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Sample records for beamed energy propulsion

  1. Beamed energy propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Beamed energy concepts offer an alternative for an advanced propulsion system. The use of a remote power source reduces the weight of the propulsion system in flight and this, combined with the high performance, provides significant payload gains. Within the context of this study's baseline scenario, two beamed energy propulsion concepts are potentially attractive: solar thermal propulsion and laser thermal propulsion. The conceived beamed energy propulsion devices generally provide low thrust (tens of pounds to hundreds of pounds); therefore, they are typically suggested for cargo transportation. For the baseline scenario, these propulsion system can provide propulsion between the following nodes: (1) low Earth orbit to geosynchronous Earth orbit; (2) low Earth orbit to low lunar orbit; (3) low lunar orbit to low Mars orbit--only solar thermal; and (4) lunar surface to low lunar orbit--only laser thermal.

  2. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Patrick; Beach, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this study was to (1) review and analyze the state-of-art in beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) by identifying potential game-changing applications, (2) formulate a roadmap of technology development, and (3) identify key near-term technology demonstrations to rapidly advance elements of BEP technology to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. The two major areas of interest were launching payloads and space propulsion. More generally, the study was requested and structured to address basic mission feasibility. The attraction of beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) is the potential for high specific impulse while removing the power-generation mass. The rapid advancements in high-energy beamed-power systems and optics over the past 20 years warranted a fresh look at the technology. For launching payloads, the study concluded that using BEP to propel vehicles into space is technically feasible if a commitment to develop new technologies and large investments can be made over long periods of time. From a commercial competitive standpoint, if an advantage of beamed energy for Earth-to-orbit (ETO) is to be found, it will rest with smaller, frequently launched payloads. For space propulsion, the study concluded that using beamed energy to propel vehicles from low Earth orbit to geosynchronous Earth orbit (LEO-GEO) and into deep space is definitely feasible and showed distinct advantages and greater potential over current propulsion technologies. However, this conclusion also assumes that upfront infrastructure investments and commitments to critical technologies will be made over long periods of time. The chief issue, similar to that for payloads, is high infrastructure costs.

  3. Advanced beamed-energy and field propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, L. N.

    1983-01-01

    Specific phenomena which might lead to major advances in payload, range and terminal velocity of very advanced vehicle propulsion are studied. The effort focuses heavily on advanced propulsion spinoffs enabled by current government-funded investigations in directed-energy technology: i.e., laser, microwave, and relativistic charged particle beams. Futuristic (post-year 2000) beamed-energy propulsion concepts which indicate exceptional promise are identified and analytically investigated. The concepts must be sufficiently developed to permit technical understanding of the physical processes involved, assessment of the enabling technologies, and evaluation of their merits over conventional systems. Propulsion concepts that can be used for manned and/or unmanned missions for purposes of solar system exploration, planetary landing, suborbital flight, transport to orbit, and escape are presented. Speculations are made on the chronology of milestones in beamed-energy propulsion development, such as in systems applications of defense, satellite orbit-raising, global aerospace transportation, and manned interplanetary carriers.

  4. Beamed energy for space craft propulsion - Conceptual status and development potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel C.; Frisbee, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of a brief study that sought to identify and characterize beamed energy spacecraft propulsion concepts that may have positive impact on the economics of space industrialization. It is argued that the technology of beamed energy propulsion systems may significantly improve the prospects for near-term colonization of outer space. It is tentatively concluded that, for space industrialization purposes, the most attractive near-term beamed energy propulsion systems are based on microwave technology. This conclusion is reached based on consideration of the common features that exist between beamed microwave propulsion and the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) concept. Laser power beaming also continues to be an attractive option for spacecraft propulsion due to the reduced diffraction-induced beam spread afforded by laser radiation wavelengths. The conceptual status and development potential of a variety of beamed energy propulsion concepts are presented. Several alternative space transportation system concepts based on beamed energy propulsion are described.

  5. Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Birkan, Mitat

    One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremelymore » powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be overcome. Part 1 presents a world-wide review of beamed energy propulsion research, including both laser and microwave arenas.« less

  6. Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Birkan, Mitat

    One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremelymore » powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be covers Part 2 covers the present research status and needs.« less

  7. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP): Considerations for Beaming High Energy-Density Electromagnetic Waves Through the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of employing beamed electromagnetic energy for vehicle propulsion within and outside the Earth's atmosphere was co-funded by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency that began in June 2010 and culminated in a Summary Presentation in April 2011. A detailed report entitled "Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study" appeared in February 2012 as NASA/TM-2012-217014. Of the very many nuances of this subject that were addressed in this report, the effects of transferring the required high energy-density electromagnetic fields through the atmosphere were discussed. However, due to the limitations of the length of the report, only a summary of the results of the detailed analyses were able to be included. It is the intent of the present work to make available the complete analytical modeling work that was done for the BEP project with regard to electromagnetic wave propagation issues. In particular, the present technical memorandum contains two documents that were prepared in 2011. The first one, entitled "Effects of Beaming Energy Through the Atmosphere" contains an overview of the analysis of the nonlinear problem inherent with the transfer of large amounts of energy through the atmosphere that gives rise to thermally-induced changes in the refractive index; application is then made to specific beamed propulsion scenarios. A brief portion of this report appeared as Appendix G of the 2012 Technical Memorandum. The second report, entitled "An Analytical Assessment of the Thermal Blooming Effects on the Propagation of Optical and Millimeter- Wave Focused Beam Waves For Power Beaming Applications" was written in October 2010 (not previously published), provides a more detailed treatment of the propagation problem and its effect on the overall characteristics of the beam such as its deflection as well as its radius. Comparisons are then made for power beaming using the disparate electromagnetic wavelengths of 1.06 microns and 2

  8. An Exploration Perspective of Beamed Energy Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, John W.

    2007-01-01

    The Vision for Exploration is currently focused on flying the Space Shuttle safely to complete our Space Station obligations, retiring the Shuttle in 2010, then returning humans to the Moon and learning how to proceed to Mars and beyond. The NASA budget still includes funds for science and aeronautics but the primary focus is on human exploration. Fiscal constraints have led to pursuing exploration vehicles that use heritage hardware, particularly existing boosters and engines, with the minimum modifications necessary to satisfy mission requirements. So, pursuit of immature technologies is not currently affordable by NASA. Beamed energy is one example of an immature technology, from a human exploration perspective, that may eventually provide significant benefits for human exploration of space, but likely not in the near future. Looking to the more distant future, this paper will examine some of the criteria that must be achieved by beamed energy propulsion to eventually contribute to human exploration of the solar system. The analysis focuses on some of the implications of increasing the payload fraction of a launch vehicle, with a quick look at trans-lunar injection. As one would expect, there is potential for benefit, and there are concerns. The analysis concludes with an assessment of the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) for some beamed energy propulsion components, indicating that TRL 2 is close to being completed.

  9. An Overview of Brazilian Developments in Beamed Energy Aerospace Propulsion and Vehicle Performance Control

    SciTech Connect

    Minucci, M. A. S.

    Beamed energy propulsion and beamed energy vehicle performance control concepts are equally promising and challenging. In Brazil, the two concepts are being currently investigated at the Prof Henry T Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, of the Institute for Advanced Studies--IEAv, in collaboration with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute--RPI, Troy, NY, and the United States Air force Research Laboratory-AFRL. Until recently, only laser energy addition for hypersonic flow control was being investigated at the Laboratory using a 0.3 m nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T2, and two 7 joule CO{sub 2} TEA lasers. Flow visualization, model pressure and heat fluxmore » measurements of the laser energy addition perturbed flow around a model were produced as a result of this joint IEAv-RPI investigation. Presently, with the participation of AFRL and the newly commissioned 0.6 m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T3, a more ambitious project is underway. Two 400 Joule Lumonics 620 CO{sub 2} TEA lasers will deliver a 20 cm X 25 cm propulsive laser beam to a complete laser propelled air breather/rocket hypersonic engine, located inside T3 test section. Schlieren photographs of the flow inside de engine as well as surface and heat flux measurements will be performed for free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25. The present paper discusses past, present and future Brazilian activities on beamed energy propulsion and related technologies.« less

  10. An Overview of Brazilian Developments in Beamed Energy Aerospace Propulsion and Vehicle Performance Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-01

    Beamed energy propulsion and beamed energy vehicle performance control concepts are equally promising and challenging. In Brazil, the two concepts are being currently investigated at the Prof Henry T Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, of the Institute for Advanced Studies—IEAv, in collaboration with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—RPI, Troy, NY, and the United States Air force Research Laboratory-AFRL. Until recently, only laser energy addition for hypersonic flow control was being investigated at the Laboratory using a 0.3 m nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T2, and two 7 joule CO2 TEA lasers. Flow visualization, model pressure and heat flux measurements of the laser energy addition perturbed flow around a model were produced as a result of this joint IEAv-RPI investigation. Presently, with the participation of AFRL and the newly commissioned 0.6 m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T3, a more ambitious project is underway. Two 400 Joule Lumonics 620 CO2 TEA lasers will deliver a 20 cm X 25 cm propulsive laser beam to a complete laser propelled air breather/rocket hypersonic engine, located inside T3 test section. Schlieren photographs of the flow inside de engine as well as surface and heat flux measurements will be performed for free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25. The present paper discusses past, present and future Brazilian activities on beamed energy propulsion and related technologies.

  11. Ion Beam Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Ion Beam Propulsion Study was a joint high-level study between the Applied Physics Laboratory operated by NASA and ASRC Aerospace at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Berkeley Scientific, Berkeley, California. The results were promising and suggested that work should continue if future funding becomes available. The application of ion thrusters for spacecraft propulsion is limited to quite modest ion sources with similarly modest ion beam parameters because of the mass penalty associated with the ion source and its power supply system. Also, the ion source technology has not been able to provide very high-power ion beams. Small ion beam propulsion systems were used with considerable success. Ion propulsion systems brought into practice use an onboard ion source to form an energetic ion beam, typically Xe+ ions, as the propellant. Such systems were used for steering and correction of telecommunication satellites and as the main thruster for the Deep Space 1 demonstration mission. In recent years, "giant" ion sources were developed for the controlled-fusion research effort worldwide, with beam parameters many orders of magnitude greater than the tiny ones of conventional space thruster application. The advent of such huge ion beam sources and the need for advanced propulsion systems for exploration of the solar system suggest a fresh look at ion beam propulsion, now with the giant fusion sources in mind.

  12. Laboratory Facilities and Measurement Techniques for Beamed-Energy-Propulsion Experiments in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos; Chanes Júnior, José Brosler; Cordeiro Marcos, Thiago Victor; Pinto, David Romanelli; Santos Vilela, Renan Guilherme; Barros Galvão, Victor Alves; Mantovani, Arthur Freire; da Costa, Felipe Jean; dos Santos Assenção, José Adeildo; dos Santos, Alberto Monteiro; de Paula Toro, Paulo Gilberto; Sala Minucci, Marco Antonio; da Silveira Rêgo, Israel; Salvador, Israel Irone; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2011-11-01

    Laser propulsion is an innovative concept of accessing the space easier and cheaper where the propulsive energy is beamed to the aerospace vehicle in flight from ground—or even satellite-based high-power laser sources. In order to be realistic about laser propulsion, the Institute for Advanced Studies of the Brazilian Air Force in cooperation with the United States Air Force and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are seriously investigating its basic physics mechanisms and engineering aspects at the Henry T. Hamamatsu Laboratory of Hypersonic and Aerothermodynamics in São José dos Campos, Brazil. This paper describes in details the existing facilities and measuring systems such as high-power laser devices, pulsed-hypersonic wind tunnels and high-speed flow visualization system currently utilized in the laboratory for experimentation on laser propulsion.

  13. Replacement of chemical rocket launchers by beamed energy propulsion.

    PubMed

    Fukunari, Masafumi; Arnault, Anthony; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2014-11-01

    Microwave Rocket is a beamed energy propulsion system that is expected to reach space at drastically lower cost. This cost reduction is estimated by replacing the first-stage engine and solid rocket boosters of the Japanese H-IIB rocket with Microwave Rocket, using a recently developed thrust model in which thrust is generated through repetitively pulsed microwave detonation with a reed-valve air-breathing system. Results show that Microwave Rocket trajectory, in terms of velocity versus altitude, can be designed similarly to the current H-IIB first stage trajectory. Moreover, the payload ratio can be increased by 450%, resulting in launch-cost reduction of 74%.

  14. Earth to Orbit Beamed Energy Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Montgomery, Edward E.

    2017-01-01

    As a means of primary propulsion, beamed energy propulsion offers the benefit of offloading much of the propulsion system mass from the vehicle, increasing its potential performance and freeing it from the constraints of the rocket equation. For interstellar missions, beamed energy propulsion is arguably the most viable in the near- to mid-term. A near-term demonstration showing the feasibility of beamed energy propulsion is necessary and, fortunately, feasible using existing technologies. Key enabling technologies are large area, low mass spacecraft and efficient and safe high power laser systems capable of long distance propagation. NASA is currently developing the spacecraft technology through the Near Earth Asteroid Scout solar sail mission and has signed agreements with the Planetary Society to study the feasibility of precursor laser propulsion experiments using their LightSail-2 solar sail spacecraft. The capabilities of Space Situational Awareness assets and the advanced analytical tools available for fine resolution orbit determination now make it possible to investigate the practicalities of an Earth-to-orbit Beamed Energy eXperiment (EBEX) - a demonstration at delivered power levels that only illuminate a spacecraft without causing damage to it. The degree to which this can be expected to produce a measurable change in the orbit of a low ballistic coefficient spacecraft is investigated. Key system characteristics and estimated performance are derived for a near term mission opportunity involving the LightSail-2 spacecraft and laser power levels modest in comparison to those proposed previously. While the technology demonstrated by such an experiment is not sufficient to enable an interstellar precursor mission, if approved, then it would be the next step toward that goal.

  15. Earth-to-Orbit Beamed Energy eXperiment (EBEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Montgomery, Edward E.

    2017-01-01

    As a means of primary propulsion, beamed energy propulsion offers the benefit of offloading much of the propulsion system mass from the vehicle, increasing its potential performance and freeing it from the constraints of the rocket equation. For interstellar missions, beamed energy propulsion is arguably the most viable in the near- to mid-term. A near-term demonstration showing the feasibility of beamed energy propulsion is necessary and, fortunately, feasible using existing technologies. Key enabling technologies are 1) large area, low mass spacecraft and 2) efficient and safe high power laser systems capable of long distance propagation. NASA is currently developing the spacecraft technology through the Near Earth Asteroid Scout solar sail mission and has signed agreements with the Planetary Society to study the feasibility of precursor laser propulsion experiments using their LightSail-2 solar sail spacecraft. The capabilities of Space Situational Awareness assets and the advanced analytical tools available for fine resolution orbit determination now make it possible to investigate the practicalities of an Earth-to-orbit Beamed Energy eXperiment (EBEX) - a demonstration at delivered power levels that only illuminate a spacecraft without causing damage to it. The degree to which this can be expected to produce a measurable change in the orbit of a low ballistic coefficient spacecraft is investigated. Key system characteristics and estimated performance are derived for a near term mission opportunity involving the LightSail-2 spacecraft and laser power levels modest in comparison to those proposed previously. A more detailed investigation of accessing LightSail-2 from Santa Rosa Island on Eglin Air Force Base on the United States coast of the Gulf of Mexico is provided to show expected results in a specific case. While the technology demonstrated by such an experiment is not sufficient to enable an interstellar precursor mission, it is a first step toward that

  16. Multi-Reflex Propulsion Systems for Space and Air Vehicles and Energy Transfer for Long Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, A.

    The purpose of this article is to call attention to the revolutionary idea of light multi-reflection. This idea allows the design of new engines, space and air propulsion systems, storage (of a beam and solar energy), transmitters of energy (to millions of kilometers), creation of new weapons, etc. This method and the main innovations were offered by the author in 1983 in the former USSR. Now the author shows in a series of articles the immense possibilities of this idea in many fields of engineering - astronautics, aviation, energy, optics, direct converter of light (laser beam) energy to mechanical energy (light engine), to name a few. This article considers the multi-reflex propulsion systems for space and air vehicles and energy transmitter for long distances in space.

  17. Survey of Beamed Energy Propulsion Concepts by the MSFC Space Environmental Effects Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, P. A.; Nehls, M. K.; Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This will be a survey paper of work that was performed by the Space Environmental Effects Team at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in the area of laser energy propulsion concepts. Two types of laser energy propulsion techniques were investigated. The first was ablative propulsion, which used a pulsed ruby laser impacting on single layer coatings and films. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the laser power density that produced an optimum coupling coefficient for each type of material tested. A commercial off-the-shelf multi-layer film was also investigated for possible applications in ablative micro-thrusters, and its optimum coupling coefficient was determined. The second type of study measured the purely photonic force provided by a 300W CW YAG laser. In initial studies, the photon force resulting from the momentum of incident photons was measured directly using a vacuum compatible microbalance and these results were compared to theory. Follow-on work used the same CW laser to excite a stable optical cavity for the purpose of amplifying the available force from incident photons.

  18. Numerical models analysis of energy conversion process in air-breathing laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Yanji; Song Junling; Cui Cunyan

    Energy source was considered as a key essential in this paper to describe energy conversion process in air-breathing laser propulsion. Some secondary factors were ignored when three independent modules, ray transmission module, energy source term module and fluid dynamic module, were established by simultaneous laser radiation transportation equation and fluid mechanics equation. The incidence laser beam was simulated based on ray tracing method. The calculated results were in good agreement with those of theoretical analysis and experiments.

  19. Propulsion at low Reynolds number via beam extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, Frederick; Neetzow, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results on the extrusion of a slender beam in a viscous fluid. We are particularly interested in the force necessary to extrude the beam as it buckles with large amplitude due to viscous friction. The problem is inspired by the propulsion of Paramecium via trichocyst extrusion. Self-propulsion in micro-organisms is mostly achieved through the beating of flagella or cilia. However, to avoid a severe aggression, unicellular Paramecium has been observed to extrude trichocysts in the direction of the aggression to burst away. These trichocysts are rod-like organelles which, upon activation, grow to about 40 μm in length in 3 milliseconds before detaching from the animal. The drag force created by these extruding rods pushing against the viscous fluid generates thrust in the opposite direction. We developed an experimental setup to measure the force required to push a steel piano wire into an aquarium filled with corn syrup. This setup offers a near-zero Reynolds number, and allows studying deployments for a range of constant extrusion speeds. The experimental results are reproduced with a numerical model coupling a large amplitude Euler-Bernoulli beam theory with a fluid load model proportional to the local beam velocity. This study was funded in part by the The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  20. Optimization of the SHX Fusion Powered Transatmospheric Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Landrum, D. Brian

    2001-01-01

    Existing propulsion technology has not achieved cost effective payload delivery rates to low earth orbit. A fusion based propulsion system, denoted as the Simultaneous Heating and eXpansion (SHX) engine, has been proposed in earlier papers. The SHX couples energy generated by a fusion reactor to the engine flowpath by use of coherent beam emitters. A quasi-one-dimensional flow model was used to quantify the effects of area expansion and energy input on propulsive efficiency for several beam models. Entropy calculations were included to evaluate the lost work in the system.

  1. Review Of Laser Lightcraft Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Eric W.; Mead, Franklin B. Jr

    Laser-powered 'Lightcraft' systems that deliver nano-satellites to LEO have been studied for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The study was built on the extensive Lightcraft laser propulsion technology already developed by theoretical and experimental work by the AFRL's Propulsion Directorate at Edwards AFB, CA. Here we review the history and engineering-physics of the laser Lightcraft system and its propulsive performance. We will also review the effectiveness and cost of a Lightcraft vehicle powered by a high-energy laser beam. One result of this study is the significant influence of laser wavelength on the power lost during laser beam propagation throughmore » Earth's atmosphere and in space. It was discovered that energy and power losses in the laser beam are extremely sensitive to wavelength for Earth-To-Orbit missions, and this significantly affects the amount of mass that can be placed into orbit for a given maximum amount of radiated power from a ground-based laser.« less

  2. The Propulsion Center at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. Our mission is to move the nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft like access to earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space. Current efforts cover a wide range of exciting areas, including high-energy plasma thrusters, advanced fission and fusion engines, antimatter propulsion systems, beamed energy rockets and sails, and fundamental motive physics. Activities involve concept investigation, proof-of-concept demonstration, and breadboard validation of new propulsion systems. The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC provides an environment where NASA, national laboratories, universities, and industry researchers can pool their skills together to perform landmark propulsion achievements. We offer excellent educational opportunities to students and young researchers-fostering a wellspring of innovation that will revolutionize space transportation.

  3. Direct Energy Conversion for Nuclear Propulsion at Low Specific Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The project will continue the FY13 JSC IR&D (October-2012 to September-2013) effort in Travelling Wave Direct Energy Conversion (TWDEC) in order to demonstrate its potential as the core of a high potential, game-changing, in-space propulsion technology. The TWDEC concept converts particle beam energy into radio frequency (RF) alternating current electrical power, such as can be used to heat the propellant in a plasma thruster. In a more advanced concept (explored in the Phase 1 NIAC project), the TWDEC could also be utilized to condition the particle beam such that it may transfer directed kinetic energy to a target propellant plasma for the purpose of increasing thrust and optimizing the specific impulse. The overall scope of the FY13 first-year effort was to build on both the 2012 Phase 1 NIAC research and the analysis and test results produced by Japanese researchers over the past twenty years to assess the potential for spacecraft propulsion applications. The primary objective of the FY13 effort was to create particle-in-cell computer simulations of a TWDEC. Other objectives included construction of a breadboard TWDEC test article, preliminary test calibration of the simulations, and construction of first order power system models to feed into mission architecture analyses with COPERNICUS tools. Due to funding cuts resulting from the FY13 sequestration, only the computer simulations and assembly of the breadboard test article were completed. The simulations, however, are of unprecedented flexibility and precision and were presented at the 2013 AIAA Joint Propulsion Conference. Also, the assembled test article will provide an ion current density two orders of magnitude above that available in previous Japanese experiments, thus enabling the first direct measurements of power generation from a TWDEC for FY14. The proposed FY14 effort will use the test article for experimental validation of the computer simulations and thus complete to a greater fidelity the

  4. A Lunar-Based Spacecraft Propulsion Concept - The Ion Beam Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ian G.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a concept for spacecraft propulsion by means of an energetic ion beam, with the ion source fixed at the spacecraft starting point (e.g., a lunar-based ion beam generator) and not onboard the vessel. This approach avoids the substantial mass penalty associated with the onboard ion source and power supply hardware, and vastly more energetic ion beam systems can be entertained. We estimate the ion beam parameters required for various scenarios, and consider some of the constraints limiting the concept. We find that the "ion beam sail' approach can be viable and attractive for journey distances not too great, for example within the Earth-Moon system, and could potentially provide support for journeys to the inner planets.

  5. Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Benjamin A.

    2004-03-30

    This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

  6. Direct Energy Conversion for Low Specific Mass In-Space Power and Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.; George, Jeffrey A.; Tarditi, Alfonso G.

    2013-01-01

    "Changing the game" in space exploration involves changing the paradigm for the human exploration of the Solar System, e.g, changing the human exploration of Mars from a three-year epic event to an annual expedition. For the purposes of this assessment an "annual expedition" capability is defined as an in-space power & propulsion system which, with launch mass limits as defined in NASA s Mars Architecture 5.0, enables sending a crew to Mars and returning them after a 30-day surface stay within one year, irrespective of planetary alignment. In this work the authors intend to show that obtaining this capability requires the development of an in-space power & propulsion system with an end-to-end specific mass considerably less than 3 kg/kWe. A first order energy balance analysis reveals that the technologies required to create a system with this specific mass include direct energy conversion and nuclear sources that release energy in the form of charged particle beams. This paper lays out this first order approximation and details these conclusions.

  7. It may be Possible to Use a Neutron Beam as Propulsion for Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    It may be possible to keep Xenon 135 in a Superpositioned state with Xe-136 and Cs 135, the two decay products of Xenon 135. This may be done using a Gamma Ray or an X-ray Laser. At first glance it has the look and feel of yet another Noble Gas Laser. The difference is that it uses Neutron states within the Nucleus. The Neutrons would be emitted with a modulated Gamma or X-ray photon. In essence it may be possible to have a totally new type of Laser---This author calls them "Matter Lasers", where a lower energy photon with fewer Quantum Numbers would be used with a Noble Gas to produce a particle beam with higher energy and more Quantum Numbers. It may be possible to replace cumbersome particle accelerators with this type of Laser, to make mass from energy, via a Neutron Gas. This would be a great technological advance in Rocket Propulsion as well; low mass photon to high mass particle, such as a Higgs particle or a Top Quark. The Xenon 135, could come from a Fission Reactor within the Space Craft, as it is a reactor poison. The workings of an X-ray laser is already known and table top versions of it have been developed. Gamma Ray lasers are already in use and have been tested. A Laser would have a columnated beam with a very precise direction, unlike just a Neutron source which would go in all directions. Of course this beam could be used as a spectroscopic tool as well, in order to determine the composition of the matter that the spacecraft encounters. The spectroscopic tool could look for "Dark Matter" and other exotic types of matter that may occur in outerspace. The spacecraft could potentially reach "near speed of light velocities" in a fairly short time, since the Laser would be firing off massive particles, with great momentum. Lastly the precise Neutron beam could be used as a very powerful weapon or as a way of clearing space debri, since it could "force Nuclear Reactions" onto the object being fired upon, making it the ultimate space weapon, and

  8. Energy regeneration model of self-consistent field of electron beams into electric power*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmin, B. N.; Ryzhov, D. R.; Trifanov, I. V.; Snezhko, A. A.; Savelyeva, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    We consider physic-mathematical models of electric processes in electron beams, conversion of beam parameters into electric power values and their transformation into users’ electric power grid (onboard spacecraft network). We perform computer simulation validating high energy efficiency of the studied processes to be applied in the electric power technology to produce the power as well as electric power plants and propulsion installation in the spacecraft.

  9. Technology Area Roadmap for In Space Propulsion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Meyer, Mike; Coote, David; Goebel, Dan; Palaszewski, Bryan; White, Sonny

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology area (TA) roadmap to develop propulsion technologies that will be used to enable further exploration of the solar system, and beyond. It is hoped that development of the technologies within this TA will result in technical solutions that will improve thrust levels, specific impulse, power, specific mass, volume, system mass, system complexity, operational complexity, commonality with other spacecraft systems, manufacturability and durability. Some of the propulsion technologies that are reviewed include: chemical and non-chemical propulsion, and advanced propulsion (i.e., those with a Technology Readiness level of less than 3). Examples of these advanced technologies include: Beamed Energy, Electric Sail, Fusion, High Energy Density Materials, Antimatter, Advanced Fission and Breakthrough propulsion technologies. Timeframes for development of some of these propulsion technologies are reviewed, and top technical challenges are reviewed. This roadmap describes a portfolio of in-space propulsion technologies that can meet future space science and exploration needs.

  10. Antimatter Requirements and Energy Costs for Near-Term Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. R.; Gerrish, H. P.; Martin, J. J.; Smith, G. A.; Meyer, K. J.

    1999-01-01

    The superior energy density of antimatter annihilation has often been pointed to as the ultimate source of energy for propulsion. However, the limited capacity and very low efficiency of present-day antiproton production methods suggest that antimatter may be too costly to consider for near-term propulsion applications. We address this issue by assessing the antimatter requirements for six different types of propulsion concepts, including two in which antiprotons are used to drive energy release from combined fission/fusion. These requirements are compared against the capacity of both the current antimatter production infrastructure and the improved capabilities that could exist within the early part of next century. Results show that although it may be impractical to consider systems that rely on antimatter as the sole source of propulsive energy, the requirements for propulsion based on antimatter-assisted fission/fusion do fall within projected near-term production capabilities. In fact, a new facility designed solely for antiproton production but based on existing technology could feasibly support interstellar precursor missions and omniplanetary spaceflight with antimatter costs ranging up to $6.4 million per mission.

  11. Overview of Advanced Space Propulsion Activities in the Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Carruth, Ralph; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd; Kamenetzky, Rachel; Gray, Perry

    2000-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system, and beyond, requires spacecraft velocities beyond our current technological level. Technologies addressing this limitation are numerous. The Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Team at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is focused on three discipline areas of advanced propulsion; Tethers, Beamed Energy, and Plasma. This presentation will give an overview of advanced propulsion related activities in the Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC. Advancements in the application of tethers for spacecraft propulsion were made while developing the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS). New tether materials were developed to meet the specifications of the ProSEDS mission and new techniques had to be developed to test and characterize these tethers. Plasma contactors were developed, tested and modified to meet new requirements. Follow-on activities in tether propulsion include the Air-SEDS activity. Beamed energy activities initiated with an experimental investigation to quantify the momentum transfer subsequent to high power, 5J, ablative laser interaction with materials. The next step with this experimental investigation is to quantify non-ablative photon momentum transfer. This step was started last year and will be used to characterize the efficiency of solar sail materials before and after exposure to Space Environmental Effects (SEE). Our focus with plasma, for propulsion, concentrates on optimizing energy deposition into a magnetically confined plasma and integration of measurement techniques for determining plasma parameters. Plasma confinement is accomplished with the Marshall Magnetic Mirror (M3) device. Initial energy coupling experiments will consist of injecting a 50 amp electron beam into a target plasma. Measurements of plasma temperature and density will be used to determine the effect of changes in magnetic field structure, beam current, and gas species. Experimental observations will be compared to

  12. Advanced Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation describes a number of advanced space propulsion technologies with the potential for meeting the need for dramatic reductions in the cost of access to space, and the need for new propulsion capabilities to enable bold new space exploration (and, ultimately, space exploitation) missions of the 21st century. For example, current Earth-to-orbit (e.g., low Earth orbit, LEO) launch costs are extremely high (ca. $10,000/kg); a factor 25 reduction (to ca. $400/kg) will be needed to produce the dramatic increases in space activities in both the civilian and government sectors identified in the Commercial Space Transportation Study (CSTS). Similarly, in the area of space exploration, all of the relatively 'easy' missions (e.g., robotic flybys, inner solar system orbiters and landers; and piloted short-duration Lunar missions) have been done. Ambitious missions of the next century (e.g., robotic outer-planet orbiters/probes, landers, rovers, sample returns; and piloted long-duration Lunar and Mars missions) will require major improvements in propulsion capability. In some cases, advanced propulsion can enable a mission by making it faster or more affordable, and in some cases, by directly enabling the mission (e.g., interstellar missions). As a general rule, advanced propulsion systems are attractive because of their low operating costs (e.g., higher specific impulse, ISD) and typically show the most benefit for relatively 'big' missions (i.e., missions with large payloads or AV, or a large overall mission model). In part, this is due to the intrinsic size of the advanced systems as compared to state-of-the-art (SOTA) chemical propulsion systems. Also, advanced systems often have a large 'infrastructure' cost, either in the form of initial R&D costs or in facilities hardware costs (e.g., laser or microwave transmission ground stations for beamed energy propulsion). These costs must then be amortized over a large mission to be cost-competitive with a SOTA

  13. Mechanical energy and power flow of the upper extremity in manual wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan-Yuen; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Hong-Wen; An, Kai-Nan

    2003-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics of mechanical energy and power flow of the upper limb during wheelchair propulsion. Mechanical energy and power flow of segments were calculated. Very few studies have taken into account the mechanical energy and power flow of the musculoskeletal system during wheelchair propulsion. Mechanical energy and power flow have proven to be useful tools for investigating locomotion disorders during human gait. Twelve healthy male adults (mean age, 23.5 years) were recruited for this study. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data of the upper extremity were collected during wheelchair propulsion using a Hi-Res Expert Vision system and an instrumented wheel, respectively. During the initiation of the propulsion phase, joint power is generated in the upper arm or is transferred from the trunk downward to the forearm and hand to propel the wheel forward. During terminal propulsion, joint power is transferred upward to the trunk from the forearm and upper arm. The rate of change of mechanical energy and power flow for the forearm and hand have similar patterns, but the upper arm values differ. Joint power plays an important role in energy transfer as well as the energy generated and absorbed by muscles spanning the joints during wheelchair propulsion. Energy and power flow information during wheelchair propulsion allows us to gain a better understanding of the coordination of the movement by the musculoskeletal system.

  14. Optimum rocket propulsion for energy-limited transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuppero, Anthony; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    In order to effect large-scale return of extraterrestrial resources to Earth orbit, it is desirable to optimize the propulsion system to maximize the mass of payload returned per unit energy expended. This optimization problem is different from the conventional rocket propulsion optimization. A rocket propulsion system consists of an energy source plus reaction mass. In a conventional chemical rocket, the energy source and the reaction mass are the same. For the transportation system required, however, the best system performance is achieved if the reaction mass used is from a locally available source. In general, the energy source and the reaction mass will be separate. One such rocket system is the nuclear thermal rocket, in which the energy source is a reactor and the reaction mass a fluid which is heated by the reactor and exhausted. Another energy-limited rocket system is the hydrogen/oxygen rocket where H2/O2 fuel is produced by electrolysis of water using a solar array or a nuclear reactor. The problem is to choose the optimum specific impulse (or equivalently exhaust velocity) to minimize the amount of energy required to produce a given mission delta-v in the payload. The somewhat surprising result is that the optimum specific impulse is not the maximum possible value, but is proportional to the mission delta-v. In general terms, at the beginning of the mission it is optimum to use a very low specific impulse and expend a lot of reaction mass, since this is the most energy efficient way to transfer momentum. However, as the mission progresses, it becomes important to minimize the amount of reaction mass expelled, since energy is wasted moving the reaction mass. Thus, the optimum specific impulse will increase with the mission delta-v. Optimum I(sub sp) is derived for maximum payload return per energy expended for both the case of fixed and variable I(sub sp) engines. Sample missions analyzed include return of water payloads from the moons of Mars and of

  15. Energy efficient engine: Propulsion system-aircraft integration evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Flight performance and operating economics of future commercial transports utilizing the energy efficient engine were assessed as well as the probability of meeting NASA's goals for TSFC, DOC, noise, and emissions. Results of the initial propulsion systems aircraft integration evaluation presented include estimates of engine performance, predictions of fuel burns, operating costs of the flight propulsion system installed in seven selected advanced study commercial transports, estimates of noise and emissions, considerations of thrust growth, and the achievement-probability analysis.

  16. Propulsion Utilizing Laser-Driven Ponderomotive Fields for Deep-Space Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, George J.; Gilland, James H.

    The generation of large amplitude electric fields in plasmas by high-power lasers has been studied for several years in the context of high-energy particle acceleration. Fields on the order of GeV/m are generated in the plasma wake of the laser by non-linear ponderomotive forces. The laser fields generate longitudinal and translational electron plasma waves with phase velocities close to the speed of light. These fields and velocities offer the potential to revolutionize spacecraft propulsion, leading to extended deep space robotic probes. Based on these initial calculations, plasma acceleration by means of laser-induced ponderomotive forces appears to offer significant potential formore » spacecraft propulsion. Relatively high-efficiencies appear possible with proper beam conditioning, resulting in an order of magnitude more thrust than alternative concepts for high I{sub SP} (>10{sup 5} s) and elimination of the primary life-limiting erosion phenomena associated with conventional electric propulsion systems. Ponderomotive propulsion readily lends itself to beamed power which might overcome some of the constraints of power-limited propulsion concepts. A preliminary assessment of the impact of these propulsion systems for several promising configurations on mission architectures has been conducted. Emphasizing interstellar and interstellar-precursor applications, performance and technical requirements are identified for a number of missions. The use of in-situ plasma and gas for propellant is evaluated as well.« less

  17. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  18. Instellar Exploration: Propulsion Options for Precursors and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles Les; Leifer, Stephanie

    1999-01-01

    NASA is considering a mission to explore near-interstellar space early in the next decade as the first step toward a vigorous interstellar exploration program. A key enabling technology for such an ambitious science and exploration effort is the development of propulsion systems capable of providing fast trip times; mission duration should not exceed the professional lifetime of the investigative team. Advanced propulsion technologies that might support an interstellar precursor mission early in the next century include some combination of solar sails, nuclear electric propulsion systems, and aerogravity assists. Follow-on missions to far beyond the heliopause will require the development of propulsion technologies that are only at the conceptual stage today. These include 1) matter-antimatter annihilation, 2) beamed-energy sails, and 3) fusion systems. For years, the scientific community has been interested in the development of solar sail technology to support exploration of the inner and outer planets. Progress in thin-film technology and the development of technologies that may enable the remote assembly of large sails in space are only now maturing to the point where ambitious interstellar precursor missions can be considered. Electric propulsion is now being demonstrated for planetary exploration by the Deep Space 1 mission. The primary issues for it's adaptation to interstellar precursor applications include the nuclear reactor that would be required and the engine lifetime. For further term interstellar missions, matter-antimatter annihilation propulsion system concepts have the highest energy density of any propulsion systems using onboard propellants. However, there are numerous challenges to production and storage of antimatter that must be overcome before it can be seriously considered for interstellar flight. Off-board energy systems (laser sails) are candidates for long-distance interstellar flight but development of component technologies and

  19. Laser power beaming: an emerging technology for power transmission and propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.

    1997-05-01

    A ground based laser beam transmitted to space can be used as an electric utility for satellites. It can significantly increase the electric power available to operate a satellite or to transport it from low earth orbit (LEO) to mid earth or geosynchronous orbits. The increase in electrical power compared to that obtainable from the sun is as much as 1000% for the same size solar panels. An increase in satellite electric power is needed to meet the increasing demands for power caused by the advent of 'direct to home TV,' for increased telecommunications, or for other demands made by the burgeoning 'space highway.' Monetary savings as compared to putting up multiple satellites in the same 'slot' can be over half a billion dollars. To obtain propulsion, the laser power can be beamed through the atmosphere to an 'orbit transfer vehicle' (OTV) satellite which travels back and forth between LEO and higher earth orbits. The OTV will transport the satellite into orbit as does a rocket but does not require the heavy fuel load needed if rocket propulsion is used. Monetary savings of 300% or more in launch costs are predicted. Key elements in the proposed concept are a 100 to 200 kW free- electron laser operating at 0.84 m in the photographic infrared region of the spectrum and a novel adaptive optic telescope.

  20. Space propulsion and power beaming using millimeter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Dickinson, R.

    1995-11-01

    Past schemes for using beamed microwave power for space propulsion and providing power to space platforms have used microwaves below 10 GHz. Recent expansions of the high power microwave technology domain offer fundamental reassessment of the following missions: (1) location of orbital debris, (2) supplying power to loitering high-altitude airplanes, (3) satellite battery recharging, (4) imaging of asteroids, (5) orbit raising and transfer, (6) interplanetary probe launch to the outer planets and comets, and ultimately (7) launch into Earth orbit. This group of applications may be done by a ground-based system. The system would start small, being built for themore » near Earth missions, and be enlarged incrementally as the technology matures and confidence develops. Of particular interest are sources in the millimeter range where there are low loss atmospheric windows and MJ pulses are available in quasi-CW operation. A development scenario for these missions using millimeter wave technology is described.« less

  1. Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold P., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Solar Thermal Propulsion (STP). Some of the topics include: 1) Ways to use Solar Energy for Propulsion; 2) Solar (fusion) Energy; 3) Operation in Orbit; 4) Propulsion Concepts; 5) Critical Equations; 6) Power Efficiency; 7) Major STP Projects; 8) Types of STP Engines; 9) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Assembly; 10) Specific Impulse; 11) Thrust; 12) Temperature Distribution; 13) Pressure Loss; 14) Transient Startup; 15) Axial Heat Input; 16) Direct Gain Engine Design; 17) Direct Gain Engine Fabrication; 18) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Components; 19) Solar Thermal Test Facility; and 20) Checkout Results.

  2. Mission applications of electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reviews the mission applications of electric propulsion. The energy requirements of candidate high-energy missions gaining in NASA priority are used to highlight the potential of electric propulsion. Mission-propulsion interfaces are examined to point out differences between chemical and electric applications. Brief comparisons between ballistic requirements and capabilities and those of electric propulsion show that electric propulsion is presently the most practical and perhaps the only technology which can accomplish missions with these energy requirements.

  3. Energy Beam Highways Through the Skies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, Leik N.

    1996-01-01

    The emergence of Energy Beam Flight Transportation Systems could dramatically change the way we travel in the 21st Century. A framework for formulating 'Highways of Light' and the top level architectures that invoke radically new Space Power Grid infrastructure, are introduced. Basically, such flight systems, hereafter called Lightcraft, would employ off-board energy beam sources (either laser or microwave) to energize on-board dependent 'motors' -- instead of the traditional autonomous 'engines' with their on-board energy sources (e.g., chemical fuels). Extreme reductions in vehicle dry mass appear feasible with the use of off-board power and a high degree of on-board artificial intelligence. Such vehicles may no longer need airports for refueling (since they require no propellant), and could possibly pick up travelers at their homes -- before motoring over to one of many local boost stations, for the flight out. With off-board power, hyper-energetic acceleration performance and boost-glide trajectories become feasible. Hypersonic MS airbreathing propulsion can enable boosts up to twice escape velocity, which will cut trip times to the moon down to 5.5 hours. The predominant technological, environmental and social factors that will result from such transportation systems will be stressed. This presentation first introduces the remote source siting options for the space power system infrastructure, and then provides three representative laser/microwave Lightcraft options (derived from historical Case Studies): i.e., 'Acorn', 'Toy Top', and 'Disc.' Next the gamut of combined-cycle engine options developed for these Lightcraft are examined -- to illuminate the 'emerging technologies' that must be harnessed to produce flight hardware. Needed proof-of concept experiments are identified, along with the Macro-Level Issues that can springboard these revolutionary concepts into hardware reality.

  4. Antimatter propulsion, status and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Steven D.; Hynes, Michael V.

    1986-01-01

    The use of advanced propulsion techniques must be considered if the currently envisioned launch date of the manned Mars mission were delayed until 2020 or later. Within the next thirty years, technological advances may allow such methods as beaming power to the ship, inertial-confinement fusion, or mass-conversion of antiprotons to become feasible. A propulsion system with an ISP of around 5000 s would allow the currently envisioned mission module to fly to Mars in 3 months and would require about one million pounds to be assembled in Earth orbit. Of the possible methods to achieve this, the antiproton mass-conversion reaction offers the highest potential, the greatest problems, and the most fascination. Increasing the production rates of antiprotons is a high priority task at facilities around the world. The application of antiprotons to propulsion requires the coupling of the energy released in the mass-conversion reaction to thrust-producing mechanisms. Recent proposals entail using the antiprotons to produce inertial confinement fusion or to produce negative muons which can catalyze fusion. By increasing the energy released per antiproton, the effective cost, (dollars/joule) can be reduced. These proposals and other areas of research can be investigated now. These short term results will be important in assessing the long range feasibility of an antiproton powered engine.

  5. High energy density propulsion systems and small engine dynamometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This study investigates all possible methods of powering small unmanned vehicles, provides reasoning for the propulsion system down select, and covers in detail the design and production of a dynamometer to confirm theoretical energy density calculations for small engines. Initial energy density calculations are based upon manufacturer data, pressure vessel theory, and ideal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. Engine tests are conducted with a braking type dynamometer for constant load energy density tests, and show true energy densities in excess of 1400 WH/lb of fuel. Findings and Conclusions. Theory predicts lithium polymer, the present unmanned system energy storage device of choice, to have much lower energy densities than other conversion energy sources. Small engines designed for efficiency, instead of maximum power, would provide the most advantageous method for powering small unmanned vehicles because these engines have widely variable power output, loss of mass during flight, and generate rotational power directly. Theoretical predictions for the energy density of small engines has been verified through testing. Tested values up to 1400 WH/lb can be seen under proper operating conditions. The implementation of such a high energy density system will require a significant amount of follow-on design work to enable the engines to tolerate the higher temperatures of lean operation. Suggestions are proposed to enable a reliable, small-engine propulsion system in future work. Performance calculations show that a mature system is capable of month long flight times, and unrefueled circumnavigation of the globe.

  6. Propulsion Systems Integration for a `Tractor Beam' Mercury Lightcraft: Liftoff Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrabo, L. N.

    2003-05-01

    Described herein is the concept and propulsion systems integration for a revolutionary beam-propelled shuttle called the ``Mercury'' lightcraft - emphasizing the liftoff engine mode. This one-person, ultra-energetic vehicle is designed to ride `tractor beams' into space, transmitted from a future network of satellite solar power stations. The objective is to create a safe, very low cost (e.g., 1000X below chemical rockets) space transportation system for human life, one that is completely `green' and independent of Earth's limited fossil fuel reserves. The lightcraft's airbreathing combined-cycle engine operates in a rotary pulsed detonation mode PDE for lift-offs and landings; at hypersonic speeds it transitions into a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) slipstream accelerator mode. For the latter, the transatmospheric flight path is momentarily transformed into an extremely long, electromagnetic ``mass-driver'' channel with an effective `fuel' specific impulse in the range of 6000 to 16,000 seconds. These future single-stage-to-orbit, highly-reusuable vehicles will ride ``Highways of Light,'' accelerating at 3 Gs into space, with their throttles just barely beyond `idle' power.

  7. High Energy Laser Beam Propagation in the Atmosphere: The Integral Invariants of the Nonlinear Parabolic Equation and the Method of Moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    The method of moments is used to define and derive expressions for laser beam deflection and beam radius broadening for high-energy propagation through the Earth s atmosphere. These expressions are augmented with the integral invariants of the corresponding nonlinear parabolic equation that describes the electric field of high-energy laser beam to propagation to yield universal equations for the aforementioned quantities; the beam deflection is a linear function of the propagation distance whereas the beam broadening is a quadratic function of distance. The coefficients of these expressions are then derived from a thin screen approximation solution of the nonlinear parabolic equation to give corresponding analytical expressions for a target located outside the Earth s atmospheric layer. These equations, which are graphically presented for a host of propagation scenarios, as well as the thin screen model, are easily amenable to the phase expansions of the wave front for the specification and design of adaptive optics algorithms to correct for the inherent phase aberrations. This work finds application in, for example, the analysis of beamed energy propulsion for space-based vehicles.

  8. Energy Efficient Engine Flight Propulsion System Preliminary Analysis and Design Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisset, J. W.; Howe, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    The final design and analysis of the flight propulsion system is presented. This system is the conceptual study engine defined to meet the performance, economic and environmental goals established for the Energy Efficient Engine Program. The design effort included a final definition of the engine, major components, internal subsystems, and nacelle. Various analytical representations and results from component technology programs are used to verify aerodynamic and structural design concepts and to predict performance. Specific design goals and specifications, reflecting future commercial aircraft propulsion system requirements for the mid-1980's, are detailed by NASA and used as guidelines during engine definition. Information is also included which details salient results from a separate study to define a turbofan propulsion system, known as the maximum efficiency engine, which reoptimized the advanced fuel saving technologies for improved fuel economy and direct operating costs relative to the flight propulsion system.

  9. Advanced Electric Propulsion for Space Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steve

    1999-01-01

    The sun tower concept of collecting solar energy in space and beaming it down for commercial use will require very affordable in-space as well as earth-to-orbit transportation. Advanced electric propulsion using a 200 kW power and propulsion system added to the sun tower nodes can provide a factor of two reduction in the required number of launch vehicles when compared to in-space cryogenic chemical systems. In addition, the total time required to launch and deliver the complete sun tower system is of the same order of magnitude using high power electric propulsion or cryogenic chemical propulsion: around one year. Advanced electric propulsion can also be used to minimize the stationkeeping propulsion system mass for this unique space platform. 50 to 100 kW class Hall, ion, magnetoplasmadynamic, and pulsed inductive thrusters are compared. High power Hall thruster technology provides the best mix of launches saved and shortest ground to Geosynchronous Earth Orbital Environment (GEO) delivery time of all the systems, including chemical. More detailed studies comparing launch vehicle costs, transfer operations costs, and propulsion system costs and complexities must be made to down-select a technology. The concept of adding electric propulsion to the sun tower nodes was compared to a concept using re-useable electric propulsion tugs for Low Earth Orbital Environment (LEO) to GEO transfer. While the tug concept would reduce the total number of required propulsion systems, more launchers and notably longer LEO to GEO and complete sun tower ground to GEO times would be required. The tugs would also need more complex, longer life propulsion systems and the ability to dock with sun tower nodes.

  10. High Temperature Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage to Augment Solar Thermal Propulsion for Microsatellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Mar 2014- May 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House High Temperature Latent Heat Thermal ...Energy Storage to Augment Solar Thermal Propulsion for Microsats 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...High Temperature Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage to Augment Solar Thermal Propulsion for Microsatellites Presentation Subtitle Matthew R. Gilpin

  11. SPE propulsion electrolyzer for NASA's integrated propulsion test article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Hamilton Standard has delivered a 3000 PSI SPE Propulsion Electrolyzer Stack and Special Test Fixture to the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) Integrated Propulsion Test Article (IPTA) program in June 1990, per contract NAS9-18030. This prototype unit demonstrates the feasibility of SPE-high pressure water electrolysis for future space applications such as Space Station propulsion and Lunar/Mars energy storage. The SPE-Propulsion Electrolyzer has met or exceeded all IPTA program goals. It continues to function as the primary hydrogen and oxygen source for the IPTA test bed at the NASA/JSC Propulsion and Power Division Thermochemical Test Branch.

  12. Directed energy interstellar propulsion of wafersats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brashears, Travis; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; McDonough, Kyle; Arias, Sebastian; Lang, Alex; Motta, Caio; Meinhold, Peter; Batliner, Payton; Griswold, Janelle; Zhang, Qicheng; Alnawakhtha, Yusuf; Prater, Kenyon; Madajian, Jonathan; Sturman, Olivia; Gergieva, Jana; Gilkes, Aidan; Silverstein, Bret

    2015-09-01

    In the nearly 60 years of spaceflight we have accomplished wonderful feats of exploration and shown the incredible spirit of the human drive to explore and understand our universe. Yet in those 60 years we have barely left our solar system with the Voyager 1 spacecraft launched in 1977 finally leaving the solar system after 37 years of flight at a speed of 17 km/s or less than 0.006% the speed of light. As remarkable as this is, we will never reach even the nearest stars with our current propulsion technology in even 10 millennium. We have to radically rethink our strategy or give up our dreams of reaching the stars, or wait for technology that does not exist. While we all dream of human spaceflight to the stars in a way romanticized in books and movies, it is not within our power to do so, nor it is clear that this is the path we should choose. We posit a technological path forward, that while not simple; it is within our technological reach. We propose a roadmap to a program that will lead to sending relativistic probes to the nearest stars and will open up a vast array of possibilities of flight both within our solar system and far beyond. Spacecraft from gram level complete spacecraft on a wafer ("wafer sats") that reach more than ¼ c and reach the nearest star in 15 years to spacecraft with masses more than 105 kg (100 tons) that can reach speeds of near 1000 km/s such systems can be propelled to speeds currently unimaginable with our existing propulsion technologies. To do so requires a fundamental change in our thinking of both propulsion and in many cases what a spacecraft is. In addition to larger spacecraft, some capable of transporting humans, we consider functional spacecraft on a wafer, including integrated optical communications, optical systems and sensors combined with directed energy propulsion. Since "at home" the costs can be amortized over a very large number of missions. The human factor of exploring the nearest stars and exo-planets would be

  13. Beam-beam interaction study of medium energy eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao,Y.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Ptitsyn, V.

    Medium Energy eRHIC (MeRHIC), the first stage design of eRHIC, includes a multi-pass ERL that provides 4GeV high quality electron beam to collide with the ion beam of RHIC. It delivers a minimum luminosity of 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Beam-beam effects present one of major factors limiting the luminosity of colliders. In this paper, both beam-beam effects on the electron beam and the proton beam in MeRHIC are investigated. The beam-beam interaction can induce a head-tail type instability of the proton beam referred to as the kink instability. Thus, beam stability conditions should be established to avoid proton beammore » loss. Also, the electron beam transverse disruption by collisions has to be evaluated to ensure that the beam quality is good enough for the energy recovery pass. The relation of proton beam stability, electron disruption and consequential luminosity are carried out after thorough discussion.« less

  14. Beam position monitor for energy recovered linac beams

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Thomas; Evtushenko, Pavel

    A method of determining the beam position in an energy recovered linac (ERL). The method makes use of in phase and quadrature (I/Q) demodulation techniques to separate the pickup signal generated by the electromagnetic fields generated by the first and second pass beam in the energy recovered linac. The method includes using analog or digital based I/Q demodulation techniques in order to measure the relative amplitude of the signals from a position sensitive beam pickup such as a button, strip line or microstripline beam position monitor.

  15. Rocket propulsion by thermonuclear micro-bombs ignited with intense relativistic electron beams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of a method for the ignition of a thermonuclear microbomb by means of an intense relativistic electron beam with regard to its potential application to rocket propulsion. With such a system, exhaust velocities up to 1000 km/sec, corresponding to a specific impulse of 100,000 sec, seem to be within the realm of possibility. The rocket is propelled by a chain of thermonuclear microbombs exploded in a concave magnetic mirror produced by superconducting field coils. The magnetic pressure of the field reflects the fireball generated by the explosion. For the large capacitor bank required to generate the intense relativistic electron beam, a desirable lightweight design may be possible through use of ferroelectric materials. Because of the high cost of the T-D and He 3-D thermonuclear material, the system has to be optimized by minimizing the T-D and He 3-D consumption by a proper TD and He 3-D fuel to hydrogen propellant mass ratio, leading to a larger total system mass than would be absolutely necessary.

  16. High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's challenge on advanced concept activity in the propulsion area, we initiated a new program entitled "High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion Studies" within the current cooperative agreement in 1998. The goals of this work are to gain further understanding of the engine of the AIMStar spacecraft, a concept which was developed at Penn State University, and to develop a prototype concept for the engine. The AIMStar engine concept was developed at Penn State University several years ago as a hybrid between antimatter and fusion technologies. Because of limited amounts of antimatter available, and concurrently the demonstrated ability for antiprotons to efficiently ignite nuclear fusion reactions, it was felt that this was a very good match. Investigations have been made concerning the performance of the reaction trap. This is a small Penning-like electromagnetic trap, which is used to simultaneously confine antiprotons and fusion fuels. Small DHe3 or DT droplets, containing a few percent molar of a fissile material, are injected into the trap, filled with antiprotons. We have found that it is important to separate the antiprotons into two adjacent wells, to inject he droplet between them and to simultaneously bring the antiprotons to the center of the trap, surrounding the droplet. Our previous concept had the droplet falling onto one cloud of antiprotons. This proved to be inefficient, as the droplet tended to evaporate away from the cloud as it interacted on its surface.

  17. In-Space Transportation Propulsion Architecture Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon

    2000-01-01

    Almost all space propulsion development and application has been chemical. Aerobraking has been used at Venus and Mars, and for entry at Jupiter. One electric propulsion mission has been flown (DS-1) and electric propulsion is in general use by commercial communications satellites for stationkeeping. Gravity assist has been widely used for high-energy missions (Voyager, Galileo, Cassini, etc.). It has served as a substitute for high-energy propulsion but is limited in energy gain, and adds mission complexity as well as launch opportunity restrictions. It has very limited value for round trip missions such as humans to Mars and return. High-energy space propulsion has been researched for many years, and some major developments, such as nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), undertaken. With the exception of solar electric propulsion at a scale of a few kilowatts, high-energy space propulsion has never been used on a mission. Most mission studies have adopted TRL 6 technology because most have looked for a near-term start. The current activity is technology planning aimed at broadening the options available to mission planners. Many of the illustrations used in this report came from various NASA sources; their use is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Facilities to Support Beamed Energy Launch Testing at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory (LHMEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, Michael L.

    2003-05-01

    The Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory (LHMEL) has been characterizing material responses to laser energy in support of national defense programs and the aerospace industry for the past 26 years. This paper reviews the overall resources available at LHMEL to support fundamental materials testing relating to impulse coupling measurement and to explore beamed energy launch concepts. Located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, LHMEL is managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory Materials Directorate AFRL/MLPJ and operated by Anteon Corporation. The facility's advanced hardware is centered around carbon dioxide lasers producing output power up to 135kW and neodymium glass lasers producing up to 10 kilojoules of repetitively pulsed output. The specific capabilities of each laser device and related optical systems are discussed. Materials testing capabilities coupled with the laser systems are also described including laser output and test specimen response diagnostics. Environmental simulation capabilities including wind tunnels and large-volume vacuum chambers relevant to beamed energy propulsion are also discussed. This paper concludes with a summary of the procedures and methods by which the facility can be accessed.

  19. Impact of Energy Gain and Subsystem Characteristics on Fusion Propulsion Performance Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, Suman; Schmidt, George R.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid transportation of large payloads and human crews to destinations throughout the solar system will require propulsion systems having not only very high exhaust velocities (I (sub sp) greater than or equal to 10 (exp 4) to 10 (exp 5) sec) but also extremely low mass-power ratios (alpha less than or equal to 10 (exp -1) kg/kW). Such low a are difficult to achieve with power-limited propulsion systems. but may be attainable with fusion and other high I (sub SP) nuclear concepts that produce energy within the propellant. The magnitude of this energy gain is of fundamental importance. It must be large enough to sustain the nuclear process while still providing a high jet power relative to the massive power-intensive subsystems associated with these types of concepts. This paper evaluates the energy gain and mass-power characteristics required for a consistent with 1-year roundtrip planetary missions ranging up to 100 AU. Central to this analysis is an equation for overall system a, which is derived from the power balance of a generalized "gain-limited" propulsion system. Results show that the gain required to achieve alpha approximately 10 (exp -1) kg/kW with foreseeable subsystem technology can vary from 50 to as high as 10,000, which is 2 to 5 orders of magnitude greater than current state-of-the art. However, order of magnitude improvements in propulsion subsystem mass and efficiency could reduce gain requirements to 10 to 1,000 - still a very challenging goal.

  20. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schmidt, George R.; Santarius, John F.; Turchi, Peter J.; Siemon, Richard E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For efficient and affordable human exploration of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion obviously cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the fission energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant produces propellant velocity of the order of 10 kinds. Alternatively the fission energy can be converted into electricity that is used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. However, the necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment greatly increases the mass of the propulsion system. Fundamental considerations in waste heat rejection and power conditioning in a fission electric propulsion system place a limit on its jet specific power to the order of about 0.2 kW/kg. If fusion can be developed for propulsion, it appears to have the best of all worlds - it can provide the largest absolute amount of energy, the propellant exhaust velocity (> 100 km/s), and the high specific jet power (> 10 kW/kg). An intermediate step towards fusion propulsion might be a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. There are similarities as well as differences between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The similarities are the underlying plasma and fusion physics, the enabling component technologies, the computational and the diagnostics capabilities. These physics and

  1. Optimize out-of-core thermionic energy conversion for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) potentialities for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) are examined. Considering current designs, their limitations, and risks raises critical questions about the use of TEC for NEP. Apparently a reactor cooled by hotter-than-1675 K heat pipes has good potentialities. TEC with higher temperatures and greater power densities than the currently proposed 1650 K, 5-to-6 W/sq cm version offers substantial gains. Other approaches to high-temperature electric isolation appear also promising. A high-power-density, high-temperature TEC for NEP appears, therefore, attainable. It is recommended to optimize out-of-core thermionic energy conversion for nuclear electric propulsion. Although current TEC designs for NEP seem unnecessary compared with Brayton versions, large gains are apparently possible with increased temperatures and greater power densities.

  2. Frontiers in propulsion research: Laser, matter-antimatter, excited helium, energy exchange thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papailiou, D. D. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Concepts are described that presently appear to have the potential for propulsion applications in the post-1990 era of space technology. The studies are still in progress, and only the current status of investigation is presented. The topics for possible propulsion application are lasers, nuclear fusion, matter-antimatter annihilation, electronically excited helium, energy exchange through the interaction of various fields, laser propagation, and thermonuclear fusion technology.

  3. Antimatter Production for Near-Term Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold P.; Schmidt, George R.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses the use and potential of power generated from Proton-Antiproton Annihilation. The problem is that there is not enough production of anti-protons, and that the production methods are inefficient. The cost for 1 gram of antiprotons is estimated at 62.5 trillion dollars. Applications which require large quantities (i.e., about 1 kg) will require dramatic improvements in the efficiency of the production of the antiprotons. However, applications which involve small quantities (i.e., 1 to 10 micrograms may be practical with a relative expansion of capacities. There are four "conventional" antimatter propulsion concepts which are: (1) the solid core, (2) the gas core, (3) the plasma core, and the (4) beam core. These are compared in terms of specific impulse, propulsive energy utilization and vehicle structure/propellant mass ratio. Antimatter-catalyzed fusion propulsion is also evaluated. The improvements outlined in the presentation to the Fermilab production, and other sites. capability would result in worldwide capacity of several micrograms per year, by the middle of the next decade. The conclusions drawn are: (1) the Conventional antimatter propulsion IS not practical due to large p-bar requirement; (2) Antimatter-catalyzed systems can be reasonably considered this "solves" energy cost problem by employing substantially smaller quantities; (3) With current infrastructure, cost for 1 microgram of p-bars is $62.5 million, but with near-term improvements cost should drop; (4) Milligram-scale facility would require a $15 billion investment, but could produce 1 mg, at $0.1/kW-hr, for $6.25 million.

  4. Solar Thermal Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Harnessing the Sun's energy through Solar Thermal Propulsion will propel vehicles through space by significantly reducing weight, complexity, and cost while boosting performance over current conventional upper stages. Another solar powered system, solar electric propulsion, demonstrates ion propulsion is suitable for long duration missions. Pictured is an artist's concept of space flight using solar thermal propulsion.

  5. History and status of beamed power technology and applications at 2.45 Gigahertz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Various applications of beamed power technology are discussed. An experimental microwave powered helicopter, rectenna technology, the use of the Solar Power Satellite to beam energy to Earth via microwaves, the use of cyclotron resonance devices, microwave powered airships, and electric propulsion are discussed.

  6. NASA's Vision for Potential Energy Reduction from Future Generations of Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Through a robust partnership with the aviation industry, over the past 50 years NASA programs have helped foster advances in propulsion technology that enabled substantial reductions in fuel consumption for commercial transports. Emerging global trends and continuing environmental concerns are creating challenges that will very likely transform the face of aviation over the next 20-40 years. In recognition of this development, NASA Aeronautics has established a set of Research Thrusts that will help define the future direction of the agency's research technology efforts. Two of these thrusts, Ultra-Efficient Commercial Vehicles and Transition to Low-Carbon Propulsion, serve as cornerstones for the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) project. The AATT project is exploring and developing high-payoff technologies and concepts that are key to continued improvement in energy efficiency and environmental compatibility for future generations of fixed-wing, subsonic transports. The AATT project is primarily focused on the N+3 timeframe, or 3 generations from current technology levels. As should be expected, many of the propulsion system architectures technologies envisioned for N+3 vary significantly from todays engines. The use of batteries in a hybrid-electric configuration or deploying multiple fans distributed across the airframe to enable higher bypass ratios are just two examples of potential advances that could enable substantial energy reductions over current propulsion systems.

  7. Beam energy tracking system on Optima XEx high energy ion implanter

    SciTech Connect

    David, Jonathan; Satoh, Shu; Wu Xiangyang

    2012-11-06

    The Axcelis Optima XEx high energy implanter is an RF linac-based implanter with 12 RF resonators for beam acceleration. Even though each acceleration field is an alternating, sinusoidal RF field, the well known phase-focusing principle produces a beam with a sharp quasi-monoenergetic energy spectrum. A magnetic energy filter after the linac further attenuates the low energy continuum in the energy spectrum often associated with RF acceleration. The final beam energy is a function of the phase and amplitude of the 12 resonators in the linac. When tuning a beam, the magnetic energy filter is set to the desired energy, andmore » each linac parameter is tuned to maximize the transmission through the filter. Once a beam is set up, all the parameters are stored in a recipe, which can be easily tuned and has proven to be quite repeatable. The magnetic field setting of the energy filter selects the beam energy from the RF Linac accelerator, and in-situ verification of beam energy in addition to the magnetic energy filter setting has long been desired. An independent energy tracking system was developed for this purpose, using the existing electrostatic beam scanner as a deflector to construct an in-situ electrostatic energy analyzer. This paper will describe the system and performance of the beam energy tracking system.« less

  8. H- beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport.

    PubMed

    Gabor, C; Back, J J; Faircloth, D C; Izaola, Z; Lawrie, S R; Letchford, A P

    2012-02-01

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H(-) ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H(-) high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  9. Working group report on beam plasmas, electronic propulsion, and active experiments using beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, J. M.; Eastman, T.; Gabriel, S.; Hawkins, J.; Matossian, J.; Raitt, J.; Reeves, G.; Sasaki, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.; Winkler, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The JPL Workshop addressed a number of plasma issues that bear on advanced spaceborne technology for the years 2000 and beyond. Primary interest was on the permanently manned space station with a focus on identifying environmentally related issues requiring early clarification by spaceborne plasma experimentation. The Beams Working Group focused on environmentally related threats that platform operations could have on the conduct and integrity of spaceborne beam experiments and vice versa. Considerations were to include particle beams and plumes. For purposes of definition it was agreed that the term particle beams described a directed flow of charged or neutral particles allowing single-particle trajectories to represent the characteristics of the beam and its propagation. On the other hand, the word plume was adopted to describe a multidimensional flow (or expansion) of a plasma or neutral gas cloud. Within the framework of these definitions, experiment categories included: (1) Neutral- and charged-particle beam propagation, with considerations extending to high powers and currents. (2) Evolution and dynamics of naturally occurring and man-made plasma and neutral gas clouds. In both categories, scientific interest focused on interactions with the ambient geoplasma and the evolution of particle densities, energy distribution functions, waves, and fields.

  10. NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The grand opening of NASA's new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, took place in July 2004. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory (PRL) serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of innovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility is the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, features a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility allows it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellant propulsion. An important area of emphasis is the development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and sets the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  11. Centralized versus distributed propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The functions and requirements of auxiliary propulsion systems are reviewed. None of the three major tasks (attitude control, stationkeeping, and shape control) can be performed by a collection of thrusters at a single central location. If a centralized system is defined as a collection of separated clusters, made up of the minimum number of propulsion units, then such a system can provide attitude control and stationkeeping for most vehicles. A distributed propulsion system is characterized by more numerous propulsion units in a regularly distributed arrangement. Various proposed large space systems are reviewed and it is concluded that centralized auxiliary propulsion is best suited to vehicles with a relatively rigid core. These vehicles may carry a number of flexible or movable appendages. A second group, consisting of one or more large flexible flat plates, may need distributed propulsion for shape control. There is a third group, consisting of vehicles built up from multiple shuttle launches, which may be forced into a distributed system because of the need to add additional propulsion units as the vehicles grow. The effects of distributed propulsion on a beam-like structure were examined. The deflection of the structure under both translational and rotational thrusts is shown as a function of the number of equally spaced thrusters. When two thrusters only are used it is shown that location is an important parameter. The possibility of using distributed propulsion to achieve minimum overall system weight is also examined. Finally, an examination of the active damping by distributed propulsion is described.

  12. Impact of Energy Gain and Subsystem Characteristics on Fusion Propulsion Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Schmidt, G. R.

    2001-01-01

    Rapid transport of large payloads and human crews throughout the solar system requires propulsion systems having very high specific impulse (I(sub sp) > 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 5) s). It also calls for systems with extremely low mass-power ratios (alpha < 10(exp -1) kg/kW). Such low alpha are beyond the reach of conventional power-limited propulsion, but may be attainable with fusion and other nuclear concepts that produce energy within the propellant. The magnitude of energy gain must be large enough to sustain the nuclear process while still providing a high jet power relative to the massive energy-intensive subsystems associated with these concepts. This paper evaluates the impact of energy gain and subsystem characteristics on alpha. Central to the analysis are general parameters that embody the essential features of any 'gain-limited' propulsion power balance. Results show that the gains required to achieve alpha = 10(exp -1) kg/kW with foreseeable technology range from approximately 100 to over 2000, which is three to five orders of magnitude greater than current fusion state of the arL Sensitivity analyses point to the parameters exerting the most influence for either: (1) lowering a and improving mission performance or (2) relaxing gain requirements and reducing demands on the fusion process. The greatest impact comes from reducing mass and increasing efficiency of the thruster and subsystems downstream of the fusion process. High relative gain, through enhanced fusion processes or more efficient drivers and processors, is also desirable. There is a benefit in improving driver and subsystem characteristics upstream of the fusion process, but it diminishes at relative gains > 100.

  13. The influence of the waterjet propulsion system on the ships' energy consumption and emissions inventories.

    PubMed

    Durán-Grados, Vanesa; Mejías, Javier; Musina, Liliya; Moreno-Gutiérrez, Juan

    2018-08-01

    In this study we consider the problems associated with calculating ships' energy and emission inventories. Various related uncertainties are described in many similar studies published in the last decade, and applying to Europe, the USA and Canada. However, none of them have taken into account the performance of ships' propulsion systems. On the one hand, when a ship uses its propellers, there is no unanimous agreement on the equations used to calculate the main engines load factor and, on the other, the performance of waterjet propulsion systems (for which this variable depends on the speed of the ship) has not been taken into account in any previous studies. This paper proposes that the efficiency of the propulsion system should be included as a new parameter in the equation that defines the actual power delivered by a ship's main engines, as applied to calculate energy consumption and emissions in maritime transport. To highlight the influence of the propulsion system on calculated energy consumption and emissions, the bottom-up method has been applied using data from eight fast ferries operating across the Strait of Gibraltar over the course of one year. This study shows that the uncertainty about the efficiency of the propulsion system should be added as one more uncertainty in the energy and emission inventories for maritime transport as currently prepared. After comparing four methods for this calculation, the authors propose a new method for eight cases. For the calculation of the Main Engine's fuel oil consumption, differences up to 22% between some methods were obtained at low loads. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP) Analysis Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joesph A.; Morton, P. Jeff; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP) systems are at the stage of engineering infancy with evolving paradigms for application. performance and general characteristics. Recent efforts have focused on an approach that employs existing technologies with near term EPPP development for usage in interplanetary exploration and asteroid/comet deflection. if mandated. The inherent advantages of EPPP are discussed and its application to a variety of propulsion concepts is explored. These include, but are not limited to, utilizing energy sources such as fission. fusion and antimatter, as well as, improved chemical explosives. A mars mission scenario is presented as a demonstration of its capability using existing technologies. A suggested alternate means to improve EPPP efficiencies could also lead to a heavy lift (non-nuclear) launch vehicle capability. Conceivably, true low-cost, access to space is possible using advanced explosive propellants and/or coupling the EPPP vehicle to a "beam propellant" concept. EPPP systems appear to offer an approach that can potentially cover ETO through interstellar transportation capability. A technology roadmap is presented that shows mutual benefits pertaining to a substantial number of existing space propulsion and research areas.

  15. High temperature latent heat thermal energy storage to augment solar thermal propulsion for microsatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilpin, Matthew R.

    Solar thermal propulsion (STP) offers an unique combination of thrust and efficiency, providing greater total DeltaV capability than chemical propulsion systems without the order of magnitude increase in total mission duration associated with electric propulsion. Despite an over 50 year development history, no STP spacecraft has flown to-date as both perceived and actual complexity have overshadowed the potential performance benefit in relation to conventional technologies. The trend in solar thermal research over the past two decades has been towards simplification and miniaturization to overcome this complexity barrier in an effort finally mount an in-flight test. A review of micro-propulsion technologies recently conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has identified solar thermal propulsion as a promising configuration for microsatellite missions requiring a substantial Delta V and recommended further study. A STP system provides performance which cannot be matched by conventional propulsion technologies in the context of the proposed microsatellite ''inspector" requiring rapid delivery of greater than 1500 m/s DeltaV. With this mission profile as the target, the development of an effective STP architecture goes beyond incremental improvements and enables a new class of microsatellite missions. Here, it is proposed that a bi-modal solar thermal propulsion system on a microsatellite platform can provide a greater than 50% increase in Delta V vs. chemical systems while maintaining delivery times measured in days. The realization of a microsatellite scale bi-modal STP system requires the integration of multiple new technologies, and with the exception of high performance thermal energy storage, the long history of STP development has provided "ready" solutions. For the target bi-modal STP microsatellite, sensible heat thermal energy storage is insufficient and the development of high temperature latent heat thermal energy storage is an enabling

  16. Energy distributions in rods and beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlever, J. C.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    A hypothesis proposed by Nefske and Sung (1987) that the mechanical energy flow in acoustic/structural systems can be modeled using a thermal energy flow analogy was tested for both longitudinal vibration in rods and transverse flexural vibrations in beams. It was found that the rod behaves according to the energy flow analogy. However, the beam solutions behaved significantly differently than predicted by the thermal analogy, unless spatially averaged energy and power flow were considered. Otherwise, the beam analysis is restricted to frequencies where the near-field terms in the displacement solution are negligible over most of the beam.

  17. SU-E-T-635: Quantitative Study On Beam Flatness Variation with Beam Energy Change

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J S; Eldib, A; Ma, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam flatness check has been proposed for beam energy check for photon beams with flattering filters. In this work, beam flatness change with beam energy was investigated quantitatively using the Monte Carlo method and its significance was compared with depth dose curve change. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations for a linear accelerator with flattering filter were performed with different initial electron energies for photon beams of 6MV and 10MV. Dose calculations in a water phantom were then perform with the phase space files obtained from the simulations. The beam flatness was calculated based on the dose profile at 10 cmmore » depth for all the beams with different initial electron energies. The percentage depth dose (PDD) curves were also analyzed. The dose at 10cm depth (D10) and the ratio of the dose at 10cm and 20cm depth (D10/D20) and their change with the beam energy were calculated and compared with the beam flatness variation. Results: It was found that the beam flatness variation with beam energy change was more significant than the change of D10 and the ratio between D10 and D20 for both 6MV and 10MV beams. Half MeV difference on the initial electron beam energy brought in at least 20% variation on the beam flatness but only half percent change on the ratio of D10 and D20. The change of D10 or D20 alone is even less significant. Conclusion: The beam energy impact on PDD is less significant than that on the beam flatness. If the PDD is used for checking the beam energy, uncertainties of the measurement could possibly disguise its change. Beam flatness changes more significantly with beam energy and therefore it can be used for monitoring the energy change for photon beams with flattering filters. However, other factors which may affect the beam flatness should be watched as well.« less

  18. Advanced Chemical Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Leslie, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Chemical Propulsion (ACP) provides near-term incremental improvements in propulsion system performance and/or cost. It is an evolutionary approach to technology development that produces useful products along the way to meet increasingly more demanding mission requirements while focusing on improving payload mass fraction to yield greater science capability. Current activities are focused on two areas: chemical propulsion component, subsystem, and manufacturing technologies that offer measurable system level benefits; and the evaluation of high-energy storable propellants with enhanced performance for in-space application. To prioritize candidate propulsion technology alternatives, a variety of propulsion/mission analyses and trades have been conducted for SMD missions to yield sufficient data for investment planning. They include: the Advanced Chemical Propulsion Assessment; an Advanced Chemical Propulsion System Model; a LOx-LH2 small pumps conceptual design; a space storables propellant study; a spacecraft cryogenic propulsion study; an advanced pressurization and mixture ratio control study; and a pump-fed vs. pressure-fed study.

  19. Fuel Effective Photonic Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajalakshmi, N.; Srivarshini, S.

    2017-09-01

    With the entry of miniaturization in electronics and ultra-small light-weight materials, energy efficient propulsion techniques for space travel can soon be possible. We need to go for such high speeds so that the generation’s time long interstellar missions can be done in incredibly short time. Also renewable energy like sunlight, nuclear energy can be used for propulsion instead of fuel. These propulsion techniques are being worked on currently. The recently proposed photon propulsion concepts are reviewed, that utilize momentum of photons generated by sunlight or onboard photon generators, such as blackbody radiation or lasers, powered by nuclear or solar power. With the understanding of nuclear photonic propulsion, in this paper, a rough estimate of nuclear fuel required to achieve the escape velocity of Earth is done. An overview of the IKAROS space mission for interplanetary travel by JAXA, that was successful in demonstrating that photonic propulsion works and also generated additional solar power on board, is provided; which can be used as a case study. An extension of this idea for interstellar travel, termed as ‘Star Shot’, aims to send a nanocraft to an exoplanet in the nearest star system, which could be potentially habitable. A brief overview of the idea is presented.

  20. NASA breakthrough propulsion physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    1999-05-01

    In 1996, NASA established the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program to seek the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, propulsion that attains the maximum transit speeds physically possible, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Topics of interest include experiments and theories regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp drives and wormholes, and superluminal quantum effects. Because these propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis is to identify affordable, near-term, and credible research that could make measurable progress toward these propulsion goals. The methods of the program and the results of the 1997 workshop are presented. This Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program, managed by Lewis Research Center, is one part of a comprehensive, long range Advanced Space Transportation Plan managed by Marshall Space Flight Center.

  1. NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, NASA established the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program to seek the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, propulsion that attains the maximum transit speeds physically possible, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Topics of interest include experiments and theories regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp drives and worm-holes, and superluminal quantum effects. Because these propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis is to identify affordable, near-term, and credible research that could make measurable progress toward these propulsion goals. The methods of the program and the results of the 1997 workshop are presented. This Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program, managed by Lewis Research Center, is one part of a comprehensive, long range Advanced Space Transportation Plan managed by Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. The NASA-Lewis program on fusion energy for space power and propulsion, 1958-1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Roth, J. Reece

    1990-01-01

    An historical synopsis is provided of the NASA-Lewis research program on fusion energy for space power and propulsion systems. It was initiated to explore the potential applications of fusion energy to space power and propulsion systems. Some fusion related accomplishments and program areas covered include: basic research on the Electric Field Bumpy Torus (EFBT) magnetoelectric fusion containment concept, including identification of its radial transport mechanism and confinement time scaling; operation of the Pilot Rig mirror machine, the first superconducting magnet facility to be used in plasma physics or fusion research; operation of the Superconducting Bumpy Torus magnet facility, first used to generate a toroidal magnetic field; steady state production of neutrons from DD reactions; studies of the direct conversion of plasma enthalpy to thrust by a direct fusion rocket via propellant addition and magnetic nozzles; power and propulsion system studies, including D(3)He power balance, neutron shielding, and refrigeration requirements; and development of large volume, high field superconducting and cryogenic magnet technology.

  3. NASA Fixed Wing Project Propulsion Research and Technology Development Activities to Reduce Thrust Specific Energy Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Rosario, Ruben Del; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the propulsion research and technology portfolio of NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Fixed Wing Project. The research is aimed at significantly reducing the thrust specific fuel/energy consumption of notional advanced fixed wing aircraft (by 60 percent relative to a baseline Boeing 737-800 aircraft with CFM56-7B engines) in the 2030 to 2035 time frame. The research investments described herein are aimed at improving propulsive efficiency through higher bypass ratio fans, improving thermal efficiency through compact high overall pressure ratio gas generators, and exploring the potential benefits of boundary layer ingestion propulsion and hybrid gas-electric propulsion concepts.

  4. NASA Fixed Wing Project Propulsion Research and Technology Development Activities to Reduce Thrust Specific Energy Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; DelRasario, Ruben; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the propulsion research and technology portfolio of NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Fixed Wing Project. The research is aimed at significantly reducing the thrust specific fuel/energy consumption of notional advanced fixed wing aircraft (by 60 % relative to a baseline Boeing 737-800 aircraft with CFM56-7B engines) in the 2030-2035 time frame. The research investments described herein are aimed at improving propulsive efficiency through higher bypass ratio fans, improving thermal efficiency through compact high overall pressure ratio gas generators, and exploring the potential benefits of boundary layer ingestion propulsion and hybrid gas-electric propulsion concepts.

  5. Calibration of a proton beam energy monitor.

    PubMed

    Moyers, M F; Coutrakon, G B; Ghebremedhin, A; Shahnazi, K; Koss, P; Sanders, E

    2007-06-01

    Delivery of therapeutic proton beams requires an absolute energy accuracy of +/-0.64 to 0.27 MeV for patch fields and a relative energy accuracy of +/-0.10 to 0.25 MeV for tailoring the depth dose distribution using the energy stacking technique. Achromatic switchyard tunes, which lead to better stability of the beam incident onto the patient, unfortunately limit the ability of switchyard magnet tesla meters to verify the correct beam energy within the tolerances listed above. A new monitor to measure the proton energy before each pulse is transported through the switchyard has been installed into a proton synchrotron. The purpose of this monitor is to correct and/or inhibit beam delivery when the measured beam energy is outside of the tolerances for treatment. The monitor calculates the beam energy using data from two frequency and eight beam position monitors that measure the revolution frequency of the proton bunches and the effective offset of the orbit from the nominal radius of the synchrotron. The new energy monitor has been calibrated by measuring the range of the beam through water and comparing with published range-energy tables for various energies. A relationship between depth dose curves and range-energy tables was first determined using Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport and energy deposition. To reduce the uncertainties associated with typical scanning water phantoms, a new technique was devised in which the beam energy was scanned while fixed thickness water tanks were sandwiched between two fixed parallel plate ionization chambers. Using a multitude of tank sizes, several energies were tested to determine the nominal accelerator orbit radius. After calibration, the energy reported by the control system matched the energy derived by range measurements to better than 0.72 MeV for all nine energies tested between 40 and 255 MeV with an average difference of -0.33 MeV. A study of different combinations of revolution frequency and radial

  6. Comparison of Aero-Propulsive Performance Predictions for Distributed Propulsion Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borer, Nicholas K.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Deere, Karen A.; Carter, Melissa B.; Viken, Sally A.; Patterson, Michael D.; Litherland, Brandon L.; Stoll, Alex M.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's X-57 "Maxwell" flight demonstrator incorporates distributed electric propulsion technologies in a design that will achieve a significant reduction in energy used in cruise flight. A substantial portion of these energy savings come from beneficial aerodynamic-propulsion interaction. Previous research has shown the benefits of particular instantiations of distributed propulsion, such as the use of wingtip-mounted cruise propellers and leading edge high-lift propellers. However, these benefits have not been reduced to a generalized design or analysis approach suitable for large-scale design exploration. This paper discusses the rapid, "design-order" toolchains developed to investigate the large, complex tradespace of candidate geometries for the X-57. Due to the lack of an appropriate, rigorous set of validation data, the results of these tools were compared to three different computational flow solvers for selected wing and propulsion geometries. The comparisons were conducted using a common input geometry, but otherwise different input grids and, when appropriate, different flow assumptions to bound the comparisons. The results of these studies showed that the X-57 distributed propulsion wing should be able to meet the as-designed performance in cruise flight, while also meeting or exceeding targets for high-lift generation in low-speed flight.

  7. Prospective of Photon Propulsion for Interstellar Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young K.

    Mastering photon propulsion is proposed to be the key to overcoming the limit of the current propulsion technology based on conventional rocketry and potentially opening a new space era. A perspective on photon propulsion is presented here to elucidate that interstellar manned roundtrip flight could be achievable in a century within a frame of exiting scientific principles, once the required existing technologies are further developed. It is shown that the developmental pathway towards the interstellar flight demands not only technological breakthroughs, but consistent long-term world-scale economic interest and investment. Such interest and investment will result from positive financial returns from routine interstellar commutes that can transport highly valuable commodities in a profitable manner. The Photonic Railway, a permanent energy-efficient transportation structure based on the Beamed-Laser Propulsion (BLP) by Forward and the Photonic Laser Thruster (PLT) by the author, is proposed to enable such routine interstellar commutes via Spacetrains. A four-phased evolutionary developmental pathway towards the Interstellar Photonic Railway is proposed. Each phase poses evolutionary, yet daunting, technological and financial challenges that need to be overcome within each time frame of 20 _ 30 years, and is projected to generate multitudes of applications that would lead to sustainable reinvestment into its development. If successfully developed, the Photonic Railway would bring about a quantum leap in the human economic and social interests in space from explorations to terraforming, mining, colonization, and permanent habitation in exoplanets.

  8. Accelerometer output and its association with energy expenditure during manual wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Learmonth, Y C; Kinnett-Hopkins, D; Rice, I M; Dysterheft, J L; Motl, R W

    2016-02-01

    This is an experimental design. This study examined the association between rates of energy expenditure (that is, oxygen consumption (VO2)) and accelerometer counts (that is, vector magnitude (VM)) across a range of speeds during manual wheelchair propulsion on a motor-driven treadmill. Such an association allows for the generation of cutoff points for quantifying the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during manual wheelchair propulsion. The study was conducted in the University Laboratory. Twenty-four manual wheelchair users completed a 6-min period of seated rest and three 6-min periods of manual wheelchair propulsion on a motor-driven wheelchair treadmill. The 6-min periods of wheelchair propulsion corresponded with three treadmill speeds (1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 mph) that elicited a range of physical activity intensities. Participants wore a portable metabolic unit and accelerometers on both wrists. Primary outcome measures included steady-state VO2 and VM, and the strength of association between VO2 and VM was based on the multiple correlation and squared multiple correlation coefficients from linear regression analyses. Strong linear associations were established between VO2 and VM for the left (R=0.93±0.44; R2=0.87±0.19), right (R=0.95±0.37; R2=0.90±0.14) and combined (R=0.94±0.38; R2=0.88±0.15) accelerometers. The linear relationship between VO2 and VM for the left, right and combined wrists yielded cutoff points for MVPA of 3659 ±1302, 3630±1403 and 3644±1339 counts min(-1), respectively. We provide cutoff points based on the linear association between energy expenditure and accelerometer counts for estimating time spent in MVPA during manual wheelchair propulsion using wrist-worn accelerometry. The similarity across wrist location permits flexibility in selecting a location for wrist accelerometry placement.

  9. Electrolysis Propulsion Provides High-Performance, Inexpensive, Clean Spacecraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim A.

    1999-01-01

    An electrolysis propulsion system consumes electrical energy to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen. These gases are stored in separate tanks and used when needed in gaseous bipropellant thrusters for spacecraft propulsion. The propellant and combustion products are clean and nontoxic. As a result, costs associated with testing, handling, and launching can be an order of magnitude lower than for conventional propulsion systems, making electrolysis a cost-effective alternative to state-of-the-art systems. The electrical conversion efficiency is high (>85 percent), and maximum thrust-to-power ratios of 0.2 newtons per kilowatt (N/kW), a 370-sec specific impulse, can be obtained. A further advantage of the water rocket is its dual-mode potential. For relatively high thrust applications, the system can be used as a bipropellant engine. For low thrust levels and/or small impulse bit requirements, cold gas oxygen can be used alone. An added innovation is that the same hardware, with modest modifications, can be converted into an energy-storage and power-generation fuel cell, reducing the spacecraft power and propulsion system weight by an order of magnitude.

  10. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  11. Ion propulsion for communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    In a recent study of potential applications for electric propulsion, it was determined that ion propulsion can provide North-South stationkeeping (NSSK) for communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit with appreciably less mass than chemical propulsion. While this finding is not new, the margin of benefit over advanced chemical propulsion technology depends strongly on the ion propulsion system specifications. Full advantage must be taken of the under-utilized stored energy available from the communication satellite's batteries. This paper describes a methodology for evaluating the benefits obtained in using ion propulsion for NSSK, both in terms of the mass reduction and its economic value.

  12. Advanced space propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been actively involved in the evaluation and development of advanced spacecraft propulsion. Recent program elements have included high energy density propellants, electrode less plasma thruster concepts, and low power laser propulsion technology. A robust advanced technology program is necessary to develop new, cost-effective methods of spacecraft propulsion, and to continue to push the boundaries of human knowledge and technology.

  13. Micro-gun based on laser pulse propulsion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haichao; Li, Hanyang; Cui, Lugui; Liu, Shuangqiang; Yang, Jun

    2017-11-24

    This paper proposes a novel "micro-gun" structure for laser pulse propulsion. The "micro-bullets" (glass microspheres) are irradiated by a laser pulse with a 10 ns duration in a dynamic process. Experimental parameters such as the microsphere diameter and the laser pulse energy are varied to investigate their influence on laser pulse propulsion. The energy field and spatial intensity distribution in the capillary tube were simulated using a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. The experimental results demonstrate that the propulsion efficiency is dependent on the laser pulse energy and the microsphere size. The propulsion modes and sources of the propelling force were confirmed through direct observation and theoretical calculation. Waves also generated by light-pressure and thermal expansions assisted the propulsion.

  14. Measurements of energy distribution and thrust for microwave plasma coupling of electrical energy to hydrogen for propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, T.; Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.; Asmussen, J.; Nakanishi, S.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave plasma system for transfer of electrical energy to hydrogen flowing through the system has potential application for coupling energy to a flowing gas in the electrothermal propulsion concept. Experimental systems have been designed and built for determination of the energy inputs and outputs and thrust for the microwave coupling of energy to hydrogen. Results for experiments with pressure in the range 100 microns-6 torr, hydrogen flow rate up to 1000 micronmoles/s, and total absorbed power to 700 w are presented.

  15. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    A free radical propulsion concept utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust was examined. The concept offered promise of a propulsion system operating at a theoretical impulse, with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, thus filling the gas existing between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas was transferred to the propellant via three body recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Power absorption by the microwave plasma discharge was in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressures. Gas temperatures inferred from gas dynamic equations showed much higher temperatures from microwave heating than from electrothermal heating. Spectroscopic analysis appeared to corroborate the inferred temperatures of one of the gases tested.

  16. Propulsion system for a motor vehicle using a bidirectional energy converter

    DOEpatents

    Tamor, Michael Alan; Gale, Allan Roy

    1999-01-01

    A motor vehicle propulsion system includes an electrical energy source and a traction motor coupled to receive electrical energy from the electrical energy source. The system also has a first bus provided electrical energy by the electrical energy source and a second bus of relatively lower voltage than the first bus. In addition, the system includes an electrically-driven source of reaction gas for the electrical energy source, the source of reaction gas coupled to receive electrical energy from the first bus. Also, the system has an electrical storage device coupled to the second bus for storing electrical energy at the lower voltage. The system also includes a bidirectional energy converter coupled to convert electrical energy from the first bus to the second bus and from the second bus to the first bus.

  17. Beam characteristics of energy-matched flattening filter free beams.

    PubMed

    Paynter, D; Weston, S J; Cosgrove, V P; Evans, J A; Thwaites, D I

    2014-05-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators can increase treatment efficiency and plan quality. There are multiple methods of defining a FFF beam. The Elekta control system supports tuning of the delivered FFF beam energy to enable matching of the percentage depth-dose (PDD) of the flattened beam at 10 cm depth. This is compared to FFF beams where the linac control parameters are identical to those for the flattened beam. All beams were delivered on an Elekta Synergy accelerator with an Agility multi-leaf collimator installed and compared to the standard, flattened beam. The aim of this study is to compare "matched" FFF beams to both "unmatched" FFF beams and flattened beams to determine the benefits of matching beams. For the three modes of operation 6 MV flattened, 6 MV matched FFF, 6 MV unmatched FFF, 10 MV flattened, 10 MV matched FFF, and 10 MV unmatched FFF beam profiles were obtained using a plotting tank and were measured in steps of 0.1 mm in the penumbral region. Beam penumbra was defined as the distance between the 80% and 20% of the normalized dose when the inflection points of the unflattened and flattened profiles were normalized with the central axis dose of the flattened field set as 100%. PDD data was obtained at field sizes ranging from 3 cm × 3 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Radiation protection measurements were additionally performed to determine the head leakage and environmental monitoring through the maze and primary barriers. No significant change is made to the beam penumbra for FFF beams with and without PDD matching, the maximum change in penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was within the experimental error of the study. The changes in the profile shape with increasing field size are most significant for the matched FFF beam, and both FFF beams showed less profile shape variation with increasing depth when compared to flattened beams, due to consistency in beam energy spectra across the radiation field. The PDDs of the FFF beams showed

  18. Beacon Beams for Deep Turbulence High Energy Laser Beam Directors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-02

    variance and nC is the atmospheric refractive index structure constant. The effect of turbulence on the focused beacon beam on target, TR...complete phase conjugation of the beacon beam is accomplished by employing Brillouin enhanced optical four wave mixing. A beacon beam formed by...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6790--12-9445 Beacon Beams for Deep Turbulence High Energy Laser Beam Directors P

  19. Development of energy-saving devices for a full slow-speed ship through improving propulsion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hun; Choi, Jung-Eun; Choi, Bong-Jun; Chung, Seok-Ho; Seo, Heung-Won

    2015-06-01

    Energy-saving devices for 317K VLCC have been developed from a propulsion standpoint. Two ESD candidates were designed via computational tools. The first device WAFon composes of flow-control fins adapted for the ship wake to reduce the loss of rotational energy. The other is WAFon-D, which is a WAFon with a duct to obtain additional thrust and to distribute the inflow velocity on the propeller plane uniform. After selecting the candidates from the computed results, the speed performances were validated with model-tests. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the ESDs may be found in improved hull and propulsive efficiencies through increased wake fraction.

  20. High-Energy Space Propulsion Based on Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Landrum, D. B.; Freeze, B.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Gerrish, H.; Schmidt, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an approach in which a magnetized target plasma is compressed inertially by an imploding material wall. A high energy plasma liner may be used to produce the required implosion. The plasma liner is formed by the merging of a number of high momentum plasma jets converging towards the center of a sphere where two compact toroids have been introduced. Preliminary 3-D hydrodynamics modeling results using the SPHINX code of Los Alamos National Laboratory have been very encouraging and confirm earlier theoretical expectations. The concept appears ready for experimental exploration and plans for doing so are being pursued. In this talk, we explore conceptually how this innovative fusion approach could be packaged for space propulsion for interplanetary travel. We discuss the generally generic components of a baseline propulsion concept including the fusion engine, high velocity plasma accelerators, generators of compact toroids using conical theta pinches, magnetic nozzle, neutron absorption blanket, tritium reprocessing system, shock absorber, magnetohydrodynamic generator, capacitor pulsed power system, thermal management system, and micrometeorite shields.

  1. High-Energy Space Propulsion Based on Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Freeze, B.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Landrum, B.; Gerrish, H.; Schmidt, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A conceptual study is made to explore the feasibility of applying magnetized target fusion (MTF) to space propulsion for omniplanetary travel. Plasma-jet driven MTF not only is highly amenable to space propulsion, but also has a number of very attractive features for this application: 1) The pulsed fusion scheme provides in situ a very dense hydrogenous liner capable of moderating the neutrons, converting more than 97% of the neutron energy into charged particle energy of the fusion plasma available for propulsion. 2) The fusion yield per pulse can be maintained at an attractively low level (< 1 GJ) despite a respectable gain in excess of 70. A compact, low-weight engine is the result. An engine with a jet power of 25 GW, a thrust of 66 kN, and a specific impulse of 77,000 s, can be achieved with an overall engine mass of about 41 metric tons, with a specific power density of 605 kW/kg, and a specific thrust density of 1.6 N/kg. The engine is rep-rated at 40 Hz to provide this power and thrust level. At a practical rep-rate limit of 200 Hz, the engine can deliver 128 GW jet power and 340 kN of thrust, at specific power and thrust density of 1,141 kW/kg and 3 N/kg respectively. 3) It is possible to operate the magnetic nozzle as a magnetic flux compression generator in this scheme, while attaining a high nozzle efficiency of 80% in converting the spherically radial momentum of the fusion plasma to an axial impulse. 4) A small fraction of the electrical energy generated from the flux compression is used directly to recharge the capacitor bank and other energy storage equipment, without the use of a highvoltage DC power supply. A separate electrical generator is not necessary. 5) Due to the simplicity of the electrical circuit and the components, involving mainly inductors, capacitors, and plasma guns, which are connected directly to each other without any intermediate equipment, a high rep-rate (with a maximum of 200 Hz) appears practicable. 6) All fusion related

  2. Application of Magnetized Target Fusion to High-Energy Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Schmidt, G. R.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most fusion propulsion concepts that have been investigated in the past employ some form of inertial or magnetic confinement. Although the prospective performance of these concepts is excellent, the fusion processes on which these concepts are based still require considerable development before they can be seriously considered for actual applications. Furthermore, these processes are encumbered by the need for sophisticated plasma and power handling systems that are generally quite inefficient and have historically resulted in large, massive spacecraft designs. Here we present a comparatively new approach, Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), which offers a nearer-term avenue for realizing the tremendous performance benefits of fusion propulsion'. The key advantage of MTF is its less demanding requirements for driver energy and power processing. Additional features include: 1) very low system masses and volumes, 2) high gain and relatively low waste heat, 3) substantial utilization of energy from product neutrons, 4) efficient, low peak-power drivers based on existing pulsed power technology, and 5) very high Isp, specific power and thrust. MTF overcomes many of the problems associated with traditional fusion techniques, thus making it particularly attractive for space applications. Isp greater than 50,000 seconds and specific powers greater than 50 kilowatts/kilogram appear feasible using relatively near-term pulse power and plasma gun technology.

  3. Electric Propulsion Induced Secondary Mass Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amini, Rashied; Landis, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    A document highlights a means to complement remote spectroscopy while also providing in situ surface samples without a landed system. Historically, most compositional analysis of small body surfaces has been done remotely by analyzing reflection or nuclear spectra. However, neither provides direct measurement that can unambiguously constrain the global surface composition and most importantly, the nature of trace composition and second-phase impurities. Recently, missions such as Deep Space 1 and Dawn have utilized electric propulsion (EP) accelerated, high-energy collimated beam of Xe+ ions to propel deep space missions to their target bodies. The energies of the Xe+ are sufficient to cause sputtering interactions, which eject material from the top microns of a targeted surface. Using a mass spectrometer, the sputtered material can be determined. The sputtering properties of EP exhaust can be used to determine detailed surface composition of atmosphereless bodies by electric propulsion induced secondary mass spectroscopy (EPI-SMS). EPI-SMS operation has three high-level requirements: EP system, mass spectrometer, and altitude of about 10 km. Approximately 1 keV Xe+ has been studied and proven to generate high sputtering yields in metallic substrates. Using these yields, first-order calculations predict that EPI-SMS will yield high signal-to-noise at altitudes greater than 10 km with both electrostatic and Hall thrusters.

  4. Optimize out-of-core thermionic energy conversion for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Current designs for out of core thermionic energy conversion (TEC) to power nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) were evaluated. Approaches to improve out of core TEC are emphasized and probabilities for success are indicated. TEC gains are available with higher emitter temperatures and greater power densities. Good potentialities for accommodating external high temperature, high power density TEC with heat pipe cooled reactors exist.

  5. Fully Scalable Porous Metal Electrospray Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-20

    particular emphasis on the variation of specific impulse for multi-modal propulsion is currently carried out by MIT and the Busek Company under an...Beam profile distributions in the negative (left) and positive (center) modes as visualized directly thorough a multi-channel plate and phosphor...screen. These profiles are parabolic (right) indicating the non-thermal character of these type of ion beams. Microscopic Image of pattern imprinted on Si

  6. Solid propulsion advanced concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Shafer, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility and application of a solid propulsion powered spacecraft concept to implement high energy missions independent of multiplanetary swingby opportunities are assessed and recommendations offered for future work. An upper stage, solid propulsion launch vehicle augmentation system was selected as the baseline configuration in view of the established program goals of low cost and high reliability. Spacecraft and propulsion system data that characterize mission performance capabilities were generated to serve as the basis for subsequent tradeoff studies. A cost effectiveness model was used for the preliminary feasibility assessment to provide a meaningful comparative effectiveness measure of the various candidate designs. The results substantiated the feasibility of the powered spacecraft concept when used in conjunction with several intermediate-sized launch vehicles as well as the existence of energy margins by which to exploit the attainment of extended mission capabilities. Additionally, in growth option applications, the employment of advanced propulsion systems and alternate spacecraft approaches appear promising.

  7. Experimental validation of the dual positive and negative ion beam acceleration in the plasma propulsion with electronegative gases thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro, E-mail: dmytro.rafalskyi@lpp.polytechnique.fr; Popelier, Lara; Aanesland, Ane

    The PEGASES (Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative Gases) thruster is a gridded ion thruster, where both positive and negative ions are accelerated to generate thrust. In this way, additional downstream neutralization by electrons is redundant. To achieve this, the thruster accelerates alternately positive and negative ions from an ion-ion plasma where the electron density is three orders of magnitude lower than the ion densities. This paper presents a first experimental study of the alternate acceleration in PEGASES, where SF{sub 6} is used as the working gas. Various electrostatic probes are used to investigate the source plasma potential and the energy, composition,more » and current of the extracted beams. We show here that the plasma potential control in such system is key parameter defining success of ion extraction and is sensitive to both parasitic electron current paths in the source region and deposition of sulphur containing dielectric films on the grids. In addition, large oscillations in the ion-ion plasma potential are found in the negative ion extraction phase. The oscillation occurs when the primary plasma approaches the grounded parts of the main core via sub-millimetres technological inputs. By controlling and suppressing the various undesired effects, we achieve perfect ion-ion plasma potential control with stable oscillation-free operation in the range of the available acceleration voltages (±350 V). The measured positive and negative ion currents in the beam are about 10 mA for each component at RF power of 100 W and non-optimized extraction system. Two different energy analyzers with and without magnetic electron suppression system are used to measure and compare the negative and positive ion and electron fluxes formed by the thruster. It is found that at alternate ion-ion extraction the positive and negative ion energy peaks are similar in areas and symmetrical in position with +/− ion energy corresponding to the amplitude of the

  8. Dedicated Laboratory Setup for CO{sub 2} TEA Laser Propulsion Experiments at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador, Israel I.; Kenoyer, David; Myrabo, Leik N.

    Laser propulsion research progress has traditionally been hindered by the scarcity of photon sources with desirable characteristics, as well as integrated specialized flow facilities in a dedicated laboratory environment. For TEA CO{sub 2} lasers, the minimal requirements are time-average powers of >100 W), and pulse energies of >10 J pulses with short duration (e.g., 0.1 to 1 {mu}s); furthermore, for the advanced pulsejet engines of interest here, the laser system must simulate pulse repetition frequencies of 1-10 kilohertz or more, at least for two (carefully sequenced) pulses. A well-equipped laser propulsion laboratory should have an arsenal of sensor and diagnosticsmore » tools (such as load cells, thrust stands, moment balances, pressure and heat transfer gages), Tesla-level electromagnet and permanent magnets, flow simulation facilities, and high-speed visualization systems, in addition to other related equipment, such as optics and gas supply systems. In this paper we introduce a cutting-edge Laser Propulsion Laboratory created at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, one of the very few in the world to be uniquely set up for beamed energy propulsion (BEP) experiments. The present BEP research program is described, along with the envisioned research strategy that will exploit current and expanded facilities in the near future.« less

  9. Numerical Analysis of a Single Microchannel Within a High-Temperature Hydrogen Heat Exchanger for Beamed Energy Propulsion Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    was subtracted. Here, based on prospective tube shell materials such as carbon fiber reinforced carbon , an emissivity of .9 was chosen. The...Conference Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 14 Jul 2013 – 19 Jul 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Numerical Analysis of a Single Microchannel Within a High ...energy to the spacecraft via microwaves . This work computationally models three different heat exchanger channel designs for use in a beam

  10. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R [Newport News, VA; Benson, Stephen V [Yorktown, VA

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  11. Fast Computation of High Energy Elastic Collision Scattering Angle for Electric Propulsion Plume Simulation (Conference Paper with Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-10

    Elastic Collision Scattering Angle for Electric Propulsion Plume Simulation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...atom needs to be sampled; however, it is confirmed that initial target atom velocity does not play significant role in typical electric propulsion ...by ANSI Std. 239.18 Fast Computation of High Energy Elastic Collision Scattering Angle for Electric Propulsion Plume Simulation∗ Samuel J. Araki1

  12. Energy-beam-driven rapid fabrication system

    DOEpatents

    Keicher, David M.; Atwood, Clinton L.; Greene, Donald L.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Harwell, Lane D.; Jeantette, Francisco P.; Romero, Joseph A.; Schanwald, Lee P.; Schmale, David T.

    2002-01-01

    An energy beam driven rapid fabrication system, in which an energy beam strikes a growth surface to form a molten puddle thereon. Feed powder is then injected into the molten puddle from a converging flow of feed powder. A portion of the feed powder becomes incorporated into the molten puddle, forcing some of the puddle contents to freeze on the growth surface, thereby adding an additional layer of material. By scanning the energy beam and the converging flow of feed powder across the growth surface, complex three-dimensional shapes can be formed, ready or nearly ready for use. Nearly any class of material can be fabricated using this system.

  13. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Wen C; Moyers, Michael F; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E; Farr, Jonathan B; Mascia, Anthony E; Schreuder, Andries N

    2009-06-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to +/-21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than +/-3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  14. Antimatter Production for Near-Term Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. R.; Gerrish, H. P.; Martin, J. J.; Smith, G. A.; Meyer, K. J.

    1999-01-01

    The superior energy density of antimatter annihilation has often been pointed to as the ultimate source of energy for propulsion. However, the limited capacity and very low efficiency of present-day antiproton production methods suggest that antimatter may be too costly to consider for near-term propulsion applications. We address this issue by assessing the antimatter requirements for six different types of propulsion concepts, including two in which antiprotons are used to drive energy release from combined fission/fusion. These requirements are compared against the capacity of both the current antimatter production infrastructure and the improved capabilities which could exist within the early part of next century. Results show that although it may be impractical to consider systems which rely on antimatter as the sole source of propulsive energy, the requirements for propulsion based on antimatter-assisted fission/fusion do fall within projected near-ten-n production capabilities. In fact, such systems could feasibly support interstellar precursor missions and omniplanetary spaceflight with antimatter costs ranging up to $60 million per mission.

  15. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Jason, Andrew J.; Blind, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  16. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser thatmore » is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.« less

  17. High resolution energy analyzer for broad ion beam characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kanarov, V.; Hayes, A.; Yevtukhov, R.

    2008-09-15

    Characterization of the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) of low energy high current density ion beams by conventional retarding field and deflection type energy analyzers is limited due to finite ion beam emittance and beam space charge spreading inside the analyzer. These deficiencies are, to a large extent, overcome with the recent development of the variable-focusing retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA), which has a cylindrical focusing electrode preceding the planar retarding grid. The principal concept of this analyzer is conversion of a divergent charged particle beam into a quasiparallel beam before analyzing it by the planar retarding field. This allowsmore » analysis of the beam particle total kinetic energy distribution with greatly improved energy resolution. Whereas this concept was first applied to analyze 5-10 keV pulsed electron beams, the present authors have adapted it to analyze the energy distribution of a low energy ({<=}1 KeV) broad ion beam. In this paper we describe the RFEA design, which was modified from the original, mainly as required by the specifics of broad ion beam energy analysis, and the device experimental characterization and modeling results. Among the modifications, an orifice electrode placed in front of the RFEA provides better spatial resolution of the broad ion beam ion optics emission region and reduces the beam plasma density in the vicinity of analyzer entry. An electron repeller grid placed in front of the RFEA collector was found critical for suppressing secondary electrons, both those incoming to the collector and those released from its surface, and improved energy spectrum measurement repeatability and accuracy. The use of finer mesh single- and double-grid retarding structures reduces the retarding grid lens effect and improves the analyzer energy resolution and accuracy of the measured spectrum mean energy. However, additional analyzer component and configuration improvements did not further change the

  18. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a free radical propulsion system, utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust, is analyzed. The system, operating at a theoretical impulse with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, is hypothesized to bridge the gap between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. A comparative methodology is outlined by which characteristics of chemical and electric propulsion for orbit raising mission can be investigated. It is noted that free radicals proposed in rockets previously met with difficulty and complexity in terms of storage requirements; the present study proposes to eliminate the storage requirements by using electric energy to achieve a continuous-flow product of free radicals which are recombined to produce a high velocity propellant. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas is transferred to the propellant via three-body-recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Microwave plasma discharge was found in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressure in preliminary experiments, and microwave heating compared to electrothermal heating showed much higher temperatures in gasdynamic equations.

  19. Multiprobe characterization of plasma flows for space propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damba, Julius; Argente, P.; Maldonado, P. E.; Cervone, A.; Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Conde, L.

    2018-02-01

    Plasma engines for space propulsion generate plasma jets (also denominated plasma plumes) having supersonic ion groups with typical speeds in the order of tens of kilometers per second, which lies between electron and ion thermal speeds. Studies of the stationary plasma expansion process using a four-grid retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA), an emissive probe (EP) and a Langmuir probe (LP), all mounted on a three dimensionally (3D) displaced multiprobe structure are discussed. Specifically, the determination of plasma beam properties from the RFEA current-voltage (IV) characteristic curves is presented. The experimental results show the ion energy spectra to be essentially unchanged over 300 mm along the plasma-jet expansion axis of symmetry. The measured ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) results from the superposition of different ion groups and has two dominant populations: A low-energy group constituted of ions from the background plasma is produced by the interaction of the plasma jet with the walls of the vacuum chamber. The fast-ion population is composed of ions from the plasma beam moving at supersonic speeds with respect to the low-energy ions. The decreasing spatial profiles of the plasma-jet current density are compared with those of the low-energy ion group, which are not uniform along the axis of symmetry because of the small contributions from other ion populations with intermediate speeds.

  20. Retarding field energy analyzer for high energy pulsed electron beam measurements.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Rovey, Joshua L; Zhao, Wansheng

    2017-01-01

    A retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA) designed specifically for high energy pulsed electron beam measurements is described in this work. By proper design of the entrance grid, attenuation grid, and beam collector, this RFEA is capable of determining the time-resolved energy distribution of high energy pulsed electron beams normally generated under "soft vacuum" environment. The performance of the RFEA is validated by multiple tests of the leakage current, attenuation coefficient, and response time. The test results show that the retarding potential in the RFEA can go up to the same voltage as the electron beam source, which is 20 kV for the maximum in this work. Additionally, an attenuation coefficient of 4.2 is obtained in the RFEA while the percent difference of the rise time of the electron beam pulse before and after attenuation is lower than 10%. When compared with a reference source, the percent difference of the RFEA response time is less than 10% for fall times greater than 35 ns. Finally, the test results of the 10 kV pseudospark-based pulsed electron beam currents collected under varying retarding potentials are presented in this paper.

  1. Method for energy recovery of spent ERL beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Hannon, Fay; Rimmer, Robert

    A method for recovering energy from spent energy recovered linac (ERL) beams. The method includes adding a plurality of passive decelerating cavities at the beam dump of the ERL, adding one or more coupling waveguides between the passive decelerating cavities, setting an adequate external Q (Qext) to adjust to the beam loading situation, and extracting the RF energy through the coupling waveguides.

  2. Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Workshop Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    1997-01-01

    In August, 1997, a NASA workshop was held to assess the prospects emerging from physics that might lead to creating the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, attaining the maximum transit speeds physically possible, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Because these propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis was to identify affordable, near-term, and credible research that could make measurable progress toward these propulsion goals. Experiments and theories were discussed regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp drives and wormholes, and superluminal quantum tunneling. Preliminary results of this workshop are presented, along with the status of the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program that conducted this workshop.

  3. Artist's Concept of NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies is under construction at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory will serve as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of irnovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility will be the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The Laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, will feature a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility will allow it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellantless propulsion. An important area of emphasis will be development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and will set the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  4. Investigation of beamed-energy ERH thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, Leik N.; Strayer, T. Darton; Bossard, John A.; Richard, Jacques C.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the performance of an External Radiation Heated (ERH) thruster. In this thruster, high intensity laser energy is focused to ignite either a Laser Supported Combustion (LSC) wave or a Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) wave. Thrust is generated as the LSC or LSD wave propagates over the thruster's surface, or in the proposed thruster configuration, the vehicle afterbody. Thrust models for the LSC and LSD waves were developed and simulated on a computer. Performance parameters investigated include the effect of laser intensity, flight Mach number, and altitude on mean-thrust and coupling coefficient of the ERH thruster. Results from these models suggest that the ERH thruster using LSC/LSD wave ignition could provide propulsion performance considerably greater than any propulsion system currently available.

  5. Control and Optimization of Electric Ship Propulsion Systems with Hybrid Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jun

    Electric ships experience large propulsion-load fluctuations on their drive shaft due to encountered waves and the rotational motion of the propeller, affecting the reliability of the shipboard power network and causing wear and tear. This dissertation explores new solutions to address these fluctuations by integrating a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) and developing energy management strategies (EMS). Advanced electric propulsion drive concepts are developed to improve energy efficiency, performance and system reliability by integrating HESS, developing advanced control solutions and system integration strategies, and creating tools (including models and testbed) for design and optimization of hybrid electric drive systems. A ship dynamics model which captures the underlying physical behavior of the electric ship propulsion system is developed to support control development and system optimization. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed control approaches, a state-of-the-art testbed has been constructed which includes a system controller, Li-Ion battery and ultra-capacitor (UC) modules, a high-speed flywheel, electric motors with their power electronic drives, DC/DC converters, and rectifiers. The feasibility and effectiveness of HESS are investigated and analyzed. Two different HESS configurations, namely battery/UC (B/UC) and battery/flywheel (B/FW), are studied and analyzed to provide insights into the advantages and limitations of each configuration. Battery usage, loss analysis, and sensitivity to battery aging are also analyzed for each configuration. In order to enable real-time application and achieve desired performance, a model predictive control (MPC) approach is developed, where a state of charge (SOC) reference of flywheel for B/FW or UC for B/UC is used to address the limitations imposed by short predictive horizons, because the benefits of flywheel and UC working around high-efficiency range are ignored by short predictive horizons. Given

  6. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams.

    PubMed

    Metzkes, J; Zeil, K; Kraft, S D; Karsch, L; Sobiella, M; Rehwald, M; Obst, L; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Schramm, U

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ∼4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.

  7. Research Opportunities in Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    Rocket propulsion determines the primary characteristics of any space vehicle; how fast and far it can go, its lifetime, and its capabilities. It is the primary factor in safety and reliability and the biggest cost driver. The extremes of heat and pressure produced by propulsion systems push the limits of materials used for manufacturing. Space travel is very unforgiving with little room for errors, and so many things can go wrong with these very complex systems. So we have to plan for failure and that makes it costly. But what is more exciting than the roar of a rocket blasting into space? By its nature the propulsion world is conservative. The stakes are so high at every launch, in terms of payload value or in human life, that to introduce new components to a working, qualified system is extremely difficult and costly. Every launch counts and no risks are tolerated, which leads to the space world's version of Catch-22:"You can't fly till you flown." The last big 'game changer' in propulsion was the use of liquid hydrogen as a fuel. No new breakthrough, low cost access to space system will be developed without new efficient propulsion systems. Because there is no large commercial market driving investment in propulsion, what propulsion research is done is sponsored by government funding agencies. A further difficulty in propulsion technology development is that there are so few new systems flying. There is little opportunity to evolve propulsion technologies and to update existing systems with results coming out of research as there is in, for example, the auto industry. The biggest hurdle to space exploration is getting off the ground. The launch phase will consume most of the energy required for any foreseeable space exploration mission. The fundamental physical energy requirements of escaping earth's gravity make it difficult. It takes 60,000 kJ to put a kilogram into an escape orbit. The vast majority (-97%) of the energy produced by a launch vehicle is used

  8. Nuclear Propulsion through Direct Conversion of Fusion Energy: The Fusion Driven Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony; Kirtley, David; Pihl, Christopher; Pfaff, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The future of manned space exploration and development of space depends critically on the creation of a dramatically more proficient propulsion architecture for in-space transportation. A very persuasive reason for investigating the applicability of nuclear power in rockets is the vast energy density gain of nuclear fuel when compared to chemical combustion energy. Current nuclear fusion efforts have focused on the generation of electric grid power and are wholly inappropriate for space transportation as the application of a reactor based fusion-electric system creates a colossal mass and heat rejection problem for space application.

  9. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP): A Near-Term Approach to Nuclear Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George R.; Manzella, David H.; Kamhawi, Hani; Kremic, Tibor; Oleson, Steven R.; Dankanich, John W.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    Studies over the last decade have shown radioisotope-based nuclear electric propulsion to be enhancing and, in some cases, enabling for many potential robotic science missions. Also known as radioisotope electric propulsion (REP), the technology offers the performance advantages of traditional reactor-powered electric propulsion (i.e., high specific impulse propulsion at large distances from the Sun), but with much smaller, affordable spacecraft. Future use of REP requires development of radioisotope power sources with system specific powers well above that of current systems. The US Department of Energy and NASA have developed an advanced Stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG) engineering unit, which was subjected to rigorous flight qualification-level tests in 2008, and began extended lifetime testing later that year. This advancement, along with recent work on small ion thrusters and life extension technology for Hall thrusters, could enable missions using REP sometime during the next decade.

  10. Second Beamed Space-Power Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, Russell J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Potential missions for microwave and laser power beaming in space are discussed. Power beaming options, millimeter wave technology, laser technology, lunar bases, spacecraft propulsion, and near-Earth applications are covered.

  11. Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Driven by Incoherent Laser Beams with Frequency Detuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, A.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Seka, W.

    2015-11-01

    In the direct-drive method of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the coupling of laser energy to target plasmas is strongly influenced by the effect of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) between multiple driving laser beams. The laser -plasma interaction (LPI) model of CBET is based on the nonparaxial laser light propagation coupled with the low-frequency ion-acoustic-domain plasma response. Common ion waves driven by multiple laser beams play a very important role in CBET. The effect of the frequency detuning (colors) in the driving laser beams is studied and it is shown to significantly reduce the level of common ion waves and therefore the level of CBET. The differences between the LPI-based CBET model and the ray-based CBET model used in hydrocodes are discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Deuterium microbomb rocket propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2010-01-01

    Large scale manned space flight within the solar system is still confronted with the solution of two problems: (1) A propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits. (2) A cost effective lifting of large payloads into earth orbit. For the solution of the first problem a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimegaampere proton beam, drawn from the magnetically insulated spacecraft acting in the ultrahigh vacuum of space as a gigavolt capacitor. For the solution of the second problem, the ignition is done by argon ion lasers driven by high explosives, with the lasers destroyed in the fusion explosion and becoming part of the exhaust.

  13. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2012-02-01

    The H(-) injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ∼38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ∼1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  14. The effect that energy storage and return feet have on the propulsion of the body: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Crimin, Anthony; McGarry, Anthony; Harris, Elena Jane; Solomonidis, Stephan Emanuel

    2014-09-01

    A variety of energy storage and return prosthetic feet are currently available for use within lower limb prostheses. Designs claim to provide a beneficial energy return during push-off, but the extent to which this occurs remains disputed. Techniques currently used to measure energy storage, dissipation and return within the structure of the prosthetic foot are debatable, with limited evidence to support substantial elastic energy storage and return from existing designs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of energy storage and return foot designs through considering the ankle power during push-off and the effect on body centre of mass propulsion. To achieve this aim, the gait patterns of six trans-tibial prosthetic users wearing different designs of energy storage and return feet were analysed while ascending a ramp. Three examples of energy storage and return feet (suitable for moderate activity) were selected and randomly evaluated: the Blatchford's Epirus, Össur Assure and College Park Tribute feet. The power at the anatomical and mechanical ankle joints was integrated to evaluate the work done over the gait cycle. The direction of the inertial force, and therefore propulsion of the body centre of mass, was used to indicate the effect of the energy return by the energy storage and return feet. Results indicate that although energy storage and return feet may provide energy return, the work done around the prosthetic ankle indicates net power absorption. Therefore, the prosthetic limb is unable to contribute to the body centre of mass propulsion to the same extent as the biological limb. © IMechE 2014.

  15. Propulsion Research at the Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John; Rodgers, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is engaged in research activities aimed at providing the bases for fundamental advancement of a range of space propulsion technologies. There are four broad research themes. Advanced chemical propulsion studies focus on the detailed chemistry and transport processes for high-pressure combustion, and on the understanding and control of combustion stability. New high-energy propellant research ranges from theoretical prediction of new propellant properties through experimental characterization propellant performance, material interactions, aging properties, and ignition behavior. Another research area involves advanced nuclear electric propulsion with new robust and lightweight materials and with designs for advanced fuels. Nuclear electric propulsion systems are characterized using simulated nuclear systems, where the non-nuclear power source has the form and power input of a nuclear reactor. This permits detailed testing of nuclear propulsion systems in a non-nuclear environment. In-space propulsion research is focused primarily on high power plasma thruster work. New methods for achieving higher thrust in these devices are being studied theoretically and experimentally. Solar thermal propulsion research is also underway for in-space applications. The fourth of these research areas is advanced energetics. Specific research here includes the containment of ion clouds for extended periods. This is aimed at proving the concept of antimatter trapping and storage for use ultimately in propulsion applications. Another activity in this involves research into lightweight magnetic technology for space propulsion applications.

  16. Plasma-based beam combiner for very high fluence and energy

    DOE PAGES

    Kirkwood, R. K.; Turnbull, D. P.; Chapman, T.; ...

    2017-10-02

    Extreme optical fluences, much beyond the damage threshold of conventional optics, are of interest for a range of high-energy-density physics applications. Nonlinear interactions of multiple beams in plasmas have the potential to produce optics that operate at much higher intensity and fluence than is possible in solids. In inertial confinement fusion experiments indirectly driven with lasers, many beams overlap in the plasma inside a hohlraum, and cross-beam energy transfer by Brillouin scattering has been employed to redistribute energy between laser beams within the target. Here in this paper, we show that in a hot, under-dense plasma the energy of manymore » input beams can be combined into a single well-collimated beam. The emerging beam has an energy of 4 kJ (over 1 ns) that is more than triple that of any incident beam, and a fluence that is more than double. Because the optic produced is plasma, and is diffractive, it is inherently capable of generating higher fluences in a single beam than solid-state refractive or reflective optics.« less

  17. Energy harvesting from controlled buckling of piezoelectric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. H.; Karami, M. Amin

    2015-11-01

    A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is presented that can generate electricity from the weight of passing cars or crowds. The energy harvester consists of a piezoelectric beam, which buckles when the device is stepped on. The energy harvester can have a horizontal or vertical configuration. In the vertical (direct) configuration, the piezoelectric beam is vertical and directly sustains the weight of the vehicles or people. In the horizontal (indirect) configuration, the vertical weight is transferred to a horizontal axial force through a scissor-like mechanism. Buckling of the beam results in significant stresses and, thus, large power production. However, if the beam’s buckling is not controlled, the beam will fracture. To prevent this, the axial deformation is constrained to limit the deformations of the beam. In this paper, the energy harvester is analytically modeled. The considered piezoelectric beam is a general non-uniform beam. The natural frequencies, mode shapes, and the critical buckling force corresponding to each mode shape are calculated. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities are included in the model. The design criteria for the device are discussed. It is demonstrated that a device, realized with commonly used piezoelectric patches, can generate tens of milliwatts of power from passing car traffic. The proposed device could also be implemented in the sidewalks or integrated in shoe soles for energy generation. One of the key features of the device is its frequency up-conversion characteristics. The piezoelectric beam undergoes free vibrations each time the weight is applied to or removed from the energy harvester. The frequency of the free vibrations is orders of magnitude larger than the frequency of the load. The device is, thus, both efficient and insensitive to the frequency of the force excitations.

  18. Earth-to-Orbit Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaurain, Andre; Souchier, Alain; Moravie, Michel; Sackheim, Robert L.; Cikanek, Harry A., III

    2003-01-01

    The Earth-to-orbit (ETO) phase of access to space is and always will be the first and most critical phase of all space missions. This first phase of all space missions has unique characteristics that have driven space launcher propulsion requirements for more than half a century. For example, the need to overcome the force of the Earth s gravity in combination with high levels of atmospheric drag to achieve the initial orbital velocity; i.e., Earth parking orbit or =9 km/s, will always require high thrust- to-weight (TN) propulsion systems. These are necessary with a T/W ratio greater than one during the ascent phase. The only type of propulsion system that can achieve these high T/W ratios are those that convert thermal energy to kinetic energy. There are only two basic sources of onboard thermal energy: chemical combustion-based systems or nuclear thermal-based systems (fission, fusion, or antimatter). The likelihood of advanced open-cycle, nuclear thermal propulsion being developed for flight readiness or becoming environmentally acceptable during the next century is extremely low. This realization establishes that chemical propulsion for ET0 launchers will be the technology of choice for at least the next century, just as it has been for the last half century of rocket flight into space. The world s space transportation propulsion requirements have evolved through several phases over the history of the space program, as has been necessitated by missions and systems development, technological capabilities available, and the growth and evolution of the utilization of space for economic, security, and science benefit. Current projections for the continuing evolution of requirements and concepts may show how future space transportation system needs could be addressed. The evolution and projections will be described in detail in this manuscript.

  19. Advanced electrostatic ion thruster for space propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, T. D.; Macpherson, D.; Gelon, W.; Kami, S.; Poeschel, R. L.; Ward, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The suitability of the baseline 30 cm thruster for future space missions was examined. Preliminary design concepts for several advanced thrusters were developed to assess the potential practical difficulties of a new design. Useful methodologies were produced for assessing both planetary and earth orbit missions. Payload performance as a function of propulsion system technology level and cost sensitivity to propulsion system technology level are among the topics assessed. A 50 cm diameter thruster designed to operate with a beam voltage of about 2400 V is suggested to satisfy most of the requirements of future space missions.

  20. The NASA Electric Propulsion Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, David C.; Wasel, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA OAST Propulsion, Power and Energy Division supports electric propulsion for a broad class of missions. Concepts with potential to significantly benefit or enable space exploration and exploitation are identified and advanced toward applications in the near to far term. Recent program progress in mission/system analyses and in electrothermal, ion, and electromagnetic technologies are summarized.

  1. Advanced Chemical Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, S. Don

    2000-01-01

    Design, propellant selection, and launch assistance for advanced chemical propulsion system is discussed. Topics discussed include: rocket design, advance fuel and high energy density materials, launch assist, and criteria for fuel selection.

  2. Laser Propulsion Standardization Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    It is a relevant issue in the research on laser propulsion that experimental results are treated seriously and that meaningful scientific comparison is possible between groups using different equipment and measurement techniques. However, critical aspects of experimental measurements are sparsely addressed in the literature. In addition, few studies so far have the benefit of independent confirmation by other laser propulsion groups. In this paper, we recommend several approaches towards standardization of published laser propulsion experiments. Such standards are particularly important for the measurement of laser ablation pulse energy, laser spot area, imparted impulse or thrust, and mass removal during ablation.more » Related examples are presented from experiences of an actual scientific cooperation between NU and DLR. On the basis of a given standardization, researchers may better understand and contribute their findings more clearly in the future, and compare those findings confidently with those already published in the laser propulsion literature. Relevant ISO standards are analyzed, and revised formats are recommended for application to laser propulsion studies.« less

  3. Fusion for Space Propulsion and Plasma Liner Driven MTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y.C. Francis; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant cannot overcome the problem. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. There are similarities as well as differences at the system level between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The differences potentially provide a wider window of opportunities for applying fusion to propulsion. For example, pulsed approaches to fusion may be attractive for the propulsion application. This is particularly so

  4. Thrust generation experiments on microwave rocket with a beam concentrator for long distance wireless power feeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunari, Masafumi; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Yusuke; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2018-04-01

    Experiments using a 1 MW-class gyrotron were conducted to examine a beamed energy propulsion rocket, a microwave rocket with a beam concentrator for long-distance wireless power feeding. The incident beam is transmitted from a beam transmission mirror system. The beam transmission mirror system expands the incident beam diameter to 240 mm to extend the Rayleigh length. The beam concentrator receives the beam and guides it into a 56-mm-diameter cylindrical thruster tube. Plasma ignition and ionization front propagation in the thruster were observed through an acrylic window using a fast-framing camera. Atmospheric air was used as a propellant. Thrust generation was achieved with the beam concentrator. The maximum thrust impulse was estimated as 71 mN s/pulse from a pressure history at the thrust wall at the input energy of 638 J/pulse. The corresponding momentum coupling coefficient, Cm was inferred as 204 N/MW.

  5. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  6. Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana, Charles [Leawood, KS

    2007-07-17

    A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

  7. Low energy stage study. Volume 1: Executive summary. [propulsion system configurations for orbital launching of space shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Cost effective approaches for placing automated payloads into circular and elliptical orbits using energy requirements significantly lower than that provided by the smallest, currently planned shuttle upper stage, SSUS-D, were investigated. Launch costs were derived using both NASA existing/planned launch approaches as well as new propulsion concepts meeting low-energy regime requirements. Candidate new propulsion approaches considered were solid (tandem, cluster, and controlled), solid/liquid combinations and all-liquid stages. Results show that the most economical way to deliver the 129 low energy payloads is basically with a new modular, short liquid bipropellant stage system for the large majority of the payloads. For the remainder of the payloads, use the shuttle with integral OMS and the Scout form for a few specialized payloads until the Shuttle becomes operational.

  8. Development of an energy analyzer as diagnostic of beam-generated plasma in negative ion beam systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Carozzi, G.; Veltri, P.; Spolaore, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.

    2017-08-01

    The measurement of the plasma potential and the energy spectrum of secondary particles in the drift region of a negative ion beam offers an insight into beam-induced plasma formation and beam transport in low pressure gasses. Plasma formation in negative-ion beam systems, and the characteristics of such a plasma are of interest especially for space charge compensation, plasma formation in neutralizers, and the development of improved schemes of beam-induced plasma neutralisers for future fusion devices. All these aspects have direct implications in the ITER Heating Neutral Beam and the operation of the prototypes, SPIDER and MITICA, and also have important role in the conceptual studies for NBI systems of DEMO, while at present experimental data are lacking. In this paper we present the design and development of an ion energy analyzer to measure the beam plasma formation and space charge compensation in negative ion beams. The diagnostic is a retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA), and will measure the transverse energy spectra of plasma molecular ions. The calculations that supported the design are reported, and a method to interpret the measurements in negative ion beam systems is also proposed. Finally, the experimental results of the first test in a magnetron plasma are presented.

  9. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. This image, taken during the test, depicts the light being concentrated into the focal point inside the vacuum chamber. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  10. Beam energy scan with asymmetric collision at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.

    A beam energy scan of deuteron-gold collision, with center-of-mass energy at 19.6, 39, 62.4 and 200.7 GeV/n, was performed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider in 2016 to study the threshold for quark-gluon plasma (QGP) production. The lattice, RF, stochastic cooling and other subsystems were in different configurations for the various energies. The operational challenges changed with every new energy. The operational experience at each energy, the operation performance, highlights and lessons of the beam energy scan are reviewed in this report.

  11. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, Henry W.; Kaita, Robert

    1987-03-03

    An arrangement is provided for the in-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams. The beam is directed onto a target surface of known composition, such that Rutherford backscattering of the beam occurs. The yield-energy characteristic response of the beam to backscattering from the target is analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques to determine the yields of energy species components of the beam.

  12. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, Henry W.; Kaita, Robert

    1987-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for the in-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams. The beam is directed onto a target surface of known composition, such that Rutherford backscattering of the beam occurs. The yield-energy characteristic response of the beam to backscattering from the target is analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques to determine the yields of energy species components of the beam.

  13. TLD linearity vs. beam energy and modality.

    PubMed

    Troncalli, Andrew J; Chapman, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) is considered to be a valuable dosimetric tool in determining patient dose. Lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (TLD-100) is widely used, as it does not display widely divergent energy dependence. For many years, we have known that TLD-100 shows supralinearity to dose. In a radiotherapy clinic, there are multiple energies and modality beams. This work investigates whether individual linearity corrections must be used for each beam or whether a single correction can be applied to all beams. The response of TLD as a function of dose was measured from 25 cGy to 1000 cGy on both electrons and photons from 6 to 18 MeV. This work shows that, within our measurement uncertainty, TLD-100 exhibits supralinearity at all megavoltage energies and modalities.

  14. Mechanical energy flow models of rods and beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlever, J. C.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that the flow of mechanical energy through a structural/acoustic system may be modeled in a manner similar to that of flow of thermal energy/in a heat conduction problem. If this hypothesis is true, it would result in relatively efficient numerical models of structure-borne energy in large built-up structures. Fewer parameters are required to approximate the energy solution than are required to model the characteristic wave behavior of structural vibration by using traditional displacement formulations. The energy flow hypothesis is tested in this investigation for both longitudinal vibration in rods and transverse flexural vibrations of beams. The rod is shown to behave approximately according to the thermal energy flow analogy. However, the beam solutions behave significantly differently than predicted by the thermal analogy unless locally-space-averaged energy and power are considered. Several techniques for coupling dissimilar rods and beams are also discussed. Illustrations of the solution accuracy of the methods are included.

  15. Advanced Space Fission Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission has been considered for in-space propulsion since the 1940s. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems underwent extensive development from 1955-1973, completing 20 full power ground tests and achieving specific impulses nearly twice that of the best chemical propulsion systems. Space fission power systems (which may eventually enable Nuclear Electric Propulsion) have been flown in space by both the United States and the Former Soviet Union. Fission is the most developed and understood of the nuclear propulsion options (e.g. fission, fusion, antimatter, etc.), and fission has enjoyed tremendous terrestrial success for nearly 7 decades. Current space nuclear research and technology efforts are focused on devising and developing first generation systems that are safe, reliable and affordable. For propulsion, the focus is on nuclear thermal rockets that build on technologies and systems developed and tested under the Rover/NERVA and related programs from the Apollo era. NTP Affordability is achieved through use of previously developed fuels and materials, modern analytical techniques and test strategies, and development of a small engine for ground and flight technology demonstration. Initial NTP systems will be capable of achieving an Isp of 900 s at a relatively high thrust-to-weight ratio. The development and use of first generation space fission power and propulsion systems will provide new, game changing capabilities for NASA. In addition, development and use of these systems will provide the foundation for developing extremely advanced power and propulsion systems capable of routinely and affordably accessing any point in the solar system. The energy density of fissile fuel (8 x 10(exp 13) Joules/kg) is more than adequate for enabling extensive exploration and utilization of the solar system. For space fission propulsion systems, the key is converting the virtually unlimited energy of fission into thrust at the desired specific impulse and thrust

  16. Longitudinal density modulation and energy conversion in intense beams.

    PubMed

    Harris, J R; Neumann, J G; Tian, K; O'Shea, P G

    2007-08-01

    Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may, under some circumstances, be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams.

  17. The Electric Propulsion Interactions Code (EPIC): A Member of the NASA Space Environment and Effects Program (SEE) Toolset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Mandell, Myron J.; Kuharski, Robert A.; Davis, D. A.; Gardner, Barbara M.; Minor, Jody

    2003-01-01

    Science Applications International Corporation is currently developing the Electric Propulsion Interactions Code, EPIC, as part of a project sponsored by the Space Environments and Effects Program at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Now in its second year of development, EPIC is an interactive computer toolset that allows the construction of a 3-D spacecraft model, and the assessment of a variety of interactions between its subsystems and the plume from an electric thruster. This paper reports on the progress of EPZC including the recently added ability to exchange results the NASA Charging Analyzer Program, Nascap-2k. The capability greatly enhances EPIC's range of applicability. Expansion of the toolset's various physics models proceeds in parallel with the overall development of the software. Also presented are recent upgrades of the elastic scattering algorithm in the electric propulsion Plume Tool. These upgrades are motivated by the need to assess the effects of elastically scattered ions on the SIC for ion beam energies that exceed loo0 eV. Such energy levels are expected in future high-power (>10 kW) ion propulsion systems empowered by nuclear sources.

  18. Piezoelectric energy harvester having planform-tapered interdigitated beams

    DOEpatents

    Kellogg, Rick A [Tijeras, NM; Sumali, Hartono [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-05-24

    Embodiments of energy harvesters have a plurality of piezoelectric planform-tapered, interdigitated cantilevered beams anchored to a common frame. The plurality of beams can be arranged as two or more sets of beams with each set sharing a common sense mass affixed to their free ends. Each set thus defined being capable of motion independent of any other set of beams. Each beam can comprise a unimorph or bimorph piezoelectric configuration bonded to a conductive or non-conductive supporting layer and provided with electrical contacts to the active piezoelectric elements for collecting strain induced charge (i.e. energy). The beams are planform tapered along the entirety or a portion of their length thereby increasing the effective stress level and power output of each piezoelectric element, and are interdigitated by sets to increase the power output per unit volume of a harvester thus produced.

  19. Propulsion System Models for Rotorcraft Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The conceptual design code NDARC (NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft) was initially implemented to model conventional rotorcraft propulsion systems, consisting of turboshaft engines burning jet fuel, connected to one or more rotors through a mechanical transmission. The NDARC propulsion system representation has been extended to cover additional propulsion concepts, including electric motors and generators, rotor reaction drive, turbojet and turbofan engines, fuel cells and solar cells, batteries, and fuel (energy) used without weight change. The paper describes these propulsion system components, the architecture of their implementation in NDARC, and the form of the models for performance and weight. Requirements are defined for improved performance and weight models of the new propulsion system components. With these new propulsion models, NDARC can be used to develop environmentally-friendly rotorcraft designs.

  20. Kinetic energy offsets for multicharged ions from an electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, D D; Ahl, C D; Shore, A M; Miller, A J; Harriss, J E; Sosolik, C E; Marler, J P

    2017-08-01

    Using a retarding field analyzer, we have measured offsets between the nominal and measured kinetic energy of multicharged ions extracted from an electron beam ion source (EBIS). By varying source parameters, a shift in ion kinetic energy was attributed to the trapping potential produced by the space charge of the electron beam within the EBIS. The space charge of the electron beam depends on its charge density, which in turn depends on the amount of negative charge (electron beam current) and its velocity (electron beam energy). The electron beam current and electron beam energy were both varied to obtain electron beams of varying space charge and these were related to the observed kinetic energy offsets for Ar 4+ and Ar 8+ ion beams. Knowledge of these offsets is important for studies that seek to utilize slow, i.e., low kinetic energy, multicharged ions to exploit their high potential energies for processes such as surface modification. In addition, we show that these offsets can be utilized to estimate the effective radius of the electron beam inside the trap.

  1. Antimatter Propulsion Developed by NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie shows possible forms of an antimatter propulsion system being developed by NASA. Antimatter annihilation offers the highest possible physical energy density of any known reaction substance. It is about 10 billion times more powerful than that of chemical energy such as hydrogen and oxygen combustion. Antimatter would be the perfect rocket fuel, but the problem is that the basic component of antimatter, antiprotons, doesn't exist in nature and has to manufactured. The process of antimatter development is ongoing and making some strides, but production of this as a propulsion system is far into the future.

  2. Antiproton catalyzed microfission/fusion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Pi-Ren; Lewis, Raymond A.; Smith, Gerald A.; Newton, Richard; Dailey, James; Werthman, W. Lance; Chakrabarti, Suman

    1994-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) utilizing an antiproton catalyzed hybrid fission/fusion target is discussed as a potential energy source for interplanetary propulsion. A proof-of-principle experiment underway at Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB and antiproton trapping experiments at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, are presented. The ICAN propulsion concept is described and results of performance analyses are reviewed. Future work to further define the ICAN concept is outlined.

  3. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Metzkes, J.; Rehwald, M.; Obst, L.

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ∼4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energymore » can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.« less

  4. Advanced space power and propulsion based on lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M.; Logan, B. G.

    2015-10-01

    One of the key components for future space exploration, manned or unmanned, is the availability of propulsion systems beyond the state of the art. The rapid development in conventional propulsion systems since the middle of the 20th century has already reached the limits of chemical propulsion technology. To enhance mission radius, shorten the transit time and also extend the lifetime of a spacecraft more efficient, but still powerful propulsion system must be developed. Apart from the propulsion system a major weight contribution arises from the required energy source. Envisioning rapid development of future high average power laser systems and especially the ICAN project we review the prospect of advanced space propulsion based on laser systems.

  5. Misconceptions of Electric Propulsion Aircraft and Their Emergent Aviation Markets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Mark D.; Fredericks, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years there have been aircraft conceptual design and system studies that have reached conflicting conclusions relating to the feasibility of full and hybrid electric aircraft. Some studies and propulsion discipline experts have claimed that battery technologies will need to improve by 10 to 20 times before electric aircraft can effectively compete with reciprocating or turbine engines. However, such studies have approached comparative assessments without understanding the compelling differences that electric propulsion offers, how these technologies will fundamentally alter the way propulsion integration is approached, or how these new technologies can not only compete but far exceed existing propulsion solutions in many ways at battery specific energy densities of only 400 watt hours per kilogram. Electric propulsion characteristics offer the opportunity to achieve 4 to 8 time improvements in energy costs with dramatically lower total operating costs, while dramatically improving efficiency, community noise, propulsion system reliability and safety through redundancy, as well as life cycle Green House Gas emissions. Integration of electric propulsion will involve far greater degrees of distribution than existing propulsion solutions due to their compact and scale-free nature to achieve multi-disciplinary coupling and synergistic integration with the aerodynamics, highlift system, acoustics, vehicle control, balance, and aeroelasticity. Appropriate metrics of comparison and differences in analysis/design tools are discussed while comparing electric propulsion to other disruptive technologies. For several initial applications, battery energy density is already sufficient for competitive products, and for many additional markets energy densities will likely be adequate within the next 7 years for vibrant introduction. Market evolution and early adopter markets are discussed, along with the investment areas that will fill technology gaps and

  6. Status of a Power Processor for the Prometheus-1 Electric Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Hill, Gerald M.; Aulisio, Michael; Gerber, Scott; Griebeler, Elmer; Hewitt, Frank; Scina, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    NASA is developing technologies for nuclear electric propulsion for proposed deep space missions in support of the Exploration initiative under Project Prometheus. Electrical power produced by the combination of a fission-based power source and a Brayton power conversion and distribution system is used by a high specific impulse ion propulsion system to propel the spaceship. The ion propulsion system include the thruster, power processor and propellant feed system. A power processor technology development effort was initiated under Project Prometheus to develop high performance and lightweight power-processing technologies suitable for the application. This effort faces multiple challenges including developing radiation hardened power modules and converters with very high power capability and efficiency to minimize the impact on the power conversion and distribution system as well as the heat rejection system. This paper documents the design and test results of the first version of the beam supply, the design of a second version of the beam supply and the design and test results of the ancillary supplies.

  7. A comparison of methods for monitoring photon beam energy constancy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Balter, Peter A; Rose, Mark; Simon, William E

    2016-11-08

    In extension of a previous study, we compared several photon beam energy metrics to determine which was the most sensitive to energy change; in addition to those, we accounted for both the sensitivity of each metric and the uncertainty in determining that metric for both traditional flattening filter (FF) beams (4, 6, 8, and 10 MV) and for flattening filter-free (FFF) beams (6 and 10 MV) on a Varian TrueBeam. We examined changes in these energy metrics when photon energies were changed to ± 5% and ± 10% from their nominal energies: 1) an attenuation-based metric (the percent depth dose at 10 cm depth, PDD(10)) and, 2) profile-based metrics, including flatness (Flat) and off-axis ratios (OARs) measured on the orthogonal axes or on the diagonals (diagonal normalized flatness, FDN). Profile-based metrics were measured near dmax and also near 10 cm depth in water (using a 3D scanner) and with ioniza-tion chamber array (ICA). PDD(10) was measured only in water. Changes in PDD, OAR, and FDN were nearly linear to the changes in the bend magnet current (BMI) over the range from -10% to +10% for both FF and FFF beams: a ± 10% change in energy resulted in a ± 1.5% change in PDD(10) for both FF and FFF beams, and changes in OAR and FDN were > 3.0% for FF beams and > 2.2% for FFF beams. The uncertainty in determining PDD(10) was estimated to be 0.15% and that for OAR and FDN about 0.07%. This resulted in minimally detectable changes in energy of 2.5% for PDD(10) and 0.5% for OAR and FDN. We found that the OAR- or FDN- based metrics were the best for detecting energy changes for both FF and FFF beams. The ability of the OAR-based metrics determined with a water scanner to detect energy changes was equivalent to that using an ionization chamber array. We recommend that OAR be measured either on the orthogonal axes or the diagonals, using an ionization chamber array near the depth of maximum dose, as a sensitive and efficient way to confirm stability of photon beam energy.

  8. Beam debunching due to ISR-induced energy diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Yampolsky, Nikolai A.; Carlsten, Bruce E.

    2017-06-20

    One of the options for increasing longitudinal coherency of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is seeding with a microbunched electron beam. Several schemes leading to significant amplitude of the beam bunching at X-ray wavelengths were recently proposed. All these schemes rely on beam optics having several magnetic dipoles. While the beam passes through a dipole, its energy spread increases due to quantum effects of synchrotron radiation. As a result, the bunching factor at small wavelengths reduces since electrons having different energies follow different trajectories in the bend. We rigorously calculate the reduction in the bunching factor due to incoherent synchrotronmore » the radiation while the beam travels in an arbitrary beamline. Lastly, we apply general results to estimate reduction of harmonic current in common schemes proposed for XFEL seeding.« less

  9. Low-energy plasma focus device as an electron beam source.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; Yaqoob, Ibrar; Kumar, Nitturi Naresh; Kuang, Lim Lian; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 10(16)/m(3), respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences.

  10. Overview of DOE space nuclear propulsion programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of Department of Energy space nuclear propulsion programs is presented in outline and graphic form. DOE's role in the development and safety assurance of space nuclear propulsion is addressed. Testing issues and facilities are discussed along with development needs and recent research activities.

  11. Nuclear propulsion technology development - A joint NASA/Department of Energy project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Lewis has undertaken the conceptual development of spacecraft nuclear propulsion systems with DOE support, in order to establish the bases for Space Exploration Initiative lunar and Mars missions. This conceptual evolution project encompasses nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems. A technology base exists for NTP in the NERVA program files; more fundamental development efforts are entailed in the case of NEP, but this option is noted to offer greater advantages in the long term.

  12. High-Voltage High-Energy Stretched Lens Array Square-Rigger (SLASR) for Direct-Drive Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe T.; O'Neill, Mark J.; Mankins, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Development is underway on a unique high-voltage, high energy solar concentrator array called Stretched Lens Array Square-Rigger (SLASR) for direct drive electric propulsion. The SLASR performance attributes closely match the critical needs of solar electric propulsion (SEP) systems, which may be used for space tugs to fuel efficiently transport cargo from low earth orbit (LEO) to low lunar orbit (LLO), in support of NASA's robotic and human exploration missions. Later SEP systems may similarly transport cargo from the earth-moon neighborhood to the Mars neighborhood. This paper will describe the SLASR technology, discuss SLASR developments and ground testing, and outline plans for future SLASR technology maturation.

  13. High-Voltage High-Energy Stretched Lens Array Square-Rigger (SLASR) for Direct-Drive Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe T.; O'Neill, Mark; Mankins, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Development is underway on a unique high-voltage, high-energy solar concentrator array called Stretched Lens Array Square-Rigger (SLASR) for direct drive electric propulsion. The SLASR performance attributes closely match the critical needs of solar electric propulsion (SEP) systems, which may be used for space tugs to fuel-efficiently transport cargo from low earth orbit (LEO) to low lunar orbit (LLO), in support of NASA s robotic and human exploration missions. Later SEP systems may similarly transport cargo from the earth-moon neighborhood to the Mars neighborhood. This paper will describe the SLASR technology, discuss SLASR developments and ground testing, and outline plans for future SLASR technology maturation.

  14. Safety and Effectiveness of a Longer Focal Beam and Burst Duration in Ultrasonic Propulsion for Repositioning Urinary Stones and Fragments.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Karmon M; Brand, Timothy C; Cunitz, Bryan W; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C; Starr, Frank; Liggitt, H Denny; Thiel, Jeff; Sorensen, Mathew D; Harper, Jonathan D; Bailey, Michael R; Dunmire, Barbrina

    2017-08-01

    In the first-in-human trial of ultrasonic propulsion, subjects passed collections of residual stone fragments repositioned with a C5-2 probe. Here, effectiveness and safety in moving multiple fragments are compared between the C5-2 and a custom (SC-50) probe that produces a longer focal beam and burst duration. Effectiveness was quantified by the number of stones expelled from a calyx phantom consisting of a 30-mm deep, water-filled well in a block of tissue mimicking material. Each probe was positioned below the phantom to move stones against gravity. Single propulsion bursts of 50 ms or 3 s duration were applied to three separate targets: 10 fragments of 2 different sizes (1-2 and 2-3 mm) and a single 4 × 7 mm human stone. Safety studies consisted of porcine kidneys exposed to an extreme dose of 10-minute burst duration, including a 7-day survival study and acute studies with surgically implanted stones. Although successful in the clinical trial, the shorter focal beam and maximum 50 ms burst duration of the C5-2 probe moved stones, but did not expel any stones from the phantom's 30-mm deep calyx. The results were similar with the SC-50 probe under the same 50 ms burst duration. Longer (3 s) bursts available with the SC-50 probe expelled all stones at both 4.5 and 9.5 cm "skin-to-stone" depths with lower probe heating compared to the C5-2. No abnormal behavior, urine chemistry, serum chemistry, or histological findings were observed within the kidney or surrounding tissues for the 10 min burst duration used in the animal studies. A longer focal beam and burst duration improved expulsion of a stone and multiple stone fragments from a phantom over a broad range of clinically relevant penetration depths and did not cause kidney injury in animal studies.

  15. Nuclear Propulsion in Space (1968)

    SciTech Connect

    None

    Project NERVA was an acronym for Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application, a joint program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and NASA managed by the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO) at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Jackass Flats, Nevada U.S.A. Between 1959 and 1972, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office oversaw 23 reactor tests, both the program and the office ended at the end of 1972.

  16. Nuclear Propulsion in Space (1968)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-01-16

    Project NERVA was an acronym for Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application, a joint program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and NASA managed by the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO) at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Jackass Flats, Nevada U.S.A. Between 1959 and 1972, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office oversaw 23 reactor tests, both the program and the office ended at the end of 1972.

  17. Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy

    DOEpatents

    Young, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

  18. SU-E-T-796: Variation of Surface Photon Energy Spectra On Bone Heterogeneity and Beam Obliquity Between Flattened and Unflattened Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J; Owrangi, A; Grigorov, G

    Purpose: This study investigates the spectra of surface photon energy and energy fluence in the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity using flattened and unflattened photon beams. The spectra were calculated in a bone and water phantom using Monte Carlo simulation (the EGSnrc code). Methods: Spectra of energy, energy fluence and mean energy of the 6 MV flattened and unflattened photon beams (field size = 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}) produced by a Varian TrueBEAM linear accelerator were calculated at the surfaces of a bone and water phantom using Monte Carlo simulations. The spectral calculations were repeated with the beam anglesmore » turned from 0° to 15°, 30° and 45° in the phantoms. Results: It is found that the unflattened photon beams contained more photons in the low-energy range of 0 – 2 MeV than the flattened beams with a flattening filter. Compared to the water phantom, both the flattened and unflattened beams had slightly less photons in the energy range < 0.4 MeV when a bone layer of 1 cm is present under the phantom surface. This shows that the presence of the bone decreased the low-energy photons backscattered to the phantom surface. When the photon beams were rotated from 0° to 45°, the number of photon and mean photon energy increased with the beam angle. This is because both the flattened and unflattened beams became more hardened when the beam angle increased. With the bone heterogeneity, the mean energies of both photon beams increased correspondingly. This is due to the absorption of low-energy photons by the bone, resulting in more significant beam hardening. Conclusion: The photon spectral information is important in studies on the patient’s surface dose enhancement when using unflattened photon beams in radiotherapy.« less

  19. Phase Rotation of Muon Beams for Producing Intense Low-Energy Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Bao, Y.; Hansen, G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for rare decay searches, which provide access to new physics that cannot be addressed at high-energy colliders. However, muons are produced within a broad energy spread unmatched to the low-energy required. In this paper we outline a phase rotation method to significantly increase the intensity of low-energy muons. The muons are produced from a short pulsed proton driver, and develop a time-momentum correlation in a drift space following production. A series of rf cavities is used to bunch the muons and phase-energy rotate the bunches to a momentum of around 100 MeV/c. Then another groupmore » of rf cavities is used to decelerate the muon bunches to low-energy. This obtains ~0.1 muon per 8 GeV proton, which is significantly higher than currently planned Mu2e experiments, and would enable a next generation of rare decay searches, and other intense muon beam applications.« less

  20. A Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) for Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chap, Andrew; Tarditi, Alfonso G.; Scott, John H.

    2013-01-01

    A Particle-in-cell simulation model has been developed to study the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) applied to the conversion of charged fusion products into electricity. In this model the availability of a beam of collimated fusion products is assumed; the simulation is focused on the conversion of the beam kinetic energy into alternating current (AC) electric power. The model is electrostatic, as the electro-dynamics of the relatively slow ions can be treated in the quasistatic approximation. A two-dimensional, axisymmetric (radial-axial coordinates) geometry is considered. Ion beam particles are injected on one end and travel along the axis through ring-shaped electrodes with externally applied time-varying voltages, thus modulating the beam by forming a sinusoidal pattern in the beam density. Further downstream, the modulated beam passes through another set of ring electrodes, now electrically oating. The modulated beam induces a time alternating potential di erence between adjacent electrodes. Power can be drawn from the electrodes by connecting a resistive load. As energy is dissipated in the load, a corresponding drop in beam energy is measured. The simulation encapsulates the TWDEC process by reproducing the time-dependent transfer of energy and the particle deceleration due to the electric eld phase time variations.

  1. Tree Topping Ceremony at NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies is under construction at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory will serve as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of irnovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility will be the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The Laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, will feature a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility will allow it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellantless propulsion. An important area of emphasis will be development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and will set the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications. This photo depicts construction workers taking part in a tree topping ceremony as the the final height of the laboratory is framed. The ceremony is an old German custom of paying homage to the trees that gave their lives in preparation of the building site.

  2. New energy conversion techniques in space, applicable to propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Sun, K. C.

    1989-01-01

    The powering of aircraft with laser energy from a solar power satellite may be a promising new approach to the critical problem of the rising cost of fuel for aircraft transportation systems. The result is a nearly fuelless, pollution-free flight transportation system which is cost-competitive with the fuel-conservative airplane of the future. The major components of this flight system include a laser power satellite, relay satellites, laser-powered turbofans and a conventional airframe. The relay satellites are orbiting optical systems which intercept the beam from a power satellite and refocus and redirect the beam to its next target.

  3. Energy Production Demonstrator for Megawatt Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, Vitaly S.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Novitski, Igor

    2014-07-16

    A preliminary study of the Energy Production Demonstrator (EPD) concept - a solid heavy metal target irradiated by GeV-range intense proton beams and producing more energy than consuming - is carried out. Neutron production, fission, energy deposition, energy gain, testing volume and helium production are simulated with the MARS15 code for tungsten, thorium, and natural uranium targets in the proton energy range 0.5 to 120 GeV. This study shows that the proton energy range of 2 to 4 GeV is optimal for both a natU EPD and the tungsten-based testing station that would be the most suitable for proton acceleratormore » facilities. Conservative estimates, not including breeding and fission of plutonium, based on the simulations suggest that the proton beam current of 1 mA will be sufficient to produce 1 GW of thermal output power with the natU EPD while supplying < 8% of that power to operate the accelerator. The thermal analysis shows that the concept considered has a problem due to a possible core meltdown; however, a number of approaches (a beam rastering, in first place) are suggested to mitigate the issue. The efficiency of the considered EPD as a Materials Test Station (MTS) is also evaluated in this study.« less

  4. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    PubMed Central

    Seong Ling, Yap; Naresh Kumar, Nitturi; Lian Kuang, Lim; Chiow San, Wong

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences. PMID:25544952

  5. An overview of the NASA Advanced Propulsion Concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Bennett, Gary L.; Frisbee, Robert H.; Sercel, Joel C.; Lapointe, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Advanced Propulsion Concepts (APC) program for the development of long-term space propulsion system schemes is managed by both NASA-Lewis and the JPL and is tasked with the identification and conceptual development of high-risk/high-payoff configurations. Both theoretical and experimental investigations have been undertaken in technology areas deemed essential to the implementation of candidate concepts. These APC candidates encompass very high energy density chemical propulsion systems, advanced electric propulsion systems, and an antiproton-catalyzed nuclear propulsion concept. A development status evaluation is presented for these systems.

  6. Lattice design and beam dynamics studies of the high energy beam transport line in the RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2015-12-01

    In RAON heavy ion accelerator, beams generated by superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR-IS) or Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) system are accelerated by lower energy superconducting linac and high energy superconducting linac. The accelerated beams are used in the high energy experimental hall which includes bio-medical and muon-SR facilities, after passing through the high energy beam transport lines. At the targets of those two facilities, the stable and small beams meeting the requirements rigorously are required in the transverse plane. Therefore the beams must be safely sent to the targets and simultaneously satisfy the two requirements, the achromatic condition and the mid-plane symmetric condition, of the targets. For this reason, the lattice design of the high energy beam transport lines in which the long deflecting sections are included is considered as a significant issue in the RAON accelerator. In this paper, we will describe the calculated beam optics satisfying the conditions and present the result of particle tracking simulations with the designed lattice of the high energy beam transport lines in the RAON accelerator. Also, the orbit distortion caused by the machine imperfections and the orbit correction with correctors will be discussed.

  7. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph, taken at MSFC's Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility, shows a concentrator mirror, a combination of 144 mirrors forming this 18-ft diameter concentrator, and a vacuum chamber that houses the focal point. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-foot diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  8. Ion energy distribution near a plasma meniscus with beam extraction for multi element focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Paul, Samit; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2010-05-15

    An earlier study of the axial ion energy distribution in the extraction region (plasma meniscus) of a compact microwave plasma ion source showed that the axial ion energy spread near the meniscus is small ({approx}5 eV) and comparable to that of a liquid metal ion source, making it a promising candidate for focused ion beam (FIB) applications [J. V. Mathew and S. Bhattacharjee, J. Appl. Phys. 105, 96101 (2009)]. In the present work we have investigated the radial ion energy distribution (IED) under the influence of beam extraction. Initially a single Einzel lens system has been used for beam extractionmore » with potentials up to -6 kV for obtaining parallel beams. In situ measurements of IED with extraction voltages upto -5 kV indicates that beam extraction has a weak influence on the energy spread ({+-}0.5 eV) which is of significance from the point of view of FIB applications. It is found that by reducing the geometrical acceptance angle at the ion energy analyzer probe, close to unidirectional distribution can be obtained with a spread that is smaller by at least 1 eV.« less

  9. Optimization of extended propulsion time nuclear-electric propulsion trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, C. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology used in optimizing extended propulsion time NEP missions considering realistic thruster lifetime constraints. These missions consist of a powered spiral escape from a 700-km circular orbit at the earth, followed by a powered heliocentric transfer with an optimized coast phase, and terminating in a spiral capture phase at the target planet. This analysis is most applicable to those missions with very high energy requirements such as outer planet orbiter missions or sample return missions where the total propulsion time could greatly exceed the expected lifetime of an individual thruster. This methodology has been applied to the investigation of NEP missions to the outer planets where examples are presented of both constrained and optimized trajectories.

  10. Characterization of the NEPOMUC primary and remoderated positron beams at different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Niemann, H.; Paschkowski, N.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Saitoh, H.; Stenson, E. V.; Stoneking, M. R.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Piochacz, C.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the characterization of the positron beam provided at the open beam port of the NEPOMUC facility at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ) Garching. The absolute positron flux of the primary beam at 400 eV and 1 keV kinetic energy and of the remoderated beam at 5, 12 and 22 eV were determined. Energy-dependent intensities in the range of (1 - 5) ·108e+ / s and (2 - 6) ·107e+ / s have been observed for the primary and remoderated beam, respectively. We attribute the significant losses for the primary beam, in comparison with the expected value, to the non-adiabatic positron guiding in the beam line. We also measured the longitudinal energy distribution of the remoderated beam, yielding an energy spread below 3.3 eV. The mean transverse energy of the remoderated beam, determined from measurements in different final magnetic fields, was found to be below 1.3 eV. These results are likely to apply to the NEPOMUC beam delivered to other user stations.

  11. Australian Air Breathing Propulsion Research for Hypersonic, Beamed Energy-Propelled Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, David

    2010-05-01

    A three year laser-propelled vehicle analysis and design investigation has been begun in June, 2009 by Faculty and graduate students at the University of Adelaide under a Grant/Cooperative Agreement Award to the University of Adelaide by the Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development (AOARD). The major objectives of thsis investigation are: (a) development of hypersonic, air breathing "lightcraft" with innovative air inlets that enable acceptable airflow capture and combustion, and acceptable cowl-lip heating rates during hot, high-speed, high angle-of-attack hypersonic flight; (b) yest of the most promising lightcraft and inlet design in the high power laser beam that is part of the shock tunnel facility at CTO Instituto in Brazil; and (c) plan a series of laser guided and propelled flights that achieve supersonic or higher speed at the Woomera Test Facility (WTF) in South Australia—using the existing WTF launching and tracking facilities and sponsor-provided laser pointing and tracking and illumination systems.

  12. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph shows a fully assembled solar thermal engine placed inside the vacuum chamber at the test facility prior to testing. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move theNation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  13. Solar-Powered Electric Propulsion Systems: Engineering and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, J. W.; Kerrisk, D. J.

    1966-01-01

    Lightweight, multikilowatt solar power arrays in conjunction with electric propulsion offer potential improvements to space exploration, extending the usefulness of existing launch vehicles to higher-energy missions. Characteristics of solar-powered electric propulsion missions are outlined, and preliminary performance estimates are shown. Spacecraft system engineering is discussed with respect to parametric trade-offs in power and propulsion system design. Relationships between mission performance and propulsion system performance are illustrated. The present state of the art of electric propulsion systems is reviewed and related to the mission requirements identified earlier. The propulsion system design and test requirements for a mission spacecraft are identified and discussed. Although only ion engine systems are currently available, certain plasma propulsion systems offer some advantages in over-all system design. These are identified, and goals are set for plasma-thrustor systems to make them competitive with ion-engine systems for mission applications.

  14. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  15. Inhibition of crossed-beam energy transfer induced by expansion-velocity fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, C.; Glize, K.; Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Debayle, A.; Casanova, M.; Baccou, C.; Labaune, C.; Depierreux, S.

    2018-04-01

    Crossed-beam energy transfer between three laser beams has been experimentally investigated in a flowing plasma. Time-evolution measurements of the amplification of a first beam by a second beam highlighted the inhibition of energy transfer by hydrodynamic modifications of the plasma in the crossing volume due to the propagation of a third beam. According to 3D simulations and an analytical model, it appears that the long-wavelength expansion-velocity fluctuations produced by the propagation of the third beam in the crossing volume are responsible for this mitigation of energy transfer. This effect could be a cause of the over-estimation of the amount of the transferred energy in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments. Besides, tuning such long-wavelength fluctuations could be a way to completely inhibit CBET at the laser entrance holes of hohlraums.

  16. Experimental results of use of triple-energy X-ray beam with K-edge filter in multi-energy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Lee, S.; Jeon, P.-H.

    2016-04-01

    Multi-energy imaging is useful for contrast enhancement of lesions, quantitative analysis of specific materials and material separation in the human body. Generally, dual-energy methods are applied to discriminating two materials, but this method cannot discriminate more than two materials. Photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polyenergetic X-rays using multiple energy bins. In this work, we developed triple-energy X-ray beams using a filter with K-edge energy and applied them experimentally. The energy spectra of triple-energy X-ray beams were assessed by using a spectrometer. The designed triple-energy X-ray beams were validated by measuring quantitative evaluations with mean energy ratio (MER), contrast variation ratio (CVR) and exposure efficiency (EE). Then, triple-energy X-ray beams were used to extract density map of three materials, iodine (I), aluminum (Al) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The results of the thickness density maps obtained with the developed triple-energy X-ray beams were compared to those acquired using the photon-counting method. As a result, it was found experimentally that the proposed triple-energy X-ray beam technique can separate the three materials as well as the photon-counting method.

  17. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in electron beams: energy dependence.

    PubMed

    Robar, V; Zankowski, C; Olivares Pla, M; Podgorsak, E B

    1996-05-01

    The response of thermoluminescent dosimeters to electron irradiations depends on the radiation dose, mean electron energy at the position of the dosimeter in phantom, and the size of the dosimeter. In this paper the semi-empirical expression proposed by Holt et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 20, 559-570 (1975)] is combined with the calculated electron dose fraction to determine the thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) response as a function of the mean electron energy and the dosimeter size. The electron and photon dose fractions, defined as the relative contributions of electrons and bremsstrahlung photons to the total dose for a clinical electron beam, are calculated with Monte Carlo techniques using EGS4. Agreement between the calculated and measured TLD response is very good. We show that the considerable reduction in TLD response per unit dose at low electron energies, i.e., at large depths in phantom, is offset by an ever-increasing relative contribution of bremsstrahlung photons to the total dose of clinical electron beams. This renders the TLD sufficiently reliable for dose measurements over the entire electron depth dose distribution despite the dependence of the TLD response on electron beam energy.

  18. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, David J.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Matthews, Kenneth L.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. Methods: An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed usingmore » a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7–20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Results: Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to

  19. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, David J; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L; Gibbons, John P; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L; Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7-20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower energies. Energy calibration

  20. Preliminary survey of propulsion using chemical energy stored in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Lionel V; Blackshear, Perry L

    1958-01-01

    Ram-jet cycles that use the chemical energy of dissociated oxygen for propulsion in the ionosphere are presented. After a review of the properties and compositions of the upper atmosphere, the external drag, recombination kinetics, and aerodynamic-heating problems of an orbiting ram jet are analyzed. The study indicates that the recombination ram jet might be useful for sustaining a satellite at an altitude of about 60 miles. Atmospheric composition and recombination-rate coefficients were too uncertain for more definite conclusions. The ram jet is a marginal device even in the optimistic view.

  1. Beam-energy-spread minimization using cell-timing optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C. R.; Ekdahl, C.; Schulze, M.

    2012-04-01

    Beam energy spread, and related beam motion, increase the difficulty in tuning for multipulse radiographic experiments at the dual-axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility’s axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). In this article, we describe an optimization method to reduce the energy spread by adjusting the timing of the cell voltages (both unloaded and loaded), either advancing or retarding, such that the injector voltage and summed cell voltages in the LIA result in a flatter energy profile. We developed a nonlinear optimization routine which accepts as inputs the 74 cell-voltage, injector voltage, and beam current waveforms. It optimizes cell timing per user-selected groups of cells and outputs timing adjustments, one for each of the selected groups. To verify the theory, we acquired and present data for both unloaded and loaded cell-timing optimizations. For the unloaded cells, the preoptimization baseline energy spread was reduced by 34% and 31% for two shots as compared to baseline. For the loaded-cell case, the measured energy spread was reduced by 49% compared to baseline.

  2. Development of high-average-power DPSSL with high beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Sadao; Kanabe, Tadashi; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Yamanaka, Masanobu; Izawa, Yasukazu; Nakatuka, Masahiro; Kandasamy, Ranganathan; Kan, Hirofumi; Hiruma, Teruo; Niino, Masayuki

    2000-08-01

    The recent progress of high power diode laser is opening new fields of laser and its application. We are developing high average power diode pumped solid state laser DPSSL for laser fusion power plant, for space propulsion and for various applications in industry. The common features or requirements of our High Average-power Laser for Nuclear-fusion Application (HALNA) are large pulse energy with relatively low repetition of few tens Hz, good beam quality of order of diffraction limit and high efficiency more than 10%. We constructed HALNA 10 (10J X 10 Hz) and tested the performance to clarify the scalability to higher power system. We have obtained in a preliminary experiment a 8.5 J output energy at 0.5 Hz with beam quality of 2 times diffraction limited far-field pattern.

  3. Nuclear systems for space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M.

    1971-01-01

    As exploration and utilization of space proceeds through the 1970s, 1980s, and beyond, spacecraft in earth orbit will become increasingly larger, spacecraft will travel deeper into space, and space activities will involve more complex operations. These trends require increasing amounts of energy for power and propulsion. The role to be played by nuclear energy is presented, including plans for deep space missions using radioisotope generators, the reactor power systems for earth orbiting stations and satellites, and the role of nuclear propulsion in space transportation.

  4. Breakthrough propulsion physics research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    1997-01-01

    In 1996, a team of government, university and industry researchers proposed a program to seek the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, propulsion that can approach and, if possible, circumvent light speed, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. This Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program, managed by Lewis Research Center, is one part of a comprehensive, long range Advanced Space Transportation Plan managed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Because the breakthrough goals are beyond existing science, a main emphasis of this program is to establish metrics and ground rules to produce near-term credible progress toward these incredible possibilities. An introduction to the emerging scientific possibilities from which such solutions can be sought is also presented.

  5. Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    1996-01-01

    In 1996, a team of government, university and industry researchers proposed a program to seek the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, propulsion that can approach and, if possible, circumvent light speed, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. This Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program, managed by Lewis Research Center, is one part of a comprehensive, long range Advanced Space Transportation Plan managed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Because the breakthrough goals are beyond existing science, a main emphasis of this program is to establish metrics and ground rules to produce near-term credible progress toward these incredible possibilities. An introduction to the emerging scientific possibilities from which such solutions can be sought is also presented.

  6. Energy efficient engine: Flight propulsion system, preliminary analysis and design update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    The preliminary design of General Electric's Energy Efficient Engine (E3) was reported in detail in 1980. Since then, the design has been refined and the components have been rig-tested. The changes which have occurred in the engine and a reassessment of the economic payoff are presented in this report. All goals for efficiency, environmental considerations, and economic payoff are being met. The E3 Flight Propulsion System has 14.9% lower sfc than a CF6-50C. It provides a 7.1% reduction in direct operating cost for a short haul domestic transport and 14.5% reduction for an international long distance transport.

  7. Performance of the HIMAC beam control system using multiple-energy synchrotron operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, K.; Furukawa, T.; Iwata, Y.; Hara, Y.; Saotome, N.; Saraya, Y.; Tansho, R.; Sato, S.; Fujimoto, T.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    Multiple-energy synchrotron operation was developed to realize fast 3D scanning irradiation for carbon-ion radiotherapy. This type of operation can output various carbon-ion beams with different energies in a single synchrotron cycle. The beam control system used in this kind of operation was developed to quickly provide the beam energy and intensity required from the irradiation control system. The performance of the system was verified by experimental tests. The system could output beams of 197 different energies in 63 s. The beam intensity could be controlled for all the output beams without large ripples or overshooting. The experimental test of irradiation for prostate cancer treatment was also successfully performed, and the test results proved that our system can greatly reduce the irradiation time.

  8. Surface modification using low energy ground state ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of effecting modifications at the surfaces of materials using low energy ion beams of known quantum state, purity, flux, and energy is presented. The ion beam is obtained by bombarding ion-generating molecules with electrons which are also at low energy. The electrons used to bombard the ion generating molecules are separated from the ions thus obtained and the ion beam is directed at the material surface to be modified. Depending on the type of ion generating molecules used, different ions can be obtained for different types of surface modifications such as oxidation and diamond film formation. One area of application is in the manufacture of semiconductor devices from semiconductor wafers.

  9. Exploring the Nuclear Phase Diagram with Beam Energy Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    The nuclear phase diagram is mapped using beam energy scans of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. This mapping is possible because different collision energies develop along different trajectories through the phase diagram. High energy collisions will evolve though a crossover phase transition according to lattice QCD, but lower collision energies may traverse a first order phase transition. There are hints for this first order phase transition and its critical endpoint, but further measurements and theoretical guidance is needed. In addition to mapping the phase transition, beam energy scans allow us to see if we can turn off the signatures of deconfinement. If an observable is a real signature for the formation of the deconfined state called quark-gluon plasma, then it should turn off at sufficiently low collision energies. In this summary talk I will show the current state of the field using beam energy scan results from RHIC and SPS, I will show where precise theoretical guidance is needed for understanding recent measurements, and I will motivate the need for more data and new measurements from FAIR, NICA, RHIC, and the SPS.

  10. Rolling resistance and propulsion efficiency of manual and power-assisted wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Efthymia; Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Buurke, Jaap H; Rietman, Johan S; Janssen, Thomas W J

    2015-11-01

    Rolling resistance is one of the main forces resisting wheelchair propulsion and thus affecting stress exerted on the upper limbs. The present study investigates the differences in rolling resistance, propulsion efficiency and energy expenditure required by the user during power-assisted and manual propulsion. Different tire pressures (50%, 75%, 100%) and two different levels of motor assistance were tested. Drag force, energy expenditure and propulsion efficiency were measured in 10 able-bodied individuals under different experimental settings on a treadmill. Results showed that drag force levels were significantly higher in the 50%, compared to the 75% and 100% inflation conditions. In terms of wheelchair type, the manual wheelchair displayed significantly lower drag force values than the power-assisted one. The use of extra-power-assisted wheelchair appeared to be significantly superior to conventional power-assisted and manual wheelchairs concerning both propulsion efficiency and energy expenditure required by the user. Overall, the results of the study suggest that the use of power-assisted wheelchair was more efficient and required less energy input by the user, depending on the motor assistance provided. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental Identification and Characterization of Multirotor UAV Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarski, Denis; Krznar, Matija; Piljek, Petar; Simunic, Nikola

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, an experimental procedure for the identification and characterization of multirotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) propulsion is presented. Propulsion configuration needs to be defined precisely in order to achieve required flight performance. Based on the accurate dynamic model and empirical measurements of multirotor propulsion physical parameters, it is possible to design diverse configurations with different characteristics for various purposes. As a case study, we investigated design considerations for a micro indoor multirotor which is suitable for control algorithm implementation in structured environment. It consists of open source autopilot, sensors for indoor flight, “take off the shelf” propulsion components and frame. The series of experiments were conducted to show the process of parameters identification and the procedure for analysis and propulsion characterization. Additionally, we explore battery performance in terms of mass and specific energy. Experimental results show identified and estimated propulsion parameters through which blade element theory is verified.

  12. Fitting relationship between the beam quality β factor of high-energy laser and the wavefront aberration of laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhong-Ye; Zhang, Xiao-Fang

    2018-01-01

    The mathematical relation between the beam quality β factor of high-energy laser and the wavefront aberration of laser beam is important in beam quality control theory of the high-energy laser weapon system. In order to obtain this mathematical relation, numerical simulation is used in the research. Firstly, the Zernike representations of typically distorted atmospheric wavefront aberrations caused by the Kolmogoroff turbulence are generated. And then, the corresponding beam quality β factors of the different distorted wavefronts are calculated numerically through fast Fourier transform. Thus, the statistical distribution rule between the beam quality β factors of high-energy laser and the wavefront aberrations of the beam can be established by the calculated results. Finally, curve fitting method is chosen to establish the mathematical fitting relationship of these two parameters. And the result of the curve fitting shows that there is a quadratic curve relation between the beam quality β factor of high-energy laser and the wavefront aberration of laser beam. And in this paper, 3 fitting curves, in which the wavefront aberrations are consisted of Zernike Polynomials of 20, 36, 60 orders individually, are established to express the relationship between the beam quality β factor and atmospheric wavefront aberrations with different spatial frequency.

  13. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Hyojae, E-mail: lkcom@ibs.re.kr; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, developmentmore » of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.« less

  14. Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Project: Project Management Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    2004-01-01

    To leap past the limitations of existing propulsion, the NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics (BPP) Project seeks further advancements in physics from which new propulsion methods can eventually be derived. Three visionary breakthroughs are sought: (1) propulsion that requires no propellant, (2) propulsion that circumvents existing speed limits, and (3) breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Because these propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis is to identify credible research that will make measurable progress toward these goals in the near-term. The management techniques to address this challenge are presented, with a special emphasis on the process used to review, prioritize, and select research tasks. This selection process includes these key features: (a) research tasks are constrained to only address the immediate unknowns, curious effects or critical issues, (b) reliability of assertions is more important than the implications of the assertions, which includes the practice where the reviewers judge credibility rather than feasibility, and (c) total scores are obtained by multiplying the criteria scores rather than by adding. Lessons learned and revisions planned are discussed.

  15. Control of energy sweep and transverse beam motion in induction linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, W. C.

    1991-05-01

    Recent interest in the electron induction accelerator has focussed on its application as a driver for high power radiation sources; free electron laser (FEL), relativistic klystron (RK) and cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM). In the microwave regime where many successful experiments have been carried out, typical beam parameters are: beam energy 1 to 10 MeV, current 1 to 3 kA and pulse width 50 nsec. Radiation source applications impose conditions on electron beam quality, as characterized by three parameters; energy sweep, transverse beam motion and brightness. These conditions must be maintained for the full pulse duration to assure high efficiency conversion of beam power to radiation. The microwave FEL that has been analyzed in the greatest detail requires energy sweep less than (+ or -) 1 pct., transverse beam motion less than (+ or -) 1 mm and brightness approx. 1 x 10(exp 8)A/sq m sq rad. In the visible region the requirements on these parameters become roughly an order of magnitude more strigent. With the ETAII accelerator at LLNL the requirements were achieved for energy sweep, transverse beam motion and brightness. The recent data and the advances that have made the improved beam quality possible are discussed. The most important advances are: understanding of focussing magnetic field errors and improvements in alignment of the magnetic axis, a redesign of the high voltage pulse distribution system between the magnetic compression modulators and the accelerator cells, and exploitation of a beam tuning algorithm for minimizing transverse beam motion. The prospects are briefly described for increasing the pulse repetition frequency to the range of 5 kHz and a delayed feedback method of regulating beam energy over very long pulse bursts, thus making average power megawatt level microwave sources at 140 GHz and above a possibility.

  16. Initial Skill Acquisition of Handrim Wheelchair Propulsion: A New Perspective.

    PubMed

    Vegter, Riemer J K; de Groot, Sonja; Lamoth, Claudine J; Veeger, Dirkjan Hej; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into cyclic motor learning processes, hand rim wheelchair propulsion is a suitable cyclic task, to be learned during early rehabilitation and novel to almost every individual. To propel in an energy efficient manner, wheelchair users must learn to control bimanually applied forces onto the rims, preserving both speed and direction of locomotion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique during the initial stage of motor learning. Therefore, 70 naive able-bodied men received 12-min uninstructed wheelchair practice, consisting of three 4-min blocks separated by 2 min rest. Practice was performed on a motor-driven treadmill at a fixed belt speed and constant power output relative to body mass. Energy consumption and the kinetics of propulsion technique were continuously measured. Participants significantly increased their mechanical efficiency and changed their propulsion technique from a high frequency mode with a lot of negative work to a longer-slower movement pattern with less power losses. Furthermore a multi-level model showed propulsion technique to relate to mechanical efficiency. Finally improvers and non-improvers were identified. The non-improving group was already more efficient and had a better propulsion technique in the first block of practice (i.e., the fourth minute). These findings link propulsion technique to mechanical efficiency, support the importance of a correct propulsion technique for wheelchair users and show motor learning differences.

  17. Propulsion Estimates for High Energy Lunar Missions Using Future Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.; Bennett, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    High energy propellants for human lunar missions are analyzed, focusing on very advanced ozone and atomic hydrogen. One of the most advanced launch vehicle propulsion systems, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), used hydrogen and oxygen and had a delivered specific impulse of 453 seconds. In the early days of the space program, other propellants (or so called metapropellants) were suggested, including atomic hydrogen and liquid ozone. Theoretical and experimental studies of atomic hydrogen and ozone were conducted beginning in the late 1940s. This propellant research may have provided screenwriters with the idea of an atomic hydrogen-ozone rocket engine in the 1950 movie, Rocketship X-M. This paper presents analyses showing that an atomic hydrogen-ozone rocket engine could produce a specific impulse over a wide range of specific impulse values reaching as high as 1,600 s. A series of single stage and multistage rocket vehicle analyses were conducted to find the minimum specific impulse needed to conduct high energy round trip lunar missions.

  18. Rare isotope beam energy measurements and scintillator developments for ReA3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling-Ying

    The ReAccelerator for 3 MeV/u beams (ReA3) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) in Michigan State University can stop rare isotope beams produced by in-flight fragmentation and reaccelerate them in a superconducting linac. The precise knowledge of the energy and the energy spread of the ion beams extracted from the ReA3 linac is essential for experimental requirement in many applications. Beam energy determination methods such as implantation on a Si detector and/or using calibrated linac settings are precise within a few tens of keV/u. In order to determine beam energies with good resolution of less than 0.5 % FWHM, a 45 degree bending magnet with a movable slit is used to determine the absolute beam energy based on the magnetic rigidity. Two methods have been developed for the energy calibration of the beam analyzing magnet: gamma-ray nuclear resonance reactions and a time-of-flight (TOF) technique. The resonance energies of gamma-ray resonant reactions provide well-known and precise calibration points. The gamma ray yields of the 27Al(p,gamma)28Si at Ep= 992 keV and 632 keV resonances and 58Ni(p,gamma)59Cu at Ep= 1843 keV resonance have been measured with the high efficiency CAESAR (CAESium iodide ARray) and SuN (Summing NaI(Tl)) detectors. By fitting the observed resonant gamma-ray yields, not only the beam energy can be precisely correlated with the magnetic field but also beam energy spread can be obtained. The measured beam energy spread is consistent with beam optics calculations. A time-of-flight system for determining the absolute energy of ion beams and calibrating the 45 degree magnetic analyzer has been developed in ReA3 by using two identical secondary electron monitors (grid-MCP detectors) with appropriate separation. The TOF technique is applicable to the variety of beam energies and ion particles. Velocities of ion beam are determined by simultaneously measuring the arrival time of beam bunches at the two detectors with

  19. Integrated propulsion/energy transfer control systems for lift-fan V/STOL aircraft. [reduction of total propulsion system and control system installation requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, W. H.; Rolls, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    An integrated propulsion/control system for lift-fan transport aircraft is described. System behavior from full-scale experimental and piloted simulator investigations are reported. The lift-fan transport is a promising concept for short-to-medium haul civil transportation and for other missions. The lift-fan transport concept features high cruise airspeed, favorable ride qualities, small perceived noise footprints, high utilization, transportation system flexibility, and adaptability to VTOL, V/STOL, or STOL configurations. The lift-fan transport has high direct operating costs in comparison to conventional aircraft, primarily because of propulsion system and aircraft low-speed control system installation requirements. An integrated lift-fan propulsion system/aircraft low-speed control system that reduces total propulsion system and control system installation requirements is discussed.

  20. Design Considerations for Clean QED Fusion Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussard, Robert W.; Jameson, Lorin W.

    1994-07-01

    The direct production of electric power appears possible from fusion reactions between fuels whose products consist solely of charged particles and thus do not present radiation hazards from energetic neutron production, as do reactions involving deuteron-bearing fuels. Among these are the fuels p, 11B, 3He, and 6Li. All of these can be ``burned'' in inertial-electrostatic-fusion (IEF) devices to power QED fusion-electric rocket engines. These IEF sources provide direct-converted electrical power at high voltage (MeV) to drive e-beams for efficient propellant heating to extreme temperatures, with resulting high specific impulse performance capabilities. IEF/QED engine systems using p11B can outperform all other advanced concepts for controlled fusion propulsion by 2-3 orders of magnitude, while 6Li6Li fusion yields one order of magnitude less advance. Either of these fusion rocket propulsion systems can provide very rapid transit for solar system missions, with high payload fractions in single-stage vehicles. The 3He3He reaction can not be used practically for direct electric conversion because of the wide spread in energy of its fusion products. However, it may eventually prove useful for thermal/electrical power generation in central station power plants, or for direct-fusion-product (DFP) propellant heatingin advanced deep-space rocket engines.

  1. NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G. (Editor); Williamson, Gary Scott (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    In August 1997, NASA sponsored a 3-day workshop to assess the prospects emerging from physics that may eventually lead to creating propulsion breakthroughs -the kind of breakthroughs that could revolutionize space flight and enable human voyages to other star systems. Experiments and theories were discussed regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp drives and wormholes, and superluminal quantum tunneling. Because the propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis was to identify affordable, near-term, and credible research tasks that could make measurable progress toward these grand ambitions. This workshop was one of the first steps for the new NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program led by the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  2. On-Board Chemical Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    On-board propulsion functions include orbit insertion, orbit maintenance, constellation maintenance, precision positioning, in-space maneuvering, de-orbiting, vehicle reaction control, planetary retro, and planetary descent/ascent. This paper discusses on-board chemical propulsion technology, including bipropellants, monopropellants, and micropropulsion. Bipropellant propulsion has focused on maximizing the performance of Earth storable propellants by using high-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials. The performance of bipropellant systems can be increased further, by operating at elevated chamber pressures and/or using higher energy oxidizers. Both options present system level difficulties for spacecraft, however. Monopropellant research has focused on mixtures composed of an aqueous solution of hydroxl ammonium nitrate (HAN) and a fuel component. HAN-based monopropellants, unlike hydrazine, do not present a vapor hazard and do not require extraordinary procedures for storage, handling, and disposal. HAN-based monopropellants generically have higher densities and lower freezing points than the state-of-art hydrazine and can higher performance, depending on the formulation. High-performance HAN-based monopropellants, however, have aggressive, high-temperature combustion environments and require advances in catalyst materials or suitable non-catalytic ignition options. The objective of the micropropulsion technology area is to develop low-cost, high-utility propulsion systems for the range of miniature spacecraft and precision propulsion applications.

  3. An integral nuclear power and propulsion system concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choong, Phillip T.; Teofilo, Vincent L.; Begg, Lester L.; Dunn, Charles; Otting, William

    An integral space power concept provides both the electrical power and propulsion from a common heat source and offers superior performance capabilities over conventional orbital insertion using chemical propulsion systems. This paper describes a hybrid (bimodal) system concept based on a proven, inherently safe solid fuel form for the high temperature reactor core operation and rugged planar thermionic energy converter for long-life steady state electric power production combined with NERVA-based rocket technology for propulsion. The integral system is capable of long-life power operation and multiple propulsion operations. At an optimal thrust level, the integral system can maintain the minimal delta-V requirement while minimizing the orbital transfer time. A trade study comparing the overall benefits in placing large payloads to GEO with the nuclear electric propulsion option shows superiority of nuclear thermal propulsion. The resulting savings in orbital transfer time and the substantial reduction of overall lift requirement enables the use of low-cost launchers for several near-term military satellite missions.

  4. Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Shorter trips are better for humans in the harmful radiation environment of deep space. Nuclear propulsion and power plants can enable high Ispand payload mass fractions because they require less fuel mass. Fusion energy research has characterized the Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method. (1) Lightning is form of pinched plasma electrical discharge phenomena. (2) Wire array Z-Pinch experiments are commonly studied and nuclear power plant configurations have been proposed. (3) Used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects (NWE) testing in the defense industry, nuclear weapon x-rays are simulated through Z-Pinch phenomena.

  5. Energy-Absorbing Beam Member

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An energy-absorbing (EA) beam member and having a cell core structure is positioned in an aircraft fuselage proximate to the floor of the aircraft. The cell core structure has a length oriented along a width of the fuselage, a width oriented along a length of the fuselage, and a depth extending away from the floor. The cell core structure also includes cell walls that collectively define a repeating conusoidal pattern of alternating respective larger and smaller first and second radii along the length of the cell core structure. The cell walls slope away from a direction of flight of the aircraft at a calibrated lean angle. An EA beam member may include the cell core structure and first and second plates along the length of the cell core structure on opposite edges of the cell material.

  6. Assessment of Technologies for Noncryogenic Hybrid Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Loyselle, Patricia L.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Morrison, Carlos R.; Lowe, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program is researching aircraft propulsion technologies that will lower noise, emissions, and fuel burn. One promising technology is noncryogenic electric propulsion, which could be either hybrid electric propulsion or turboelectric propulsion. Reducing dependence on the turbine engine would certainly reduce emissions. However, the weight of the electricmotor- related components that would have to be added would adversely impact the benefits of the smaller turbine engine. Therefore, research needs to be done to improve component efficiencies and reduce component weights. This study projects technology improvements expected in the next 15 and 30 years, including motor-related technologies, power electronics, and energy-storage-related technologies. Motor efficiency and power density could be increased through the use of better conductors, insulators, magnets, bearings, structural materials, and thermal management. Energy storage could be accomplished through batteries, flywheels, or supercapacitors, all of which expect significant energy density growth over the next few decades. A first-order approximation of the cumulative effect of each technology improvement shows that motor power density could be improved from 3 hp/lb, the state of the art, to 8 hp/lb in 15 years and 16 hp/lb in 30 years.

  7. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photograph shows an overall view of the Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The 20-by 24-ft heliostat mirror, shown at the left, has dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on an 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror (right). The concentrator mirror then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber, shown at the front of concentrator mirror. Researchers at MSFC have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than chemical a combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propell nt. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  8. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Baggett, Randy; Bonometti, Joe; Herrmann, Melody; James, Bonnie; Montgomery, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program s technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5 - 10 kW range, to advanced cryogenic propulsion, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called, 'propellantless' because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, aeroassist, and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, and NASA s plans for advancing them as part of the $60M per year In-Space Propulsion Technology Program.

  9. Comparative dosimetric characterization for different types of detectors in high-energy electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Yeol; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Hun Jeong; Huh, Hyun Do; Park, Seungwoo; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum Bae; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Seong Hoon; Shin, Dong Oh

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform a comparison and on analysis of measured dose factor values by using various commercially available high-energy electron beam detectors to measure dose profiles and energy property data. By analyzing the high-energy electron beam data from each detector, we determined the optimal detector for measuring electron beams in clinical applications. The dose linearity, dose-rate dependence, percentage depth dose, and dose profile of each detector were measured to evaluate the dosimetry characteristics of high-energy electron beams. The dose profile and the energy characteristics of high-energy electron beams were found to be different when measured by different detectors. Through comparison with other detectors based on the analyzed data, the microdiamond detector was found to have outstanding dose linearity, a low dose-rate dependency, and a small effective volume. Thus, this detector has outstanding spatial resolution and is the optimal detector for measuring electron beams. Radiation therapy results can be improved and related medical accidents can be prevented by using the procedure developed in this research in clinical practice for all beam detectors when measuring the electron beam dose.

  10. Chromaticity of the lattice and beam stability in energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N.

    2012-07-01

    Energy recovery linacs (ERLs) are an emerging generation of accelerators that promises to revolutionize the fields of high-energy physics and photon sciences. These accelerators combine the advantages of linear accelerators with that of storage rings, and augur the delivery of electron beams of unprecedented power and quality. The use of superconducting radio-frequency cavities converts ERLs into nearly perfect “perpetuum mobile” accelerators, wherein the beam is accelerated to the desired energy, used, and then yields the energy back to the rf field. However, one potential weakness of these devices is transverse beam breakup instability that could severely limit the available beam current. In this paper, I propose a novel method of suppressing these dangerous effects via a natural phenomenon in the accelerators, viz., the chromaticity of the transverse motion.

  11. Chromaticity of the lattice and beam stability in energy-recovery linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.

    2011-12-23

    Energy recovery linacs (ERLs) are an emerging generation of accelerators promising to revolutionize the fields of high-energy physics and photon sciences. These accelerators combine the advantages of linear accelerators with that of storage rings, and hold the promise of delivering electron beams of unprecedented power and quality. Use of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities converts ERLs into nearly perfect 'perpetuum mobile' accelerators, wherein the beam is accelerated to a desirable energy, used, and then gives the energy back to the RF field. One potential weakness of these devices is transverse beam break-up instability that could severely limit the available beam current.more » In this paper, I present a method of suppressing these dangerous effects using a natural phenomenon in the accelerators, viz., the chromaticity of the transverse motion.« less

  12. High beam quality and high energy short-pulse laser with MOPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Quanwei; Pang, Yu; Jiang, JianFeng; Tan, Liang; Cui, Lingling; Wei, Bin; Sun, Yinhong; Tang, Chun

    2018-03-01

    A high energy, high beam quality short-pulse diode-pumped Nd:YAG master oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) laser with two amplifier stages is demonstrated. The two-rod birefringence compensation was used as beam quality controlling methods, which presents a short-pulse energy of 40 mJ with a beam quality value of M2 = 1.2 at a repetition rate of 400Hz. The MOPA system delivers a short-pulse energy of 712.5 mJ with a pulse width of 12.4 ns.The method of spherical aberration compensation is improved the beam quality, a M2 factor of 2.3 and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 27.7% is obtained at the maximum laser out power.The laser obtained 1.4J out energy with polarization integration.

  13. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  14. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Iqbal, M; Liu, R; Chi, Y

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  15. Status of advanced orbital transfer propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, L. P.

    1985-01-01

    A new Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) propulsion system that will be used in conjunction with the Space Shuttle, Space Station and Orbit Maneuvering Vehicle is discussed. The OTV will transfer men, large space structures and conventional payloads between low Earth and higher energy orbits. Space probes carried by the OTV will continue the exploration of the solar system. When lunar bases are established, the OTV will be their transportation link to Earth. Critical engine design considerations based upon the need for low cost payload delivery, space basing, reusability, aeroassist maneuvering, low g transfers of large space structures and man rating are described. The importance of each of these to propulsion design is addressed. Specific propulsion requirements discussed are: (1) high performance H2/O2 engine; (2) multiple engine configurations totalling no more than 15,000 lbf thrust 15 to 20 hr life; (3) space maintainable modular design; (4) health monitoring capability; and (5) safety and mission success with backup auxiliary propulsion.

  16. Performance Criteria of Nuclear Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, L. R.

    Future exploration of the solar system on a major scale will require propulsion systems capable of performance far greater than is achievable with the present generation of rocket engines using chemical propellants. Viable missions going deeper into interstellar space will be even more demanding. Propulsion systems based on nuclear energy sources, fission or (eventually) fusion offer the best prospect for meeting the requirements. The most obvious gain coming from the application of nuclear reactions is the possibility, at least in principle, of obtaining specific impulses a thousandfold greater than can be achieved in chemically energised rockets. However, practical considerations preclude the possibility of exploiting the full potential of nuclear energy sources in any engines conceivable in terms of presently known technology. Achievable propulsive power is a particularly limiting factor, since this determines the acceleration that may be obtained. Conventional chemical rocket engines have specific propulsive powers (power per unit engine mass) in the order of gigawatts per tonne. One cannot envisage the possibility of approaching such a level of performance by orders of magnitude in presently conceivable nuclear propulsive systems. The time taken, under power, to reach a given terminal velocity is proportional to the square of the engine's exhaust velocity and the inverse of its specific power. An assessment of various nuclear propulsion concepts suggests that, even with the most optimistic assumptions, it could take many hundreds of years to attain the velocities necessary to reach the nearest stars. Exploration within a range of the order of a thousand AU, however, would appear to offer viable prospects, even with the low levels of specific power of presently conceivable nuclear engines.

  17. Dual energy approach for cone beam artifacts correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chulhee; Choi, Shinkook; Lee, Changwoo; Baek, Jongduk

    2017-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography systems generate 3D volumetric images, which provide further morphological information compared to radiography and tomosynthesis systems. However, reconstructed images by FDK algorithm contain cone beam artifacts when a cone angle is large. To reduce the cone beam artifacts, two-pass algorithm has been proposed. The two-pass algorithm considers the cone beam artifacts are mainly caused by high density materials, and proposes an effective method to estimate error images (i.e., cone beam artifacts images) by the high density materials. While this approach is simple and effective with a small cone angle (i.e., 5 - 7 degree), the correction performance is degraded as the cone angle increases. In this work, we propose a new method to reduce the cone beam artifacts using a dual energy technique. The basic idea of the proposed method is to estimate the error images generated by the high density materials more reliably. To do this, projection data of the high density materials are extracted from dual energy CT projection data using a material decomposition technique, and then reconstructed by iterative reconstruction using total-variation regularization. The reconstructed high density materials are used to estimate the error images from the original FDK images. The performance of the proposed method is compared with the two-pass algorithm using root mean square errors. The results show that the proposed method reduces the cone beam artifacts more effectively, especially with a large cone angle.

  18. Phase 1 Space Fission Propulsion Energy Source Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana; Carter, Robert; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. If fission propulsion systems are to be developed to their full potential; however, near-term customers must be identified and initial fission systems successfully developed, launched, and operated. Studies conducted in fiscal year 2001 (IISTP, 2001) show that fission electric propulsion (FEP) systems with a specific mass at or below 50 kg/kWjet could enhance or enable numerous robotic outer solar system missions of interest. At the required specific mass, it is possible to develop safe, affordable systems that meet mission requirements. To help select the system design to pursue, eight evaluation criteria were identified: system integration, safety, reliability, testability, specific mass, cost, schedule, and programmatic risk. A top-level comparison of four potential concepts was performed: a Testable, Passive, Redundant Reactor (TPRR), a Testable Multi-Cell In-Core Thermionic Reactor (TMCT), a Direct Gas Cooled Reactor (DGCR), and a Pumped Liquid Metal Reactor.(PLMR). Development of any of the four systems appears feasible. However, for power levels up to at least 500 kWt (enabling electric power levels of 125-175 kWe, given 25-35% power conversion efficiency) the TPRR has advantages related to several criteria and is competitive with respect to all. Hardware-based research and development has further increased confidence in the TPRR approach. Successful development and utilization of a "Phase I" fission electric propulsion system will enable advanced Phase 2 and Phase 3 systems capable of providing rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system.

  19. A method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of composite subfloor beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    A simple method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of composite subfloor beam structure was developed. The method is based upon the weighted sum of the energy-absorption capability of constituent elements of a subfloor beam. An empirical data base of energy absorption results from circular and square cross section tube specimens were used in the prediction capability. The procedure is applicable to a wide range of subfloor beam structure. The procedure was demonstrated on three subfloor beam concepts. Agreement between test and prediction was within seven percent for all three cases.

  20. Progress Towards the Development of a Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter for Aneutronic Fusion Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarditi, A. G.; Chap, A.; Wolinsky, J.; Scott, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    A coordinated experimental and theory/simulation effort has been carried out to investigate the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC), a scheme that has been proposed in the past for the direct conversion into electricity of the kinetic energy of an ion beam generated from fusion reactions. This effort has been focused in particular on the TWDEC process in the high density beam regime, thus accounting for the ion beam expansion due to its space charge.

  1. Solar thermal propulsion for planetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that many desirable planetary exploration missions require large injection delta-V. Solar Thermal Rocket (STR) propulsion, under study for orbit-raising applications may enhance or enable such high-energy missions. The required technology of thermal control for liquid hydrogen propellant is available for the required storage duration. Self-deploying, inflatable solar concentrators are under study. The mass penalty for passive cryogenic thermal control, liquid hydrogen tanks and solar concentrators does not compromise the specific impulse advantage afforded by the STR as compared to chemical propulsion systems. An STR injection module is characterized and performance is evaluated by comparison to electric propulsion options for the Saturn Orbiter Titan Probe (SOTP) and Uranus Flyby Uranus Probe (UFUP) missions.

  2. Nuclear power propulsion system for spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroteev, A. S.; Oshev, Yu. A.; Popov, S. A.; Karevsky, A. V.; Solodukhin, A. Ye.; Zakharenkov, L. E.; Semenkin, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The proposed designs of high-power space tugs that utilize solar or nuclear energy to power an electric jet engine are reviewed. The conceptual design of a nuclear power propulsion system (NPPS) is described; its structural diagram, gas circuit, and electric diagram are discussed. The NPPS incorporates a nuclear reactor, a thermal-to-electric energy conversion system, a system for the conversion and distribution of electric energy, and an electric propulsion system. Two criterion parameters were chosen in the considered NPPS design: the temperature of gaseous working medium at the nuclear reactor outlet and the rotor speed of turboalternators. The maintenance of these parameters at a given level guarantees that the needed electric voltage is generated and allows for power mode control. The processes of startup/shutdown and increasing/reducing the power, the principles of distribution of electric energy over loads, and the probable emergencies for the proposed NPPS design are discussed.

  3. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  4. Electric propulsion system for wheeled vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, J.A.

    1981-11-03

    An electric propulsion system for a wheeled vehicle has a generator and motor connected to a drive shaft and an electrical system for charging a battery during all conditions of power transfer from the wheels of the vehicle to the generator to minimize energy required for propulsion. A variable speed power coupling unit connecting the motor to the drive shaft has sprockets revolving about a belt connected sun sprocket with speed control effected by varying the rate of satellite sprocket rotation.

  5. NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: Overview and Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Baggett, Randy M.; Bonometti, Joseph A.; Herrmann, Melody; James, Bonnie F.; Montgomery, Sandy E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program's technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next-generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5- to 10-kW range to aerocapture and solar sails, substantial advances in - spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called 'propellantless' because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer.tethers, aeroassist and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, as well as NASA's plans for advancing them as part of the In-Space Propulsion Technology Program.

  6. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: Overview and Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Baggett, Randy M.; Bonometti, Joseph A.; Herrmann, Melody; James, Bonnie F.; Montgomery, Sandy E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program s technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next-generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5- to 10-kW range to aerocapture and solar sails, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals ase the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called 'propellantless' because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, aeroassist, and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, as well as NASA s plans for advancing them as part of the In-Space Propulsion Technology Program.

  7. Thermal liquid propulsion system using magnetic nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, V. H.; Virpura, H. A.; Bhatnagar, S. P.

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, we have demonstrated the thermal liquid propulsion system using the idea of magnetocaloric energy generation system. Thermal sensitive magnetic nanofluid is used for this study. In presence of magnetic field and temperature gradient, the magnetic nanofluid loses its magnetization. Hot fluid replaced by the fluid which is at ambient temperature. Temperature profile of liquid propulsion was measured in a horizontal closed loop of glass assembly.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of a piezoelectric energy harvester with clamped-clamped beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yan; Yu, Menglin; Gao, Shiqiao; Kong, Xiangxin; Gu, Wang; Zhang, Ran; Liu, Bowen

    2018-05-01

    This work presents a piezoelectric energy harvester with clamped-clamped beams, and it is fabricated with MEMS process. When excited by sinusoidal vibration, the energy harvester has a sharp jumping down phenomenon and the measured frequency responses of the clamped-clamped beams structure show a larger bandwidth which is about 56Hz, more efficient than that with cantilever beams. When the exciting acceleration ac is 12m/s2, the energy harvester achieves to a maximum open-circuit voltage of 94mV on one beam. The load voltage is proportional to the load resistance, and it increased with the increase of load resistance. Connected four beams in series, the output power reaches the maximum value of 730 nW and the optimal load is 15KΩ to one beam.

  9. Propulsion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    Manual 91 - 710 Vol. 2 ( AFSPCMAN 91 - 710 V2). 8. Astrium EADS. 2010. cs.astrium.eads.net. April. 9. Astrium EADS. 2010. : http...of the High Energy Density Matter (HEDM) Conference. Albuquerque, NM, February 24-27, (Phillips Lab PL-CP- 91 -3003, p. 3 ). 104. Sullivan, D. J...Chapter 3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Chapter 18 - Propulsion Systems 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  10. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  11. Crossed-beam energy transfer: polarization effects and evidence of saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, D.; Colaïtis, A.; Follett, R. K.; Palastro, J. P.; Froula, D. H.; Michel, P.; Goyon, C.; Chapman, T.; Divol, L.; Kemp, G. E.; Mariscal, D.; Patankar, S.; Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S.; Moody, J. D.; Tubman, E. R.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2018-05-01

    Recent results on crossed-beam energy transfer are presented. Wavelength tuning was used to vary the amount of energy transfer between two beams in a quasi-stationary plasma with carefully controlled conditions. The amount of transfer agreed well with calculations assuming linear ion acoustic waves (IAWs) with amplitudes up to δ n/n≈ 0.015. Increasing the initial probe intensity to access larger IAW amplitudes for otherwise fixed conditions yields evidence of saturation. The ability to manipulate a beam's polarization, which results from the anisotropic nature of the interaction, is revisited; an example is provided to demonstrate how polarization effects in a multibeam situation can dramatically enhance the expected amount of energy transfer.

  12. Space propulsion systems. Present performance limits and application and development trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, R. D.; Lo, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Typical spaceflight programs and their propulsion requirements as a comparison for possible propulsion systems are summarized. Chemical propulsion systems, solar, nuclear, or even laser propelled rockets with electrical or direct thermal fuel acceleration, nonrockets with air breathing devices and solar cells are considered. The chemical launch vehicles have similar technical characteristics and transportation costs. A possible improvement of payload by using air breathing lower stages is discussed. The electrical energy supply installations which give performance limits of electrical propulsion and the electrostatic ion propulsion systems are described. The development possibilities of thermal, magnetic, and electrostatic rocket engines and the state of development of the nuclear thermal rocket and propulsion concepts are addressed.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage for Bi-Modal Solar Thermal Propulsion (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    applications • Mentioned as a potential buffer / storage material for TPVs • Brief mentions in the solar thermal literature...Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Investigation of Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage for 5a. CONTRACT...NUMBER In-House Bi-Modal Solar Thermal Propulsion 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew R. Gilpin, David B. Scharfe

  14. Antimatter Driven P-B11 Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammash, Terry; Martin, James; Godfroy, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    One of the major advantages of using P-B11 fusion fuel is that the reaction produces only charged particles in the form of three alpha particles and no neutrons. A fusion concept that lends itself to this fuel cycle is the Magnetically Insulated Inertial Confinement Fusion (MICF) reactor whose distinct advantage lies in the very strong magnetic field that is created when an incident particle (or laser) beam strikes the inner wall of the target pellet. This field serves to thermally insulate the hot plasma from the metal wall thereby allowing thc plasma to burn for a long time and produce a large energy magnification. If used as a propulsion device, we propose using antiprotons to drive the system which we show to be capable of producing very large specific impulse and thrust. By way of validating the confinement propenies of MICF we will address a proposed experiment in which pellets coated with P-B11 fuel at the appropriate ratio will be zapped by a beam of antiprotons that enter the target through a hole. Calculations showing the density and temperature of the generated plasma along with the strength of the magnetic field and other properties of the system will be presented and discussed.

  15. Axial propulsion with flapping and rotating wings, a comparison of potential efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kroninger, Christopher M

    2018-04-18

    Interest in biological locomotion and what advantages the principles governing it might offer in the design of manmade vehicles prompts one to consider the power requirements of flapping relative to rotary propulsion. The amount of work performed on the fluid surrounding a thrusting surface (wing or blade) is reflected in the kinetic energy of the wake. Consideration of the energy in the wake is sufficient to define absolute minimum limitations on the power requirement to generate a particular thrust. This work applies wake solutions to compare the minimum inviscid propulsive power requirement of wings flapping and in rotation at wing loading conditions reflective of hover through a state of lightly-loaded cruise. It is demonstrated that hovering flapping flight is less efficient than rotary wing propulsion except for the most extreme flap amplitude strokes ([Formula: see text]   >  160°) if operating at large wake wavelength. In cruise, a larger range of flap amplitude kinematics ([Formula: see text]  >  140°) can be aerodynamically more energy efficient for wake wavelengths reflective of biological propulsion. These results imply, based on the observed wing kinematics of continuous steady flight, that flapping propulsion in animals is unlikely to be more efficient than rotary propulsion.

  16. Precision shape modification of nanodevices with a low-energy electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex; Yuzvinsky, Thomas David; Fennimore, Adam

    2010-03-09

    Methods of shape modifying a nanodevice by contacting it with a low-energy focused electron beam are disclosed here. In one embodiment, a nanodevice may be permanently reformed to a different geometry through an application of a deforming force and a low-energy focused electron beam. With the addition of an assist gas, material may be removed from the nanodevice through application of the low-energy focused electron beam. The independent methods of shape modification and material removal may be used either individually or simultaneously. Precision cuts with accuracies as high as 10 nm may be achieved through the use of precision low-energy Scanning Electron Microscope scan beams. These methods may be used in an automated system to produce nanodevices of very precise dimensions. These methods may be used to produce nanodevices of carbon-based, silicon-based, or other compositions by varying the assist gas.

  17. Axial energy spread measurements of an accelerated positive ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Gough, R. A.; Kunkel, W. B.; Leung, K. N.; Perkins, L. T.; Pickard, D. S.; Sun, L.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M. D.; Wutte, D.; Mondelli, Alfred A.; Stengl, Gerhard

    1997-01-01

    A multicusp ion source has been designed for use in ion projection lithography. Longitudinal energy spreads of the extracted positive hydrogen ion beam have been studied using a retarding field energy analyzer. It has been found that the filament-discharge multicusp ion source can deliver a beam with an energy spread less than 3 eV which is required for the ALG-1000 machine. The multicusp ion source can also deliver the current required for the application.

  18. A Conceptual Design of Omni-Directional Receiving Dual-Beam Laser Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiping; Zhang, Qinghong

    2010-05-01

    The laser engine design is one of the key issues for laser propulsion technology. A concept of Omni-Directional Receiving Dual-Beam Laser Engine (ODLE) together with its configuration design is proposed in this paper. The ODLE is noted for its features as follows: First, the optical system is completely separated from the thrust system, the incident laser beams are reflected into the thrust chamber by the optics only twice, so the beam energy loss is small. Second, the optical system can be adjusted in all direction to track the incident laser beams, ensuring its wide applications in various kinds of launching trajectories. Third, the adoption of the dual-beam single-or double-engine configuration can reduce 50% of the power requirement for each laser, and a smooth laser relay can be carried out if needed during the launching process. The paper has proposed 2 launch plans into the LEO with the ODLE: the plane trajectory and the conic spiral trajectory. The simulated results indicate that the transmission distance of laser beams for the conic spiral trajectory is far less than that of the plane trajectory. As a result, it can reduce significantly the divergence and energy loss of laser beams, and is also of advantage for the measurement and control operation during the launch process.

  19. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.

    1983-09-26

    Objects of the present invention are provided for a particle beam having a full energy component at least as great as 25 keV, which is directed onto a beamstop target, such that Rutherford backscattering, preferably near-surface backscattering occurs. The geometry, material composition and impurity concentration of the beam stop are predetermined, using any suitable conventional technique. The energy-yield characteristic response of backscattered particles is measured over a range of angles using a fast ion electrostatic analyzer having a microchannel plate array at its focal plane. The knee of the resulting yield curve, on a plot of yield versus energy, is analyzed to determine the energy species components of various beam particles having the same mass.

  20. Propulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air and Space, 1978

    1978-01-01

    An introductory discussion of aircraft propulsion is included along with diagrams and pictures of piston, turbojet, turboprop, turbofan, and jet engines. Also, a table on chemical propulsion is included. (MDR)

  1. High-speed flight propulsion systems. Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics. Vol. 137

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, S.N.B.; Curran, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on high-speed flight propulsion systems are presented. The topics addressed are: propulsion systems from takeoff to high-speed flight, propulsion system performance and integration for high Mach air-breathing flight, energy analysis of high-speed flight systems, waves and thermodynamics in high Mach number propulsive ducts, turbulent free shear layer mixing and combustion, turbulent mixing in supersonic combustion systems, mixing and mixing enhancement in supersonic reacting flowfields, study of combustion and heat-exchange processes in high-enthalpy short-duration facilities, and facility requirements for hypersonic propulsion system testing.

  2. SU-F-19A-06: Experimental Investigation of the Energy Dependence of TLD Sensitivity in Low-Energy Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z; Nath, R

    Purpose: To measure the energy dependence of TLD sensitivity in lowenergy photon beams with equivalent mono-energetic energy matching those of 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs brachytherapy sources. Methods: A Pantek DXT 300 x-ray unit (Precision X-ray, Branford, CT), with stable digital voltage control down to 20 kV, was used to establish three lowenergy photon beams with narrow energy spread and equivalent monoenergetic energies matching those of 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs brachytherapy sources. The low-energy x-ray beams and a reference 6 MV photon beam were calibrated according to the AAPM TG-61 and TG-51 protocols, respectively, using a parallel-plate low-energy chamber and amore » Farmer cylindrical chamber with NIST traceable calibration factors. The dose response of model TLD-100 micro-cubes (1×1×1 mm{sup 3}) in each beam was measured for five different batches of TLDs (each contained approximately 100 TLDs) that have different histories of irradiation and usage. Relative absorbed dose sensitivity was determined as the quotient of the slope of dose response for a beam-of-interest to that of the reference beam. Results: Equivalent mono-energetic photon energies of the low-energy beams established for 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs sources were 20.5, 27.5, and 30.1 keV, respectively. Each beam exhibited narrow spectral spread with energyhomogeneity index close to 90%. The relative absorbed-dose sensitivity was found to vary between different batches of TLD with maximum differences of up to 8%. The mean and standard deviation determined from the five TLD batches was 1.453 ± 0.026, 1.541 ± 0.035 and 1.529 ± 0.051 for the simulated 103P, 125I and 131Cs beams, respectively. Conclusion: Our measured relative absorbed-dose sensitivities are greater than the historically measured value of 1.41. We find that the relative absorbed-dose sensitivity of TLD in the 103P beam is approximately 5% lower than that of 125I and 131Cs beams. Comparison of our results with other studies will be

  3. SU-E-T-146: Beam Energy Spread Estimate Based On Bragg Peak Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Anferov, V; Derenchuk, V; Moore, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: ProNova is installing and commissioning a two room proton therapy system in Knoxville, TN. Beam energy out of the 230MeV cyclotron was measured on Jan 24, 2015. Cyclotron beam was delivered into a Zebra multi layered IC detector calibrated in terms of penetration range in water. The analysis of the measured Bragg peak determines penetration range in water which can be subsequently converted into proton beam energy. We extended this analysis to obtain an estimate of the beam energy spread out of the cyclotron. Methods: Using Monte Carlo simulations we established the correlation between Bragg peak shape parameters (widthmore » at 50% and 80% dose levels, distal falloff) and penetration range for a monoenergetic proton beam. For large uniform field impinging on a small area detector, we observed linear dependence of each Bragg peak parameter on beam penetration range as shown in Figure A. Then we studied how this correlation changes when the shape of Bragg peak is distorted by the beam focusing conditions. As shown in Figure B, small field size or diverging beam cause Bragg peak deformation predominantly in the proximal region. The distal shape of the renormalized Bragg peaks stays nearly constant. This excludes usage of Bragg peak width parameters for energy spread estimates. Results: The measured Bragg peaks had an average distal falloff of 4.86mm, which corresponds to an effective range of 35.5cm for a monoenergetic beam. The 32.7cm measured penetration range is 2.8cm less. Passage of a 230MeV proton beam through a 2.8cm thick slab of water results in a ±0.56MeV energy spread. As a final check, we confirmed agreement between shapes of the measured Bragg peak and one generated by Monte-Carlo code for proton beam with 0.56 MeV energy spread. Conclusion: Proton beam energy spread can be estimated using Bragg peak analysis.« less

  4. Free-electron laser power beaming to satellites at China Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.; Rather, John D.; Montgomery, Edward E.

    1994-05-01

    Laser power beaming of energy through the atmosphere to a satellite can extend its lifetime by maintaining the satellite batteries in operating condition. An alternate propulsion system utilizing power beaming will also significantly reduce the initial insertion cost of these satellites, which now are as high as $72,000/lb for geosynchronous orbit. Elements of the power beaming system are a high-power laser, a large diameter telescope to reduce diffractive losses, an adaptive optic beam conditioning system and possibly a balloon or aerostat carrying a large mirror to redirect the laser beam to low earth orbit satellites after it has traversed most of the earth's atmosphere vertically. China Lake, California has excellent seeing, averages 260 cloud-free days/year, has the second largest geothermal plant in the United States nearby for power, groundwater from the lake for cooling water, and is at the center of one of the largest restricted airspaces in the United States. It is an ideal site for such a laser power beaming system. Technological challenges in building such a system and installing it at China Lake are discussed.

  5. Numerical studies on alpha production from high energy proton beam interaction with Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S. D.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Korn, G.

    2017-05-01

    Numerical investigations on high energy proton beam interaction with high density Boron plasma allows to simulate conditions concerning the alpha production from recent experimental measurements . The experiments measure the alpha production due to p11B nuclear fusion reactions when a laser-driven high energy proton beam interacts with Boron plasma produced by laser beam interaction with solid Boron. The alpha production and consequently the efficiency of the process depends on the initial proton beam energy, proton beam density, the Boron plasma density and temperature, and their temporal evolution. The main advantage for the p11B nuclear fusion reaction is the production of three alphas with total energy of 8.9 MeV, which could enhance the alpha heating effect and improve the alpha production. This particular effect is termed in the international literature as the alpha avalanche effect. Numerical results using a multi-fluid, global particle and energy balance, code shows the alpha production efficiency as a function of the initial energy of the proton beam, the Boron plasma density, the initial Boron plasma temperature and the temporal evolution of the plasma parameters. The simulations enable us to determine the interaction conditions (proton beam - B plasma) for which the alpha heating effect becomes important.

  6. Coulomb repulsion and the electron beam directed energy weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2004-09-01

    Mutual repulsion of discrete charged particles or Coulomb repulsion is widely considered to be an ultimate hard limit in charged particle optics. It prevents the ability to finely focus high current beams into small spots at large distances from defining apertures. A classic example is the 1970s era "Star Wars" study of an electron beam directed energy weapon as an orbiting antiballistic missile device. After much analysis, it was considered physically impossible to focus a 1000-amp 1-GeV beam into a 1-cm diameter spot 1000-km from the beam generator. The main reason was that a 1-cm diameter beam would spread to 5-m diameter at 1000-km due to Coulomb repulsion. Since this could not be overcome, the idea was abandoned. But is this true? What if the rays were reversed? That is, start with a 5-m beam converging slightly with the same nonuniform angular and energy distribution as the electrons from the original problem were spreading at 1000-km distance. Could Coulomb repulsion be overcome? Looking at the terms in computational studies, some are reversible while others are not. Based on estimates, the nonreversible terms should be small - of the order of 0.1 mm. If this is true, it is possible to design a practical electron beam directed weapon not limited by Coulomb repulsion.

  7. Deriving the Generalized Power and Efficiency Equations for Jet Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsing-Juin; Chang, Chih-Luong

    The kinetic power and efficiency equations for general jet propulsion systems are classically given in a much cursory, incomplete, and ununified format. This situation prohibits the propulsion designer from seeing the panorama of interrelated propulsion parameters and effects. And in some cases, it may lead to an energy-inefficient propulsion system design, or induce significant offset in propulsion performance as demonstrated in this study. Thus, herein we attempt to clarify some related concepts and to rigorously derive the associated generalized equations with a complete spectrum of physical parameters to be manipulated in quest of better performance. By a highly efficient interweaved transport scheme, we have derived the following equations for general jet propulsion systems: i.e., generalized total kinetic power, generalized kinetic power delivered to the jet propulsion system, generalized thrust power, generalized available propulsion power, and relevant generalized propulsive, thermal, and overall efficiency equations. Further, the variants of these equations under special conditions are also considered. For taking advantage of the above propulsion theories, we also illustrate some novel propulsion strategies in the final discussion, such as the dive-before-climb launch of rocket from highland mountain on eastbound rail, with perhaps minisatellites as the payloads.

  8. Energy Efficient Engine: Flight propulsion system final design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald Y.; Stearns, E. Marshall

    1985-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) is a NASA program to create fuel saving technology for future transport engines. The Flight Propulsion System (FPS) is the engine designed to achieve E3 goals. Achieving these goals required aerodynamic, mechanical and system technologies advanced beyond that of current production engines. These technologies were successfully demonstrated in component rigs, a core engine and a turbofan ground test engine. The design and benefits of the FPS are presented. All goals for efficiency, environmental considerations, and economic payoff were met. The FPS has, at maximum cruise, 10.67 km (35,000 ft), M0.8, standard day, a 16.9 percent lower installed specific fuel consumption than a CF6-50C. It provides an 8.6 percent reduction in direct operating cost for a short haul domestic transport and a 16.2 percent reduction for an international long distance transport.

  9. NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 5: Propulsion technology panel, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Payload experiments which could be carried out in near earth space using the shuttle orbiter, its payload bay, the Spacelab, and/or some free-flying device that might be used for long duration testing were identified. Specific areas examined in terms of user requirements include: chemical propulsion, nuclear propulsion (fission, fussion, radioisotopes), and collected energy (coherent energy and solar electromagnetic energy). Cost reduction objectives for advanced propulsion technology development were also developed.

  10. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A., E-mail: ivanov@inp.nsk.su

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase themore » efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.« less

  11. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  12. High-energy electron beams for ceramic joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turman, Bob N.; Glass, S. J.; Halbleib, J. A.; Helmich, D. R.; Loehman, Ron E.; Clifford, Jerome R.

    1995-03-01

    Joining of structural ceramics is possible using high melting point metals such as Mo and Pt that are heated with a high energy electron beam, with the potential for high temperature joining. A 10 MeV electron beam can penetrate through 1 cm of ceramic, offering the possibility of buried interface joining. Because of transient heating and the lower heat capacity of the metal relative to the ceramic, a pulsed high power beam has the potential for melting the metal without decomposing or melting the ceramic. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the process with a series of 10 MeV, 1 kW electron beam experiments. Shear strengths up to 28 MPa have been measured. This strength is comparable to that reported in the literature for bonding silicon nitride (Si3N4) to molybdenum with copper-silver-titanium braze, but weaker than that reported for Si3N4 - Si3N4 with gold-nickel braze. The bonding mechanism appears to be formation of a thin silicide layer. Beam damage to the Si3N4 was also assessed.

  13. Optimization of solenoid based low energy beam transport line for high current H+ beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, R.; Singh, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Roy, S.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2015-02-01

    A 20 MeV, 30 mA CW proton linac is being developed at BARC, Mumbai. This linac will consist of an ECR ion source followed by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and Drift tube Linac (DTL). The low energy beam transport (LEBT) line is used to match the beam from the ion source to the RFQ with minimum beam loss and increase in emittance. The LEBT is also used to eliminate the unwanted ions like H2+ and H3+ from entering the RFQ. In addition, space charge compensation is required for transportation of such high beam currents. All this requires careful design and optimization. Detailed beam dynamics simulations have been done to optimize the design of the LEBT using the Particle-in-cell code TRACEWIN. We find that with careful optimization it is possible to transport a 30 mA CW proton beam through the LEBT with 100% transmission and minimal emittance blow up, while at the same time suppressing unwanted species H2+ and H3+ to less than 3.3% of the total beam current.

  14. Performance evaluation of nonlinear energy harvesting with magnetically coupled dual beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chunbo; Tang, Lihua; Qin, Weiyang

    2017-04-01

    To enhance the output power and broaden the operation bandwidth of vibration energy harvesters (VEH), nonlinear two degree-of-freedom (DOF) energy harvesters have attracted wide attention recently. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a nonlinear VEH with magnetically coupled dual beams and compare it with the typical Duffing-type VEH to find the advantages and drawbacks of this nonlinear 2-DOF VEH. First, based on the lumped parameter model, the characteristics of potential energy shapes and static equilibriums are analyzed. It is noted that the dual beam configuration is much easy to be transformed from a mono-stable state into a bi-stable state when the repulsive magnet force increases. Based on the equilibrium positions and different kinds of nonlinearities, four nonlinearity regimes are determined. Second, the performance of 1-DOF and 2-DOF configurations are compared respectively in these four nonlinearity regimes by simulating the forward sweep responses of these two nonlinear VEHs under different acceleration levels. Several meaningful conclusions are obtained. First, the main alternative to enlarge the operation bandwidth for dual-beam configuration is chaotic oscillation, in which two beams jump between two stable positions chaotically. However, the large-amplitude periodic oscillations, such as inter-well oscillation, cannot take place in both piezoelectric and parasitic beams at the same time. Generally speaking, both of the magnetically coupled dual-beam energy harvester and Duffingtype energy harvester, have their own advantages and disadvantages, while given a large enough base excitation, the maximum voltages of these two systems are almost the same in all these four regimes.

  15. Propulsion Physics Under the Changing Density Field Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    To grow as a space faring race, future spaceflight systems will requires new propulsion physics. Specifically a propulsion physics model that does not require mass ejection without limiting the high thrust necessary to accelerate within or beyond our solar system and return within a normal work period or lifetime. In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they called Chameleon Cosmology, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. This theory represents a scalar field within and about an object, even in the vacuum. Whereby, these scalar fields can be viewed as vacuum energy fields with definable densities that permeate all matter; having implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties; implying a new force mechanism for propulsion physics. Using Chameleon Cosmology, the author has developed a new propulsion physics model, called the Changing Density Field (CDF) Model. This model relates to density changes in these density fields, where the density field density changes are related to the acceleration of matter within an object. These density changes in turn change how an object couples to the surrounding density fields. Whereby, thrust is achieved by causing a differential in the coupling to these density fields about an object. Since the model indicates that the density of the density field in an object can be changed by internal mass acceleration, even without exhausting mass, the CDF model implies a new propellant-less propulsion physics model

  16. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Patrick B.; Schutte, Carol L.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    The Propulsion Materials Technology actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program by developing advanced materials that enable development of higher efficiency powertrains for ground transportation. Propulsion Materials works closely with the other disciplines within the VT Program to identify the materials properties essential for the development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light duty powertrains.

  17. A review of NASA's propulsion programs for aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. L.; Johnson, H. W.; Weber, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A review of five NASA engine-oriented propulsion programs of major importance to civil aviation are presented and discussed. Included are programs directed at exploring propulsion system concepts for (1) energy conservation subsonic aircraft (improved current turbofans, advanced turbofans, and advanced turboprops); (2) supersonic cruise aircraft (variable cycle engines); (3) general aviation aircraft (improved reciprocating engines and small gas turbines); (4) powered lift aircraft (advanced turbofans); and (5) advanced rotorcraft.

  18. NASA N3-X with Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felder, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation summarizing the phase I study of the NASA N3-X turboelectric distributed propulsion power aircraft to the IMechE Disruptive Green Propulsion Technologies conference in London, UK November 16th and 17th, 2014. This presentation contains the results of a NASA internal study funded by the NASA Fixed Wing program to look at the application of turboelectric distributed propulsion to a long-range 300 seat aircraft. The reference aircraft is the Boeing 777-200LR. The N3-X reduced energy consumption by 70 compared to the 777-200LR, LTO NOx by 85 compared to the CAEP 6 limits, and noise by 32-64 EPNdB depending on engine placement compared to the stage 4 noise standards. This exceeded the N+3 metrics of reducing energy by 60, LTO NOx by 80, and noise by 52 EPNdB. Cruise NOx was not estimated, but likely meet the 80 reduction goal as well.

  19. The need for expanded exploration of matter-antimatter annihilation for propulsion application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, P. F.

    1982-01-01

    The use of matter-antimatter annihilation as a propulsion application for interstellar travel is discussed. The physical basis for the superior energy release in such a system is summarized, and the problems associated with antimatter production, collection and storage are assessed. Advances in devising a workable propulsion system are reported, and the parameters of an antimatter propulsion system are described.

  20. Extended performance electric propulsion power processor design study. Volume 2: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biess, J. J.; Inouye, L. Y.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    Electric propulsion power processor technology has processed during the past decade to the point that it is considered ready for application. Several power processor design concepts were evaluated and compared. Emphasis was placed on a 30 cm ion thruster power processor with a beam power rating supply of 2.2KW to 10KW for the main propulsion power stage. Extension in power processor performance were defined and were designed in sufficient detail to determine efficiency, component weight, part count, reliability and thermal control. A detail design was performed on a microprocessor as the thyristor power processor controller. A reliability analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of the control electronics redesign. Preliminary electrical design, mechanical design and thermal analysis were performed on a 6KW power transformer for the beam supply. Bi-Mod mechanical, structural and thermal control configurations were evaluated for the power processor and preliminary estimates of mechanical weight were determined.

  1. Hyperenergetic manned aerospacecraft propelled by intense pulsed microwave power beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrabo, Leik N.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this research was to exploit wireless power transmission (microwave/millimeter)--to lower manned space transportation costs by two or three orders of magnitude. Concepts have been developed for lightweight, mass-producible, beam-propelled aerospacecraft called Lightcraft. The vehicles are designed for a 'mass-poor, energy-rich' (i.e. hyper-energentic flight infrastructure which utilizes remote microwave power stations to build an energy-beam highway to space. Although growth in laser power levels has lagged behind expectations, microwave and millimeter-wave source technology now exists for rapid scaling to the megawatt and gigawatt time-average power levels. The design exercise focused on the engine, structure, and receptive optics requirements for a 15 meter diameter, 5 person Earth- to-moon aerospacecraft. Key elements in the airbreathing accelerator propulsion system are: a) a 'flight-weight' 35GHz rectenna electric powerplant, b) microwave-induced 'Air Spike' and perimeter air-plasma generators, and c) MagnetoHydroDynamic-Fanjet engine with its superconducting magnets and external electrodes.

  2. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    Matter-antimatter annihilation releases more energy per unit mass than any other method of energy production, making it an attractive energy source for spacecraft propulsion. In the magnetically confined plasma engine, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas. The resulting charged annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. The calculated energy transfer efficiencies for a low number density (10(14)/cu cm) hydrogen propellant are insufficient to warrant operating the engine in this mode. Efficiencies are improved using moderate propellant number densities (10(16)/cu cm), but the energy transferred to the plasma in a realistic magnetic mirror system is generally limited to less than 2 percent of the initial proton-antiproton annihilation energy. The energy transfer efficiencies are highest for high number density (10(18)/cu cm) propellants, but plasma temperatures are reduced by excessive radiation losses. Low to moderate thrust over a wide range of specific impulse can be generated with moderate propellant number densities, while higher thrust but lower specific impulse may be generated using high propellant number densities. Significant mass will be required to shield the superconducting magnet coils from the high energy gamma radiation emitted by neutral pion decay. The mass of such a radiation shield may dominate the total engine mass, and could severely diminish the performance of antiproton powered engines which utilize magnetic confinement. The problem is compounded in the antiproton powered plasma engine, where lower energy plasma bremsstrahlung radiation may cause shield surface ablation and degradation.

  3. Use of off-axis injection as an alternative to geometrically merging beams in an energy-recovering linac

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R [York County, VA

    2012-01-10

    A method of using off-axis particle beam injection in energy-recovering linear accelerators that increases operational efficiency while eliminating the need to merge the high energy re-circulating beam with an injected low energy beam. In this arrangement, the high energy re-circulating beam and the low energy beam are manipulated such that they are within a predetermined distance from one another and then the two immerged beams are injected into the linac and propagated through the system. The configuration permits injection without geometric beam merging as well as decelerated beam extraction without the use of typical beamline elements.

  4. Advanced Energy Conversion Concept for Beamed-Energy Propulsion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-21

    pulsed simultaneously at 40 HL. the thruster will operate almost iMen&1 within the infra - sonIc regime. c) Asymmetric thrust considerations During low...LSD WAVES) - / TIME I-*- INFRA - SONIC I LEVITATIUN FREQUENCY Firm U-27 .?AmpUtude-laimpd macro-pulam .5 " I A. SIDE VIEW CUNICAL TIP ,?I , i...s equal local sta ic), and the sonic velocity. Since cool air can rush in only at the speed of sound, one would want to minimize the expanded plasma

  5. Electromagnetic propulsion test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    A test facility for the exploration of electromagnetic propulsion concept is described. The facility is designed to accommodate electromagnetic rail accelerators of various lengths (1 to 10 meters) and to provide accelerating energies of up to 240 kiloJoules. This accelerating energy is supplied as a current pulse of hundreds of kiloAmps lasting as long as 1 millisecond. The design, installation, and operating characteristics of the pulsed energy system are discussed. The test chamber and its operation at pressures down to 1300 Pascals (10 mm of mercury) are described. Some aspects of safety (interlocking, personnel protection, and operating procedures) are included.

  6. Advanced transportation system studies. Alternate propulsion subsystem concepts: Propulsion database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Transportation System Studies alternate propulsion subsystem concepts propulsion database interim report is presented. The objective of the database development task is to produce a propulsion database which is easy to use and modify while also being comprehensive in the level of detail available. The database is to be available on the Macintosh computer system. The task is to extend across all three years of the contract. Consequently, a significant fraction of the effort in this first year of the task was devoted to the development of the database structure to ensure a robust base for the following years' efforts. Nonetheless, significant point design propulsion system descriptions and parametric models were also produced. Each of the two propulsion databases, parametric propulsion database and propulsion system database, are described. The descriptions include a user's guide to each code, write-ups for models used, and sample output. The parametric database has models for LOX/H2 and LOX/RP liquid engines, solid rocket boosters using three different propellants, a hybrid rocket booster, and a NERVA derived nuclear thermal rocket engine.

  7. Z-Pinch fusion-based nuclear propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; Percy, T.

    2013-02-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human space flight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly [1]. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield [2]. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10-6 s). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) [3] propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle. The analysis of the Z-Pinch MIF propulsion system concludes that a 40-fold increase of Isp over chemical propulsion is predicted. An Isp of 19,436 s and thrust of 3812 N s/pulse, along with nearly doubling the predicted payload mass fraction, warrants further development of enabling technologies.

  8. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Brunetti, E.; Gil, D. Reboredo; Welsh, G. H.; Li, F. Y.; Cipiccia, S.; Ersfeld, B.; Grant, D. W.; Grant, P. A.; Islam, M. R.; Tooley, M. P.; Vieux, G.; Wiggins, S. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators. PMID:28281679

  9. High-flux source of low-energy neutral beams using reflection of ions from metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, John W.; Motley, Robert W.; Langer, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Reflection of low-energy ions from surfaces can be applied as a method of producing high-flux beams of low-energy neutral particles, and is an important effect in several areas of plasma technology, such as in the edge region of fusion devices. We have developed a beam source based on acceleration and reflection of ions from a magnetically confined coaxial RF plasma source. The beam provides a large enough flux to allow the energy distribution of the reflected neutrals to be measured despite the inefficiency of detection, by means of an electrostatic cylindrical mirror analyzer coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Energy distributions have been measured for oxygen, nitrogen, and inert gas ions incident with from 15 to 70 eV reflected from amorphous metal surfaces of several compositions. For ions of lighter atomic mass than the reflecting metal, reflected beams have peaked energy distributions; beams with the peak at 4-32 eV have been measured. The energy and mass dependences of the energy distributions as well as measurements of absolute flux, and angular distribution and divergence are reported. Applications of the neutral beams produced are described.

  10. Mission Steering Profiles of Outer Planetary Orbiters Using Radioisotope Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiehler, Douglas; Oleson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) has the potential to enable small spacecraft to orbit outer planetary targets with trip times comparable to flyby missions. The ability to transition from a flyby to an orbiter mission lies in the availability of continuous low power electric propulsion along the entire trajectory. The electric propulsion system s role is to add and remove energy from the spacecraft s trajectory to bring it in and out of a heliocentric hyperbolic escape trajectory for the outermost target bodies. Energy is added and the trajectory is reshaped to rendezvous with the closer-in target bodies. Sample REP trajectories will be presented for missions ranging for distances from Jupiter orbit to the Pluto-Kuiper Belt.

  11. Electron Beam-Cure Polymer Matrix Composites: Processing and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, G.; Frame, B.; Jensen, B.; Nettles, A.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers from NASA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are evaluating a series of electron beam curable composites for application in reusable launch vehicle airframe and propulsion systems. Objectives are to develop electron beam curable composites that are useful at cryogenic to elevated temperatures (-217 C to 200 C), validate key mechanical properties of these composites, and demonstrate cost-saving fabrication methods at the subcomponent level. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites is an enabling capability for production of aerospace structures in a non-autoclave process. Payoffs of this technology will be fabrication of composite structures at room temperature, reduced tooling cost and cure time, and improvements in component durability. This presentation covers the results of material property evaluations for electron beam-cured composites made with either unidirectional tape or woven fabric architectures. Resin systems have been evaluated for performance in ambient, cryogenic, and elevated temperature conditions. Results for electron beam composites and similar composites cured in conventional processes are reviewed for comparison. Fabrication demonstrations were also performed for electron beam-cured composite airframe and propulsion piping subcomponents. These parts have been built to validate manufacturing methods with electron beam composite materials, to evaluate electron beam curing processing parameters, and to demonstrate lightweight, low-cost tooling options.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment: I. Performance Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Cole, J. W.; Lineberry, J. T.; Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Lineberry, C. W.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of conventional thermal propulsion systems is fundamentally constrained by the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels and the thermal limits of available materials. Electromagnetic thrust augmentation represents one intriguing possibility for improving the fuel composition of thermal propulsion systems, thereby increasing overall specific energy characteristics; however, realization of such a system requires an extremely high-energy-density electrical power source as well as an efficient plasma acceleration device. This Technical Publication describes the development of an experimental research facility for investigating the use of cross-field magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerators as a possible thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. In this experiment,a 1.5-MW(sub e) Aerotherm arc heater is used to drive a 2-MW(sub e) MHD accelerator. The heatsink MHD accelerator is configured as an externally diagonalized, segmented channel, which is inserted into a large-bore, 2-T electromagnet. The performance analysis and engineering design of the flow path are described as well as the parameter measurements and flow diagnostics planned for the initial series of test runs.

  13. Existing machine propulsion is transformed by state-of-the-art gearbox apparatus saves at least 50% energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V.

    2013-12-01

    This innovation on www.repowermachine.com is finalist at Clean-tech and Energy of 2012 Minnesota's TEKNE AWARDS. Vehicles are pushed by force of friction between their wheels and land, propellers and water or air according to Third Newton's law of physics of moving. Force of friction is dependent to vehicle weight as highest torque of wheel or propeller for vehicle moving from stop. Friction force DOES NOT dependent to motor power. Why existing SUV of 2,000 lb uses 550 hp motor when first vehicle has 0.75 hp motor (Carl Benz';s patent #37435, January 29, 1886 in Germany)? Gas or magnet field reaches needed torque of wheels too slowly because requires huge motor power for acceleration SUV from 0 to 100 mph for 5 second. The acceleration system by gas or magnet field uses additional energy for increasing motor shaft idle speed and reduces its highest torque of physical volume because necessary to increase motor power that equal/exceed motor power according to vehicle weight. Therefore, any transmission torque DOES NOT NEED and it is use as second brake. Ship, locomotives, helicopters, CNC machine tools, etc motor(s) directly turn wheels, propellers, spindles or ignore to use gear -transmission designs. How do you follow to Creator's physics law of LEVER for saving energy? Existing machine propulsion is transformed by one comprising least numbers of gears and maybe shafts from above state-of-the-art 1,000 gearbox apparatus designs. It is installed or replaced transmission in existing propulsion that is transformed to non-accelerated propulsion. It cuts about 80% mechanical energy that acceleration system wastes in motor heat form, cuts time of movement by reaching each speed for 1-2 seconds. It produces all needed speeds and uses only idle speed of cheapest motor with reduced power and cost that have replaced existing motor too. There is opportunity to eliminate vehicle/machine roads traffics in cities that creates additional unknown GHG emissions Revolutionary

  14. Magnetic Nozzle Simulation Studies for Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, Alfonso

    2010-11-01

    Electric Propulsion has recently re-gained interest as one of the key technologies to enable NASA's long-range space missions. Options are being considered also in the field of aneutronic fusion propulsion for high-power electric thrusters. To support these goals the study of the exhaust jet in a plasma thruster acquires a critical importance because the need of high-efficiency generation of thrust. A model of the plasma exhaust has been developed with the 3D magneto-fluid NIMROD code [1] to study the physics of the plasma detachment in correlation with experimentally relevant configurations. The simulations show the role of the plasma diamagnetism and of the magnetic reconnection process in the formation of a detached plasma. Furthermore, in direct fusion-propulsion concepts high-energy (MeV range) fusion products have to be efficiently converted into a slower and denser plasma jet (with specific impulse down to few 1000's seconds, for realistic missions in the Solar System). For this purpose, a two-stage conversion process is being modeled where high-energy ions are non-adiabatically injected and confined into a magnetic duct leading to the magnetic nozzle, transferring most of their energy into their gyro-motion and drifting at slower speed along with the plasma propellant. The propellant acquires then thermal energy that gets converted into the direction of thrust by the magnetic nozzle. [1] C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004).

  15. An electron cyclotron resonance ion source based low energy ion beam platform.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Shang, Y; Ma, B H; Zhang, X Z; Feng, Y C; Li, X X; Wang, H; Guo, X H; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Zhang, Z M; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    To satisfy the requirements of surface and atomic physics study in the field of low energy multiple charge state ion incident experiments, a low energy (10 eV/q-20 keV/q) ion beam platform is under design at IMP. A simple test bench has been set up to test the ion beam deceleration systems. Considering virtues such as structure simplicity, easy handling, compactness, cost saving, etc., an all-permanent magnet ECRIS LAPECR1 [Lanzhou all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source No. 1] working at 14.5 GHz has been adopted to produce intense medium and low charge state ion beams. LAPECR1 source has already been ignited. Some intense low charge state ion beams have been produced on it, but the first test also reveals that many problems are existing on the ion beam transmission line. The ion beam transmission mismatches result in the depressed performance of LAPECR1, which will be discussed in this paper. To obtain ultralow energy ion beam, after being analyzed by a double-focusing analyzer magnet, the selected ion beam will be further decelerated by two afocal deceleration lens systems, which is still under design. This design has taken into consideration both ions slowing down and also ion beam focusing. In this paper, the conceptual design of deceleration system will be discussed.

  16. Artist's concept of Antimatter propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is an artist's rendition of an antimatter propulsion system. Matter - antimatter arnihilation offers the highest possible physical energy density of any known reaction substance. It is about 10 billion times more powerful than that of chemical engergy such as hydrogen and oxygen combustion. Antimatter would be the perfect rocket fuel, but the problem is that the basic component of antimatter, antiprotons, doesn't exist in nature and has to manufactured. The process of antimatter development is on-going and making some strides, but production of this as a propulsion system is far into the future.

  17. A Monochromatic, Aberration-Corrected, Dual-Beam Low Energy Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-01-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. PMID:23582636

  18. A monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-07-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurements of the energy distribution of a high brightness rubidium ion beam.

    PubMed

    Ten Haaf, G; Wouters, S H W; Nijhof, D F J; Mutsaers, P H A; Vredenbregt, E J D

    2018-07-01

    The energy distribution of a high brightness rubidium ion beam, which is intended to be used as the source for a focused ion beam instrument, is measured with a retarding field analyzer. The ions are created from a laser-cooled and compressed atomic beam by two-step photoionization in which the ionization laser power is enhanced in a build-up cavity. Particle tracing simulations are performed to ensure the analyzer is able to resolve the distribution. The lowest achieved full width 50% energy spread is (0.205 ± 0.006) eV, which is measured at a beam current of 9 pA. The energy spread originates from the variation in the ionization position of the ions which are created inside an extraction electric field. This extraction field is essential to limit disorder-induced heating which can decrease the ion beam brightness. The ionization position distribution is limited by a tightly focused excitation laser beam. Energy distributions are measured for various ionization and excitation laser intensities and compared with calculations based on numerical solutions of the optical Bloch equations including ionization. A good agreement is found between measurements and calculations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Full-wave and ray-based modeling of cross-beam energy transfer between laser beams with distributed phase plates and polarization smoothing

    DOE PAGES

    Follett, R. K.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; ...

    2017-10-20

    Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments rely on ray-based cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) models to calculate laser energy deposition. The ray-based models assume locally plane-wave laser beams and polarization averaged incoherence between laser speckles for beams with polarization smoothing. The impact of beam speckle and polarization smoothing on crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) are studied using the 3-D wave-based laser-plasma-interaction code LPSE. The results indicate that ray-based models under predict CBET when the assumption of spatially averaged longitudinal incoherence across the CBET interaction region is violated. A model for CBET between linearly-polarized speckled beams is presented that uses raymore » tracing to solve for the real speckle pattern of the unperturbed laser beams within the eikonal approximation and gives excellent agreement with the wavebased calculations. Lastly, OMEGA-scale 2-D LPSE calculations using ICF relevant plasma conditions suggest that the impact of beam speckle on laser absorption calculations in ICF implosions is small (< 1%).« less

  1. Full-wave and ray-based modeling of cross-beam energy transfer between laser beams with distributed phase plates and polarization smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, R. K.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.

    Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments rely on ray-based cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) models to calculate laser energy deposition. The ray-based models assume locally plane-wave laser beams and polarization averaged incoherence between laser speckles for beams with polarization smoothing. The impact of beam speckle and polarization smoothing on crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) are studied using the 3-D wave-based laser-plasma-interaction code LPSE. The results indicate that ray-based models under predict CBET when the assumption of spatially averaged longitudinal incoherence across the CBET interaction region is violated. A model for CBET between linearly-polarized speckled beams is presented that uses raymore » tracing to solve for the real speckle pattern of the unperturbed laser beams within the eikonal approximation and gives excellent agreement with the wavebased calculations. Lastly, OMEGA-scale 2-D LPSE calculations using ICF relevant plasma conditions suggest that the impact of beam speckle on laser absorption calculations in ICF implosions is small (< 1%).« less

  2. Measurement Issues In Pulsed Laser Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert

    Various measurement techniques have been used throughout the over 40-year history of laser propulsion. Often, these approaches suffered from inconsistencies in definitions of the key parameters that define the physics of laser ablation impulse generation. Such parameters include, but are not limited to the pulse energy, spot area, imparted impulse, and ablated mass. The limits and characteristics of common measurement techniques in each of these areas will be explored as they relate to laser propulsion. The idea of establishing some standardization system for laser propulsion data is introduced in this paper, so that reported results may be considered and studiedmore » by the general community with more certain understanding of particular merits and limitations. In particular, it is the intention to propose a minimum set of requirements a literature study should meet. Some international standards for measurements are already published, but modifications or revisions of such standards may be necessary for application to laser ablation propulsion. Issues relating to development of standards will be discussed, as well as some examples of specific experimental circumstances in which standardization would have prevented misinterpretation or misuse of past data.« less

  3. FY2015 Propulsion Materials Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    The Propulsion Materials Program actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of VTO by investigating and identifying the materials properties that are most essential for continued development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light-duty powertrains. The technical approaches available to enhance propulsion systems focus on improvements in both vehicle efficiency and fuel substitution, both of which must overcome the performance limitations of the materials currently in use. Propulsion Materials Program activities work with national laboratories, industry experts, and VTO powertrain systems (e.g., Advanced Combustion Engines [ACE], Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machinesmore » [APEEM], and fuels) teams to develop strategies that overcome materials limitations in future powertrain performance. The technical maturity of the portfolio of funded projects ranges from basic science to subsystem prototype validation. Projects within a Propulsion Materials Program activity address materials concerns that directly impact critical technology barriers within each of the above programs, including barriers that impact fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, improved reliability, and reduced manufacturing costs. The program engages only the barriers that result from material property limitations and represent fundamental, high-risk materials issues.« less

  4. Advanced propulsion system for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norrup, L. V.; Lintz, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    A number of hybrid propulsion systems were evaluated for application in several different vehicle sizes. A conceptual design was prepared for the most promising configuration. Various system configurations were parametrically evaluated and compared, design tradeoffs performed, and a conceptual design produced. Fifteen vehicle/propulsion systems concepts were parametrically evaluated to select two systems and one vehicle for detailed design tradeoff studies. A single hybrid propulsion system concept and vehicle (five passenger family sedan)were selected for optimization based on the results of the tradeoff studies. The final propulsion system consists of a 65 kW spark-ignition heat engine, a mechanical continuously variable traction transmission, a 20 kW permanent magnet axial-gap traction motor, a variable frequency inverter, a 386 kg lead-acid improved state-of-the-art battery, and a transaxle. The system was configured with a parallel power path between the heat engine and battery. It has two automatic operational modes: electric mode and heat engine mode. Power is always shared between the heat engine and battery during acceleration periods. In both modes, regenerative braking energy is absorbed by the battery.

  5. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from an L-shaped beam-mass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erturk, Alper; Renno, Jamil M.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2008-03-01

    Cantilevered piezoelectric harvesters have been extensively considered in the energy harvesting literature. Mostly, a traditional cantilevered beam with one or more piezoceramic layers is located on a vibrating host structure. Motion of the host structure results in vibrations of the harvester beam and that yields an alternating voltage output. As an alternative to classical cantilevered beams, this paper presents a novel harvesting device; a flexible L-shaped beam-mass structure that can be tuned to have a two-to-one internal resonance to a primary resonance ω II ≅ 2ω I which is not possible for classical cantilevers). The L-shaped structure has been well investigated in the literature of nonlinear dynamics since the two-to-one internal resonance, along with the consideration of quadratic nonlinearities, may yield modal energy exchange (for excitation frequency ω≅ ω Ior the so-called saturation phenomenon (for ω≅ω II). As a part of our ongoing research on piezoelectric energy harvesting, we are investigating the possibility of improving the electrical outputs in energy harvesting by employing these features of the L-shaped structure. This paper aims to introduce the idea, describes the important features of the L-shaped harvester configuration and develops a linear distributed parameter model for predicting the electromechanically coupled response. In addition, this work proposes a direct application of the L-shaped piezoelectric energy harvester configuration for use as landing gears in unmanned air vehicle applications.

  6. The Chameleon Solid Rocket Propulsion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Glen A.

    The Khoury and Weltman (2004a and 2004b) Chameleon Model presents an addition to the gravitation force and was shown by the author (Robertson, 2009a and 2009b) to present a new means by which one can view other forces in the Universe. The Chameleon Model is basically a density-dependent model and while the idea is not new, this model is novel in that densities in the Universe to include the vacuum of space are viewed as scalar fields. Such an analogy gives the Chameleon scalar field, dark energy/dark matter like characteristics; fitting well within cosmological expansion theories. In respect to thismore » forum, in this paper, it is shown how the Chameleon Model can be used to derive the thrust of a solid rocket motor. This presents a first step toward the development of new propulsion models using density variations verse mass ejection as the mechanism for thrust. Further, through the Chameleon Model connection, these new propulsion models can be tied to dark energy/dark matter toward new space propulsion systems utilizing the vacuum scalar field in a way understandable by engineers, the key toward the development of such systems. This paper provides corrections to the Chameleon rocket model in Robertson (2009b).« less

  7. SciTech Connect

    Froning, H. David Jr

    Although Australia has no Beamed Energy Propulsion programs at the present time, it is accomplishing significant scientific and technological activity that is of potential relevance to Beamed Energy Propulsion (BEP). These activities include: continual upgrading and enhancement of the Woomera Test Facility, Which is ideal for development and test of high power laser or microwave systems and the flight vehicles they would propel; collaborative development and test, with the US and UK of hypersonic missiles that embody many features needed by beam-propelled flight vehicles; hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems that embody inlet-engine-nozzle features needed for beam-riding agility by air breathingmore » craft; and research on specially conditioned EM fields that could reduce beamed energy lost during atmospheric propagation.« less

  8. Feasibility of a 90° electric sector energy analyzer for low energy ion beam characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mahinay, C. L. S., E-mail: cmahinay@nip.upd.edu.ph; Ramos, H. J.; Wada, M.

    2015-02-15

    A simple formula to calculate refocusing by locating the output slit at a specific distance away from the exit of 90° ion deflecting electric sector is given. Numerical analysis is also performed to calculate the ion beam trajectories for different values of the initial angular deviation of the beam. To validate the theory, a compact (90 mm × 5.5 mm × 32 mm) 90° sector ESA is fabricated which can fit through the inner diameter of a conflat 70 vacuum flange. Experimental results show that the dependence of resolution upon the distance between the sector exit and the Faraday cupmore » agrees with the theory. The fabricated 90° sector electrostatic energy analyzer was then used to measure the space resolved ion energy distribution functions of an ion beam with the energy as low as 600 eV.« less

  9. Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis at Low Beam Energy: Almost Always an Adventure!

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of various materials at low-incident beam energies, E 0≤5 keV, using peak fitting and following the measured standards/matrix corrections protocol embedded in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Desktop Spectrum Analyzer-II analytical software engine. Low beam energy analysis provides improved spatial resolution laterally and in-depth. The lower beam energy restricts the atomic shells that can be ionized, reducing the number of X-ray peak families available to the analyst. At E 0=5 keV, all elements of the periodic table except H and He can be measured. As the beam energy is reduced below 5 keV, elements become inaccessible due to lack of excitation of useful characteristic X-ray peaks. The shallow sampling depth of low beam energy microanalysis makes the technique more sensitive to surface compositional modification due to formation of oxides and other reaction layers. Accurate and precise analysis is possible with the use of appropriate standards and by accumulating high count spectra of unknowns and standards (>1 million counts integrated from 0.1 keV to E 0).

  10. Propulsion Systems Panel deliberations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianca, Carmelo J.; Miner, Robert; Johnston, Lawrence M.; Bruce, R.; Dennies, Daniel P.; Dickenson, W.; Dreshfield, Robert; Karakulko, Walt; Mcgaw, Mike; Munafo, Paul M.

    1993-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Panel was established because of the specialized nature of many of the materials and structures technology issues related to propulsion systems. This panel was co-chaired by Carmelo Bianca, MSFC, and Bob Miner, LeRC. Because of the diverse range of missions anticipated for the Space Transportation program, three distinct propulsion system types were identified in the workshop planning process: liquid propulsion systems, solid propulsion systems and nuclear electric/nuclear thermal propulsion systems.

  11. Propulsion Systems Panel deliberations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianca, Carmelo J.; Miner, Robert; Johnston, Lawrence M.; Bruce, R.; Dennies, Daniel P.; Dickenson, W.; Dreshfield, Robert; Karakulko, Walt; McGaw, Mike; Munafo, Paul M.

    1993-02-01

    The Propulsion Systems Panel was established because of the specialized nature of many of the materials and structures technology issues related to propulsion systems. This panel was co-chaired by Carmelo Bianca, MSFC, and Bob Miner, LeRC. Because of the diverse range of missions anticipated for the Space Transportation program, three distinct propulsion system types were identified in the workshop planning process: liquid propulsion systems, solid propulsion systems and nuclear electric/nuclear thermal propulsion systems.

  12. Present and future experiments using bright low-energy positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Bright slow positron beams enable not only experiments with drastically reduced measurement time and improved signal-to-noise ratio but also the realization of novel experimental techniques. In solid state physics and materials science positron beams are usually applied for the depth dependent analysis of vacancy-like defects and their chemical surrounding using positron lifetime and (coincident) Doppler broadening spectroscopy. For surface studies, annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy allows the analysis of the elemental composition in the topmost atomic layer, and the atomic positions at the surface can be determined by positron diffraction with outstanding accuracy. In fundamental research low-energy positron beams are used for the production of e.g. cold positronium or positronium negative ions. All the aforementioned experiments benefit from the high intensity of present positron beam facilities. In this paper, we scrutinize the technical constraints limiting the achievable positron intensity and the available kinetic energy at the sample position. Current efforts and future developments towards the generation of high intensity spin-polarized slow positron beams paving the way for new positron experiments are discussed.

  13. Determination of electron energy, spectral width, and beam divergence at the exit window for clinical megavoltage x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Sawkey, D L; Faddegon, B A

    2009-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of x-ray beams typically take parameters of the electron beam in the accelerating waveguide to be free parameters. In this paper, a methodology is proposed and implemented to determine the energy, spectral width, and beam divergence of the electron source. All treatment head components were removed from the beam path, leaving only the exit window. With the x-ray target and flattener out of the beam, uncertainties in physical characteristics and relative position of the target and flattening filter, and in spot size, did not contribute to uncertainty in the energy. Beam current was lowered to reduce recombination effects. The measured dose distributions were compared with Monte Carlo simulation of the electron beam through the treatment head to extract the electron source characteristics. For the nominal 6 and 18 MV x-ray beams, the energies were 6.51 +/- 0.15 and 13.9 +/- 0.2 MeV, respectively, with the uncertainties resulting from uncertainties in the detector position in the measurement and in the stopping power in the simulations. Gaussian spectral distributions were used, with full widths at half maximum ranging from 20 +/- 4% at 6 MV to 13 +/- 4% at 18 MV required to match the fall-off portion of the percent-depth ionization curve. Profiles at the depth of maximum dose from simulations that used the manufacturer-specified exit window geometry and no beam divergence were 2-3 cm narrower than measured profiles. Two simulation configurations yielding the measured profile width were the manufacturer-specified exit window thickness with electron source divergences of 3.3 degrees at 6 MV and 1.8 degrees at 18 MV and an exit window 40% thicker than the manufacturer's specification with no beam divergence. With the x-ray target in place (and no flattener), comparison of measured to simulated profiles sets upper limits on the electron source divergences of 0.2 degrees at 6 MV and 0.1 degrees at 18 MV. A method of determining source

  14. One dimensional heavy ion beam transport: Energy independent model. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Hamidullah

    1990-01-01

    Attempts are made to model the transport problem for heavy ion beams in various targets, employing the current level of understanding of the physics of high-charge and energy (HZE) particle interaction with matter are made. An energy independent transport model, with the most simplified assumptions and proper parameters is presented. The first and essential assumption in this case (energy independent transport) is the high energy characterization of the incident beam. The energy independent equation is solved and application is made to high energy neon (NE-20) and iron (FE-56) beams in water. The numerical solutions is given and compared to a numerical solution to determine the accuracy of the model. The lower limit energy for neon and iron to be high energy beams is calculated due to Barkas and Burger theory by LBLFRG computer program. The calculated values in the density range of interest (50 g/sq cm) of water are: 833.43 MeV/nuc for neon and 1597.68 MeV/nuc for iron. The analytical solutions of the energy independent transport equation gives the flux of different collision terms. The fluxes of individual collision terms are given and the total fluxes are shown in graphs relative to different thicknesses of water. The values for fluxes are calculated by the ANASTP computer code.

  15. Energy response of glass bead TLDs irradiated with radiation therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, S. M.; Jordan, T. J.; Hussein, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Clark, C. H.; Nisbet, A.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2014-11-01

    Glass beads are a novel TL dosimeter in radiotherapy. An important characteristic of TL dosimeters is their energy response, especially when intended for use in radiotherapy applications over a wide range of energies (typically from X-rays generated at 80 kVp up to 25 MV photon and MeV electron beams). In this paper, the energy response of glass beads (Mill Hill, Japan) is investigated for their TL response to kV X-rays from an orthovoltage radiotherapy unit and also for MV photon and MeV electron beams from a medical linear accelerator. The experimental findings show that for photon and electron beams, the TL response of this particular glass bead, normalised to unity for 6 MV X-rays (TPR20/10=0.670), decreases to 0.96±0.02 for 15 MV X-rays (TPR20/10=0.761) and to 0.95±0.01 for 20 MeV electron beams (R50,D=8.35 cm). This compares favourably with other TLD materials such as LiF and also alanine dosimeters that are readout with an EPR system. For kV X-rays, the response increases to 4.52±0.05 for 80 kV X-rays (HVL=2.4 mm Al) which approaches 3 times that of LiF TLDs and 5 times that of alanine. In conclusion, the particular glass beads, when used as a dosimeter material, show a relatively small energy dependence over the megavoltage range of clinically relevant radiation qualities, being clearly advantageous for accurate dosimetry. Conversely, the energy response is significant for photon beam energies covering the kV range. In both circumstances, in dosimetric evaluations the energy response needs to be taken into account.

  16. The NASA-JPL advanced propulsion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    Institute (engine testing), Thermacore (electrode development), as well as at MIT (plume modeling), and USC (diagnostics). Also, the mission performance of a nuclear-electric propulsion (NEP) Li-LFA Mars cargo vehicle is being modeled by JPL (mission analysis; thruster and power processor modeling) and the Rocketdyne Energy Technology and Engineering Center (ETEC) (power system modeling). Finally, the fusion propulsion research activities that JPL is supporting at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and at Lawrenceville Plasma Physics (LPP) are aimed at far-term fast (less than 100 day round trip) piloted Mars missions and, in the very far term, interstellar missions.

  17. Energetic Combustion Devices for Aerospace Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical reactions have long been the mainstay thermal energy source for aerospace propulsion and power. Although it is widely recognized that the intrinsic energy density limitations of chemical bonds place severe constraints on maximum realizable performance, it will likely be several years before systems based on high energy density nuclear fuels can be placed into routine service. In the mean time, efforts to develop high energy density chemicals and advanced combustion devices which can utilize such energetic fuels may yield worthwhile returns in overall system performance and cost. Current efforts in this vein are being carried out at NASA MSFC under the direction of the author in the areas of pulse detonation engine technology development and light metals combustion devices. Pulse detonation engines are touted as a low cost alternative to gas turbine engines and to conventional rocket engines, but actual performance and cost benefits have yet to be convincingly demonstrated. Light metal fueled engines also offer potential benefits in certain niche applications such as aluminum/CO2 fueled engines for endo-atmospheric Martian propulsion. Light metal fueled MHD generators also present promising opportunities with respect to electric power generation for electromagnetic launch assist. This presentation will discuss the applications potential of these concepts with respect to aero ace propulsion and power and will review the current status of the development efforts.

  18. Beam energy spread in FERMI@elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A; Zholents, Alexander A; Zolotorev, Max S.

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) of electrons in the pre-cathode area in the electron guns know in the literature as Boersh effect is responsible for a growth of the electron beam energy spread there. Albeit most visible within the electron gun where the electron beam density is large and the energy spread is small, the IBS acts all along the entire electron beam pass through the Linac. In this report we calculate the energy spread induced by IBS in the FERMI@elettra electron gun.

  19. Generation of Low-Energy High-Current Electron Beams in Plasma-Anode Electron Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozur, G. E.; Proskurovsky, D. I.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a review of studies on the generation of low-energy high-current electron beams in electron guns with a plasma anode and an explosive-emission cathode. The problems related to the initiation of explosive electron emission under plasma and the formation and transport of high-current electron beams in plasma-filled systems are discussed consecutively. Considerable attention is given to the nonstationary effects that occur in the space charge layers of plasma. Emphasis is also placed on the problem of providing a uniform energy density distribution over the beam cross section, which is of critical importance in using electron beams of this type for surface treatment of materials. Examples of facilities based on low-energy high-current electron beam sources are presented and their applications in materials science and practice are discussed.

  20. Curing Composite Materials Using Lower-Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Catherine A.; Bykanov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In an improved method of fabricating composite-material structures by laying up prepreg tapes (tapes of fiber reinforcement impregnated by uncured matrix materials) and then curing them, one cures the layups by use of beams of electrons having kinetic energies in the range of 200 to 300 keV. In contrast, in a prior method, one used electron beams characterized by kinetic energies up to 20 MeV. The improved method was first suggested by an Italian group in 1993, but had not been demonstrated until recently. With respect to both the prior method and the present improved method, the impetus for the use of electron- beam curing is a desire to avoid the high costs of autoclaves large enough to effect thermal curing of large composite-material structures. Unfortunately, in the prior method, the advantages of electron-beam curing are offset by the need for special walls and ceilings on curing chambers to shield personnel from x rays generated by impacts of energetic electrons. These shields must be thick [typically 2 to 3 ft (about 0.6 to 0.9 m) if made of concrete] and are therefore expensive. They also make it difficult to bring large structures into and out of the curing chambers. Currently, all major companies that fabricate composite-material spacecraft and aircraft structures form their layups by use of automated tape placement (ATP) machines. In the present improved method, an electron-beam gun is attached to an ATP head and used to irradiate the tape as it is pressed onto the workpiece. The electron kinetic energy between 200 and 300 keV is sufficient for penetration of the ply being laid plus one or two of the plies underneath it. Provided that the electron-beam gun is properly positioned, it is possible to administer the required electron dose and, at the same time, to protect personnel with less shielding than is needed in the prior method. Adequate shielding can be provided by concrete walls 6 ft (approximately equal to 1.8 m) high and 16 in. (approximately

  1. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: A Step Toward Interstellar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; James, Bonnie; Baggett, Randy; Montgomery, Sandy

    2005-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space. The maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. By developing the capability to support mid-term robotic mission needs, the program is laying the technological foundation for travel to nearby interstellar space. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program s technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next-generation ion propulsion systems operating in the 5-10 kW range, to solar sail propulsion, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called "propellantless" because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations, such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of those propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies that will most significantly advance our exploration of deep space.

  2. Neutrons in proton pencil beam scanning: parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger A.; Baiocco, Giorgio; Lomax, Tony

    2016-08-01

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons produced during proton therapy in inducing cancer is unknown, but potentially large. In particular, since neutron biological effectiveness is energy dependent, it is necessary to estimate, besides the dose, also the energy spectra, in order to obtain quantities which could be a measure of the biological effectiveness and test current models and new approaches against epidemiological studies on cancer induction after proton therapy. For patients treated with proton pencil beam scanning, this work aims to predict the spatially localized neutron energies, the effective quality factor, the weighting factor according to ICRP, and two RBE values, the first obtained from the saturation corrected dose mean lineal energy and the second from DSB cluster induction. A proton pencil beam was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron spectra for three different proton beam energies a parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE was calculated. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed parameterizations in order to calculate the spatially localized neutron energy, quality factors and RBE for each treated patient. The parameterization represents the simple quantification of neutron energy in two energy bins and the quality factors and RBE with a satisfying precision up to 85 cm away from the proton pencil beam when compared to the results based on 3D Monte Carlo simulations. The root mean square error of the energy estimate between Monte Carlo simulation based results and the parameterization is 3.9%. For the quality factors and RBE estimates it is smaller than 0.9%. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. It was found that the parameterizations for neutron energy, quality factors and RBE were independent of proton energy in the investigated energy range of interest for proton therapy. The pencil beam algorithm has

  3. Neutrons in proton pencil beam scanning: parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger A; Baiocco, Giorgio; Lomax, Tony

    2016-08-21

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons produced during proton therapy in inducing cancer is unknown, but potentially large. In particular, since neutron biological effectiveness is energy dependent, it is necessary to estimate, besides the dose, also the energy spectra, in order to obtain quantities which could be a measure of the biological effectiveness and test current models and new approaches against epidemiological studies on cancer induction after proton therapy. For patients treated with proton pencil beam scanning, this work aims to predict the spatially localized neutron energies, the effective quality factor, the weighting factor according to ICRP, and two RBE values, the first obtained from the saturation corrected dose mean lineal energy and the second from DSB cluster induction. A proton pencil beam was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron spectra for three different proton beam energies a parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE was calculated. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed parameterizations in order to calculate the spatially localized neutron energy, quality factors and RBE for each treated patient. The parameterization represents the simple quantification of neutron energy in two energy bins and the quality factors and RBE with a satisfying precision up to 85 cm away from the proton pencil beam when compared to the results based on 3D Monte Carlo simulations. The root mean square error of the energy estimate between Monte Carlo simulation based results and the parameterization is 3.9%. For the quality factors and RBE estimates it is smaller than 0.9%. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. It was found that the parameterizations for neutron energy, quality factors and RBE were independent of proton energy in the investigated energy range of interest for proton therapy. The pencil beam algorithm has

  4. Free-electron laser power beaming to satellites at China Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.; Rather, John D.; Montgomery, Edward E.

    1994-05-01

    Laser power beaming of energy through the atmosphere to a satellite can extend its lifetime by maintaining the satellite batteries in operating condition. An alternate propulsion system utilizing power beaming will also significantly reduce the initial insertion cost of these satellites, which now are as high as $DLR72,000/lb for geosynchronous orbit. Elements of the power beaming system are a high-power laser, a large diameter telescope to reduce diffractive losses, an adaptive optic beam conditioning system and possibly a balloon or aerostat carrying a large mirror to redirect the laser beam to low earth orbit satellites after it has traversed most of the earth's atmosphere vertically. China Lake, California has excellent seeing, averages 260 cloud-free days/year, has the second largest geothermal plant in the United States nearby for power, groundwater from the lake for cooling water, and is at the center of one of the largest restricted airspaces in the United States. It is an ideal site for such a laser power beaming system. Technological challenges in building such a system and installing it at China Lake will be discussed.

  5. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Subpanel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, George C.; Warren, John W.; Martinell, John; Clark, John S.; Perkins, David

    1993-01-01

    On 20 Jul. 1989, in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, President George Bush proclaimed his vision for manned space exploration. He stated, 'First for the coming decade, for the 1990's, Space Station Freedom, the next critical step in our space endeavors. And next, for the new century, back to the Moon. Back to the future. And this time, back to stay. And then, a journey into tomorrow, a journey to another planet, a manned mission to Mars.' On 2 Nov. 1989, the President approved a national space policy reaffirming the long range goal of the civil space program: to 'expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system.' And on 11 May 1990, he specified the goal of landing Astronauts on Mars by 2019, the 50th anniversary of man's first steps on the Moon. To safely and ever permanently venture beyond near Earth environment as charged by the President, mankind must bring to bear extensive new technologies. These include heavy lift launch capability from Earth to low-Earth orbit, automated space rendezvous and docking of large masses, zero gravity countermeasures, and closed loop life support systems. One technology enhancing, and perhaps enabling, the piloted Mars missions is nuclear propulsion, with great benefits over chemical propulsion. Asserting the potential benefits of nuclear propulsion, NASA has sponsored workshops in Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and has initiated a tri-agency planning process to ensure that appropriate resources are engaged to meet this exciting technical challenge. At the core of this planning process, NASA, DOE, and DOD established six Nuclear Propulsion Technical Panels in 1991 to provide groundwork for a possible tri-agency Nuclear Propulsion Program and to address the President's vision by advocating an aggressive program in nuclear propulsion. To this end the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Technology Panel has focused it energies; this final report

  6. Enabling Electric Propulsion for Flight - Hybrid Electric Aircraft Research at AFRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Sean; Lin, Yohan; Kloesel, Kurt; Ginn, Starr

    2014-01-01

    Advances in electric machine efficiency and energy storage capability are enabling a new alternative to traditional propulsion systems for aircraft. This has already begun with several small concept and demonstration vehicles, and NASA projects this technology will be essential to meet energy and emissions goals for commercial aviation in the next 30 years. In order to raise the Technology Readiness Level of electric propulsion systems, practical integration and performance challenges will need to be identified and studied in the near-term so that larger, more advanced electric propulsion system testbeds can be designed and built. Researchers at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center are building up a suite of test articles for the development, integration, and validation of these systems in a real world environment.

  7. Range and Energy Straggling in Ion Beam Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tai, Hsiang

    2000-01-01

    A first-order approximation to the range and energy straggling of ion beams is given as a normal distribution for which the standard deviation is estimated from the fluctuations in energy loss events. The standard deviation is calculated by assuming scattering from free electrons with a long range cutoff parameter that depends on the mean excitation energy of the medium. The present formalism is derived by extrapolating Payne's formalism to low energy by systematic energy scaling and to greater depths of penetration by a second-order perturbation. Limited comparisons are made with experimental data.

  8. Flowing DPF Design for Propulsion Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    plasma acceleration but not a pinch i.e., added fusion energy , as envisioned in a DPF. The outer electrode at the UI DPF is constructed of 24 rods which...many respects to a coaxial plasma accelerator or a magnetic plasmoid accelerator, the added fusion energy supplied by the pinch step greatly enhances...modified DPF in space propulsion. Using a scaled-up model. From this model, the contribution of fusion energy to thrust and specific impulse is estimated

  9. Propellantless Propulsion Technologies for In-Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In order to implement the ambitious science and exploration missions planned over the next several decades, improvements in in-space transportation and propulsion technologies must be achieved. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs. Future missions will require 2 to 3 times more total change in velocity over their mission lives than the NASA Solar Electric Technology Application Readiness (NSTAR) demonstration on the Deep Space 1 mission. Rendezvous and return missions will require similar investments in in-space propulsion systems. New opportunities to explore beyond the outer planets and to the stars will require unparalleled technology advancement and innovation. The Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) is investing in technologies to achieve a factor of 10 reduction in the cost of Earth orbital transportation and a factor of 2 or 3 reduction in propulsion system mass and travel time for planetary missions within the next 15 years. Since more than 70% of projected launches over the next 10 years will require propulsion systems capable of attaining destinations beyond Low Earth Orbit, investment in in-space technologies will benefit a large percentage of future missions. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called, "propellantless" because they do not require on-board fuel to achieve thrust. An overview of the state-of-the-art in propellantless propulsion technologies such as solar and plasma sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, and aeroassist and aerocapture will be described. Results of recent earth-based technology demonstrations and space tests will also be discussed.

  10. Overview of Advanced Electromagnetic Propulsion Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Kamhawi, Hani; Gilland, James H.; Arrington, Lynn A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Very High Power Electric Propulsion task is sponsored by the Energetics Heritage Project. Electric propulsion technologies currently being investigated under this program include pulsed electromagnetic plasma thrusters, magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, helicon plasma sources as well as the systems models for high power electromagnetic propulsion devices. An investigation and evaluation of pulsed electromagnetic plasma thruster performance at energy levels up to 700 Joules is underway. On-going magnetoplasmadynamic thruster experiments will investigate applied-field performance characteristics of gas-fed MPDs. Plasma characterization of helicon plasma sources will provide additional insights into the operation of this novel propulsion concept. Systems models have been developed for high power electromagnetic propulsion concepts, such as pulsed inductive thrusters and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters to enable an evaluation of mission-optimized designs.

  11. Experimental investigation of a unique airbreathing pulsed laser propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Manka, C.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Investigations were conducted into unique methods of converting pulsed laser energy into propulsive thrust across a flat impulse surface under atmospheric conditions. The propulsion experiments were performed with a 1-micron neodymium-glass laser at the Space Plasma Branch of the Naval Research Laboratory. Laser-induced impulse was measured dynamically by ballistic pendulums and statically using piezoelectric pressure transducers on a stationary impulse surface. The principal goal was to explore methods for increasing the impulse coupling performance of airbreathing laser-propulsion engines. A magnetohydrodynamic thrust augmentation effect was discovered when a tesla-level magnetic field was applied perpendicular to the impulse surface. The impulse coupling coefficient performance doubled and continued to improve with increasing laser-pulse energies. The resultant performance of 180 to 200 N-s/MJ was found to be comparable to that of the earliest afterburning turbojets.

  12. Propulsion at the Marshall Space Flight Center - A brief history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.; Fisher, M. F.; Mccool, A. A.; Mccarty, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    The history of propulsion development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized, beginning with the development of the propulsion system for the Redstone missile. This course of propulsion development continues through the Jupiter IRBM, the Saturn family of launch vehicles and the engines that powered them, the Centaur upper stage and RL-10 engine, the Reactor In-Flight Test stage and the NERVA nuclear engine. The Space Shuttle Main Engine and Solid Rocket Boosters are covered, as are spacecraft propulsion systems, including the reaction control systems for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory and the Space Station. The paper includes a description of several technology efforts such as those in high pressure turbomachinery, aerospike engines, and the AS203 cyrogenic fluid management flight experiment. These and other propulsion projects are documented, and the scope of activities in support of these efforts at Marshall delineated.

  13. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Bogacz, S. Alex

    2015-12-01

    The LHeC is envisioned as a natural upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multipass superconducting energy-recovery linac (ERL) operating in a continuous wave mode. The unprecedently high energy of the multipass ERL combined with a stringent emittance dilution budget poses new challenges for the beam optics. Here, we investigate the performances of a novel arc architecture based on a flexible momentum compaction lattice that mitigates the effects of synchrotron radiation while containing the bunch lengthening. Extensive beam-dynamics investigations have been performed with placet2, a recently developed tracking code for recirculating machines. They include the first end-to-end tracking and a simulation of the machine operation with a continuous beam. This paper briefly describes the Conceptual Design Report lattice, with an emphasis on possible and proposed improvements that emerged from the beam-dynamics studies. The detector bypass section has been integrated in the lattice, and its design choices are presented here. The stable operation of the ERL with a current up to ˜150 mA in the linacs has been validated in the presence of single- and multibunch wakefields, synchrotron radiation, and beam-beam effects.

  14. High energy polarimetry of positron beams

    DOE PAGES

    Gaskell, D.

    2018-05-01

    Møller and Compton polarimetry are the primary techniques used for high energy electron polarimetry at Jefferson Lab. Both techniques can also be used for positron polarimetry, in principle. However, some modifications to the configuration and/or operating mode of the existing devices will likely be required for use with the types of positron beams currently under consideration at Jefferson Lab.

  15. High energy polarimetry of positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, D.

    2018-05-01

    Møller and Compton polarimetry are the primary techniques used for high energy electron polarimetry at Jefferson Lab. In principle, both techniques can also be used for positron polarimetry. However, some modifications to the configuration and/or operating mode of the existing devices will likely be required for use with the types of positron beams currently under consideration at Jefferson Lab.

  16. Study of advanced electric propulsion system concept using a flywheel for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, F. C.; Lackner, H.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced electric propulsion system concepts with flywheels for electric vehicles are evaluated and it is predicted that advanced systems can provide considerable performance improvement over existing electric propulsion systems with little or no cost penalty. Using components specifically designed for an integrated electric propulsion system avoids the compromises that frequently lead to a loss of efficiency and to inefficient utilization of space and weight. A propulsion system using a flywheel power energy storage device can provide excellent acceleration under adverse conditions of battery degradation due either to very low temperatures or high degrees of discharge. Both electrical and mechanical means of transfer of energy to and from the flywheel appear attractive; however, development work is required to establish the safe limits of speed and energy storage for advanced flywheel designs and to achieve the optimum efficiency of energy transfer. Brushless traction motor designs using either electronic commutation schemes or dc-to-ac inverters appear to provide a practical approach to a mass producible motor, with excellent efficiency and light weight. No comparisons were made with advanced system concepts which do not incorporate a flywheel.

  17. Electron energy distributions measured during electron beam/plasma interactions. [in E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, R. J.; Anderson, H. R.; Mcgarity, J. O.

    1980-01-01

    In the large vacuum facility at the NASA-Johnson Space Center an electron beam was projected 20 m parallel to B from a gun with variable accelerating potential (1.0 to 2.5 kV) to an aluminum target. The ionospheric neutral pressure and field were approximated. Beam electron energy distributions were measured directly using an electrostatic deflection analyzer and indirectly with a detector that responded to the X-rays produced by electron impact on the target. At low currents the distribution is sharply peaked at the acceleration potential. At high currents a beam plasma discharge occurs and electrons are redistributed in energy so that the former energy peak broadens to 10-15 percent FWHM with a strongly enhanced low energy tail. At the 10% of maximum point the energy spectrum ranges from less than 1/2 to 1.2 times the gun energy. The effect is qualitatively the same at all pitch angles and locations sampled.

  18. A piezoelectric energy harvester for broadband rotational excitation using buckled beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhengqiu; Kitio Kwuimy, C. A.; Wang, Zhiguo; Huang, Wenbin

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a rotational energy harvester using a piezoelectric bistable buckled beam to harvest low-speed rotational energy. The proposed harvester consists of a piezoelectric buckled beam with a center magnet, and a rotary magnet pair with opposite magnetic poles mounted on a revolving host. The magnetic plucking is used to harvest the angular kinetic energy of the host. The nonlinear snap-through mechanism is utilized to improve the vibration displacement and output voltage of the piezoelectric layer over a wide rotation frequency range. Theoretical simulation and experimental results show that the proposed energy harvester can yield a stable average output power ranging between 6.91-48.01 μW over a rotation frequency range of 1-14 Hz across a resistance load of 110 kΩ. Furthermore, dual attraction magnets were employed to overcome the suppression phenomenon at higher frequencies, which yields a broadband and flat frequency response over 6-14 Hz with the output power reaching 42.19-65.44 μW, demonstrating the great potential of the bistable buckled beam for wideband rotation motion energy harvesting.

  19. A Future with Hybrid Electric Propulsion Systems: A NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelRosario, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    The presentation highlights a NASA perspective on Hybrid Electric Propulsion Systems for aeronautical applications. Discussed are results from NASA Advance Concepts Study for Aircraft Entering service in 2030 and beyond and the potential use of hybrid electric propulsion systems as a potential solution to the requirements for energy efficiency and environmental compatibility. Current progress and notional potential NASA research plans are presented.

  20. Propulsion Research and Technology: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, John; Schmidt, George

    1999-01-01

    Propulsion is unique in being the main delimiter on how far and how fast one can travel in space. It is the lack of truly economical high-performance propulsion systems that continues to limit and restrict the extent of human endeavors in space. Therefore the goal of propulsion research is to conceive and investigate new, revolutionary propulsion concepts. This presentation reviews the development of new propulsion concepts. Some of these concepts are: (1) Rocket-based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion, (2) Alternative combined Cycle engines suc2 as the methanol ramjet , and the liquid air cycle engines, (3) Laser propulsion, (4) Maglifter, (5) pulse detonation engines, (6) solar thermal propulsion, (7) multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB) and other low-G cryogenic fluids, (8) Electric propulsion, (9) nuclear propulsion, (10) Fusion Propulsion, and (11) Antimatter technology. The efforts of the NASA centers in this research is also spotlighted.

  1. Low energy beam transport for HIDIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusel, O.; Pozimski, J.; Jakob, A.; Lakatos, A.

    2001-05-01

    Low energy beam transport (LEBT) for a heavy ion inertial fusion (HIDIF, I. Hofmann and G. Plass, Report of the European Study Group on Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion for the Period 1995-1998) facility suffers from high space charge forces and high ion mass. Space charge compensation reduces the necessary focusing force of the lenses and the radius of the beam in the LEBT, and therefrom the emittance growth due to aberrations and self fields is reduced. Gabor lenses (D. Gabor, Nature 160 (1947)) providing a stable space charge cloud for focusing and combine strong cylinder symmetric focusing with partly space charge compensation and low emittance growth. A high tolerance against source noise and current fluctuations and reduced investment costs could be other possible advantages. The proof of principle has already been demonstrated (J.A. Palkovic, Measurements on a Gabor lens for Neutralizing and Focusing a 30 keV Proton beam, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1989; J. Pozimski, P. Groß, R. Dölling and T. Weis, First experimental studies of a Gabor plasma-lens in Frankfurt, Proceedings of the 3rd EPAC Conference, Berlin, 1992). To broaden the experiences and to investigate the realisation of a LEBT concept for the HIDIF injector an experimental program using two Gabor lenses for independent variation of beam radius and envelope angel at RFQ injection was started. Therefrom the first experimental results using a double Gabor lens (DGPL) LEBT system for transporting an high perveance Xe + beam are presented and the results of numerical simulations are shown.

  2. Legal Implications of Nuclear Propulsion for Space Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is intended to examine nuclear propulsion concepts such as "Project Orion", "Project Daedalus", NERVA, VASIMIR, from the legal point of view. The UN Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space apply to nuclear power sources in outer space devoted to the generation of electric power on board space objects for non-propulsive purposes, and do not regulate the use of nuclear energy as a means of propulsion. However, nuclear propulsion by means of detonating atomic bombs (ORION) is, in principle, banned under the 1963 Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapon Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space, and Under Water. The legality of use of nuclear propulsion will be analysed from different approaches - historical (i.e. the lawfulness of these projects at the time of their proposal, at the present time, and in the future - in the light of the mutability and evolution of international law), spatial (i.e. the legal regime governing peaceful nuclear explosions in different spatial zones - Earth atmosphere, Earth orbit, Solar System, and interstellar space), and technical (i.e, the legal regime applicable to different nuclear propulsion techniques, and to the various negative effects - e.g. damage to other space systems as an effect of the electromagnetic pulse, etc). The paper will analyse the positive law, and will also come with suggestions "de lege ferenda".

  3. Energy recovery from mixed H-/H0/H+ beams and collector simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.; Cavenago, M.; Baltador, C.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.; Agostinetti, P.

    2017-08-01

    An axisymmetric system to recover beam energy from partially neutralized H- beams was recently proposed, for a given beam acceleration voltage Vs. In the case of ion source NIO1 Vs may range from 20 to 60 kV. A realistic beam with 3 mrad divergence, and a composition of 25 : 50 : 25 of H-, H0 and H+ has been considered. The collector works by decelerating the H- ions (into a system similar to a Faraday cup provided with an exit hole electrode), so that they are radially deflected by space charge and anode lens effects, and collected to a low kinetic energy Kc (less than 1 keV), while neutral and H+ ions can pass through the exit hole electrode. A following collector can recover H+ energy. Since the space charge calculations are challenging for highly nonlinear problem and for a possible (numerically unstable) virtual cathode phenomena different computation tools were compared for simulations. Stabilization techniques are compared. Limits for local perveance are discussed. Also mesh asymmetry effects and the related transverse oscillations of H+ beam may be observed. Efficiency over 90 % can be reached in typical conditions. The secondary yield (which is low thanks to low impact energy Kc and Faraday cup concept) is estimated.

  4. Space Propulsion Technology Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. Focused program elements are: (1) transportation systems, which include earth-to-orbit propulsion, commercial vehicle propulsion, auxiliary propulsion, advanced cryogenic engines, cryogenic fluid systems, nuclear thermal propulsion, and nuclear electric propulsion; (2) space platforms, which include spacecraft on-board propulsion, and station keeping propulsion; and (3) technology flight experiments, which include cryogenic orbital N2 experiment (CONE), SEPS flight experiment, and cryogenic orbital H2 experiment (COHE).

  5. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  6. A diamond detector in the dosimetry of high-energy electron and photon beams.

    PubMed

    Laub, W U; Kaulich, T W; Nüsslin, F

    1999-09-01

    A diamond detector type 60003 (PTW Freiburg) was examined for the purpose of dosimetry with 4-20 MeV electron beams and 4-25 MV photon beams. Results were compared with those obtained by using a Markus chamber for electron beams and an ionization chamber for photon beams. Dose distributions were measured in a water phantom with the detector connected to a Unidos electrometer (PTW Freiburg). After a pre-irradiation of about 5 Gy the diamond detector shows a stability in response which is better than that of an ionization chamber. The current of the diamond detector was measured under variation of photon beam dose rate between 0.1 and 7 Gy min(-1). Different FSDs were chosen. Furthermore the pulse repetition frequency and the depth of the detector were changed. The electron beam dose rate was varied between 0.23 and 4.6 Gy min(-1) by changing the pulse-repetition frequency. The response shows no energy dependence within the covered photon-beam energy range. Between 4 MeV and 18 MeV electron beam energy it shows only a small energy dependence of about 2%, as expected from theory. For smaller electron energies the response increases significantly and an influence of the contact material used for the diamond detector can be surmised. A slight sublinearity of the current and dose rate was found. Detector current and dose rate are related by the expression i alpha Ddelta, where i is the detector current, D is the dose rate and delta is a correction factor of approximately 0.963. Depth-dose curves of photon beams, measured with the diamond detector, show a slight overestimation compared with measurements with the ionization chamber. This overestimation is compensated for by the above correction term. The superior spatial resolution of the diamond detector leads to minor deviations between depth-dose curves of electron beams measured with a Markus chamber and a diamond detector.

  7. Experimental assessment of out-of-field dose components in high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Alabdoaburas, Mohamad M; Mege, Jean-Pierre; Chavaudra, Jean; Bezin, Jérémi Vũ; Veres, Atilla; de Vathaire, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally investigate the out-of-field dose in a water phantom, with several high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy (RT). The study was carried out for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV electron beams, on three different linear accelerators, each equipped with a specific applicator. Measurements were performed in a water phantom, at different depths, for different applicator sizes, and off-axis distances up to 70 cm from beam central axis (CAX). Thermoluminescent powder dosimeters (TLD-700) were used. For given cases, TLD measurements were compared to EBT3 films and parallel-plane ionization chamber measurements. Also, out-of-field doses at 10 cm depth, with and without applicator, were evaluated. With the Siemens applicators, a peak dose appears at about 12-15 cm out of the field edge, at 1 cm depth, for all field sizes and energies. For the Siemens Primus, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak reaches 2.3%, 1%, 0.9% and 1.3% of the maximum central axis dose (Dmax) for 6, 9, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams, respectively. For the Siemens Oncor, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak dose reaches 0.8%, 1%, 1.4%, and 1.6% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 14 MeV, respectively, and these values increase with applicator size. For the Varian 2300C/D, the doses at 12.5 cm out of the field edge are 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.5%, and 1.1% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV, respectively, and increase with applicator size. No peak dose is evidenced for the Varian applicator for these energies. In summary, the out-of-field dose from electron beams increases with the beam energy and the applicator size, and decreases with the distance from the beam central axis and the depth in water. It also considerably depends on the applicator types. Our results can be of interest for the dose estimations delivered in healthy tissues outside the treatment field for the RT patient, as well as in studies exploring RT long-term effects.

  8. Sensitivity of inelastic response to numerical integration of strain energy. [for cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    The exact solution to the quasi-static, inelastic response of a cantilever beam of rectangular cross section subjected to a bending moment at the tip is obtained. The material of the beam is assumed to be linearly elastic-linearly strain-hardening. This solution is then compared with three different numerical solutions of the same problem obtained by minimizing the total potential energy using Gaussian quadratures of two different orders and a Newton-Cotes scheme for integrating the strain energy of deformation. Significant differences between the exact dissipative strain energy and its numerical counterpart are emphasized. The consequence of this on the nonlinear transient responses of a beam with solid cross section and that of a thin-walled beam on elastic supports under impulsive loads are examined.

  9. Exploring Propulsion System Requirements for More and All-Electric Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Helicopters offer unique capabilities that are important for certain missions. More and all-electric propulsion systems for helicopters offer the potential for improved efficiency, reliability, vehicle and mission capabilities as well as reduced harmful emissions. To achieve these propulsion system-based benefits, the relevant requirements must be understood and developed for the various component, sub-component and ancillary systems of the overall propulsion system. Three representative helicopters were used to explore propulsion and overall vehicle and mission requirements. These vehicles varied from light utility (one to three occupants) to highly capable (three crew members plus ten passengers and cargo). Assuming 15 and 30 year technology availability, analytical models for electric system components were developed to understand component and ancillary requirements. Overall propulsion system characteristics were developed and used for vehicle sizing and mission analyses to understand the tradeoffs of component performance and weight, with increase in vehicle size and mission capability. Study results indicate that only the light utility vehicle retained significant payload for an arbitrary 100 nautical mile range assuming 15 year technology. Thirty year technology assumptions for battery energy storage are sufficient to enable some range and payload capabilities, but further improvements in energy density are required to maintain or exceed payload and range capabilities versus present systems. Hydrocarbon-fueled range extenders can be prudently used to recover range and payload deficiencies resulting from battery energy density limitations. Thermal loads for electric systems are low heat quality, but seem manageable. To realize the benefits from more and all-electric systems, technology goals must be achieved, as well as vehicles, missions and systems identified that are best suited to take advantage of their unique characteristics.

  10. Exploring Propulsion System Requirements for More and All-Electric Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Helicopters offer unique capabilities that are important for certain missions. More and all-electric propulsion systems for helicopters offer the potential for improved efficiency, reliability, vehicle and mission capabilities as well as reduced harmful emissions. To achieve these propulsion system-based benefits, the relevant requirements must be understood and developed for the various component, sub-component and ancillary systems of the overall propulsion system. Three representative helicopters were used to explore propulsion and overall vehicle and mission requirements. These vehicles varied from light utility (one to three occupants) to highly capable (three crew members plus ten passengers and cargo). Assuming 15 and 30 year technology availability, analytical models for electric system components were developed to understand component and ancillary requirements. Overall propulsion system characteristics were developed and used for vehicle sizing and mission analyses to understand the tradeoffs of component performance and weight, with increase in vehicle size and mission capability. Study results indicate that only the light utility vehicle retained significant payload for an arbitrary 100 nautical mile range assuming 15 year technology. Thirty year technology assumptions for battery energy storage are sufficient to enable some range and payload capabilities, but further improvements in energy density are required to maintain or exceed payload and range capabilities versus present systems. Hydrocarbon-fueled range extenders can be prudently used to recover range and payload deficiencies resulting from battery energy density limitations. Thermal loads for electric systems are low heat quality, but seem manageable. To realize the benefits from more and all-electric systems, technology goals must be achieved, as well as identify vehicles, missions and systems that are best suited to take advantage of their unique characteristics.

  11. Comparative performance evaluation of advanced AC and DC EV propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, R. D.; Crumley, R. L.

    Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) evaluates EV propulsion systems and components for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Electric and Hybrid Vehicle (EHV) Program. In this study, experimental data were used to evaluate the relative performances of the benchmark Chrysler/GE ETV-1 DC and the Ford/GE First Generation Single-Shaft AC (ETX-I) propulsion systems. Tests were conducted on the INEL's chassis dynamometer using identical aerodynamic and rolling resistance road-load coefficients and vehicle test weights. The results allowed a direct comparison of selected efficiency and performance characteristics for the two propulsion system technologies. The ETX-I AC system exhibited slightly lower system efficiency during constant speed testing than the ETV-1 DC propulsion system.

  12. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  13. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  14. Mars Sample Return Using Solar Sail Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Macdonald, Malcolm; Mcinnes, Colin; Percy, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Many Mars Sample Return (MSR) architecture studies have been conducted over the years. A key element of them is the Earth Return Stage (ERS) whose objective is to obtain the sample from the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) and return it safely to the surface of the Earth. ERS designs predominantly use chemical propulsion [1], incurring a significant launch mass penalty due to the low specific impulse of such systems coupled with the launch mass sensitivity to returned mass. It is proposed to use solar sail propulsion for the ERS, providing a high (effective) specific impulse propulsion system in the final stage of the multi-stage system. By doing so to the launch mass of the orbiter mission can be significantly reduced and hence potentially decreasing mission cost. Further, solar sailing offers a unique set of non-Keplerian low thrust trajectories that may enable modifications to the current approach to designing the Earth Entry Vehicle by potentially reducing the Earth arrival velocity. This modification will further decrease the mass of the orbiter system. Solar sail propulsion uses sunlight to propel vehicles through space by reflecting solar photons from a large, mirror-like surface made of a lightweight, reflective material. The continuous photonic pressure provides propellantless thrust to conduct orbital maneuvering and plane changes more efficiently than conventional chemical propulsion. Because the Sun supplies the necessary propulsive energy, solar sails require no onboard propellant, thus reducing system mass. This technology is currently at TRL 7/8 as demonstrated by the 2010 flight of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA, IKAROS mission. [2

  15. The Ion Propulsion System for the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Santiago, Walter; Kamhawi, Hani; Polk, James E.; Snyder, John Steven; Hofer, Richard R.; Parker, J. Morgan

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission is a candidate Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission whose main objectives are to develop and demonstrate a high-power solar electric propulsion capability for the Agency and return an asteroidal mass for rendezvous and characterization in a companion human-crewed mission. The ion propulsion system must be capable of operating over an 8-year time period and processing up to 10,000 kg of xenon propellant. This high-power solar electric propulsion capability, or an extensible derivative of it, has been identified as a critical part of an affordable, beyond-low-Earth-orbit, manned-exploration architecture. Under the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate the critical electric propulsion and solar array technologies are being developed. The ion propulsion system being co-developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle is based on the NASA-developed 12.5 kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS0 thruster and power processing technologies. This paper presents the conceptual design for the ion propulsion system, the status of the NASA in-house thruster and power processing activity, and an update on flight hardware.

  16. The Enabling Use of Ion Propulsion on Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayman, M.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Mase, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Dawn's mission to orbit both Vesta and Ceres is enabled by its use of ion propulsion. Even orbiting Vesta alone with conventional propulsion would have been unaffordable within the constraints of the Discovery Program, and orbiting both would have been impossible. In fact, no other spacecraft has been targeted to orbit two solar system destinations, which is only one of the many firsts that Dawn will achieve. The successful testing of ion propulsion on Deep Space 1 paved the way for Dawn not only to use the hardware with confidence but also to learn how to design the flight system and design the mission to take advantage of its capabilities. In addition to allowing Dawn to reach these two important targets, ion propulsion allows the spacecraft to accomplish significant changes in its orbit. Therefore, science observations of Vesta are planned from four different orbits, at varying altitudes and solar geometry. The use of ion propulsion results in a significant mission design effort since the trajectory is constantly being refined. This also creates a flexible mission architecture, which allows for optimization of the mission as conditions change. Solar electric ion propulsion is especially well suited to missions to the Main Asteroid Belt since solar energy is still a viable power source, whereas the size of the solar array needed beyond 3.5 AU is a potential limitation. Dawn has already surpassed the record for greatest propulsive velocity, but its greatest achievements will no doubt be the incredible bounty of science data enabled by this innovative flight system.

  17. Beam and spin dynamics in the fast ramping storage ring ELSA: Concepts and measures to increase beam energy, current and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, Wolfgang; Balling, Andreas; Boldt, Oliver; Dieckmann, Andreas; Eberhardt, Maren; Frommberger, Frank; Heiliger, Dominik; Heurich, Nikolas; Koop, Rebecca; Klarner, Fabian; Preisner, Oliver; Proft, Dennis; Pusch, Thorsten; Roth, André; Sauerland, Dennis; Schedler, Manuel; Schmidt, Jan Felix; Switka, Michael; Thiry, Jens-Peter; Wittschen, Jürgen; Zander, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The electron accelerator facility ELSA has been operated for almost 30 years serving nuclear physics experiments investigating the sub-nuclear structure of matter. Within the 12 years funding period of the collaborative research center SFB/TR 16, linearly and circularly polarized photon beams with energies up to more than 3 GeV were successfully delivered to photoproduction experiments. In order to fulfill the increasing demands on beam polarization and intensity, a comprehensive research and upgrade program has been carried out. Beam and spin dynamics have been studied theoretically and experimentally, and sophisticated new devices have been developed and installed. The improvements led to a significant increase of the available beam polarization and intensity. A further increase of beam energy seems feasible with the implementation of superconducting cavities.

  18. Beam dynamics simulations of post low energy beam transport section in RAON heavy ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hyunchang, E-mail: hcjin@ibs.re.kr; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae

    RAON (Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness) heavy ion accelerator of the rare isotope science project in Daejeon, Korea, has been designed to accelerate multiple-charge-state beams to be used for various science programs. In the RAON accelerator, the rare isotope beams which are generated by an isotope separation on-line system with a wide range of nuclei and charges will be transported through the post Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to transport many kinds of rare isotope beams stably to the RFQ, the post LEBT should be devised to satisfy the requirement ofmore » the RFQ at the end of post LEBT, simultaneously with the twiss parameters small. We will present the recent lattice design of the post LEBT in the RAON accelerator and the results of the beam dynamics simulations from it. In addition, the error analysis and correction in the post LEBT will be also described.« less

  19. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, Sergei M.

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electronmore » beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.« less

  20. Hydrodynamics of Peristaltic Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios; Hart, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    A curious class of animals called salps live in marine environments and self-propel by ejecting vortex rings much like jellyfish and squid. However, unlike other jetting creatures that siphon and eject water from one side of their body, salps produce vortex rings by pumping water through siphons on opposite ends of their hollow cylindrical bodies. In the simplest cases, it seems like some species of salp can successfully move by contracting just two siphons connected by an elastic body. When thought of as a chain of timed contractions, salp propulsion is reminiscent of peristaltic pumping applied to marine locomotion. Inspired by salps, we investigate the hydrodynamics of peristaltic propulsion, focusing on the scaling relationships that determine flow rate, thrust production, and energy usage in a model system. We discuss possible actuation methods for a model peristaltic vehicle, considering both the material and geometrical requirements for such a system.

  1. Focal Point Inside the Vacuum Chamber for Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on an 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. This photograph is a close-up view of a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber at the MSFC Solar Thermal Propulsion Test facility. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  2. Mechanical efficiency of two commercial lever-propulsion mechanisms for manual wheelchair locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lui, Jordon; MacGillivray, Megan K; Sheel, A William; Jeyasurya, Jeswin; Sadeghi, Mahsa; Sawatzky, Bonita Jean

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the mechanical efficiency (ME) of two commercially available lever-propulsion mechanisms for wheelchairs and (2) compare the ME of lever propulsion with hand rim propulsion within the same wheelchair. Of the two mechanisms, one contained a torsion spring while the other used a roller clutch design. We hypothesized that the torsion spring mechanism would increase the ME of propulsion due to a passive recovery stroke enabled by the mechanism. Ten nondisabled male participants with no prior manual wheeling experience performed submaximal exercise tests using both lever-propulsion mechanisms and hand rim propulsion on two different wheelchairs. Cardiopulmonary parameters including oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), and energy expenditure (En) were determined. Total external power (Pext) was measured using a drag test protocol. ME was determined by the ratio of Pext to En. Results indicated no significant effect of lever-propulsion mechanism for all physiological measures tested. This suggests that the torsion spring did not result in a physiological benefit compared with the roller clutch mechanism. However, both lever-propulsion mechanisms showed decreased VO2 and HR and increased ME (as a function of slope) compared with hand rim propulsion (p < 0.001). This indicates that both lever-propulsion mechanisms tested are more mechanically efficient than conventional hand rim propulsion, especially when slopes are encountered.

  3. FY2016 Propulsion Materials Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    The Propulsion Materials Program actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of VTO by investigating and identifying the materials properties that are most essential for continued development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light-duty powertrains. The technical approaches available to enhance propulsion systems focus on improvements in both vehicle efficiency and fuel substitution, both of which must overcome the performance limitations of the materials currently in use. Propulsion Materials Program activities work with national laboratories, industry experts, and VTO powertrain systems (e.g., Advanced Combustion Engines and Fuels) teams to develop strategies thatmore » overcome materials limitations in future powertrain performance. The technical maturity of the portfolio of funded projects ranges from basic science to subsystem prototype validation. Projects within a Propulsion Materials Program activity address materials concerns that directly impact critical technology barriers within each of the above programs, including barriers that impact fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, improved reliability, and reduced manufacturing costs. The program engages only the barriers that result from material property limitations and represent fundamental, high-risk materials issues.« less

  4. Electric Propulsion Requirements and Mission Analysis Under NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudzinski, Leonard a.; Pencil, Eric J.; Dankanich, John W.

    2007-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology Project (ISPT) is currently NASA's sole investment in electric propulsion technologies. This project is managed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the NASA Headquarters Science Mission Directorate (SMD). The objective of the electric propulsion project area is to develop near-term and midterm electric propulsion technologies to enhance or enable future NASA science missions while minimizing risk and cost to the end user. Systems analysis activities sponsored by ISPT seek to identify future mission applications in order to quantify mission requirements, as well as develop analytical capability in order to facilitate greater understanding and application of electric propulsion and other propulsion technologies in the ISPT portfolio. These analyses guide technology investments by informing decisions and defining metrics for technology development to meet identified mission requirements. This paper discusses the missions currently being studied for electric propulsion by the ISPT project, and presents the results of recent electric propulsion (EP) mission trades. Recent ISPT systems analysis activities include: an initiative to standardize life qualification methods for various electric propulsion systems in order to retire perceived risk to proposed EP missions; mission analysis to identify EP requirements from Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship classes of missions; and an evaluation of system requirements for radioisotope-powered electric propulsion. Progress and early results of these activities is discussed where available.

  5. Interaction of high-energy beams with magnetized plasma: feasibility study for laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Delzanno, G. L.; Dorfman, S. E.; Cattell, C. A.; Van Compernolle, B.

    2017-12-01

    We discuss plans for an experiment that will investigate interaction of energetic electron beam with magnetized plasma. The planned experiment will be conducted on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA and will utilize a variable-energy (0.1-1) MeV electron beam. Such energetic beams have recently attracted renewed attention as a basis for a number of active experiments in space, largely due to possibility of overcoming limitations imposed by spacecraft charging in low-density (e.g. magnetospheric) plasma. In this talk, we will discuss theoretical and computation studies of the plasma modes excited by the beam and beam stability. Energetic beams radiate both whistler and high-frequency R-X mode via Cherenkov resonances, with the relative efficiency of coupling to R-X mode increasing with beam energy. The stability of a finite-size, modulated beam (as produced by the available beam sources) is investigated and relative significance of instabilities and direct radiation is discussed. Special attention will be paid to discussing how laboratory experiments relate to conditions in space.

  6. Status of Propulsion Technology Development Under the NASA In-space Propulsion Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David; Kamhawi, Hani; Patterson, Mike; Dankanich, John; Pencil, Eric; Pinero, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Since 2001, the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program has been developing and delivering in-space propulsion technologies for NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for future NASA Discovery, New Frontiers, Flagship and sample return missions currently under consideration. The ISPT program is currently developing technology in three areas that include Propulsion System Technologies, Entry Vehicle Technologies, and Systems Mission Analysis. ISPT's propulsion technologies include: 1) the 0.6-7 kW NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) gridded ion propulsion system; 2) a 0.3-3.9kW Hall-effect electric propulsion (HEP) system for low cost and sample return missions; 3) the Xenon Flow Control Module (XFCM); 4) ultra-lightweight propellant tank technologies (ULTT); and 5) propulsion technologies for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). The HEP system is composed of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster, a power processing unit (PPU), and the XFCM. NEXT and the HiVHAc are throttle-able electric propulsion systems for planetary science missions. The XFCM and ULTT are two component technologies which being developed with nearer-term flight infusion in mind. Several of the ISPT technologies are related to sample return missions needs like: MAV propulsion and electric propulsion. And finally, one focus of the SystemsMission Analysis area is developing tools that aid the application or operation of these technologies on wide variety of mission concepts. This paper provides a brief overview of the ISPT program, describing the development status and technology infusion readiness.

  7. Propulsion for CubeSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmer, Kristina

    2017-05-01

    At present, very few CubeSats have flown in space featuring propulsion systems. Of those that have, the literature is scattered, published in a variety of formats (conference proceedings, contractor websites, technical notes, and journal articles), and often not available for public release. This paper seeks to collect the relevant publically releasable information in one location. To date, only two missions have featured propulsion systems as part of the technology demonstration. The IMPACT mission from the Aerospace Corporation launched several electrospray thrusters from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and BricSAT-P from the United States Naval Academy had four micro-Cathode Arc Thrusters from George Washington University. Other than these two missions, propulsion on CubeSats has been used only for attitude control and reaction wheel desaturation via cold gas propulsion systems. As the desired capability of CubeSats increases, and more complex missions are planned, propulsion is required to accomplish the science and engineering objectives. This survey includes propulsion systems that have been designed specifically for the CubeSat platform and systems that fit within CubeSat constraints but were developed for other platforms. Throughout the survey, discussion of flight heritage and results of the mission are included where publicly released information and data have been made available. Major categories of propulsion systems that are in this survey are solar sails, cold gas propulsion, electric propulsion, and chemical propulsion systems. Only systems that have been tested in a laboratory or with some flight history are included.

  8. The Ion Propulsion System for the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Santiago, Walter; Kamhawi, Hani; Polk, James E.; Snyder, John Steven; Hofer, Richard; Parker, J. Morgan

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission is a candidate Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission whose main objectives are to develop and demonstrate a high-power solar electric propulsion capability for the Agency and return an asteroidal mass for rendezvous and characterization in a subsequent human-crewed mission. The ion propulsion subsystem must be capable of operating over an 8-year time period and processing up to 10,000 kg of xenon propellant. This high-power solar electric propulsion capability, or an extensible derivative of it, has been identified as an enabling element of an affordable beyond low-earth orbit human-crewed exploration architecture. Under the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate the critical electric propulsion and solar array technologies are being developed. The ion propulsion system for the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle is based on the NASA-developed 12.5 kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding thruster and power processing technologies. This paper presents the conceptual design for the ion propulsion system, a status on the NASA in-house thruster and power processing is provided, and an update on acquisition for flight provided.

  9. Enhancement of quasi-static strain energy harvesters using non-uniform cross-section post-buckled beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Pengcheng; Borchani, Wassim; Hasni, Hassene; Lajnef, Nizar

    2017-08-01

    Thanks to their efficiency enhancement systems based on post-buckled structural elements have been extensively used in many applications such as actuation, remote sensing and energy harvesting. The post-buckling snap-through behavior of bilaterally constrained beams has been exploited to create sensing or energy harvesting mechanisms for quasi-static applications. The conversion mechanism has been used to transform low-rate and low-frequency excitations into high-rate motions. Electric energy has been generated from such high-rate motions using piezoelectric transducers. However, lack of control over the post-buckling behavior severely limits the mechanism’s efficiency. This study aims to maximize the levels of harvestable power by controlling the location of snap-throughs along the beam at different buckling transitions. Since the snap-through location cannot be controlled by tuning the geometric properties of a uniform beam, non-uniform cross-sections are examined. An energy-based theoretical model is herein developed to predict the post-buckling response of non-prismatic beams. The total potential energy is minimized under constraints that represent the physical confinement of the beam between the lateral boundaries. The experimentally validated results show that changing the shape and geometric dimensions of non-uniform beams allows for the accurate controlling of the snap-through location at different buckling transitions. A 78.59% improvement in harvested energy levels has been achieved by optimization of beam shape.

  10. Prediction of applied forces in handrim wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Ju; Lin, Po-Chou; Guo, Lan-Yuen; Su, Fong-Chin

    2011-02-03

    Researchers of wheelchair propulsion have usually suggested that a wheelchair can be properly designed using anthropometrics to reduce high mechanical load and thus reduce pain and damage to joints. A model based on physiological features and biomechanical principles can be used to determine anthropometric relationships for wheelchair fitting. To improve the understanding of man-machine interaction and the mechanism through which propulsion performance been enhanced, this study develops and validates an energy model for wheelchair propulsion. Kinematic data obtained from ten able-bodied and ten wheelchair-dependent users during level propulsion at an average velocity of 1m/s were used as the input of a planar model with the criteria of increasing efficiency and reducing joint load. Results demonstrate that for both experienced and inexperienced users, predicted handrim contact forces agree with experimental data through an extensive range of the push. Significant deviations that were mostly observed in the early stage of the push phase might result from the lack of consideration of muscle dynamics and wrist joint biomechanics. The proposed model effectively verified the handrim contact force patterns during dynamic propulsion. Users do not aim to generate mechanically most effective forces to avoid high loadings on the joints. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inspection applications with higher electron beam energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, D. R.; Jones, J. L.; Yoon, W. Y.; Haskell, K. J.; Sterbentz, J. W.; Zabriskie, J. M.; Hunt, A. W.; Harmon, F.; Kinlaw, M. T.

    2005-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has developed prototype shielded nuclear material detection systems based on pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) techniques for the inspection of cargo containers. During this work, increased nuclear material detection capabilities have been demonstrated at higher electron beam energies than those allowed by federal regulations for cargo inspection. This paper gives a general overview of a nuclear material detection system, the PPA technique and discusses the benefits of using these higher energies. This paper also includes a summary of the numerical and test results from LINAC operations up to 24 MeV and discusses some of the federal energy limitations associated with cargo inspection.

  12. Supersonic plasma beams with controlled speed generated by the alternative low power hybrid ion engine (ALPHIE) for space propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, L.; Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Donoso, J. M.; Damba, J.; Tierno, S. P.; Alamillo-Gamboa, E.; Castillo, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    The characteristics of supersonic ion beams from the alternative low power hybrid ion engine (ALPHIE) are discussed. This simple concept of a DC powered plasma accelerator that only needs one electron source for both neutral gas ionization and ion beam neutralization is also examined. The plasma production and space charge neutralization processes are thus coupled in this plasma thruster that has a total DC power consumption of below 450 W, and uses xenon or argon gas as a propellant. The operation parameters of the plasma engine are studied in the laboratory in connection with the ion energy distribution function obtained with a retarding-field energy analyzer. The ALPHIE plasma beam expansion produces a mesothermal plasma flow with two-peaked ion energy distribution functions composed of low and high speed ion groups. The characteristic drift velocities of the fast ion groups, in the range 36.6-43.5 Km/s, are controlled by the acceleration voltage. These supersonic speeds are higher than the typical ion sound velocities of the low energy ion group produced by the expansion of the plasma jet. The temperatures of the slow ion population lead to ion Debye lengths longer than the electron Debye lengths. Furthermore, the electron impact ionization can coexist with collisional ionization by fast ions downstream the grids. Finally, the performance characteristics and comparisons with other plasma accelerator schemes are also discussed.

  13. Microsecond Electron Beam Source with Electron Energy Up to 400 Kev and Plasma Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, É. N.; Basov, G. F.; Shershnev, S.

    2017-12-01

    A new high-power source of electrons with plasma anode for producing high-current microsecond electron beams with electron energy up to 400 keV has been developed, manufactured, and put in operation. To increase the cross section and pulse current duration of the beam, a multipoint explosive emission cathode is used in the electron beam source, and the beam is formed in an applied external guiding magnetic field. The Marx generator with vacuum insulation is used as a high-voltage source. Electron beams with electron energy up to 300-400 keV, current of 5-15 kA, duration of 1.5-3 μs, energy up to 4 kJ, and cross section up to 150 cm2 have been produced. The operating modes of the electron beam source are realized in which the applied voltage is influenced weakly on the current. The possibility of source application for melting of metal surfaces is demonstrated.

  14. Assessing Potential Propulsion Breakthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    2005-01-01

    The term, propulsion breakthrough, refers to concepts like propellantless space drives and faster-than-light travel, the kind of breakthroughs that would make interstellar exploration practical. Although no such breakthroughs appear imminent, a variety of investigations into these goals have begun. From 1996 to 2002, NASA supported the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Project to examine physics in the context of breakthrough spaceflight. Three facets of these assessments are now reported: (1) predicting benefits, (2) selecting research, and (3) recent technical progress. Predicting benefits is challenging since the breakthroughs are still only notional concepts, but kinetic energy can serve as a basis for comparison. In terms of kinetic energy, a hypothetical space drive could require many orders of magnitude less energy than a rocket for journeys to our nearest neighboring star. Assessing research options is challenging when the goals are beyond known physics and when the implications of success are profound. To mitigate the challenges, a selection process is described where: (a) research tasks are constrained to only address the immediate unknowns, curious effects or critical issues, (b) reliability of assertions is more important than their implications, and (c) reviewers judge credibility rather than feasibility. The recent findings of a number of tasks, some selected using this process, are discussed. Of the 14 tasks included, six reached null conclusions, four remain unresolved, and four have opportunities for sequels. A dominant theme with the sequels is research about the properties of space, inertial frames, and the quantum vacuum.

  15. Crossed-beam energy transfer: polarization effects and evidence of saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, D.; Colaitis, A.; Follett, R. K.

    In this article, recent results on crossed-beam energy transfer are presented. Wave-length tuning was used to vary the amount of energy transfer between two beams in a quasi-stationary plasma with carefully controlled conditions. The amount of transfer agreed well with calculations assuming linear ion acoustic waves with amplitudes up to δn/n ≈ 0.015. Increasing the initial probe intensity to access larger ion acoustic wave amplitudes for otherwise fixed conditions yields evidence of saturation. The ability to manipulate a beam’s polarization, which results from the anisotropic nature of the interaction, is revisited; an example is provided to demonstrate how polarization effectsmore » in a multibeam situation can dramatically enhance the expected amount of energy transfer.« less

  16. Crossed-beam energy transfer: polarization effects and evidence of saturation

    DOE PAGES

    Turnbull, D.; Colaitis, A.; Follett, R. K.; ...

    2018-04-05

    In this article, recent results on crossed-beam energy transfer are presented. Wave-length tuning was used to vary the amount of energy transfer between two beams in a quasi-stationary plasma with carefully controlled conditions. The amount of transfer agreed well with calculations assuming linear ion acoustic waves with amplitudes up to δn/n ≈ 0.015. Increasing the initial probe intensity to access larger ion acoustic wave amplitudes for otherwise fixed conditions yields evidence of saturation. The ability to manipulate a beam’s polarization, which results from the anisotropic nature of the interaction, is revisited; an example is provided to demonstrate how polarization effectsmore » in a multibeam situation can dramatically enhance the expected amount of energy transfer.« less

  17. Distributed Propulsion Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun Dae

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of large jet-powered transport aircraft, the majority of these vehicles have been designed by placing thrust-generating engines either under the wings or on the fuselage to minimize aerodynamic interactions on the vehicle operation. However, advances in computational and experimental tools along with new technologies in materials, structures, and aircraft controls, etc. are enabling a high degree of integration of the airframe and propulsion system in aircraft design. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been investigating a number of revolutionary distributed propulsion vehicle concepts to increase aircraft performance. The concept of distributed propulsion is to fully integrate a propulsion system within an airframe such that the aircraft takes full synergistic benefits of coupling of airframe aerodynamics and the propulsion thrust stream by distributing thrust using many propulsors on the airframe. Some of the concepts are based on the use of distributed jet flaps, distributed small multiple engines, gas-driven multi-fans, mechanically driven multifans, cross-flow fans, and electric fans driven by turboelectric generators. This paper describes some early concepts of the distributed propulsion vehicles and the current turboelectric distributed propulsion (TeDP) vehicle concepts being studied under the NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project to drastically reduce aircraft-related fuel burn, emissions, and noise by the year 2030 to 2035.

  18. Polar lunar power ring: Propulsion energy resource

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, Graham Scott

    1990-01-01

    A ring shaped grid of photovoltaic solar collectors encircling a lunar pole at 80 to 85 degrees latitude is proposed as the primary research, development, and construction goal for an initial lunar base. The polar Lunar Power Ring (LPR) is designed to provide continuous electrical power in ever increasing amounts as collectors are added to the ring grid. The LPR can provide electricity for any purpose indefinitely, barring a meteor strike. The associated rail infrastructure and inherently expandable power levels place the LPR as an ideal tool to power an innovative propulsion research facility or a trans-Jovian fleet. The proposed initial output range is 90 Mw to 90 Gw.

  19. Electric Propulsion Applications and Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Frank M.; Wickenheiser, Timothy J.

    1996-01-01

    Most space missions require on-board propulsion systems and these systems are often dominant spacecraft mass drivers. Presently, on-board systems account for more than half the injected mass for commercial communications systems and even greater mass fractions for ambitious planetary missions. Anticipated trends toward the use of both smaller spacecraft and launch vehicles will likely increase pressure on the performance of on-board propulsion systems. The acceptance of arcjet thrusters for operational use on commercial communications satellites ushered in a new era in on-board propulsion and exponential growth of electric propulsion across a broad spectrum of missions is anticipated. NASA recognizes the benefits of advanced propulsion and NASA's Office of Space Access and Technology supports an aggressive On-Board Propulsion program, including a strong electric propulsion element, to assure the availability of high performance propulsion systems to meet the goals of the ambitious missions envisioned in the next two decades. The program scope ranges from fundamental research for future generation systems through specific insertion efforts aimed at near term technology transfer. The On-Board propulsion program is committed to carrying technologies to levels required for customer acceptance and emphasizes direct interactions with the user community and the development of commercial sources. This paper provides a discussion of anticipated missions, propulsion functions, and electric propulsion impacts followed by an overview of the electric propulsion element of the NASA On-Board Propulsion program.

  20. (Surface engineering by high energy beams)

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, C.J.

    1989-10-23

    A paper entitled Structure-Mechanical Property relationships in Ion-Implanted Ceramics'' was presented at the 2nd International Seminar on Surface Engineering by High Energy Beams in Lisbon, Portugal. This seminar was sponsored by the International Federation of Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering and included discussions on surface modifications using laser, electron, and ion beams. The visit to the University of Lisbon and LNETI-Sacavem included discussions regarding collaborative research in which Professor J.C. Soares and Dr. M.F. da Silva would conduct perturbed angular correlation (PAC) studies on ion-implanted samples supplied by the traveler. The collaboration between researchers at ORNL and the University Claudemore » Bernard-Lyon 1 (France) continues. Data were analyzed during this visit, plans for further experiments were developed, and a paper was drafted for publication.« less

  1. Status of Propulsion Technology Development Under the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David; Kamhawi, Hani; Patterson, Mike; Pencil, Eric; Pinero, Luis; Falck, Robert; Dankanich, John

    2014-01-01

    Since 2001, the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program has been developing and delivering in-space propulsion technologies for NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for future NASA Discovery, New Frontiers, Flagship and sample return missions currently under consideration. The ISPT program is currently developing technology in three areas that include Propulsion System Technologies, Entry Vehicle Technologies, and Systems/Mission Analysis. ISPT's propulsion technologies include: 1) the 0.6-7 kW NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) gridded ion propulsion system; 2) a 0.3-3.9kW Halleffect electric propulsion (HEP) system for low cost and sample return missions; 3) the Xenon Flow Control Module (XFCM); 4) ultra-lightweight propellant tank technologies (ULTT); and 5) propulsion technologies for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). The NEXT Long Duration Test (LDT) recently exceeded 50,000 hours of operation and 900 kg throughput, corresponding to 34.8 MN-s of total impulse delivered. The HEP system is composed of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HIVHAC) thruster, a power processing unit (PPU), and the XFCM. NEXT and the HIVHAC are throttle-able electric propulsion systems for planetary science missions. The XFCM and ULTT are two component technologies which being developed with nearer-term flight infusion in mind. Several of the ISPT technologies are related to sample return missions needs: MAV propulsion and electric propulsion. And finally, one focus of the Systems/Mission Analysis area is developing tools that aid the application or operation of these technologies on wide variety of mission concepts. This paper provides a brief overview of the ISPT program, describing the development status and technology infusion readiness.

  2. Effects of Gravity-Assist Timing on Outer-Planet Missions Using Solar-Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Byoungsam; Coverstone, Victoria L.; Cupples, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Missions to the outer planets for spacecraft with a solar-electric propulsion system (SEPS) and that utilize a single Venus gravity assist are investigated. The trajectories maximize the delivered mass to the target planet for a range of flight times. A comparison of the trajectory characteristics (delivered mass, launch energy and onboard propulsive energy) is made for various Venus gravity assist opportunities. Methods to estimate the delivered mass to the outer planets are developed.

  3. Development priorities for in-space propulsion technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Les; Meyer, Michael; Palaszewski, Bryan; Coote, David; Goebel, Dan; White, Harold

    2013-02-01

    During the summer of 2010, NASA's Office of Chief Technologist assembled 15 civil service teams to support the creation of a NASA integrated technology roadmap. The Aero-Space Technology Area Roadmap is an integrated set of technology area roadmaps recommending the overall technology investment strategy and prioritization for NASA's technology programs. The integrated set of roadmaps will provide technology paths needed to meet NASA's strategic goals. The roadmaps have been reviewed by senior NASA management and the National Research Council. With the exception of electric propulsion systems used for commercial communications satellite station-keeping and a handful of deep space science missions, almost all of the rocket engines in use today are chemical rockets; that is, they obtain the energy needed to generate thrust by combining reactive chemicals to create a hot gas that is expanded to produce thrust. A significant limitation of chemical propulsion is that it has a relatively low specific impulse. Numerous concepts for advanced propulsion technologies with significantly higher values of specific impulse have been developed over the past 50 years. Advanced in-space propulsion technologies will enable much more effective exploration of our solar system, near and far, and will permit mission designers to plan missions to "fly anytime, anywhere, and complete a host of science objectives at the destinations" with greater reliability and safety. With a wide range of possible missions and candidate propulsion technologies with very diverse characteristics, the question of which technologies are 'best' for future missions is a difficult one. A portfolio of technologies to allow optimum propulsion solutions for a diverse set of missions and destinations are described in the roadmap and herein.

  4. Experimental assessment of out‐of‐field dose components in high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Alabdoaburas, Mohamad M.; Mege, Jean‐Pierre; Chavaudra, Jean; Bezin, Jérémi Vũ; Veres, Attila; de Vathaire, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally investigate the out‐of‐field dose in a water phantom, with several high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy (RT). The study was carried out for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV electron beams, on three different linear accelerators, each equipped with a specific applicator. Measurements were performed in a water phantom, at different depths, for different applicator sizes, and off‐axis distances up to 70 cm from beam central axis (CAX). Thermoluminescent powder dosimeters (TLD‐700) were used. For given cases, TLD measurements were compared to EBT3 films and parallel‐plane ionization chamber measurements. Also, out‐of‐field doses at 10 cm depth, with and without applicator, were evaluated. With the Siemens applicators, a peak dose appears at about 12–15 cm out of the field edge, at 1 cm depth, for all field sizes and energies. For the Siemens Primus, with a 10×10cm2 applicator, this peak reaches 2.3%, 1%, 0.9% and 1.3% of the maximum central axis dose (Dmax) for 6, 9, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams, respectively. For the Siemens Oncor, with a 10×10cm2 applicator, this peak dose reaches 0.8%, 1%, 1.4%, and 1.6% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 14 MeV, respectively, and these values increase with applicator size. For the Varian 2300C/D, the doses at 12.5 cm out of the field edge are 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.5%, and 1.1% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV, respectively, and increase with applicator size. No peak dose is evidenced for the Varian applicator for these energies. In summary, the out‐of‐field dose from electron beams increases with the beam energy and the applicator size, and decreases with the distance from the beam central axis and the depth in water. It also considerably depends on the applicator types. Our results can be of interest for the dose estimations delivered in healthy tissues outside the treatment field for the RT patient, as well as in studies exploring RT long‐term effects. PACS number

  5. The Feasibility of Linear Motors and High-Energy Thrusters for Massive Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stull, M. A.

    A combination of two propulsion technologies, superconducting linear motors using ambient magnetic fields and high- energy particle beam thrusters, may make it possible to develop massive aerospace vehicles the size of aircraft carriers. If certain critical thresholds can be attained, linear motors can enable massive vehicles to fly within the atmosphere and can propel them to orbit. Thrusters can do neither, because power requirements are prohibitive. However, unless superconductors having extremely high critical current densities can be developed, the interplanetary magnetic field is too weak for linear motors to provide sufficient acceleration to reach even nearby planets. On the other hand, high-energy thrusters can provide adequate acceleration using a minimal amount of reaction mass, at achievable levels of power generation. If the requirements for linear motor propulsion can be met, combining the two modes of propulsion could enable huge nuclear powered spacecraft to reach at least the inner planets of the solar system, the asteroid belt, and possibly Jupiter, in reasonably short times under continuous acceleration, opening them to exploration, resource development and colonization.

  6. Green Propulsion Technologies for Advanced Air Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Rosario, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Air transportation is critical to U.S. and Global economic vitality. However, energy and climate issues challenge aviations ability to be sustainable in the long term. Aviation must dramatically reduce fuel use and related emissions. Energy costs to U.S. airlines nearly tripled between 1995 and 2011, and continue to be the highest percentage of operating costs. The NASA Advanced Air Transports Technology Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advanced technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. The presentation will highlight the NASA vision of revolutionary systems and propulsion technologies needed to achieve these challenging goals. Specifically, the primary focus is on the N+3 generation; that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe, which are envisioned as being powered by Hybrid Electric Propulsion Systems.

  7. Fusion Propulsion Z-Pinch Engine Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human spaceflight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly1. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield 2. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10(exp -6 sec). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Decade Module 2 (DM2), approx.500 KJ pulsed-power is coming to the RSA Aerophysics Lab managed by UAHuntsville in January, 2012. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) 3 propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle.

  8. Energy distribution measurement of narrow-band ultrashort x-ray beams via K-edge filters subtraction

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Paolo; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Marziani, Michele

    2012-10-01

    The characterization of novel x-ray sources includes the measurement of the photon flux and the energy distribution of the produced beam. The aim of BEATS2 experiment at the SPARC-LAB facility of the INFN National Laboratories of Frascati (Rome, Italy) is to investigate possible medical applications of an x-ray source based on Thomson relativistic back-scattering. This source is expected to produce a pulsed quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam with an instantaneous flux of 10{sup 20} ph/s in pulses 10 ps long and with an average energy of about 20 keV. A direct measurement of energy distribution of this beam is very difficult withmore » traditional detectors because of the extremely high photon flux. In this paper, we present a method for the evaluation of the energy distribution of quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams based on beam filtration with K-edge absorbing foils in the energy range of interest (16-22 keV). The technique was tested measuring the energy distribution of an x-ray beam having a spectrum similar to the expected one (SPARC-LAB Thomson source) by using a tungsten anode x-ray tube properly filtered and powered. The energy distribution obtained has been compared with the one measured with a HPGe detector showing very good agreement.« less

  9. Identification of propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter; Guo, Ten-Huei; Duyar, Ahmet

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a tutorial on the use of model identification techniques for the identification of propulsion system models. These models are important for control design, simulation, parameter estimation, and fault detection. Propulsion system identification is defined in the context of the classical description of identification as a four step process that is unique because of special considerations of data and error sources. Propulsion system models are described along with the dependence of system operation on the environment. Propulsion system simulation approaches are discussed as well as approaches to propulsion system identification with examples for both air breathing and rocket systems.

  10. Coordination and propulsion and non-propulsion phases in 100 meter breaststroke swimming.

    PubMed

    Strzała, Marek; Krężałek, Piotr; Kucia-Czyszczoń, Katarzyna; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Stanula, Arkadiusz; Tyka, Anna K; Sagalara, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to analyze the coordination, propulsion and non-propulsion phases in the 100 meter breaststroke race. Twenty-seven male swimmers (15.7 ± 1.98 years old) with the total body length (TBL) of 247.0 ± 10.60 [cm] performed an all-out 100 m breaststroke bout. The bouts were recorded with an underwater camera installed on a portable trolley. The swimming kinematic parameters, stroke rate (SR) and stroke length (SL), as well as the coordination indices based on propulsive or non-propulsive movement phases of the arms and legs were distinguished. Swimming speed (V100surface breast) was associated with SL (R = 0.41, p < 0.05) and with TBL tending towards statistical significance (R = 0.36, p < 0.07), all relationships between the selected variables in the study were measured using partial correlations with controlled age. SL interplayed negatively with the limbs propulsive phase Overlap indicator (R = -0.46, p < 0.05), but had no significant relationship to the non-propulsion Glide indicator. The propulsion in-sweep (AP3) phase of arms and their non-propulsion partial air recovery (ARair) phase interplayed with V100surface breast (R = 0.51, p < 0.05 and 0.48 p < 0.05) respectively, displaying the importance of proper execution of this phase (AP3) and in reducing the resistance recovery phases in consecutive ones.

  11. Why Density Dependent Propulsion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

  12. Energy-Sensitive Ion- and Cathode-Luminescent Radiation-Beam Monitors Based on Multilayer Thin-Film Designs.

    PubMed

    Gil-Rostra, Jorge; Ferrer, Francisco J; Espinós, Juan Pedro; González-Elipe, Agustín R; Yubero, Francisco

    2017-05-17

    A multilayer luminescent design concept is presented to develop energy-sensitive radiation-beam monitors on the basis of colorimetric analysis. Each luminescent layer within the stack consists of rare-earth-doped transparent oxides of optical quality and a characteristic luminescent emission under excitation with electron or ion beams. For a given type of particle beam (electron, protons, α particles, etc.), its penetration depth and therefore its energy loss at a particular buried layer within the multilayer stack depend on the energy of the initial beam. The intensity of the luminescent response of each layer is proportional to the energy deposited by the radiation beam within the layer, so characteristic color emission will be achieved if different phosphors are considered in the layers of the luminescent stack. Phosphor doping, emission efficiency, layer thickness, and multilayer structure design are key parameters relevant to achieving a broad colorimetric response. Two case examples are designed and fabricated to illustrate the capabilities of these new types of detector to evaluate the kinetic energy of either electron beams of a few kilo-electron volts or α particles of a few mega-electron volts.

  13. Energy efficient engine flight propulsion system: Aircraft/engine integration evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Results of aircraft/engine integration studies conducted on an advanced flight propulsion system are reported. Economic evaluations of the preliminary design are included and indicate that program goals will be met. Installed sfc, DOC, noise, and emissions were evaluated. Aircraft installation considerations and growth were reviewed.

  14. Energy efficient engine flight propulsion system: Aircraft/engine integration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, R.F.

    Results of aircraft/engine integration studies conducted on an advanced flight propulsion system are reported. Economic evaluations of the preliminary design are included and indicate that program goals will be met. Installed sfc, DOC, noise, and emissions were evaluated. Aircraft installation considerations and growth were reviewed.

  15. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL < 1 / (2 πωpe)) laser pulses drive highly nonlinear plasma waves which can trap ~ nC of electrons and accelerate them to ~GeV energies over ~cm lengths. These electron beams can then be converted by a high-Z target via bremsstrahlung into low-divergence (< 20 mrad) beams of high-energy (<600 MeV) photons and subsequently into positrons via the Bethe-Heitler process. By increasing the material thickness and Z, the resulting Ne+ /Ne- ratio can approach unity, resulting in a near neutral density plasma jet. These quasi-neutral beams are presumed to retain the short-pulse (τL < 40 fs) characteristic of the electron beam, resulting in a high peak density of ne- /e+ ~ 1016 cm-3 , making the source an excellent candidate for laboratory study of astrophysical leptonic jets. Alternatively, the electron beam can be interacted with a counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  16. Electrolysis Propulsion for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim A.; Arrington, Lynn A.; McElroy, James F.; Mitlitsky, Fred; Weisberg, Andrew H.; Carter, Preston H., II; Myers, Blake; Reed, Brian D.

    1997-01-01

    Electrolysis propulsion has been recognized over the last several decades as a viable option to meet many satellite and spacecraft propulsion requirements. This technology, however, was never used for in-space missions. In the same time frame, water based fuel cells have flown in a number of missions. These systems have many components similar to electrolysis propulsion systems. Recent advances in component technology include: lightweight tankage, water vapor feed electrolysis, fuel cell technology, and thrust chamber materials for propulsion. Taken together, these developments make propulsion and/or power using electrolysis/fuel cell technology very attractive as separate or integrated systems. A water electrolysis propulsion testbed was constructed and tested in a joint NASA/Hamilton Standard/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories program to demonstrate these technology developments for propulsion. The results from these testbed experiments using a I-N thruster are presented. A concept to integrate a propulsion system and a fuel cell system into a unitized spacecraft propulsion and power system is outlined.

  17. Low-energy ion beam-based deposition of gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. R., E-mail: mrvasquez@coe.upd.edu.ph; Wada, M.

    2016-02-15

    An ion source with a remote plasma chamber excited by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency power was used for low-energy broad ion beam extraction. Optical emission spectral analyses showed the sputtering and postionization of a liquid gallium (Ga) target placed in a chamber separated from the source bombarded by argon (Ar) plasma guided by a bent magnetic field. In addition, an E × B probe successfully showed the extraction of low-energy Ga and Ar ion beams using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. By introducing dilute amounts of nitrogen gas into the system, formation of thin Ga-based films on a silicon substratemore » was demonstrated as determined from X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity studies.« less

  18. Magnetized Target Fusion in Advanced Propulsion Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cylar, Rashad

    2003-01-01

    The Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) Propulsion lab at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has a program in place that has adopted to attempt to create a faster, lower cost and more reliable deep space transportation system. In this deep space travel the physics and development of high velocity plasma jets must be understood. The MTF Propulsion lab is also in attempt to open up the solar system for human exploration and commercial use. Fusion, as compared to fission, is just the opposite. Fusion involves the light atomic nuclei combination to produce denser nuclei. In the process, the energy is created by destroying the mass according to the distinguished equation: E = mc2 . Fusion energy development is being pursued worldwide as a very sustainable form of energy that is environmentally friendly. For the purposes of space exploration fusion reactions considered include the isotopes of hydrogen-deuterium (D2) and tritium (T3). Nuclei have an electrostatic repulsion between them and in order for the nuclei to fuse this repulsion must be overcome. One technique to bypass repulsion is to heat the nuclei to very high temperatures. The temperatures vary according to the type of reactions. For D-D reactions, one billion degrees Celsius is required, and for D-T reactions, one hundred million degrees is sufficient. There has to be energy input for useful output to be obtained form the fusion To make fusion propulsion practical, the mass, the volume, and the cost of the equipment to produce the reactions (generally called the reactor) need to be reduced by an order of magnitude or two from the state-of-the-art fusion machines. Innovations in fusion schemes are therefore required, especially for obtaining thrust for propulsive applications. Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is one of the innovative fusion concepts that have emerged over the last several years. MSFC is working with Los Alamos National Laboratory and other research groups in studying the

  19. Ion-beam technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Robson, R. R.; Sovey, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Ion propulsion research and development yields a mature technology that is transferable to a wide range of nonpropulsive applications, including terrestrial and space manufacturing. A xenon ion source was used for an investigation into potential ion-beam applications. The results of cathode tests and discharge-chamber experiments are presented. A series of experiments encompassing a wide range of potential applications is discussed. Two types of processes, sputter deposition, and erosion were studied. Some of the potential applications are thin-film Teflon capacitor fabrication, lubrication applications, ion-beam cleaning and polishing, and surface texturing.

  20. An energy harvesting solution based on the post-buckling response of non-prismatic slender beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Pengcheng; Borchani, Wassim; Hasni, Hassene; Alavi, Amir H.; Lajnef, Nizar

    2017-04-01

    Systems based on post-buckled structural elements have been extensively used in many applications such as actuation, remote sensing and energy harvesting thanks to their efficiency enhancement. The post-buckling snap- through behavior of bilaterally constrained beams has been used to create an efficient energy harvesting mechanism under quasi-static excitations. The conversion mechanism has been used to transform low-rate and low-frequency excitations into high-rate motions. Electric energy can be generated from such high-rate motions using piezoelectric transducers. However, lack of control over the post-buckling behavior severely limits the mechanism's efficiency. This study aims to maximize the levels of the harvestable power by controlling the location of the snapping point along the beam at different buckling transitions. Since the snap-through location cannot be controlled by tuning the geometry properties of a uniform cross-section beam, non-uniform cross sections are examined. An energy-based theoretical model is herein developed to predict the post-buckling response of non-uniform cross-section beams. The total potential energy is minimized under constraints that represent the physical confinement of the beam between the lateral boundaries. Experimentally validated results show that changing the shape and geometry dimensions of non- uniform cross-section beams allows for the accurate control of the snap-through location at different buckling transitions. A 78.59% increase in harvested energy levels is achieved by optimizing the beam's shape.

  1. Energy broadening due to space-charge oscillations in high current electron beams. [SEPAC payload experiment on Spacelab 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Jongeward, G. A.; Parks, D. E.; Reasoner, D. L.; Purvis, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    During electron beam accelerator operation on Spacelab I, substantial fluxes of electrons were observed with energies greater than the initial beam energy. Numerical calculations are performed for the emission of an unneutralized, one-dimensional electron beam. These calculations show clearly that space charge oscillations, which are associated with the charge buildup on the emitter, strongly modify the beam and cause the returning beam particles to have a distribution of kinetic energies ranging from half to over twice the initial energy.

  2. Dual energy scanning beam laminographic x-radiography

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Randolph F.

    1998-01-01

    A multiple x-ray energy level imaging system includes a scanning x-ray beam and two detector design having a first low x-ray energy sensitive detector and a second high x-ray energy sensitive detector. The low x-ray energy detector is placed next to or in front of the high x-ray energy detector. The low energy sensitive detector has small stopping power for x-rays. The lower energy x-rays are absorbed and converted into electrical signals while the majority of the higher energy x-rays pass through undetected. The high energy sensitive detector has a large stopping power for x-rays as well as it having a filter placed between it and the object to absorb the lower energy x-rays. In a second embodiment; a single energy sensitive detector is provided which provides an output signal proportional to the amount of energy in each individual x-ray it absorbed. It can then have an electronic threshold or thresholds set to select two or more energy ranges for the images. By having multiple detectors located at different positions, a dual energy laminography system is possible.

  3. Dual energy scanning beam laminographic x-radiography

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, S.; Wojcik, R.F.

    1998-04-21

    A multiple x-ray energy level imaging system includes a scanning x-ray beam and two detector design having a first low x-ray energy sensitive detector and a second high x-ray energy sensitive detector. The low x-ray energy detector is placed next to or in front of the high x-ray energy detector. The low energy sensitive detector has small stopping power for x-rays. The lower energy x-rays are absorbed and converted into electrical signals while the majority of the higher energy x-rays pass through undetected. The high energy sensitive detector has a large stopping power for x-rays as well as it having a filter placed between it and the object to absorb the lower energy x-rays. In a second embodiment; a single energy sensitive detector is provided which provides an output signal proportional to the amount of energy in each individual x-ray it absorbed. It can then have an electronic threshold or thresholds set to select two or more energy ranges for the images. By having multiple detectors located at different positions, a dual energy laminography system is possible. 6 figs.

  4. Stable topological insulators achieved using high energy electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lukas; Konczykowski, Marcin; Deng, Haiming; Korzhovska, Inna; Begliarbekov, Milan; Chen, Zhiyi; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Marsi, Marino; Perfetti, Luca; Hruban, Andrzej; Wołoś, Agnieszka; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators are potentially transformative quantum solids with metallic surface states which have Dirac band structure and are immune to disorder. Ubiquitous charged bulk defects, however, pull the Fermi energy into the bulk bands, denying access to surface charge transport. Here we demonstrate that irradiation with swift (∼2.5 MeV energy) electron beams allows to compensate these defects, bring the Fermi level back into the bulk gap and reach the charge neutrality point (CNP). Controlling the beam fluence, we tune bulk conductivity from p- (hole-like) to n-type (electron-like), crossing the Dirac point and back, while preserving the Dirac energy dispersion. The CNP conductance has a two-dimensional character on the order of ten conductance quanta and reveals, both in Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3, the presence of only two quantum channels corresponding to two topological surfaces. The intrinsic quantum transport of the topological states is accessible disregarding the bulk size. PMID:26961901

  5. Model Test of the Aerospace Laser Propulsion Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageichik, Alexander A.; Egorov, Maxim S.; Ostapenko, Svetlana V.; Rezunkov, Yuri A.; Safronov, Alexander L.; Stepanov, Vladimir V.

    2005-04-01

    One of the main results of the experimental and theoretical investigations made under the ISTC Project ♯ 1801 is the original design of Aerospace Laser Propulsion Engine (ASLPE) developed. The designed characteristics of the ASLPE flight model are experimentally approved, including the test experiments with a solid propellant. The obtained momentum coupling coefficient is rather high and comparable one with respect to the coefficient obtained by other researchers. Moreover, it is experimentally demonstrated that the thrust characteristics of the ASLPE flight model does not depend on angular aberrations of the beam coming onto the beam concentrator of the model with the incident angle of 0.01 radian. The experiments also demonstrated that successful launching of the vehicle with the ASLPE under the laser characteristics is possible also if the vehicle mass will be decreased and the thermal blooming effect will be eliminated.

  6. Space fusion energy conversion using a field reversed configuration reactor: A new technical approach for space propulsion and power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Miley, George H.; Santarius, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The fusion energy conversion design approach, the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) - when burning deuterium and helium-3, offers a new method and concept for space transportation with high energy demanding programs, like the Manned Mars Mission and planetary science outpost missions require. FRC's will increase safety, reduce costs, and enable new missions by providing a high specific power propulsion system from a high performance fusion engine system that can be optimally designed. By using spacecraft powered by FRC's the space program can fulfill High Energy Space Missions (HESM) in a manner not otherwise possible. FRC's can potentially enable the attainment of high payload mass fractions while doing so within shorter flight times.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  8. Feasibility of Colliding-beam fast-fission reactor via 238U80++238 U80+ --> 4 FF + 5n + 430 MeV beam with suppressed plutonium and direct conversion of fission fragment (FF) energy into electricity and/or Rocket propellant with high specific impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan; Hester, Tim; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Uranium-uranium colliding beam experiment1, used fully ionized 238U92+ at energy 100GeV --> <-- 100 GeV, has measured total σ = 487 b. Reaction rate of colliding beams is proportional to neutron flux-squared. First functional Auto-Collider3-6, a compact Migma IV, 1 m in diameter, had self-colliding deuterons, D+, of 725 KeV --> <-- 725 KeV, resulting in copious production of T and 3He. U +U Autocollider``EXYDER'' will use strong-focusing magnet7, which would increase reaction rate by 104. 80 times ionized U ions accelerated through 3 MV accelerator, will collide beam 240 MeV --> <-- 240 MeV. Reaction is: 238U80+ +238 U80+ --> 4 FF + 5n + 430 MeV. Using a simple model1 fission σf ~ 100 b. Suppression of Pu by a factor of 106 will be achieved because NO thermal neutron fission can take place; only fast, 1-3 MeV, where σabs is negligible. Direct conversion of 95% of 430 MeV produced is carried by electrically charged FFs which are magnetically funneled for direct conversion of energy of FFs via electrostatic decelerators4,11. 90% of 930 MeV is electrically recoverable. Depending on the assumptions, we project electric _ power density production of 20 to 200 MWe m-3, equivalent to Thermal 1.3 - 13 GWthm-3. If one-half of unburned U is used for propulsion while rest powers system, heavy FF ion mass provides specific impulse Isp = 106 sec., 103 times higher than current rocket engines.

  9. Study of Collective Beam Effects in Energy Recovery Linac Driven Free Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christpher C.

    Collective beam effects such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and longitudinal space charge (LSC) can degrade the quality of high-energy electron beams used for applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). The advent of energy recovery linac (ERL)-based FELs brings exciting possibilities for very high-average current FELs that can operate with greater efficiency. However, due to the structure of ERLs, they may be even more susceptible to CSR. It is therefore necessary that these collective beam effects be well understood if future ERL-based designs are to be successful. The Jefferson Laboratory ERL driven IR FEL provides an ideal test-bed for looking at how CSR impacts the electron beam. Due to its novel design we can easily test how CSR's impact on the beam varies as a function of compression within the machine. In this work we will look at measurements of both average energy loss and energy spectrum fragmentation as a function of bunch compression. These results are compared to particle tracking simulations including a 1D CSR model and, in general, good agreement is seen between simulation and measurement. Of particular interest is fragmentation of the energy spectrum that is observed due to CSR and LSC. We will also show how this fragmentation develops and how it can be mitigated through use of the sextupoles in the JLab FEL. Finally, a more complete 2D model is used to simulate CSR-beam interaction. Due to the parameters of the experiment it is expected that a 2D CSR model would yield different results than the 1D CSR model. However, excellent agreement is seen between the two CSR model results.

  10. Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, R.

    2004-11-01

    Next Generation Electric Propulsion (NGEP) technology development tasks are working towards advancing solar-powered electric propulsion systems and components to levels ready for transition to flight systems. Current tasks within NGEP include NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT), Carbon Based Ion Optics (CBIO), NSTAR Extended Life Test (ELT) and low-power Hall Effect thrusters. The growing number of solar electric propulsion options provides reduced cost and flexibility to capture a wide range of Solar System exploration missions. Benefits of electric propulsion systems over state-of-the-art chemical systems include increased launch windows, which reduce mission risk; increased deliverable payload mass for more science; and a reduction in launch vehicle size-- all of which increase the opportunities for New Frontiers and Discovery class missions. The Dawn Discovery mission makes use of electric propulsion for sequential rendezvous with two large asteroids (Vesta then Ceres), something not possible using chemical propulsion. NEXT components and thruster system under development have NSTAR heritage with significant increases in maximum power and Isp along with deep throttling capability to accommodate changes in input power over the mission trajectory. NEXT will produce engineering model system components that will be validated (through qualification-level and integrated system testing) and ready for transition to flight system development. NEXT offers Discovery, New Frontiers, Mars Exploration and outer-planet missions a larger deliverable payload mass and a smaller launch vehicle size. CBIO addresses the need to further extend ion thruster lifetime by using low erosion carbon-based materials. Testing of 30-cm Carbon-Carbon and Pyrolytic graphite grids using a lab model NSTAR thruster are complete. In addition, JPL completed a 1000 hr. life test on 30-cm Carbon-Carbon grids. The NSTAR ELT was a life time qualification test started in 1999 with a goal of 88 kg

  11. Trajectory Optimization of an Interstellar Mission Using Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kluever, Craig A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents several mission designs for heliospheric boundary exploration using spacecraft with low-thrust ion engines as the primary mode of propulsion The mission design goal is to transfer a 200-kg spacecraft to the heliospheric boundary in minimum time. The mission design is a combined trajectory and propulsion system optimization problem. Trajectory design variables include launch date, launch energy, burn and coast arc switch times, thrust steering direction, and planetary flyby conditions. Propulsion system design parameters include input power and specific impulse. Both SEP and NEP spacecraft arc considered and a wide range of launch vehicle options are investigated. Numerical results are presented and comparisons with the all chemical heliospheric missions from Ref 9 are made.

  12. A summary of EHV propulsion technology. [Electric and Hybrid Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    While the battery used by an electric vehicle is the primary determinant of range, and to a lesser extent of performance, the design of the vehicle's propulsion system establishes its performance level and is the greatest contributor to its purchase price. Propulsion system weight, efficiency and cost are related to the specific combination of components used. Attention is given to the development status of the U.S. Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, through which propulsion component and system design improvements have been made which promise weight savings of 35-50 percent, efficiency gains of 25 percent, and lower costs, when compared to the state of the art at the program's inception.

  13. Experimental Investigations on Beamed Energy Aerospace Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    the aluminum ―igniter‖ material greatly lowers the incident laser intensity and fluence required to trigger the optical air breakdown 7 . The geometry...sequence following laser-induced air -breakdown was lost. The pressure distribution across the under-surface of the shroud is displayed in Fig. 24, along...photograph of bifurcated air -breakdown geometry across inlet gap, and secondary breakdown on shroud under-surface. 37 Fig. 29 Run#21 – Measured

  14. Z-Pinch Magneto-Inertial Fusion Propulsion Engine Design Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, Janie H.; Statham, Geoffrey; Adams, Robert B.; Polsgrove, Tara; Fincher, Sharon; Fabisinski, Leo; Maples, C. Dauphne; Percy, Thomas K.; Cortez, Ross J.; Cassibry, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human spaceflight missions. Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) is an approach which has been shown to potentially lead to a low cost, small fusion reactor/engine assembly (1). The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is an MIF concept in which a column of gas is compressed to thermonuclear conditions by an estimated axial current of approximately 100 MA. Recent advancements in experiments and the theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield as I(sup 4) (2). The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this is repeated over short timescales (10(exp -6) sec). This plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects (NWE) testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. There is a wealth of literature characterizing Z-Pinch physics and existing models (3-5). In order to be useful in engineering analysis, a simplified Z-Pinch fusion thermodynamic model was developed to determine the quantity of plasma, plasma temperature, rate of expansion, energy production, etc. to calculate the parameters that characterize a propulsion system. The amount of nuclear fuel per pulse, mixture ratio of the D-T and nozzle liner propellant, and assumptions about the efficiency of the engine, enabled the sizing of the propulsion system and resulted in an estimate of the thrust and Isp of a Z-Pinch fusion propulsion system for the concept vehicle. MIF requires a magnetic nozzle to contain and direct the nuclear pulses, as well as a robust structure and radiation shielding. The structure

  15. Small Satellite Propulsion Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Oleson, Steven R.; Curran, Francis M.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced chemical and low power electric propulsion offer attractive options for small satellite propulsion. Applications include orbit raising, orbit maintenance, attitude control, repositioning, and deorbit of both Earth-space and planetary spacecraft. Potential propulsion technologies for these functions include high pressure Ir/Re bipropellant engines, very low power arcjets, Hall thrusters, and pulsed plasma thrusters, all of which have been shown to operate in manners consistent with currently planned small satellites. Mission analyses show that insertion of advanced propulsion technologies enables and/or greatly enhances many planned small satellite missions. Examples of commercial, DoD, and NASA missions are provided to illustrate the potential benefits of using advanced propulsion options on small satellites.

  16. Results of Evaluation of Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave

    2003-01-01

    The solar thermal propulsion evaluation reported here relied on prior research for all information on solar thermal propulsion technology and performance. Sources included personal contacts with experts in the field in addition to published reports and papers. Mission performance models were created based on this information in order to estimate performance and mass characteristics of solar thermal propulsion systems. Mission analysis was performed for a set of reference missions to assess the capabilities and benefits of solar thermal propulsion in comparison with alternative in-space propulsion systems such as chemical and electric propulsion. Mission analysis included estimation of delta V requirements as well as payload capabilities for a range of missions. Launch requirements and costs, and integration into launch vehicles, were also considered. The mission set included representative robotic scientific missions, and potential future NASA human missions beyond low Earth orbit. Commercial communications satellite delivery missions were also included, because if STP technology were selected for that application, frequent use is implied and this would help amortize costs for technology advancement and systems development. A C3 Topper mission was defined, calling for a relatively small STP. The application is to augment the launch energy (C3) available from launch vehicles with their built-in upper stages. Payload masses were obtained from references where available. The communications satellite masses represent the range of payload capabilities for the Delta IV Medium and/or Atlas launch vehicle family. Results indicated that STP could improve payload capability over current systems, but that this advantage cannot be realized except in a few cases because of payload fairing volume limitations on current launch vehicles. It was also found that acquiring a more capable (existing) launch vehicle, rather than adding an STP stage, is the most economical in most cases.

  17. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1992-01-01

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shockwaves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment.

  18. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kare, J.T.

    1992-10-06

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shock waves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment. 10 figs.

  19. High Temperature Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage to Augment Solar Thermal Propulsion for Microsatellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-30

    Solar Thermal Propulsion for Micro. Sats 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew R. Gilpin 5d...ABSTRACT Solar thermal propulsion (STP) offers an unique combination of thrust and efficiency, providing greater total V capability than chemical...to conventional technologies. The trend in solar thermal research over the past two decades has been towards simplification and miniaturization to

  20. Energy monitoring device for 1.5-2.4 MeV electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuochi, P. G.; Lavalle, M.; Martelli, A.; Kovács, A.; Mehta, K.; Kuntz, F.; Plumeri, S.

    2010-03-01

    An easy-to-use and robust energy monitoring device has been developed for reliable detection of day-to-day small variations in the electron beam energy, a critical parameter for quality control and quality assurance in industrial radiation processing. It has potential for using on-line, thus providing real-time information. Its working principle is based on the measurement of currents, or charges, collected by two aluminium absorbers of specific thicknesses (dependent on the beam energy), insulated from each other and positioned within a faraday cup-style aluminium cage connected to the ground. The device has been extensively tested in the energy range of 4-12 MeV under standard laboratory conditions at Institute of Isotopes and CNR-ISOF using different types of electron accelerators; namely, a TESLA LPR-4 LINAC (3-6 MeV) and a L-band Vickers LINAC (7-12 MeV), respectively. This device has been also tested in high power electron beam radiation processing facilities, one equipped with a 7-MeV LUE-8 linear accelerator used for crosslinking of cables and medical device sterilization, and the other equipped with a 10 MeV Rhodotron TT100 recirculating accelerator used for in-house sterilization of medical devices. In the present work, we have extended the application of this method to still lower energy region, i.e. from 1.5 to 2.4 MeV. Also, we show that such a device is capable of detecting deviation in the beam energy as small as 40 keV.

  1. High efficiency and high-energy intra-cavity beam shaping laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hailong; Meng, Junqing; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-09-01

    We present a technology of intra-cavity laser beam shaping with theory and experiment to obtain a flat-top-like beam with high-pulse energy. A radial birefringent element (RBE) was used in a crossed Porro prism polarization output coupling resonator to modulate the phase delay radially. The reflectively of a polarizer used as an output mirror was variable radially. A flat-top-like beam with 72.5 mJ, 11 ns at 20 Hz was achieved by a side-pumped Nd:YAG zigzag slab laser, and the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency was 17.3%.

  2. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linacmore » photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.« less

  3. OTV Propulsion Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The statistical technology needs of aero-assist maneuvering, propulsion, and usage of cryogenic fluids were presented. Industry panels discussed the servicing of reusable space based vehicles and propulsion-vehicle interation.

  4. Underwater vehicle propulsion and power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Chao, Yi (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An underwater vehicle includes a shaft with a propeller disposed thereon; a generator/motor having a stator and a rotor, the rotor being operable to rotate with the propeller; at least one energy storage device connected to the generator/motor; and a controller for setting the generator/motor in a charge mode, a propulsion mode and an idle mode.

  5. An Energy Saving System for a Beam Pumping Unit

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hongqiang; Liu, Jun; Han, Jiuqiang; Jiang, An

    2016-01-01

    Beam pumping units are widely used in the oil production industry, but the energy efficiency of this artificial lift machinery is generally low, especially for the low-production well and high-production well in the later stage. There are a number of ways for energy savings in pumping units, with the periodic adjustment of stroke speed and rectification of balance deviation being two important methods. In the paper, an energy saving system for a beam pumping unit (ESS-BPU) based on the Internet of Things (IoT) was proposed. A total of four types of sensors, including load sensor, angle sensor, voltage sensor, and current sensor, were used to detect the operating conditions of the pumping unit. Data from these sensors was fed into a controller installed in an oilfield to adjust the stroke speed automatically and estimate the degree of balance in real-time. Additionally, remote supervision could be fulfilled using a browser on a computer or smartphone. Furthermore, the data from a practical application was recorded and analyzed, and it can be seen that ESS-BPU is helpful in reducing energy loss caused by unnecessarily high stroke speed and a poor degree of balance. PMID:27187402

  6. Thermal Propulsion Capture System Heat Exchanger Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges of manned spaceflight beyond low earth orbit and the moon is harmful radiation that astronauts would be exposed to on their long journey to Mars and further destinations. Using nuclear energy has the potential to be a more effective means of propulsion compared to traditional chemical engines (higher specific impulse). An upper stage nuclear engine would allow astronauts to reach their destination faster and more fuel efficiently. Testing these engines poses engineering challenges due to the need to totally capture the engine exhaust. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System is a concept for cost effectively and safely testing Nuclear Thermal Engines. Nominally, hydrogen exhausted from the engine is not radioactive, but is treated as such in case of fuel element failure. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System involves injecting liquid oxygen to convert the hydrogen exhaust into steam. The steam is then cooled and condensed into liquid water to allow for storage. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System concept for ground testing of a nuclear powered engine involves capturing the engine exhaust to be cooled and condensed before being stored. The hydrogen exhaust is injected with liquid oxygen and burned to form steam. That steam must be cooled to saturation temperatures before being condensed into liquid water. A crossflow heat exchanger using water as a working fluid will be designed to accomplish this goal. Design a cross flow heat exchanger for the Thermal Propulsion Capture System testing which: Eliminates the need for water injection cooling, Cools steam from 5800 F to saturation temperature, and Is efficient and minimizes water requirement.

  7. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Jiang, Jian; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Chang; Wei, Jianguo

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  8. Hypervelocity gun. [using both electric and chemical energy for projectile propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, F. C.; Biehl, A. J. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    A velocity amplifier system which uses both electric and chemical energy for projectile propulsion is provided in a compact hypervelocity gun suitable for laboratory use. A relatively heavy layer of a tamping material such as concrete encloses a loop of an electrically conductive material. An explosive charge at least partially surrounding the loop is adapted to collapse the loop upon detonation of the charge. A source of electricity charges the loop through two leads, and an electric switch which is activated by the charge explosive charge, disconnects the leads from the source of electricity and short circuits them. An opening in the tamping material extends to the loop and forms a barrel. The loop, necked down in the opening, forms the sabot on which the projectile is located. When the loop is electrically charged and the explosive detonated, the loop is short circuited and collapsed thus building up a magnetic field which acts as a sabot catcher. The sabot is detached from the loop and the sabot and projectile are accelerated to hypervelocity.

  9. Ultrasonic propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Eric

    In this investigation, a propulsion system is introduced for propelling and guiding an object through a fluid. Thrust for forward motion and for turning is produced by acoustic waves generated by piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers. The principle of operation of the transducers is described, and methods are presented for the design of the entire system, including the transducers, signal generator, guidance and control system, and the power source. A wirelessly controlled proof-of-concept device was constructed. This device demonstrates the operation and practicality of the propulsion and guidance systems and illustrates that they may be employed in situations where the use of conventional propulsive devices such as propellers or jets is unfeasible.

  10. Nonlinear finite amplitude vibrations of sharp-edged beams in viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aureli, M.; Basaran, M. E.; Porfiri, M.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we study flexural vibrations of a cantilever beam with thin rectangular cross section submerged in a quiescent viscous fluid and undergoing oscillations whose amplitude is comparable with its width. The structure is modeled using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and the distributed hydrodynamic loading is described by a single complex-valued hydrodynamic function which accounts for added mass and fluid damping experienced by the structure. We perform a parametric 2D computational fluid dynamics analysis of an oscillating rigid lamina, representative of a generic beam cross section, to understand the dependence of the hydrodynamic function on the governing flow parameters. We find that increasing the frequency and amplitude of the vibration elicits vortex shedding and convection phenomena which are, in turn, responsible for nonlinear hydrodynamic damping. We establish a manageable nonlinear correction to the classical hydrodynamic function developed for small amplitude vibration and we derive a computationally efficient reduced order modal model for the beam nonlinear oscillations. Numerical and theoretical results are validated by comparison with ad hoc designed experiments on tapered beams and multimodal vibrations and with data available in the literature. Findings from this work are expected to find applications in the design of slender structures of interest in marine applications, such as biomimetic propulsion systems and energy harvesting devices.

  11. The edge transient-current technique (E-TCT) with high energy hadron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorišek, Andrej; Cindro, Vladimir; Kramberger, Gregor; Mandić, Igor; Mikuž, Marko; Muškinja, Miha; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel way to investigate the properties of silicon and CVD diamond detectors for High Energy Physics experiments complementary to the already well-established E-TCT technique using laser beam. In the proposed setup the beam of high energy hadrons (MIPs) is used instead of laser beam. MIPs incident on the detector in the direction parallel to the readout electrode plane and perpendicular to the edge of the detector. Such experiment could prove very useful to study CVD diamond detectors that are almost inaccessible for the E-TCT measurements with laser due to large band-gap as well as to verify and complement the E-TCT measurements of silicon. The method proposed is being tested at CERN in a beam of 120 GeV hadrons using a reference telescope with track resolution at the DUT of few μm. The preliminary results of the measurements are presented.

  12. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  13. Field resonance propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    A propulsion concept was developed based on a proposed resonance between coherent, pulsed electromagnetic wave forms, and gravitational wave forms (or space-time metrics). Using this concept a spacecraft propulsion system potentially capable of galactic and intergalactic travel without prohibitive travel times was designed. The propulsion system utilizes recent research associated with magnetic field line merging, hydromagnetic wave effects, free-electron lasers, laser generation of megagauss fields, and special structural and containment metals. The research required to determine potential, field resonance characteristics and to evaluate various aspects of the spacecraft propulsion design is described.

  14. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Malapit, Giovanni M.; Department of Physical Sciences, University of the Philippines Baguio, Baguio City 2600; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S.

    2012-02-15

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into themore » data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.« less

  15. Effect of workload setting on propulsion technique in handrim wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Arnet, Ursina; Veeger, Dirkjan H E J; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the influence of workload setting (speed at constant power, method to impose power) on the propulsion technique (i.e. force and timing characteristics) in handrim wheelchair propulsion. Twelve able-bodied men participated in this study. External forces were measured during handrim wheelchair propulsion on a motor driven treadmill at different velocities and constant power output (to test the forced effect of speed) and at power outputs imposed by incline vs. pulley system (to test the effect of method to impose power). Outcome measures were the force and timing variables of the propulsion technique. FEF and timing variables showed significant differences between the speed conditions when propelling at the same power output (p < 0.01). Push time was reduced while push angle increased. The method to impose power only showed slight differences in the timing variables, however not in the force variables. Researchers and clinicians must be aware of testing and evaluation conditions that may differently affect propulsion technique parameters despite an overall constant power output. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Directions in propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed here is research at NASA Lewis in the area of propulsion controls as driven by trends in advanced aircraft. The objective of the Lewis program is to develop the technology for advanced reliable propulsion control systems and to integrate the propulsion control with the flight control for optimal full-system control.

  17. Deuterium-tritium pulse propulsion with hydrogen as propellant and the entire space-craft as a gigavolt capacitor for ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2013-08-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ∼105 K. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  18. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Aerospace Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Robertson, Tony; Hawk, Clark W.; Turner, Matt; Koelfgen, Syri

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate system level performance and design issues associated with magnetic flux compression devices for aerospace power generation and propulsion. The proposed concept incorporates the principles of magnetic flux compression for direct conversion of nuclear/chemical detonation energy into electrical power. Specifically a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stator structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). The expanding plasma cloud is entirely confined by the compressed magnetic field at the expense of internal kinetic energy. Electrical power is inductively extracted, and the detonation products are collimated and expelled through a magnetic nozzle. The long-term development of this highly integrated generator/propulsion system opens up revolutionary NASA Mission scenarios for future interplanetary and interstellar spacecraft. The unique features of this concept with respect to future space travel opportunities are as follows: ability to implement high energy density chemical detonations or ICF microfusion bursts as the impulsive diamagnetic plasma source; high power density system characteristics constrain the size, weight, and cost of the vehicle architecture; provides inductive storage pulse power with a very short pulse rise time; multimegajoule energy bursts/terawatt power bursts; compact pulse power driver for low-impedance dense plasma devices; utilization of low cost HTSC material and casting technology to increase magnetic flux conservation and inductive energy storage; improvement in chemical/nuclear-to-electric energy conversion efficiency and the ability to generate significant levels of thrust with very high specific impulse; potential for developing a small, lightweight, low cost, self-excited integrated propulsion and power system suitable for space stations, planetary bases, and interplanetary and interstellar space travel

  19. JANNAF 18th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 18 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 18th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) meeting held jointly with the 36th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) and 24th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS) meetings. The meeting was held 18-21 October 1999 at NASA Kennedy Space Center and The DoubleTree Oceanfront Hotel, Cocoa Beach, Florida. Topics covered at the PSHS meeting include: shaped charge jet and kinetic energy penetrator impact vulnerability of gun propellants; thermal decomposition and cookoff behavior of energetic materials; violent reaction; detonation phenomena of solid energetic materials subjected to shock and impact stimuli; and hazard classification, insensitive munitions, and propulsion systems safety.

  20. Hybrid rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzman, Allen L.

    1993-01-01

    Topics addressed are: (1) comparison of the theoretical impulses; (2) comparison of the density-specific impulses; (3) general propulsion system features comparison; (4) hybrid systems, booster applications; and (5) hybrid systems, upper stage propulsion applications.

  1. Revisiting Nuclear Thermal Propulsion for Human Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percy, Thomas K.; Rodriguez, Mitchell

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) has long been considered as a viable in-space transportation alternative for delivering crew and cargo to the Martian system. While technology development work in nuclear propulsion has continued over the year, general interest in NTP propulsion applications has historically been tied directly to the ebb and flow of interest in sending humans to explore Mars. As far back as the 1960’s, plans for NTP-based human Mars exploration have been proposed and periodically revisited having most recently been considered as part of NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0. NASA has been investigating human Mars exploration strategies tied to its current Journey to Mars for the past few years however, NTP has only recently been added into the set of alternatives under consideration for in-space propulsion under the Mars Study Capability (MSC) team, formerly the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) team. The original charter of the EMC was to find viable human Mars exploration approaches that relied heavily on technology investment work already underway, specifically related to the development of large Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) systems. The EMC team baselined several departures from traditional Mars exploration ground rules to enable these types of architectures. These ground rule changes included lower energy conjunction class trajectories with corresponding longer flight times, aggregation of mission elements in cis-Lunar space rather than Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and, in some cases, the pre-deployment of Earth return propulsion systems to Mars. As the MSC team continues to refine the in-space transportation trades, an NTP-based architecture that takes advantage of some of these ground rule departures is being introduced.

  2. Near-field optical model for directed energy-propelled spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucich, Amber; Snyder, Tomas; Hughes, Gary B.; Srinivasan, Prashant; Lubin, Philip; Zhang, Qicheng; Cohen, Alexander; Madajian, Jonathan; Brashears, Travis; Rupert, Nic

    2017-09-01

    Directed energy is envisioned to drive wafer-scale spacecraft to relativistic speeds. Spacecraft propulsion is provided by a large array of lasers, either in Earth orbit or stationed on the ground. The directed-energy beam is focused on the spacecraft sail, and momentum from photons in the laser beam is transferred to the spacecraft as the beam reflects off of the sail. In order for the beam to be concentrated on the spacecraft, precise phase control of all the elements across the laser array will be required. Any phase misalignments within the array will give rise to pointing fluctuations and flux asymmetry in the beam, necessitating creative approaches to spacecraft stability and beam following. In order to simulate spacecraft acceleration using an array of phase-locked lasers, a near field intensity model of the laser array is required. This paper describes a light propagation model that can be used to calculate intensity patterns for the near-field diffraction of a phased array. The model is based on the combination of complex frequencies from an array of emitters as the beams from each emitter strike a target surface. Ray-tracing geometry is used to determine the distance from each point on an emitter optical surface to each point on the target surface, and the distance is used to determine the phase contribution. Simulations are presented that explore the effects of fixed and time-varying phase mis-alignments on beam pointing, beam intensity and focusing characteristics.

  3. Manual wheelchair propulsion patterns on natural surfaces during start-up propulsion.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Alicia M; Roche, Bailey M; Collinger, Jennifer L; Cooper, Rory A; Boninger, Michael L

    2009-11-01

    To classify propulsion patterns over surfaces encountered in the natural environment during start-up and compare selected biomechanical variables between pattern types. Case series. National Veterans Wheelchair Games, Minneapolis, MN, 2005. Manual wheelchair users (N=29). Subjects pushed their wheelchairs from a resting position over high-pile carpet, over linoleum, and up a ramp with a 5 degrees incline while propulsion kinematics and kinetics were recorded with a motion capture system and an instrumented wheel. Three raters classified the first 3 strokes as 1 of 4 types on each surface: arc, semicircular (SC), single looping over propulsion (SL), and double looping over propulsion (DL). The Fisher exact test was used to assess pattern changes between strokes and surface type. A multiple analysis of variance test was used to compare peak and average resultant force and moment about the hub, average wheel velocity, stroke frequency, contact angle, and distance traveled between stroke patterns. SL was the most common pattern used during start-up propulsion (44.9%), followed by arc (35.9%), DL (14.1%), and SC (5.1%). Subjects who dropped their hands below the rim during recovery achieved faster velocities and covered greater distances (.016< or =P< or =.075) during start-up on linoleum and carpet and applied more force during start-up on the ramp compared with those who used an arc pattern (P=.066). Classifying propulsion patterns is a difficult task that should use multiple raters. In addition, propulsion patterns change during start-up, with an arc pattern most prevalent initially. The biomechanical findings in this study agree with current clinical guidelines that recommend training users to drop the hand below the pushrim during recovery.

  4. Simulation studies for operating electron beam ion trap at very low energy for disentangling edge plasma spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xuelong; Fei, Zejie; Xiao, Jun; Lu, Di; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2012-07-01

    Electron beam ion traps (EBITs) are very useful tools for disentanglement studies of atomic processes in plasmas. In order to assist studies on edge plasma spectroscopic diagnostics, a very low energy EBIT, SH-PermEBIT, has been set up at the Shanghai EBIT lab. In this work, simulation studies for factors which hinder an EBIT to operate at very low electron energies were made based on the Tricomp (Field Precision) codes. Longitudinal, transversal, and total kinetic energy distributions were analyzed for all the electron trajectories. Influences from the electron current and electron energy on the energy depression caused by the space charge are discussed. The simulation results show that although the energy depression is most serious along the center of the electron beam, the electrons in the outer part of the beam are more likely to be lost when an EBIT is running at very low energy. Using the simulation results to guide us, we successfully managed to reach the minimum electron beam energy of 60 eV with a beam transmission above 57% for the SH-PermEBIT. Ar and W spectra were measured from the SH-PermEBIT at the apparent electron beam energies (read from the voltage difference between the electron gun cathode and the central drift tube) of 60 eV and 1200 eV, respectively. The spectra are shown in this paper.

  5. Influence of the Integral Quality Monitor transmission detector on high energy photon beams: A multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Casar, Bozidar; Pasler, Marlies; Wegener, Sonja; Hoffman, David; Talamonti, Cinzia; Qian, Jianguo; Mendez, Ignasi; Brojan, Denis; Perrin, Bruce; Kusters, Martijn; Canters, Richard; Pallotta, Stefania; Peterlin, Primoz

    2017-09-01

    The influence of the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM) transmission detector on photon beam properties was evaluated in a preclinical phase, using data from nine participating centres: (i) the change of beam quality (beam hardening), (ii) the influence on surface dose, and (iii) the attenuation of the IQM detector. For 6 different nominal photon energies (4 standard, 2 FFF) and square field sizes from 1×1cm 2 to 20×20cm 2 , the effect of IQM on beam quality was assessed from the PDD 20,10 values obtained from the percentage dose depth (PDD) curves, measured with and without IQM in the beam path. The change in surface dose with/without IQM was assessed for all available energies and field sizes from 4×4cm 2 to 20×20cm 2 . The transmission factor was calculated by means of measured absorbed dose at 10cm depth for all available energies and field sizes. (i) A small (0.11-0.53%) yet statistically significant beam hardening effect was observed, depending on photon beam energy. (ii) The increase in surface dose correlated with field size (p<0.01) for all photon energies except for 18MV. The change in surface dose was smaller than 3.3% in all cases except for the 20×20cm 2 field and 10MV FFF beam, where it reached 8.1%. (iii) For standard beams, transmission of the IQM showed a weak dependence on the field size, and a pronounced dependence on the beam energy (0.9412 for 6MV to 0.9578 for 18MV and 0.9440 for 6MV FFF; 0.9533 for 10MV FFF). The effects of the IQM detector on photon beam properties were found to be small yet statistically significant. The magnitudes of changes which were found justify treating IQM either as tray factors within the treatment planning system (TPS) for a particular energy or alternatively as modified outputs for specific beam energy of linear accelerators, which eases the introduction of the IQM into clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. High Intensity Laser Power Beaming Architecture for Space and Terrestrial Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Taysir; Fast, Brian; Raible, Daniel; Dinca, Dragos; Tollis, Nick; Jalics, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    High Intensity Laser Power Beaming (HILPB) has been developed as a technique to achieve Wireless Power Transmission (WPT) for both space and terrestrial applications. In this paper, the system architecture and hardware results for a terrestrial application of HILPB are presented. These results demonstrate continuous conversion of high intensity optical energy at near-IR wavelengths directly to electrical energy at output power levels as high as 6.24 W from the single cell 0.8 cm2 aperture receiver. These results are scalable, and may be realized by implementing receiver arraying and utilizing higher power source lasers. This type of system would enable long range optical refueling of electric platforms, such as MUAV s, airships, robotic exploration missions and provide power to spacecraft platforms which may utilize it to drive electric means of propulsion.

  7. Electric Propulsion Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    DTIC FILE COPY AL-TR-89-040 AD: AD-A227 121 Final Report forteprod Electric Propulsion Study 21 Sep 1988 to 30 Nov 1989 DTIC ’ELECTE0OCT 0c 41990u... Electric Propulsion Study (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Cravens, Dennis J. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 15. PAGE...identif bv block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Inductive theories, electric propulsion, unified field 21 0- theories, Conservatc!±,n Laws, Dynamic

  8. Pin diode calibration - beam overlap monitoring for low energy cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.

    2015-09-30

    We were trying to address the question whether or not the Pin Diodes, currently installed approximately 1 meter downstream of the RHIC primary collimators, are suitable to monitor a recombination signal from the future RHIC low energy cooling section. A maximized recombination signal, with the Au+78 ions being lost on the collimator, will indicate optimal Au-electron beam overlap as well as velocity matching of the electron beam in the cooling section.

  9. Fast energy spectrum and transverse beam profile monitoring and feedback systems for the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Soderstrom, E.J.; Abrams, G.S.; Weinstein, A.J.

    Fast energy spectrum and transverse beam profile monitoring systems have been tested at the SLC. The signals for each system are derived from digitizations of images on phosphor screens. Individual beam bunch images are digitized in the case of the transverse profile system and synchrotron radiation images produced by wiggler magnets for the energy spectrum. Measurements are taken at two-second intervals. Feedback elements have been installed for future use and consist of rf phase shifters to control energy spectrum and dipole correctors to control the beam launch into the linac affecting the transverse beam profile. Details of these systems, includingmore » hardware, timing, data acquisition, data reduction, measurement accuracy, and operational experience will be presented. 9 refs.« less

  10. Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Nontoxic Cryogenic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for nontoxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of nontoxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of nontoxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of nontoxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that nontoxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

  11. Feasibility Study on Cardiac Arrhythmia Ablation Using High-Energy Heavy Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, H. Immo; Graeff, Christian; Simoniello, Palma; Constantinescu, Anna; Takami, Mitsuru; Lugenbiel, Patrick; Richter, Daniel; Eichhorn, Anna; Prall, Matthias; Kaderka, Robert; Fiedler, Fine; Helmbrecht, Stephan; Fournier, Claudia; Erbeldinger, Nadine; Rahm, Ann-Kathrin; Rivinius, Rasmus; Thomas, Dierk; Katus, Hugo A.; Johnson, Susan B.; Parker, Kay D.; Debus, Jürgen; Asirvatham, Samuel J.; Bert, Christoph; Durante, Marco; Packer, Douglas L.

    2016-12-01

    High-energy ion beams are successfully used in cancer therapy and precisely deliver high doses of ionizing radiation to small deep-seated target volumes. A similar noninvasive treatment modality for cardiac arrhythmias was tested here. This study used high-energy carbon ions for ablation of cardiac tissue in pigs. Doses of 25, 40, and 55 Gy were applied in forced-breath-hold to the atrioventricular junction, left atrial pulmonary vein junction, and freewall left ventricle of intact animals. Procedural success was tracked by (1.) in-beam positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging; (2.) intracardiac voltage mapping with visible lesion on ultrasound; (3.) lesion outcomes in pathohistolgy. High doses (40-55 Gy) caused slowing and interruption of cardiac impulse propagation. Target fibrosis was the main mediator of the ablation effect. In irradiated tissue, apoptosis was present after 3, but not 6 months. Our study shows feasibility to use high-energy ion beams for creation of cardiac lesions that chronically interrupt cardiac conduction.

  12. Energy correction factors of LiF powder TLDs irradiated in high-energy electron beams and applied to mailed dosimetry for quality assurance networks.

    PubMed

    Marre, D; Ferreira, I H; Bridier, A; Björeland, A; Svensson, H; Dutreix, A; Chavaudra, J

    2000-12-01

    Absorbed dose determination with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) generally relies on calibration in 60Co gamma-ray reference beams. The energy correction factor fCo(E) for electron beams takes into account the difference between the response of the TLD in the beam of energy E and in the 60Co gamma-ray beam. In this work, fCo(E) was evaluated for an LiF powder irradiated in electron beams of 6 to 20 MeV (Varian 2300C/D) and 10 to 50 MeV (Racetrack MM50), and its variation with electron energy, TLD size and nature of the surrounding medium was also studied for LiF powder. The results have been applied to the ESTRO-EQUAL mailed dosimetry quality assurance network. Monte Carlo calculations (EGS4, PENELOPE) and experiments have been performed for the LiF powder (rho = 1.4 g cm3) (DTL937, Philitech, France), read on a home made reader and a PCL3 automatic reader (Fimel, France). The TLDs were calibrated using Fricke dosimetry and compared with three ionization chambers (NE2571, NACP02, ROOS). The combined uncertainties in the experimental fCo(E) factors determined in this work are less than about 0.4% (1 SD), which is appreciably smaller than the uncertainties up to 1.4% (1 SD) reported for other calculated values in the literature. Concerning the Varian 2300C/D beams, the measured fCo(E) values decrease from 1.065 to 1.049 +/- 0.004 (1 SD) when the energy at depth in water increases from 2.6 to 14.1 MeV; the agreement with Monte Carlo calculations is better than 0.5%. For the Racetrack MM50 pulsed-scanned beams, the average experimental value of fCo(E) is 1.071 +/- 0.005 (1 SD) for a mean electron energy at depth Ez ranging from 4.3 to 36.3 MeV: fCo(E) is up to 2% higher for the MM50 beams than for the 2300C/D beams in the range of the tested energies. The energy correction factor for LiF powder (3 mm diameter and 15 mm length) varies with beam quality and type (pulsed or pulsed-scanning), cavity size and nature of the surrounding medium. The fCo(E) values obtained

  13. Experimental Investigation of Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Engines: CO2TEA vs. EDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Koichi; Sasoh, Akihiro; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2005-04-01

    Single pulse laboratory experiments were carried out with a high-power CO2 Transversely-Exited Atmospheric (TEA) laser using parabolic laser propulsion (LP) engines of historic interest: 1) an original Pirri/ AERL bell engine, and 2) a scaled-up 11-cm diameter version with identical geometry. The objective was to quantify the effects of pulse duration upon the impulse coupling coefficient performance — with pulse energy as the parametric variable. Performance data from the TEA laser are contrasted with former results derived from AVCO Everett Research Laboratory and PLVTS CO2 electron discharge lasers (EDL). The `short-pulse' 2-microsecond TEA laser tests generated results that were distinctively different from that of the `long-pulse' EDL sources. The TC-300 TEA laser employed an unstable resonator to deliver up to 380 joules, and the square output beam measured 15-cm on a side, with a hollow 8-cm center. A standard ballistic pendulum was employed to measure the performance.

  14. Characterization of a Gafchromic film for the two-dimensional profile measurement of low-energy heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuri, Yosuke; Narumi, Kazumasa; Yuyama, Takahiro

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of the transverse intensity distribution measurement of low-energy (keV/u range) heavy-ion beams using radiochromic films is experimentally explored. We employ a Gafchromic radiochromic film, HD-V2, whose active layer is not laminated by a surface-protection layer. The coloration response of films irradiated with several ion beams is characterized in terms of optical density (OD) by reading the films with a general-purpose scanner. To explore the energy dependence of the film response widely, the kinetic energy of the beams is varied from 1.5 keV/u to 27 MeV/u. We have found that the coloration of HD-V2 films is induced by irradiation with low-energy ion beams of the order of 10 keV/u. The range of the beams is considerably shorter than the thickness of the film's active layer. The dependence of OD response on ion species is also discussed. We demonstrate that the Gafchromic film used here is useful for measuring the intensity distribution of such low-energy ion beams.

  15. Crossed beam (E--VRT) energy transfer experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, I.V.; Hofmann, H.; Rost, K.A.

    A molecular crossed beam apparatus which has been developed to perform electronic-to-vibrational, rotational, translational (E--V,R,T) energy transfer studies is described. Its capabilities are illustrated on the basis of a number of energy transfer spectra obtained for collision systems of the type Na*+Mol(..nu..,j) ..-->..Na+Mol (..nu..',j') where Na* represents a laser excited sodium atom and Mol a diatomic or polyatomic molecule. Because of the lack of reliable dynamic theories on quenching processes, statistical approaches such as the ''linearly forced harmonic oscillator'' and ''prior distributions'' have been used to model the experimental spectra. The agreement is found to be satisfactory, so even suchmore » simple statistics may be useful to describe (E--V,R,T) energy transfer processes in collision systems with small molecules.« less

  16. Materials Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRC's Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  17. Material Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRCs Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  18. Gait strategy changes with acceleration to accommodate the biomechanical constraint on push-off propulsion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keonyoung; Baek, Juhyun; Park, Sukyung

    2012-11-15

    To maintain steady and level walking, push-off propulsion during the double support phase compensates for the energy loss through heel strike collisions in an energetically optimal manner. However, a large portion of daily gait activities also contains transient gait responses, such as acceleration or deceleration, during which the observed dominance of the push-off work or the energy optimality may not hold. In this study, we examined whether the push-off propulsion during the double support phase served as a major energy source for gait acceleration, and we also studied the energetic optimality of accelerated gait using a simple bipedal walking model. Seven healthy young subjects participated in the over-ground walking experiments. The subjects walked at four different constant gait speeds ranging from a self-selected speed to a maximum gait speed, and then they accelerated their gait from zero to the maximum gait speed using a self-selected acceleration ratio. We measured the ground reaction force (GRF) of three consecutive steps and the corresponding leg configuration using force platforms and an optical marker system, respectively, and we compared the mechanical work performed by the GRF during each single and double support phase. In contrast to the model prediction of an increase in the push-off propulsion that is proportional to the acceleration and minimizes the mechanical energy cost, the push-off propulsion was slightly increased, and a significant increase in the mechanical work during the single support phase was observed. The results suggest that gait acceleration occurs while accommodating a feasible push-off propulsion constraint. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Applying design principles to fusion reactor configurations for propulsion in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Scott A.; Deveny, Marc E.; Schulze, Norman R.

    1993-01-01

    The application of fusion power to space propulsion requires rethinking the engineering-design solution to controlled-fusion energy. Whereas the unit cost of electricity (COE) drives the engineering-design solution for utility-based fusion reactor configurations; initial mass to low earth orbit (IMLEO), specific jet power (kW(thrust)/kg(engine)), and reusability drive the engineering-design solution for successful application of fusion power to space propulsion. We applied three design principles (DP's) to adapt and optimize three candidate-terrestrial-fusion-reactor configurations for propulsion in space. The three design principles are: provide maximum direct access to space for waste radiation, operate components as passive radiators to minimize cooling-system mass, and optimize the plasma fuel, fuel mix, and temperature for best specific jet power. The three candidate terrestrial fusion reactor configurations are: the thermal barrier tandem mirror (TBTM), field reversed mirror (FRM), and levitated dipole field (LDF). The resulting three candidate space fusion propulsion systems have their IMLEO minimized and their specific jet power and reusability maximized. We performed a preliminary rating of these configurations and concluded that the leading engineering-design solution to space fusion propulsion is a modified TBTM that we call the Mirror Fusion Propulsion System (MFPS).

  20. Note: A well-confined pulsed low-energy ion beam: Test experiments of Ar+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jie; Wu, Chun-Xiao; Tian, Shan Xi

    2018-06-01

    Here we report a pulsed low-energy ion beam source for ion-molecule reaction study, in which the ions produced by the pulsed electron impact are confined well in the spatial size of each bunch. In contrast to the ion focusing method to reduce the transverse section of the beam, the longitudinal section in the translational direction is compressed by introducing a second pulse in the ion time-of-flight system. The test experiments for the low-energy argon ions are performed. The present beam source is ready for applications in the ion-molecule reaction dynamics experiments, in particular, in combination with the ion velocity map imaging technique.

  1. Effect of Stone Size and Composition on Ultrasonic Propulsion Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Karmon M; Brand, Timothy C; Bailey, Michael R; Cunitz, Bryan W; Harper, Jonathan D; Sorensen, Mathew D; Dunmire, Barbrina

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate in more detail the effectiveness of a new designed more efficient ultrasonic propulsion for large stones and specific stone compositions in a tissue phantom model. In the first clinical trial of noninvasive ultrasonic propulsion, urinary stones of unknown compositions and sizes up to 10 mm were successfully repositioned. The study included 8- to 12-mm stones of 4 different primary compositions (calcium oxalate monohydrate, ammonium acid urate, calcium phosphate, and struvite) and a renal calyx phantom consisting of a 12 mm × 30 mm well in a 10-cm block of tissue-mimicking material. Primary outcome was the number of times a stone was expelled over 10 attempts, with ultrasonic propulsion burst duration varying from 0.5 seconds to 5 seconds. Overall success rate at expelling stones was 95%. All calcium oxalate monohydrate and ammonium acid urate stones were expelled 100% of the time. The largest stone (12 mm) became lodged within the 12-mm phantom calyx 25% of the time regardless of the burst duration. With the 0.5-second burst, there was insufficient energy to expel the heaviest stone (0.88 g), but there was sufficient energy at the longer burst durations. With a single burst, ultrasonic propulsion successfully moved most stones at least 3 cm and, regardless of size or composition, expelled them from the calyx. Ultrasonic propulsion is limited to the stones smaller than the calyceal space, and for each burst duration, related to maximum stone mass. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Effect of Stone Size and Composition on Ultrasonic Propulsion Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Karmon M.; Brand, Timothy C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Harper, Jonathan D.; Sorensen, Mathew D.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate in more detail the effectiveness of a new designed more efficient ultrasonic propulsion for large stones and specific stone compositions in a tissue phantom model. In the first clinical trial of noninvasive ultrasonic propulsion, urinary stones of unknown compositions and sizes up to 10 mm were successfully repositioned. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study included 8- to 12-mm stones of 4 different primary compositions (calcium oxalate monohydrate, ammonium acid urate, calcium phosphate, and struvite) and a renal calyx phantom consisting of a 12 mm × 30 mm well in a 10-cm block of tissue-mimicking material. Primary outcome was the number of times a stone was expelled over 10 attempts, with ultrasonic propulsion burst duration varying from 0.5 seconds to 5 seconds. RESULTS Overall success rate at expelling stones was 95%. All calcium oxalate monohydrate and ammonium acid urate stones were expelled 100% of the time. The largest stone (12 mm) became lodged within the 12-mm phantom calyx 25% of the time regardless of the burst duration. With the 0.5-second burst, there was insufficient energy to expel the heaviest stone (0.88 g), but there was sufficient energy at the longer burst durations. CONCLUSION With a single burst, ultrasonic propulsion successfully moved most stones at least 3 cm and, regardless of size or composition, expelled them from the calyx. Ultrasonic propulsion is limited to the stones smaller than the calyceal space, and for each burst duration, related to maximum stone mass. PMID:28964820

  3. Overview of Pulse Detonation Propulsion Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    PROPULSION TECHNOLOGY M. L. Coleman CHEMICAL PROPULSION INFORMATION AGENCY THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY. WHITING SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING -COLUMBIA...U. 20 R. Santoro, "Advanced Propulsion Research: A Focus of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center," Chemical Propulsion Information...Detonation Engine ," AIAA 95-3155 (July 1995), U-A. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Space Transportation Day 2000 Presentation Material, Advance Chemical

  4. Embedded Wing Propulsion Conceptual Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Saunders, John D.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of distributed propulsion work under NASA's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts or RAC project, a new propulsion-airframe integrated vehicle concept called Embedded Wing Propulsion (EWP) is developed and examined through system and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. The idea behind the concept is to fully integrate a propulsion system within a wing structure so that the aircraft takes full benefits of coupling of wing aerodynamics and the propulsion thrust stream. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of the EWP concept applied to large transport aircraft such as the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft. In this paper, some of early analysis and current status of the study are presented. In addition, other current activities of distributed propulsion under the RAC project are briefly discussed.

  5. Averaged Propulsive Body Acceleration (APBA) Can Be Calculated from Biologging Tags That Incorporate Gyroscopes and Accelerometers to Estimate Swimming Speed, Hydrodynamic Drag and Energy Expenditure for Steller Sea Lions

    PubMed Central

    Trites, Andrew W.; Rosen, David A. S.; Potvin, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Forces due to propulsion should approximate forces due to hydrodynamic drag for animals horizontally swimming at a constant speed with negligible buoyancy forces. Propulsive forces should also correlate with energy expenditures associated with locomotion—an important cost of foraging. As such, biologging tags containing accelerometers are being used to generate proxies for animal energy expenditures despite being unable to distinguish rotational movements from linear movements. However, recent miniaturizations of gyroscopes offer the possibility of resolving this shortcoming and obtaining better estimates of body accelerations of swimming animals. We derived accelerations using gyroscope data for swimming Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus), and determined how well the measured accelerations correlated with actual swimming speeds and with theoretical drag. We also compared dive averaged dynamic body acceleration estimates that incorporate gyroscope data, with the widely used Overall Dynamic Body Acceleration (ODBA) metric, which does not use gyroscope data. Four Steller sea lions equipped with biologging tags were trained to swim alongside a boat cruising at steady speeds in the range of 4 to 10 kph. At each speed, and for each dive, we computed a measure called Gyro-Informed Dynamic Acceleration (GIDA) using a method incorporating gyroscope data with accelerometer data. We derived a new metric—Averaged Propulsive Body Acceleration (APBA), which is the average gain in speed per flipper stroke divided by mean stroke cycle duration. Our results show that the gyro-based measure (APBA) is a better predictor of speed than ODBA. We also found that APBA can estimate average thrust production during a single stroke-glide cycle, and can be used to estimate energy expended during swimming. The gyroscope-derived methods we describe should be generally applicable in swimming animals where propulsive accelerations can be clearly identified in the signal—and they should

  6. In-Space Propulsion Solar Electric Propulsion Program Overview of 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggett, Randy M.; Hulgan, Wendy W.; Dankanich, John W.; Bechtel, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    The primary source of electric propulsion development throughout NASA is implemented by the In-Space Propulsion Technology Project at the NASA MSFC under the management of the Science Mission Directorate. The Solar Electric Propulsion technology area's objective is to develop near and mid-term SEP technology to enhance or enable mission capture while minimizing risk and cost to the end user. Major activities include developing NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT), implementing a Standard Architecture, and developing a long life High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAC). Lower level investments include advanced feed system development, advanced cathode testing and xenon recovery testing. Progress on current investments and future plans are discussed.

  7. Solar Electric Propulsion for Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Oleson, Steven R.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Use of high-power solar arrays, at power levels ranging from approximately 500 KW to several megawatts, has been proposed for a solar-electric propulsion (SEP) demonstration mission, using a photovoltaic array to provide energy to a high-power xenon-fueled engine. One of the proposed applications of the high-power SEP technology is a mission to rendezvous with an asteroid and move it into lunar orbit for human exploration, the Asteroid Retrieval mission. The Solar Electric Propulsion project is dedicated to developing critical technologies to enable trips to further away destinations such as Mars or asteroids. NASA needs to reduce the cost of these ambitious exploration missions. High power and high efficiency SEP systems will require much less propellant to meet those requirements.

  8. Control of power, torque, and instability drive using in-shot variable neutral beam energy in tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Pace, D. C.; Collins, C. S.; Crowley, B.; ...

    2016-09-28

    A first-ever demonstration of controlling power and torque injection through time evolution of neutral beam energy has been achieved in recent experiments at the DIII-D tokamak. Pre-programmed waveforms for the neutral beam energy produce power and torque inputs that can be separately and continuously controlled. Previously, these inputs were tailored using on/off modulation of neutral beams resulting in large perturbations (e.g. power swings of over 1 MW). The new method includes, importantly for experiments, the ability to maintain a fixed injected power while varying the torque. In another case, different beam energy waveforms (in the same plasma conditions) produce significantmore » changes in the observed spectrum of beam ion-driven instabilities. Measurements of beam ion loss show that one energy waveform results in the complete avoidance of coherent losses due to Alfvénic instabilities. This new method of neutral beam operation is intended for further application in a variety of DIII-D experiments including those concerned with high-performance steady state scenarios, fast particle effects, and transport in the low torque regime. As a result, developing this capability would provide similar benefits and improved plasma control for other magnetic confinement fusion facilities.« less

  9. Control of power, torque, and instability drive using in-shot variable neutral beam energy in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D. C.; Collins, C. S.; Crowley, B.

    A first-ever demonstration of controlling power and torque injection through time evolution of neutral beam energy has been achieved in recent experiments at the DIII-D tokamak. Pre-programmed waveforms for the neutral beam energy produce power and torque inputs that can be separately and continuously controlled. Previously, these inputs were tailored using on/off modulation of neutral beams resulting in large perturbations (e.g. power swings of over 1 MW). The new method includes, importantly for experiments, the ability to maintain a fixed injected power while varying the torque. In another case, different beam energy waveforms (in the same plasma conditions) produce significantmore » changes in the observed spectrum of beam ion-driven instabilities. Measurements of beam ion loss show that one energy waveform results in the complete avoidance of coherent losses due to Alfvénic instabilities. This new method of neutral beam operation is intended for further application in a variety of DIII-D experiments including those concerned with high-performance steady state scenarios, fast particle effects, and transport in the low torque regime. As a result, developing this capability would provide similar benefits and improved plasma control for other magnetic confinement fusion facilities.« less

  10. Control of power, torque, and instability drive using in-shot variable neutral beam energy in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, D. C.; Collins, C. S.; Crowley, B.; Grierson, B. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pawley, C.; Rauch, J.; Scoville, J. T.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Zhu, Y. B.; The DIII-D Team

    2017-01-01

    A first-ever demonstration of controlling power and torque injection through time evolution of neutral beam energy has been achieved in recent experiments at the DIII-D tokamak (Luxon 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 614). Pre-programmed waveforms for the neutral beam energy produce power and torque inputs that can be separately and continuously controlled. Previously, these inputs were tailored using on/off modulation of neutral beams resulting in large perturbations (e.g. power swings of over 1 MW). The new method includes, importantly for experiments, the ability to maintain a fixed injected power while varying the torque. In another case, different beam energy waveforms (in the same plasma conditions) produce significant changes in the observed spectrum of beam ion-driven instabilities. Measurements of beam ion loss show that one energy waveform results in the complete avoidance of coherent losses due to Alfvénic instabilities. This new method of neutral beam operation is intended for further application in a variety of DIII-D experiments including those concerned with high-performance steady state scenarios, fast particle effects, and transport in the low torque regime. Developing this capability would provide similar benefits and improved plasma control for other magnetic confinement fusion facilities.

  11. Brief review on pulse laser propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haichao; Li, Hanyang; Wang, Yan; Cui, Lugui; Liu, Shuangqiang; Yang, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Pulse laser propulsion (PLP) is an advanced propulsion concept can be used across a variety of fields with a wide range of applications. PLP reflects superior payload as well as decreased launch costs in comparison with other conventional methods of producing thrust, such as chemical propulsion or electric propulsion. Numerous researchers have attempted to exploit the potential applications of PLP. This paper first reviews concepts relevant to PLP, including the propulsion modes, breakdown regimes, and propulsion efficiency; the propulsion targets for different materials with the pulse laser are then discussed in detail, including the propulsion of solid and liquid microspheres. PLP applications such as the driven microsatellite, target surface particle removal, and orbital debris removal are also discussed. Although the PLP has been applied to a variety of fields, further research is yet warranted to establish its application in the aerospace field.

  12. NASA Electric Propulsion System Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felder, James L.

    2015-01-01

    An overview of NASA efforts in the area of hybrid electric and turboelectric propulsion in large transport. This overview includes a list of reasons why we are looking at transmitting some or all of the propulsive power for the aircraft electrically, a list of the different types of hybrid-turbo electric propulsion systems, and the results of 4 aircraft studies that examined different types of hybrid-turbo electric propulsion systems.

  13. Time of Flight based diagnostics for high energy laser driven ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, V.; Milluzzo, G.; Alejo, A.; Amico, A. G.; Booth, N.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Doria, D.; Green, J.; Kar, S.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Margarone, D.; McKenna, P.; Padda, H.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Romagnani, L.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Borghesi, M.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays the innovative high power laser-based ion acceleration technique is one of the most interesting challenges in particle acceleration field, showing attractive characteristics for future multidisciplinary applications, including medical ones. Nevertheless, peculiarities of optically accelerated ion beams make mandatory the development of proper transport, selection and diagnostics devices in order to deliver stable and controlled ion beams for multidisciplinary applications. This is the main purpose of the ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration) beamline that will be realized and installed within 2018 at the ELI-Beamlines research center in the Czech Republic, where laser driven high energy ions, up to 60 MeV/n, will be available for users. In particular, a crucial role will be played by the on-line diagnostics system, recently developed in collaboration with INFN-LNS (Italy), consisting of TOF detectors, placed along the beamline (at different detection distances) to provide online monitoring of key characteristics of delivered beams, such as energy, fluence and ion species. In this contribution an overview on the ELIMAIA available ion diagnostics will be briefly given along with the preliminary results obtained during a test performed with high energy laser-driven proton beams accelerated at the VULCAN PW-laser available at RAL facility (U.K.).

  14. New Propulsion Technologies For Exploration of the Solar System and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In order to implement the ambitious science and exploration missions planned over the next several decades, improvements in in-space transportation and propulsion technologies must be achieved. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs. Future missions will require 2 to 3 times more total change in velocity over their mission lives than the NASA Solar Electric Technology Application Readiness (NSTAR) demonstration on the Deep Space 1 mission. Rendezvous and return missions will require similar investments in in-space propulsion systems. New opportunities to explore beyond the outer planets and to the stars will require unparalleled technology advancement and innovation. The Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) is investing in technologies to achieve a factor of 10 reduction in the cost of Earth orbital transportation and a factor of 2 reduction in propulsion system mass and travel time for planetary missions within the next 15 years. Since more than 70% of projected launches over the next 10 years will require propulsion systems capable of attaining destinations beyond Low Earth Orbit, investment in in-space technologies will benefit a large percentage of future missions. The ASTP technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5 - 10 kW range, to fission-powered multi-kilowatt systems, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called, "propellantless" because they do not require on-board fuel to achieve thrust. An overview of the state-of-the-art in propellantless propulsion technologies such as solar and plasma sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, and aeroassist and aerocapture

  15. Modeling silicon diode energy response factors for use in therapeutic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2009-10-21

    Silicon diodes have good spatial resolution, which makes them advantageous over ionization chambers for dosimetry in fields with high dose gradients. However, silicon diodes overrespond to low-energy photons, that are more abundant in scatter which increase with large fields and larger depths. We present a cavity-theory-based model for a general response function for silicon detectors at arbitrary positions within photon fields. The model uses photon and electron spectra calculated from fluence pencil kernels. The incident photons are treated according to their energy through a bipartition of the primary beam photon spectrum into low- and high-energy components. Primary electrons from the high-energy component are treated according to Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Low-energy primary photons together with all scattered photons are treated according to large cavity theory supplemented with an energy-dependent factor K(E) to compensate for energy variations in the electron equilibrium. The depth variation of the response for an unshielded silicon detector has been calculated for 5 x 5 cm(2), 10 x 10 cm(2) and 20 x 20 cm(2) fields in 6 and 15 MV beams and compared with measurements showing that our model calculates response factors with deviations less than 0.6%. An alternative method is also proposed, where we show that one can use a correlation with the scatter factor to determine the detector response of silicon diodes with an error of less than 3% in 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams.

  16. Energy deposition of H and He ion beams in hydroxyapatite films: a study with implications for ion-beam cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Limandri, Silvina; de Vera, Pablo; Fadanelli, Raul C; Nagamine, Luiz C C M; Mello, Alexandre; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Behar, Moni; Abril, Isabel

    2014-02-01

    Ion-beam cancer therapy is a promising technique to treat deep-seated tumors; however, for an accurate treatment planning, the energy deposition by the ions must be well known both in soft and hard human tissues. Although the energy loss of ions in water and other organic and biological materials is fairly well known, scarce information is available for the hard tissues (i.e., bone), for which the current stopping power information relies on the application of simple additivity rules to atomic data. Especially, more knowledge is needed for the main constituent of human bone, calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), which constitutes 58% of its mass composition. In this work the energy loss of H and He ion beams in HAp films has been obtained experimentally. The experiments have been performed using the Rutherford backscattering technique in an energy range of 450-2000 keV for H and 400-5000 keV for He ions. These measurements are used as a benchmark for theoretical calculations (stopping power and mean excitation energy) based on the dielectric formalism together with the MELF-GOS (Mermin energy loss function-generalized oscillator strength) method to describe the electronic excitation spectrum of HAp. The stopping power calculations are in good agreement with the experiments. Even though these experimental data are obtained for low projectile energies compared with the ones used in hadron therapy, they validate the mean excitation energy obtained theoretically, which is the fundamental quantity to accurately assess energy deposition and depth-dose curves of ion beams at clinically relevant high energies. The effect of the mean excitation energy choice on the depth-dose profile is discussed on the basis of detailed simulations. Finally, implications of the present work on the energy loss of charged particles in human cortical bone are remarked.

  17. A pepper-pot emittance meter for low-energy heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kremers, H. R.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Brandenburg, S.

    2013-02-15

    A novel emittance meter has been developed to measure the four-dimensional, transverse phase-space distribution of a low-energy ion beam using the pepper-pot technique. A characteristic feature of this instrument is that the pepper-pot plate, which has a linear array of holes in the vertical direction, is scanned horizontally through the ion beam. This has the advantage that the emittance can also be measured at locations along the beam line where the beam has a large horizontal divergence. A set of multi-channel plates, scintillation screen, and ccd camera is used as a position-sensitive ion detector allowing a large range of beammore » intensities that can be handled. This paper describes the design, construction, and operation of the instrument as well as the data analysis used to reconstruct the four-dimensional phase-space distribution of an ion beam. Measurements on a 15 keV He{sup +} beam are used as an example.« less

  18. Online Measurement of the Energy Spread of Multi-Turn Beam in the Fermilab Booster at Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.; Bhat, C. M.; Hendricks, B. S.

    We have developed a computer program interfaced with the ACNET environment of Fermilab accelerators to measure energy spread of the proton beam from the LINAC at an injection into the Booster. It uses a digitizing oscilloscope and provides users an ability to configure the scope settings for optimal data acquisition from a resistive wall current monitor. When the program is launched, a) a one shot timeline is generated to initiate beam injection into the Booster, b) a gap of about 40 ns is produced in the injected beam using a set of fast kickers, c) collects line charge distribution datamore » from the wall current monitor for the first 200 μs from the injection and d) performs complete data analysis to extract full beam energy spread of the beam. The program also gives the option to store the data for offline analyses. We illustrate a case with an example. We also present results on beam energy spread as a function of beam intensity from recent measurements.« less

  19. Systematic investigations of low energy Ar ion beam sputtering of Si and Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, R.; Frost, F.; Neumann, H.; Bundesmann, C.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2013-12-01

    Ion beam sputter deposition (IBD) delivers some intrinsic features influencing the growing film properties, because ion properties and geometrical process conditions generate different energy and spatial distributions of the sputtered and scattered particles. Even though IBD has been used for decades, the full capabilities are not investigated systematically and specifically used yet. Therefore, a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the correlation between the properties of the ion beam, the generated secondary particles and backscattered ions and the deposited films needs to be done.A vacuum deposition chamber has been set up which allows ion beam sputtering of different targets under variation of geometrical parameters (ion incidence angle, position of substrates and analytics in respect to the target) and of ion beam parameters (ion species, ion energy) to perform a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the correlation between the properties of the ion beam, the properties of the sputtered and scattered particles, and the properties of the deposited films. A set of samples was prepared and characterized with respect to selected film properties, such as thickness and surface topography. The experiments indicate a systematic influence of the deposition parameters on the film properties as hypothesized before. Because of this influence, the energy distribution of secondary particles was measured using an energy-selective mass spectrometer. Among others, experiments revealed a high-energetic maximum for backscattered primary ions, which shifts with increasing emission angle to higher energies. Experimental data are compared with Monte Carlo simulations done with the well-known Transport and Range of Ions in Matter, Sputtering version (TRIM.SP) code [J.P. Biersack, W. Eckstein, Appl. Phys. A: Mater. Sci. Process. 34 (1984) 73]. The thicknesses of the films are in good agreement with those calculated from simulated particle fluxes. For the positions of the

  20. Effects of variable practice on the motor learning outcomes in manual wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Leving, Marika T; Vegter, Riemer J K; de Groot, Sonja; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2016-11-23

    Handrim wheelchair propulsion is a cyclic skill that needs to be learned during rehabilitation. It has been suggested that more variability in propulsion technique benefits the motor learning process of wheelchair propulsion. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of variable practice on the motor learning outcomes of wheelchair propulsion in able-bodied participants. Variable practice was introduced in the form of wheelchair basketball practice and wheelchair-skill practice. Motor learning was operationalized as improvements in mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique. Eleven Participants in the variable practice group and 12 participants in the control group performed an identical pre-test and a post-test. Pre- and post-test were performed in a wheelchair on a motor-driven treadmill (1.11 m/s) at a relative power output of 0.23 W/kg. Energy consumption and the propulsion technique variables with their respective coefficient of variation were calculated. Between the pre- and the post-test the variable practice group received 7 practice sessions. During the practice sessions participants performed one-hour of variable practice, consisting of five wheelchair-skill tasks and a 30 min wheelchair basketball game. The control group did not receive any practice between the pre- and the post-test. Comparison of the pre- and the post-test showed that the variable practice group significantly improved the mechanical efficiency (4.5 ± 0.6% → 5.7 ± 0.7%) in contrast to the control group (4.5 ± 0.6% → 4.4 ± 0.5%) (group x time interaction effect p < 0.001).With regard to propulsion technique, both groups significantly reduced the push frequency and increased the contact angle of the hand with the handrim (within group, time effect). No significant group × time interaction effects were found for propulsion technique. With regard to propulsion variability, the variable practice group increased variability when

  1. Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concept for Sustainable Aviation: Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun Dae; Felder, James L.; Tong, Michael. T.; Armstrong, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In response to growing aviation demands and concerns about the environment and energy usage, a team at NASA proposed and examined a revolutionary aeropropulsion concept, a turboelectric distributed propulsion system, which employs multiple electric motor-driven propulsors that are distributed on a large transport vehicle. The power to drive these electric propulsors is generated by separately located gas-turbine-driven electric generators on the airframe. This arrangement enables the use of many small-distributed propulsors, allowing a very high effective bypass ratio, while retaining the superior efficiency of large core engines, which are physically separated but connected to the propulsors through electric power lines. Because of the physical separation of propulsors from power generating devices, a new class of vehicles with unprecedented performance employing such revolutionary propulsion system is possible in vehicle design. One such vehicle currently being investigated by NASA is called the "N3-X" that uses a hybrid-wing-body for an airframe and superconducting generators, motors, and transmission lines for its propulsion system. On the N3-X these new degrees of design freedom are used (1) to place two large turboshaft engines driving generators in freestream conditions to minimize total pressure losses and (2) to embed a broad continuous array of 14 motor-driven fans on the upper surface of the aircraft near the trailing edge of the hybrid-wing-body airframe to maximize propulsive efficiency by ingesting thick airframe boundary layer flow. Through a system analysis in engine cycle and weight estimation, it was determined that the N3-X would be able to achieve a reduction of 70% or 72% (depending on the cooling system) in energy usage relative to the reference aircraft, a Boeing 777-200LR. Since the high-power electric system is used in its propulsion system, a study of the electric power distribution system was performed to identify critical dynamic and

  2. Heat transfer in aerospace propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, Robert J.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Gladden, Herbert J.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is an overview of heat transfer related research in support of aerospace propulsion, particularly as seen from the perspective of the NASA Lewis Research Center. Aerospace propulsion is defined to cover the full spectrum from conventional aircraft power plants through the Aerospace Plane to space propulsion. The conventional subsonic/supersonic aircraft arena, whether commercial or military, relies on the turbine engine. A key characteristic of turbine engines is that they involve fundamentally unsteady flows which must be properly treated. Space propulsion is characterized by very demanding performance requirements which frequently push systems to their limits and demand tailored designs. The hypersonic flight propulsion systems are subject to severe heat loads and the engine and airframe are truly one entity. The impact of the special demands of each of these aerospace propulsion systems on heat transfer is explored.

  3. Assessing potential propulsion breakthroughs.

    PubMed

    Millis, Marc G

    2005-12-01

    The term, propulsion breakthrough, refers to concepts like propellantless space drives and faster-than-light travel, the kind of breakthroughs that would make interstellar exploration practical. Although no such breakthroughs appear imminent, a variety of investigations have begun. During 1996-2002 NASA supported the breakthrough propulsion physics project to examine physics in the context of breakthrough spaceflight. Three facets of these assessments are now reported: (1) predicting benefits, (2) selecting research, and (3) recent technical progress. Predicting benefits is challenging, since the breakthroughs are still only notional concepts, but energy can serve as a basis for comparison. A hypothetical space drive would require many orders of magnitude less energy than a rocket for journeys to our nearest neighboring star. Assessing research options is challenging when the goals are beyond known physics and when the implications of success are profound. To mitigate the challenges, a selection process is described where: (1) research tasks are constrained to only address the immediate unknowns, curious effects, or critical issues; (2) reliability of assertions is more important than their implications; and (3) reviewers judge credibility rather than feasibility. The recent findings of a number of tasks, some selected using this process, are discussed. Of the 14 tasks included, six reached null conclusions, four remain unresolved, and four have opportunities for sequels. A dominant theme with the sequels is research about the properties of space, inertial frames, and the quantum vacuum.

  4. Center for Advanced Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Space Propulsion (CASP) is part of the University of Tennessee-Calspan Center for Aerospace Research (CAR). It was formed in 1985 to take advantage of the extensive research faculty and staff of the University of Tennessee and Calspan Corporation. It is also one of sixteen NASA sponsored Centers established to facilitate the Commercial Development of Space. Based on investigators' qualifications in propulsion system development, and matching industries' strong intent, the Center focused its efforts in the following technical areas: advanced chemical propulsion, electric propulsion, AI/Expert systems, fluids management in microgravity, and propulsion materials processing. This annual report focuses its discussion in these technical areas.

  5. Determination of interfacial states in solid heterostructures using a variable-energy positron beam

    DOEpatents

    Asoka kumar, Palakkal P. V.; Lynn, Kelvin G.

    1993-01-01

    A method and means is provided for characterizing interfacial electron states in solid heterostructures using a variable energy positron beam to probe the solid heterostructure. The method includes the steps of directing a positron beam having a selected energy level at a point on the solid heterostructure so that the positron beam penetrates into the solid heterostructure and causes positrons to collide with the electrons at an interface of the solid heterostructure. The number and energy of gamma rays emitted from the solid heterostructure as a result of the annihilation of positrons with electrons at the interface are detected. The data is quantified as a function of the Doppler broadening of the photopeak about the 511 keV line created by the annihilation of the positrons and electrons at the interface, preferably, as an S-parameter function; and a normalized S-parameter function of the data is obtained. The function of data obtained is compared with a corresponding function of the Doppler broadening of the annihilation photopeak about 511 keV for a positron beam having a second energy level directed at the same material making up a portion of the solid heterostructure. The comparison of these functions facilitates characterization of the interfacial states of electrons in the solid heterostructure at points corresponding to the penetration of positrons having the particular energy levels into the interface of the solid heterostructure. Accordingly, the invention provides a variable-energy non-destructive probe of solid heterostructures, such as SiO.sub.2 /Si, MOS or other semiconductor devices.

  6. Determination of interfacial states in solid heterostructures using a variable-energy positron beam

    DOEpatents

    Asokakumar, P.P.V.; Lynn, K.G.

    1993-04-06

    A method and means is provided for characterizing interfacial electron states in solid heterostructures using a variable energy positron beam to probe the solid heterostructure. The method includes the steps of directing a positron beam having a selected energy level at a point on the solid heterostructure so that the positron beam penetrates into the solid heterostructure and causes positrons to collide with the electrons at an interface of the solid heterostructure. The number and energy of gamma rays emitted from the solid heterostructure as a result of the annihilation of positrons with electrons at the interface are detected. The data is quantified as a function of the Doppler broadening of the photopeak about the 511 keV line created by the annihilation of the positrons and electrons at the interface, preferably, as an S-parameter function; and a normalized S-parameter function of the data is obtained. The function of data obtained is compared with a corresponding function of the Doppler broadening of the annihilation photopeak about 511 keV for a positron beam having a second energy level directed at the same material making up a portion of the solid heterostructure. The comparison of these functions facilitates characterization of the interfacial states of electrons in the solid heterostructure at points corresponding to the penetration of positrons having the particular energy levels into the interface of the solid heterostructure. Accordingly, the invention provides a variable-energy non-destructive probe of solid heterostructures, such as SiO[sub 2]/Si, MOS or other semiconductor devices.

  7. FY2014 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    None

    The Propulsion Materials Program actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of VTO by investigating and identifying the materials properties that are most essential for continued development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light-duty powertrains. The technical approaches available to enhance propulsion systems focus on improvements in both vehicle efficiency and fuel substitution, both of which must overcome the performance limitations of the materials currently in use. Propulsion Materials Program activities work with national laboratories, industry experts, and VTO powertrain systems (e.g., Advanced Combustion Engines [ACE], Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machinesmore » [APEEM], and fuels) teams to develop strategies that overcome materials limitations in future powertrain performance. The technical maturity of the portfolio of funded projects ranges from basic science to subsystem prototype validation. Projects within a Propulsion Materials Program activity address materials concerns that directly impact critical technology barriers within each of the above programs, including barriers that impact fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, improved reliability, and reduced manufacturing costs. The program engages only the barriers that result from material property limitations and represent fundamental, high-risk materials issues.« less

  8. Effects of shape and stroke parameters on the propulsion performance of an axisymmetric swimmer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jifeng; Alben, Silas

    2012-03-01

    In nature, there exists a special group of aquatic animals which have an axisymmetric body and whose primary swimming mechanism is to use periodic body contractions to generate vortex rings in the surrounding fluid. Using jellyfish medusae as an example, this study develops a mathematical model of body kinematics of an axisymmetric swimmer and uses a computational approach to investigate the induced vortex wakes. Wake characteristics are identified for swimmers using jet propulsion and rowing, two mechanisms identified in previous studies of medusan propulsion. The parameter space of body kinematics is explored through four quantities: a measure of body shape, stroke amplitude, the ratio between body contraction duration and extension duration, and the pulsing frequency. The effects of these parameters on thrust, input power requirement and circulation production are quantified. Two metrics, cruising speed and energy cost of locomotion, are used to evaluate the propulsion performance. The study finds that a more prolate-shaped swimmer with larger stroke amplitudes is able to swim faster, but its cost of locomotion is also higher. In contrast, a more oblate-shaped swimmer with smaller stroke amplitudes uses less energy for its locomotion, but swims more slowly. Compared with symmetric strokes with equal durations of contraction and extension, faster bell contractions increase the swimming speed whereas faster bell extensions decrease it, but both require a larger energy input. This study shows that besides the well-studied correlations between medusan body shape and locomotion, stroke variables also affect the propulsion performance. It provides a framework for comparing the propulsion performance of axisymmetric swimmers based on their body kinematics when it is difficult to measure and analyze their wakes empirically. The knowledge from this study is also useful for the design of roboti