event was marked by cooling in July 1995 everywhere across the equatorial Pacific.

  15. Ion-beam assisted, electron-beam physical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.

    1996-12-01

    Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) is a relatively new technology that has overcome some of the difficulties associated with chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and thermal spray processes. In the EB-PVD process, focused high-energy electron beams generated from electron guns are directed to melt and evaporate ingots, as well as preheat the substrate inside a vacuum chamber. By adding the assistance of ion beams to the process, coating density and adhesion are improved, while costs are reduced. This article describes physical vapor deposition and ion-beam processes, explains the advantages of EB-PVD, shows how ion beams optimize the benefits of EB-PVD, and enumerates a variety of applications.

  16. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  17. Elementary particle physics. Progress report, July 1992--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Izen, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) is participating in two e{sup +}e{sup -}, experiments, Beijing Spectrometer (BES) and BABAR, the PEP-11 B Factory detector. The UTD group consists of Profs. Joseph M. Izen and Xinchou Lou, seven Ph.D. students. A post-doc is requested to join them in this work. BES explores the physics of the {tau}-charm threshold region. Associated production of {tau} and charmed mesons allow for absolute branching fraction measurements with good control of backgrounds. BES is uniquely positioned to study the leptonic and hadronic decays of quarkonia. The Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) delivers luminosities an order of magnitude higher than earlier facilities. BES and BEPC will be upgraded following the 1994-5 run, and will resume data taking in Fall, 1996 with an improved detector and a Three-fold increase in luminosity. The raison d`etre of BABAR is the exploration of CP violation in the B meson system. An asymmetric storage ring is required to observe the time-dependence of the CP asymmetry. Other BABAR physics includes measurements of CKM matrix elements, rare B decays, penguin diagrams, B{sub s} decays, and precision measurements of {tau} and D meson decays. The scheduled BABAR turn-on in 1999 provides the UTD group with a natural evolution with continuous physics during this period. Professors Joseph M. Izen and Xinchou Lou are leading the BES and BABAR program at UTD. Both have specialized in e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments and share 22 years of experience at the SPEAR, BEPC, CESR, PETRA, SLC and LEP rings.

  18. Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gulley, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

  19. Theoretical and Experimental Beam Plasma Physics (TEBPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental beam plasma physics (TEBPP) consists of a package of five instruments to measure electric and magnetic fields, plasma density and temperature, neutral density, photometric emissions, and energetic particle spectra during firings of the particle injector (SEPAC) electron beam. The package is developed on a maneuverable boom (or RMS) and is used to measure beam characteristics and induced perturbations field ( 10 m) and mid field ( 10 m to 100 m) along the electron beam. The TEBPP package will be designed to investigate induced oscillations and induced electromagnetic mode waves, neutral and ion density and temperature effects, and beam characteristics as a function of axial distance.

  20. Theoretical and Experimental Beam Plasma Physics (TEBPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental beam plasma physics (TEBPP) consists of a package of five instruments to measure electric and magnetic fields, plasma density and temperature, neutral density, photometric emissions, and energetic particle spectra during firings of the particle injector (SEPAC) electron beam. The package is deployed on a maneuverable boom (or RMS) and is used to measure beam characteristics and induced perturbations in the near field ( 10 m) and mid field (10 m to 100 m) along the electron beam. The TEBPP package will be designed to investigate induced oscillations and induced electromagnetic mode waves, neutral and ion density and temperature effects, and beam characteristics as a function of axial distance.

  1. Nuclear physics research at the University of Richmond. Progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Vineyard, M.F.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Major, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from November 1, 1994 to October 31, 1995. The experimental work described in this report is in electromagnetic and heavy-ion nuclear physics. The effort in electromagnetic nuclear physics is in preparation for the research program at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and is focused on the construction and use of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The heavy-ion experiments were performed at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility and SUNY, Stony Brook. The physics interests driving these efforts at CEBAF are in the study of the structure, interactions, and nuclear-medium modifications of mesons and baryons. This year, an extension of the experiment to measure the magnetic form factor of the neutron was approved by the CEBAF Program Advisory Committee Nine (PAC9) for beam at 6 GeV. The authors also submitted updates to PAC9 on the experiments to measure inclusive {eta} photoproduction in nuclei and electroproduction of the {Lambda}, {Lambda}*(1520), and f{sub 0}(975). In addition to these experiments, the authors collaborated on a proposal to measure rare radiative decays of the {phi} meson which was also approved by PAC9. Their contributions to the construction of the CLAS include the development of the drift-chamber gas system, drift-chamber software, and controls software. Major has been leading the effort in the construction of the gas system. In the last year, the Hall B gas shed was constructed and the installation of the gas system components built at the University of Richmond has begun. Over the last six years, the efforts in low-energy heavy-ion physics have decreased due to the change in focus to electromagnetic nuclear physics at CEBAF. Most of the heavy-ion work is completed and there are now new experiments planned. Included in this report are two papers resulting from collaborations on heavy-ion experiments.

  2. Salary-Trend Studies of Faculty for the Years 1994-95 and 1997-98 in the Following Academic Disciplines/Major Fields: Accounting, ..., Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Richard D.

    This document provides comparative salary trend data for full-time faculty in 27 academic disciplines/major fields for the baseline year 1994-95 and the trend year 1997-98 for 262 public and 387 private institutions. For each discipline/major field surveyed, the report provides a Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) definition, data…

  3. Salary-Trend Study of Faculty in All Discipline Averages in the National CUPA Salary-Trend Surveys of 1991-92 and 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Richard D.

    Salary trends of university faculty in 41 disciplines between 1991-92 and 1994-95 based on a survey of 223 public and 345 private institutions of higher education are summarized. The article lists the average salaries of all discipline averages by rank, including new assistant professor and the faculty mix percentage. Comarisons are also made…

  4. Center for Beam Physics papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    Six papers are included in this collection. They cover: a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron and electron- electron collisions; constraints on laser-driven accelerators for a high-energy linear collider; progress on the design of a high luminosity muon-muon collider; RF power source development at the RTA test facility; sensitivity studies of crystalline beams; and single bunch collective effects in muon colliders.

  5. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  6. Beam and Plasma Physics Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    relativistic klystron amplifiers, virtual cathode oscillators, magnetically insulated transmission lines, transvertrons and vircator phase/frequency...Computational Physics Studies III MRC/ABQ-R-1278 101 03-08 SPHC Manual MRC/ABQ-R-1237 103 03-09 Diagnostic White Paper Contributions MRC/ABQ-N-451 106 9 2.2...magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Computations were performed using the particle-in-cell code CCUBE, developed originally by Los

  7. Physics with Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Segel, Ralph E.

    2013-11-08

    Using stable and radioactive beams provided by ATLAS nuclear reactions of special interest in astrophysics have been studied with emphasis on breakout from the hot CNO cycle to the rp-process. The masses of nuclear fragments provided by a strong fission source have been measured in order to help trace the path of the r process. 8Li ions produced by the d(7Li,8Li)n reaction have been trapped and the electrons and alphas emitted in the ensuing beta-decay measured. The neutrino directions were therefore determined, which leads to a measurement of the electron-neutrino correlation. The energies and kinematics are such that a sensitive search for any tensor admixture could be performed and an upper limit of 0.6% was placed on any such admixture. Earlier work on the electromagnetic form factors of the proton was extended. Graduate students were active participants in all of these eperiments, which formed the basis for six PhD theses.

  8. New York State Commission on Quality of Care for the Mentally Disabled. Annual Report, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Commission on Quality of Care for the Mentally Disabled, Albany.

    This annual report details activities by the New York State Commission on Quality of Care for the Mentally Disabled, which oversees the public and private service system for individuals with mental disorders. The report notes that during 1994-1995, the Commission's cost-effectiveness studies identified over $15 million in potential savings, and…

  9. Kentucky School and District Accountability Results. Accountability Cycle 3 (1994-95 to 1997-98). Briefing Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort.

    This briefing packet contains data on the school and district accountability results for Kentucky's state assessment system, the Kentucky Instructional Results Information System, for 1994-1995 through its last use in 1997-1998. The first section contains state and regional accountability indices by grade level, with number of students tested and…

  10. High energy physics research. Final technical report, 1957--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, H.H.

    1995-10-01

    This is the final technical report to the Department of Energy on High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. It discusses research conducted in the following areas: neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; string theory; electroweak and collider physics; supergravity; cp violation and baryogenesis; particle cosmology; collider detector at Fermilab; the sudbury neutrino observatory; B-physics; particle physics in nuclei; and advanced electronics and detector development.

  11. Water-temperature, specific-conductance, and meteorological data for the Tualatin River basin, Oregon, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risley, John C.; Doyle, Micelis C.

    1997-01-01

    Water-temperature, air-temperature, specific- conductance, wind-speed, and solar-radiation data are presented from a study conducted in the Tualatin River Basin in northwestern Oregon during 7-month periods from May 1 through November 30, 1994 and May 1 through November 30, 1995. The study was done to assist local and State agencies in understanding temporal and spatial patterns of water temperatures in the river, determining the relation between water temperature and human activities, and developing urban and agricultural management strategies for controlling impacts on stream temperatures. Data were collected at 14 fixed-station continuous monitoring sites located on or near the main stem and major tributaries. Data fromtemperature and specific-conductance sites were collected instantaneously every 30 minutes on the hour and half hour. Wind-speed and solar-radiation data at two sites were averaged every 60 minutes. Wind-speed and solar-radiation data at a third site were averaged every 30 minutes. Water temperature data were also collected during seven synoptic surveys near the two main wastewater-treatment plants. The surveys were conducted during the low-flow period from August to October of 1994 and August to September 1995. During each survey, up to six recording temperature probes were positioned at locations upstream and downstream of plant effluent outlets. The probes collected data every 16 minutes over 48-hour periods.

  12. Ground-water flow and water quality of the Indian Island well field near Grand Island, Nebraska, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmons, Patrick J.; Bowman, Phillip R.

    2000-01-01

    Ground water is the principal source of water for public and self-supplied domestic use in Nebraska. Ground water supplied about 235 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) in 1990, or about 78 percent of the estimated public-water supply in Nebraska. In addition, ground water supplied about 1,017 Mgal/d, or about 83 percent of the irrigation water in the Platte River Valley (Nebraska Natural Resources Commission, 1994). Withdrawing ground water in the valley induces recharge from the river and has the potential to change ground-water quality near the river where many public-supply wells are located. The Platte River alluvial aquifer, which underlies the Platte River Valley (fig. 1), is the single most important source of water for public supply in central and eastern Nebraska. The aquifer, which is part of the High Plains aquifer, consists of stream-laid deposits of sand and gravel with discontinuous layers of clay and silt, and is connected hydraulically to the Platte River. The aquifer provides about 117 Mgal/d, or nearly 50 percent of the total daily ground-water production for Nebraska (Nebraska Natural Resources Commission, 1994). The aquifer also supplies water to Nebraska's largest cities including Kearney, Grand Island, Lincoln, and Omaha.

  13. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

  14. Studies of longitudinal instability with an electron beam. Technical progress report, September 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This progress report covers the research on the {open_quotes}Study of Longitudinal Instability with an Electron Beam{close_quotes} performed at the University of Maryland during the period from September 1, 1993 to February 28, 1994 of the two-year grant sponsored by the Department of Energy, under Grant No. DEFG02-92ER54178. This research is motivated by the issue of longitudinal instability in induction linacs as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion. The Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC) in its final report to DOE (September 1990) identified longitudinal instability as a key physics problem that needs to be solved if an induction linac is to be developed into a successful HIF driver. The FPAC report also stated that {open_quotes}in parallel{close_quotes} to the design and construction of ILSE {open_quotes}enhanced theoretical and experimental efforts are required for an improved understanding of potentially serious longitudinal beam instability issues{close_quotes}. The experiment with electron beams in this area is a low-cost way to gain a thorough understanding of the instability and to test computer codes in collaboration with LBL, LLNL, and I. Haber at NRL. The last six months saw the transition of the research activities from phase 1 to phase 2. By the end of last September, the experiments on space-charge waves had been completed. This had fulfilled the first year`s goal of this two-year grant. Though the completion of the experiments was one month later than that scheduled and the data analysis still continues up to now, the authors have done much more than was originally proposed.

  15. Elementary particle physics. Progress report, July 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Izen, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Much of the work was connected with experimental measurements made at the Beijing Spectrometer operating at {radical}s = 4.03 GeV. The effort has now moved to investigating the physics derived from the {radical}s = 4.03 GeV data, including D{sub s} production, absolute D{sub s} branching fractions (hadronic, leptonic, and inclusive semileptonic), D*D and D*D* production, absolute D hadronic branching fractions, D* branching fractions, and an upper limit on the {nu}{sub {tau}} mass. 2 figs., 11 refs.

  16. Removal of strontium and transuranics from Hanford waste via hydrothermal processing -- FY 1994/95 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.J.; Schmidt, A.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Gano, S.R.; Lehmann, R.W.; Momont, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Under the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Technology Development Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating and developing organic destruction technologies that may be incorporated into the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) to treat Hanford tank waste. Organic (and ferrocyanide) destruction removes the compounds responsible for waste safety issues, and conditions the supernatant for low-level waste disposal by removing compounds that may be responsible for promoting strontium and transuranic (TRU) components solubility. Destruction or defunctionalization of complexing organics in tank wastes eliminates organic species that can reduce the efficiency of radionuclide (E.g., {sup 90}Sr) separation processes, such as ion exchange, solvent extraction, and precipitation. The technologies being evaluated and tested for organic destruction are low-temperature hydrothermal processing (HTP) and wet air oxidation (WAO). Four activities are described: Batch HTP/WAO testing with Actual Tank Waste (Section 3.0), Batch HTP Testing with Simulant (Section 4.0), Batch WAO testing with Simulant (Section 5.0), and Continuous Bench-scale WAO Testing with Simulant (Section 6.0). For each of these activities, the objectives, test approach, results, status, and direction of future investigations are discussed. The background and history of the HTP/WAO technology is summarized below. Conclusions and Recommendations are provided in Section 2.0. A continuous HTP off-gas safety evaluation conducted in FY 1994 is included as Appendix A.

  17. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1994-FY 95 annual report. Volume 9, Number 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during CY 1994 and FY 1995. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through FY 1995. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission.

  18. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in primary school children in the south-eastern Iranian city of Bam, 1994-95.

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, I.; Fekri, A. R.; Aflatonian, M. R.; Nadim, A.; Nikian, Y.; Kamesipour, A.

    1998-01-01

    Between August 1994 and July 1995, 11,517 primary school children aged 6-11 years in the south-eastern Iranian city of Bam, comprising 5560 (48.3%) girls and 5957 (51.7%) boys, were examined for the presence of active lesions or scars of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). There was a trend towards increasing prevalence with age, the prevalence being 10.7% in 6-year-old and 20% in > or = 11-year-old children. Overall, 1.3% of the children had active lesions and 14.3% had scars. There was no significant difference between the sexes in the prevalence of active lesions and/or scars. Of the children examined, 54 (0.5%) had leishmaniasis recidivans: 19 girls (35.2%) and 35 boys (64.8%). The number of active lesions or scars per child ranged from 1 to 10. The majority (82.3%) had 1 lesion, 12.4% had 2 lesions, and 5.3% had > or = 3. The average number of lesions was 1.08 (1.03 in girls and 1.18 in boys). The face was the part of the body most commonly involved (63.6%), followed by the hands (20.9%), legs (12.8%) and other parts of the body (2.7%). Examination of isolates from 14 children revealed that in 13 (92.9%) the causal organism was Leishmania tropica and in the other (7.1%) L. major. The survey indicates that the geographical distribution of CL is far wider than previously thought. It also shows that Bam is a suitable areas for a vaccine field trial. PMID:9744249

  19. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A.

    1996-02-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY94. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1994. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that PPPL`s environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 195 1. The long-range goal of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1994, PPPL had one of its two large tokamak devices in operation-the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification or PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991 and operated periodically during 1992 and 1993; it did not operate in 1994 for funding reasons. In December 1993, TFTR began conducting the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments and set new records by producing over ten @on watts of energy in 1994. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (T?X), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL`s next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In December 1994, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFTR Shutdown and Removal (S&R) and TPX was submitted to the regulatory agencies, and a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) was issued by DOE for these projects.

  20. Spes: Exotic Beams for Nuclear Physics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Corradetti, Stefano; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesu; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-02-01

    The SPES project at Laboratori di Legnaro of INFN (Italy) is concentrating on the production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei for nuclear physics experiments using uranium fission at a rate of 1013 fission/s. The emphasis on neutron-rich isotopes is justified by the fact that this vast territory has been little explored. The Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) will be produced by the ISOL technique using proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx. The most critical element of the SPES project is the Multi-Foil Direct Target. Up to the present time, the proposed target represents an innovation in terms of its capability to sustain the primary beam power. This talk will present the status of the project financed by INFN, which is actually in the construction phase at Legnaro. In particular, developments related to the target and the ion-source activities using the surface ion source, plasma ion source, and laser ion source techniques will be reported.

  1. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  2. Field screening of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in and near Walker River Indian Reservation, Nevada 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thodal, Carl E.; Tuttle, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    A study was begun in 1994 to determine whether the quality of irrigation drainage from the Walker River Indian Reservation, Nevada, has caused or has potential to cause harmful effects on human health or on fish and wildlife, or may adversely affect the suitability of the Walker River for other beneficial uses. Samples of water, bottom sediment, and biota were collected during June-August 1994 (during a drought year) from sites upstream from and on the Walker River Indian Reservation for analyses of trace elements. Other analyses included physical characteristics, major dissolved constituents, selected species of water-soluble nitrogen and phosphorus, and selected pesticides in bottom sediment. Water samples were collected again from four sites on the Reservation in August 1995 (during a wetterthan- average year) to provide data for comparing extreme climatic conditions. Water samples collected from the Walker River Indian Reservation in 1994 equaled or exceeded the Nevada water-quality standard or level of concern for at least one of the following: water temperature, pH, dissolved solids, unionized ammonia, phosphate, arsenic, boron, chromium, lead, and molybdenum; in 1995, only a single sample from one site exceeded a Nevada water-quality standard for molybdenum. Levels of concern for trace elements in bottom sediment collected in 1994 were equaled or exceeded for arsenic, iron, manganese, and zinc. Concentrations of organochiorine pesticide residues in bottom sediment were below analytical reporting limits. Levels of concern for trace-elements in samples of biota were equaled or exceeded for arsenic, boron, copper, and mercury. Results of toxicity testing indicate that only water samples from Walker Lake caused a toxic response in test bacteria. Arsenic and boron concentrations in water, bottom sediment, and biological tissue exceeded levels of concern throughout the Walker River Basin, but most commonly in the lower Walker River Basin. Mercury also was elevated

  3. PREFACE: Physics with Reaccelerated ISOL Beams Physics with Reaccelerated ISOL Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Nigel

    2010-02-01

    Since the pioneering work of Cockcroft and Walton, one of the central tools in experimental nuclear physics has been reactions induced by accelerated beams. Over the last 25 years or so, following the experiments at Berkeley and elsewhere which saw the uncovering of evidence for the neutron halo, reactions induced by high-energy beams (gtrsim 30 MeV/nucleon) of radioactive nuclei produced via in-flight fragmentation have become an essential probe of nuclei far from stability. Radioactive ions have, however, long been available at very low energies, through the Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) method. Indeed, the technique may be traced back as far as the work of Kofoed-Hansen and Nielsen in Copenhagen in the early 1950s. The first, and longest running dedicated ISOL facility is, of course, ISOLDE at CERN, which first started operation in October 1967. Given the combination of intense beams coupled to thick targets, the ISOL technique has the capability of producing very high yields of nuclei far from stability. Extracting and separating the nuclei of interest from the targets requires, as experience at ISOLDE and elsewhere has shown over the years, a broad range of techniques both in both chemistry and ion-source technology, as well as separation techniques. Nevertheless, the routine production of a broad range of elements and isotopes has become possible over the years. Many nuclear reaction studies require beams with energies considerably lower than those produced by in-flight fragmentation, and often with superior optical qualities and much smaller energy spreads (ideally with the characteristics of stable beams). Such needs have lead to the development of (re)accelerated ISOL beams, whereby the on-line target-ion source systems and separators are coupled to a post-accelerator. The first such facility was developed at the Cyclotron Research Centre at Louvain-la-Neuve in the late 1980s based on the existing Cyclone-110 accelerator. Whilst originally

  4. Transverse Beam Physics in UMER - Update

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, S.; Sutter, D.; Beaudoin, B.; Cornacchia, M.; Fiuza, K.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koeth, T.; Reiser, M.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2010-11-04

    We're continuing our effort to measure orbits, tunes, momentum compaction, chromaticity and lattice functions in UMER as a function of beam current over a range of space charge intensities significantly larger than in other circular machines. Our measurements and comparisons with the codes ELEGANT and WARP indicate that the centroid motion in UMER can be described with sufficient accuracy by single-particle models, but that the effects of image forces on the betatron tune, i.e. the coherent tune shift, become evident and stronger for higher beam currents. Furthermore, we have identified linear resonances in the machine, with some differences in the stopband location and widths for the different beam currents. We discuss these and other effects that may contribute to beam degradation and losses, particularly for high space charge (6 and 21 mA at 10 keV).

  5. Salary-Trend Studies of Faculty for the Years 1994-95 and 1997-98 in the Following Academic Disciplines/Major Fields: History, General, ...,Visual and Performing Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Richard D.

    This document provides comparative salary trend data for full-time faculty in 26 academic disciplines/major fields for the baseline year 1994-95 and the trend year 1997-98 for 262 public and 387 private institutions. For each discipline/major field surveyed, the report provides a Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) definition, data…

  6. Salary-Trend Studies of Faculty for the Years 1991-92 and 1994-95 in the Following Academic Disciplines/Major Fields: Geography...Visual and Performing Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Richard D.; And Others

    This volume provides comparative trend data for faculty salaries in public and private colleges and universities, based on two surveys, one of public and the other of private senior colleges and universities. For those institutions (223 public and 345 private) participating in both 1991-92 and 1994-95 surveys, trend data are provided. For each…

  7. Salary-Trend Studies of Faculty for the Years 1991-92 and 1994-95 in the Following Academic Disciplines/Major Fields: Accounting...Foreign Languages and Literatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Richard D.; And Others

    This volume provides comparative trend data for faculty salaries in public and private colleges and universities, based on two surveys, one of public and the other of private senior colleges and universities. For those institutions (223 public and 345 private) participating in both 1991-92 and 1994-95 surveys, trend data are provided. For each…

  8. High performance computing for beam physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.

    1994-09-01

    Several countries are now involved in efforts aimed at utilizing accelerator-driven technologies to solve problems of national and international importance. These technologies have both economic and environmental implications. The technologies include waste transmutation, plutonium conversion, neutron production for materials science and biological science research, neutron production for fusion materials testing, fission energy production systems, and tritium production. All of these projects require a high-intensity linear accelerator that operates with extremely low beam loss. This presents a formidable computational challenge: One must design and optimize over a kilometer of complex accelerating structures while taking into account beam loss to an accuracy of 10 parts per billion per meter. Such modeling is essential if one is to have confidence that the accelerator will meet its beam loss requirement, which ultimately affects system reliability, safety and cost. At Los Alamos, the authors are developing a capability to model ultra-low loss accelerators using the CM-5 at the Advanced Computing Laboratory. They are developing PIC, Vlasov/Poisson, and Langevin/Fokker-Planck codes for this purpose. With slight modification, they have also applied their codes to modeling mesoscopic systems and astrophysical systems. In this paper, they will first describe HPC activities in the accelerator community. Then they will discuss the tools they have developed to model classical and quantum evolution equations. Lastly they will describe how these tools have been used to study beam halo in high current, mismatched charged particle beams.

  9. Beam-beam interaction in an asymmetric collider for B-physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1989-08-01

    This note is devoted to deriving the minimum criteria to achieve a symmetrical behavior of unequal energy beams in asymmetric colliders for B-physics. The computer simulation results suggest that at least the following quantities should be equalized in the two rings: beam-beam tune shift, cross-sectional area at the interaction point, damping decrement per turn, and betatron phase modulation due to synchrotron motion. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. H line; a beam line for fundamental physics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Naritoshi; Toyoda, Akihisa; Aoki, Masaharu; Shimomura, Koichiro; Mibe, Tsutomu; Nakatsugawa, Yohei; Otani, Masashi; Saito, Naohito; Miyake, Yasuhiro

    2014-12-01

    The muon facility, J-PARC (Muon Science Establishment; MUSE), has been operating since the first beam in 2008. Starting with a 200 kW proton beam, a beam intensity of 3 × 106 muons/s was reached in 2009 which was the most intense pulsed muon beam in the world. From the 2 cm thick graphite target, four secondary muon beam lines are designed to be extracted. Three beam lines currently exist, the first being operational and the other two undergoing commissioning. The fourth and the last beam line, the H line, is planned to be constructed. This new beam line is designed to have a large acceptance, provides the ability to tune the momentum, and use a kicker magnet and/or a Wien filter. The H line is designed to provide an intense beam of 108 surface muons/s for fundamental physics studies to observe new physics beyond the standard model. Such studies require high statistics and they need to occupy the experimental areas for a relatively long period.

  11. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

  12. Atomic physics experiments with stored cooled heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    The wide ranging interest in the development of heavy ion synchrotrons with electron beam cooling is evident from the number of projects presently under way. Although much of the initial motivation for these rings stemmed from nuclear and particle physics, a considerable amount of atomic physics experimentation is planned. This paper surveys some of the new opportunities in atomic physics which may be made available with storage ring systems. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Heavy quark and neutrino physics. Final technical report, FY1994--FY1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This report begins with an overview of KSU history in personnel and funding, creation of infrastructure, and physics. Then brief summaries are given for the following research projects: Fermilab E653: Measuring Charm and Beauty Decays via Hadronic Production in a Hybrid Emulsion Spectrometer; Fermilab E791: Continued Study of Heavy Flavors at TPL; Fermilab E815: Precision Measurements of Neutrino Neutral-Current Interactions Using a Sign-Selected Beam; Fermilab E872/DONUT: Direct Observation of {nu}{sub {tau}}; Fermilab E803/COSMOS: Neutrino Oscillations; KSU at the Fermilab D0 collider; Muon Collider; OJI Progress Report: Multisampling Drift Chamber.

  14. Nuclear physics with radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, Raymond L.

    2015-07-23

    This is a final report on DOE Grant No. DE FG02 96ER40955, which was active at Tennessee Technological University (TTU) from 1 March 1996 to 29 May 2015. Generally, this report will provide an overall summary of the more detailed activities presented in the progress reports, numbered DOE/ER/40955-1 through DOE/ER/40955-18, which were submitted annually to the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics.

  15. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  16. AGS experiments: 1993 - 1994 - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains: FY 1995 AGS Schedule as Run; FY 1996-97 AGE Schedule (working copy); AGS Beams 1995; AGS Experimental Area FY 1993 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1994 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1995 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1996 Physics Program (In progress); A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and Listing of AGS experimenters begins here. This is the twelfth edition.

  17. A driver linac for the Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory : physics design and beam dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) being developed at ANL consists of an 833 MV heavy-ion driver linac capable of producing uranium ions up to 200 MeV/u and protons to 580 MeV with 400 kW beam power. We have designed all accelerator components including a two charge state LEBT, an RFQ, a MEBT, a superconducting linac, a stripper station and chicane. We present the results of an optimized linac design and end-to-end simulations including machine errors and detailed beam loss analysis. The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) has been proposed at ANL as a reduced scale of the original Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) project with about half the cost but the same beam power. AEBL will address 90% or more of RIA physics but with reduced multi-users capabilities. The focus of this paper is the physics design and beam dynamics simulations of the AEBL driver linac. The reported results are for a multiple charge state U{sup 238} beam.

  18. Physics with post-accelerated beams at ISOLDE: nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro, A.; Riisager, K.; Van Duppen, P.

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear-reaction studies have until now constituted a minor part of the physics program with post-accelerated beams at ISOLDE, mainly due to the maximum energy of REX-ISOLDE of around 3 MeV/u that limits reaction work to the mass region below A = 100. We give an overview of the current experimental status and of the physics results obtained so far. Finally, the improved conditions given by the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade are described.

  19. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  20. Physics with Ultracold and Thermal Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Steyerl, Albert

    2004-08-10

    note an inconsistency requiring clarification. The largest contribution to this sum is |V{sub ud}|{sup 2} which is determined most sensitively by the neutron lifetime and the neutron decay asymmetry parameter A. Confirmation of nonunitarity would imply that the Standard Model of particle physics may have to be extended. To prepare for an improved {tau}{sub n} measurement based on ultracold neutron (UCN) storage our project had two main goals: (a) To investigate the suitability of a new type of per-fluorinated oil for low-loss wall coating. Like Fomblin oil, which has been used in several previous high-precision {tau}{sub n} measurements, the new oil consists only of carbon, oxygen and fluorine. These elements have very low neutron absorption cross sections. However, due to weak intermolecular binding the new polymer solidifies at a lower temperature ({approx}150 K vs. {approx}230 K for Fomblin) and can, therefore, be used in liquid form at a lower temperature. This is important since a liquid perfectly seals small gaps and the low temperature ensures that the loss due to thermal-inelastic and quasi-elastic scattering is also small. The new types of oil have become known as 'Low Temperature Fomblin' (LTF). (b) If indeed the anticipated low losses were obtained we planned to perform first direct UCN storage experiments in a gravitational storage system coated with this oil. This system in principle allows measurement of the storage lifetime as a function of UCN energy and trap size, and an extrapolation to zero loss yields the neutron lifetime.

  1. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K+ ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally

  2. The COMPASS setup for physics with hadron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Ciliberti, P.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Cotte, D.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Desforge, D.; Dinkelbach, A. M.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Durand, D.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giganon, A.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Gregori, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d`Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jörg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Menon, G.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M. A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pesaro, V.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pires, C.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymond, J.-M.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Rousse, J.-Y.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rychter, A.; Samartsev, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Terça, G.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Weitzel, Q.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2015-04-01

    The main characteristics of the COMPASS experimental setup for physics with hadron beams are described. This setup was designed to perform exclusive measurements of processes with several charged and/or neutral particles in the final state. Making use of a large part of the apparatus that was previously built for spin structure studies with a muon beam, it also features a new target system as well as new or upgraded detectors. The hadron setup is able to operate at the high incident hadron flux available at CERN. It is characterised by large angular and momentum coverages, large and nearly flat acceptances, and good two and three-particle mass resolutions. In 2008 and 2009 it was successfully used with positive and negative hadron beams and with liquid hydrogen and solid nuclear targets. This paper describes the new and upgraded detectors and auxiliary equipment, outlines the reconstruction procedures used, and summarises the general performance of the setup.

  3. Physical and chemical characteristics of Terrace Reservoir, Conejos County, Colorado, May 1994 through May 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stogner, Robert W.; Edelmann, Patrick; Walton-Day, Katherine

    1997-01-01

    Terrace Reservoir receives drainage of low-pH, metal-enriched water from mineralized areas, including the Summitville Mine, within the AlamosaRiver Basin. Drainage from the Summitville Mine has contributed a substantial part of the metal load to Terrace Reservoir. From May 1994 through May 1995, a study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to evaluate the physical and chemical characteristics of Terrace Reservoir.Terrace Reservoir was thermally stratified from about mid-May through August 1994. Thermal stratification was absent from September\\x111994through March 1995. During periods of stratification, underflow of the Alamosa River was predominant, and residence times of the underflow were shortened by 40 to 75\\x11percent of the theoretical residence times for a well-mixed reservoir. Transport and deposition of suspended solids in Terrace Reservoir varied spatially and temporally. Most of the suspended solids were deposited in Terrace Reservoir. The concentration of dissolved oxygen in the reservoir varied little spatially or temporally and generally was within a few tenths of the dissolved-oxygen concentration of the inflow. The pH of water in the reservoir generally ranged from about 4.0 to about 7.0, depending on date, depth, and location. The largest pH values were measured during May. A markeddecrease of about 1.5\\x11pH units occurred at site T5 in the reservoir about mid-June. The pH of the reservoir remained at or below 5.5 from mid-June through November. Dissolved-metal concentrations varied spatially and temporally in response to several factors, which included inflow characteristics, reservoir stratification and mixing, inflow-routing and flow-through patterns, residence times, sedimentation, dissolved oxygen, and pH.Inflow chemistry is the dominant controlling factor of metal chemistry within Terrace Reservoir.During periods of stratification, large vertical variations in metal

  4. Consistency check of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadman, B.; Chawapun, N.; Ua-apisitwong, S.; Asakit, T.; Chumpu, N.; Rueansri, J.

    2016-03-01

    In radiotherapy, medical linear accelerator (Linac) is the key system used for radiation treatments delivery. Although, recommissioning was recommended after major modification of the machine by AAPM TG53, but it might not be practical in radiotherapy center with heavy workloads. The main purpose of this study was to compare photon beam physical data between initial commissioning and recommissioning of 6 MV Elekta Precise linac. The parameters for comparing were the percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles. The clinical commissioning test cases followed IAEA-TECDOC-1583 were planned on REF 91230 IMRT Dose Verification Phantom by Philips’ Pinnacle treatment planning system. The Delta4PT was used for dose distribution verification with 90% passing criteria of the gamma index (3%/3mm). Our results revealed that the PDDs and beam profiles agreed within a tolerance limit recommended by TRS430. Most of the point doses and dose distribution verification passed the acceptance criteria. This study showed the consistency of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process. There was a good agreement between initial commissioning and recommissioning within a tolerance limit, demonstrated that the full recommissioning process might not be required. However, in the complex treatment planning geometry, the initial data should be applied with great caution.

  5. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1994--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1994-10-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 8 (July - September, 1994), work on the formulation of coal water slurries from flotation concentrates was completed. Parametric and optimization tests were performed on the Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch MicrocelT{sup M} flotation column. Laboratory research on selective agglomeration was completed with limited testing of the Dietz coal and alternate agglomerants. Initial planning has started for the bench-scale agglomeration unit which will utilize heptane as the bridging liquid in a conventional two-stage system, and steam stripping for heptane recovery and recycle. A project review meeting was held at Bechtel to discuss the detailed design of the PDU, which is being designed to process Indiana VII, Sunnyside, and Taggart coals. Process flow, piping and instrument, and equipment layout diagrams are being revised to reflect the process improvements resulting from bench-scale testing. Material Requisition activity has commenced, and will continue next quarter along with the selection of a construction subcontractor.

  6. Archive of digital Boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS Cruises 94CCT01 and 95CCT01, eastern Texas and western Louisiana, 1994 and 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Morton, Robert A.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2004-01-01

    In June of 1994 and August and September of 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology, conducted geophysical surveys of the Sabine and Calcasieu Lake areas and the Gulf of Mexico offshore eastern Texas and western Louisiana. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, observers' logbooks, GIS information, and formal FGDC metadata. In addition, a filtered and gained GIF image of each seismic profile is provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Examples of SU processing scripts and in-house (USGS) software for viewing SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. Processed profile images, trackline maps, navigation files, and formal metadata may be viewed with a web browser. Scanned handwritten logbooks and Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs may be viewed with Adobe Reader.

  7. Physical source realization of complex source pulsed beams

    PubMed

    Heyman; Lomakin; Kaiser

    2000-04-01

    Complex source pulsed beams (CSPB) are exact wave-packet solutions of the time-dependent wave equation that are modeled mathematically in terms of radiation from a pulsed point source located at a complex space-time coordinate. In the present paper, the physical source realization of the CSPB is explored. This is done in the framework of the acoustic field, as a concrete physical example, but a similar analysis can be applied for electromagnetic CSPB. The physical realization of the CSPB is addressed by deriving exact expressions for the acoustic source distribution in the real coordinate space that generates the CSPB, and by exploring the power and energy flux near these sources. The exact source distribution is of finite support. Special emphasis is placed on deriving simplified source functions and parametrization for the special case where the CSPB are well collimated.

  8. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J.F.; Rose, C.R.; Shurter, R.B.

    1995-05-05

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Nuclear Physics with 10 PW laser beams at Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamfir, N. V.

    2014-05-01

    The field of the uncharted territory of high-intensity laser interaction with matter is confronted with new exotic phenomena and, consequently, opens new research perspectives. The intense laser beams interacting with a gas or solid target generate beams of electrons, protons and ions. These beams can induce nuclear reactions. Electrons also generate ions high-energy photons via bremsstrahlung processes which can also induce nuclear reactions. In this context a new research domain began to form in the last decade or so, namely nuclear physics with high power lasers. The observation of high brilliance proton beams of tens of MeV energy from solid targets has stimulated an intense research activity. The laser-driven particle beams have to compete with conventional nuclear accelerator-generated beams. The ultimate goal is aiming at applications of the laser produced beams in research, technology and medicine. The mechanism responsible for ion acceleration are currently subject of intensive research in many laboratories in the world. The existing results, experimental and theoretical, and their perspectives are reviewed in this article in the context of IZEST and the scientific program of ELI-NP.

  10. Selected trace metals and organic compounds and bioavailability of selected organic compounds in soils, Hackberry Flat, Tillman County, Oklahoma, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    In 1995 the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation acquired a drained wetland in southwest Oklahoma known as Hackberry Flat. Following restoration by Wildlife Conservation the wetland will be used by migratory birds and waterfowl. If naturally occurring trace metals and residual organic compounds from agriculture and industry were present, they may have posed a potential biohazard and were a concern for Wildlife Conservation. The U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Geological Survey, examined the soils of Hackberry Flat to determine trace metal concentrations, presence of selected organic compounds, and the bioavailability of selected organic compounds in the soils. The purpose of this report is to present the data that establish the baseline concentrations of selected trace metals and organic compounds in the soils of Hackberry Flat prior to wetland restoration. Sampling and analysis were performed using two approaches. One was to collect soil samples and analyze the composition with standard laboratory practices. The second exposed composite soils samples to organic-free water and a semipermeable membrane device that mimics an organism and then analyzed the device. Ten soil samples were collected in 1994 to be analyzed for trace metals, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Soil samples tested for bioavailability of selected organic compounds were collected in 1995. Most of the 182 soil samples collected were from the center of every 40-acre quarter-quarter section owned by the Wildlife Conservation. The samples were grouped by geographical area with a maximum of 16 sample sites per group. Concentrations of most selected trace metals measured from soils in Hackberry Flat are within the range of mean concentrations measured in cultivated soils within the United States. Organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons were not found at concentrations above

  11. Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-08-01

    Isotopes and accelerators, hallmarks of nuclear physics, are finding increasingly sophisticated and effective applications in the medical field. Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes are now a $10B/yr business worldwide, with over 10 million procedures and patient studies performed every year. This paper will discuss the use of isotopes for these applications. In addition, beams of protons and heavy ions are being more and more widely used clinically for treatment of malignancies. To be discussed here as well will be the rationale and techniques associated with charged-particle therapy, and the progress in implementation and optimization of these technologies for clinical use.

  12. High Energy Density Physics Research Using Intense Ion Beams: the HEDgeHOB Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Piriz, A. R.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Deutsch, C.

    2008-11-01

    Intense particle beams provide a novel tool to generate large samples of HED matter with uniform physical conditions [1]. Theoretical studies have shown that an ion beam can be employed using different experimental schemes to study HED states in matter. These include HIHEX [2,3] and LAPLAS [4,5]. The former involves isochoric and uniform heating of matter by an ion beam that is followed by isentropic expansion of the heated material. This allows one to access the entire phase diagram including those regions which can not be accessed by traditional methods of shock waves. The latter considers a multiple shock reflection technique that leads to a low-entropy compression of a test material like H or water which generates physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interior of giant planets. Interesting problems like Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities have also been investigated in detail.This work has provided the necessary basis for the HEDgeHOB proposal for future experiments at the FAIR facility at Darmstadt. [1] N.A. Tahir et al., PRE 60 (1999) 4715. [2] D.H.H. Hoffmann et al., PoP 9 (2002) 3652. [3] N.A. Tahir et al., PRL 95 (2005) 035001. [4] N.A. Tahir et al., PRE 62 (2001) 016402. [5] N.A. Tahir et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 577 (2007) 238.

  13. Relation of water quality to land use in the drainage basins of four tributaries to the Toms River, New Jersey, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunchak-Kariouk, Kathryn

    1999-01-01

    The influence of land use on the water quality of four tributaries to the Toms River, which drains nearly one-half of the Barnegat Bay wateshed, was studied during the initial phase of a multiyear investigation. Water samples were collected from and streamflows were measured in Long Swamp Creek, Wrangel Brook, Davenport Branch, and Jakes Creek during periods of base flow and stormflow in the growing and nongrowing seasons during May 1994 to October 1995. The drainage areas upstream from the seven measurement sites were characterized as highly developed, moderately developed, slightly developed, or undeveloped. Concentrations were determined and area-normalized instantaneous loads (yields) were estimated for total nitrogen, ammonia, nitrate, organic nitrogen, hydrolyzable phosphorus plus orthosphosphorus, orthophosphorus, total suspended solids, and fecal-coliform bacteria in the water samples. Specific conductance, pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were measured. Yields of total nitrogen, nitrate, and organic nitrogen at sites on Wrangel Brook, which drains moderately developed areas, were either larger than or similar to yields at the site on Long Swamp Creek, which drains a highly developed area. The magnitude of these yields probably was not related directly to the intensity of land development, but more likely was influenced by the type of development, the amount of base flow, and historical land use in the basin. The large concentrations of total nitrogen and nitrate in base flow in Wrangel Brook could have resulted from fertilizers that were applied to high-maintenance lawns and from agricultural runoff that has remained in the ground water since the 1950's and eventually was discharged to streams. Yields of ammonia appear to be partly related to the intensity of land development and storm runoff. Yields of ammonia at the site on Long Swamp Creek (a highly developed area) were either larger than or similar to yields at sites on Wrangel Brook (moderately

  14. Radar and optical observations and physical modeling of triple near-Earth Asteroid (136617) 1994 CC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozović, Marina; Benner, Lance A. M.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Nolan, Michael C.; Howell, Ellen S.; Magri, Christopher; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Pollock, Joseph T.; Pravec, Petr; Galád, Adrián; Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc; Busch, Michael W.; Shepard, Michael K.; Reichart, Daniel E.; Ivarsen, Kevin M.; Haislip, Joshua B.; LaCluyze, Aaron P.; Jao, Joseph; Slade, Martin A.; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Hicks, Michael D.

    2011-11-01

    We report radar, photometric, and spectroscopic observations of near-Earth Asteroid (136617) 1994 CC. The radar measurements were obtained at Goldstone (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) and Arecibo (2380 MHz, 12.6 cm) on 9 days following the asteroid's approach within 0.0168 AU on June 10, 2009. 1994 CC was also observed with the Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes (PROMPT) on May 21 and June 1-3. Visible-wavelength spectroscopy was obtained with the 5-m Hale telescope at Palomar on August 25. Delay-Doppler radar images reveal that 1994 CC is a triple system; along with (153591) 2001 SN263, this is only the second confirmed triple in the near-Earth population. Photometry obtained with PROMPT yields a rotation period for the primary P = 2.38860 ± 0.00009 h and a lightcurve amplitude of ˜0.1 mag suggesting a shape with low elongation. Hale telescope spectroscopy indicates that 1994 CC is an Sq-class object. Delay-Doppler radar images and shape modeling reveal that the primary has an effective diameter of 0.62 ± 0.06 km, low pole-on elongation, few obvious surface features, and a prominent equatorial ridge and sloped hemispheres that closely resemble those seen on the primary of binary near-Earth Asteroid (66391) 1999 KW4. Detailed orbit fitting reported separately by Fang et al. (Fang, J., Margot, J.-L., Brozovic, M., Nolan, M.C., Benner, L.A.M., Taylor, P.A. [2011]. Astron. J. 141, 154-168) gives a mass of the primary of 2.6 × 10 11 kg that, coupled with the effective diameter, yields a bulk density of 2.1 ± 0.6 g cm -3. The images constrain the diameters of the inner and outer satellites to be 113 ± 30 m and 80 ± 30 m, respectively. The inner satellite has a semimajor axis of ˜1.7 km (˜5.5 primary radii), an orbital period of ˜30 h, and its Doppler dispersion suggests relatively slow rotation, 26 ± 12 h, consistent with spin-orbit lock. The outer satellite has an orbital period of ˜9 days and a rotation period of 14 ± 7 h, establishing

  15. Vision of nuclear physics with photo-nuclear reactions by laser-driven γ beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Tajima, T.; Schreiber, J.; Barty, C. P. J.; Fujiwara, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2009-11-01

    A laser-accelerated dense electron sheet with an energy E=tilde{γ} mc^2 can be used as a relativistic mirror to coherently reflect a second laser with photon energy ħω, thus generating by the Doppler boost [A. Einstein, Annalen der Physik 17, 891 (1905); D. Habs et al., Appl. Phys. B 93, 349 (2008)] brilliant high-energy photon beams with hbarω^'=4tilde{γ}^2hbarω and short duration for many new nuclear physics experiments. While the shortest-lived atomic levels are in the atto-second range, nuclear levels can have lifetimes down to zeptoseconds. We discuss how the modulation of electron energies in phase-locked laser fields used for as-measurements [E. Goulielmakis et al., Science 317, 769 (2007)] can be carried over to the new direct measurement of fs-zs nuclear lifetimes by modulating the energies of accompanying conversion electrons or emitted protons. In the field of nuclear spectroscopy we discuss the new perspective as a function of increasing photon energy. In nuclear systems a much higher sensitivity is predicted to the time variation of fundamental constants compared to atomic systems [V. Flambaum, arXiv:nucl-th/0801.1994v1 (2008)]. For energies up to 50 keV Mössbauer-like recoilless absorption allows to produce nuclear bosonic ensembles with many delocalized coherent polaritons [G.V. Smirnov et al., Phys. Rev. A 71, 023804 (2005)] for the first time. Using the ( γ, n) reaction to produce cold, polarized neutrons with a focusing ellipsoidal device [P. Böni, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 586, 1 (2008); Ch. Schanzer et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. 529, 63 (2004)], brilliant cold polarized micro-neutron beams become available. The compact and relatively cheap laser-generated γ beams may serve for extended studies at university-based facilities.

  16. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J.F.; Rose, C.R.; Shurter, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design.

  17. B meson physics with polarized electron beams at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    The expected large cross-section for e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. Z/sup 0/ and subsequent decay to b/bar b/ quarks makes the Z/sup 0/ an attractive place to pursue B meson physics. In addition, the big Electroweak asymmetries, thought to exist in Z/sup 0/ decays to b/bar b/ quarks with polarized electron beams, provide an outstanding handle for observation of such effects as B/sup 0/-/bar B//sup 0/ mixing. In this paper, the feasibility of such measurements is investigated and, with relatively small samples of Z/sup 0/'s (a few hundred thousand), both B/sub d/ and B/sub s/ meson mixing are shown to be measurable. The subject of CP violation in neutral B mesons is discussed last, but presently such measurements seem to be out of reach. 7 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. The STAR beam energy scan phase II physics and upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videbaek, Flemming; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The second phase of the Beam Energy Scan at RHIC will occur in 2019-2020 and will explore with precision measurements in the part of the QCD phase diagram where baryon densities are high. The program will examine energy regime of interest and turn the trends observed in phase-I into conclusions. This will be discussed in context of some of the key measurements, kurtosis of net-protons that could pinpoint the position of a critical point, measurements of directed flow of baryons vs. energy that might prove a softening of the EOS , and chiral restoration in the di-lepton channel. The measurements will be possible with an order of magnitude better statistics thanks to the electron cooling upgrade of RHIC, and the addition of the iTPC, Event Plane, and endcap TOF upgrades to STAR. Office of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. DOE Office of Science.

  19. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric J.-M.

    2014-06-01

    Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  20. Advanced computations of multi-physics, multi-scale effects in beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, J.F.; Macridin, A.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art beam dynamics simulations include multiple physical effects and multiple physical length and/or time scales. We present recent developments in Synergia2, an accelerator modeling framework designed for multi-physics, multi-scale simulations. We summarize recent several recent results in multi-physics beam dynamics, including simulations of three Fermilab accelerators: the Tevatron, the Main Injector and the Debuncher. Early accelerator simulations focused on single-particle dynamics. To a first approximation, the forces on the particles in an accelerator beam are dominated by the external fields due to magnets, RF cavities, etc., so the single-particle dynamics are the leading physical effects. Detailed simulations of accelerators must include collective effects such as the space-charge repulsion of the beam particles, the effects of wake fields in the beam pipe walls and beam-beam interactions in colliders. These simulations require the sort of massively parallel computers that have only become available in recent times. We give an overview of the accelerator framework Synergia2, which was designed to take advantage of the capabilities of modern computational resources and enable simulations of multiple physical effects. We also summarize some recent results utilizing Synergia2 and BeamBeam3d, a tool specialized for beam-beam simulations.

  1. High Energy Density Physics technical quarterly, October--December 1994. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The High Energy Density Physics Technical Quarterly (formerly the AGEX 2 Technical Quarterly) publishes short technical contributions on above ground experiments that use pulsed power and laser drivers. The Quarterly is intended to provide rapid exposure of timely technical ideas and results as well as a means for documenting High Energy Density Physics progress and scientific quality for the High Energy Density Physics community. Two articles are included in this volume. They are ``Simulation and Analysis of PEGII-25`` and ``Resistor Developments for Atlas Marx Modules``.

  2. Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, July 1, 1994--June 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.K.; Griffin, J.J.

    1995-06-01

    This progress report contains 36 items of research work done by ten members of the University of Maryland Nuclear Theory Group with 21 outside collaborators from various institutions in the US, Canada, Korea and Europe. The report is in four sections, each representing major and basic areas of interest in nuclear theory. The sections are as follows: (1) hadrons in nuclei and nuclear matter; (2) hadron physics; (3) relativistic dynamics in quark, hadron and nuclear physics; (4) heavy ion dynamics and related processes.

  3. Understanding Our Gifted. 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knopper, Dorothy, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    These six newsletter issues include special features on: (1) the spectrum of giftedness; (2) technology; (3) recognizing gifted young children; (4) secondary gifted students; (5) exploring creativity; and (6) mutual education. Examples of articles are: "Six Steps to Academic Damage Control: Beginning the Climb toward Higher Standards" (Linda…

  4. NRL Fact Book 1994-95

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    Services 100 Acoustics Division 102 Remote Sensing Division 104 Oceanography Division 106 Marine Geosciences Division 108 Marine Meteorology Division...Couple model development Coastal/ocean bubble-optical characterization Marine Geosciences Geoacoustic modeling to support acoustic performance prediction...targets Meteorological tactical decision aids Ocean Acoustics Underwater acoustics , including propagation, noise, and reverberation Fiber-optic acoustic

  5. FreeCAD visualization of realistic 3D physical optics beams within a CAD system-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayer, D.; O'Sullivan, C.; Scully, S.; Burke, D.; Brossard, J.; Chapron, C.

    2016-07-01

    The facility to realise the shape and extent of optical beams within a telescope or beamcombiner can aid greatly in the design and layout of optical elements within the system. It can also greatly facilitate communication between the optical design team and other teams working on the mechanical design of an instrument. Beyond the realm where raytracing is applicable however, it becomes much more difficult to realise accurate 3D beams which incorporate diffraction effects. It then is another issue to incorporate this into a CAD model of the system. A novel method is proposed which has been used to aid with the design of an optical beam combiner for the QUBIC (Q and U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology) 1 experiment operating at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The method combines calculation work in GRASP 2, a commercial physical optics modelling tool from TICRA, geometrical work in Mathematica, and post processing in MATLAB. Finally, the Python console of the open source package FreeCAD3 is exploited to realise the 3D beams in a complete CAD system-model of the QUBIC optical beam combiner. This paper details and explains the work carried out to reach the goal and presents some graphics of the outcome. 3D representations of beams from some back-to-back input horns of the QUBIC instrument are shown within the CAD model. Beams of the -3dB and -13dB contour envelope are shown as well as envelopes enclosing 80% and 95% of the power of the beam. The ability to see these beams in situ with all the other elements of the combiner such as mirrors, cold stop, beam splitter and cryostat widows etc. greatly simplified the design for these elements and facilitated communication of element dimension and location between different subgroups within the QUBIC group.

  6. Beam Physics in X-Ray Radiography Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y J; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Falabella, S; Goldin, F J; Guethlein, G; Lauer, E L; McCarrick, J F; Neurath, R; Richardson, R A; Sampayan, S; Weir, J T

    2002-12-02

    Performance of x-ray radiography facilities requires focusing the electron beams to sub-millimeter spots on the x-ray converters. Ions extracted from a converter by impact of a high intensity beam can partially neutralize the beam space charge and change the final focusing system. We will discuss these ion effects and mitigation.

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1993-- September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project is well into the experimental phase of its deuterium-tritium (D-T) program, with the objective to derive the maximum amount of experimental data on the behavior of tokamak plasmas containing a significant population of energetic alpha particles. Since the initial D-T experiments in December 1993, the operational performance of the TFTR, as well as the required tritium-handling and machine maintenance procedures in an activated environment, have improved markedly, so that D-T operation has now become essentially routine, while fully conforming with all of the safety and environmental requirements. During the D-T phase, the machine and auxiliary-systems parameters have also been increased, most notably the toroidal field (to 5.6 T) and the neutral-beam power (to 40 MW). The radio-frequency power in the ion-cyclotron-range of frequencies (ICRF) has been increased to 11 MW.

  8. Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, December 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, T.D.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1994-07-01

    Under Hadrons in Nuclei and Nuclear Matter the authors research the ways in which the properties of nucleons and mesons are modified in the nuclear medium. Research progress is reported on a number of topics in this general area, including studies of the role of chiral symmetry for finite density or temperature nuclear matter, the use of QCD sum rules to describe baryons in nuclear matter, and color transparency. In the general field of Hadron Physics broad progress included studies of perturbative QCD, heavy quark physics, QCD sum rules, and QCD-based models. Notable progress was also achieved in Relativistic Dynamics in Quark, Hadron, and Nuclear Physics, where an explicit model of composite particles shows how the z-graph physics (which is an essential part of Dirac phenomenology) comes about. In addition, calculations of elastic electron-deuteron scattering based on two-body relativistic dynamics and meson exchange currents were completed, as were studies of quark-anti-quark bound states based on a relativistic quark model. Progress is also reported on the relativistic few-body problem. In the area of Heavy Ion Dynamics and Sharp Lepton Pairs, work continues on the Composite Particle Scenario for the `Sharp Lepton Problem`. In particular, the scenario can now encompass the anomalous sharp leptons reported from positron irradiation of heavy neutral atoms, establishing such irradiations as an alternative experimental window to the heavy ion experiments.

  9. TEBPP: Theoretical and Experimental study of Beam-Plasma-Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, H. R.; Bernstein, W.; Linson, L. M.; Papadopoulos, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Hallinan, T. J.; Leinbach, H.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of an electron beam (0 to 10 keV, 0 to 1.5 Amp) with the plasma and neutral atmospheres at 200 to 400 km altitude is studied with emphasis on applications to near Earth and cosmical plasmas. The interaction occurs in four space time regions: (1) near electron gun, beam coming into equilibrium with medium; (2) equilibrium propagation in ionosphere; (3) ahead of beam pulse, temporal and spatial precursors; (4) behind a beam pulse. While region 2 is of the greatest interest, it is essential to study Region 1 because it determines the characteristics of the beam as it enters 2 through 4.

  10. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  11. Future Physics Opportunities in Beam Energy Scan at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nu

    2015-10-01

    In the first phase of the beam energy scan program (BES-I) at RHIC, we have collected data from Au +Au collisions at the center of mass energy range from 7.7 GeV to 39 GeV, corresponding to the baryonic chemical potential of 420 MeV to 120 MeV, respectively. We have observed the disappearance of the suppression of leading hadrons at large pT, break down of the quark scaling in the identified particle elliptic flow, the net-proton directed flow slope dv1/dy shows a minimum with negative sign, and a non-monotonical behavior of the net-proton correlation function (the fourth order) at the energy less than 20 GeV. All of these observations indicate that the property of the medium at high baryon density is dramatically different from that created at the RHIC top energy where the baryon density is small and partonic interactions are dominant. In this talk I will first review what we have learned in RHIC BES-I. Then I will discuss the opportunities in the future bean energy scan program in order to address key questions regarding the QCD phase structure including the illusive critical point. I will stress that adequate detector upgrades, focused at the large baryon density region, are essential for the physics program.

  12. Physical and engineering aspect of carbon beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Minohara, Shinichi; Yusa, Ken; Urakabe, Eriko; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Iseki, Yasushi; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Tomitani, Takehiro

    2003-08-01

    Conformal irradiation system of HIMAC has been up-graded for a clinical trial using a technique of a layer-stacking method. The system has been developed for localizing irradiation dose to target volume more effectively than the present irradiation dose. With dynamic control of the beam modifying devices, a pair of wobbler magnets, and multileaf collimator and range shifter, during the irradiation, more conformal radiotherapy can be achieved. The system, which has to be adequately safe for patient irradiations, was constructed and tested from a viewpoint of safety and the quality of the dose localization realized. A secondary beam line has been constructed for use of radioactive beam in heavy-ion radiotherapy. Spot scanning method has been adapted for the beam delivery system of the radioactive beam. Dose distributions of the spot beam were measured and analyzed taking into account of aberration of the beam optics. Distributions of the stopped positron-emitter beam can be observed by PET. Pencil beam of the positron-emitter, about 1 mm size, can also be used for measurements ranges of the test beam in patients using positron camera. The positron camera, consisting of a pair of Anger-type scintillation detectors, has been developed for this verification before treatment. Wash-out effect of the positron-emitter was examined using the positron camera installed. In this report, present status of the HIMAC irradiation system is described in detail.

  13. Physical and engineering aspect of carbon beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Minohara, Shinichi; Yusa, Ken; Urakabe, Eriko; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Tomitani, Takehiro; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Iseki, Yasushi

    2003-08-26

    Conformal irradiation system of HIMAC has been up-graded for a clinical trial using a technique of a layer-stacking method. The system has been developed for localizing irradiation dose to target volume more effectively than the present irradiation dose. With dynamic control of the beam modifying devices, a pair of wobbler magnets, and multileaf collimator and range shifter, during the irradiation, more conformal radiotherapy can be achieved. The system, which has to be adequately safe for patient irradiations, was constructed and tested from a viewpoint of safety and the quality of the dose localization realized. A secondary beam line has been constructed for use of radioactive beam in heavy-ion radiotherapy. Spot scanning method has been adapted for the beam delivery system of the radioactive beam. Dose distributions of the spot beam were measured and analyzed taking into account of aberration of the beam optics. Distributions of the stopped positron-emitter beam can be observed by PET. Pencil beam of the positron-emitter, about 1 mm size, can also be used for measurements ranges of the test beam in patients using positron camera. The positron camera, consisting of a pair of Anger-type scintillation detectors, has been developed for this verification before treatment. Wash-out effect of the positron-emitter was examined using the positron camera installed. In this report, present status of the HIMAC irradiation system is described in detail.

  14. Institute of Geophyics and Planetary Physics. Annual report for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F.J.

    1995-09-29

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, Riverside, and Irvine and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the six branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, high-pressure sciences, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and is structured around three research centers. The Center for Geosciences, headed by George Zandt and Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Center for High-Pressure Sciences, headed by William Nellis, sponsors research on the properties of planetary materials and on the synthesis and preparation of new materials using high-pressure processing.

  15. Research in high energy physics. Progress report, 1 July 1993--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.; Block, M.; Buchholz, D.

    1994-07-01

    Progress on Task A centered around data analysis. E835 is now approved. It will extend E760 studies, exploring new charmonium states and featuring an upgraded detector system plus operation at 4--6 times higher luminosity. Results are given on E760 analysis. Task B has 10 papers that have either appeared in print, or have been prepared for publication. They break down into four categories; experimental physics, theoretical physics, and computer computational techniques. They are described here along with an exciting new experimental proposal to use Da{Phi}ne, the {Phi} factory that is being constructed at Frascati National Laboratory. Progress for Task C which includes participating in the D0 project at TeV I, and the photoproduction experiment, E687, at TeV II is given. While Northwestern is not participating in the top quark physics group at D0, they have been involved in the data analysis and the discussions that led to the limits on the top quark mass. Task D comprises the shared services for the Northwestern DOE contract. This includes the maintenance and operation of all computers within the HEP group. The projects supported by Task D during the past year are given. Task E progress was to resolve the apparent conflict between EMC, SMC, and SLAC results on nucleon structure functions and Bjorken sum rules. Task F covered research in hadronic decay of the tau, thermal field theory, plasma effects in astrophysics, and heavy quarkonium. Task G covers E665, a general purpose muon scattering experiment which can detect both the scattered muon and most charged and neutral hadrons produced in the forward region. The Northwest group has collaborated very closely in the past year with the Harvard group on analyses of structure functions and vector meson production in the 1991 data sample.

  16. Support of experimental high energy physics research at the University of South Carolina, 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, M.V.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J.R.

    1997-06-01

    This brief report summarizes the activities of the University of South Carolina`s high energy physics group during the three-year period of DE-FG02-92ER40719. The activities of the group began in 1980 under a predecessor grant from DOE, and continue today under a successor grant. The retirements of one grant in favor of another were for reasons of administrative convenience or necessity. The characterization of the report as {open_quotes}final{close_quotes} is not reflective of the group`s projects, which by-and-large continue with support from the successor grant.

  17. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  18. The future of high-energy physics in the US: Statement for the 1994 HEPAP Subpanel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peoples, J., Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The United States has a superb capability for forefront research in elementary particle physics for the next decade -- but it can be realized only if there is sufficient funding to make efficient use of our existing world-class facilities. Throughout most of the past half century, the US has led the world in making contributions to our growing understanding of elementary particle physics. We are no longer the dominant force in the field, but we are still one of the leaders. The termination of the SSC is an enormous blow, but it need not end our participation in the field. We must first take advantage of what we have -- and that is considerable -- and then use it as the basis for a successful strategy for the first few decades in the next century. The US can make many important contributions to our field for the rest of this decade and for part of the next. But, after that, we will not long remain among the world's leaders unless we have the foresight to preserve and strengthen our capability to construct and operate world-class facilities.

  19. Digital Signal Processing. A review of DSP formalism, algorithms and networks for the beam instrumentation workshop, Vancouver, Canada, October 4, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Linscott, I.

    1995-05-05

    The formalism of Digital Signal Processing (DSP), is reviewed with the objective of providing a framework for understanding the utility of DSP techniques for Beam Instrumentation and developiong criteria for assessing the merits of DSP applications. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  1. Physics of beam self-modulation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-10-15

    The self-modulation instability is a key effect that makes possible the usage of nowadays proton beams as drivers for plasma wakefield acceleration. Development of the instability in uniform plasmas and in plasmas with a small density up-step is numerically studied with the focus at nonlinear stages of beam evolution. The step parameters providing the strongest established wakefield are found, and the mechanism of stable bunch train formation is identified.

  2. Porcine skin damage thresholds for 0.6 to 9.5 cm beam diameters from 1070-nm continuous-wave infrared laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Vincelette, Rebecca; Noojin, Gary D; Harbert, Corey A; Schuster, Kurt J; Shingledecker, Aurora D; Stolarski, Dave; Kumru, Semih S; Oliver, Jeffrey W

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing use of high-power fiber lasers in manufacturing and telecommunications industries operating in the infrared spectrum between 1000 and 2000 nm, which are advertised to provide as much as 10 kW continuous output power at 1070 nm. Safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental and modeling investigations with scant data available for these wavelengths. A series of studies using 1070-nm infrared lasers to determine the minimum visible lesion damage thresholds in skin using the Yucatan miniature pig (Sus scrofa domestica) for a range of beam diameters (0.6, 1.1, 1.9, 2.4, 4.7, and 9.5 cm) and a range of exposure durations (10 ms to 10 s) is presented. Experimental peak temperatures associated with each damage threshold were measured using thermal imaging. Peak temperatures at damage threshold for the 10-s exposures were ∼10°C lower than those at shorter exposures. The lowest and highest experimental minimum visible lesion damage thresholds were found to have peak radiant exposures of 19 and 432  J/cm2 for the beam diameter-exposure duration pairs of 2.4 cm, 25 ms and 0.6 cm, 10 s, respectively. Thresholds for beam diameters >2.5  cm had a weak to no effect on threshold radiant exposure levels for exposure times ≤0.25  s, but may have a larger effect on thresholds for exposures ≥10  s.

  3. Workshop on Physics with Neutral Kaon Beam at JLab (KL2016) Mini-Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Strakovsky, Igor I.; Amaryan, Moskov; Chudakov, Eugene A.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Pennington, Michael R.; Ritman, James L.

    2016-05-01

    The KL2016 Workshop is following the Letter of Intent LoI12-15-001 "Physics Opportunities with Secondary KL beam at JLab" submitted to PAC43 with the main focus on the physics of excited hyperons produced by the Kaon beam on unpolarized and polarized targets with GlueX setup in Hall D. Such studies will broaden a physics program of hadron spectroscopy extending it to the strange sector. The Workshop was organized to get a feedback from the community to strengthen physics motivation of the LoI and prepare a full proposal.

  4. Nuclear physics with advanced brilliant gamma beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur, Călin A.; Filipescu, Dan; Gheorghe, Ioana; Iancu, Violeta; Suliman, Gabriel; Teşileanu, Ovidiu

    2016-01-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility is dedicated to nuclear physics studies with the use of extreme electromagnetic radiation. One of the main research system to be installed and operated in the facility is an outstanding high brilliance gamma beam system. The Gamma Beam System of ELI-NP will produce intense, quasi-monochromatic gamma beams via inverse Compton scattering of short laser pulses on relativistic electron beam pulses. The gamma beams available at ELI-NP will allow for the performance of photo-nuclear reactions aiming to reveal the intimate structure of the atomic nucleus. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, photo-fission, photo-disintegration reactions above the particle threshold will be used to study the dipole response of nuclei, the structure of the Pygmy resonances, nuclear processes relevant for astrophysics, production and study of exotic neutron-rich nuclei.

  5. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  6. The physics of FEL in an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.

    2010-10-07

    We solve linearized Vlasov-Maxwell FEL equations for a 3-D perturbation in the infinite electron beam with Lorentzian energy distributions using paraxial approximation. We present analytical solutions for various initial perturbations and discuss the effect of optical guiding in such system.

  7. Physical and chemical characteristics of Terrace Reservoir, Conejos County, Colorado, May 1994 through May 1995; interim report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stogner, Robert W.; Edelmann, Patrick; Walton-Day, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    Terrace Reservoir receives drainage of low-pH, metal-enriched water from mineralized areas, including the Summitville Mine, within the AlamosaRiver Basin. Drainage from the Summitville Mine has contributed a substantial part of the metal load to Terrace Reservoir. From May 1994 through May 1995, a study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to evaluate the physical and chemical characteristics of Terrace Reservoir.Terrace Reservoir was thermally stratified from about mid-May through August 1994. Thermal stratification was absent from September\\x111994through March 1995. During periods of stratification, underflow of the Alamosa River was predominant, and residence times of the underflow were shortened by 40 to 75\\x11percent of the theoretical residence times for a well-mixed reservoir. Transport and deposition of suspended solids in Terrace Reservoir varied spatially and temporally. Most of the suspended solids were deposited in Terrace Reservoir. The concentration of dissolved oxygen in the reservoir varied little spatially or temporally and generally was within a few tenths of the dissolved-oxygen concentration of the inflow. The pH of water in the reservoir generally ranged from about 4.0 to about 7.0, depending on date, depth, and location. The largest pH values were measured during May. A markeddecrease of about 1.5\\x11pH units occurred at site T5 in the reservoir about mid-June. The pH of the reservoir remained at or below 5.5 from mid-June through November. Dissolved-metal concentrations varied spatially and temporally in response to several factors, which included inflow characteristics, reservoir stratification and mixing, inflow-routing and flow-through patterns, residence times, sedimentation, dissolved oxygen, and pH.Inflow chemistry is the dominant controlling factor of metal chemistry within Terrace Reservoir.During periods of stratification, large vertical variations in metal

  8. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies - froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 23, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

  9. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies - froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 24, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

  10. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 25, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery. This progress report provides a summary of the technical work undertaken during this period, highlighting the major results. A brief description of the work done prior to this quarter is provided in this report under the task headings.

  11. Genomic Physics. Multiple Laser Beam Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The synapses affected by Alzheimer's disease can be rejuvenated by the multiple ultrashort wavelength laser beams.[2] The guiding lasers scan the whole area to detect the amyloid plaques based on the laser scattering technique. The scanning lasers pinpoint the areas with plaques and eliminate them. Laser interaction is highly efficient, because of the focusing capabilities and possibility for the identification of the damaging proteins by matching the protein oscillation eigen-frequency with laser frequency.[3] Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, La Jolla, California, USA.

  12. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-01-25

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 9 (October--December, 1995), parametric and optimization testing was completed for the Taggart, Sunnyside, and Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column. The detailed design of the 2-t/hr PDU grinding, flotation, and dewatering circuits neared completion with the specification of the major pieces of capital equipment to be purchased for these areas. Selective agglomeration test work investigated the properties of various industrial grades of heptane for use during bench- and PDU-scale testing. It was decided to use a hydrotreated grade of commercial heptane due to its low cost and low concentration of aromatic compounds. The final Subtask 6.4 CWF Formulation Studies Test Plan was issued. A draft version of the Subtask 6.5 Preliminary Design and Test Plan Report was also issued, discussing the progress made in the design of the bench-scale selective agglomeration unit. PDU construction work moved forward through the issuing of 26 request for quotations and 21 award packages for capital equipment.

  13. Double-differential fragmentation cross-section measurements of 95 MeV/nucleon 12C beams on thin targets for hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudouet, J.; Juliani, D.; Labalme, M.; Cussol, D.; Angélique, J. C.; Braunn, B.; Colin, J.; Finck, Ch.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Guérin, H.; Henriquet, P.; Krimmer, J.; Rousseau, M.; Saint-Laurent, M. G.; Salvador, S.

    2013-08-01

    During therapeutic treatment with heavy ions like carbon, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation and secondary light charged particles, in particular protons and α particles, are produced. To estimate the dose deposited into the tumors and the surrounding healthy tissues, an accurate prediction on the fluences of these secondary fragments is necessary. Nowadays, a very limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross sections are being measured in the energy range used in hadron therapy (40 to 400 MeV/nucleon). Therefore, new measurements are performed to determine the double differential cross section of carbon on different thin targets. This work describes the experimental results of an experiment performed on May 2011 at GANIL. The double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 95 MeV/nucleon on thin targets (C, CH2, Al, Al2O3, Ti, and PMMA) have been measured. The experimental setup will be precisely described, the systematic error study will be explained and all the experimental data will be presented.

  14. Strong field physics and QED experiments with ELI-NP 2×10PW laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Turcu, I. C. E. Balascuta, S. Negoita, F.; Jaroszynski, D.; McKenna, P.

    2015-02-24

    The ELI-NP facility will focus a 10 PW pulsed laser beam at intensities of ∼10{sup 23} W/cm{sup 2} for the first time, enabling investigation of the new physical phenomena at the interfaces of plasma, nuclear and particle physics. The electric field in the laser focus has a maximum value of ∼10{sup 15} V/m at such laser intensities. In the ELI-NP Experimental Area E6, we propose the study of Radiation Reaction, Strong Field Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) effects and resulting production of Ultra-bright Sources of Gamma-rays which could be used for nuclear activation. Two powerful, synchronized 10 PW laser beams will be focused in the E6 Interaction Chamber on either gas or solid targets. One 10 PW beam is the Pump-beam and the other is the Probe-beam. The focused Pump beam accelerates the electrons to relativistic energies. The accelerated electron bunches interact with the very high electro-magnetic field of the focused Probe beam. The layout of the experimental area E6 will be presented with several options for the experimental configurations.

  15. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended.

  16. New Generation of Diagnostic Beam Injectors for Large Plasma Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexander A.

    1999-11-01

    During the last decades the injection of neutral beams has been widely used in magnetic fusion devices for diagnostic purposes. Modern fusion facilities are characterized by quite stringent conditions for measurements with diagnostic neutral beam injectors (DNBIs). In particular, an access to the plasma is often strongly limited, the beam penetration into the plasma core is low, the background radiation and particle outfluxes are high, especially in the presence of high power heating neutral beams. Note that the required characteristics of DNBIs differ in many respects from those of injectors for plasma heating. Generally, diagnostic beams should have a higher energy and current stability, lower angular divergence and the beam size, and a higher equivalent current density. In addition, in contrast to heating beams, modulation of a diagnostic beam with a frequency of 5-500 Hz and even higher is often required to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (see, for example, [1]). Considerable progress has been recently made at the Budker Institute in developing DNBIs which are capable of meeting the requirements of plasma diagnostics in modern fusion devices, including CHERS, Rutherford scattering, motional Stark effect, active charge-exchange, etc [2,3]. For different applications, three basic versions of DNBIs have been developed: CW injectors with a relatively low current (up to 10 mA for 60 keV energy), long pulse injectors (up to 10 s, 50 keV) with a moderate current (1-2 eq. A for hydrogen) and short pulse ones (milliseconds range) with a higher current (up to 20A). The plasma emitter in the injectors is created either by the RF discharge or by an arc discharge. In many cases, the beam focusing is needed to increase the current density in the plasma. In the developed DNBIs, it is provided by spherically formed grids of the ion optical system. The paper describes the developed DNBIs and reviews experimental results on the measurements of plasma parameters at different

  17. Electro- and photonuclear physics with polarized beams and targets

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Two long-standing issues in photonuclear physics, the giant M1 resonance in Pb and deuteron photodisintegration, have been studied recently with polarized photons at Urbana and Frascati, respectively. The implications that this work has for settling these key issues will be discussed. In addition, the advantages of the internal polarized target method for electron scattering studies will be discussed and the technology of internal polarized target development will be reviewed. The first results from a spin-exchange, optically-pumped polarized H and D source will be presented.

  18. Closeout Report Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02 95ER40931 Advanced Map Methods for the Description of Particle Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Berz; Kyoko Makino

    2008-12-17

    The above grant was active at Michigan State University from 1994 until 2007. We summarize and document the various activities and key output under the grant, including degrees awarded to graduate students at MSU and through the VUBeam program sponsored by the grant, the books, publications and reports produced, the meetings organized, and the presentations given.

  19. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  20. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-05-15

    background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  1. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    through the background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  2. Physical characteristics of the M.D. Anderson Hospital clinical neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Horton, J L; Otte, V A; Schultheiss, T E; Stafford, P M; Sun, T; Zermeno, A

    1988-09-01

    The physical characteristics of the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) clinical neutron beam are presented. The central-axis percent depth-dose values are intermediate between a 4 and 6 MV X-ray beam. The build-up curves reach a depth of maximum dose at 1.2 cm and have surface dose values of approximately 30%. Teflon flattening filters are employed to flatten the beam at the depth of the 75% dose level. Two wedges are available for shaping the beam; they are made of Teflon and produce wedge angles of 31 degrees and 45 degrees as defined by the ICRU. Output factors ranged from 0.88 for a 4 x 4 cm field to 1.12 for a 20 x 20 cm field. Tungsten blocks reduced the dose received at Dmax to 25% of the unblocked value but only 52% of the unblocked value at a depth of 22.8 cm.

  3. Physics design of the injector source for ITER neutral beam injector (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Aprile, D.; Chitarin, G.; Fonnesu, N.; Marconato, N.; Pilan, N.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G. Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.

    2014-02-15

    Two Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are foreseen to provide a substantial fraction of the heating power necessary to ignite thermonuclear fusion reactions in ITER. The development of the NBI system at unprecedented parameters (40 A of negative ion current accelerated up to 1 MV) requires the realization of a full scale prototype, to be tested and optimized at the Test Facility under construction in Padova (Italy). The beam source is the key component of the system and the design of the multi-grid accelerator is the goal of a multi-national collaborative effort. In particular, beam steering is a challenging aspect, being a tradeoff between requirements of the optics and real grids with finite thickness and thermo-mechanical constraints due to the cooling needs and the presence of permanent magnets. In the paper, a review of the accelerator physics and an overview of the whole R and D physics program aimed to the development of the injector source are presented.

  4. Physics design of the injector source for ITER neutral beam injector (invited).

    PubMed

    Antoni, V; Agostinetti, P; Aprile, D; Cavenago, M; Chitarin, G; Fonnesu, N; Marconato, N; Pilan, N; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Veltri, P

    2014-02-01

    Two Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are foreseen to provide a substantial fraction of the heating power necessary to ignite thermonuclear fusion reactions in ITER. The development of the NBI system at unprecedented parameters (40 A of negative ion current accelerated up to 1 MV) requires the realization of a full scale prototype, to be tested and optimized at the Test Facility under construction in Padova (Italy). The beam source is the key component of the system and the design of the multi-grid accelerator is the goal of a multi-national collaborative effort. In particular, beam steering is a challenging aspect, being a tradeoff between requirements of the optics and real grids with finite thickness and thermo-mechanical constraints due to the cooling needs and the presence of permanent magnets. In the paper, a review of the accelerator physics and an overview of the whole R&D physics program aimed to the development of the injector source are presented.

  5. Water-Quality Assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas--Surface-Water Quality, Shallow Ground-Water Quality, and Factors Affecting Water Quality in the Rincon Valley, South-Central New Mexico, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, Scott K.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, surface-water and ground-water samples were collected in 1994 and 1995 for analysis of common constituents, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, trace elements, radioactivity, volatile organic compounds, and pesticides to characterize surface- water quality and shallow ground-water quality and to determine factors affecting water quality in the Rincon Valley, south-central New Mexico. Samples of surface water were collected from three sites on the Rio Grande and from sites on three agricultural drains in the Rincon Valley in January 1994 and 1995, April 1994, and October 1994. Ground-water samples were collected in late April and early May 1994 from 30 shallow wells that were installed during the investigation. Dissolved-solids concentrations in surface water ranged from 434 to 1,510 milligrams per liter (mg/L). Dissolved-solids concentrations were smallest in water from the Rio Grande below Caballo Dam and largest in the drains. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 3.3 mg/L as nitrogen, and ammonia concentrations ranged from less than 0.015 to 0.33 mg/L as nitrogen in surface-water samples. Trace-element concentrations in surface water were significantly smaller than the acute-fisheries standards. One or more pesticides were detected in 34 of 37 surface-water samples. DCPA (dacthal) and metolachlor were the most commonly detected pesticides. No standards have been established for the pesticides analyzed for in this study. Dissolved-solids concentrations in shallow ground water ranged from 481 to 3,630 mg/L. All but 2 of 30 samples exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level for dissolved solids of 500 mg/L. Water from about 73 percent of the wells sampled exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 250 mg/L for sulfate, and water from about 7 percent of the wells sampled exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 250 mg/L for chloride. Nitrite plus nitrate

  6. Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-04-27

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I) , and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations. 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. Physical origin of the frequency shifts in cesium beam frequency standards: Related environmental sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Dimarcq, N.; Giordano, V.; Viennet, J.

    1990-01-01

    When observed in a cesium beam frequency standard, the hyperfine transition frequency of the atoms differs slightly from the invariant transition frequency of the unperturbed atoms at rest. The various physical and technical origins of the frequency offsets are stated. They relate to fundamental physical effects, to the method of probing the atomic resonance and to the frequency control of the slaved oscillator. The variation of the frequency offsets under a change of the value of the internal operating characteristics is considered. The sensitivity to a change of the magnetic induction, the microwave power, and the temperature is given. A comparison is made of the sensitivity of cesium beam frequency standards of the commercially available type, making use of magnetic state selection, and of devices under study, in which the state preparation and detection is accomplished optically. The pathways between the external stimuli and the physical origin of the frequency offsets are specified.

  8. Induction-accelerator heavy-ion fusion: Status and beam physics issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    1996-01-26

    Inertial confinement fusion driven by beams of heavy ions is an attractive route to controlled fusion. In the U.S., induction accelerators are being developed as {open_quotes}drivers{close_quotes} for this process. This paper is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the concept of induction-accelerator driven heavy-ion fusion is briefly reviewed, and the U.S. program of experiments and theoretical investigations is described. In the second, a {open_quotes}taxonomy{close_quotes} of space-charge-dominated beam physics issues is presented, accompanied by a brief discussion of each area.

  9. Beam physics of the 8-GeV H-minus linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-11-01

    Fermilab is developing the concept and design of an 8-GeV superconducting H-minus linac with the primary mission of increasing the intensity of the Main Injector for the production of neutrino superbeams. The front-end of the linac up to 420 MeV operates at 325 MHz and accelerates beam from the ion source using a room temperature radio-frequency quadrupole followed by short CH type resonators and superconducting spoke resonators. In the high energy section, the acceleration is provided by the International Linear Collider (ILC)-style superconducting elliptical 1.3 GHz cavities. The beam physics for the linac is presented in this paper using two beam dynamics codes: TRACK and ASTRA.

  10. Beam Polarization at the ILC: the Physics Impact and the Accelerator Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, B.; Bailey, I.; Bartels, C.; Brachmann, A.; Clarke, J.; Hartin, A.; Hauptman, J.; Helebrant, C.; Hesselbach, S.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Marchesini, I.; Monig, Klaus; Moffeit, K.C.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Riemann, S.; Schalicke, A.; Schuler, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Ushakov, A.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Bonn U. /SLAC

    2011-11-23

    In this contribution accelerator solutions for polarized beams and their impact on physics measurements are discussed. Focus are physics requirements for precision polarimetry near the interaction point and their realization with polarized sources. Based on the ILC baseline programme as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), recent developments are discussed and evaluated taking into account physics runs at beam energies between 100 GeV and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole and options as the 1TeV upgrade and GigaZ. The studies, talks and discussions presented at this conference demonstrated that beam polarization and its measurement are crucial for the physics success of any future linear collider. To achieve the required precision it is absolutely decisive to employ multiple devices for testing and controlling the systematic uncertainties of each polarimeter. The polarimetry methods for the ILC are complementary: with the upstream polarimeter the measurements are performed in a clean environment, they are fast and allow to monitor time-dependent variations of polarization. The polarimeter downstream the IP will measure the disrupted beam resulting in high background and much lower statistics, but it allows access to the depolarization at the IP. Cross checks between the polarimeter results give redundancy and inter-calibration which is essential for high precision measurements. Current plans and issues for polarimeters and also energy spectrometers in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC are summarized in reference [28]. The ILC baseline design allows already from the beginning the operation with polarized electrons and polarized positrons provided the spin rotation and the fast helicity reversal for positrons will be implemented. A reversal of the positron helicity significantly slower than that of electrons is not recommended to not compromise the precision and hence the success of the ILC. Recently to use calibration data at the Z

  11. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schietinger, T.; Pedrozzi, M.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, B.; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  12. Ion-beam inertial fusion: the requirements posed by target and deposition physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1981-10-19

    The demonstration of ICF scientific feasibility requires success in target design, driver development and target fabrication. Since these are interrelated, we present here some results of ion beam target studies and relate them to parameters of interest to ion accelerators. Ion deposition physics have long been a well known subject apart from high beam currents. Recent NRL experiments at up to 250 kA/cm/sup 2/ ions confirm the classical deposition physics now at current densities which are comparable to most ion targets. On the other hand, GSI data at low current density but 1 to 10 MeV/nucleon are continually being accumulated. They have yet to find anomalous results. Relying on target concepts outlined briefly, we report on the energy gain of ion-driven fusion targets as a function of input energy, ion ranges and focal spot radius. We also comment on some consequences of target gain versus driver and reactor requirements.

  13. Physical characterization of single convergent beam device for teletherapy: theoretical and Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, R G; Valente, M

    2015-09-21

    The main purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility and physical characteristics of a new teletherapy device of radiation therapy based on the application of a convergent x-ray beam of energies like those used in radiotherapy providing highly concentrated dose delivery to the target. We have denominated it Convergent Beam Radio Therapy (CBRT). Analytical methods are developed first in order to determine the dosimetry characteristic of an ideal convergent photon beam in a hypothetical water phantom. Then, using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code, a similar convergent beam that is applied to the water phantom is compared with that of the analytical method. The CBRT device (Converay(®)) is designed to adapt to the head of LINACs. The converging beam photon effect is achieved thanks to the perpendicular impact of LINAC electrons on a large thin spherical cap target where Bremsstrahlung is generated (high-energy x-rays). This way, the electrons impact upon various points of the cap (CBRT condition), aimed at the focal point. With the X radiation (Bremsstrahlung) directed forward, a system of movable collimators emits many beams from the output that make a virtually definitive convergent beam. Other Monte Carlo simulations are performed using realistic conditions. The simulations are performed for a thin target in the shape of a large, thin, spherical cap, with an r radius of around 10-30 cm and a curvature radius of approximately 70 to 100 cm, and a cubed water phantom centered in the focal point of the cap. All the interaction mechanisms of the Bremsstrahlung radiation with the phantom are taken into consideration for different energies and cap thicknesses. Also, the magnitudes of the electric and/or magnetic fields, which are necessary to divert clinical-use electron beams (0.1 to 20 MeV), are determined using electromagnetism equations with relativistic corrections. This way the above-mentioned beam is manipulated and guided for its perpendicular impact

  14. Archive of digital boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS cruises 94GFP01, 95GFP01, 96GFP01, 97GFP01, and 98GFP02 in Lakes Pontchartrain, Borgne, and Maurepas, Louisiana, 1994-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Flocks, James G.; Penland, Shea; Wiese, Dana S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the University of New Orleans, the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the University of Georgia, conducted five geophysical surveys of Lakes Pontchartrain, Borgne, and Maurepas in Louisiana from 1994 to 1998. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, observers' logbooks, GIS information, and formal FGDC metadata. In addition, a filtered and gained digital GIF image of each seismic profile is provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Examples of SU processing scripts and in-house (USGS) software for viewing SEG-Y headers (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. Processed profile images, trackline maps, navigation files, and formal metadata may be viewed with a web browser, and scanned handwritten logbooks may be viewed with Adobe Reader. To access the information contained on these discs, open the file 'index.htm' located at the top level of the discs using a web browser. This report also contains hyperlinks to USGS collaborators and other agencies. These links are only accessible if access to the Internet is available while viewing these documents.

  15. 1994 C. H. McCloy Research Lecture: Does Physical Activity Play a Role in Preventing Osteoporosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drinkwater, Barbara L.

    1994-01-01

    Review considers problems encountered in relating women's physical activity to increases in bone mass, noting the implications of recommending exercise to help prevent osteoporosis based on that information. Research indicates that for the full benefit of exercise on skeletal health, there must be adequate gonadal hormone levels. (SM)

  16. Active Target-Time Projection Chambers for Reactions Induced by Rare Isotope Beams: Physics and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittig, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Weakly bound nuclear systems can be considered to represent a good testing-ground of our understanding of non-perturbative quantum systems. Great progress in experimental sensitivity has been attained by increase in rare isotope beam intensities and by the development of new high efficiency detectors. It is now possible to study reactions leading to bound and unbound states in systems with very unbalanced neutron to proton ratios. Application of Active Target-Time Projection Chambers to this domain of physics will be illustrated by experiments performed with existing detectors. The NSCL is developing an Active Target-Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC) to be used to study reactions induced by rare isotope beams at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Facility (NSCL) and at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The AT-TPC counter gas acts as both a target and detector, allowing investigations of fusion, isobaric analog states, cluster structure of light nuclei and transfer reactions to be conducted without significant loss in resolution due to the thickness of the target. The high efficiency and low threshold of the AT-TPC will allow investigations of fission barriers and giant resonances with fast fragmentation rare isotope beams. This detector type needs typically a large number of electronic channels (order of magnitude 10,000) and a high speed DAQ. A reduced size prototype detector with prototype electronics has been realized and used in several experiments. A short description of other detectors of this type under development will be given.

  17. Issues of incompatibility of dipole beam separation schemes with EIC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Aschenauer, E.; Kiselev, A.; Parker, B.; Petti, R.

    2015-11-17

    This report addresses the question can the risk of an eRHIC machine be reduced by replacing the crab-cavities through a dipole field in the IR to separate the electron and hadron beams. In the following several scenarios to integrate a separation dipole in the IR design will be described. For each of the scenarios the challenges and problems to realize this in practice will be detailed. In addition the impact on the detector design and the EIC physics program will also be discussed. Several physics requirements need to be integrated into the interaction region design, in order to perform the physics program as described in the EIC White Paper and in the RHIC Design Study. These requirements are also described in detail on a dedicated page of the eRHIC-wiki. The main requirements are described here.

  18. Nuclear theory with applications to astrophysics and particle physics. Final report, 15 January 1994--14 January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    Many of the topics discussed here are takeoff points for projects proposed later. Brief summaries are given for the following projects: (1) time-reversal violation; (2) the rare-earth r-process bump; (3) structure of weakly bound pairs; (4) neutron-proton pairing and isospin symmetry; (5) detection of galactic dark matter; (6) iodine as a solar neutrino detector; and (7) neutrino physics at LSND.

  19. Intense, brilliant micro γ-beams in nuclear physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Gasilov, S.; Lang, C.; Thirolf, P. G.; Jentschel, M.; Diehl, R.; Schroer, C.; Barty, C. P. J.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2011-06-01

    900, we can obtain small spots for each of the beamlets. While focusing the beamlets to a much smaller spot size, we can bend them effectively with micro wedges to e.g. parallel beamlets. We can monochromatize these γ beamlets within the rocking curve of a common Laue crystal, using an additional angle selection by a collimator to reach a strongly reduced band width of 10-4 - 10-6. We propose the use of a further lens/wedge arrays or Bragg reflection to superimpose the beamlets to a very small total γ beam spot. Many experiments gain much from the high beam resolution and the smaller focal spot. This new γ optics requires high resolution diagnostics, where we want to optimize the focusing, using very thin target wires of a specific nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) isotope to monitor the focusing for the resonance energy. With such beams we can explore new nuclear physics of higher excited states with larger level densities. New phenomena, like the transition from chaotic to regular nuclear motion, weakly-bound halo states or states decaying by tunneling can be studied. The higher level density also allows to probe parity violating nuclear forces more sensitively. This γ optics improves many applications, like a more brilliant positron source, a more brilliant neutron source, higher specific activity of medical radioisotopes or NRF micro-imaging.

  20. Treatment of cancer of the pancreas by intraoperative electron beam therapy: physical and biological aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Bagne, F.R.; Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Milligan, A.J.; Bronn, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation therapy has had a significant and an expanded role in the management of cancer of the pancreas during the last decade. In particular, for locally advanced disease, radiation therapy has improved the median survival of patients to 1 year. Intraoperative electron beam therapy has been applied to unresectable and resectable pancreatic cancer in an attempt to enhance local control of disease and to improve patient survival. This paper presents a survey of the role of radiation therapy in treatment of cancer of the pancreas, provides information on the radiobiological aspects of this treatment modality and details the physical and dosimetric characteristics of intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons. Presented are the design specifics of an applicator system, central axis beam data, applicator parameters, dose distribution data, shielding, treatment planning and means of verification. Emphasis is placed on the collaboration and cooperation necessary for all members of the intraoperative radiation therapy team including surgeons, radiation therapists, medical physicists, anesthesiologists, technologists, and nurses.29 references.

  1. Study of ion beam transport from the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source at the Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Sha, S; Yang, Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Zhu, Y H; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Lin, S H; Li, X X; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Zhao, H Y; Ma, H Y; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Wu, Q; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2012-02-01

    Ion beam transport from the Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) electron cyclotron resonance ion source was studied at the Institute of Modern Physics during 2010. Particle-in-cell simulations and experimental results have shown that both space charge and magnetic aberrations lead to a larger beam envelope and emittance growth. In the existing SECRAL extraction beam line, it has been shown that raising the solenoid lens magnetic field reduces aberrations in the subsequent dipole and results in lower emittance. Detailed beam emittance measurements are presented in this paper.

  2. New frontiers in nuclear physics with high-power lasers and brilliant monochromatic gamma beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Negoita, F.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C. A.; Ursescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of high power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics as well as societal applications in material science, nuclear energy and applications for medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures has selected a proposal based on these new premises called the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI). The ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for nuclear physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense low-energy gamma beam, a combination of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. This unique combination of beams that are unique worldwide allows us to develop an experimental program in nuclear physics at the frontiers of present-day knowledge as well as society driven applications. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility as well as the new perspectives in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  3. Transverse Beam Polarizationas an Alternate View into New Physics at CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    In e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions, transverse beam polarization can be a useful tool in studying the properties of particles associated with new physics beyond the Standard Model(SM). However, unlike in the case of measurements associated with longitudinal polarization, the formation of azimuthal asymmetries used to probe this physics in the case of transverse polarization requires both e{sup {+-}} beams to be simultaneously polarized. In this paper we discuss the further use of transverse polarization as a probe of new physics models at a high energy, {radical}s = 3 TeV version of CLIC. In particular, we show (i) how measurements of the sign of these asymmetries is sufficient to discriminate the production of spin-0 supersymmetric states from the spin-1/2 Kaluza-Klein excitations of Universal Extra Dimensions. Simultaneously, the contribution to this asymmetry arising from the potentially large SM W{sup +}W{sup -} background can be made negligibly small. We then show (ii) how measurements of such asymmetries and their associated angular distributions on the peak of a new resonant Z{prime}-like state can be used to extract precision information on the Z{prime} couplings to the SM fermions.

  4. Device physics of thin-film polycrystalline cells and modules. Annual subcontract report, December 6, 1994--December 5, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sites, J R

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the work on a number of projects carried out at both the cell and the module level during the past year. We investigated the effects of CdS thickness in collaboration with six CdTe cell-fabrication laboratories; there appears to be a critical thickness, between 500 and 1000 {Angstrom} depending on fabrication process, below which junction quality is degraded. Our experimental and modeling project showed that conduction-band offsets less than about 0.3 eV have little effect on the performance of a CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) or CdTe cell under the traditional assumption that the absorber material accounts for most of the depletion region. The work in several other cell projects included the role of Ga distribution in Cu{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) cells, changes that occur in some cells over time, optical characterization of commonly used CdTe substrates and front contacts, and comparative characterization of CIGS cells where identical absorbers were combined with variations in window fabrication. Our work on the primary module-characterization project developed the successful use of chopping-frequency variation in a scanning beam to separate photocurrent and shunting problems affecting individual cells of an encapsulated module. Other module projects included modifications in analysis required by the typical module-cell geometry, the practical effect of nonuniformities in light intensity or cell temperature, and the advantages and pitfalls of forward bias across a module during a light scan.

  5. The future of high-energy physics in the United States: Statement for the 1994 HEPAP subpanel

    SciTech Connect

    Peoples, J. Jr.

    1994-02-06

    The United States has a superb capability for forefront research in elementary particle physics for the next decade-but it can be realized only if there is sufficient funding to make efficient use of our existing world-class facilities. Throughout most of the past half century, the US has led the world in making contributions to our growing understanding of elementary particle physics. We are no longer the dominant force in the field, but we are still one of the leaders. The termination of the SSC is an enormous blow, but it need not end our participation in the field. We must first take advantage of what we have -- and that is considerable -- and then use it as the basis for a successful strategy for the first few decades in the next century. The US can make many important contributions to our field for the rest of this decade and for part of the next. But, after that, we will not long remain among the world`s leaders unless we have the foresight to preserve and strengthen our capability to construct and operate world-class facilities.

  6. Physical aspects of external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Soubra, M.; Dunscombe, P.B.; Hodson, D.I.; Wong, G. )

    1990-06-01

    The optimization of radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant mesothelioma highlights many of the currently outstanding problems in clinical radiation physics. The experimental investigation of an intuitively attractive irradiation technique with combined photon and electron beams using a specially constructed phantom has established that, due to the penetration in low density material of both primary electrons and those secondary to photon irradiation, the normal lung tissue is not spared to any significant degree by such a technique. Furthermore, great care needs to be exercised in the treatment planning calculations for this approach if absolute dosimetry errors as large as 50% are to be avoided.

  7. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dawoud, S. M. Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A.; Sykes, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  8. Theoretical research in intermediate-energy nuclear physics. [Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, R.

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses progress that has been made on the following seven problems: (1) (e, e{prime}p) at high momentum transfer; (2) post,acceleration effects in two-nucleon interferometry of heavy-ion collisions; (3) pion-nucleus interactions above 0.5 GeV; (4) chiral symmetry breaking in nuclei and picnic atom anomaly; (5) atomic screening on nuclear astronomical reactions; (6) QCD related work (coherent pion production from skyrmion-antiskyrmion annihilation, QCD in 1 + 1 dimensions, and correlation functions in the QCD vacuum), and (7) kaonic hydrogen atom experiment. The problems deal with various topics mostly in intermediate-energy nuclear physics. We place priority on (1) and (2), and describe them somewhat in detail below. Other problems are our on-going projects, but we are placing lower priority on them in the second and third year.

  9. 1994 SSRL Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-18

    SSRL, a division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, is a national user facility which provides synchrotron radiation, a name given to x-rays or light produced by electrons circulating in a storage ring at nearly the speed of light. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.3 GeV storage ring, SPEAR. SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which has been operating for user experiments 6 to 7 months per year. 1994, the third year of operation of SSRL as a fully dedicated, low-emittance, independent user facility was superb. The facility ran extremely well, delivering 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Over 600 users came from 167 institutions to participate in 343 experiments. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. the standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994.

  10. Physical and encoded Q-plates for the generation of switchable vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ignacio; Sánchez-López, María. del Mar; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Badham, Katherine; Delaney, Sam W.; Cottrell, Don M.; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Tanabe, Ayano; Kurihara, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    In this work we report on our achievements in generating switchable and arbitrary vector beams by means of q-plates. Two kind of q-plates are considered: i) a physical prototype from Citizen Co. and ii) a virtual device that is encoded onto a spatial light modulator (SLM). In both cases experimental and analytical results within the Jones formalism are shown. The performance of a segmented and tunable liquid crystal q-plate prototype is characterized at visible and telecommunications wavelengths, and the generation of first-order vector beams is probed. By using a reflective geometry and tuning the q-plate at half-wave or at quarter-wave retardance, it is shown how the device can operate either as a q-plate with double order. Finally, we show the generation of arbitrary programmable integer and fractional vector beams by encoding a q-plate onto a SLM based system. The system is based on a double-pass configuration that consecutively modulates the vertical and the horizontal polarization components of light using a transmissive LCoS display. Therefore, new and exotic q-plate designs can be analyzed prior to their fabrication.

  11. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh. Progress report, 1 November 1993--31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, E. Jr.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    Task A involves the study of kaon decays. The overall physics focus of the current work is rare and semi-rare decays of the {phi} and the short-lived kaon, with an emphasis on those aspects needed in preparation for the proposed {Phi}-factory measurements of CPT violation. Another aspect of the rare kaon decay work is E865 at BNL, a search for K{sup +} yields {pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, a lepton number violating process. Pittsburgh`s E865 responsibilities are the design and construction of the Cerenkov counters. The major goals of task B are as follows: (1) the analysis of the E706 (direct photon production) data taken during the 1987--1988 and 1990--1991 target runs at Fermilab and (2) the continuation of work within SVXII group of the CDF collaboration. The CDF program involves a dedicated effort towards the design of the silicon vertex detector upgrade, SVXII.

  12. Processing-structure-property relationships in electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D. Srinivasa; Valleti, Krishna; Joshi, S. V.; Janardhan, G. Ranga

    2011-05-15

    The physical and mechanical properties of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings deposited by the electron beam physical vapor deposition technique have been investigated by varying the key process variables such as vapor incidence angle and sample rotation speed. The tetragonal zirconia coatings formed under varying process conditions employed were found to have widely different surface and cross-sectional morphologies. The porosity, phase composition, planar orientation, hardness, adhesion, and surface residual stresses in the coated specimens were comprehensively evaluated to develop a correlation with the process variables. Under transverse scratch test conditions, the YSZ coatings exhibited two different crack formation modes, depending on the magnitude of residual stress. The influence of processing conditions on the coating deposition rate, column orientation angle, and adhesion strength has been established. Key relationships between porosity, hardness, and adhesion are also presented.

  13. EBIT - Electronic Beam Ion Trap: N Divison experimental physics annual report 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, D.

    1996-10-01

    The multi-faceted research effort of the EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap) program in N-Division of the Physics and Space Technology Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continues to contribute significant results to the physical sciences from studies with low energy very highly charged heavy ions. The EBIT program attracts a number of collaborators from the US and abroad for the different projects. The collaborations are partly carried out through participating graduate students demonstrating the excellent educational capabilities at the LLNL EBIT facilities. Moreover, participants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities are engaged in the EBIT project. This report describes EBIT work for 1995 in atomic structure measurements and radiative transition probabilities, spectral diagnostics for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, ion/surface interaction studies, electron-ion interactions studies, retrap and ion collisions, and instrumental development.

  14. Advanced physical coal cleaning to comply with potential air toxic regulations. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C.; Wang, D.

    1995-12-31

    Studies have indicated that the potentially hazardous trace elements found in coal have a strong affinity for coal pyrite. Thus, by maximizing the rejection of pyrite, one can minimize the trace element content of a given coal while also reducing sulfur emissions. The pyrite in most Illinois Basin coals, however, is finely disseminated within the coal matrix. Therefore, to remove the pyrite using physical coal cleaning techniques, the pyrite must be liberated by grinding the coal to ultrafine particle sizes. Fortunately, the coals being fed to pulverized coal boilers (PCB) are already ground to a very fine size, i.e., 70% passing 200 mesh. Therefore, this research project will investigate the use of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies for cleaning PCB feed as a compliance strategy. Work in this quarter has focused on the processing of a PCB feed sample collected from Central Illinois Power`s Newton Power Station using column flotation and an enhanced gravity separator as separate units and in a circuitry arrangement. The PCB feed sample having a low ash content of about 12% was further cleaned to 6% while achieving a very high energy recovery of about 90% in a single stage column flotation operation. Enhanced gravity treatment is believed to be providing excellent total sulfur rejection values, although with inferior ash rejection for the {minus}400 mesh size fraction. The circuitry arrangement with the Falcon concentrator as the primary cleaner followed by the Microcel column resulted in an excellent ash rejection performance, which out performed the release analysis. Trace element analyses of the samples collected from these tests will be conducted during the next report period.

  15. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guimei

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam

  16. First atomic physics experiments with cooled stored ion beams at the Heidelberg heavy-ion ring TSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Balykin, V.; Baumann, W.; Berger, J.; Bisoffi, G.; Blatt, P.; Blum, M.; Faulstich, A.; Friedrich, A.; Gerhard, M.; Geyer, C.; Grieser, M.; Grieser, R.; Habs, D.; Heyng, H.W.; Hochadel, B.; Holzer, B.; Huber, G.; Jaeschke, E.; Jung, M.; Karafillidis, A.; Kilgus, G.; Klein, R.; Kraemer, D.; Krause, P.; Krieg, M.; Kuehl, T.; Matl, K.; Mueller, A.; Music, M.; Neumann, R.; Neureither, G.; Ott, W.; Petrich, W.; Povh, B.; Repnow, R.; Schroeder, S.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Sigray, P.; Steck, M.; Stokstad, R.; Szmola, E.; Wagner, M.; Wanner, B.; Welti, K.; Zwickler, S. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg Manne Siegbahn Institute , Stockholm Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung , Darmstadt (Fed

    1990-06-01

    An overview of atomic physics experiments at the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) is given. Highly charged ions up to fully stripped silicon have been stored at energies between 4 and 12 MeV/u. The enhancement of the beam intensity by stacking, the beam lifetime, and electron cooling of these ion beams are discussed. Radiative and state-selective dielectronic recombination rates of hydrogen-like oxygen ions with free electrons from the electron cooler were measured. Beam noise spectra are being investigated with regard to collective effects caused by the Coulomb interaction in the cold ion beams. Resonance fluorescence from stored single-charged ions was observed using tunable narrow-band lasers. First indications of laser cooling in a storage ring were seen.

  17. Canted-Cosine-Theta Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for High Energy Physics and Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Lucas Nathan

    Advances in superconducting magnet technology have historically enabled the construction of new, higher energy hadron colliders. Looking forward to the needs of a potential future collider, a significant increase in magnet field and performance is required. Such a task requires an open mind to the investigation of new design concepts for high field magnets. Part I of this thesis will present an investigation of the Canted-Cosine-Theta (CCT) design for high field Nb3Sn magnets. New analytic and finite element methods for analysis of CCT magnets will be given, along with a discussion on optimization of the design for high field. The design, fabrication, and successful test of the 2.5 T NbTi dipole CCT1 will be presented as a proof-of-principle step towards a high field Nb3Sn magnet. Finally, the design and initial steps in the fabrication of the 16 T Nb3Sn dipole CCT2 will be described. Part II of this thesis will investigate the CCT concept extended to a curved magnet for use in an ion beam therapy gantry. The introduction of superconducting technology in this field shows promise to reduce the weight and cost of gantries, as well as open the door to new beam optics solutions with high energy acceptance. An analytic approach developed for modeling curved CCT magnets will be presented, followed by a design study of a superconducting magnet for a proton therapy gantry. Finally, a new magnet concept called the "Alternating Gradient CCT" (AG-CCT) will be introduced. This concept will be shown to be a practical magnet solution for achieving the alternating quadrupole fields desired for an achromatic gantry, allowing for the consideration of treatment with minimal field changes in the superconducting magnets. The primary motivation of this thesis is to share new developments for Canted-Cosine-Theta superconducting magnets, with the hope this design will improve technology for high energy physics and ion beam cancer therapy.

  18. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of an Electron-Beam Physical-Vapor-Deposition Coating.

    PubMed

    Slifka, A J; Filla, B J

    2003-01-01

    An industrial ceramic thermal-barrier coating designated PWA 266, processed by electron-beam physical-vapor deposition, was measured using a steady-state thermal conductivity technique. The thermal conductivity of the mass fraction 7 % yttria-stabilized zirconia coating was measured from 100 °C to 900 °C. Measurements on three thicknesses of coatings, 170 μm, 350 μm, and 510 μm resulted in thermal conductivity in the range from 1.5 W/(m·K) to 1.7 W/(m·K) with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 20 %. The thermal conductivity is not significantly dependent on temperature.

  19. Status of the Jefferson Lab Polarized Beam Physics Program and Preparations for Upcoming Parity Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J. Grames; P. Adderley; M. Baylac; J. Clark; A. Day; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker; M. Stutzman

    2003-07-01

    An ambitious nuclear physics research program continues at Jefferson Lab with Users at three experiment halls receiving reliable, highly polarized electrons at currents to 100 {micro}A. The polarized photoguns and drive lasers that contribute to Jefferson Lab's success will be described as well as significant events since PES2000. Typical of conditions at accelerators worldwide, success brings new challenges. Beam quality specifications continue to become more demanding as Users conduct more challenging experiments. In the months that follow this workshop, two parity violation experiments will begin at Jefferson Lab, G0 and HAPPEx2. The photogun requirements for these experiments will be discussed as well as our plans to eliminate/minimize systematic errors. Recent efforts to construct high power Ti-Sapphire drive lasers for these experiments also will be discussed.

  20. Validation of Geant4 physics models for 56Fe ion beam in various media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalota, Summit; Kumar, Ashavani

    2012-11-01

    The depth-dose distribution of a 56Fe ion beam has been studied in water, polyethylene, nextel, kevlar and aluminum media. The dose reduction versus areal depth is also calculated for 56Fe ions in carbon, polyethylene and aluminum using the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4. This study presents the validation of physics models available in Geant4 by comparing the simulated results with the experimental data available in the literature. Simulations are performed using binary cascade (BIC), abrasion-ablation (AA) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) models; integrated into Geant4. Deviations from experimental results may be due to the selection of simple geometry. This paper also addresses the differences in the simulated results from various models.

  1. B meson physics with polarized electron beams at linear colliders running at the Z

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    The expected large cross section for e e Z and subsequent decay to b/bar b/ quarks makes the Z an attractive placeto pursue B meson physics. The cross section for b-quark production at the Z is compared to resonance production at the UPSILON/sub 4s/ and UPSILON/sub 5s/. In addition the big electroweak asymmetries, thought to exist in Z decays to b/bar b/ quarks with polarized electron beams, provide an outstanding handle for observation of such effects as B - /bar B/ mixing. In this paper, the feasibility of such measurements is investigated and, with relatively small samples of Z's (a few hundred thousand), both B/sub d/ and B/sub s/ meson mixing are shown to be measurable. The subject of CP violation in neutral B mesons is discussed last, but presently such measurements seem to be out of reach. 7 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. International energy outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

  3. Program Advisory Committees Summary Report. 1994-95 Academic Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Grant

    A study summarized the activities of two advisory bodies--the Program Advisory Committees (PACs) and Trade Advisory Boards (TABs)--at Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST). Minutes from all meetings were collected, reviewed, and analyzed according to the main areas of concern for the advisory committees:…

  4. Graduate Follow-Up Report, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    Each year, a follow-up study is conducted to gather data on the activities and perceptions of students approximately 6 months after their graduation from Wisconsin's Technical Colleges (WTC). Specifically, the survey seeks to identify the current activities of the WTC graduates, determine the extent to which current activities are related to the…

  5. Academic Advising Handbook, 1994-95: Houston Baptist University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Jerry

    This handbook is a revised guide for faculty academic advisors at Houston Baptist University (HBU), a liberal arts university in Houston, Texas. The handbook is divided into three sections. The first section, "Academic Advising Research Data," discusses assumptions about the practice of advising and its role in higher education, various…

  6. Colleges and Universities: Faculty and Staff, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Robert M., Comp.

    This publication provides statistical information relating to the salaries, tenure and fringe benefits for full-time instructional faculty, as well as other employees at Pennsylvania colleges and universities. The primary sources of data were the annual surveys of instructional faculty and staff at Pennsylvania institutions of higher education…

  7. History Textbooks: A Standard and Guide. 1994-95 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Textbook Council, New York, NY.

    Based on expert review and research, this book provides an innovative standard and guide to social studies textbooks used in kindergarten through 12th grade classrooms for content, style, and design. The standards provide a foundation for individuals to select satisfactory textbooks and to help educators and school boards in the adoption of…

  8. Technical Challenges and Scientific Payoffs of Muon BeamAccelerators for Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-09-25

    Historically, progress in particle physics has largely beendetermined by development of more capable particle accelerators. Thistrend continues today with the recent advent of high-luminosityelectron-positron colliders at KEK and SLAC operating as "B factories,"the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and theworldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider.Looking to the future, one of the most promising approaches is thedevelopment of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very highscientific potential, and would substantially advance thestate-of-the-art in accelerator design. A 20-50 GeV muon storage ringcould serve as a copious source of well-characterized electron neutrinosor antineutrinos (a Neutrino Factory), providing beams aimed at detectorslocated 3000-7500 km from the ring. Such long baseline experiments areexpected to be able to observe and characterize the phenomenon ofcharge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector, and thusprovide an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in science,namely, why the matter-dominated universe in which we reside exists atall. By accelerating muons to even higher energies of several TeV, we canenvision a Muon Collider. In contrast with composite particles likeprotons, muons are point particles. This means that the full collisionenergy is available to create new particles. A Muon Collider has roughlyten times the energy reach of a proton collider at the same collisionenergy, and has a much smaller footprint. Indeed, an energy frontier MuonCollider could fit on the site of an existing laboratory, such asFermilab or BNL. The challenges of muon-beam accelerators are related tothe facts that i) muons are produced as a tertiary beam, with very large6D phase space, and ii) muons are unstable, with a lifetime at rest ofonly 2 microseconds. How these challenges are accommodated in theaccelerator design will be described. Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon

  9. Physics Opportunities of a Fixed-Target Experiment using the LHC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Fleuret, F.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J.P.; /Orsay, IPN

    2012-03-16

    We outline the many physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the proton and lead-ion beams of the LHC extracted by a bent crystal. In a proton run with the LHC 7-TeV beam, one can analyze pp, pd and pA collisions at center-of-mass energy {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 115 GeV and even higher using the Fermi motion of the nucleons in a nuclear target. In a lead run with a 2.76 TeV-per-nucleon beam, {radical}s{sub NN} is as high as 72 GeV. Bent crystals can be used to extract about 5 x 10{sup 8} protons/sec; the integrated luminosity over a year reaches 0.5 fb{sup -1} on a typical 1 cm-long target without nuclear species limitation. We emphasize that such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, gluon and heavy-quark distributions of the proton and the neutron can be accessed at large x and even at x larger than unity in the nuclear case. Single diffractive physics and, for the first time, the large negative-xF domain can be accessed. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter versus the features of the hot and dense matter formed in heavy-ion collisions, including the formation of the quark-gluon plasma, which can be studied in PbA collisions over the full range of target-rapidity domain with a large variety of nuclei. The polarization of hydrogen and nuclear targets allows an ambitious spin program, including measurements of the QCD lensing effects which underlie the Sivers single-spin asymmetry, the study of transversity distributions and possibly of polarized parton distributions. We also emphasize the potential offered by pA ultra-peripheral collisions where the nucleus target A is used as a coherent photon source, mimicking photoproduction processes in ep collisions. Finally, we note that W and Z bosons can be produced and detected in a fixed-target experiment and in their

  10. Effect of basic physical parameters to control plasma meniscus and beam halo formation in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2013-09-14

    Our previous study shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources: the negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. In this article, the detail physics of the plasma meniscus and beam halo formation is investigated with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that the basic physical parameters such as the H{sup −} extraction voltage and the effective electron confinement time significantly affect the formation of the plasma meniscus and the resultant beam halo since the penetration of electric field for negative ion extraction depends on these physical parameters. Especially, the electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of electron diffusion across the magnetic field. The plasma meniscus penetrates deeply into the source plasma region when the effective electron confinement time is short. In this case, the curvature of the plasma meniscus becomes large, and consequently the fraction of the beam halo increases.

  11. Physical simulation of the long-term dynamic action of a plasma beam on a space debris object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuvalov, Valentin A.; Gorev, Nikolai. B.; Tokmak, Nikolai A.; Kochubei, Galina S.

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed for physical (laboratory) simulation of the long-term dynamic action of plasma beam high-energy ions on a space debris object with the aim of removing it to a lower orbit followed by its burning in the Earth's atmosphere. The methodology is based on the use of a criterion for the equivalence of two plasma beam exposure regimes (in the Earth' ionosphere and in laboratory conditions) and an accelerated test procedure in what concerns space debris object material sputtering and space debris object erosion by a plasma beam in the Earth's ionosphere. The space debris coating material (blanket thermal insulation) sputtering yield and normal and tangential momentum transfer coefficients are determined experimentally as a function of the ion energy and the ion beam incidence angle.

  12. a Study on the Physical Bases of Ion-Beam Lithography - Theory and Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapiperis, Leonidas

    The present work undertakes to make a comprehensive study of the basic physical mechanisms involved in the Ion-Beam Exposure of resists and the generation of relief patterns in them for Integrated Circuit fabrication. A new Monte Carlo simulation scheme of ion-stopping in matter, PIBER (Program for Ion Beam Exposure of Resists), developed by the author in collaboration with I. Adesida, is described. A recently proposed nuclear scattering cross section, generated by fitting to a wide range of experimental range vs energy data (Kalbitzer and Oetzmann, 1980) is used. Both the adjusted LSS theory (Lindhard et al, 1961) and the experimentally fitted tables of Andersen and Ziegler (1976) are used for the electronic stopping part. Very good agreement is reported between PIBER and experiment for a wide range of ion-target combinations. The development properties of hydrogen-exposed PMMA (Poly Methyl Methacrylate) are utilized for the first systematic determination of hydrogen ranges in this organic resist. The development rate of hydrogen and gallium exposed PMMA is experimentally parametrized as a function of absorbed energy-density. The differences in the development behaviour of PMMA between light ion and heavy ion exposures are related to the different underlying mechanisms of ion energy-loss. Simple development profiles in PMMA are computer simulated for both hydrogen and gallium exposures at different energies and doses. Resist resolution limits are estimated for the two ion species. The fabrication of 400-A-wide lines in PMMA by 40-keV hydrogen-ion exposure through a holographically -generated fine conformal gold mask is reported. Photolithographic and holographic mask-making techniques are described. Progress in high-brightness ion-sources is reviewed, and the suitability of different source types is assessed for various lithographic applications. A short review of amorphous chalcogenide resists is given. Some experimental results in positive -type Ge(,x('Se)1-x

  13. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1994. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor studies, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, ICP-AES analysis of biological samples), physics (treatment planning software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of BSH and BPA is presented and results of 21 spontaneous tumor bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are discussed. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors is presented. Highlights from the First International Workshop on Accelerator-Based Neutron Sources for BNCT are included. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Relative biological effectiveness of the 60-MeV therapeutic proton beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, Poland.

    PubMed

    Słonina, Dorota; Biesaga, Beata; Swakoń, Jan; Kabat, Damian; Grzanka, Leszek; Ptaszkiewicz, Marta; Sowa, Urszula

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of a 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, the first one to operate in Poland. RBE was assessed at the surviving fractions (SFs) of 0.01, 0.1, and 0.37, for normal human fibroblasts from three cancer patients. The cells were irradiated near the Bragg peak of the pristine beam and at three depths within a 28.4-mm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). Reference radiation was provided by 6-MV X-rays. The mean RBE value at SF = 0.01 for fibroblasts irradiated near the Bragg peak of pristine beam ranged between 1.06 and 1.15. The mean RBE values at SF = 0.01 for these cells exposed at depths of 2, 15, and 27 mm of the SOBP ranged between 0.95-1.00, 0.97-1.02, and 1.05-1.11, respectively. A trend was observed for RBE values to increase with survival level and with depth in the SOBP: at SF = 0.37 and at the depth of 27 mm, RBE values attained their maximum (1.19-1.24). The RBE values estimated at SF = 0.01 using normal human fibroblasts for the 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the IFJ PAN in Kraków are close to values of 1.0 and 1.1, used in clinical practice.

  15. Preparation of a primary argon beam for the CERN fixed target physics.

    PubMed

    Küchler, D; O'Neil, M; Scrivens, R; Thomae, R

    2014-02-01

    The fixed target experiment NA61 in the North Area of the Super Proton Synchrotron is studying phase transitions in strongly interacting matter. Up to now they used the primary beams available from the CERN accelerator complex (protons and lead ions) or fragmented beams created from the primary lead ion beam. To explore a wider range of energies and densities a request was made to provide primary argon and xenon beams. This paper describes the results of the setting up and 10 week test run of the Ar(11+) beam from the 14.5 GHz ECR ion source and the linear accelerator (Linac3) at CERN.

  16. Space Studies Board, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This 1994 report of the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council summarizes the charter and organization of the board, activities and membership, major and short reports, and congressional testimony. A cumulative bibliography of the Space Studies (formerly Space Science) Board and its committees is provided. An appendix contains reports of the panel to review Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) plans. Major reports cover scientific opportunities in the human exploration of space, the dichotomy between funding and effectiveness in space physics, an integrated strategy for the planetary sciences for the years 1995-2010, and Office of Naval Research (ONR) research opportunities in upper atmospheric sciences. Short reports cover utilization of the space station, life and microgravity sciences and the space station program, Space Infrared Telescope Facility and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, and the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Cassini Saturn Probe.

  17. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, John P.; Antolak, John A.; Followill, David S.; Huq, M. Saiful; Klein, Eric E.; Lam, Kwok L.; Palta, Jatinder R.; Roback, Donald M.; Reid, Mark; Khan, Faiz M.

    2014-03-15

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ′}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ′} ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  18. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, John P; Antolak, John A; Followill, David S; Huq, M Saiful; Klein, Eric E; Lam, Kwok L; Palta, Jatinder R; Roback, Donald M; Reid, Mark; Khan, Faiz M

    2014-03-01

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D'0, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D'0 = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D'0 ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of dm, with D'0 = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  19. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as 12C and 16O . All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the 12C (α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  20. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  1. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  2. The Len-Tenna"Physical Optics and Beam Former Design as Converging Disciplines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    discuss Fresnel lenses , subspace, and near field beam formers. 1. INTRODUCTION Beam-forming as applied in radar and comm.- unications...for white light. To this end in section 2 we will discuss Fresnel lenses , and show that they are a mixture of coherent and incoherent beam forming...2 FRESNEL LENSES AS BEAMFORMERS The Fresnel lens was invented in 1822, by the French physicist Joseph Fresnel [3]. Fresnel made the fundamental

  3. International Cell Exchange, 1994.

    PubMed

    Lau, M; Terasaki, P I; Park, M S

    1994-01-01

    1. We summarize typings of 40 cells for Class I antigens and 20 cultured cell lines for Class II antigens through the International Cell Exchange in 1994. Serologic Class II typings were compared with DNA typings for the same 20 cells. Two hundred eighty-one laboratories participated in the monthly Class I Serum Exchange. One hundred nineteen serology laboratories and 74 DNA laboratories reported Class II specificities on a monthly basis. 2. The average detection levels, as well as the high detection levels, were determined for 16 A-locus and 27 B-locus antigens. Mean detection rates of 95% or greater average detection were obtained for 12 A-locus and 10 B-locus antigens. Lower than 80% agreement was calculated for one A-locus antigen (A74) and 7 B-locus (B46, B48, B61, B67, B73, B75, B77) antigens. 3. We compared discrepancy rates of 10 A-locus and 7 B-locus antigens typed 3 times or more. The false-negative discrepancy rates, i.e. how often the antigen was missed, were greater for more of the B-locus specificities than for the A-locus antigens. B62, having the highest false-positive rate, tended to be overassigned. The discrepancy rates, especially the false-negative rate, for B70 were shown to decrease over a 7-year period. 4. In 1994, 8 laboratories attained records of total no misses for all analyzed antigens. Twelve laboratories had final records of only one discrepancy, and 5 laboratories had impressive perfect records (zero false negatives and false positives) for their yearly antigen reports. 5. Retyping of 12 Class I and 8 Class II reference cells showed improved detection of antigens. Results of a donor typed 4 times over 11 years demonstrated marked improvement, nearly doubling for A33, B38, and B75. Two cells first typed in 1991, then retyped in 1994, showed improved detection for Class II splits by serology and DNA typing. 6. We updated the list of sequenced Class I Exchange cells. Seven new cells were added as well as confirmatory sequence data for A

  4. Physical parameters of very small diameter 10 MV X-ray beams for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Edwin

    Physical aspects of very small diameter X-ray beams used for a linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery are presented in this thesis. A 10 MV linac was used as the radiation source. Very small 10 MV photon fields with diameters of 1.5 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm are produced by special collimators attached to the treatment head of the linac. The radiation beam data were measured with a small field diode detector as well as radiographic and radiochromic films. Measured beam parameters were compared with the same parameters calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For very small photon fields with diameters on the order of the focal spot size, MC calculations show that both the percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and dose profiles are sensitive to the focal spot size. A simple sliding slit technique was developed to measure the focal spot size and shape for accurate MC simulations of very small diameter beams. The measured focal spot of the 10 MV linac is elliptical in shape and fitted by a Gaussian distribution with full-widths-at-half-maximum (FWHMs) of 2.05 mm and 1.34 mm in the principal axes of the ellipse. A Gaussian circle equivalent in area to the experimentally determined focal spot ellipse was used in MC simulations. The resulting PDD and beam profile calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. Dynamic radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams was carried out using the 10 MV linac. Radiosurgical isodose distributions were measured with radiographic films in a spherical head phantom and calculated with the MC technique. A good agreement between the measured and MC-calculated isodose distributions for very small diameter fields is achieved. The displacement of the center of the measured isodose distributions relative to the laser-defined isocenter was on the order of 0.7 mm. All these results show the potential of linac-based radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams for clinical use.

  5. Physical properties of electron beam evaporated CdTe and CdTe:Cu thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Punitha, K.; Sivakumar, R.; Sanjeeviraja, C.; Sathe, Vasant; Ganesan, V.

    2014-12-07

    In this paper, we report on physical properties of pure and Cu doped cadmium telluride (CdTe) films deposited onto corning 7059 microscopic glass substrates by electron beam evaporation technique. X-ray diffraction study showed that all the deposited films belong to amorphous nature. The average transmittance of the films is varied between 77% and 90%. The optical energy band gap of pure CdTe film is 1.57 eV and it decreased to 1.47 eV upon 4 wt. % of Cu addition, which may be due to the extension of localized states in the band structure. The refractive index of the films was calculated using Swanepoel method. It was observed that the dispersion data obeyed the single oscillator of the Wemple-Didomenico model, from which the dispersion energy (E{sub d}) parameters, dielectric constants, plasma frequency, and oscillator energy (E{sub o}) of CdTe and CdTe:Cu films were calculated and discussed in detail with the light of possible mechanisms underlying the phenomena. The variation in intensity of photoluminescence band edge emission peak observed at 820 nm with Cu dopant is due to the change in surface state density. The observed trigonal lattice of Te peaks in the micro-Raman spectra confirms the p-type conductive nature of films, which was further corroborated by the Hall effect measurement. The lowest resistivity of 6.61 × 10{sup 4} Ω cm was obtained for the CdTe:Cu (3 wt. %) film.

  6. Quarkonium Physics at a Fixed-Target Experiment Using the LHC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lansberg, J.P.; Brodsky, S.J.; Fleuret, F.; Hadjidakis, C.; /Orsay, IPN

    2012-04-09

    We outline the many quarkonium-physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the p and Pb LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. This provides an integrated luminosity of 0.5 fb{sup -1} per year on a typical 1cm-long target. Such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. With such a high luminosity, one can analyse quarkonium production in great details in pp, pd and pA collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 115 GeV and at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 72 GeV in PbA collisions. In a typical pp (pA) run, the obtained quarkonium yields per unit of rapidity are 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than those expected at RHIC and about respectively 10 (70) times larger than for ALICE. In PbA, they are comparable. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, the large negative-x{sub F} domain can be accessed for the first time, greatly extending previous measurements by Hera-B and E866. Such analyses should help resolving the quarkonium-production controversies and clear the way for gluon PDF extraction via quarkonium studies. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter and the features of the hot and dense matter formed in PbA collisions. A polarised proton target allows the study of transverse-spin asymmetries in J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production, providing access to the gluon and charm Sivers functions.

  7. The University of Maryland Electron Ring: A Model Recirculator for Intense Beam Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, S.; Li, H.; Cui, Y.; Feldman, D.; Godlove, T.; Haber, I.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J.; Kishek, R. A.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; Walter, M.; Wilson, M.; Zou, Y.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), designed for transport studies of space-charge dominated beams in a strong focusing lattice, is nearing completion. Low energy, high intensity electron beams provide an excellent model system for experimental studies with relevance to all areas that require high quality, intense charged-particle beams. In addition, UMER constitutes an important tool for benchmarking of computer codes. When completed, the UMER lattice will consist of 36 alternating-focusing (FODO) periods over an 11.5-m circumference. Current studies in UMER over about 2/3 of the ring include beam-envelope matching, halo formation, asymmetrical focusing, and longitudinal dynamics (beam bunch erosion and wave propagation.) Near future, multi-turn operation of the ring will allow us to address important additional issues such as resonance-traversal, energy spread and others. The main diagnostics are phosphor screens and capacitive beam position monitors placed at the center of each 200 bending section. In addition, pepper-pot and slit-wire emittance meters are in operation. The range of beam currents used corresponds to space charge tune depressions from 0.2 to 0.8, which is unprecedented for a circular machine.

  8. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: A Novel Mirror for Cold Molecules with a Semi-Gaussian Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ya-Ling; Zhou, Qi; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jian-Ping

    2008-09-01

    We propose a novel mirror for cold molecules with a blue-detuned semi-Gaussian beam and study the dynamic reflection process of cold molecules by Monte Carlo simulation. Our study shows that this mirror can realize a specular reflection of cold iodine molecular beam with a temperature of 30 mK by a reflectivity of 58.2% when the semi-Gaussian laser power is 1.0kW. When a semi-Gaussian CO2 laser beam with a power of 5.8 kW is used, the reflectivity of this mirror can reach about 100%.

  9. Arizona Public Library Statistics. 1994-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library and Archives, Phoenix.

    The statistics in this document were provided by Arizona public libraries for 1994-95. The counties are grouped as follows: Apache, Cochise,and Coconino; Gila, Graham, Greenlee, and La Paz; Maricopa and Mohave; Navajo, Pima, and Pinal; and Santa Cruz, Yavapai, and Yuma. The following data is presented in table form for each of the five groups: (1)…

  10. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 1994-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indigenous Affairs, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of the eight issues of the IWGIA newsletter "Indigenous Affairs" published during 1994-95. Each issue is published in separate English and Spanish versions. The newsletter is published by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA), an organization that supports indigenous peoples in their efforts…

  11. Nonlinear physics and energetic particle transport features of the beam-plasma instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlevaro, Nakia; Falessi, Matteo V.; Montani, Giovanni; Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-10-01

    > In this paper we study transport features of a one-dimensional beam-plasma system in the presence of multiple resonances. As a model description of the general problem of a warm energetic particle beam, we assume cold supra-thermal beams and investigate the self-consistent evolution in the presence of the complete spectrum of nearly degenerate Langmuir modes. A qualitative transport estimation is obtained by computing the Lagrangian Coherent Structures of the system on given temporal scales. This leads to the splitting of the phase space into regions where the local transport processes are relatively faster. The general theoretical framework is applied to the case of the nonlinear dynamics of two cold beams, for which numerical simulation results are illustrated and analysed.

  12. High intensity X/γ photon beams for nuclear physics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, L.; Alesini, D.; Bacci, N.; Bliss, N.; Cassou, K.; Curatolo, C.; Drebot, I.; Dupraz, K.; Giribono, A.; Petrillo, V.; Palumbo, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Variola, A.; Zomer, F.

    2016-05-01

    In this manuscript we review the challenges of Compton backscattering sources in advancing photon beam performances in the 1 - 20 MeV energy range, underlining the design criteria bringing to maximum spectral luminosity and briefly describing the main achievements in conceiving and developing new devices (multi-bunch RF cavities and Laser recirculators) for the case of ELI-NP Gamma Beam System (ELI-NP-GBS).

  13. 'Programming' Electron Beam Ion Traps To Produce Atomic Data Relevant To Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Currell, Fred; O'Rourke, Brian; Kavanagh, Anthony; Li Yueming; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hirofumi

    2009-09-10

    After a brief review of the processes taking place in electron beam ions traps (EBITs), the means by which EBITs are used to make measurements of electron impact ionization cross-sections and dielectronic recombination resonance strengths are discussed. In particular, results from a study involving holmium ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap are used to illustrate a technique for studying dielectronic recombination in open-shell target ions.

  14. Time-Dependent Ion Diode Physics and Ion Beam Transport in Stabilized Plasma Channels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-31

    pro- duce cylindrical and ballistically focussed ion beams. These diodes consist of a conducting anode which is pulsed positive, typically to one half... flashover of the foil from charge-accumulation, and u.v. ionization fromi the electron pinch. NUNN" PINCHED-BEAM ION DIODE £14, Anode Foil Hollow...time history are shown, along with a biased probe measurement of the ion current pulse . For the case of a conducting 25 micron aluminum anode

  15. American Nuclear Society 1994 student conference eastern region

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report contains abstracts from the 1994 American Nuclear Society Student Conference. The areas covered by these abstracts are: fusion and plasma physics; nuclear chemistry; radiation detection; reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; and corrosion science and waste issues.

  16. Effect of concentration of polyfunctional monomers on physical properties of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber under electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tariq; Ahmed, Shamshad; Ahmed, Munir; Yoshii, Fumio

    2005-06-01

    An investigation has been undertaken to find out the effect of concentration of different polyfunctional monomers (PFMs) on the physical properties of the acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) crosslinked by electron beam (EB). The PFMs used were diethylene glycol dimethacrylate, trimethylol propane trimethacrylate and trimethylol propane triacrylate. The physical properties of EB-irradiated NBR sheets were evaluated by measuring the tensile strength, elongation percent at break, hardness and gel fraction. The results showed a remarkable increase in tensile strength, hardness and gel fraction as the concentration of PFMs was increased from 1 part per hundred (phr) to 5 phr in the NBR samples whereas elongation percent decreased in a steady manner. The improvement in physical properties of radiation crosslinked NBR in the presence of PFMs may be attributed to its increased crosslinking density as observed by the corresponding increase in gel content.

  17. 10 CFR 95.33 - Security education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security education. 95.33 Section 95.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.33 Security education. All cleared employees must...

  18. 10 CFR 95.33 - Security education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Security education. 95.33 Section 95.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.33 Security education. All cleared employees must...

  19. 10 CFR 95.33 - Security education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Security education. 95.33 Section 95.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.33 Security education. All cleared employees must...

  20. 10 CFR 95.33 - Security education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Security education. 95.33 Section 95.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.33 Security education. All cleared employees must...

  1. Applications of beam-plasma systems: New innovative training programme in Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Michael; Neverov, Ruslan; Vin, Aung Tun

    2012-09-01

    New training programme developed in Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology for Russian and foreign students is presented. The programme is intended to master degree applicants in the field of the aerospace and industrial technologies and represents the achievements in the electron-beam plasma systems development. The programme is based on the system approach to the beam-plasma systems and on the life-circle support of these systems including development, operation and maintenance during customer-use period. Two examples of the research projects that students carry out at the final stages of the programme are described in detail. They are plasmachemical techniques of bioactive materials production and ground tests of various satellite on-board sensors.

  2. Physical, chemical, and biological data for detailed study of irrigation drainage in the San Juan River area, New Mexico, 1993-94, with supplemental data, 1991-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.L.; Lusk, J.D.; Bristol, R.S.; Wilson, R.M.; Shineman, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    In response to increasing concern about the quality of irrigation drainage and its potential effects on fish, wildlife, and human health, the U.S. Department of the Interior formed an interbureau task group to prepare a plan for investigating water- quality problems on irrigation projects sponsored by the Department of the Interior. The San Juan River area in northwestern New Mexico was one of the areas designated for study. Investigators collected water, bottom-sediment, soil, and biological samples at more than 50 sites in the San Juan River area during 1993-94. Sample sites included (1) sites located within Department of the Interior irrigation project service areas, or areas that receive drainage from irrigation projects; (2) reference sites for comparison with irrigation project sites; and (3) sites located within the reach of the San Juan River from Navajo Dam to 10 miles downstream from the dam. The types of habitat sampled included the main stem of the San Juan River, backwater areas adjacent to the San Juan River, tributaries to the San Juan River, ponds, seeps, irrigation-delivery canals, irrigation-drainage canals, a stock tank, and shallow ground water. The types of media sampled included water, bottom sediment, soil, aquatic plants, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, and fish. Semipermeable-membrane devices were used as a surrogate medium to sample both air and water in some instances. Sample measurements included concentrations of major ions, trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon compounds, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. This report presents tables of physical, chemical, and biological data collected for the U.S. Department of the Interior National Irrigation Water-Quality Program. Additionally, supplemental physical, chemical, and biological data collected in association with the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project are presented.

  3. [Endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (95 cases)].

    PubMed

    el Khoury, J; Rouvier, P

    1992-01-01

    A series of 95 intranasal dacryocystorhinostomies for ophthalmologic problems were performed. The operative technique as well as the results are discussed. Success rate is about 95.8%, of which 82.1% with immediate results. Even if the results of both intranasal and external approaches are equivalent, the intranasal one presents a little advantage. No intraoperative complications are observed.

  4. High Energy Density Physics Research Using Intense Heavy Ion Beam at FAIR: The HEDgeHOB Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.; Deutsch, C.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-03-01

    International project, Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR), has entered in its construction phase at Darmstadt. It is expected that the new powerful heavy ion synchrotron, SIS100 will deliver a strongly bunched intense beam of energetic uranium ions that will provide the scientists with an efficient and novel tool to research High Energy Density (HED) Physics in the laboratory. Over the past 15 years, substantial theoretical work has been done to design numerous experiments that can be done at this facility in this field. This work has resulted in an extensive scientific proposal named HEDgeHOB, that includes experiment proposals addressing various aspects of HED matter, for example, planetary physics, equation of state, hydrodynamic instabilities and others. In this paper we present a summary of this work.

  5. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  6. ``Accelerators and Beams,'' multimedia computer-based training in accelerator physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbar, R. R.; Browman, A. A.; Mead, W. C.; Williams, R. A.

    1999-06-01

    We are developing a set of computer-based tutorials on accelerators and charged-particle beams under an SBIR grant from the DOE. These self-paced, interactive tutorials, available for Macintosh and Windows platforms, use multimedia techniques to enhance the user's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. They integrate interactive "On-Screen Laboratories," hypertext, line drawings, photographs, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. They target a broad audience, from undergraduates or technicians to professionals. Presently, three modules have been published (Vectors, Forces, and Motion), a fourth (Dipole Magnets) has been submitted for review, and three more exist in prototype form (Quadrupoles, Matrix Transport, and Properties of Charged-Particle Beams). Participants in the poster session will have the opportunity to try out these modules on a laptop computer.

  7. 1000 MeV Proton beam therapy facility at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute Synchrocyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimov, N. K.; Gavrikov, Yu A.; Ivanov, E. M.; Karlin, D. L.; Khanzadeev, A. V.; Yalynych, N. N.; Riabov, G. A.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Vinogradov, V. M.

    2006-05-01

    Since 1975 proton beam of PNPI synchrocyclotron with fixed energy of 1000 MeV is used for the stereotaxic proton therapy of different head brain diseases. 1300 patients have been treated during this time. The advantage of high energy beam (1000 MeV) is low scattering of protons in the irradiated tissue. This factor allows to form the dose field with high edge gradients (20%/mm) that is especially important for the irradiation of the intra-cranium targets placed in immediate proximity to the life critical parts of the brain. Fixation of the 6 0mm diameter proton beam at the isodose centre with accuracy of ±1.0 mm, two-dimensional rotation technique of the irradiation provide a very high ratio of the dose in the irradiation zone to the dose at the object's surface equal to 200:1. The absorbed doses are: 120-150 Gy for normal hypophysis, 100-120 Gy for pituitary adenomas and 40-70 Gy for arterio-venous malformation at the rate of absorbed dose up to 50 Gy/min. In the paper the dynamics and the efficiency of 1000 MeV proton therapy treatment of the brain deceases are given. At present time the feasibility study is in progress with the goal to create a proton therapy on Bragg peak by means of the moderation of 1000 MeV proton beam in the absorber down to 200 MeV, energy required for radiotherapy of deep seated tumors.

  8. BEAM-ish: A Graphical User Interface for the Physical Characterization of Macromolecular Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, Jeff; Snell, Edward H.; Pokross, Matthew; Arvai, Andrew S.; Nielsen, Chris; Nguyen, Xuong; Bellamy, Henry D; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Crystal mosaicity is determined from the measurement of the reflection angular width and can be used as an indicator of crystal perfection. A new method has been developed that combines the use of unfocused synchrotron radiation, super-fine phi slicing and a CCD area detector to simultaneously measure the mosaicity of hundreds of reflections . The X-ray beam characteristics and Lorentz correction are deconvoluted from the resulting reflection widths to calculate the true crystal mosaicity.

  9. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  10. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H. Y. Zhang, J. J.; Jin, Q. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Liu, W.; Wang, G. C.

    2016-02-15

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 10{sup 13} W cm{sup −2} in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications.

  11. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited).

    PubMed

    Zhao, H Y; Zhang, J J; Jin, Q Y; Liu, W; Wang, G C; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2016-02-01

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 10(13) W cm(-2) in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications.

  12. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Jin, Q. Y.; Liu, W.; Wang, G. C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 1013 W cm-2 in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications.

  13. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Rowe, R.M.; Anast, K.R.; Jha, M.C.

    1994-05-06

    This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effectve replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States as well as for advanced combustars currently under development. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals fbr clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 51-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress, made during the 6th quarter of the project from January 1 to March 31, 1994. The project has three major objectives: (1) The primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel for premium fuel applications. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. (2) A secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term application of these advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines and converting this to marketable products in current market economics. (3) A third objective is to determine the removal of toxic trace elements from coal by advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies.

  14. Core descriptions, core photographs, physical property logs and surface textural data of sediment cores recovered from the continental shelf of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary during the research cruises M-1-95-MB, P-2-95-MB, and P-1-97-MB

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orzech, Kevin M.; Dahl, Wendy E.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2001-01-01

    In response to the 1992 creation of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS), the United States Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a multiyear investigation of the Sanctuary continental margin. As part of the investigative effort, this report summarizes the shipboard procedures, subsequent laboratory analyses, and data results from three seafloor sampling cruises conducted on the continental shelf between Monterey peninsula, CA and San Francisco, CA. The cruises were conducted in 1995 aboard the NOAA Ship McArthur (M-1-95-MB) and in 1995 and 1997 aboard the R/V Point Sur (P-2-95-MB and P-1-97-MB). Scientists and representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), and the San Jose State University Moss Landing Marine Laboratory (SJSU-MLML) supported the research effort. In this report we present sediment descriptions, sediment textural data, physical property logs, station metadata, and photographs of subcores from a total of three hundred and eighty four sample stations. At these sites either a box corer, MultiCore™r, grab sampler or a combination of these sampling devices were used to collect the sea floor sediments. The report is presented in an interactive web-based format with each mapped core station linked to the corresponding description and photo, and to a spreadsheet of surface texture and other sampling data.

  15. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, John P.; Antolak, John A.; Followill, David S.; Huq, M. Saiful; Klein, Eric E.; Lam, Kwok L.; Palta, Jatinder R.; Roback, Donald M.; Reid, Mark; Khan, Faiz M.

    2014-01-01

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$D_0^\\prime $\\end{document}D0′, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$D_0^\\prime $\\end{document}D0′ = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$D_0^\\prime $\\end{document}D0′ ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of dm, with

  16. Stem Cell Physics. Multiple-Laser-Beam Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V.

    2013-03-01

    A novel method for the treatment of Parkinson's disease is proposed. Pluripotent stem cells are laser cultured, using ultrashort wavelength, (around 0.1 micron-ultraviolet radiation-with intensities of a few mW/cm2) , multiple laser beams.[2] The multiple-energy laser photons[3] interact with the neuron DNA molecules to be cloned. The laser created dopaminergic substantia nigra neurons can be, (theoretically), laser transplanted, (a higher focusing precision as compared to a syringe method), into the striatum or substantia nigra regions of the brain, or both. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  17. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  18. Structural and growth aspects of electron beam physical vapor deposited NiO-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Kuanr, Sushil Kumar; K, Suresh Babu

    2016-03-15

    Deposition of composite materials as thin film by electron beam physical vapor deposition technique (EB-PVD) still remains as a challenge. Here, the authors report the deposition of NiO-CeO{sub 2} (30/70 wt. %) composites on quartz substrate by EB-PVD. Two NiO-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite targets—one as green compact and the other after sintering at 1250 °C—were used for the deposition. Though the targets varied with respect to physical properties such as crystallite size (11–45 nm) and relative density (44% and 96%), the resultant thin films exhibited a mean crystallite size in the range of 20–25 nm underlining the role of physical nature of deposition. In spite of the crystalline nature of the targets and similar elemental concentration, a transformation from amorphous to crystalline structure was observed in thin films on using sintered target. Postannealing of the as deposited film at 800 °C resulted in a polycrystalline structure consisting of CeO{sub 2} and NiO. Deposition using pure CeO{sub 2} or NiO as target resulted in the preferential orientation toward (111) and (200) planes, respectively, showing the influence of adatoms on the evaporation and growth process of NiO-CeO{sub 2} composite. The results demonstrate the influence of electron beam gun power on the adatom energy for the growth process of composite oxide thin films.

  19. The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raja et al.

    2001-08-08

    The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

  20. Physical properties of nitrogenated amorphous carbon films produced by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francois; Andre, Bernard; Veen, A. Van; Mijnarends, P. E.; Schut, H.; Labohm, F.; Delplancke, Marie Paule; Dunlop, Hugh; Anger, Eric

    1994-12-01

    Carbon films with up to 32 at.% N (a-C:N) have been prepared using an ion-beam-assisted magnetron, with an N2(+) beam at energies between 50 and 300 eV. The composition and density of the films vary strongly with the deposition parameters. Electron energy loss spectroscopy shows that these a-C:N films are mostly graphitic with up to 20% C Sp3 bonding. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and neutron depth profiling show that the density goes through a maximum as the average deposited energy per unit depth increases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that nitrogen is mostly combined with carbon in triple (C(triple bond)N and double (C=N) bonds. Positron annihilation spectroscopy shows that the void concentration in the films goes through a minimum with deposited energy. These results are consistent with a densification induced by the collisions at low deposited energy, and damage-induced graphitization at high deposited energy values.

  1. Physics Impact of Improvements to the Beam Timing Resolution at MicroBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, Tia; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The MicroBooNE detector is a liquid argon time-projection chamber (89 tons active mass) at Fermilab designed to measure interactions of neutrinos from the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB) and the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline. During the first year of data-taking, the arrival time of the neutrinos was only understood with an accuracy of 100 ns for the BNB, and was unverified for NuMI. A set of upgrades has been implemented that will reduce the uncertainty in beam delivery time by two orders of magnitude, significantly improving our ability to observe neutral-current elastic interactions in the BNB, and kaon decays at rest using NuMI. This talk explains the improvements in neutrino arrival timing, their impact on these two analyses, and the overall benefit to all other MicroBooNE measurements. DOE Office of Science.

  2. LLE 1994 annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This is the 1994 annual report for the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The report is presented as a series of research type reports. The titles emphasize the breadth of work carried out. They are: stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts; characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry; transport and sound waves in plasmas with light and heavy ions; three-halves-harmonic radiation from long-scale-length plasmas revisited; OMEGA upgrade status report; target imaging and backlighting diagnosis; effect of electron collisions on ion-acoustic waves and heat flow; particle-in-cell code simulations of the interaction of gaussian ultrashort laser pulses with targets of varying initial scale lengths; characterization of thick cryogenic fuel layers: compensation for the lens effect using convergent beam interferometry; compact, multijoule-output, Nd:Glass, large-aperture ring amplifier; atomic force microscopy observation of water-induced morphological changes in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} monolayer coatings; observation of longitudinal acceleration of electrons born in a high-intensity laser focus; spatial intensity nonuniformities of an OMEGA beam due to nonlinear beam propagation; calculated X-ray backlighting images of mixed imploded targets; evaluation of cosmic rays for use in the monitoring of the MEDUSA scintillator-photomultiplier diagnostic array; highly efficient second-harmonic generation of ultra-intense Nd:Glass laser pulses multiple cutoff wave numbers of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability; ultrafast, all-silicon light modulator; angular dependence of the stimulated Brillouin scattering in homogeneous plasma; femtosecond excited-state dynamics of a conjugated ladder polymer.

  3. R&D ERL: Beam dynamics, parameters, and physics to be learned

    SciTech Connect

    Kayran, D.

    2010-02-01

    The R&D ERL facility at BNL aims to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The ERL is being installed in one of the spacious bays in Bldg. 912 of the RHIC/AGS complex (Fig. 1). The bay is equipped with an overhead crane. The facility has a control room, two service rooms and a shielded ERL cave. The control room is located outside of the bay in a separate building. The single story house is used for a high voltage power supply for 1 MW klystron. The two-story unit houses a laser room, the CW 1 MW klystron with its accessories, most of the power supplies and electronics. The ERL R&D program has been started by the Collider Accelerator Department (C-AD) at BNL as an important stepping-stone for 10-fold increase of the luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) using relativistic electron cooling of gold ion beams with energy of 100 GeV per nucleon. Furthermore, the ERL R&D program extends toward a possibility of using 10-20 GeV ERL for future electron-hadron/heavy ion collider, MeRHIC/eRHIC. These projects are the driving force behind the development of ampere-class ERL technology, which will find many applications including light sources and FELs. The intensive R&D program geared towards the construction of the prototype ERL is under way: from development of high efficiency photo-cathodes to the development of new merging system compatible with emittance compensation.

  4. 1994 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  5. Water-quality and physical characteristics of streams in the Treyburn development area of Falls Lake watershed, North Carolina, 1994-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oblinger, C.J.; Cuffney, T.F.; Meador, M.R.; Garrett, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Treyburn is a 5,400-acre planned, mixed-use development in the upper Neuse River Basin of North Carolina. The development, which began in 1986, is located in the Falls Lake watershed near three water-supply reservoirs-Lake Michie to the north, Falls Lake to the southeast, and Little River Reservoir to the west. A study began in 1988 to determine the water-quality characteristics of surface waters in and around the Treyburn development area. Data to characterize water quality at five different sites were collected from July 1994 through September 1998. Data from a previous study are available for some sites for the period 1988-93. The sites were selected to characterize water quality and quantity in and near the Treyburn development and included an undeveloped basin, a relatively small basin containing single-family residences and a golf course, a basin downstream from the western part of the development with some industrial land use, and two basins unaffected by the development where agricultural land is being converted to urban and forested land use. Suspended-sediment concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 581 milligrams per liter and were fairly uniform among the five sites. Median suspended-sediment concentrations ranged from 12 to 21 milligrams per liter. Few concentrations of metals and trace elements, except aluminum, iron, and manganese, exceeded the laboratory reporting levels or water-quality criteria. At one site, concentrations of silver exceeded both the action level and the reporting level; copper was detected at each site and exceeded the action level of 7 micrograms per liter at one site. The lowest range and median concentrations of total organic nitrogen, nitrate, ammonia, total phosphorus, and orthophosphorus occurred in the relatively undisturbed, forested site. The maximum concentration of organic nitrogen (1.97 milligrams per liter) occurred at one of the sites unaffected by the Treyburn development where agricultural land is being

  6. 10 CFR 95.33 - Security education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.33 Security education. All cleared employees must be... security briefing that includes the following topics: (1) A Threat Awareness Briefing. (2) A...

  7. Reaching the Neglected 95%

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoSchiavo, Frank M.; Shatz, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Comments on an article by J. J. Arnett regarding the assertion that American psychology focuses too narrowly on Americans while neglecting the other 95% of the world's population. The authors' comments focus on why American psychologists have become overreliant on American samples, and they provide alternative suggestions for broadening the scope…

  8. [Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22 using Pace electrophoresis and large fragment cloning]. Annual report, October 1, 1991--July 1, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.I.

    1994-12-31

    In the past two years, the authors have made a great deal of progress in establishing Fosmid and BAC libraries and in using large BAC libraries for gene mapping. In addition, they initiated work on the application of BAC clones to long range genome sequencing. They continue to increase the ability to rapidly generate large BAC libraries and to efficiently apply these libraries to genome mapping. The BACs provide a very effective means of developing physical maps. The current work suggests that BAC contigs will be extremely useful as source material for genome sequencing.

  9. Spin physics experiments at NICA-SPD with polarized proton and deuteron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I.; Efremov, A.; Pshekhonov, D.; Kovalenko, A.; Teryaev, O.; Shevchenko, O.; Nagajcev, A.; Guskov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Toplilin, N.

    2016-08-01

    This is a brief description of suggested measurements of asymmetries of the Drell-Yan (DY) pair production in collisions of non-polarized, longitudinally and transversally polarized protons and deuterons which provide an access to all leading-twist collinear and TMD PDFs of quarks and anti-quarks in nucleons. Other spin effects in hadronic and heavy-ion collisions may be also studied constituing the spin physics program at NICA.

  10. Notes on Linguistics, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, David, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This document contains the 1994 edition of a publication designed to share information in the field of linguistics that is of practical, theoretical, administrative, or general interest. Articles in these issues include: "Ethnography Vs. Questionnaire" (Thomas E. Murray); "Differences: A Diary Entry"--concerning structuralism…

  11. Trustee Quarterly, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trustee Quarterly, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The four issues of "Trustee Quarterly" combined here focus on topics of current concern to community college trustees. The winter 1994 issues offers these feature articles: "Honoring Retiring Presidents," by Terry O'Banion; "Trustees as Reluctant Leaders: The Board/CEO Relationship," Norma Jean Germond, John Keyser, and Vaughn A. Sherman; and…

  12. English Leadership Quarterly, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, James, Ed.; Kiernan, Henry, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    These 4 issues of the English Leadership Quarterly comprise volume 16, published during 1994. Articles in number 1 deal with practical advice, and include: "The Law of Privacy and the Writing Teacher" (Ben T. Allen); Beware of Teachers Who Laminate Their Lesson Plans and Other Useful Suggestions about Teaching" (Robert Perrin);…

  13. Visual Arts Research, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Nancy C., Ed.; Thompson, Christine, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the journal "Visual Arts in Research" published in 1994. This journal focuses on the theory and practice of visual arts education from educational, historical, philosophical, and psychological perspectives. Number 1 of this volume includes the following contributions: (1) "Zooming in on the Qualitative…

  14. Annual Review 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard Van Leer Foundation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The report provides an annual report and financial review for 1994 of the Bernard van Leer Foundation, a private institution that was created for broad humanitarian purposes in 1949, and shows the varied aspects of the foundation's activities in the project field. In addition, it includes a number of feature articles which highlight specific…

  15. Interaction, 1994-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interaction, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This Canadaian document, in French and English language versions, is a compilation of quarterly journal issues for Spring, Summer, and Fall of 1994, and Winter, 1995 (i.e., all of volume 8). Each issue is divided into four sections: Opinions, Practice, Focus, and News. The effective management of various child care concerns, and children's play…

  16. Tech Prep Newsletter, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Jim, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This document consists of the 36 issues of a newsletter issued during 1994. Each issue is devoted to a specific topic pertinent to Tech Prep. Tech Prep is a federally funded effort, including mathematics, sciences, and language arts, that aims to prepare students for a lifetime of learning and career advancement. The Northwest Tech Prep Consortium…

  17. Mechanism of spallation in platinum aluminide/electron beam physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gell, M.; Vaidyanathan, K.; Barber, B.; Cheng, J.; Jordan, E.

    1999-02-01

    The spallation failure of a commercial thermal barrier coating (TBC), consisting of a single-crystal RENE N5 superalloy, a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) bond coat, and an electron beam-deposited 7 wt pct yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic layer (7YSZ), was studied following cyclic furnace testing. In the uncycled state and prior to deposition of the ceramic, the Pt-Al bond-coat surface contains a cellular network of ridges corresponding to the underlying bond-coat grain-boundary structure. With thermal cycling, the ridges and associated grain boundaries are the sites of preferential oxidation and cracking, which results in the formation of cavities that are partially filled with oxide. Using a fluorescent penetrant dye in conjunction with a direct-pull test, it is shown that, when specimens are cycled to about 80 pct of life, these grain-boundary regions show extensive debonding. The roles of oxidation and cyclic stress in localized grain boundary region spallation are discussed. The additional factors leading to large-scale TBC spallation are described.

  18. Multiscale Approach to the Physics of Ion-Beam Therapy:. Thermo-Mechanical Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'yov, A. V.; Yakubovich, A. V.; Surdutovich, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the multiscale approach towards the understanding of processes responsible for the radiation damage caused by energetic ions. This knowledge is important because it can be utilized in the ion-beam cancer therapy, which is one of the most advanced modern techniques to cure certain types of cancer. The central element of the multiscale approach is the theoretical evaluation and quantification of DNA damage within cell environment. We consider different pathways of DNA damage and focus on the the illustration of the thermo-mechanical effects caused by the propagation of ions through the biological environment and in particular on the possibility of the creation of the shock waves in the vicinity of the ion tracks. We demonstrate that at the initial stages after ion's passage the shock wave is so strong that it can contribute to the DNA damage due to large pressure gradients developed at the distances of a few nanometers from the ionic tracks. This novel mechanism of the DNA damage provides an important contribution to the cumulative bio-damage caused by low-energy secondary electrons, holes and free radicals.

  19. Physical processes in directed ion beam sputtering. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    The general operation of a discharge chamber for the production of ions is described. A model is presented for the magnetic containment of both primary and secondary or Maxwellian electrons in the discharge plasma. Cross sections were calculated for energy and momentum transfer in binary collisions between like pairs of Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms in the energy range from about 1 eV to 1000 eV. These calculations were made from available pair interaction potentials using a classical model. Experimental data from the literature were fit to a theoretical expression for the Ar resonance charge exchange cross section over the same energy range. A model was developed that describes the processes of conical texturing of a surface due to simultaneous directed ion beam etching and sputter deposition of an impurity material. This model accurately predicts both a minimum temperature for texturing to take place and the variation of cone density with temperature. It also provides the correct order of magnitude of cone separation. It was predicted from the model, and subsequently verified experimentally, that a high sputter yield material could serve as a seed for coning of a lower sputter yield substrate. Seeding geometries and seed deposition rates were studied to obtain an important input to the theoretical texturing model.

  20. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams: Working Group C Summary on Applications to FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2003-03-19

    This is the summary of the activities in working group C, ''Application to FELs,'' which was based in the Bithia room at the Joint ICFA Advanced Accelerator and Beam Dynamics Workshop on July 1-6, 2002 in Chia Laguna, Sardinia, Italy. Working group C was small in relation to the other working groups at that workshop. Attendees include Enrica Chiadroni, University of Rome ape with an identical pulse length. ''La Sapienza'', Luca Giannessi, ENEA, Steve Lidia, LBNL, Vladimir Litvinenko, Duke University, Patrick Muggli, UCLA, Alex Murokh, UCLA, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn, SLAC, Sven Reiche, UCLA, Jamie Rosenzweig, UCLA, Claudio Pellegrini, UCLA, Susan Smith, Daresbury Laboratory, Matthew Thompson, UCLA, Alexander Varfolomeev, Russian Research Center, plus a small number of occasional visitors. The working group addressed a total of nine topics. Each topic was introduced by a presentation, which initiated a discussion of the topic during and after the presentation. The speaker of the introductory presentation facilitated the discussion. There were six topics that were treated in stand-alone sessions of working group C. In addition, there were two joint sessions, one with working group B, which included one topic, and one with working group C, which included two topics. The presentations that were given in the joint sessions are summarized in the working group summary reports for groups B and D, respectively. This summary will only discuss the topics that were addressed in the stand-alone sessions, including Start-To-End Simulations, SASE Experiment, PERSEO, ''Optics Free'' FEL Oscillators, and VISA II.

  1. STS-95 Mission Insignia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-95 patch, designed by the crew, is intended to reflect the scientific, engineering, and historic elements of the mission. The Space Shuttle Discovery is shown rising over the sunlit Earth limb, representing the global benefits of the mission science and the solar science objectives of the Spartan Satellite. The bold number '7' signifies the seven members of Discovery's crew and also represents a historical link to the original seven Mercury astronauts. The STS-95 crew member John Glenn's first orbital flight is represented by the Friendship 7 capsule. The rocket plumes symbolize the three major fields of science represented by the mission payloads: microgravity material science, medical research for humans on Earth and in space, and astronomy.

  2. Ear Deformations Give Bats a Physical Mechanism for Fast Adaptation of Ultrasonic Beam Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Balakrishnan, Sreenath; He, Weikai; Yan, Zhen; Müller, Rolf

    2011-11-01

    A large number of mammals, including humans, have intricate outer ear shapes that diffract incoming sound in a direction- and frequency-specific manner. Through this physical process, the outer ear shapes encode sound-source information into the sensory signals from each ear. Our results show that horseshoe bats could dynamically control these diffraction processes through fast nonrigid ear deformations. The bats’ ear shapes can alter between extreme configurations in about 100 ms and thereby change their acoustic properties in ways that would suit different acoustic sensing tasks.

  3. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yorita, T. Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  4. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  5. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  6. Comment on the Word 'Cooling' as it is Used in Beam Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2005-09-10

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

  7. In-beam quality assurance using induced β+ activity in hadrontherapy: a preliminary physical requirements study using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestand, L.; Montarou, G.; Force, P.; Pauna, N.

    2012-10-01

    Light and heavy ions particle therapy, mainly by means of protons and carbon ions, represents an advantageous treatment modality for deep-seated and/or radioresistant tumours. An in-beam quality assurance principle is based on the detection of secondary particles induced by nuclear fragmentations between projectile and target nuclei. Three different strategies are currently under investigation: prompt γ rays imaging, proton interaction vertex imaging and in-beam positron emission tomography. Geant4 simulations have been performed first in order to assess the accuracy of some hadronic models to reproduce experimental data. Two different kinds of data have been considered: β+-emitting isotopes and prompt γ-ray production rates. On the one hand simulations reproduce experimental β+ emitting isotopes production rates to an accuracy of 24%. Moreover simulated β+ emitting nuclei production rate as a function of depth reproduce well the peak-to-plateau ratio of experimental data. On the other hand by tuning the tolerance factor of the photon evaporation model available in Geant4, we reduce significantly prompt γ-ray production rates until a very good agreement is reached with experimental data. Then we have estimated the total amount of induced annihilation photons and prompt γ rays for a simple treatment plan of ∼1 physical Gy in a homogenous equivalent soft tissue tumour (6 cm depth, 4 cm radius and 2 cm wide). The average annihilation photons emitted during a 45 s irradiation in a 4 π solid angle are ∼2 × 106 annihilation photon pairs and 108 single prompt γ whose energy ranges from a few keV to 10 MeV.

  8. In-beam quality assurance using induced β(+) activity in hadrontherapy: a preliminary physical requirements study using Geant4.

    PubMed

    Lestand, L; Montarou, G; Force, P; Pauna, N

    2012-10-21

    Light and heavy ions particle therapy, mainly by means of protons and carbon ions, represents an advantageous treatment modality for deep-seated and/or radioresistant tumours. An in-beam quality assurance principle is based on the detection of secondary particles induced by nuclear fragmentations between projectile and target nuclei. Three different strategies are currently under investigation: prompt γ rays imaging, proton interaction vertex imaging and in-beam positron emission tomography. Geant4 simulations have been performed first in order to assess the accuracy of some hadronic models to reproduce experimental data. Two different kinds of data have been considered: β(+)-emitting isotopes and prompt γ-ray production rates. On the one hand simulations reproduce experimental β(+) emitting isotopes production rates to an accuracy of 24%. Moreover simulated β(+) emitting nuclei production rate as a function of depth reproduce well the peak-to-plateau ratio of experimental data. On the other hand by tuning the tolerance factor of the photon evaporation model available in Geant4, we reduce significantly prompt γ-ray production rates until a very good agreement is reached with experimental data. Then we have estimated the total amount of induced annihilation photons and prompt γ rays for a simple treatment plan of ∼1 physical Gy in a homogenous equivalent soft tissue tumour (6 cm depth, 4 cm radius and 2 cm wide). The average annihilation photons emitted during a 45 s irradiation in a 4 π solid angle are ∼2 × 10(6) annihilation photon pairs and 10(8) single prompt γ whose energy ranges from a few keV to 10 MeV.

  9. Annual energy review 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-07-01

    This 13th edition presents the Energy Information Administration's historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1994; thus, this report is well-suited to long-term trend analyses. It covers all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels and electricity. Statistics on renewable energy sources are also included: this year, for the first time, usage of renewables by other consumers as well as by electric utilities is included. Also new is a two-part, comprehensive presentation of data on petroleum products supplied by sector for 1949 through 1994. Data from electric utilities and nonutilities are integrated as 'electric power industry' data; nonutility power gross generation are presented for the first time. One section presents international statistics (for more detail see EIA's International Energy Annual).

  10. Annual energy review 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This 13th edition presents the Energy Information Administration`s historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1994; thus, this report is well-suited to long-term trend analyses. It covers all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels and electricity. Statistics on renewable energy sources are also included: this year, for the first time, usage of renewables by other consumers as well as by electric utilities is included. Also new is a two-part, comprehensive presentation of data on petroleum products supplied by sector for 1949 through 1994. Data from electric utilities and nonutilities are integrated as ``electric power industry`` data; nonutility power gross generation are presented for the first time. One section presents international statistics (for more detail see EIA`s International Energy Annual).

  11. Systematic analysis of biological and physical limitations of proton beam range verification with offline PET/CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, A.; Parodi, K.; Bortfeld, T.; Shih, H. A.; Paganetti, H.

    2009-07-01

    The clinical use of offline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans for proton range verification is currently under investigation at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Validation is achieved by comparing measured activity distributions, acquired in patients after receiving one fraction of proton irradiation, with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulated distributions. Deviations between measured and simulated activity distributions can either reflect errors during the treatment chain from planning to delivery or they can be caused by various inherent challenges of the offline PET/CT verification method. We performed a systematic analysis to assess the impact of the following aspects on the feasibility and accuracy of the offline PET/CT method: (1) biological washout processes, (2) patient motion, (3) Hounsfield unit (HU) based tissue classification for the simulation of the activity distributions and (4) tumor site specific aspects. It was found that the spatial reproducibility of the measured activity distributions is within 1 mm. However, the feasibility of range verification is restricted to a limited amount of positions and tumor sites. Washout effects introduce discrepancies between the measured and simulated ranges of about 4 mm at positions where the proton beam stops in soft tissue. Motion causes spatial deviations of up to 3 cm between measured and simulated activity distributions in abdominopelvic tumor cases. In these later cases, the MC simulated activity distributions were found to be limited to about 35% accuracy in absolute values and about 2 mm in spatial accuracy depending on the correlativity of HU into the physical and biological parameters of the irradiated tissue. Besides, for further specific tumor locations, the beam arrangement, the limited accuracy of rigid co-registration and organ movements can prevent the success of PET/CT range verification. All the addressed factors explain why the proton beam range can

  12. Editorial: AJP's 1994 Referees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemons, Don S.; Romer, Robert H.

    1995-06-01

    Once again, on behalf of all of our authors and readers, we want to express our gratitude to AJP's reviewers. During the calendar year 1994, the 592 reviewers listed below contributed one or more (in some cases, many more) referee reports on manuscripts submitted to this Journal. We all owe an enormous debt to their expertise and dedication. Don S. Lemons, Assistant Editor Robert H. Romer, Editor

  13. Assessment of computerized treatment planning system accuracy in calculating wedge factors of physical wedged fields for 6 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Wazir; Maqbool, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Hussain, Amjad; Tahir, Sajjad; Matiullah; Rooh, Gul; Ahmad, Tanveer; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-07-01

    Wedge filters are commonly used in external beam radiotherapy to achieve a uniform dose distribution within the target volume. The main objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the beam modifier algorithm of Theraplan plus (TPP version 3.8) treatment planning system and to confirm that either the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and wedged cross-sectional data or not. In this regard the effect of beam hardening and beam softening was studied with physical wedges for 6 MV photons. The Normalized Wedge Factors (NWFs) were measured experimentally as well as calculated with the Theraplan plus, as a function of depth and field size in a water phantom for 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° wedge filters. The beam hardening and softening was determined experimentally by deriving the required coefficients for all wedge angles. The TPP version 3.8 requires wedge transmission factor at single depth and multiple field sizes. Without incorporating the hardening and softening coefficients the percent difference between measured and calculated NFWs was as high as 7%. After the introduction of these parameters into the algorithm, the agreement between measured and TPP (V 3.8) calculated NWFs were improved to within 2 percent for various depths. Similar improvement was observed in TPP version 3.8 while calculating NWFs for various field sizes when the required coefficients were adjusted. In conclusion, the dose calculation algorithm of TPP version 3.8 showed good accuracy for a 6 MV photon beam provided beam hardening and softening parameters are taken into account. From the results, it is also concluded that, the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and

  14. Test beams and polarized fixed target beams at the NLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lewis; Pitthan, Rainer; Rokni, Sayed; Thompson, Kathleen; Kolomensky, Yury

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics running. A list of physics topics is given; one topic (Mo/ller Scattering) is treated in more depth.

  15. Test Beams and Polarized Fixed Target Beams at the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Pitthan, Rainer

    2001-01-17

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics running. A list of physics topics is given; one topic (Moeller Scattering) is treated in more depth.

  16. Impact of annealing on physical properties of e-beam evaporated polycrystalline CdO thin films for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Anuradha; Chander, S.; Dhaka, M. S.

    2017-04-01

    An impact of annealing on the physical properties of polycrystalline CdO thin films is carried out in this study. CdO thin films of thickness 650 nm were fabricated on glass and indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates employing e-beam evaporation technique. The pristine thin films were annealed in air atmosphere at 250 °C, 400 °C and 550 °C for one hour followed by investigation of structural, optical, electrical and morphological properties along with elemental composition using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, source meter, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. XRD patterns confirmed the polycrystalline nature and cubic structure (with space group Fm 3 bar m) of the films. The crystallographic parameters are calculated and found to be influenced by the post-air annealing treatment. The optical study shows that direct band gap is ranging from 1.98 eV to 2.18 eV and found to be decreased with post-annealing. The refractive index and optical conductivity are also increased with annealing temperature. The current-voltage characteristics show ohmic behaviour of the annealed films. The surface morphology is observed to be improved with annealing and grain-size is increased as well as EDS spectrum confirmed the presence of cadmium (Cd) and oxygen (O) in the deposited films.

  17. Beam dynamics group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper summarizes the activities of the beam dynamics working group of the LHC Collective Effects Workshop that was held in Montreux in 1994. It reviews the presentations that were made to the group, the discussions that ensued, and the consensuses that evolved.

  18. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  19. A novel algorithm for the calculation of physical and biological irradiation quantities in scanned ion beam therapy: the beamlet superposition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, G.; Attili, A.; Battistoni, G.; Bertrand, D.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cappucci, F.; Ciocca, M.; Mairani, A.; Milian, F. M.; Molinelli, S.; Morone, M. C.; Muraro, S.; Orts, T.; Patera, V.; Sala, P.; Schmitt, E.; Vivaldo, G.; Marchetto, F.

    2016-01-01

    The calculation algorithm of a modern treatment planning system for ion-beam radiotherapy should ideally be able to deal with different ion species (e.g. protons and carbon ions), to provide relative biological effectiveness (RBE) evaluations and to describe different beam lines. In this work we propose a new approach for ion irradiation outcomes computations, the beamlet superposition (BS) model, which satisfies these requirements. This model applies and extends the concepts of previous fluence-weighted pencil-beam algorithms to quantities of radiobiological interest other than dose, i.e. RBE- and LET-related quantities. It describes an ion beam through a beam-line specific, weighted superposition of universal beamlets. The universal physical and radiobiological irradiation effect of the beamlets on a representative set of water-like tissues is evaluated once, coupling the per-track information derived from FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations with the radiobiological effectiveness provided by the microdosimetric kinetic model and the local effect model. Thanks to an extension of the superposition concept, the beamlet irradiation action superposition is applicable for the evaluation of dose, RBE and LET distributions. The weight function for the beamlets superposition is derived from the beam phase space density at the patient entrance. A general beam model commissioning procedure is proposed, which has successfully been tested on the CNAO beam line. The BS model provides the evaluation of different irradiation quantities for different ions, the adaptability permitted by weight functions and the evaluation speed of analitical approaches. Benchmarking plans in simple geometries and clinical plans are shown to demonstrate the model capabilities.

  20. A novel algorithm for the calculation of physical and biological irradiation quantities in scanned ion beam therapy: the beamlet superposition approach.

    PubMed

    Russo, G; Attili, A; Battistoni, G; Bertrand, D; Bourhaleb, F; Cappucci, F; Ciocca, M; Mairani, A; Milian, F M; Molinelli, S; Morone, M C; Muraro, S; Orts, T; Patera, V; Sala, P; Schmitt, E; Vivaldo, G; Marchetto, F

    2016-01-07

    The calculation algorithm of a modern treatment planning system for ion-beam radiotherapy should ideally be able to deal with different ion species (e.g. protons and carbon ions), to provide relative biological effectiveness (RBE) evaluations and to describe different beam lines. In this work we propose a new approach for ion irradiation outcomes computations, the beamlet superposition (BS) model, which satisfies these requirements. This model applies and extends the concepts of previous fluence-weighted pencil-beam algorithms to quantities of radiobiological interest other than dose, i.e. RBE- and LET-related quantities. It describes an ion beam through a beam-line specific, weighted superposition of universal beamlets. The universal physical and radiobiological irradiation effect of the beamlets on a representative set of water-like tissues is evaluated once, coupling the per-track information derived from FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations with the radiobiological effectiveness provided by the microdosimetric kinetic model and the local effect model. Thanks to an extension of the superposition concept, the beamlet irradiation action superposition is applicable for the evaluation of dose, RBE and LET distributions. The weight function for the beamlets superposition is derived from the beam phase space density at the patient entrance. A general beam model commissioning procedure is proposed, which has successfully been tested on the CNAO beam line. The BS model provides the evaluation of different irradiation quantities for different ions, the adaptability permitted by weight functions and the evaluation speed of analitical approaches. Benchmarking plans in simple geometries and clinical plans are shown to demonstrate the model capabilities.

  1. Extraction design and low energy beam transport optimization of space charge dominated multispecies ion beam sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delferrière, O.; De Menezes, D.

    2004-05-01

    In all accelerator projects, the low energy part of the accelerator has to be carefully optimized to match the beam characteristic requirements of the higher energy parts. Since 1994 with the beginning of the Injector of Protons for High Intensity (IPHI) project and Source of Light Ions with High Intensities (SILHI) electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source development at CEA/Saclay, we are using a set of two-dimensional (2D) codes for extraction system optimization (AXCEL, OPERA-2D) and beam transport (MULTIPART). The 95 keV SILHI extraction system optimization has largely increased the extracted current, and improved the beam line transmission. From these good results, a 130 mA D+ extraction system for the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility project has been designed in the same way as SILHI one. We are also now involved in the SPIRAL 2 project for the building of a 40 keV D+ ECR ion source, continuously tunable from 0.1 to 5 mA, for which a special four-electrode extraction system has been studied. In this article we will describe the 2D design process and present the different extraction geometries and beam characteristics. Simulation results of SILHI H+ beam emittance will be compared with experimental measurements.

  2. STS-95 Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Orbiter Discovery is riding on its main landing gear as it lowers its nose wheel after touching down on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Main gear touchdown was at 12:04 p.m. EST, landing on orbit 135. Discovery returns to Earth with its crew of seven after successfully completing mission STS-95, lasting nearly nine days and 3.6 million miles. The crew includes mission commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr.; pilot Steven W. Lindsey, mission specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, with the European Space Agency (ESA); payload specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA); and payload specialist John H. Glenn, Jr., a senator from Ohio and one of the original seven Project Mercury astronauts. The mission included research payloads such as the Spartan-201 solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as a SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  3. Level structure of {sup 95}Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M.A.; Chowdhury, M.S.

    2005-11-01

    The level structure of the {sup 95}Nb nucleus has been studied with the (t,p) reaction in {sup 93}Nb using a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a multichannel magnetic spectrograph at an incident beam energy of 12 MeV. Proton spectra are obtained at 12 different angles from 5 deg. to 87.5 deg. at an interval of 7.5 deg. Measurements of the proton distributions from the {sup 93}Nb(t,p){sup 95}Nb reaction were made for the ground and 54 excited states up to the excitation energy of 3.669 MeV. Absolute differential cross sections for the levels have been measured. The experimental angular distributions are compared with the theoretical distorted-wave Born approximation calculations to determine L values and J{sup {pi}} values. The level structure of {sup 95}Nb is compared with previous results.

  4. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  5. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  6. Student Otcomes at Mt. Hood Community College: Assessment Efforts, 1994-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoering, Juliette M.

    A study was conducted at Oregon's Mount Hood Community College (MHCC) to determine student outcomes for 1994-1996. Data were collected from state employment records for graduates from 1994-95, follow-up surveys of 1993-94 graduates and completers, surveys of former MHCC students who transferred to state system of higher education institutions, and…

  7. Physics potential of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment using a J-PARC neutrino beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Aihara, H.; Andreopoulos, C.; Anghel, I.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Askins, M.; Back, J. J.; Ballett, P.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bay, F.; Beltrame, P.; Berardi, V.; Bergevin, M.; Berkman, S.; Berry, T.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Cafagna, F. S.; Carminati, G.; Cartwright, S. L.; Catanesi, M. G.; Choi, K.; Choi, J. H.; Collazuol, G.; Cowan, G.; Cremonesi, L.; Davies, G.; De Rosa, G.; Densham, C.; Detwiler, J.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Fernández, P.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A.; Fitton, M.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Galymov, V.; Ganezer, K.; Gonin, M.; Gumplinger, P.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haga, Y.; Hartfiel, B.; Hartz, M.; Hayato, Y.; Hierholzer, M.; Hill, J.; Himmel, A.; Hirota, S.; Horiuchi, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Inoue, K.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishino, H.; Ishitsuka, M.; Itow, Y.; Izmaylov, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jang, H. I.; Jiang, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jung, C. K.; Kaboth, A.; Kajita, T.; Kameda, J.; Karadhzov, Y.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Koga, M.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W. R.; Kudenko, Y.; Kutter, T.; Kuze, M.; Labarga, L.; Lagoda, J.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Learned, J. G.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Ma, W.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Mariani, C.; Marti, L.; Martin, J. F.; Martin, C.; Martins, P. P. J.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Minakata, H.; Minamino, A.; Mine, S.; Mineev, O.; Miura, M.; Monroe, J.; Mori, T.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, T.; Muheim, F.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayama, S.; Needham, M.; Nicholls, T.; Nirkko, M.; Nishimura, Y.; Noah, E.; Nowak, J.; Nunokawa, H.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Okajima, Y.; Okumura, K.; Oser, S. M.; O'Sullivan, E.; Ovsiannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Pérez, J.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Pistillo, C.; Playfer, S.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Quilain, B.; Quinto, M.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A.; Redij, A.; Retiere, F.; Riccio, C.; Richard, E.; Rondio, E.; Rose, H. J.; Ross-Lonergan, M.; Rott, C.; Rountree, S. D.; Rubbia, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakuda, M.; Sanchez, M. C.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shimizu, I.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smy, M. B.; Sobczyk, J.; Sobel, H. W.; Stewart, T.; Stone, J. L.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, A. T.; Svoboda, R.; Tacik, R.; Takeda, A.; Taketa, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Tanaka, H.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorpe, M.; Tobayama, S.; Tolich, N.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vagins, M. R.; Vasseur, G.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Xin, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Zito, M.

    2015-05-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next-generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of CP asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long-baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW × 10^7s integrated proton beam power (corresponding to 1.56 × 10^{22} protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a 2.5^circ off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic CP phase δ _{CP} can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of δ _{CP}, and CP violation can be established with a statistical significance of more than 3 σ (5 σ) for 76{%} (58{%}) of the {δ _{CP}} parameter space. Using both ν _e appearance and ν _μ disappearance data, the expected 1σ uncertainty of sin ^2θ _{23} is 0.015(0.006) for sin ^2θ _{23}=0.5(0.45).

  8. Lead poisoning among sandblasting workers--Galveston, Texas, March 1994.

    PubMed

    1995-01-27

    In the United States, an estimated 95% of elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) in adults are attributable to occupational exposure (1). This report summarizes the findings of an investigation by the Galveston County (Texas) Health District (GCHD) of occupational lead poisoning associated with sandblasting during February-March 1994.

  9. 10 CFR 95.18 - Key personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.18 Key personnel. The senior management official and the Facility Security Officer must always be cleared to a level commensurate with the...

  10. Electric and hybrid vehicle program site operator program. Quarterly progress report, October 1994--December 1994 (First quarter of FY-95)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-07-01

    The DOE Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. Its mission now includes three ma or activity categories: (1) Advancement of Electric Vehicle (EV) technologies, (2) Development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use, and (3) Increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 13 Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified in Table ES-1. The EV inventories of each participant are summarized in Table ES-2.

  11. Comparative study on the effect of electron beam irradiation on the physical properties of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bibo; Hong, Ningning; Shi, Yongqian; Wang, Biao; Sheng, Haibo; Song, Lei; Tang, Qinbo; Hu, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) flame retarded by a combination of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) and polyamide-6 (PA-6) have been crosslinked by high energy electron beam irradiation. The effect of high energy electron beam irradiation on the crosslinking degree, mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 cable material was studied by gel content, heat extention test, mechanical test, dynamic mechanical analysis, high-insulation resistance meter and thermogravimetric analysis. The gel content and heat extention test results showed that the EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can be easily crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. The tensile strength of EVA composites was drastically increased from 16.2 to maximum 26.2 MPa as the electron beam irradiation dose increases from 0 to 160 kGy. The volatilized products of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites were analyzed and compared by thermogravimetric analysis/infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR).

  12. A simple and fast physics-based analytical method to calculate therapeutic and stray doses from external beam, megavoltage x-ray therapy.

    PubMed

    Jagetic, Lydia J; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2015-06-21

    State-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment planning systems provide reliable estimates of the therapeutic radiation but are known to underestimate or neglect the stray radiation exposures. Most commonly, stray radiation exposures are reconstructed using empirical formulas or lookup tables. The purpose of this study was to develop the basic physics of a model capable of calculating the total absorbed dose both inside and outside of the therapeutic radiation beam for external beam photon therapy. The model was developed using measurements of total absorbed dose in a water-box phantom from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator to calculate dose profiles in both the in-plane and cross-plane direction for a variety of square field sizes and depths in water. The water-box phantom facilitated development of the basic physical aspects of the model. RMS discrepancies between measured and calculated total absorbed dose values in water were less than 9.3% for all fields studied. Computation times for 10 million dose points within a homogeneous phantom were approximately 4 min. These results suggest that the basic physics of the model are sufficiently simple, fast, and accurate to serve as a foundation for a variety of clinical and research applications, some of which may require that the model be extended or simplified based on the needs of the user. A potentially important advantage of a physics-based approach is that the model is more readily adaptable to a wide variety of treatment units and treatment techniques than with empirical models.

  13. Probing the Interstellar Medium along the Lines of Sight to Supernovae SN 1994D and SN 1994I: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    1996-06-01

    In the paper "Probing the Interstellar Medium along the Lines of Sight to Supernovae SN 1994D and SN 19941" by Luis C. Ho and Alexei V. Filippenko (ApJ, 444,165 [1995]; hereafter HF95), SN 1994D was assumed to be on the approaching side of its host galaxy, NGC 4526. The authors wish to correct this assumption. Long-slit optical spectra (resolution 6-7 A) obtained on 1994 March 18 UT with the 3 m Shane reflector at Lick Observatory exhibit Hα and [N II] λλ6548, 6583 emission lines that clearly show that SN 1994D is on the receding side of the galaxy, at a heliocentric velocity of ~850 km s^-1^ (The heliocentric systemic velocity of NGC 4526, measured at the nucleus, is ~620 km s^-1^, higher than the value of ~450 km s^-1^ often cited in the literature [e.g., the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog of Bright Galaxies].) Thus, "system 6" in the high-resolution Keck spectrum of SN 1994D (Table 1 of HF95), at v = 709 km s^-1^, is almost certainly produced by gas in the outer regions of the gas/dust disk of NGC 4526, along the line of sight to the supernova (which is assumed to be within, or close to, the disk). Its velocity is not "anomalous," and it is unlikely to be of intergalactic origin, contrary to the previous conclusion of the paper. The revised value for the velocity of SN 1994D also suggests that systems 2-5 in Table 1 of HF95, all of which have heliocentric velocities in the range 200-250 km s^-1^, are not produced in the disk of NGC 4526; instead, they almost certainly correspond to "high-velocity clouds" (HVCs) associated with the Milky Way. Hence, they are similar to systems 3-5 along the line of sight to SN 1994I in M51 (HF95). In support of this, the authors note that Kumar & Thonnard (AJ, 88,260 [1983]) detect H I emission centered on heliocentric velocity 215 km s^-1^ at several different positions toward NGC 4526, in good agreement with the average velocity of the Na I absorption lines in our Keck spectrum; they conclude that the H I emission is produced

  14. 10 CFR 95.17 - Processing facility clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processing facility clearance. 95.17 Section 95.17 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.17 Processing facility clearance....

  15. 10 CFR 95.23 - Termination of facility clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Termination of facility clearance. 95.23 Section 95.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.23 Termination of facility clearance....

  16. 10 CFR 95.34 - Control of visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control of visitors. 95.34 Section 95.34 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.34 Control of visitors. (a) Uncleared...

  17. 10 CFR 95.27 - Protection while in use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection while in use. 95.27 Section 95.27 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.27 Protection while in use. While in...

  18. 1994 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  19. Research and Technology, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report selectively summarizes the NASA Lewis Research Center's research and technology accomplishments for the fiscal year 1994. It comprises approximately 200 short articles submitted by the staff members of the technical directorates. The report is organized into six major sections: Aeronautics, Aerospace Technology, Space Flight Systems, Engineering and Computational Support, Lewis Research Academy, and Technology Transfer. A table of contents and author index have been developed to assist the reader in finding articles of special interest. This report is not intended to be a comprehensive summary of all research and technology work done over the past fiscal year. Most of the work is reported in Lewis-published technical reports, journal articles, and presentations prepared by Lewis staff members and contractors. In addition, university grants have enabled faculty members and graduate students to engage in sponsored research that is reported at technical meetings or in journal articles. For each article in this report a Lewis contact person has been identified, and where possible, reference documents are listed so that additional information can be easily obtained. The diversity of topics attests to the breadth of research and technology being pursued and to the skill mix of the staff that makes it possible.

  20. AGS experiments: 1992, 1993, 1994. Revision December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    This document contains listings and two page summaries for experiments run at the GAS for 1992--1994. Listings are also given for publications and experimenters. A working copy of the 1995--1996 experiment schedule is also included.

  1. Upgraded coal interest group. First quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.; Lebowitz, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    The interest group got under way effective January 1, 1994, with nine utility members, EPRI, Bechtel, and the Illinois Clean Coal Institute. DOE participation was effective October 1, 1994. The first meeting was held on April 22, 1994 in Springfield, Illinois and the second meeting was held on August 10--11, 1994 at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Technical reviews were prepared in several areas, including the following: status of low rank coal upgrading, advanced physical coal cleaning, organic sulfur removal from coal, handling of fine coal, combustion of coal water slurries. It was concluded that, for bituminous coals, processing of fines from coal cleaning plants or impoundments was going to be less costly than processing of coal, since the fines were intrinsically worth less and advanced upgrading technologies require fine coal. Penelec reported on benefits of NOX reductions when burning slurry fuels. Project work was authorized in the following areas: Availability of fines (CQ, Inc.), Engineering evaluations (Bechtel), and Evaluation of slurry formulation and combustion demonstrations (EER/MATS). The first project was completed.

  2. Measurement of surface stay times for physical adsorption of gases. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Univ.; [using molecular beam time of flight technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A molecular beam time-of-flight technique is studied as a means of determining surface stay times for physical adsorption. The experimental approach consists of pulsing a molecular beam, allowing the pulse to strike an adsorbing surface and detecting the molecular pulse after it has subsequently desorbed. The technique is also found to be useful for general studies of adsorption under nonequilibrium conditions including the study of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. The shape of the detected pulse is analyzed in detail for a first-order desorption process. For mean stay times, tau, less than the mean molecular transit times involved, the peak of the detected pulse is delayed by an amount approximately equal to tau. For tau much greater than these transit times, the detected pulse should decay as exp(-t/tau). However, for stay times of the order of the transit times, both the molecular speed distributions and the incident pulse duration time must be taken into account.

  3. Electromagnetic nonuniformly correlated beams.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2012-10-01

    A class of electromagnetic sources with nonuniformly distributed field correlations is introduced. The conditions on source parameters guaranteeing that the source generates a physical beam are derived. It is shown that the new sources are capable of producing beams with polarization properties that evolve on propagation in a manner much more complex compared to the well-known electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beams.

  4. Simulations of beam-matter interaction experiments at the CERN HiRadMat facility and prospects of high-energy-density physics research.

    PubMed

    Tahir, N A; Burkart, F; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Wollmann, D; Piriz, A R

    2014-12-01

    In a recent publication [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we reported results on beam-target interaction experiments that have been carried out at the CERN HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials) facility using extended solid copper cylindrical targets that were irradiated with a 440-GeV proton beam delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). On the one hand, these experiments confirmed the existence of hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons that leads to substantial increase in the range of the protons and the corresponding hadron shower in the target, a phenomenon predicted by our previous theoretical investigations [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 25, 051003 (2012)]. On the other hand, these experiments demonstrated that the beam heated part of the target is severely damaged and is converted into different phases of high energy density (HED) matter, as suggested by our previous theoretical studies [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 79, 046410 (2009)]. The latter confirms that the HiRadMat facility can be used to study HED physics. In the present paper, we give details of the numerical simulations carried out to understand the experimental measurements. These include the evolution of the physical parameters, for example, density, temperature, pressure, and the internal energy in the target, during and after the irradiation. This information is important in order to determine the region of the HED phase diagram that can be accessed in such experiments. These simulations have been done using the energy deposition code fluka and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, big2, iteratively.

  5. The supersonic molecular beam injector as a reliable tool for plasma fueling and physics experiment on HL-2A.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Yu, D L; Feng, B B; Yao, L H; Song, X M; Zang, L G; Gao, X Y; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R

    2016-09-01

    On HL-2A tokamak, supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) has been developed as a routine refueling method. The key components of the system are an electromagnetic valve and a conic nozzle. The valve and conic nozzle are assembled to compose the simplified Laval nozzle for generating the pulsed beam. The appurtenance of the system includes the cooling system serving the cooled SMBI generation and the in situ calibration component for quantitative injection. Compared with the conventional gas puffing, the SMBI features prompt response and larger fueling flux. These merits devote the SMBI a good fueling method, an excellent plasma density feedback control tool, and an edge localized mode mitigation resource.

  6. The supersonic molecular beam injector as a reliable tool for plasma fueling and physics experiment on HL-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; Yu, D. L.; Feng, B. B.; Yao, L. H.; Song, X. M.; Zang, L. G.; Gao, X. Y.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2016-09-01

    On HL-2A tokamak, supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) has been developed as a routine refueling method. The key components of the system are an electromagnetic valve and a conic nozzle. The valve and conic nozzle are assembled to compose the simplified Laval nozzle for generating the pulsed beam. The appurtenance of the system includes the cooling system serving the cooled SMBI generation and the in situ calibration component for quantitative injection. Compared with the conventional gas puffing, the SMBI features prompt response and larger fueling flux. These merits devote the SMBI a good fueling method, an excellent plasma density feedback control tool, and an edge localized mode mitigation resource.

  7. Moment-matching method for extraction of asymmetric beam jitters and bore sight errors in simulations and experiments with actively illuminated satellites of small physical cross section.

    PubMed

    Gudimetla, V S Rao; Riker, Jim F

    2011-03-10

    Optical returns from remote resident space-based objects such as satellites suffer from pointing and tracking errors. In a previously reported paper [Appl. Opt.46, 5608 (2007)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.46.005608], we developed a moment-matching technique that used the statistics of time series of these optical returns to extract information about bore sight and symmetric beam jitter errors (symmetric here implies that the standard deviations of the jitter measured along two orthogonal axes, perpendicular to the line of sight, are equal). In this paper, we extend that method to cover the case of asymmetric beam jitter and bore sight. The asymmetric beam jitter may be due to the combination of symmetric atmospheric turbulence beam jitter and optical beam train jitter. In addition, if a tracking control system is operating, even the residual atmospheric tracking jitter could be asymmetric because the power spectrum is different for the slewing direction compared to the cross-track direction. Analysis of the problem has produced a set of nonlinear equations that can be reduced to a single but much higher-order nonlinear equation in terms of one of the jitter variances. After solving for that jitter, all the equations can be solved to extract all jitter and bore sight errors. The method has been verified by using simulations and then tested on experimental data. In order to develop this method, we derived analytical expressions for the probability density function and the moments of the received total intensity. The results reported here are valid for satellites of small physical cross section, or else those with retroreflectors that dominate the signal return. The results are, in general, applicable to the theory of noncircular Gaussian speckle with a coherent background.

  8. Thompson receives 1994 Bowen award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David H.; Thompson, Alan Bruce

    At the Spring Meeting in Baltimore, May 23, 1994, Alan Bruce Thompson of the Eidgenossiche Technische Hochschule, Zurich, received the 1994 N. L. Bowen Award of the Volcanology, Geochemsitry, and Petrology section, which is given for a single outstanding contribution to volcanology, geochemistry, or petrology made during the preceding 5 years. The award was presented by David H. Green of the Research School of Earth Sciences. The citation and response are given here.

  9. Failure mechanisms of platinum aluminide bond coat/electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Krishnakumar

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) allow operation of structural components, such as turbine blades and vanes in industrial and aircraft gas engines, at temperatures close to the substrate melting temperatures. They consist of four different layers; a high strength creep-resistant nickel-based superalloy substrate, an oxidation resistant bond coat (BC), a low thermal conductivity ceramic topcoat and a thermally grown oxide (TGO), that is predominantly alpha-Al 2O3, that forms between the BC and the TBC. Compressive stresses (3--5 GPa) that are generated in the thin TGO (0.25--8 mum) due to the mismatch in thermal coefficient of expansion between the TGO and BC play a critical role in the failure of these coatings. In this study, the failure mechanisms of a commercial yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) coating on platinum aluminide (beta-(Ni,Pt)Al) bond coat have been identified. Two distinct mechanisms have been found responsible for the observed damage initiation and progression at the TGO/bond coat interface. The first mechanism leads to localized debonding at TGO/bond coat interface due to increased out-of-plane tensile stress, along bond coat features that manifest themselves as ridges. The second mechanism causes cavity formation at the TGO/bond coat interface, driven by cyclic plasticity of the bond coat. It has been found that the debonding at the TGO/bond coat interface due to the first mechanism is solely life determining. The final failure occurs by crack extension along either the TGO/bond coat interface or the TGO/YSZ interface or a combination of both, leading to large scale buckling. Based on these mechanisms, it is demonstrated that the bond coat grain size and the aspect ratio of the ridges have a profound influence on spallation lives of the coating. The removal of these ridges by fine polishing prior to TBC deposition led to a four-fold improvement in life. The failure mechanism identified for the

  10. Time average neutralized migma: A colliding beam/plasma hybrid physical state as aneutronic energy source — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan C.

    1988-08-01

    A D + beam of kinetic energy Ti = 0.7 MeV was stored in a "simple mirror" magnetic field as self-colliding orbits or migma and neutralized by ambient, oscillating electrons whose bounce frequencies were externally controlled. Space charge density was exceeded by an order of magnitude without instabilities. Three nondestructive diagnostic methods allowed measurements of ion orbit distribution, ion storage times, ion energy distribution, nuclear reaction rate, and reaction product spectrum. Migma formed a disc 20 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm thick. Its ion density was sharply peaked in the center; the ion-to-electron temperature ratio was TiTe ˜ 10 3; ion-electron temperature equilibrium was never reached. The volume average and central D + density were n = 3.2 × 10 9 cm -3 and nc = 3 × 10 10 cm -3 respectively, compared to the space charge limit density nsc = 4 × 10 8 cm -3. The energy confinement time was τc = 20-30 s, limited by the change exchange reactions with the residual gas in the vacuum (5 × 10 -9 Torr). The ion energy loss rate was 1.4 keV/s. None of the instabilities that were observed in mirrors at several orders of magnitude lower density occurred. The proton energy spectrum for dd + d → T + p + 4 MeV shows that dd collided at an average crossing angle of 160°. Evidence for exponential density buildup has also been observed. Relative to Migma III results and measured in terms of the product of ion energy E, density n, and confinement time τ, device performance was improved by a factor of 500. Using the central fast ion density, we obtained the triple product: Tnτ ≅ 4 × 10 14 keV s cm -3, which is greater than that of the best fusion devices. The luminosity (collision rate per unit cross section) was ˜ 10 29 cm -2s -1, with o.7 A ion current through the migma center. The stabilizing features of migma are: (1) large Larmor radius; (2) small canonical angular momentum; (3) short axial length z (disc shape); (4) nonadiabatic motions in r and z

  11. A Decade Later, How Much of Rwanda's Musculoskeletal Impairment Is Caused by the War in 1994 and by Related Violence?

    PubMed Central

    Kuper, Hannah; Atijosan, Oluwarantimi; Rischewski, Dorothea; Simms, Victoria; Lavy, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Background In 1994 there was a horrific genocide in Rwanda following years of tension, resulting in the murder of at least 800,000 people. Although many people were injured in addition to those killed, no attempt has been made to assess the lasting burden of physical injuries related to these events. The aim of this study was to estimate the current burden of musculoskeletal impairment (MSI) attributable to the 1994 war and related violence. Methodology/Principal Findings A national cross-sectional survey of MSI was conducted in Rwanda. 105 clusters of 80 people were selected through probability proportionate to size sampling. Households within clusters were selected through compact segment sampling. Enumerated people answered a seven-question screening test to assess whether they might have an MSI. Those who were classed as potential cases in the screening test were examined and interviewed by a physiotherapist, using a standard protocol that recorded the site, nature, cause, and severity of the MSI. People with MSI due to trauma were asked whether this trauma occurred during the 1990–1994 war or during the episodes that preceded or followed this war. Out of 8,368 people enumerated, 6,757 were available for screening and examination (80.8%). 352 people were diagnosed with an MSI (prevalence = 5.2%, 95% CI = 4.5–5.9%). 106 cases of MSI (30.6%) were classified as resulting from trauma, based on self-report and the physiotherapist's assessment. Of these, 14 people (13.2%) reported that their trauma-related MSI occurred during the 1990–1994 war, and a further 7 (6.6%) that their trauma-related MSI occurred during the violent episodes that preceded and followed the war, giving an overall prevalence of trauma-related MSI related to the 1990–1994 war of 0.3% (95% CI = 0.2–0.4%). Conclusions/Significance A decade on, the overall prevalence of MSI was relatively high in Rwanda but few cases appeared to be the result of the 1994 war or related violence

  12. Revisiting T2KK and T2KO physics potential and ν _μ -{\\bar{ν }}_μ beam ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Kaoru; Ko, Pyungwon; Okamura, Naotoshi; Takaesu, Yoshitaro

    2017-03-01

    We revisit the sensitivity study of the Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Korea (T2KK) and Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Oki (T2KO) proposals where a water Čerenkov detector with the 100 kton fiducial volume is placed in Korea (L = 1000 km) and Oki island (L = 653 km) in Japan, respectively, in addition to the Super-Kamiokande for determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and leptonic CP phase (δ_{CP}). We systematically study the running ratio of the ν _μ and {\\bar{ν }}_μ focusing beams with dedicated background estimation for the ν _e appearance and ν _μ disappearance signals, especially improving treatment of the neutral-current π ^0 backgrounds. Using a ν _μ -{\\bar{ν }}_μ beam ratio between 3:2 and 2.5:2.5 (in units of 10^{21}POT with the proton energy of 40 GeV), the mass-hierarchy determination with the median sensitivity of 3-5 σ by the T2KK and 1-4 σ by the T2KO experiment are expected when sin ^2 θ _{23} = 0.5, depending on the mass-hierarchy pattern and CP phase. These sensitivities are enhanced (reduced) by 30-40% in Δ χ ^2 when sin ^2 θ _{23} = 0.6 (0.4). The CP phase is measured with the uncertainty of 20° - 50° by the T2KK and T2KO using the ν _μ -{\\bar{ν }}_μ focusing beam ratio between 3.5:1.5 and 1.5:3.5. These findings indicate that inclusion of the {\\bar{ν }}_μ focusing beam improves the sensitivities of the T2KK and T2KO experiments to both the mass-hierarchy determination and the leptonic CP phase measurement simultaneously with the preferred beam ratio being between 3:2-2.5:2.5 ({× } 10^{21}POT).

  13. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1994). Volume 59

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, James P.

    1994-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period of April-June 1994, contains articles on surface characterization by atomic force microscopy; electron acceleration with intense laser field; spatial intensity variations induced by nonlinear beam propagation; backlighting of implosion targets exhibiting mix; and the use of cosmic rays to monitor large, multielement detectors. Four of these articles - surface characterization; nonlinear beam propagation; backlighting of mixed targets; and monitoring of the MEDUSA detector array - are related to the OMEGA Upgrade, which is currently under construction.

  15. Characterization of Corning EPMA Standard Glasses 95IRV, 95IRW, and 95IRX

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Paul; Counce, Dale; Kluk, Emily; Nabelek, Carol

    2002-01-01

    The preparation, synthesis, and characterization of Corning trace-element glasses 95IRV, 95IRW, and 95IRX by bulk chemical and electron microprobe techniques is discussed. Working values for the doped elements in the 95-series glasses are established. Blank values have been determined by both bulk chemical and electron microprobe analysis, and important x-ray interferences are highlighted. Chemical homogeneity both within a rod cross-section, and along cane length has been documented. These glasses are standard reference materials intended for use as both primary and secondary electron microprobe standards. PMID:27446763

  16. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  17. [Proceeding and Abstracts of the 1994 National Marine Educators Association Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigsby, Michael, Ed.; Tooker, Lisa, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This bulletin contains the proceedings and 54 abstracts for symposia, workshops and contributed papers of the 1994 National Marine Educators Association Conference (Knoxville, Tennessee, August 8-11, 1994). Some of the topics covered in conference abstracts include: (1) elementary physical, chemical, and biological labs and curriculum; (2)…

  18. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher

    2013-04-19

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  19. Physical properties of biaxially oriented poly(ethylene terephtalate) irradiated at different temperatures and doses with electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adem, E.; Hernández-Sampelayo, A. Rubio; Báez, J. E.; Miranda, J.; Labrada-Delgado, G. J.; Marcos-Fernández, A.

    2017-01-01

    The electron beam irradiation of a biaxially oriented PET film was carried out in air over a range of 50-3000 kGy at different temperatures and a dose rate of 4.48 kGy min-1. The effects of the irradiation at temperatures above and below the glass transition temperature (Tg) on the thermal and mechanical properties were studied. Melting temperature decreased slightly and crystallization temperature and crystallinity increased significantly with the increase in dose, more at higher irradiation temperature, whereas Tg did not show any significant change with dose or temperature. Mechanical properties were adversely affected by irradiation. Stress and strain at break were strongly reduced, more at higher irradiation temperature, and Young's Modulus slightly increased with the increase in dose. The changes in properties were related to the chain scission produced by the electron beam irradiation leading to a decrease in molecular weight.

  20. A simple and fast physics-based analytical method to calculate therapeutic and stray doses from external beam, megavoltage x-ray therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagetic, Lydia J.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2015-06-01

    State-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment planning systems provide reliable estimates of the therapeutic radiation but are known to underestimate or neglect the stray radiation exposures. Most commonly, stray radiation exposures are reconstructed using empirical formulas or lookup tables. The purpose of this study was to develop the basic physics of a model capable of calculating the total absorbed dose both inside and outside of the therapeutic radiation beam for external beam photon therapy. The model was developed using measurements of total absorbed dose in a water-box phantom from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator to calculate dose profiles in both the in-plane and cross-plane direction for a variety of square field sizes and depths in water. The water-box phantom facilitated development of the basic physical aspects of the model. RMS discrepancies between measured and calculated total absorbed dose values in water were less than 9.3% for all fields studied. Computation times for 10 million dose points within a homogeneous phantom were approximately 4 min. These results suggest that the basic physics of the model are sufficiently simple, fast, and accurate to serve as a foundation for a variety of clinical and research applications, some of which may require that the model be extended or simplified based on the needs of the user. A potentially important advantage of a physics-based approach is that the model is more readily adaptable to a wide variety of treatment units and treatment techniques than with empirical models.

  1. Beam Physics Dissertation Award Talk: Feedback Control of Coupled-Bunch Instabilities: Measurement of System Dynamics and Controller Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2004-05-01

    Modern light sources and circular colliders incorporate high currents with large numbers of populated bunches. At the design currents coupling of bunches via resonant structures causes unstable motion so that operation of these accelerators requires active feedback instability control. Design of stabilizing feedback algorithms is a challenging optimization and control problem involving multiple trade-offs. In this talk the process of feedback controller design will be presented starting from quantifying the behavior of unstable eigenvalues as a function of beam current, beam energy, and other accelerator parameters. I will describe how the the diagnostic capabilities of the longitudinal feedback system are used to measure relevant beam and feedback system parameters. These measurements allow one to create a model of the closed-loop system for off-line testing of the proposed controllers. Comparison of the models with experimental measurements will be presented. Next I will present a method for design of robust stabilizing feedback controllers based on the approximation of a frequency-domain transfer function. The method will be illustrated with design examples and operational results from ALS, DAΦNE, and BESSY-II.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Axial and Beam-Riding Propulsive Physics with TEA CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, D. A.; Salvador, I.; Myrabo, L. N.; Notaro, S. N.; Bragulla, P. W.

    2010-10-08

    A twin Lumonics K922M pulsed TEA CO{sub 2} laser system (pulse duration of approximately 100 ns FWHM spike, with optional 1 {mu}s tail, depending upon laser gas mix) was employed to experimentally measure both axial thrust and beam-riding behavior of Type no. 200 lightcraft engines, using a ballistic pendulum and Angular Impulse Measurement Device (AIMD, respectively. Beam-riding forces and moments were examined along with engine thrust-vectoring behavior, as a function of: a) laser beam lateral offset from the vehicle axis of symmetry; b) laser pulse energy ({approx}12 to 40 joules); c) pulse duration (100 ns, and 1 {mu}s); and d) engine size (97.7 mm to 161.2 mm). Maximum lateral momentum coupling coefficients (C{sub M}) of 75 N-s/MJ were achieved with the K922M laser whereas previous PLVTS laser (420 J, 18 {mu}s duration) results reached only 15 N-s/MJ--an improvement of 5x. Maximum axial C{sub M} performance with the K922M reached 225 N-s/MJ, or about {approx}3x larger than the lateral C{sub M} values. These axial C{sub M} results are sharply higher than the 120 N/MW previously reported for long pulse (e.g., 10-18 {mu}s)CO{sub 2} electric discharge lasers.

  3. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor.

    PubMed

    Singh, M J; De Esch, H P L

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H(-) accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  4. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. J.; De Esch, H. P. L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H- accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  5. Life Sciences Accomplishments 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnell, Mary Lou (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    proposals for ground-based and flight research for all programs. Areas of particular interest to NASA were defined Proposals due April 29, 1994, will be peer reviewed - externally for scientific merit. This annual NRA process is now the mechanism for recruiting both extramural and intramural investigations. As an overview of LBSAD activities in 1993, this accomplishments document covers each of the major organizational components of the Division and the accomplishments of each. The second section is a review of the Space Life Sciences Research programs Space Biology, Space Physiology and Countermeasures, Radiation Health, Environmental Health, Space Human Factors, Advanced Life Support, and Global Monitoring and Disease Prediction, The third section, Research in Space Flight, describes the substantial contributions of the Spacelab Life Sciences 2 (SLS-2) mission to life sciences research and the significant contributions of the other missions flown in 1993, along with plans for future missions. The Division has greatly expanded and given high priority to its Education and Outreach Programs, which are presented in the fourth section. The fifth and final section, Partners for Space, shows the Divisions Cooperative efforts with other national and international agencies to achieve common goals, along with the accomplishments of joint research and analysis programs.

  6. WE-EF-303-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING- THERAPY): A Comprehensive Simulation of Image Guided Beam Gating for Liver Tumor Treatments Using Scanned Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Knopf, A; Weber, D; Lomax, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of image guided beam gating for PBS liver treatments under realistic breathing conditions. Methods: We have previously proposed a Beams’ Eye View (BEV) X-ray image system as an online motion monitoring device for deriving a gating signal for PBS proton therapy. Using dedicated 4D dose calculations (4DDC), in this work we have simulated gated liver treatments using three amplitude-based gating windows (10/5/3mm) based on motion extracted from BEV imaging of fiducial markers or the diaphragm. In order to improve motion mitigation, BEV guided gating has also been combined with either volumetric (VS) or layered (LS) rescanning. Nine 4DCT(MRI) liver data-sets have been used for the investigation, which not only consider realistic patient geometries but also motion variations between different breathing cycles. All 4D plans have been quantified in terms of plan homogeneity in the PTV (D5-D95), the total estimated treatment time and the beam-on duty cycle. Results: Neither gating nor rescanning can fully retrieve a comparable plan homogeneity to the static case, and considerable reductions of the duty cycle (<10%) were observed as a Result motion variations when small gating windows are used. However, once combined with rescanning, dose homogeneity within 1% of the static plan could be achieved with reasonable prolongation of the treatment time for all 9 subjects. No differences were observed between the efficacy of layered or volumetric re-scanning, or of gating signals extracted from fiducial or diaphragm motions. However, layered rescanning may be preferred over volumetric rescanning when performed in combination with gating as it is generally more time-efficient and dosimetrically robust to patient and motion variations Conclusion Combining BEV beam gating with rescanning is an efficient and effective approach to treating mobile liver tumours, and is equally effective if either the diaphragm or fiducial markers are used as

  7. AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline 5.a.: Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations - Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams.

    PubMed

    Smilowitz, Jennifer B; Das, Indra J; Feygelman, Vladimir; Fraass, Benedick A; Kry, Stephen F; Marshall, Ingrid R; Mihailidis, Dimitris N; Ouhib, Zoubir; Ritter, Timothy; Snyder, Michael G; Fairobent, Lynne

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States. The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner. Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized. The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:• Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.• Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  8. The Boeing Company's Manufacturing Technology Student Internship. Evaluation Report (1994-95).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Changhua; Owens, Thomas R.

    An evaluation was conducted of the Boeing Company's summer internship program for students enrolled in a manufacturing technology program after grades 11, 12, and 13 (first year of community college). The evaluation included the following activities: a review of documents describing the internship structure, student selection process, and…

  9. The Accelerating Literacy Program: 1994-95 Final Report. Publication Number 94.13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Trina R.; Wilkinson, L. David

    The Austin Independent School District (Texas) developed the Accelerating Literacy Program (ALP) in 1993 to provide additional support for students who were having trouble passing the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) in the elementary grades. The ALP operates on the principle of integrating reading, writing, listening, and speaking…

  10. The Student Guide: Financial Aid from the U.S. Department of Education, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This guide tells about federal student aid programs for postsecondary education and how to apply for them. It begins by outlining sources for finding out about student aid, such as state higher education agencies, guidance counselors, and organizations connected with particular fields of interest. The guide offers tips on choosing a school…

  11. Inter-American Foundation: '95 in Review, October 1, 1994 to September 30, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-American Foundation, Arlington, VA.

    This report summarizes 1995 activities of the Inter-American Foundation (IAF), an independent agency of the U.S. government. The IAF promotes equitable, responsible, and participatory self-help development in the Caribbean and Latin America by awarding grants directly to local grassroots organizations, as well as to larger organizations that…

  12. Vacation Study Abroad, 1994/95. The Complete Guide to Summer and Short-Term Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sara J., Ed.

    This book describes over 2,100 academic programs sponsored by U.S. and foreign universities, language schools, and a wide variety of other organizations for summer and short-term study abroad programs. Entries are based on a 1993 survey. While most programs listed are available to undergraduates, many programs are also open to precollege students,…

  13. Academic Year Abroad, 1994/95. The Most Complete Guide to Planning Academic Year Study Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sara J., Ed.

    This book describes over 2,100 academic programs (at least one academic quarter in length) sponsored by accredited U.S. postsecondary institutions or developed for U.S. students by foreign universities and other organizations. Entries are based on a 1993 survey. While most programs listed are available to undergraduates, many programs are also…

  14. Joint Force Quarterly. Number 6, Autumn/Winter 1994-95

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    planning was often troubled by the discovery of hitherto unknown or underappreciated weapon effects. Defense planners cannot know exactly what will be...ready and re- sponsive.18 The need for a separate air force was clearest to commanders at theater-level J F Q F O R U M C–5 Galaxy at San Vito Air...Confederacy. It was a fertile farming area and held large iron deposits as well as numerous forges and furnaces. With the lack of industrial capacity

  15. German Graduate Student Professional Development: Report on a Survey of Perceptions (1994-95).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonglewski, Margaret; Penningroth, Ann

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 188 graduate students in 28 German programs investigated students' perceptions of their own professional development for teaching or work in business or government. It examined career goals, the importance of and participation in professional development activities, relationship with advisor/mentor on professional development issues,…

  16. 1994-95 Legislative Program, Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community Coll. District, El Cajon, CA.

    This booklet presents policy positions adopted by the Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District Governing Board, forming a legislative agenda for the college focused on the state issues of access, financing, economic development, and regulatory impediments; and the federal issues of financial aid, workforce development, and administrative…

  17. Follow-Up of JCCC Career Program Completers, Class of 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    Each year, Kansas' Johnson County Community College (JCCC) surveys students who completed career programs during the previous year and their current employers to determine outcomes and levels of satisfaction. In fall 1995, 723 students who earned degrees and certificates or who left the college with marketable skills were surveyed. Completed…

  18. Brookhaven highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Established in 1947 on Long Island, New York, on the site of the former army Camp Upton, BNL is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated Universities, Inc., under contract to the US Department of Energy. BNL`s annual budget is about $400 million, and the Laboratory`s facilities are valued at replacements cost in excess of over $2.8 billion. Employees number around 3,300,and over 4,000 guests, collaborators and students come each year to use the Laboratory`s facilities and work with the staff. Scientific and technical achievements at BNL have made their way into daily life in areas as varied as health care, construction materials and video games. The backbone of these developments is fundamental research, which is and always will be an investment in the future.

  19. High energy density physics effects predicted in simulations of the CERN HiRadMat beam-target interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Experiments have been done at the CERN HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials) facility in which large cylindrical copper targets were irradiated with 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The primary purpose of these experiments was to confirm the existence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra-relativistic protons and their hadronic shower in solid materials, that was predicted by previous numerical simulations. The experimental measurements have shown very good agreement with the simulation results. This provides confidence in our simulations of the interaction of the 7 TeV LHC (Large Hadron Collider) protons and the 50 TeV Future Circular Collider (FCC) protons with solid materials, respectively. This work is important from the machine protection point of view. The numerical simulations have also shown that in the HiRadMat experiments, a significant part of thetarget material is be converted into different phases of High Energy Density (HED) matter, including two-phase solid-liquid mixture, expanded as well as compressed hot liquid phases, two-phase liquid-gas mixture and gaseous state. The HiRadMat facility is therefore a unique ion beam facility worldwide that is currently available for studying the thermophysical properties of HED matter. In the present paper we discuss the numerical simulation results and present a comparison with the experimental measurements.

  20. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  1. Nuclear reaction measurements of 95 MeV/u 12C interactions on PMMA for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunn, B.; Labalme, M.; Ban, G.; Chevallier, M.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Dauvergne, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Haas, F.; Guertin, A.; Lebhertz, D.; Le Foulher, F.; Pautard, C.; Ray, C.; Rousseau, M.; Salsac, M. D.; Stuttge, L.; Testa, E.; Testa, M.

    2011-11-01

    The ion dose deposition in tissues is characterized by a favorable depth dose profile (i.e. Bragg peak) and a small lateral spread. In order to keep these benefits of ions in cancer treatments, a very high accuracy is required on the dose deposition (±3%). For given target stoichiometry and geometry, the largest uncertainty on the physical dose deposition is due to the ion nuclear fragmentation. We have performed an experiment at GANIL with a 95 MeV/u 12C beam on thick tissue equivalent PMMA targets (thicknesses: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mm). The main goals of this experiment are to provide experimental fragmentation data for benchmarking the physical models used for treatment planning. Production rates, energy and angular distributions of charged fragments have been measured. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of this experiment.

  2. Electromagnetics laboratory annual report, 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindell, I. V.; Sihvola, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    Activities of the Electromagnetics Laboratory during 1994 are described in this report. As highlights of the output stand the monographs Electromagnetic Waves in Chiral and Bi-Isotropic Media (Artech House, Boston) and History of Electrical Engineering (Otatieto, Espoo, in Finnish). Also, the total number of papers published and accepted for publication in international refereed journals show a new record, 40 items.

  3. Household vehicles energy consumption 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

  4. WATESOL Journal, 1989-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WATESOL Journal, 1994

    1994-01-01

    "WATESOL" is an acronym for "Washington Area Teachers of English To Speakers of Other Languages." This document consists of the only three issues of the "WATESOL Journal" published from 1989 through 1994. Fall 1989 includes: (1) "The Visual Voices of Nonverbal Films" (Salvatore J. Parlato); (2)…

  5. FY 1994 Annual Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This is the third Office of Inspector General (OIG)Annual Work Plan. Its purpose is to summarize work completed in Fiscal Year (FY) 1993, identify ongoing projects from previous fiscal years which the OIG intends to continue into FY 1994, and announce planned projects which the OIG intends to begin in FY 19994.

  6. Women in Higher Education, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenninger, Mary Dee, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This document consists of the 12 monthly issues of a newsletter on women students, teachers, and administrators in higher education, issued in 1994. Each issue includes feature articles, news on higher education, profiles of significant people in the field, and job announcements. The issues' main article topics are: (1) campuses's changing…

  7. Community College Humanities Review, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seabrook, John H., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Designed as a forum for the exchange of ideas on significant issues in the humanities, this annual journal presents articles written by two-year college faculty in the humanities disciplines. The 1994 issue includes the following articles: (1) "Notes to a Lecture on Euripides' Medea: Medean Apolis," by Daniel Canney; (2) "The Holocaust Experience:…

  8. Beam Beam Simulation Studies for NLC And SLC2000

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.A.; Chen, P.; Irwin, J.; Zimmermann, F.; /SLAC

    2010-05-27

    We apply and modify the computer codes CAIN(P.Chen, G.Horton-Smith, T.Ohgaki, A.W.Weidemann, K.Yokoya, contributed to Workshop on Gamma-Gamma Colliders, Berkeley, CA, March 28-31, 1994; SLAC-PUB-6583.) and GUINEAPIG(D.Schulte (DESY), unpublished.) to make detailed studies of the beam-beam interaction in the SLAC design for a future linear collider (NLC), as well as to the proposed SLC2000 project. Using realistic beam distributions, we present simulations related to the tuning and optimization of luminosity in SLC2000 and NLC.

  9. Final Report for Statistical Nonlinear Optics of High Energy Density Plasmas: The Physics of Multiple Crossing Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Afeyan, Bedros; Hueller, Stefan; Montgomery, David S.; Hammer, James H.; Meezan, Nathan B.; Heebner, John E.

    2016-10-24

    The various implementations of the STUD pulse program (spike trains of uneven duration and delay) for LPI (laser-plasma instability) control were studied in depth, and novel regimes were found. How to generate STUD pulses with large time-bandwidth products, how to measure their optical scattering signatures, and how to experimentally demonstrate their usefulness were explored. Theoretical and numerical studies were conducted on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) and Crossed Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) including statistical models. We established how LPI can be tamed and gain democratized in space and time. Implementing STUD pulses on NIF was also studied. Future high rep rate lasers and fast diagnostics will aid in the adoption of the whole STUD pulse program for LPI control in High Energy Density Plasmas (HEDP).

  10. ESnet Program Plan 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Merola, S.

    1994-11-01

    This Program Plan characterizes ESnet with respect to the current and future needs of Energy Research programs for network infrastructure, services, and development. In doing so, this document articulates the vision and recommendations of the ESnet Steering Committee regarding ESnet`s development and its support of computer networking facilities and associated user services. To afford the reader a perspective from which to evaluate the ever-increasing utility of networking to the Energy Research community, we have also provided a historical overview of Energy Research networking. Networking has become an integral part of the work of DOE principal investigators, and this document is intended to assist the Office of Scientific Computing in ESnet program planning and management, including prioritization and funding. In particular, we identify the new directions that ESnet`s development and implementation will take over the course of the next several years. Our basic goal is to ensure that the networking requirements of the respective scientific programs within Energy Research are addressed fairly. The proliferation of regional networks and additional network-related initiatives by other Federal agencies is changing the process by which we plan our own efforts to serve the DOE community. ESnet provides the Energy Research community with access to many other peer-level networks and to a multitude of other interconnected network facilities. ESnet`s connectivity and relationship to these other networks and facilities are also described in this document. Major Office of Energy Research programs are managed and coordinated by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, the Office of Magnetic Fusion Energy, the Office of Scientific Computing, and the Office of Health and Environmental Research. Summaries of these programs are presented, along with their functional and technical requirements for wide-area networking.

  11. Validation of electromagnetic and hadronic physical processes in the interaction of a proton beam with matter: A Solar Particle Events case study with an Al slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loffredo, Filomena; Vardaci, Emanuele; Quarto, Maria; Roca, Vincenzo; Pugliese, Mariagabriella

    2017-01-01

    In the study of the effectiveness of shielding materials against radiations, one of the main steps concerns with the validation of models describing the interaction processes of the radiation of interest with the material chosen for the shielding. This paper shows the results of the validation of electromagnetic and hadronic processes with the aim to contribute to the study of protection for astronauts against the radiations due to the Solar Particle Events, in particular to the selection of the optimal material for radiation shielding. The physics case deals with the interaction of a proton beam with an aluminum slab about 20 g/cm2 thick. Two specific applications, STP and DOSE, were developed by using Geant4 package. STP computes the radiations produced in the interaction and their stopping power; DOSE computes the absorbed dose from the stopping power calculated by STP. The validation process was performed in two steps. In the first one, the output of the STP code is compared to data available on NIST database; in the second one, the absorbed dose computed with DOSE is compared to the dose gathered during an experiment performed at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory involving the bombardment of an aluminum slab with a 1 GeV proton beam. The computing model has allowed us to correlate the size of the impinging beam profile to the dose measured before and after an Al slab. The sharp increase of the dose in the position right after the slab might be due to the stochastic nature of the trajectories of charged ions in matter which makes the radiation to emerge with non-zero transverse linear momentum. From the case examined here, we conclude that aluminum is not an efficient material for Solar Particle Event shielding.

  12. Closeout for U.S. Department of Energy Final Technical Report for University of Arizona grant DOE Award Number DE-FG03-95ER40906 From 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004 Grant title: Theory and Phenomenology of Strong and Weak High Energy Physics (Task A) and Experimental Elementary Particle Physics (Task B)

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherfoord, John; Toussaint, Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2005-03-03

    The following pages describe the high energy physics program at the University of Arizona which was funded by DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER40906, for the period 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004. In this report, emphasis was placed on more recent accomplishments. This grant was divided into two tasks, a theory task (Task A) and an experimental task (Task B but called Task C early in the grant period) with separate budgets. Faculty supported by this grant, for at least part of this period, include, for the theory task, Adrian Patrascioiu (now deceased), Ina Sarcevic, and Douglas Toussaint., and, for the experimental task, Elliott Cheu, Geoffrey Forden, Kenneth Johns, John Rutherfoord, Michael Shupe, and Erich Varnes. Grant monitors from the Germantown DOE office, overseeing our grant, changed over the years. Dr. Marvin Gettner covered the first years and then he retired from the DOE. Dr. Patrick Rapp worked with us for just a few years and then left for a position at the University of Puerto Rico. Dr. Kathleen Turner took his place and continues as our grant monitor. The next section of this report covers the activities of the theory task (Task A) and the last section the activities of the experimental task (Task B).

  13. UNFINISHED JOURNEY Project. Quarterly report, September 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    In September, 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy (Nevada Operations Office) made a $199,708 grant (through the Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education Program), to the UNFINISHED JOURNEY Project. The Project began in April, 1994, to develop and implement an innovative model of student outreach by San Jose State University (SJSU) to underserved, underrepresented student populations of the East Side Union High School District (ESUHSD). The Project was formed by a consortium involving SJSU, ESUHSD, some 20 private sector organizations (foundations/corporations), numerous local community/professional organizations, and approximately 100 private funders. This proposal to the U.S. Department of Energy was to have the Department join this unique partnership to focus University outreach to underserved student populations to pursue careers in mathematics, science, and technology.

  14. 1994 State Legislation on Native American Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Kimberly A.

    This report includes state-by-state summaries of 1994 legislation pertaining to Native American issues. Of 344 bills introduced in the state legislatures in 1994, 92 were enacted and 20 are still pending. Major issues addressed in 1994 legislation included Native American education; history, language, and culture preservation; sovereignty; law…

  15. Routine Operational Environmental Monitoring schedule, CY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This document provides Health Physics (HP) a schedule in accordance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) Program during calendar year (CY) 1994. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of EES and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive waste sites are scheduled to be surveyed annually at a minimum. Any newly discovered waste sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995. This schedule does not discuss the manpower needs nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines.

  16. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  17. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  18. [Treatment with charged particles beams: hadrontherapy part I: physical basis and clinical experience of treatment with protons].

    PubMed

    Noël, G; Feuvret, L; Ferrand, R; Mazeron, J-J

    2003-10-01

    Protons have physical characteristics, which differ from those of photons used in conventional radiotherapy. Better shielding of critical organs is obtained by using their particular ballistic (Bragg peak and lateral narrow penumbra). Some indications as ocular melanoma, chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull are now strongly accepted by the radiation oncologist community. Others are still in evaluation: meningioma, locally advanced nasopharynx tumor and paediatric tumors. The aim of this review is to present the clinical results of a technic which seems "confidential" because of the rarety and the cost of equipments.

  19. Beam-beam simulations for separated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-04-10

    We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong-strong gaussian code for separated beams for the LHC and RHIC. The frequency spectrum produced by the beam-beam collisions is readily obtained and offers a good opportunity for experimental comparisons. Although our results for the emittance blowup are preliminary, we conclude that, for nominal parameter values, there is no significant difference between separated beams and center-on-center collisions.

  20. Monthly energy review, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Energy production during March 1994 totaled 5.9 quadrillion Btu, a 3.7-percent increase from the level of production during March 1993. Coal production increased 15.7 percent, petroleum production fell 4.1 percent, and natural gas production decreased 1.1 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were up 0.5 percent from the level of production during March 1993. Energy consumption during March 1994 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 1.3 percent below the level of consumption during March 1993. Natural gas consumption decreased 3.6 percent, petroleum consumption fell 1.6 percent, and coal consumption remained the same. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined increased 3.7 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during March 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 6.7 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 3.2 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 15.7 percent. Net exports of coal rose 2.1 percent from the level in March 1993.

  1. Monthly energy review, August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-29

    Energy production during May 1994 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 2.4-percent increase from the level of production during May 1993. Coal production increased 13.3 percent, natural gas production rose 1.7 percent, and petroleum production decreased 2.5 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 8.3 percent from the level of production during May 1993. Energy consumption during May 1994 totaled 6.6 quadrillion Btu, 3.6 percent above the level of consumption during May 1993. Natural gas consumption increased 8.7 percent, coal consumption rose 4.6 percent, and petroleum consumption was up 3.6 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 5.8 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during May 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 14.3 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 8.4 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 23.2 percent. Net exports of coal fell 16.8 percent from the level in May 1993.

  2. Monthly energy review, July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-26

    Energy production during April 1994 totaled 5.5 quadrillion Btu, a 2.2-percent increase from the level of production during April 1993. Coal production increased 11.8 percent, petroleum production fell 4.0 percent, and natural gas production decreased 0.3 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 2.9 percent from the level of production during April 1993. Energy consumption during April 1994 totaled 6.7 quadrillion Btu, 1.4 percent above the level of consumption during April 1993. Petroleum consumption increased 3.9 percent, coal consumption rose 1.1 percent, and natural gas consumption decreased 1.5 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.4 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during April 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 8.7 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 4.5 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 18.5 percent. Net exports of coal fell 9.2 percent from the level in April 1993.

  3. Effect of thickness on physical properties of electron beam vacuum evaporated CdZnTe thin films for tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Subhash; Dhaka, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    The thickness and physical properties of electron beam vacuum evaporated CdZnTe thin films have been optimized in the present work. The films of thickness 300 nm and 400 nm were deposited on ITO coated glass substrates and subjected to different characterization tools like X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectrophotometer, source meter and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the structural, optical, electrical and surface morphological properties respectively. The XRD results show that the as-deposited CdZnTe thin films have zinc blende cubic structure and polycrystalline in nature with preferred orientation (111). Different structural parameters are also evaluated and discussed. The optical study reveals that the optical transition is found to be direct and energy band gap is decreased for higher thickness. The transmittance is found to increase with thickness and red shift observed which is suitable for CdZnTe films as an absorber layer in tandem solar cells. The current-voltage characteristics of deposited films show linear behavior in both forward and reverse directions as well as the conductivity is increased for higher film thickness. The SEM studies show that the as-deposited CdZnTe thin films are found to be homogeneous, uniform, small circle-shaped grains and free from crystal defects. The experimental results confirm that the film thickness plays an important role to optimize the physical properties of CdZnTe thin films for tandem solar cell applications as an absorber layer.

  4. STS-95 Day 02 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this second day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, are seen preparing a glovebox device in the middeck area of Discovery, an enclosed research facility that will support numerous science investigations throughout the mission. Payload Specialist John Glenn, activates the Microgravity Encapsulation Process experiment (MEPS). This experiment will study the formation of capsules containing two kinds of anti-tumor drugs that could be delivered directly to solid tumors with applications for future chemotherapy treatments and the pharmaceutical industry.

  5. Soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam CT: Evaluation by 2AFC tests in relation to physical performance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tward, D. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Daly, M. J.; Richard, S.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Paul, N. S.

    2007-11-15

    Soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was evaluated via two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) tests. Investigations included the dependence of detectability on radiation dose, the influence of the asymmetric three-dimensional (3D) noise-power spectrum (NPS) in axial and sagittal or coronal planes, and the effect of prior knowledge on detectability. Custom-built phantoms ({approx}15 cm diameter cylinders) containing soft-tissue-simulating spheres of variable contrast and diameter were imaged on an experimental CBCT bench. The proportion of correct responses (P{sub corr}) in 2AFC tests was analyzed as a figure of merit, ideally equal to the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. P{sub corr} was evaluated as a function of the sphere diameter (1.6-12.7 mm), contrast (20-165 HU), dose (1-7 mGy), plane of visualization (axial/sagittal), apodization filter (Hanning and Ram-Lak), and prior knowledge provided to the observer [ranging from stimulus known exactly (SKE) to stimulus unknown (SUK)]. Detectability limits were characterized in terms of the dose required to achieve a given level of P{sub corr} (e.g., 70%). For example, a 20 HU stimulus of diameter down to {approx}6 mm was detected with P{sub corr} 70% at dose {>=}2 mGy. Detectability tended to be greater in axial than in sagittal planes, an effect amplified by sharper apodization filters in a manner consistent with 3D NPS asymmetry. Prior knowledge had a marked influence on detectability - e.g., P{sub corr} for a {approx}6 mm(20 HU) sphere was {approx}55%-65% under SUK conditions, compared to {approx}70%-85% for SKE conditions. Human observer tests suggest practical implications for implementation of CBCT: (i) Detectability limits help to define minimum-dose imaging techniques for specific imaging tasks; (ii) detectability of a given structure can vary between axial and sagittal/coronal planes, owing to the spatial-frequency content of the 3D NPS in relation to the

  6. Soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam CT: evaluation by 2AFC tests in relation to physical performance metrics.

    PubMed

    Tward, D J; Siewerdsen, J H; Daly, M J; Richard, S; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A; Paul, N S

    2007-11-01

    Soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was evaluated via two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) tests. Investigations included the dependence of detectability on radiation dose, the influence of the asymmetric three-dimensional (3D) noise-power spectrum (NPS) in axial and sagittal or coronal planes, and the effect of prior knowledge on detectability. Custom-built phantoms (approximately 15 cm diameter cylinders) containing soft-tissue-simulating spheres of variable contrast and diameter were imaged on an experimental CBCT bench. The proportion of correct responses (Pcorr) in 2AFC tests was analyzed as a figure of merit, ideally equal to the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Pcorr was evaluated as a function of the sphere diameter (1.6-12.7 mm), contrast (20-165 HU), dose (1-7 mGy), plane of visualization (axial/sagittal), apodization filter (Hanning and Ram-Lak), and prior knowledge provided to the observer [ranging from stimulus known exactly (SKE) to stimulus unknown (SUK)]. Detectability limits were characterized in terms of the dose required to achieve a given level of Pcorr (e.g., 70%). For example, a 20 HU stimulus of diameter down to approximately 6 mm was detected with Pcorr 70% at dose > or =2 mGy. Detectability tended to be greater in axial than in sagittal planes, an effect amplified by sharper apodization filters in a manner consistent with 3D NPS asymmetry. Prior knowledge had a marked influence on detectability--e.g., Pcorr for a approximately 6 mm (20 HU) sphere was approximately 55%-65% under SUK conditions, compared to approximately 70%-85% for SKE conditions. Human observer tests suggest practical implications for implementation of CBCT: (i) Detectability limits help to define minimum-dose imaging techniques for specific imaging tasks; (ii) detectability of a given structure can vary between axial and sagittal/coronal planes, owing to the spatial-frequency content of the 3D NPS in relation to the

  7. An attempt to correlate surface physics with chemical properties: molecular beam and Kelvin probe investigations of Ce1-xZrxO2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Sadhu K; Dubey, Anjani; Date, Kalyani S; Datar, Suwarna; Gopinath, Chinnakonda S

    2016-10-05

    What is the correlation between physical properties of the surfaces (such as surface potential, electronic nature of the surface), and chemical and catalysis properties (such as chemisorption, sticking probability of surface)? An attempt has been made to explore any correlation that might exist between the physical and chemical properties of thin film surfaces. Kelvin probe microscopy (KPM) and the molecular beam (MB) methods were employed to carry out the surface potential, and oxygen adsorption and oxygen storage capacity (OSC) measurements on Ce1-xZrxO2 thin films. A sol-gel synthesis procedure and spin-coating deposition method have been applied to make continuous nanocrystalline Ce1-xZrxO2 (x = 0-1) (CZ) thin films with uniform thickness (35-50 nm); however, surface roughness and porosity inherently changes with CZ composition. MB studies of O2 adsorption on CZ reveal high OSC for Ce0.9Zr0.1O2, which also exhibits highly porous and significantly rough surface characteristics. The surface potential observed from KPM studies varied between 30 and 80 mV, with Ce-rich compositions exhibiting the highest surface potential. Surface potential shows large changes after reduction or oxidation of the CZ film demonstrating the influence of Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) on surface potential, which is also a key to catalytic activity for ceria-based catalysts. The surface potential measured from KPM and the OSC measured from MB vary linearly and they depend on the Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) ratio. More and detailed studies are suggested to arrive at a correlation between the physical and chemical properties of the surfaces.

  8. SKILL PREP Program for American Indian Students. Final report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloh, S.; Huebner, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Scientific Knowledge for Indian Learning and Leadership (SKILL) precollege college program of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology concluded the 1994 PREP program on July 22, 1994. The program graduated 22 students from the 4-week residential math/science program for American Indian students. Primary academic focus was physics (30 hours); each student was given a bicycle to solve problems on angular momentum and mechanical advantage. Mathematical calculations and problem solving exercises were done in mathematics class (20 hours). Preliminary results in math, physics, and geology show dramatic increases in student achievement over the 4- week period. The program paired every two students with a faculty member or research scientist, and each team completed a research project.

  9. 95-GHz millimeter wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHarg, J. C.; Abouzahra, Mohamed D.; Lucey, R. F.

    1996-12-01

    Recent advances in MMW solid-state technology, combined with state-of-the-art quasi-optical feed elements, have made possible upgrades to an instrumentation radar in the W-band. Mixer diodes capable of cryogenic operation have led to a reduction in the receiver noise figure, and a Gunn-effect diode amplifier has boosted transmit power. Application of Gaussian beam optics has provided a reduction in transmit and receive losses, while increasing transmit/receive isolation and power handling capability. In all, an improvement of almost two orders of magnitude is ought, yielding the capability to provide metric tracking and range-Doppler imaging on a variety of important targets.

  10. WE-FG-207A-03: Low-Dose Cone-Beam Breast CT: Physics and Technology Development.

    PubMed

    Boone, J

    2016-06-01

    dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1-8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In

  11. LLE review. Quarterly report, January 1994--March 1994, Volume 58

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, A.

    1994-07-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period Jan - Mar 1994, contains articles on backlighting diagnostics; the effect of electron collisions on ion-acoustic waves and heat flow; using PIC code simulations for analysis of ultrashort laser pulses interacting with solid targets; creating a new instrument for characterizing thick cryogenic layers; and a description of a large-aperture ring amplifier for laser-fusion drivers. Three of these articles - backlighting diagnostics; characterizing thick cryogenic layers; and large-aperture ring amplifier - are directly related to the OMEGA Upgrade, now under construction. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  12. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  13. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  14. Affirmative Action Plans, January 1, 1994--December 31, 1994. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-16

    This document is the Affirmative Action Plan for January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California (``LBL`` or ``the Laboratory.``) This is an official document that will be presented upon request to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, US Department of Labor. The plan is prepared in accordance with the Executive Order 11246 and 41 CFR Section 60-1 et seq. covering equal employment opportunity and will be updated during the year, if appropriate. Analyses included in this volume as required by government regulations are based on statistical comparisons. All statistical comparisons involve the use of geographic areas and various sources of statistics. The geographic areas and sources of statistics used here are in compliance with the government regulations, as interpreted. The use of any geographic area or statistic does not indicate agreement that the geographic area is the most appropriate or that the statistic is the most relevant. The use of such geographic areas and statistics is intended to have no significance outside the context of this Affirmative Action Plan, although, of course, such statistics and geographic areas will be used in good faith with respect to this Affirmative Action Plan.

  15. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The {open_quotes}early implementation{close_quotes} phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large {gamma}-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive {sup 21}Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium.

  16. 1994 Athletic Trainer Employment and Salary Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brent L.; Perrin, David H.; VanLunen, Bonnie L.; Szczerba, Joseph E.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Gansneder, Bruce M.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine: 1) demographics and professional credentials of recently hired athletic trainers, 2) the association between these characteristics and the high school, clinical, and collegiate setting, and 3) which of these factors best predicted salary. Design and Setting: A survey was sent to all prospective employers. Of the 472 surveys sent, 282 (60%) were returned. Subjects: Prospective employers who were listed on the NATA job vacancy notices from January 1, 1994 to October 1, 1994. Measurements: Employers selected a job description for their position opening and indicated the characteristics of the people they hired. The job descriptions were placed into three categories. A chi-square analysis was used to determine the degree of association between applicant characteristics and job descriptions. Employee characteristics were coded and a stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to determined which of the characteristics best predicted salary. Analyses of variance were performed to determine differences among the three practice settings and as follow-up analyses to the multiple regression. An analysis of variance was also performed to compare salaries based on job description and teaching responsibilities. Results: No association was found between the employment setting and gender, ethnicity, marital status, educational route, physical therapy, credential, or EMT certification. There was an association between the CPR instructor's credential and employment setting and between highest degree attained and employment setting. Conclusions: The results suggest that these factors were most closely associated with employment in the collegiate setting. With regard to salary, it was determined that a doctoral degree, a master's degree, and marital status were the best predictors of salary. PMID:16558401

  17. Multi-Megawatt Operation of a 95 GHz Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felch, Kevin; Blank, Monica; Borchard, Philipp; Cahalan, Pat; Cauffman, Steve

    2010-11-01

    A 95 GHz gyrotron capable of generating CW power levels in excess of 2 MW is under development at CPI. The gyrotron employs a single-anode electron gun that produces a 90-kV, 75-A electron beam for interaction with the TE22,6,1 cavity mode. Output power from the cavity is transformed into a Gaussian beam using an internal converter that consists of a waveguide launcher and three focusing and phase-correcting mirrors. The beam exits the tube through a chemical-vapor-deposition diamond window. The spent electron beam is dissipated in a 40.6-cm diameter collector fabricated from a strengthened copper alloy. The collector nominally operates at a voltage of 61 kV relative to the cathode potential to minimize the amount of power absorbed in the collector and to improve efficiency. In tests on the gyrotron the maximum power achieved thus far is 1.72 MW with 33% efficiency at the nominal beam current of 75 A. At a reduced beam current of 45 A, an output power of 1.4 MW is obtained with over 50% efficiency. We are planning tube modifications to increase the output power level where efficiencies of greater than 50% can still be obtained.

  18. California energy flow in 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Mui, N.

    1996-09-01

    California energy consumption increased in 1994 in keeping with a recovery from the previous mild recession years. Although unemployment remained above the national average, other indicators pointed to improved economic health. Increased energy use was registered principally in the residential/commercial and transportation end-use sectors. A cooler-than-usual winter and spring was reflected in increased consumption of natural gas, the principal space-heating fuel in the state. Because of low water levels behind state dams, utilities turned to natural gas for electrical generation and to increased imports from out-of- state sources to meet demand. Other factors, such as smaller output from geothermal, biomass, and cogenerators, contributed to the need for the large increase in electrical supply from these two sources. Nonetheless, petroleum dominated the supply side of the energy equation of the state in which transportation requirements comprise more than one-third of total energy demand. About half of the oil consumed derived from California production. Onshore production has been in slow decline; however, in 1994 the decrease was compensated for by increases from federal offshore fields. Until 1994 production had been limited by regulatory restrictions relating to the movement of the crude oil to onshore refineries. State natural gas production remained at 1993 levels. The increased demand was met by larger imports from Canada through the recent expansion of Pacific Transmission Company`s 804 mile pipeline. Deregulation of the state`s utilities moved ahead in 1994 when the California Public Utilities Commission issued its proposal on how to restructure the industry. Public hearings were conducted in which the chief issues were recovery of the utilities` capital investments, conflicts with the Public Utilities Policies Act, management of power transactions between new suppliers and former utility customers, and preservation of energy conservation programs

  19. Electric sales and revenue 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

  20. Natural gas monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is the executive summary from Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  1. Scientific development of a massively parallel ocean climate model. Progress report for 1992--1993 and Continuing request for 1993--1994 to CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics)

    SciTech Connect

    Semtner, A.J. Jr.; Chervin, R.M.

    1993-05-01

    During the second year of CHAMMP funding to the principal investigators, progress has been made in the proposed areas of research, as follows: investigation of the physics of the thermohaline circulation; examination of resolution effects on ocean general circulation; and development of a massively parallel ocean climate model.

  2. A large liquid argon time projection chamber for long-baseline, off-axis neutrino oscillation physics with the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.; Jensen, D.; Jostlein, H.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Bromberg, C.; Lu, C.; McDonald, T.; Gallagher, H.; Mann, A.; Schneps, J.; Cline, D.; Sergiampietri, F.; Wang, H.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B.T.; Menary, S.; /York U., Canada

    2005-09-01

    Results from neutrino oscillation experiments in the last ten years have revolutionized the field of neutrino physics. While the overall oscillation picture for three neutrinos is now well established and precision measurements of the oscillation parameters are underway, crucial issues remain. In particular, the hierarchy of the neutrino masses, the structure of the neutrino mixing matrix, and, above all, CP violation in the neutrino sector are the primary experimental challenges in upcoming years. A program that utilizes the newly commissioned NuMI neutrino beamline, and its planned upgrades, together with a high-performance, large-mass detector will be in an excellent position to provide decisive answers to these key neutrino physics questions. A Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) [2], which combines fine-grained tracking, total absorption calorimetry, and scalability, is well matched for this physics program. The few-millimeter-scale spatial granularity of a LArTPC combined with dE/dx measurements make it a powerful detector for neutrino oscillation physics. Scans of simulated event samples, both directed and blind, have shown that electron identification in {nu}{sub e} charged current interactions can be maintained at an efficiency of 80%. Backgrounds for {nu}{sub e} appearance searches from neutral current events with a {pi}{sup 0} are reduced well below the {approx} 0.5-1.0% {nu}{sub e} contamination of the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam [3]. While the ICARUS collaboration has pioneered this technology and shown its feasibility with successful operation of the T600 (600-ton) LArTPC [4], a detector for off-axis, long-baseline neutrino physics must be many times more massive to compensate for the low event rates. We have a baseline concept [5] based on the ICARUS wire plane structure and commercial methods of argon purification and housed in an industrial liquefied-natural-gas tank. Fifteen to fifty kton liquid argon capacity tanks have been considered. A very

  3. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1994, through March 31, 1994. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal drying process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal processing, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership`s ACCP Demonstration Facility entered Phase III, Demonstration Operation, in April 1992 and operated in an extended startup mode through August 10, 1993, when the facility became commercial. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership instituted an aggressive program to overcome startup obstacles and now focuses on supplying product coal to customers. Significant accomplishments in the history of the SynCoal{reg_sign} process development are shown in Appendix A.

  4. [Comparison of a dental cone beam CT with a multi-detector row CT on effective doses and physical image quality].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Tokumori, Kenji; Okamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshiura, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a dental cone beam computed tomography (dental CBCT) and a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) using effective doses and physical image quality. A dental mode (D-mode) and an implant mode (I-mode) were employed for calculating effective doses. Field of view (FOV) size of the MDCT was 150 mm. Three types of images were obtained using 3 different reconstruction functions: FC1 (for abdomen images), FC30 (for internal ear and bone images) and FC81 (for high resolution images). Effective doses obtained with the D-mode and with the I-mode were about 20% and 50% of those obtained with the MDCT, respectively. Resolution properties obtained with the D-mode and I-mode were superior to that of the MDCT in a high frequency range. Noise properties of the D-mode and the I-mode were better than those with FC81. It was found that the dental CBCT has better potential as compared with MDCT in both dental and implant modes.

  5. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, January 1994--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-04

    The objectives of the EHAP program are to: Develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management and risk communication; Develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects, and; Identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes activities and reports on progress for the third quarter of year two (January-March, 1994) of the grant. To better accomplish objectives, grant efforts are organized into three major elements: The Crossroads of Humanity Series; Research, Science and Education Programs; and Program Management. The Crossroads of Humanity Series charted a new course, incorporating lessons learned during previous quarters into a series of programs designed to address environmental issues in a real world setting. Reports are included on the various research programs with milestones and deliverables from the third quarter.

  6. Placement Survey Report: North Hennepin Community College 1994-1995 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winch, Cheryl; And Others

    Comprised primarily of data tables, this report presents findings from a survey conducted by Minnesota's North Hennepin Community College (NHCC) to determine outcomes for the 779 graduates from 1994-95. Following an introduction describing the study methodology and indicating that 672 graduates returned completed surveys, the first section…

  7. Deconfinement of Quarks with TeV Attosecond Photon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2010-02-01

    Recently, I have proposed a novel heuristic method for the deconfinement of quarks.footnotetextM. Gell-Mann. The Quark and the Jaguar: Adventures in the Simple and the Complex (New York, NY: W.H. Freeman and Co., 1994) [cf. M. Gell-Mann, The Garden of Live Flowers in: V. Stefan (Editor), Physics and Society. Essays Honoring Victor Frederick Weisskopf (Springer, 1998), pp. 109-121]. It proceeds in two phases.footnotetextV. Alexander Stefan, On a Heuristic Point of View About Inertial Deconfinement of Quarks, American Physical Society, 2009 APS April Meeting, May 2-5, 2009, abstract #E1.038. Firstly, a frozen hydrogen pellet is inertially confined by the ultra-intense lasers up to a solid state density. Secondly, a solid state nano-pellet is ``punched'' by the photon beam created in the beat wave driven free electron laser (BW-FEL), leading to the ``rapture'' (in a ``karate chop'' model) of the ``MIT Bag''footnotetextJ. I. Friedman and H. Kendall, Viki, in: V. Stefan (Editor), Physics and Society. (Springer, 1998), pp. 103-108]. before the asymptotically free quarks move apart. Hereby, I propose TeV, a few 100s attosecond, photon beams in interaction with the nano-pellet. The threshold ``rapture force'' of the TeV attosecond photon is 10^7 N. )

  8. Cartesian beams.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2007-12-01

    A new and very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in Cartesian coordinates is presented. We call such a field a Cartesian beam. The complex amplitude of the Cartesian beams is described by either the parabolic cylinder functions or the confluent hypergeometric functions, and the beams are characterized by three parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integration are studied in detail. Applying the general expression of the Cartesian beams, we also derive two new and meaningful beam structures that, to our knowledge, have not yet been reported in the literature. Special cases of the Cartesian beams are the standard, elegant, and generalized Hermite-Gauss beams, the cosine-Gauss beams, the Lorentz beams, and the fractional order beams.

  9. 1994 Ergonomics Program Quality Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Longbotham, L.; Miller, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the quality of service provided to the primary customers of the Corporate Ergonomics Group (CEG). One hundred clients who received services between October 1993 and June 1994 were asked questions on their expectations, implementation of ergonomic recommendations, follow-ups, time required, productivity improvements, symptom alleviation, and satisfaction. Suggestions on how processes could be improved were also solicited. In general, recommendations are being implemented, worksite evaluations are going smoothly, and customers are satisfied with the process. The CEG was pleased to learn that half of the people who implemented recommendations experienced improvements in productivity, and four out of five symptomatic customers experienced partial or complete relief. Through analysis of the data and by studying clients` suggestions for process improvement, the CEG has developed a strategy for changing and improving current procedures and practices. These plans can be found in the last section of this report.

  10. Monthly energy review, May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-25

    Energy production during February 1994 totaled 5.3 quadrillion Btu, a 2.2% increase over February 1993. Coal production increased 9%, natural gas rose 2.5%, and petroleum decreased 3.6%; all other forms of energy production combined were down 3%. Energy consumption during the same period totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 4.1% above February 1993. Natural gas consumption increased 5.8%, petroleum 5.2%, and coal 2.3%; consumption of all other energy forms combined decreased 0.7%. Net imports of energy totaled 1.4 quadrillion Btu, 16.9% above February 1993; petroleum net imports increased 10.1%, natural gas net imports were down 4.9%, and coal net exports fell 43.7%. This document is divided into: energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, international energy, appendices (conversion factors, etc.), and glossary.

  11. Special session on environment and energy, and repeated emphasis from early-`80s onwards, hybrid-drive targets for penetrating beams, that encompasses ultra high intensity lasers and/or particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W. ||

    1994-10-05

    In this special session, we discuss {bold global} {bold climate} {bold change} concerns, as well as {bold cleanup} {bold of} {bold wastes} {bold and}/{bold or} {bold toxic} {bold materials}, their relations to energy and other technologies. We especially bring together scientists to discuss available and/or developable technologies of amelioration or cleanup, for consideration of unusual uses of {bold Lasers}, {bold Particle} {bold Beams} {bold and} {bold other} {bold plasma} Phenomena. {copyright}{ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics} 1994

  12. Natural gas annual 1994: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data fro the Nation from 1930 to 1994, and by State from 1967 to 1994.

  13. Career Placement and Graduate Transfer Report, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Coll. of Rhode Island, Warwick.

    This report provides data on the career and transfer outcomes of 1994 graduates from the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI). A brief foreword indicates that surveys were distributed to 1,700 graduates from 1994, with 81% (n=1,380) responding. Next, data on graduate outcomes are presented for the following 36 programs: business…

  14. Research in experimental elementary particle physics. A proposal to the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew P. White; Kaushik De; Paul A. Draper; Ransom Stephens

    1995-04-13

    We report on the activities of the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Texas at Arlington for the period 1994-95. We propose the continuation of the research program for 1996-98 with strong participation in the detector upgrade and physics analysis work for the D0 Experiment at Fermilab, prototyping and pre-production studies for the muon and calorimeter systems for the ATLAS Experiment at CERN, and detector development and simulation studies for the PP2PP Experiment at Brookhaven.

  15. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  16. Final Technical Report 5/1/86 - 1/31/95

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-31

    This document summarizes progress made on this project during the third year (February 1, 1994--January 31, 1995) of the current three-year grant period and outlines proposed renewal period activities of the theoretical high energy physics group at the University of Arizona.

  17. Electron lenses for head-on beam-beam compensation in RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Altinbas, Z.; Anerella, M.; Bajon, E.; Bannon, M.; Bruno, D.; Costanzo, M.; Drees, A.; Gassner, D. M.; Gupta, R. C.; Hock, J.; Harvey, M.; Jain, A. K.; Jamilkowski, J. P.; Kankiya, P.; Lambiase, R.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mi, C.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; Minty, M.; Nemesure, S.; Ng, W.; Phillips, D.; Pikin, A. I.; Rosas, P. J.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Samms, T.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Shrey, T. C.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wanderer, P.; Zhang, W.; White, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    Two electron lenses (e -lenses) have been in operation during the 2015 RHIC physics run as part of a head-on beam-beam compensation scheme. While the RHIC lattice was chosen to reduce the beam-beam-induced resonance-driving terms, the electron lenses reduced the beam-beam-induced tune spread. This has been demonstrated for the first time. The beam-beam compensation scheme allows for higher beam-beam parameters and therefore higher intensities and luminosity. In this paper, we detail the design considerations and verification of the electron beam parameters of the RHIC e -lenses. Longitudinal and transverse alignments with ion beams and the transverse beam transfer function measurement with head-on electron-proton beam are presented.

  18. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Models, Exhibits, Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  19. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Models, Exhibits, Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  20. 47 CFR 95.1015 - Disclosure policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1015 Disclosure policies. (a) Manufacturers... authorized by rule under the Low Power Radio Service (47 CFR part 95) and must not cause harmful...

  1. 47 CFR 95.1015 - Disclosure policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1015 Disclosure policies. (a) Manufacturers... authorized by rule under the Low Power Radio Service (47 CFR part 95) and must not cause harmful...

  2. 47 CFR 95.1015 - Disclosure policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1015 Disclosure policies. (a) Manufacturers... authorized by rule under the Low Power Radio Service (47 CFR part 95) and must not cause harmful...

  3. The effects of transverse plasma flow on laser beam deflection and of ultra-intense laser beam filamentation on channel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.

    1997-11-01

    Recent experiments conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the Nova and Janus lasers demonstrate deflection of the laser beam in plasma with flow transverse to the beam. In gas-filled hohlraum experiments(S. G. Glendinning et al.), the laser spot on the hohlraum wall is ~ 100 μm closer to the laser entrance hole (LEH) than in empty hohlraum experiments, which degrades drive symmetry. In a series of exploding foil experiments(J. D. Moody et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1294 (1996)., intensity dependent deflection of the transmitted beam is observed, and interferometric measurements of laser-produced channels in preformed plasma(P. E. Young et al.), to be submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett., 1997. show beam deflection in the presence of near-sonic transverse flow. Theoretical analysis(D. E. Hinkel et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1298 (1996). yields simple scaling laws for the formation of ponderomotively (or thermally) created density depressions downstream from the laser beam's high intensity regions, into which the light is refracted. An integrated approach that utilizes plasma parameters from the hydrocode Lasnex, detailed knowledge of the beam structure, and plasma physics analysis and modelling with F3D(R. L. Berger et al.), Phys. Fluids B 5, 2243 (1993)., has been used to develop a predictive capability that successfully quantifies the amount of beam deflection occurring in experiments. Related physics of beam self-focussing and filamentation is of relevance to the Fast Ignitor(M. Tabak et al.), Phys. Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994).. In channeling experiments performed on the 100 TW laser at LLNL, the f/3 laser beam, which has a 15 μm waist at best focus, has intensities in excess of IL = 1 × 10^17 W/cm^2. Modelling of these high intensity experiments indicates that channel formation occurs over a wide range of cone angles for an idealized (Gaussian) beam. However, when beam structure is taken into consideration, channel formation in the underdense

  4. The Hanford Site focus, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.M.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes what the Hanford Site will look like in the next two years. We offer thumbnail sketches of Hanford Site programs and the needs we are meeting through our efforts. We describe our goals, some recent accomplishments, the work we will do in fiscal year (FY) 1994, the major activities the FY 1995 budget request covers, and the economic picture in the next few years. The Hanford Site budget shows the type of work being planned. US Department of Energy (DOE) sites like the Hanford Site use documents called Activity Data Sheets to meet this need. These are building blocks that are included in the budget. Each Activity Data Sheet is a concise (usually 4 or 5 pages) summary of a piece of work funded by the DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management budget. Each sheet describes a waste management or environmental restoration need over a 5-year period; related regulatory requirements and agreements; and the cost, milestones, and steps proposed to meet the need. The Hanford Site is complex and has a huge budget, and its Activity Data Sheets run to literally thousands of pages. This report summarizes the Activity Data Sheets in a less detailed and much more reader-friendly fashion.

  5. Structures Division 1994 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1994 are presented.

  6. PREP program annual report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    A total of thirty-three 9th and 10th grade American Indian students participated in the program. Curricular focal points were environmental science, supported by courses and labs in mathematics, technical writing, and chemistry. The 1994 summer program was the second year of the environmental science focus. The environmental component covered four topics during the month-long program: drinking water, waste water, solid waste pollution, and mining reclamation. The overall goal of the project was to encourage a greater number of the targeted high school students to acquire the necessary skills to succeed in rigorous college academic programs and to enter science-based disciplines. Students participating in the program were involved in a rigorous daily academic program of formal instruction. Participants lived in the residence halls and participated in many aspects of college life, including planned recreational activities. Students were also involved in academic year activities to maintain a heightened awareness and interest in science-based fields. These goals were met and the program was judged to be a success.

  7. 47 CFR 95.635 - Unwanted radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Unwanted radiation. 95.635 Section 95.635 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.635 Unwanted radiation. (a) In addition to...

  8. 47 CFR 95.635 - Unwanted radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Unwanted radiation. 95.635 Section 95.635 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.635 Unwanted radiation. (a) In addition to...

  9. 47 CFR 95.635 - Unwanted radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Unwanted radiation. 95.635 Section 95.635... SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.635 Unwanted radiation. Link to an amendment... Unwanted radiation. (d) * * * (1) * * * (v) Are more than 2.5 MHz outside of the 2360-2400 MHz band...

  10. 47 CFR 95.635 - Unwanted radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Unwanted radiation. 95.635 Section 95.635 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.635 Unwanted radiation. (a) In addition to...

  11. 21 CFR 1250.95 - Insect control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insect control. 1250.95 Section 1250.95 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.95 Insect control. Vessels shall be maintained free of infestation by flies, mosquitoes, fleas, lice, and other insects known to be vectors...

  12. 7 CFR 1948.95 - Grant monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Grant monitoring. 1948.95 Section 1948.95 Agriculture... § 1948.95 Grant monitoring. Each grant will be monitored by FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 to ensure that the Grantee is complying with the terms of the grant and that the...

  13. 7 CFR 1948.95 - Grant monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Grant monitoring. 1948.95 Section 1948.95 Agriculture... § 1948.95 Grant monitoring. Each grant will be monitored by FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 to ensure that the Grantee is complying with the terms of the grant and that the...

  14. 7 CFR 3575.95 - Future recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Future recovery. 3575.95 Section 3575.95 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL Community Programs Guaranteed Loans § 3575.95 Future recovery. After a loan has been...

  15. 7 CFR 1779.95 - Future recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Future recovery. 1779.95 Section 1779.95 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.95 Future recovery. After a loan...

  16. 7 CFR 1779.95 - Future recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Future recovery. 1779.95 Section 1779.95 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.95 Future recovery. After a loan...

  17. 7 CFR 3575.95 - Future recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Future recovery. 3575.95 Section 3575.95 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL Community Programs Guaranteed Loans § 3575.95 Future recovery. After a loan has been...

  18. 29 CFR 95.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Competition. 95.43 Section 95.43 Labor Office of the... Standards § 95.43 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert...

  19. 29 CFR 95.43 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Competition. 95.43 Section 95.43 Labor Office of the... Standards § 95.43 Competition. All procurement transactions shall be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and free competition. The recipient shall be alert...

  20. 45 CFR 95.519 - Cost disallowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost disallowance. 95.519 Section 95.519 Public... PROGRAMS (PUBLIC ASSISTANCE, MEDICAL ASSISTANCE AND STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS) Cost Allocation Plans § 95.519 Cost disallowance. If costs under a Public Assistance program are not claimed...

  1. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  2. 21 CFR 510.95 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 510.95 Section 510.95 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS General Provisions § 510.95...

  3. 10 CFR 9.5 - Interpretations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interpretations. 9.5 Section 9.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS § 9.5 Interpretations. Except as specifically authorized by the Commission in writing, no interpretation of the meaning of the regulations in this part by an officer or employee of...

  4. 47 CFR 95.851 - Certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification. 95.851 Section 95.851 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.851 Certification. Each CTS and RTU transmitter...

  5. 47 CFR 95.603 - Certification required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification required. 95.603 Section 95.603 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations General Provisions § 95.603 Certification required. (a) Each...

  6. 47 CFR 95.605 - Certification procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification procedures. 95.605 Section 95.605... SERVICES Technical Regulations General Provisions § 95.605 Certification procedures. Any entity may request certification for its transmitter when the transmitter is used in the GMRS, FRS, R/C, CB, 218-219 MHz...

  7. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  8. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  9. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  10. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  11. 47 CFR 95.1101 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 95.1101 Section 95.1101 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1101 Scope. This subpart...

  12. 47 CFR 95.1101 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope. 95.1101 Section 95.1101 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1101 Scope. This subpart...

  13. 50 CFR 27.95 - Fires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fires. 27.95 Section 27.95 Wildlife and... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.95 Fires. On all national wildlife refuges persons are prohibited from the following: (a) Setting on fire or causing to be set on fire...

  14. 50 CFR 27.95 - Fires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fires. 27.95 Section 27.95 Wildlife and... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.95 Fires. On all national wildlife refuges persons are prohibited from the following: (a) Setting on fire or causing to be set on fire...

  15. 50 CFR 27.95 - Fires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fires. 27.95 Section 27.95 Wildlife and... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.95 Fires. On all national wildlife refuges persons are prohibited from the following: (a) Setting on fire or causing to be set on fire...

  16. 50 CFR 27.95 - Fires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fires. 27.95 Section 27.95 Wildlife and... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.95 Fires. On all national wildlife refuges persons are prohibited from the following: (a) Setting on fire or causing to be set on fire...

  17. 50 CFR 27.95 - Fires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fires. 27.95 Section 27.95 Wildlife and... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.95 Fires. On all national wildlife refuges persons are prohibited from the following: (a) Setting on fire or causing to be set on fire...

  18. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  19. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  20. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. Except for the 2390-2400 MHz band, no antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use....

  1. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  2. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use. In addition, any MedRadio antenna used...

  3. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  4. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  5. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  6. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use. In addition, any MedRadio antenna used...

  7. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  8. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  9. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  10. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  11. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. Except for the 2390-2400 MHz band, no antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use....

  12. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  13. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  14. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  15. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. Link to an amendment published at 77 FR 55733, Sept. 11, 2012. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured...

  16. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  17. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  18. 33 CFR 159.95 - Safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety. 159.95 Section 159.95 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.95 Safety. (a) Each device must— (1) Be free...

  19. 33 CFR 159.95 - Safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety. 159.95 Section 159.95 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.95 Safety. (a) Each device must— (1) Be free...

  20. 33 CFR 159.95 - Safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety. 159.95 Section 159.95 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.95 Safety. (a) Each device must— (1) Be free...

  1. 33 CFR 159.95 - Safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety. 159.95 Section 159.95 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.95 Safety. (a) Each device must— (1) Be free...

  2. 33 CFR 159.95 - Safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety. 159.95 Section 159.95 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.95 Safety. (a) Each device must— (1) Be free...

  3. 29 CFR 95.24 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program income. 95.24 Section 95.24 Labor Office of the... Program Management § 95.24 Program income. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, program income earned during the project period shall be retained by the recipient and added to...

  4. 29 CFR 95.24 - Program income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Program income. 95.24 Section 95.24 Labor Office of the... Program Management § 95.24 Program income. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, program income earned during the project period shall be retained by the recipient and added to...

  5. 28 CFR 0.95 - General functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General functions. 0.95 Section 0.95 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Bureau of Prisons § 0.95 General functions. The Director of the Bureau of Prisons shall direct all activities of...

  6. 19 CFR 122.95 - Other provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other provisions. 122.95 Section 122.95 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Transportation in Bond and Merchandise in Transit § 122.95 Other...

  7. 10 CFR 95.63 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 95.63 Section 95.63 Energy NUCLEAR... INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.63 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for criminal sanctions for willful violation of, attempted...

  8. 46 CFR 95.17-10 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Controls. 95.17-10 Section 95.17-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.17-10 Controls. (a) The foam agent, its container, and all controls and... controls and valves for the operation of the system shall be outside the space protected and shall not...

  9. 46 CFR 95.16-5 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Controls. 95.16-5 Section 95.16-5 Shipping COAST GUARD... Clean Agent Gas Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.16-5 Controls. (a) At least one releasing station must be installed near the main entrance/exit to the protected space. (b) System controls must be of...

  10. 47 CFR 95.645 - Control accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Control accessibility. 95.645 Section 95.645 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.645 Control accessibility. (a) No...

  11. 47 CFR 95.645 - Control accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control accessibility. 95.645 Section 95.645 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.645 Control accessibility. (a) No...

  12. 46 CFR 95.17-10 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Controls. 95.17-10 Section 95.17-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.17-10 Controls. (a) The foam agent, its container, and all controls and... controls and valves for the operation of the system shall be outside the space protected and shall not...

  13. 46 CFR 95.16-5 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Controls. 95.16-5 Section 95.16-5 Shipping COAST GUARD... Clean Agent Gas Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.16-5 Controls. (a) At least one releasing station must be installed near the main entrance/exit to the protected space. (b) System controls must be of...

  14. 47 CFR 95.645 - Control accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Control accessibility. 95.645 Section 95.645 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.645 Control accessibility. (a) No...

  15. 46 CFR 95.16-5 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controls. 95.16-5 Section 95.16-5 Shipping COAST GUARD... Clean Agent Gas Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.16-5 Controls. (a) At least one releasing station must be installed near the main entrance/exit to the protected space. (b) System controls must be of...

  16. 46 CFR 95.17-10 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Controls. 95.17-10 Section 95.17-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.17-10 Controls. (a) The foam agent, its container, and all controls and... controls and valves for the operation of the system shall be outside the space protected and shall not...

  17. 46 CFR 95.17-10 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controls. 95.17-10 Section 95.17-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.17-10 Controls. (a) The foam agent, its container, and all controls and... controls and valves for the operation of the system shall be outside the space protected and shall not...

  18. 47 CFR 95.1219 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1219 Section 95.1219 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1219 Marketing limitations....

  19. 47 CFR 95.1219 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1219 Section 95.1219 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1219 Marketing limitations....

  20. 47 CFR 95.1019 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1019 Section 95.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1019 Marketing limitations....

  1. 47 CFR 95.1219 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1219 Section 95.1219 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1219 Marketing limitations....

  2. 47 CFR 95.1019 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1019 Section 95.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1019 Marketing limitations....

  3. 47 CFR 95.1019 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1019 Section 95.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1019 Marketing limitations....

  4. 47 CFR 95.1019 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1019 Section 95.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1019 Marketing limitations....

  5. 47 CFR 95.1019 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1019 Section 95.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1019 Marketing limitations....

  6. 47 CFR 95.1219 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1219 Section 95.1219 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1219 Marketing limitations....

  7. 47 CFR 95.1219 - Marketing limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marketing limitations. 95.1219 Section 95.1219 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1219 Marketing limitations....

  8. 47 CFR 95.857 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emission standards. 95.857 Section 95.857... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.857 Emission standards. (a) All transmissions by each CTS and by each RTU shall use an emission type that complies with the following standard...

  9. 47 CFR 95.857 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emission standards. 95.857 Section 95.857... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.857 Emission standards. (a) All transmissions by each CTS and by each RTU shall use an emission type that complies with the following standard...

  10. 47 CFR 95.857 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emission standards. 95.857 Section 95.857... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.857 Emission standards. (a) All transmissions by each CTS and by each RTU shall use an emission type that complies with the following standard...

  11. 47 CFR 95.633 - Emission bandwidth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emission bandwidth. 95.633 Section 95.633... SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.633 Emission bandwidth. (a) The authorized bandwidth (maximum permissible bandwidth of a transmission) for emission type H1D, J1D, R1D, H3E, J3E or...

  12. 47 CFR 95.857 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emission standards. 95.857 Section 95.857... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.857 Emission standards. (a) All transmissions by each CTS and by each RTU shall use an emission type that complies with the following standard...

  13. 47 CFR 95.857 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emission standards. 95.857 Section 95.857... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.857 Emission standards. (a) All transmissions by each CTS and by each RTU shall use an emission type that complies with the following standard...

  14. 47 CFR 95.633 - Emission bandwidth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emission bandwidth. 95.633 Section 95.633... SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.633 Emission bandwidth. (a) The authorized bandwidth (maximum permissible bandwidth of a transmission) for emission type H1D, J1D, R1D, H3E, J3E or...

  15. 47 CFR 95.633 - Emission bandwidth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emission bandwidth. 95.633 Section 95.633... SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.633 Emission bandwidth. (a) The authorized bandwidth (maximum permissible bandwidth of a transmission) for emission type H1D, J1D, R1D, H3E, J3E or...

  16. 47 CFR 95.1205 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Station identification. 95.1205 Section 95.1205 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1205 Station identification. A...

  17. 47 CFR 95.1207 - Station inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Station inspection. 95.1207 Section 95.1207 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1207 Station inspection. Any...

  18. 21 CFR 1250.95 - Insect control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insect control. 1250.95 Section 1250.95 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.95 Insect control. Vessels shall be maintained free of infestation by flies, mosquitoes, fleas, lice, and other insects known to be vectors...

  19. 29 CFR 95.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 95.31 Section 95.31 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON... § 95.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance...

  20. 29 CFR 95.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 95.31 Section 95.31 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON... § 95.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance...