Science.gov

Sample records for beaming space applications

  1. Beamed microwave power transmission and its application to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William C.; Eves, E. E.

    1992-01-01

    The general principles and special components of beamed microwave power transmission systems are outlined and their application to the space program are discussed. The beamed system is defined as starting with a dc source of power at the transmitting end, converting it to a microwave beam for transmission through space, and ending with the dc power output at the receiving end. An experimentally measured and certified dc-to-dc efficiency of 54 percent has been achieved, using this definition. The application discussed is that of a LEO to GEO transportation system that depends upon vehicles propelled by electric thrusters whose power is supplied by a microwave beam originating at the earth's surface. The advantages of the all-electronic system over a chemically propelled system are enumerated. The principles of space propulsion, particularly as they relate to electric propulsion, are outlined. Key components of the system and environmental considerations are discussed.

  2. Exploration mission enhancements possible with power beaming. [Space Applications Power Beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.; Coomes, E.P. ); Segna, D.R. )

    1990-10-01

    A key factor in the exploration and development of the space frontier is the availability of energy where and when it is needed. Currently all space satellites and platforms include self-contained power systems that supply the energy necessary to accomplish mission objectives. An alternative approach is to couple advanced high power system with energy beam transmitters and energy receivers to form an infrastructure of a space power utility where a central power system provides power to multiple users. Major space activities, such as low Earth orbit space commercialization and the colonization of the Moon or Mars, would benefit significantly from a central power generation and transmission system. This paper describes the power-beaming concept and system components as applied to space power generation and distribution in support of the Space Exploration Initiative. Beam-power scenarios are discussed including commonality of systems and hardware with cargo transport vehicles, power beaming from orbit to stationary and mobile users on the Lunar and Mars surfaces, and other surface applications. 6 refs.

  3. Photovoltaic-Concentrator Based Power Beaming For Space Elevator Application

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Daniel E.; Chiang, Richard; Keys, Catherine C.; Lyjak, Andrew W.; Starch, Michael D.; Nees, John A.

    2010-05-06

    The MClimber team, at the Student Space Systems Fabrication Laboratory of the University of Michigan, has developed a prototype robotic climber for competition in the NASA sponsored Power Beaming Challenge. This paper describes the development of the system that utilizes a simple telescope to deliver an 8 kW beam to a photovoltaic panel in order to power a one kilometer climb. Its unique approach utilizes a precision GPS signal to track the panel. Fundamental systems of the project were implemented using a design strategy focusing on robustness and modularity. Development of this design and its results are presented.

  4. Space processing applications of ion beam technology. [surface finishing, welding, milling and film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Ion thruster engines for spacecraft propulsion can serve as ion beam sources for potential space processing applications. The advantages of space vacuum environments and the possible gravity effects on thruster ion beam materials operations such as thin film growth, ion milling, and surface texturing were investigated. The direct gravity effect on sputter deposition and vapor deposition processes are discussed as well as techniques for cold and warm welding.

  5. Ground-Based and Space-Based Laser Beam Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozek, John M.

    1995-01-01

    A space power system based on laser beam power is sized to reduce mass, increase operational capabilities, and reduce complexity. The advantages of laser systems over solar-based systems are compared as a function of application. Power produced from the conversion of a laser beam that has been generated on the Earth's surface and beamed into cislunar space resulted in decreased round-trip time for Earth satellite electric propulsion tugs and a substantial landed mass savings for a lunar surface mission. The mass of a space-based laser system (generator in space and receiver near user) that beams down to an extraterrestrial airplane, orbiting spacecraft, surface outpost, or rover is calculated and compared to a solar system. In general, the advantage of low mass for these space-based laser systems is limited to high solar eclipse time missions at distances inside Jupiter. The power system mass is less in a continuously moving Mars rover or surface outpost using space-based laser technology than in a comparable solar-based power system, but only during dust storm conditions. Even at large distances for the Sun, the user-site portion of a space-based laser power system (e.g., the laser receiver component) is substantially less massive than a solar-based system with requisite on-board electrochemical energy storage.

  6. Three dimensional simulations of space charge dominated heavy ion beams with applications to inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, David Peter

    1994-11-01

    Heavy ion fusion requires injection, transport and acceleration of high current beams. Detailed simulation of such beams requires fully self-consistent space charge fields and three dimensions. WARP3D, developed for this purpose, is a particle-in-cell plasma simulation code optimized to work within the framework of an accelerator`s lattice of accelerating, focusing, and bending elements. The code has been used to study several test problems and for simulations and design of experiments. Two applications are drift compression experiments on the MBE-4 facility at LBL and design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector for the proposed ILSE facility. With aggressive drift compression on MBE-4, anomalous emittance growth was observed. Simulations carried out to examine possible causes showed that essentially all the emittance growth is result of external forces on the beam and not of internal beam space-charge fields. Dominant external forces are the dodecapole component of focusing fields, the image forces on the surrounding pipe and conductors, and the octopole fields that result from the structure of the quadrupole focusing elements. Goal of the design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector is to produce a beam of as low emittance as possible. The simulations show that the dominant effects that increase the emittance are the nonlinear octopole fields and the energy effect (fields in the axial direction that are off-axis). Injectors were designed that minimized the beam envelope in order to reduce the effect of the nonlinear fields. Alterations to the quadrupole structure that reduce the nonlinear fields further were examined. Comparisons were done with a scaled experiment resulted in very good agreement.

  7. Wave optics simulation of spatially partially coherent beams: Applications to free space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xifeng

    One of the main drawbacks that prevent the extensive application of free space laser communications is the atmospheric turbulence through which the beam must propagate. For the past four decades, much attention has been devoted to finding different methods to overcome this difficulty. A partially coherent beam (PCB) has been recognized as an effective approach to improve the performance of an atmospheric link. It has been examined carefully with most analyses considering the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam. However, practical PCBs may not follow GSM theory and are better examined through some numerical simulation approach such as a wave optics simulation. Consequently, an approach for modeling the spatially PCB in wave optics simulation is presented here. The approach involves the application of a sequence of random phase screens to an initial beam field and the summation of the intensity results after propagation. The relationship between the screen parameters and the spatial coherence function for the beam is developed and the approach is verified by comparing results with analytic formulations for a Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam. A variety of simulation studies were performed for this dissertation. The propagation through turbulence of a coherent beam and a particular version of a PCB, a pseudo-partially coherent beam (PPCB), is analyzed. The beam is created with a sequence of several Gaussian random phase screens for each atmospheric realization. The average intensity profiles, the scintillation index and aperture averaging factor for a horizontal propagation scenario are examined. Comparisons between these results and their corresponding analytic results for the well-known GSM beam are also made. Cumulative probability density functions for the received irradiance are initially investigated. Following the general simulation investigations, a performance metric is proposed as a general measure for optimizing the transverse coherence length of a partial

  8. Application of Electron Beams in Space for Energy Storage and Optical Beam Generation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    MIRROR -DRIFT __ SPACE BUNCHER OUTPUT RADIATION Fig. 6-Optical klystron I/ // CATCHER MAGNET - / PAIR OF CORNER MAGNETSI ~FORM AN ACHROMATIC SERVCO.Rl I...optical link will be unable to penetrate heavy cloud formations and will thus present availability problems in most regions of the world. CONCLUDING

  9. Second Beamed Space-Power Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, Russell J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Potential missions for microwave and laser power beaming in space are discussed. Power beaming options, millimeter wave technology, laser technology, lunar bases, spacecraft propulsion, and near-Earth applications are covered.

  10. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Kashine, Kenji; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2004-02-04

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  11. Space Experiments to Advance Beamed Energy Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Donald G.

    2010-05-01

    High power microwave sources are now available and usable, with modification, or beamed energy propulsion experiments in space. As output windows and vacuum seals are not needed space is a natural environment for high power vacuum tubes. Application to space therefore improves reliability and performance but complicates testing and qualification. Low power communications satellite devices (TWT, etc) have already been through the adapt-to-space design cycle and this history is a useful pathway for high power devices such as gyrotrons. In this paper, space experiments are described for low earth orbit (LEO) and lunar environment. These experiments are precursors to space application for beamed energy propulsion using high power microwaves. Power generation and storage using cryogenic systems are important elements of BEP systems and also have an important role as part of BEP experiments in the space environment.

  12. Tailoring accelerating beams in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2017-02-01

    An appropriate wave-front design will enable light fields that propagate along arbitrary trajectories, thus forming accelerating beams in free space. Previous strategies for designing such accelerating beams rely mainly on caustic methods, which start from diffraction integrals and deal only with two-dimensional fields. Here we introduce an alternate perspective to construct accelerating beams in phase space by designing the corresponding Wigner distribution function (WDF). We find that such a WDF-based method is capable of providing both the initial field distribution and the angular spectrum in need by projecting the WDF into the real space and the Fourier space, respectively. Moreover, this approach applies to the construction of both two- and three-dimensional fields, greatly generalizing previous caustic methods. It may therefore open a new route for construction of highly tailored accelerating beams and facilitate applications ranging from particle manipulation and trapping to optical routing as well as material processing.

  13. Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Govind

    2015-01-01

    The Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification (SOCLBA) project will provide a capability to amplify a laser beam that is received in a modulating retro-reflector (MRR) located in a satellite in low Earth orbit. It will also improve the pointing procedure between Earth and spacecraft terminals. The technology uses laser arrays to strengthen the reflected laser beam from the spacecraft. The results of first year's work (2014) show amplification factors of 60 times the power of the signal beam. MMRs are mirrors that reflect light beams back to the source. In space optical communications, a high-powered laser interrogator beam is directed from the ground to a satellite. Within the satellite, the beam is redirected back to ground using the MMR. In the MMR, the beam passes through modulators, which encode a data signal onto the returning beam. MMRs can be used in small spacecraft for optical communications. The SOCLBA project is significant to NASA and small spacecraft due to its application to CubeSats for optical data transmission to ground stations, as well as possible application to spacecraft for optical data transmission.

  14. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users’ Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center

    PubMed Central

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  15. Non-uniform space charge controlled KTN beam deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Ju-Hung; Zhu, Wenbin; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Stuart; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    A non-uniform space charge-controlled KTN beam deflector is presented and analyzed. We found that a non-uniform space charge can result in a non-uniform beam deflection angles. This effect can be useful for some applications such as electric field controlled beam separation. However, a non-uniform space charge needs to be avoided if one wants uniform beam deflection throughout the entire crystal.

  16. Application of a transverse phase-space measurement technique for high-brightness, H{sup {minus}} beams to the GTA H{sup {minus}} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Garcia, R.C.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sander, O.R.; Sandoval, D.P.; Shinas, M.A.; Smith, M.; Yuan, V.W.; Connolly, R.C.

    1995-05-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) had the objective Of Producing a high-brightness, high-current H-beam. The major components were a 35 keV injector, a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), an intertank matching section (IMS), and a drift tube linac (DTL), consisting of 10 modules. A technique for measuring the transverse phase-space of high-power density beams has been developed and tested. This diagnostic has been applied to the GTA H-beam. Experimental results are compared to the slit and collector technique for transverse phase-space measurements and to simulations.

  17. Level crossing statistics for optical beam wander in a turbulent atmosphere with applications to ground-to-space laser communications.

    PubMed

    Yura, Harold T; Fields, Renny A

    2011-06-20

    Level crossing statistics is applied to the complex problem of atmospheric turbulence-induced beam wander for laser propagation from ground to space. A comprehensive estimate of the single-axis wander angle temporal autocorrelation function and the corresponding power spectrum is used to develop, for the first time to our knowledge, analytic expressions for the mean angular level crossing rate and the mean duration of such crossings. These results are based on an extension and generalization of a previous seminal analysis of the beam wander variance by Klyatskin and Kon. In the geometrical optics limit, we obtain an expression for the beam wander variance that is valid for both an arbitrarily shaped initial beam profile and transmitting aperture. It is shown that beam wander can disrupt bidirectional ground-to-space laser communication systems whose small apertures do not require adaptive optics to deliver uniform beams at their intended target receivers in space. The magnitude and rate of beam wander is estimated for turbulence profiles enveloping some practical laser communication deployment options and suggesting what level of beam wander effects must be mitigated to demonstrate effective bidirectional laser communication systems.

  18. Power Beaming, Orbital Debris Removal, and Other Space Applications of a Ground Based Free Electron Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    power beaming to satellites, the removal of orbital debris , laser illumination of objects within the solar system for scientific study, and...frequency of accesses between a satellite and one or more ground stations for multiple orbital profiles. FEL illumination of orbital debris is modeled to

  19. Phase space analysis of velocity bunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippetto, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cultrera, L.; di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Pace, E.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vicario, C.; Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Cianchi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Giannessi, L.; Labat, M.; Quattromini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Marrelli, C.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Serluca, M.

    2011-09-01

    Peak current represents a key demand for new generation electron beam photoinjectors. Many beam applications, such as free electron laser, inverse Compton scattering, terahertz radiation generation, have efficiencies strongly dependent on the bunch length and current. A method of beam longitudinal compression (called velocity bunching) has been proposed some years ago, based on beam longitudinal phase space rotation in a rf field potential. The control of such rotation can lead to a compression factor in excess of 10, depending on the initial longitudinal emittance. Code simulations have shown the possibility to fully compensate the transverse emittance growth during rf compression, and this regime has been experimentally proven recently at SPARC. The key point is the control of transverse beam plasma oscillations, in order to freeze the emittance at its lowest value at the end of compression. Longitudinal and transverse phase space distortions have been observed during the experiments, leading to asymmetric current profiles and higher final projected emittances. In this paper we discuss in detail the results obtained at SPARC in the regime of velocity bunching, analyzing such nonlinearities and identifying the causes. The beam degradation is discussed, both for slice and projected parameters. Analytical tools are derived to experimentally quantify the effect of such distortions on the projected emittance.

  20. Application of acoustic surface wave filter-beam lead component technology to deep space multimission hardware design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kermode, A. W.; Boreham, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    This paper discusses the utilization of acoustic surface wave filters, beam lead components, and thin film metallized ceramic substrate technology as applied to the design of deep space, long-life, multimission transponder. The specific design to be presented is for a second mixer local oscillator module, operating at frequencies as high as 249 MHz.

  1. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  2. Monte Carlo validation of the TrueBeam 10XFFF phase–space files for applications in lung SABR

    SciTech Connect

    Teke, Tony; Duzenli, Cheryl; Bergman, Alanah; Viel, Francis; Atwal, Parmveer; Gete, Ermias

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To establish the clinical acceptability of universal Monte Carlo phase–space data for the 10XFFF (flattening filter free) photon beam on the Varian TrueBeam Linac, including previously unreported data for small fields, output factors, and inhomogeneous media. The study was particularly aimed at confirming the suitability for use in simulations of lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment plans. Methods: Monte Carlo calculated percent depth doses (PDDs), transverse profiles, and output factors for the TrueBeam 10 MV FFF beam using generic phase–space data that have been released by the Varian MC research team were compared with in-house measurements and published data from multiple institutions (ten Linacs from eight different institutions). BEAMnrc was used to create field size specific phase–spaces located underneath the jaws. Doses were calculated with DOSXYZnrc in a water phantom for fields ranging from 1 × 1 to 40 × 40 cm{sup 2}. Particular attention was paid to small fields (down to 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}) and dose per pulse effects on dosimeter response for high dose rate 10XFFF beams. Ion chamber measurements were corrected for changes in ion collection efficiency (P{sub ion}) with increasing dose per pulse. MC and ECLIPSE ANISOTROPIC ANALYTICAL ALGORITHM (AAA) calculated PDDs were compared to Gafchromic film measurement in inhomogeneous media (water, bone, lung). Results: Measured data from all machines agreed with Monte Carlo simulations within 1.0% and 1.5% for PDDs and in-field transverse profiles, respectively, for field sizes >1 × 1 cm{sup 2} in a homogeneous water phantom. Agreements in the 80%–20% penumbra widths were better than 2 mm for all the fields that were compared. For all the field sizes considered, the agreement between their measured and calculated output factors was within 1.1%. Monte Carlo results for dose to water at water/bone, bone/lung, and lung/water interfaces as well as within lung agree with film

  3. Overview of Phase Space Manipulations of Relativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-08-31

    Phase space manipulation is a process to rearrange beam's distribution in 6-D phase space. In this paper, we give an overview of the techniques for tailoring beam distribution in 2D, 4D, and 6D phase space to meet the requirements of various applications. These techniques become a new focus of accelerator physics R&D and very likely these advanced concepts will open up new opportunities in advanced accelerators and the science enabled by them.

  4. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2004-09-25

    A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  5. Earth to space power beaming: A new NASA technology initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rather, John D. G.

    1992-02-01

    Laser power beaming from the Earth's surface is an innovative and potentially cost-effective option for reliably providing electrical power for applications such as space transportation, Earth-orbiting satellites, and lunar development. The maturation of laser power beaming technology can support low power applications such as upgraded conventional communications satellites in the present decade. Power beaming systems to support extensive lunar base operations that may consume extremely large amounts of power can be implemented early in the 21st century. The synergistic advantages of high-thrust, high specific-impulse electric propulsion may make enhanced, low cost space logistics an area of unique significance for laser power beaming. Economic forces will continue as a driving factor in the selection of major system elements for both commercial applications as well as the avant-garde national space missions envisioned for the 21st century. As a result, the implementation of laser power beaming systems will only take place if they can demonstrate clear economic benefits without sacrificing performance, personnel safety, or the environment. Similarly, the development activities that are a necessary precursor to any operational system will take place only if key industry and government leaders perceive laser power beaming systems as an achievable goal with realistic payoffs in comparison to competing energy options. This paper summarizes NASA's current research to evaluate laser power beaming systems as they apply to applications of greatest interest, and it includes a summary of the current laser power beaming program within the NASA Headquarters Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. This research effort will quantify some key technical certainties and uncertainties pertaining to laser power beaming systems appropriate for space applications as well as establish a path of development that includes maturation of key technology components for reliable laser and

  6. Design, development and fabrication of a deployable/retractable truss beam model for large space structures application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Louis R.

    1987-01-01

    The design requirements for a truss beam model are reviewed. The concept behind the beam is described. Pertinent analysis and studies concerning beam definition, deployment loading, joint compliance, etc. are given. Design, fabrication and assembly procedures are discussed.

  7. Control of Space-Based Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifzer. W. J.; Taminger, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Engineering a closed-loop control system for an electron beam welder for space-based additive manufacturing is challenging. For earth and space based applications, components must work in a vacuum and optical components become occluded with metal vapor deposition. For extraterrestrial applications added components increase launch weight, increase complexity, and increase space flight certification efforts. Here we present a software tool that closely couples path planning and E-beam parameter controls into the build process to increase flexibility. In an environment where data collection hinders real-time control, another approach is considered that will still yield a high quality build.

  8. Ion-beam technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Robson, R. R.; Sovey, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Ion propulsion research and development yields a mature technology that is transferable to a wide range of nonpropulsive applications, including terrestrial and space manufacturing. A xenon ion source was used for an investigation into potential ion-beam applications. The results of cathode tests and discharge-chamber experiments are presented. A series of experiments encompassing a wide range of potential applications is discussed. Two types of processes, sputter deposition, and erosion were studied. Some of the potential applications are thin-film Teflon capacitor fabrication, lubrication applications, ion-beam cleaning and polishing, and surface texturing.

  9. Liquid Crystal-based Beam Steering Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Bos, Philip; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Wang, Xinghua; Pishnyak, Oleg; Kreminska, Liubov; Golovin, Andrii

    2006-01-01

    Liquid crystal-based beam steering devices can provide electronic beam scanning to angles above 1 milliradian, sub-microradian beam pointing accuracy, as well as wave-front correction to maintain output optical beam quality. The liquid crystal technology effort will be summarized, and the potential application of the resulting devices to NASA space-based scenarios will be described.

  10. Solar Power Beaming: From Space to Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Parker, J M; Beach, R J; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-04-14

    Harvesting solar energy in space and power beaming the collected energy to a receiver station on Earth is a very attractive way to help solve mankind's current energy and environmental problems. However, the colossal and expensive 'first step' required in achieving this goal has to-date stifled its initiation. In this paper, we will demonstrate that recent advance advances in laser and optical technology now make it possible to deploy a space-based system capable of delivering 1 MW of energy to a terrestrial receiver station, via a single unmanned commercial launch into Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Figure 1 depicts the overall concept of our solar power beaming system, showing a large solar collector in space, beaming a coherent laser beam to a receiving station on Earth. We will describe all major subsystems and provide technical and economic discussion to support our conclusions.

  11. Nonlinear longitudinal space charge oscillations in relativistic electron beams.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, P; Li, R K; Marinelli, A

    2011-05-06

    In this Letter we study the evolution of an initial periodic modulation in the temporal profile of a relativistic electron beam under the effect of longitudinal space-charge forces. Linear theory predicts a periodic exchange of the modulation between the density and the energy profiles at the beam plasma frequency. For large enough initial modulations, wave breaking occurs after 1/2 period of plasma oscillation leading to the formation of short current spikes. We confirm this effect by direct measurements on a ps-modulated electron beam from an rf photoinjector. These results are useful for the generation of intense electron pulse trains for advanced accelerator applications.

  12. Nonlinear Longitudinal Space Charge Oscillations in Relativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.; Marinelli, A.

    2011-05-06

    In this Letter we study the evolution of an initial periodic modulation in the temporal profile of a relativistic electron beam under the effect of longitudinal space-charge forces. Linear theory predicts a periodic exchange of the modulation between the density and the energy profiles at the beam plasma frequency. For large enough initial modulations, wave breaking occurs after 1/2 period of plasma oscillation leading to the formation of short current spikes. We confirm this effect by direct measurements on a ps-modulated electron beam from an rf photoinjector. These results are useful for the generation of intense electron pulse trains for advanced accelerator applications.

  13. Study of longitudinal dynamics in space-charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai

    Modern accelerator applications, such as heavy ion fusion drivers, pulsed neutron sources, electron injectors for high-energy linear colliders, and X-ray Free Electron Lasers, demand beams with high intensity, low emittance and small energy spread. At low (non-relativistic) energies, the "electrostatic", collective interactions from space-charge forces existing in such intense beams play the dominant role; we characterize these beams as space-charge dominated beams. This dissertation presents numerous new findings on the longitudinal dynamics of a space-charge dominated beam, particularly on the propagation of density perturbations. In order to fully understand the complex physics of longitudinal space-charge waves, we combine the results of theory, computer simulation, and experiment. In the Long Solenoid Experimental system (LSE), with numerous diagnostic tools and techniques, we have, for the first time, experimentally measured the detailed energy profiles of longitudinal space-charge waves at different locations, both near the beam source and at the end of the transport system. Along with the current profiles, we have a complete set of experimental data for the propagation of space-charge waves. We compare these measured results to a 1-D theory and find better agreement for beams with perturbations in the linear regime, where the perturbation strength is less than 10%, than those with nonlinear perturbations. Using fast imaging techniques that we newly developed, we have, for the first time, obtained the progressive time-resolved images of longitudinal slices of a space-charge dominated beam. These images not only provide us time-resolved transverse density distribution of the beam, but also enable us to take time-resolved transverse phase space measurement using computerized tomography. By combining this information with the longitudinal energy measurement, we have, for the first time, experimentally constructed the full 6-D phase space. Part of the results

  14. Beam Tomography in Longitudinal Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mane, V.; Wei, J.; Peggs, S.

    1997-05-01

    Longitudinal particle motion in circular accelerators is typically monitored by one dimensional (1-D) profiles. Adiabatic particle motion in 2-D phase space can be reconstructed with tomographic techniques, using 1-D profiles. In this paper, we discuss a filtered backprojection algorithm, with a high pass ramp or Hann filter, for phase space reconstruction. The algorithm uses several projections of the beam at equally spaced angles over half a synchrotron period. A computer program RADON has been developed to process digitized mountain range data and do the phase space reconstruction for the AGS, and later for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Analysis has been performed to determine the sensitivity to machine parameters and data acquisition errors. During the Sextant test of RHIC in early 1997, this program has been successfully employed to reconstruct the motion of Au^77+ beam in the AGS.

  15. Beam waveguides in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Smith, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    A beam waveguide is a mechanism for guiding electromagnetic radiation from one part of an antenna to another through a series of reflectors. Appropriate placement of reflectors on an antenna allows a beam to be guided around the elevation axis and/or below the alidade. The beam waveguide permits placement of all electronics in a room on the alidade below the elevation axis, or below the alidade; feed horn covers to be protected from the weather; and feed electronics to be in spacious rooms rather than in crowded cones, and always level rather than tipping with change in elevation angle. These factors can lead to lower costs in implementation such as Ka-band, better antenna performance at X-band, more efficient and stable performance of transmitters and receivers, and lower maintenance and operating costs. Studies are underway to determine methods for converting the major antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN) to beam waveguide operations by 1995.

  16. Tomographic measurement of the phase space distribution of a space-charge-dominated beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    Many applications of accelerators, such as free electron lasers, pulsed neutron sources, and heavy ion fusion, require a good quality beam with high intensity. In practice, the achievable intensity is often limited by the dynamics at the low-energy, space-charge dominated end of the machine. Because low-energy beams can have complex distribution functions, a good understanding of their detailed evolution is needed. To address this issue, we have developed a simple and accurate tomographic method to map the beam phase using quadrupole magnets, which includes the effects from space charge. We extend this technique to use also solenoidal magnets which are commonly used at low energies, especially in photoinjectors, thus making the diagnostic applicable to most machines. We simulate our technique using a particle in cell code (PIC), to ascertain accuracy of the reconstruction. Using this diagnostic we report a number of experiments to study and optimize injection, transport and acceleration of intense space charge dominated beams. We examine phase mixing, by studying the phase-space evolution of an intense beam with a transversely nonuniform initial density distribution. Experimental measurements, theoretical predictions and PIC simulations are in good agreement each other. Finally, we generate a parabolic beam pulse to model those beams from photoinjectors, and combine tomography with fast imaging techniques to investigate the time-sliced parameters of beam current, size, energy spread and transverse emittance. We found significant differences between the slice emittance profiles and slice orientation as the beam propagates downstream. The combined effect of longitudinal nonuniform profiles and fast imaging of the transverse phase space provided us with information about correlations between longitudinal and transverse dynamics that we report within this dissertation.

  17. Higher order annular Gaussian laser beam propagation in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyyuboglu, Halil T.; Yenice, Yusuf E.; Baykal, Yahya K.

    2006-03-01

    Propagation of higher order annular Gaussian (HOAG) laser beams in free space is examined. HOAG beams are defined as the difference of two Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beams; thus, they can be produced by subtracting a smaller beam from a larger beam, that are cocentered and both possess HG mode field distributions. Such beams can be considered as a generalization of the well-known annular Gaussian beams. We formulate the source and receiver plane characteristics and kurtosis parameter of HOAG beams propagating in free space and evaluate them numerically. In comparison to HG beams, HOAG beams have a broader beam size with outer lobes of kidney shape. The amount of received power within the same receiver aperture size, that is, power in bucket, is generally lower for higher order beams. The convergence of the kurtosis parameter to an asymptotic value for higher order beams takes much longer propagation distances compared to zero-order beams.

  18. Space applications of superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Vorreiter, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Some potential applications of superconductivity in space are summarized, e.g., the use of high field magnets for cosmic ray analysis or energy storage and generation, space applications of digital superconducting devices, such as the Josephson switch and, in the future, a superconducting computer. Other superconducting instrumentation which could be used in space includes: low frequency superconducting sensors, microwave and infrared detectors, instruments for gravitational studies, and high-Q cavities for use as stabilizing elements in clocks and oscillators.

  19. MSFC evaluation of the space fabrication demonstration system (beam builder)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, E. O.; Irvine, C. N.

    1981-01-01

    The beam builder, designed and manufactured as a ground demonstration model, is a precursor to a machine for use in the space environment, transportable by the space shuttle. The beam builder has the capability to automatically fabricate triangular truss beams in low Earth orbit with a highly reliable machine that requires a minimum of in-space maintenance and repair. A performance assessment of the beam builder, which was fabricated from commercial hardware is given.

  20. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Meusel, O. Droba, M.; Noll, D.; Schulte, K.; Schneider, P. P.; Wiesner, C.

    2016-02-15

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  1. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited).

    PubMed

    Meusel, O; Droba, M; Noll, D; Schulte, K; Schneider, P P; Wiesner, C

    2016-02-01

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  2. Laser power beaming for satellite applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.

    1993-09-22

    A serious consideration of laser power beaming for satellite applications appears to have grown out of a NASA mission analysis for transmitting power to lunar bases during the two week dark period. System analyses showed that laser power beaming to the moon in conjunction with efficient, large area solar cell collection panels, were an attractive alternative to other schemes such as battery storage and nuclear generators, largely because of the high space transportation costs. The primary difficulty with this scheme is the need for very high average power visible lasers. One system study indicated that lasers in excess of 10 MW at a wavelength of approximately 850 nm were required. Although such lasers systems have received much attention for military applications, their realization is still a long term goal.

  3. Current understanding and issues on electron beam injection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1988-01-01

    The status of the physics understanding involved in electron beam injection in space is reviewed. The paper examines our understanding of beam plasma interactions and their associated wave and energized particle spectra of the processes involved in the beam plasma discharge, and of the vehicle charge neutralization. 'Strawman' models are presented for comparison with experimental observations.

  4. Compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Wang, G.

    2015-05-03

    The effects of space charge play a significant role in modern-day accelerators, frequently constraining the beam parameters attainable in an accelerator or in an accelerator chain. They also can limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with sub-TeV high-brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using an appropriate electron beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam in a coasting beam. But these methods cannot compensate space charge tune spread in a bunched hadron beam. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with mismatched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread.

  5. Space Charge Effect in the Sheet and Solid Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ho Young; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Ahn, Saeyoung

    1998-11-01

    We analyze the space charge effect of two different types of electron beam ; sheet and solid electron beam. Electron gun simulations are carried out using shadow and control grids for high and low perveance. Rectangular and cylindrical geometries are used for sheet and solid electron beam in planar and disk type cathode. The E-gun code is used to study the limiting current and space charge loading in each geometries.

  6. The X-beam as a deployable boom for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Louis R.

    1988-01-01

    Extension of antennas and thrust modules from the primary structure of the space station will require deployable beams of high stiffness and strength, as well as low mass and package volume. A square boom cross section is desirable for interface reasons. These requirements and others are satisfied by the X-beam. The X-beam folds by simple geometry, using single-degree-of-freedom hinges at simple angles, with no strain during deployment. Strut members are of large diameter with unidirectional graphite fibers for maximum beam performance. Fittings are aluminum with phosphor bronze bushings so that compliance is low and joint lifetime is high. The several beam types required for different applications on the space station will use the same basic design, with changes in strut cross section where necessary. Deployment is by a BI-STEM which pushes the beam out; retraction is by cables which cause initial folding and pull the beam in.

  7. Formation of High Charge State Heavy Ion Beams with intense Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.

    2011-03-01

    High charge-state heavy-ion beams are of interest and used for a number of accelerator applications. Some accelerators produce the beams downstream of the ion source by stripping bound electrons from the ions as they pass through a foil or gas. Heavy-ion inertial fusion (HIF) would benefit from low-emittance, high current ion beams with charge state >1. For these accelerators, the desired dimensionless perveance upon extraction from the emitter is {approx}10{sup -3}, and the electrical current of the beam pulse is {approx}1 A. For accelerator applications where high charge state and very high current are desired, space charge effects present unique challenges. For example, in a stripper, the separation of charge states creates significant nonlinear space-charge forces that impact the beam brightness. We will report on the particle-in-cell simulation of the formation of such beams for HIF, using a thin stripper at low energy.

  8. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, Peter

    2014-02-15

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  9. A phase-space beam position monitor for synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Martinson, Mercedes; Belev, George; Dallin, Les; de Jong, Mark; Chapman, Dean

    2015-07-01

    The stability of the photon beam position on synchrotron beamlines is critical for most if not all synchrotron radiation experiments. The position of the beam at the experiment or optical element location is set by the position and angle of the electron beam source as it traverses the magnetic field of the bend-magnet or insertion device. Thus an ideal photon beam monitor would be able to simultaneously measure the photon beam's position and angle, and thus infer the electron beam's position in phase space. X-ray diffraction is commonly used to prepare monochromatic beams on X-ray beamlines usually in the form of a double-crystal monochromator. Diffraction couples the photon wavelength or energy to the incident angle on the lattice planes within the crystal. The beam from such a monochromator will contain a spread of energies due to the vertical divergence of the photon beam from the source. This range of energies can easily cover the absorption edge of a filter element such as iodine at 33.17 keV. A vertical profile measurement of the photon beam footprint with and without the filter can be used to determine the vertical centroid position and angle of the photon beam. In the measurements described here an imaging detector is used to measure these vertical profiles with an iodine filter that horizontally covers part of the monochromatic beam. The goal was to investigate the use of a combined monochromator, filter and detector as a phase-space beam position monitor. The system was tested for sensitivity to position and angle under a number of synchrotron operating conditions, such as normal operations and special operating modes where the photon beam is intentionally altered in position and angle at the source point. The results are comparable with other methods of beam position measurement and indicate that such a system is feasible in situations where part of the synchrotron beam can be used for the phase-space measurement.

  10. Space propulsion and power beaming using millimeter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Dickinson, R.

    1995-11-01

    Past schemes for using beamed microwave power for space propulsion and providing power to space platforms have used microwaves below 10 GHz. Recent expansions of the high power microwave technology domain offer fundamental reassessment of the following missions: (1) location of orbital debris, (2) supplying power to loitering high-altitude airplanes, (3) satellite battery recharging, (4) imaging of asteroids, (5) orbit raising and transfer, (6) interplanetary probe launch to the outer planets and comets, and ultimately (7) launch into Earth orbit. This group of applications may be done by a ground-based system. The system would start small, being built for the near Earth missions, and be enlarged incrementally as the technology matures and confidence develops. Of particular interest are sources in the millimeter range where there are low loss atmospheric windows and MJ pulses are available in quasi-CW operation. A development scenario for these missions using millimeter wave technology is described.

  11. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2016-02-15

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H{sup +} beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H{sup −} ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  12. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  13. Threshold criterion for a space simulation beam-plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Walker, D. N.; Papadopoulos, K.; Bernstein, W.; Lin, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the threshold characteristics of a space simulation beam-plasma discharge with emphasis on density profiles and a density-dependent ignition criterion. The study included various beam-plasma conditions covering beam currents from 8 to 85 mA, beam energies from 0.8 to 2.0 keV, and magnetic fields at 0.9 and 1.5 G. The study included experimental determinations of radial profiles of electron density for each of the selected conditions extending from a low-density, pre-beam-plasma discharge state to a strong beam-plasma discharge condition. The experimental results are shown to agree with detailed model calculations, which consider the beam-plasma discharge to be produced by large-amplitude electron plasma waves resulting from the beam-plasma interaction.

  14. Initial alignment method for free space optics laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yuta; Tashiro, Yuki; Izumi, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Koichi; Tsujimura, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    The authors have newly proposed and constructed an active free space optics transmission system. It is equipped with a motor driven laser emitting mechanism and positioning photodiodes, and it transmits a collimated thin laser beam and accurately steers the laser beam direction. It is necessary to introduce the laser beam within sensible range of the receiver in advance of laser beam tracking control. This paper studies an estimation method of laser reaching point for initial laser beam alignment. Distributed photodiodes detect laser luminescence at respective position, and the optical axis of laser beam is analytically presumed based on the Gaussian beam optics. Computer simulation evaluates the accuracy of the proposed estimation methods, and results disclose that the methods help us to guide the laser beam to a distant receiver.

  15. Generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution and Beam Matrix for Phase-Space Manipulations of High-Intensity Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Moses; Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.; Groening, Lars; Xiao, Chen

    2016-11-01

    In an uncoupled linear lattice system, the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution formulated on the basis of the single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants has served as a fundamental theoretical basis for the analyses of the equilibrium, stability, and transport properties of high-intensity beams for the past several decades. Recent applications of high-intensity beams, however, require beam phase-space manipulations by intentionally introducing strong coupling. In this Letter, we report the full generalization of the KV model by including all of the linear (both external and space-charge) coupling forces, beam energy variations, and arbitrary emittance partition, which all form essential elements for phase-space manipulations. The new generalized KV model yields spatially uniform density profiles and corresponding linear self-field forces as desired. The corresponding matrix envelope equations and beam matrix for the generalized KV model provide important new theoretical tools for the detailed design and analysis of high-intensity beam manipulations, for which previous theoretical models are not easily applicable.

  16. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  17. Space applications instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.; Oberholtzer, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A compendium of resumes of 158 instrument systems or experiments, of particular interest to space applications, is presented. Each resume exists in a standardized format, permitting entries for 26 administrative items and 39 scientific or engineering items. The resumes are organized into forty groups determined by the forty spacecraft with which the instruments are associated. The resumes are followed by six different cross indexes, each organized alphabetically according to one of the following catagories: instrument name, acronym, name of principal investigator, name of organization employing the principal investigator, assigned experiment number, and spacecraft name. The resumes are associated with a computerized instrument resume search and retrieval system.

  18. Application of reactor-pumped lasers to power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Repetti, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    Power beaming is the concept of centralized power generation and distribution to remote users via energy beams such as microwaves or laser beams. The power beaming community is presently performing technical evaluations of available lasers as part of the design process for developing terrestrial and space-based power beaming systems. This report describes the suitability of employing a nuclear reactor-pumped laser in a power beaming system. Although there are several technical issues to be resolved, the power beaming community currently believes that the AlGaAs solid-state laser is the primary candidate for power beaming because that laser meets the many design criteria for such a system and integrates well with the GaAs photodiode receiver array. After reviewing the history and physics of reactor-pumped lasers, the advantages of these lasers for power beaming are discussed, along with several technical issues which are currently facing reactor-pumped laser research. The overriding conclusion is that reactor-pumped laser technology is not presently developed to the point of being technially or economically competitive with more mature solid-state technologies for application to power beaming. 58 refs.

  19. Subluminal group velocity and dispersion of Laguerre Gauss beams in free space.

    PubMed

    Bareza, Nestor D; Hermosa, Nathaniel

    2016-05-27

    That the speed of light in free space c is constant has been a pillar of modern physics since the derivation of Maxwell and in Einstein's postulate in special relativity. This has been a basic assumption in light's various applications. However, a physical beam of light has a finite extent such that even in free space it is by nature dispersive. The field confinement changes its wavevector, hence, altering the light's group velocity vg. Here, we report the subluminal vg and consequently the dispersion in free space of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam, a beam known to carry orbital angular momentum. The vg of LG beam, calculated in the paraxial regime, is observed to be inversely proportional to the beam's divergence θ0, the orbital order ℓ and the radial order p. LG beams of higher orders travel relatively slower than that of lower orders. As a consequence, LG beams of different orders separate in the temporal domain along propagation. This is an added effect to the dispersion due to field confinement. Our results are useful for treating information embedded in LG beams from astronomical sources and/or data transmission in free space.

  20. Interplay of space-charge and beam-beam effects in a collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-09-27

    Operation of a collider at low energy or use of cooling techniques to increase beam density may result in luminosity limitation due to the space-charge effects. Understanding of such limitation became important for Low-Energy RHIC physics program with heavy ions at the center of mass energies of 5-20 GeV/nucleon. For a collider, we are interested in a long beam lifetime, which limits the allowable space-charge tune shift. An additional complication comes from the fact that ion beams are colliding, which requires careful consideration of the interplay of direct space-charge and beam-beam effects. This paper summarizes the initial observations during experimental studies in RHIC at low energies.

  1. Second beamed space-power workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Deyoung, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    The powering of aircraft with laser energy from a solar power satellite may be a promising new approach to the critical problem of the rising cost of fuel for aircraft transportation systems. The result is a nearly fuelless, pollution-free flight transportation system which is cost-competitive with the fuel-conservative airplane of the future. The major components of this flight system include a laser power satellite, relay satellites, laser-powered turbofans and a conventional airframe. The relay satellites are orbiting optical systems which intercept the beam from a power satellite and refocus and redirect the beam to its next target.

  2. Space Charge Dominated Beams in the Iucf Cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    1995-01-01

    Many present and future accelerator projects require significantly increased brightness of the accelerated and stored beams to make modern nuclear and high energy experiments feasible. In the case of IUCF Cooler it has been stated that there is strong motivation for increased beam intensity to provide the designed luminosity for the future Light Ion Spin Synchrotron. To achieve the desired brightness of the beam one must consider a complex problem involving both effective injection and circumventing various intensity limits. This dissertation is essentially a collection of theoretical models and experimental observations which, taken together, make an attempt to analyze numerous intensity and space charge related effects in the IUCF Cooler. We found that the proton beams in the IUCF Cooler are nearly completely space charge dominated longitudinally. This leads to a number of beam properties, such as coherent synchrotron frequency shift and an absence of decoherence in the synchrotron phase oscillations, which have not been observed before. We observed experimentally that the intensity limit in the IUCF Cooler is a peak current limit due to space charge effects. Beam losses occur due to incoherent transverse effects, such as large space charge tune shift and the formation of tails. In addition to that, a very precise bunched beam current monitor was invented and tested. This device could be used in the future precise nuclear experiments.

  3. Practical Applications of Space Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report gives an overview of a study conducted by the Space Applications Board (SAB) on the practical applications of space systems. In this study, the SAB considered how the nation's space capability might be used to solve problems such as the shortage of food and energy; the improvement of the physical environment; inventorying and…

  4. Applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelerinter, E.; Spielberg, N.

    1980-01-01

    Wire adhesion in steel belted radial tires; carbon fibers and composite; cold welding, brazing, and fabrication; hydrogen production, separation, and storage; membrane use; catalysis; sputtering and texture; and ion beam implantation are discussed.

  5. Transport of 3D space charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jian-Qin

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical analysis and the computer code design for the intense pulsed beam transport. Intense beam dynamics is a very important issue in low-energy high-current accelerators and beam transport systems. This problem affects beam transmission and beam qualities. Therefore, it attracts the attention of the accelerator physicists worldwide. The analysis and calculation for the intense beam dynamics are very complicated, because the state of particle motion is dominated not only by the applied electromagnetic fields, but also by the beam-induced electromagnetic fields (self-fields). Moreover, the self fields are related to the beam dimensions and particle distributions. So, it is very difficult to get the self-consistent solutions of particle motion analytically. For this reason, we combine the Lie algebraic method and the particle in cell (PIC) scheme together to simulate intense 3D beam transport. With the Lie algebraic method we analyze the particle nonlinear trajectories in the applied electromagnetic fields up to third order approximation, and with the PIC algorithm we calculate the space charge effects to the particle motion. Based on the theoretical analysis, we have developed a computer code, which calculates beam transport systems consisting of electrostatic lenses, electrostatic accelerating columns, solenoid lenses, magnetic and electric quadruples, magnetic sextupoles, octopuses and different kinds of electromagnetic analyzers. The optimization calculations and the graphic display for the calculated results are provided by the code.

  6. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  7. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  8. Application of recursive Gibbs-Appell formulation in deriving the equations of motion of N-viscoelastic robotic manipulators in 3D space using Timoshenko Beam Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, M. H.; Shafei, A. M.

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the application of Gibbs-Appell (G-A) formulation and the assumed modes method to the mathematical modeling of N-viscoelastic link manipulators. The paper's focus is on obtaining accurate and complete equations of motion which encompass the most related structural properties of lightweight elastic manipulators. In this study, two important damping mechanisms, namely, the structural viscoelasticity (Kelvin-Voigt) effect (as internal damping) and the viscous air effect (as external damping) have been considered. To include the effects of shear and rotational inertia, the assumption of Timoshenko beam (TB) theory (TBT) has been applied. Gravity, torsion, and longitudinal elongation effects have also been included in the formulations. To systematically derive the equations of motion and improve the computational efficiency, a recursive algorithm has been used in the modeling of the system. In this algorithm, all the mathematical operations are carried out by only 3×3 and 3×1 matrices. Finally, a computational simulation for a manipulator with two elastic links is performed in order to verify the proposed method.

  9. Ignition of beam plasma discharge in the electron beam experiment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1985-01-01

    An ignition of beam plasma discharge (BPD) in space was observed in a neutral gas-electron beam interaction experiment by Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 in 1983. An electron beam of 8 kV 100 mA was injected into a high dense nitrogen gas cloud of 10 to the 23rd molecules which was released during 100 msec from the Orbiter. The appearance of the beam and its surroundings observed by a low-light-level TV camera showed a local ignition of the beam plasma discharge in the gas cloud. The enhanced plasma production, generation of auroral emission, and associated wave emission were also detected by onboard diagnostic instruments.

  10. NASA Beams Beatles Song to Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    The transmission over NASA's Deep Space Network will commemorate the 40th anniversary of the day The Beatles recorded the song, as well as the 50th anniversary of NASA's founding and the group's be...

  11. Subluminal group velocity and dispersion of Laguerre Gauss beams in free space

    PubMed Central

    Bareza, Nestor D.; Hermosa, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    That the speed of light in free space c is constant has been a pillar of modern physics since the derivation of Maxwell and in Einstein’s postulate in special relativity. This has been a basic assumption in light’s various applications. However, a physical beam of light has a finite extent such that even in free space it is by nature dispersive. The field confinement changes its wavevector, hence, altering the light’s group velocity vg. Here, we report the subluminal vg and consequently the dispersion in free space of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam, a beam known to carry orbital angular momentum. The vg of LG beam, calculated in the paraxial regime, is observed to be inversely proportional to the beam’s divergence θ0, the orbital order ℓ and the radial order p. LG beams of higher orders travel relatively slower than that of lower orders. As a consequence, LG beams of different orders separate in the temporal domain along propagation. This is an added effect to the dispersion due to field confinement. Our results are useful for treating information embedded in LG beams from astronomical sources and/or data transmission in free space. PMID:27231195

  12. Subluminal group velocity and dispersion of Laguerre Gauss beams in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareza, Nestor D.; Hermosa, Nathaniel

    2016-05-01

    That the speed of light in free space c is constant has been a pillar of modern physics since the derivation of Maxwell and in Einstein’s postulate in special relativity. This has been a basic assumption in light’s various applications. However, a physical beam of light has a finite extent such that even in free space it is by nature dispersive. The field confinement changes its wavevector, hence, altering the light’s group velocity vg. Here, we report the subluminal vg and consequently the dispersion in free space of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam, a beam known to carry orbital angular momentum. The vg of LG beam, calculated in the paraxial regime, is observed to be inversely proportional to the beam’s divergence θ0, the orbital order ℓ and the radial order p. LG beams of higher orders travel relatively slower than that of lower orders. As a consequence, LG beams of different orders separate in the temporal domain along propagation. This is an added effect to the dispersion due to field confinement. Our results are useful for treating information embedded in LG beams from astronomical sources and/or data transmission in free space.

  13. High brightness beams and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams. Thermionic systems are briefly covered. Recent and past results from the photoinjector programs are given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers using photoinjectors is discussed. The progress that has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency, is covered. Finally, a discussion of emittance measurements of photoinjector systems and how the measurement is complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam is presented.

  14. Space processing applications bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This special bibliography lists 724 articles, papers, and reports which discuss various aspects of the use of the space environment for materials science research or for commercial enterprise. The potentialities of space processing and the improved materials processes that are made possible by the unique aspects of the space environment are emphasized. References identified in April, 1978 are cited.

  15. Hybrid silicon free-space source with integrated beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doylend, J. K.; Heck, M. J. R.; Bovington, J. T.; Peters, J. D.; Davenport, M. L.; Coldren, L. A.; Bowers, J. E.

    2013-02-01

    Free-space beam steering using optical phase arrays are desirable as a means of implementing Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and free-space communication links without the need for moving parts, thus alleviating vulnerabilities due to vibrations and inertial forces. Implementing such an approach in silicon photonic integrated circuits is particularly desirable in order to take advantage of established CMOS processing techniques while reducing both device size and packaging complexity. In this work we demonstrate a free-space diode laser together with beam steering implemented on-chip in a silicon photonic circuit. A waveguide phased array, surface gratings, a hybrid III-V/silicon laser and an array of hybrid III/V silicon amplifiers were fabricated on-chip in order to achieve a fully integrated steerable free-space optical source with no external optical inputs, thus eliminating the need for fiber coupling altogether. The chip was fabricated using a modified version of the hybrid silicon process developed at UCSB, with modifications in order to incorporate diodes within the waveguide layer as well as within the III-V gain layer. Beam steering across a 12° field of view with +/-0.3° accuracy and 1.8°x0.6° beam width was achieved, with background peaks suppressed 7 dB relative to the main lobe within the field of view for arbitrarily chosen beam directions.

  16. Neurosurgical applications of ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, Jacob I.; Levy, Richard P.; Phillips, Mark H.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Lyman, John T.

    1989-04-01

    The program at Donner Pavilion has applied nuclear medicine research to the diagnosis and radiosurgical treatment of life-threatening intracranial vascular disorders that affect more than half a million Americans. Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery, using narrow beams of heavy ions, demonstrates superior biological and physical characteristics in brain over X-and γ-rays, viz., improved dose distribution in the Bragg peak and sharp lateral and distal borders and less scattering of the beam. Examination of CNS tissue response and alteration of cerebral blood-flow dynamics related to heavy-ion Bragg peak radiosurgery is carried out using three-dimensional treatment planning and quantitative imaging utilizing cerebral angiography, computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cine-CT, xenon X-ray CT and positron emission tomography (PET). Also under examination are the physical properties of narrow heavy-ion beams for improving methods of dose delivery and dose distribution and for establishing clinical RBE/LET and dose-response relationships for human CNS tissues. Based on the evaluation and treatment with stereotactically directed narrow beams of heavy charged particles of over 300 patients, with cerebral angiography, CT scanning and MRI and PET scanning of selected patients, plus extensive clinical and neuroradiological followup, it appears that Stereotactic charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery obliterates intracranial arteriovenous malformations or protects against rebleeding with reduced morbidity and no mortality. Discussion will include the method of evaluation, the clinical research protocol, the Stereotactic neuroradiological preparation, treatment planning, the radiosurgery procedure and the protocol for followup. Emphasis will be placed on the neurological results, including the neuroradiological and clinical response and early and late delayed injury in brain leading to complications (including vasogenic edema

  17. Ion beam analysis techniques in interdisciplinary applications

    SciTech Connect

    Respaldiza, Miguel A.; Ager, Francisco J.

    1999-11-16

    The ion beam analysis techniques emerge in the last years as one of the main applications of electrostatic accelerators. A short summary of the most used IBA techniques will be given as well as some examples of applications in interdisciplinary sciences.

  18. Ion Beam Analysis Techniques in Interdisciplinary Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Respaldiza, Miguel A.; Ager, Francisco J.

    1999-12-31

    The ion beam analysis techniques emerge in the last years as one of the main applications of electrostatic accelerators. A short summary of the most used IBA techniques will be given as well as some examples of applications in interdisciplinary sciences.

  19. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  20. Antenna technology for beamed space-power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorwich, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Based on present technology, the efficient transfer of RF power in space is feasible. However, many parameters must be taken into consideration when designing the system and the interrelationships of these parameters must also be considered. Once the distance between the orbiting spacecraft is specified and the transmit frequency is chosen, then the maximum size for the transmit and receive antennas is fixed (i.e., Rayleigh Range). Once the level of transmit power and trasmit time is specified, then the minimum number of spacecraft batteries is determined. High power RF transmission allows the satellite designer another option in the design of spacecraft power systems.

  1. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the effect of microgravity on the fabrication of electron beam freeform (EBF) in aerospace environments. The contents include: 1) Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) Process Description; 2) Portable Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication System at NASA LaRC; 3) Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication in the Space Environment; 4) Effect of Gravity on Surface Tension; 5) Effect of Deposit Height on Cooling Path; 6) Microgravity Testing Aboard JSC's C-9; 7) Typical Test Flight Plates; 8) Direction and Height Trials for Process Control; 9) Effect of Wire Entry Direction into Molten Pool; 10) Microstructure of Single Layer EBF Deposits; 11) 0-g Deposit with Incorrect Standoff Distance; 12) Successful Demonstration of EBF in 0-g; and 13) Conclusion.

  2. White Sands Space Harbor Area 1, Microwave Scanning Beam Landing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    White Sands Space Harbor Area 1, Microwave Scanning Beam Landing Ground Stations, 1,500' to the south of the north end of Runway 17/35; 1,500' to the west of the east end of Runway 23/05; and 1,500' southwest of the northeast end of Runway 20/02., White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  3. Space-time evolution of the beam-plasma instability

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lemons, D.S.; Mostrom, M.A.

    1983-10-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of the beam-plasma instability confirm that the behavior of the interaction can be described as a wave packet that continually grows in both space and time. A consequence is that the energy deposition length of the instability becomes shorter in time, offering increased potential for this interaction to be used as an inertial fusion driver.

  4. Very large aperture optics for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, T. G.; Smith, J. P.; Johnson, M. T.

    1994-09-01

    A new type of space optics technology is presented which promises the realization of very large apertures (tens of meters), while packagable into lightweight, small volume containers compatible with conventional launch vehicles. This technology makes use of thin foils of circular shape which are uniformly mass loaded around the perimeter. Once unfurled and set into rapid rotation about the transversal axis, the foil is stretched into a perfectly flat plane by the centrifugal forces acting on the peripheral masses. The simplest applications of this novel technology are optically flat reflectors, using metallized foils of Mylar, Kevlar, or Kapton. Other more complex optical components can be realized by use of binary optics techniques, such as depositing holograms by selective local microscale removal of the reflective surface. Electrostatic techniques, in conjunction with an auxiliary foil, under local, distributed real-time control of the optical parameters, allow implementation of functions like beam steering and focal length adjustments. Gas pressurization allows stronger curvatures and thus smaller focal ratios for non-imaging applications. Limits on aperture are imposed primarily by manufacturing capabilities. Applications of such large optics in space are numerous. They range from military, such as space based lasers, to the civilian ones of power beaming, solar energy collection, and astronomy. This paper examines this simple and innovative concept in detail, discusses deployment and attitude control issues and presents approaches for realization.

  5. Bistable Mechanisms for Space Applications.

    PubMed

    Zirbel, Shannon A; Tolman, Kyler A; Trease, Brian P; Howell, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Compliant bistable mechanisms are monolithic devices with two stable equilibrium positions separated by an unstable equilibrium position. They show promise in space applications as nonexplosive release mechanisms in deployment systems, thereby eliminating friction and improving the reliability and precision of those mechanical devices. This paper presents both analytical and numerical models that are used to predict bistable behavior and can be used to create bistable mechanisms in materials not previously feasible for compliant mechanisms. Materials compatible with space applications are evaluated for use as bistable mechanisms and prototypes are fabricated in three different materials. Pin-puller and cutter release mechanisms are proposed as potential space applications.

  6. Bistable Mechanisms for Space Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zirbel, Shannon A.; Tolman, Kyler A.; Trease, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Compliant bistable mechanisms are monolithic devices with two stable equilibrium positions separated by an unstable equilibrium position. They show promise in space applications as nonexplosive release mechanisms in deployment systems, thereby eliminating friction and improving the reliability and precision of those mechanical devices. This paper presents both analytical and numerical models that are used to predict bistable behavior and can be used to create bistable mechanisms in materials not previously feasible for compliant mechanisms. Materials compatible with space applications are evaluated for use as bistable mechanisms and prototypes are fabricated in three different materials. Pin-puller and cutter release mechanisms are proposed as potential space applications. PMID:28030588

  7. Space Lidar and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With advances in lasers and electro-optic technology, lidar is becoming an established technique for remote sensing of the Earth and planets from space. Some of the earliest space-based lidar measurements were made in the early 1970s from lunar orbit using the laser altimeter on the Apollo 15 mission. Space lidar instruments in active use today include the MOLA instrument aboard the Mars Global Surveyor mission and the Near Laser Rangefinder on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Mission. This talk will review laser remote sensing techniques, critical technologies, and some results from past and present NASA missions. It will also review near term plans for NASA's ICESat and Picasso missions and summarize some concepts for lidar on future missions.

  8. A power beaming based infrastructure for space power

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.

    1991-08-01

    At present all space mission power requirements are met by integral, on-board, self-contained power systems. To provide needed flexibility for space exploration and colonization, an additional approach to on-board, self-contained power systems is needed. Power beaming, an alternative approach to providing power, has the potential to provide increased mission flexibility while reducing total mass launched into space. Laser-power beaming technology provides a viable power and communication infrastructure that can be developed sequentially as it is applied to power satellite constellations in Earth orbit and to orbital transport vehicles transferring satellites and cargos to geosynchronous orbit and beyond. Coupled with nuclear electric propulsion systems for cargo transport, the technology can be used to provide global power to the Lunar surface and to Mars' surface and moons. The technology can be developed sequentially as advances in power system and propulsion system technology occur. This paper presents stepwise development of an infrastructure based on power beaming that can support the space development and exploration goals of the Space Exploration Initiative. Power scenarios based on commonality of power systems hardware with cargo transport vehicles are described. Advantages of this infrastructure are described. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Mechanisms for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Le Letty, R.; Barré, M.; Pasquarella, S.; Bokaie, M.; Bataille, A.; Poiet, G.

    2012-06-01

    All space instruments contain mechanisms or moving mechanical assemblies that must move (sliding, rolling, rotating, or spinning) and their successful operation is usually mission-critical. Generally, mechanisms are not redundant and therefore represent potential single point failure modes. Several space missions have suffered anomalies or failures due to problems in applying space mechanisms technology. Mechanisms require a specific qualification through a dedicated test campaign. This paper covers the design, development, testing, production, and in-flight experience of the PICARD/SODISM mechanisms. PICARD is a space mission dedicated to the study of the Sun. The PICARD Satellite was successfully launched, on June 15, 2010 on a DNEPR launcher from Dombarovskiy Cosmodrome, near Yasny (Russia). SODISM (SOlar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper) is a 11 cm Ritchey-Chretien imaging telescope, taking solar images at five wavelengths. SODISM uses several mechanisms (a system to unlock the door at the entrance of the instrument, a system to open/closed the door using a stepper motor, two filters wheels using a stepper motor, and a mechanical shutter). For the fine pointing, SODISM uses three piezoelectric devices acting on the primary mirror of the telescope. The success of the mission depends on the robustness of the mechanisms used and their life.

  10. Phase Space Tomography: A Simple, Portable and Accurate Technique to Map Phase Spaces of Beams with Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Kishek, R. A.; Bernal, S.; Walter, M.; Haber, I.; Fiorito, R.; Thangaraj, J. C. T.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; O'Shea, P. G.; Li, H.

    2006-11-27

    In order to understand the charged particle dynamics, e.g. the halo formation, emittance growth, x-y energy transfer and coupling, knowledge of the actual phase space is needed. Other the past decade there is an increasing number of articles who use tomography to map the beam phase space and measure the beam emittance. These studies where performed at high energy facilities where the effect of space charge was neglible and therefore not considered in the analysis. This work extends the tomography technique to beams with space charge. In order to simplify the analysis linear forces where assumed. By carefully modeling the tomography process using the particle-in-cell code WARP we test the validity of our assumptions and the accuracy of the reconstructed phase space. Finally, we report experimental results of phase space mapping at the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) using tomography.

  11. KC Space Pirates and NASA's Power Beaming Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Brian; Lades, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The Space Elevator Games with $2 Million in prize money is one of the most exciting challenges in the NASA Centennial Challenges program. We had an 8kW TRUMPF laser beaming power straight up 1 kilometer to a moving vehicle. This paper is the team captain's analysis of the state of the art in power beaming, and the excitement and challenge of the games themselves. Predictions are made of what new technology we will see in the next round of the games coming spring 2010.

  12. Space-Shuttle applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faget, M. A.; Davis, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the performance potential of the Space Shuttle and the high-energy transportation system to be derived from it. It is shown that, in addition to its cost effectiveness in earth-orbital missions, the Shuttle promises to be of major significance for future solar-system exploration. Eventually, the Shuttle will make possible the use of large interplanetary payloads launched at high velocities to the far reaches of the solar system.

  13. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2012-04-27

    Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between transverse phase space (x,x') and longitudinal phase space (z,{delta}), where x is the transverse position, x' is the transverse divergence, and z and {delta} are relative longitudinal position and energy deviation with respect to the reference particle. Methods to achieve exact phase space exchanges, i.e., mapping x to z, x' to {delta}, z to x, and {delta} to x', are suggested. Schemes to mitigate and completely compensate for the thick-lens effect of the transverse cavity on emittance exchange are studied. Some applications of the phase space exchange for advanced beam manipulation and diagnostics are discussed.

  14. Ion beam treatment of potential space materials at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmaul, Michael; Mirtich, Michael J.; Curren, Arthur

    1992-01-01

    Ion source systems in different configurations, have been used to generate unique morphologies for several NASA space applications. The discharge chamber of a 30 cm ion source was successfully used to texture potential space radiator materials for the purpose of obtaining values of thermal emittance greater than 0.85 at 700 and 900 K. High absorptance surfaces were obtained using ion beam seed texturing, for space radiator materials that were flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for 5.8 years in space. An ion source discharge chamber was also used to develop electrode surfaces with suppressed secondary electron emission characteristics for use in collectors in microwave amplifier traveling wave tubes. This was accomplished by sputtering textured carbon onto copper as well as texturing copper using tantalum and molybdenum as sacrificial texture inducing seeding materials. In a third configuration, a dual ion beam system was used to generate high transmittance diamondlike carbon (DLC) films.

  15. Applications of Tethers in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the first workshop on applications of tethers in space are summarized. The workshop gathered personalities from industry, academic institutions and government to discuss the relatively new area of applied technology of very long tethers in space to a broad spectrum of future space missions. A large number of tethered concepts and configurations was presented covering electrodynamic interaction tethers, tethered transportation through angular momentum exchange, tethered constellations, low gravity utilization, applicable technology, and tethered test facilities. Specific recommendations were made to NASA in each area.

  16. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Babbush, C. A.; Vankampen, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic pros-thesis fixtion, and dental implants.

  17. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Van Kampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic prosthesis fixation, and dental implants.

  18. Practical Applications of Space Systems, Supporting Paper 12: Space Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report summarizes the findings of one of fourteen panels that studied progress in space science applications and defined user needs capable of being met by space-system applications. The study was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and was conducted by the Space Applications Board. The panels comprised user…

  19. Piezoelectric Transformers for Space Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    TWTA payload configuration is shown in Figure 3. DC Batteries HIGH VOLTAGE CIRCUITS Collectors Cathode Solar Cells Inverter High Voltage... SOLAR PANNELS SPACE- CRAFT PRIMARY POWER BUS 28 V / 42 V THRUSTER HIGH VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLY CONTROL CIRCUIT IGNITION...to a second group of applications. Worldwide companies are now investigating the use of PTs for power applications, including battery chargers

  20. Beam Phase Space of an Intense Ion Beam in a Neutralizing Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Bazouin, Guillaume; Beneytout, Alice; Lidia, Steven M.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Grote, David P.

    2011-10-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-I) generates high intensity ion beams to explore warm dense matter physics. Transverse final focusing is accomplished with an 8-Tesla, 10-cm long pulsed solenoid magnet combined with a background neutralizing plasma to effectively cancel the space charge field of the ion beam. We report on phase space measurements of the beam before the neutralization channel and of the focused ion beam at the target plane. These are compared to WARP particle-in-cell simulations of the ion beam propagation through the focusing system and neutralizing plasma. Due to the orientation of the plasma sources with respect to the focusing magnet, the plasma distribution within the final focusing lens is strongly affected by the magnetic field, an effect which can influence the peak intensity at the target and which is included in the model of the experiment. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, LBNL under Contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  1. Nanomaterials for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moloney, Padraig G.

    2006-01-01

    Nano-engineered materials are multi-functional materials with superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Nanomaterials may be used for a variety of space exploration applications, including ultracapacitors, active/passive thermal management materials, and nanofiltration for water recovery. Additional applications include electrical power/energy storage systems, hybrid systems power generation, advanced proton exchange membrane fuel cells, and air revitalization. The need for nanomaterials and their growth, characterization, processing and space exploration applications is discussed. Data is presented for developing solid-supported amine adsorbents based on carbon nanotube materials and functionalization of nanomaterials is examined.

  2. Geant4 Applications in Space

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, M.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    Use of Geant4 is rapidly expanding in space application domain. I try to overview three major application areas of Geant4 in space, which are apparatus simulation for pre-launch design and post-launch analysis, planetary scale simulation for radiation spectra and surface and sub-surface explorations, and micro-dosimetry simulation for single event study and radiation-hardening of semiconductor devices. Recently, not only the mission dependent applications but also various multi-purpose or common tools built on top of Geant4 are also widely available. I overview some of such tools as well. The Geant4 Collaboration identifies that the space applications are now one of the major driving forces of the further developments and refinements of Geant4 toolkit. Highlights of such developments are introduced.

  3. Modeling Extraction of VLF Energy from Localized Ion Ring Beams for Space Based Active Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scales, Wayne; Ganguli, Gurudas; Crabtree, Chris; Rudakov, Leonid; Mithaiwala, Manish

    2012-07-01

    Waves in the VLF range are of considerable interest in the magnetosphere since they are responsible for transporting energy and momentum and therefore impacting space weather. Ion ring beams can efficiently generate waves in the VLF frequency range between the electron and ion gyro-frequency (Mithaiwala et al., 2010). Generation of VLF waves by infinite extent ion ring beams have been extensively treated for a broad range of space plasma applications. However, ion ring distributions created by chemical release experiments in the ionosphere (Koons and Pongratz, 1981) and those that occur naturally during storms/substorms or solar-wind comet interactions are localized over a spatial extent. This presentation will consider a new computational model for the nonlinear evolution of VLF waves generated by a spatially localized ion ring beam. The model, though quite general, will have application to generation of VLF waves in the radiation belts by localized creation of an ion ring beam. The model includes the convective loss of energy through phenomenological electron-ion collisions, which models nonlinear scattering of electrostatic lower hybrid waves into large group velocity electromagnetic whistler/magnetosonic waves (Ganguli et al., 2010). Therefore the model, though electrostatic, includes critical electromagnetic effects in a computationally efficient fashion. An emphasis is placed on the determining the efficiency of extraction of VLF energy from the ion ring beam due to the spatial localization of the ion ring beam. It is shown that due to the convection of the VLF waves out of the source region, the efficiency of wave energy extraction is greatly enhanced. This is accompanied by a reduction in background and ion ring beam heating. The results will be used to highlight the importance of non-linear scattering to future active experiments in space. Mithaiwala et al. Phys. Plasma, doi.org/10.1063/1.3372842, 2010 Koons and Pongratz, JGR, 1981. Ganguli et al., Phys

  4. Space vehicle accelerometer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The physics of accelerometer applications are reviewed, and details are given on accelerometer instruments and the principles of their operations. The functions to which accelerometers are applied are listed, and terms commonly used in accelerometer reports are defined. Criteria guides state what rule, limitation, or standard must be imposed on each essential design element to insure successful design. Elaboration of these criteria in the form of recommended practices show how to satisfy each of these criteria, with the best procedure described when possible.

  5. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOEpatents

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  6. Multiple beam phased array for Space Station Control Zone Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halsema, P. B.

    The Space Station Communications Control Zone is a disk shaped region 40 nautical miles in diameter and 10 nautical miles thick centered about the Space Station. It is estimated that 6 simultaneous Multiple Access (MA) channels will be required to satisfy the projected communications needs within this zone. These channels will be used to communicate with MA users located anywhere within the Control Zone. This paper details the tradeoffs and design implementation of a multiple beam integrated phased array to provide antenna coverage of the Control Zone. The array is a compact, modular assembly using Gallium Arsenide circuits, microstrip elements, and advanced packaging techniques. This results in a small, reliable antenna system capable of meeting the projected Space Station requirements and flexible enough to grow and evolve as the Space Station communications needs develop.

  7. Transform coding for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Data compression coding requirements for aerospace applications differ somewhat from the compression requirements for entertainment systems. On the one hand, entertainment applications are bit rate driven with the goal of getting the best quality possible with a given bandwidth. Science applications are quality driven with the goal of getting the lowest bit rate for a given level of reconstruction quality. In the past, the required quality level has been nothing less than perfect allowing only the use of lossless compression methods (if that). With the advent of better, faster, cheaper missions, an opportunity has arisen for lossy data compression methods to find a use in science applications as requirements for perfect quality reconstruction runs into cost constraints. This paper presents a review of the data compression problem from the space application perspective. Transform coding techniques are described and some simple, integer transforms are presented. The application of these transforms to space-based data compression problems is discussed. Integer transforms have an advantage over conventional transforms in computational complexity. Space applications are different from broadcast or entertainment in that it is desirable to have a simple encoder (in space) and tolerate a more complicated decoder (on the ground) rather than vice versa. Energy compaction with new transforms are compared with the Walsh-Hadamard (WHT), Discrete Cosine (DCT), and Integer Cosine (ICT) transforms.

  8. High-Power Electron Accelerators for Space (and other) Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong; Lewellen, John W.

    2016-05-23

    This is a presentation on high-power electron accelerators for space and other applications. The main points covered are: electron beams for space applications, new designs of RF accelerators, high-power high-electron mobility transistors (HEMT) testing, and Li-ion battery design. In summary, the authors have considered a concept of 1-MeV electron accelerator that can operate up to several seconds. This concept can be extended to higher energy to produce higher beam power. Going to higher beam energy requires adding more cavities and solid-state HEMT RF power devices. The commercial HEMT have been tested for frequency response and RF output power (up to 420 W). Finally, the authors are testing these HEMT into a resonant load and planning for an electron beam test in FY17.

  9. Power beaming to space using a nuclear reactor-pumped laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; Monroe, D.K.; Pickard, P.S.

    1993-10-01

    The present political and environmental climate may slow the inevitable direct utilization of nuclear power in space. In the meantime, there is another approach for using nuclear energy for space power. That approach is to let nuclear energy generate a laser beam in a ground-based nuclear reactor-pumped laser (RPL), and then beam the optical energy into space. Potential space applications for a ground-based RPL include (1) illuminating geosynchronous communication satellites in the earth`s shadow to extend their lives, (2) beaming power to orbital transfer vehicles, (3) providing power (from earth) to a lunar base during the long lunar night, and (4) removing space debris. FALCON is a high-power, steady-state, nuclear reactor-pumped laser (RPL) concept that is being developed by the Department of Energy with Sandia National Laboratories as the lead laboratory. The FALCON program has experimentally demonstrated reactor-pumped lasing in various mixtures of xenon, argon, neon, and helium at wavelengths of 0.585, 0.703, 0.725, 1.271, 1.733, 1.792, 2.032, 2.63, 2.65, and 3.37 {mu}m with intrinsic efficiency as high as 2.5%. Frequency-doubling the 1.733{minus}{mu}m line would yield a good match for photovoltaic arrays at 0.867 {mu}m. Preliminary designs of an RPL suitable for power beaming have been completed. The MWclass laser is fairly simple in construction, self-powered, closed-cycle (no exhaust gases), and modular. This paper describes the FALCON program accomplishments and power-beaming applications.

  10. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  11. Laser power beaming applications and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robert J.; Cover, Ralph A.; Curtin, Mark S.; Dinius, R.; Lampel, Michael C.

    1994-05-01

    Beaming laser energy to spacecraft has important economic potential. It promises significant reduction in the cost of access to space, for commercial and government missions. While the potential payoff is attractive, existing technologies perform the same missions and the keys to market penetration for power beaming are a competitive cost and a schedule consistent with customers' plans. Rocketdyne is considering these questions in the context of a commercial enterprise -- thus, evaluation of the requirements must be done based on market assessments and recognition that significant private funding will be involved. It is in the context of top level business considerations that the technology requirements are being assessed and the program being designed. These considerations result in the essential elements of the development program. Since the free electron laser is regarded as the `long pole in the tent,' this paper summarizes Rocketdyne's approach for a timely, cost-effective program to demonstrate an FEL capable of supporting an initial operating capability.

  12. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen; Sawkey, Daren

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. Methods: In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, R{sub p}, and R{sub p+} for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Results: Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, and R{sub p} were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. Conclusions: We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for

  13. Laser beamed power: Satellite demonstration applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Westerlund, Larry H.

    1992-01-01

    It is possible to use a ground-based laser to beam light to the solar arrays of orbiting satellites, to a level sufficient to provide all or some of the operating power required. Near-term applications of this technology for providing supplemental power to existing satellites are discussed. Two missions with significant commercial pay-off are supplementing solar power for radiation-degraded arrays and providing satellite power during eclipse for satellites with failed batteries.

  14. Space applications of diamagnetic suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelrine, Ronald E.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional noncontact magnetic suspensions require power and sensor feedback to maintain stability of the levitated object. Magnetic suspensions using superconductors require neither power nor feedback for stability but must be maintained at low temperatures. This paper discusses a little known type of magnetic bearing that does not require power, sensor feedback, or cooling: diamagnetic suspension. While the bearing pressure for diamagnetic suspensions is typically limited to 1 g/sq cm, their simplicity, environmental tolerances, and wide range of material choices suggest that they may be useful for a number of space applications. This paper discusses the fundamentals of diamagnetic suspensions as well as their potential space applications.

  15. A Space-Charge-Neutralizing Plasma for Beam Drift Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.E.; Gilson, E.P.; Greenway, W.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Sefkow, A.B.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2008-08-01

    Simultaneous radial focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams are being studied to heat matter to the warm dense matter, or strongly coupled plasma regime. Higher compression ratios can be achieved if the beam compression takes place in a plasma-filled drift region in which the space-charge forces of the ion beam are neutralized. Recently, a system of four cathodic arc plasma sources has been fabricated and the axial plasma density has been measured. A movable plasma probe array has been developed to measure the radial and axial plasma distribution inside and outside of a {approx} 10 cm long final focus solenoid (FFS). Measured data show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter {approx} 5 mm along the solenoid axis when the FFS is powered with an 8T field. Measured plasma density of {ge} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} meets the challenge of n{sub p}/Zn{sub b} > 1, where n{sub p} and n{sub b} are the plasma and ion beam density, respectively, and Z is the mean ion charge state of the plasma ions.

  16. Electron Beam Applications in Chemical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D.; Dragusin, M.; Radoiu, M.; Moraru, R.; Oproiu, C.; Cojocaru, G.; Margarit, C.

    1997-05-01

    Our recent results in the field of polymeric materials obtained by electron beam irradiation are presented. Two types of polymeric flocculants and three hydrogels are described. The effects of radiation absorbed dose and chemical composition of the irradiated solutions upon the polymeric materials characteristics are discussed. The required absorbed dose levels to produce the polymeric flocculants are in the range of 0.4 kGy to 1 kGy, and 4 kGy to 12 kGy for hydrogels. Experimental results obtained by testing polymeric flocculants with waste water from food industry are given. Plymeric materials processing was developed on a pilot small scale level with a 0.7 kW and 5.5 MeV linac built in Romania. A new facility for application of combined electron beam and microwave irradiation in the field of polymeric materials preparation is presently under investigation. Preliminary results have demonstrated that some polymeric flocculants characteristics, such as linearity, were improved by using combined electron beam and microwave irradiation. Also, the absorbed dose levels decreases in comparison with those required when only electron beam irradiation was used.

  17. Application of a localized chaos by rf-phase modulations in phase-space dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Physics of chaos in a localized phase-space region is exploited to produce a longitudinally uniformly distributed beam. Theoretical study and simulations are used to study its origin and applicability in phase-space dilution of beam bunch. Through phase modulation to a double-rf system, a central region of localized chaos bounded by invariant tori are generated by overlapping parametric resonances. Condition and stability of the chaos will be analyzed. Applications include high-power beam, beam distribution uniformization, and industrial beam irradiation.

  18. Space-to-Space Power Beaming Enabling High Performance Rapid Geocentric Orbit Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.; Vassallo, Corinne; Tadge, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The use of electric propulsion is more prevalent than ever, with industry pursuing all electric orbit transfers. Electric propulsion provides high mass utilization through efficient propellant transfer. However, the transfer times become detrimental as the delta V transitions from near-impulsive to low-thrust. Increasing power and therefore thrust has diminishing returns as the increasing mass of the power system limits the potential acceleration of the spacecraft. By using space-to-space power beaming, the power system can be decoupled from the spacecraft and allow significantly higher spacecraft alpha (W/kg) and therefore enable significantly higher accelerations while maintaining high performance. This project assesses the efficacy of space-to-space power beaming to enable rapid orbit transfer while maintaining high mass utilization. Concept assessment requires integrated techniques for low-thrust orbit transfer steering laws, efficient large-scale rectenna systems, and satellite constellation configuration optimization. This project includes the development of an integrated tool with implementation of IPOPT, Q-Law, and power-beaming models. The results highlight the viability of the concept, limits and paths to infusion, and comparison to state-of-the-art capabilities. The results indicate the viability of power beaming for what may be the only approach for achieving the desired transit times with high specific impulse.

  19. Gaussian beam measurement for HIFI instrument: Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaleev, Miroslav G.; Ermisch, Karsten; Fredrixon, Mathias; Svensson, Magnus; Belitsky, Victor

    2004-09-01

    The Heterodyne Instrument (HIFI) is part of the ESA Herschel Space Observatory Project. The instrument is intended for high-resolution spectroscopy and has a frequency coverage from 480 to 1250 GHz band in five receiver bands and 1410 to 1910 GHz in two additional bands. HIFI is built based on a modular principle: the mixers together with their respective optics are integrated into Mixer Sub-Assemblies (MSA). Each frequency band has two MSAs allocated for horizontal and vertical polarization. In this paper, we present the work done on the design and construction of a Gaussian beam measurement range. One of the unique features of the developed method is a possibility to measure the beam parameters of the MSAs in the absolute coordinate system referred to the device under test. This along with other methods should allow integration of the entire HIFI with the best possible coupling of the antenna beam to the receivers and achieving ultimate performance in such a complicated optical system. The range houses the measured MSA, which is at 4 K ambient temperature, and a continuous wave source placed on a precise scanner entirely under vacuum. Developed triangulation system provides mechanical reference data on the MSA, in-situ, after the entire system is evacuated and the cooling is finished. We adopted a scalar measurement approach where the test source scans the receiver input beam and the mixer IF power is measured. The data collected from 3-4 planar scans are used to calculate the orientation and position of the optical axis. We present results from the first beam measurements for MSA HIFI bands 1 and 2 (480 and 640 GHz), the measurement system performance and accuracy analysis.

  20. TIME-DEPENDENT PHASE SPACE MEASUREMENTS OF THE LONGITUDINALLY COMPRESSING BEAM IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect

    LBNL; Lidia, S.M.; Bazouin, G.; Seidl, P.A.

    2011-03-15

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCXI) generates high intensity ion beams to explore Warm Dense Matter physics. A {approx}150 kV, {approx}500 ns modulating voltage pulse is applied to a {approx}300 kV, 5-10 {mu}s, 25 mA K+ ion beam across a single induction gap. The velocity modulated beam compresses longitudinally during ballistic transport along a space charge neutralizing plasma transport line, resulting in {approx}3A peak current with {approx}2-3 ns pulse durations (FWHM) at the target plane. Transverse final focusing is accomplished with a {approx}8 T, 10 cm long pulsed solenoid magnet. Time-dependent electrostatic focusing in the induction gap, and chromatic aberrations in the final focus optics limit the peak fluenceat the target plane for the compressed beam pulse. We report on time-dependent phase space measurements of the compressed pulse in the ballistic transport beamline, and measurement of the time-dependent radial impulses derived from the interaction of the beam and the induction gap voltage. We present results of start-to-end simulations to benchmark the experiments. Fast correction strategies are discussed with application to both NDCX-I and the soon to be commissioned NDCX-II accelerators.

  1. Potential for EMU Fabric Damage by Electron Beam and Molten Metal During Space Welding for the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of preparations concerning the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), studies were performed to better understand the effect of molten metal contact and electron beam impingement with various fabrics for space suit applications. The question arose as to what would occur if the electron beam from the Ukrainian Universal Hand Tool (UHT) designed for welding in space were to impinge upon a piece of Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The expectation was that the electron beam would lay down a static charge pattern with no damage to the ceramic fabric. The electron beam is capable of spraying the fabric with enough negative charge to repel further electrons from the fabric before significant heating occurs. The static charge pattern would deflect any further charge accumulation except for a small initial amount of leakage to the grounded surface of the welder. However, when studies were made of the effect of the electron beam on the insulating ceramic fabric it was surprisingly found that the electron beam did indeed burn through the ceramic fabric. It was also found that the shorter electron beam standoff distances had longer burnthrough times than did some greater electron beam standoff distances. A possible explanation for the longer burnthrough times for the small electron beam standoff distance would be outgassing of the fabric which caused the electron beam hand-tool to cycle on and off to provide some protection for the cathodes. The electron beam hand tool was observed to cycle off at the short standoff distance of two inches likely due to vapors being outgassed. During the electron beam welding process there is an electron leakage, or current leakage, flow from the fabric. A static charge pattern is initially laid down by the electron beam current flow. The static charge makes up the current leakage flow which initially slightly heats up the fabric. The initially laid down surface charge leaks a

  2. Infrared detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fick, Wolfgang; Gassmann, Kai Uwe; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Haiml, Markus; Hanna, Stefan; Hübner, Dominique; Höhnemann, Holger; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Thöt, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The motivation and intended benefits for the use of infrared (IR) detectors for space applications are highlighted. The actual status of state-of-the-art IR detectors for space applications is presented based on some of AIM's currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength IR (SWIR) to the long-wavelength IR (LWIR) and very long-wavelength IR (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength IR (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP and the IR detectors for the Sentinel 3 SLSTR will be elaborated. Additionally, dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC, will be addressed.

  3. Suppression of Space Charge Induced Beam Halo in Nonlinear Focusing Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri Konstantinovich; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-01-29

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. We discuss a new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry. The resulting solution is applied to the problem of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.

  4. Suppression of Space Charge Induced Beam Halo in Nonlinear Focusing Channel

    DOE PAGES

    Batygin, Yuri Konstantinovich; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; ...

    2016-01-29

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. We discuss a new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry. The resulting solution is applied to the problemmore » of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.« less

  5. Emittance Measurements of Space Charge Dominated Electron Beam.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AD-AI8 693 EMITTANE KASUREMNIS OF SPACE CHARG DOMINATED I/S ELECIRON BEAI) NAVAL SURFACE WEAPONS CENTER SILVER SPRING N, NASUNG El AL. 01 JUN 65 NSW...UNIT NUMBERS 10901 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, Maryland 20903-5000 I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE 1 June 1985 13. NUMBER...by a plate with a pinhole of radius rp which travels on the -axis, This system is commonly 8 NSWC TR 85-244 designed as L > a (beam radius) >> d > rp

  6. Statistical description of the free-space propagation of highly aberrated optical beams.

    PubMed

    Mani, Ali; Wang, Meng; Moin, Parviz

    2006-12-01

    The free-space propagation of initially aberrated optical beams is considered with an emphasis on aero-optical applications. An exact statistical solution of the paraxial wave equation is derived that can be used to obtain statistics of the beam such as beam center, spread, and higher-order statistics as algebraic functions of propagation distance, wavelength, and statistics of the initial wavefront. Correlations between the proposed description and intensity-based statistics, such as the Strehl ratio, are investigated. It is found that the root-mean-square (rms) of the gradient of the wavefront plays an important role in causing coherence degradation and that the rms of the wavefront error is not always an appropriate measure of the degradation. To illustrate the use of this statistical tool, index of refraction data from a numerical simulation of compressible flow over a cylinder are employed to perform an aero-optical analysis.

  7. Recent results from studies of electron beam phenomena in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, Torsten; Banks, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines selected results from experiments, performed in 1980s, involving the ejection of beams of electrons from spacecraft. Special attention is given to the basic processes associated with the spacecraft charging, passive current collection, beam-atmosphere interactions, beam-plasma interactions, and neutral gas emission. Consideration is also given to future experiments on active electron beam ejections in space.

  8. Nuclear Propulsion for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, M. G.; Bechtel, R. D.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Basics of Nuclear Systems: Long history of use on Apollo and space science missions. 44 RTGs and hundreds of RHUs launched by U.S. during past 4 decades. Heat produced from natural alpha (a) particle decay of Plutonium (Pu-238). Used for both thermal management and electricity production. Used terrestrially for over 65 years. Fissioning 1 kg of uranium yields as much energy as burning 2,700,000 kg of coal. One US space reactor (SNAP-10A) flown (1965). Former U.S.S.R. flew 33 space reactors. Heat produced from neutron-induced splitting of a nucleus (e.g. U-235). At steady-state, 1 of the 2 to 3 neutrons released in the reaction causes a subsequent fission in a "chain reaction" process. Heat converted to electricity, or used directly to heat a propellant. Fission is highly versatile with many applications.

  9. Ion beam figuring approach for thermally sensitive space optics.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaolin; Deng, Weijie; Tang, Wa; Zhang, Binzhi; Xue, Donglin; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-10-01

    During the ion beam figuring (IBF) of a space mirror, thermal radiation of the neutral filament and particle collisions will heat the mirror. The adhesive layer used to bond the metal parts and the mirror is very sensitive to temperature rise. When the temperature exceeds the designed value, the mirror surface shape will change markedly because of the thermal deformation and stress release of the adhesive layer, thereby reducing the IBF accuracy. To suppress the thermal effect, we analyzed the heat generation mechanism. By using thermal radiation theory, we established a thermal radiation model of the neutral filament. Additionally, we acquired a surface-type Gaussian heat source model of the ion beam sputtering based on the removal function and Faraday scan result. Using the finite-element-method software ABAQUS, we developed a method that can simulate the thermal effect of the IBF for the full path and all dwell times. Based on the thermal model, which was experimentally confirmed, we simulated the thermal effects for a 675  mm×374  mm rectangular SiC space mirror. By optimizing the dwell time distribution, the peak temperature value of the adhesive layer during the figuring process was reduced under the designed value. After one round of figuring, the RMS value of the surface error changed from 0.094 to 0.015λ (λ=632.8  nm), which proved the effectiveness of the thermal analysis and suppression method.

  10. Ion beam plume and efflux characterization flight experiment study. [space shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Zafran, S.; Cole, A.; Rosiak, G.; Komatsu, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    A flight experiment and flight experiment package for a shuttle-borne flight test of an 8-cm mercury ion thruster was designed to obtain charged particle and neutral particle material transport data that cannot be obtained in conventional ground based laboratory testing facilities. By the use of both ground and space testing of ion thrusters, the flight worthiness of these ion thrusters, for other spacecraft applications, may be demonstrated. The flight experiment definition for the ion thruster initially defined a broadly ranging series of flight experiments and flight test sensors. From this larger test series and sensor list, an initial flight test configuration was selected with measurements in charged particle material transport, condensible neutral material transport, thruster internal erosion, ion beam neutralization, and ion thrust beam/space plasma electrical equilibration. These measurement areas may all be examined for a seven day shuttle sortie mission and for available test time in the 50 - 100 hour period.

  11. Deterministic Ethernet for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidi, C.; Wolff, B.

    2015-09-01

    Typical spacecraft systems are distributed to be able to achieve the required reliability and availability targets of the mission. However the requirements on these systems are different for launchers, satellites, human space flight and exploration missions. Launchers require typically high reliability with very short mission times whereas satellites or space exploration missions require very high availability at very long mission times. Comparing a distributed system of launchers with satellites it shows very fast reaction times in launchers versus much slower once in satellite applications. Human space flight missions are maybe most challenging concerning reliability and availability since human lives are involved and the mission times can be very long e.g. ISS. Also the reaction times of these vehicles can get challenging during mission scenarios like landing or re-entry leading to very fast control loops. In these different applications more and more autonomous functions are required to fulfil the needs of current and future missions. This autonomously leads to new requirements with respect to increase performance, determinism, reliability and availability. On the other hand side the pressure on reducing costs of electronic components in space applications is increasing, leading to the use of more and more COTS components especially for launchers and LEO satellites. This requires a technology which is able to provide a cost competitive solution for both the high reliable and available deep-space as well as the low cost “new space” markets. Future spacecraft communication standards therefore have to be much more flexible, scalable and modular to be able to deal with these upcoming challenges. The only way to fulfill these requirements is, if they are based on open standards which are used cross industry leading to a reduction of the lifecycle costs and an increase in performance. The use of a communication network that fulfills these requirements will be

  12. Electron Beam Manufacturable Composites for Space Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    lower intensity. Differing substitution at the pendant oxygens should not alter the intensity greatly. What was unexpected was the blue shift of...the spectrum relative to Bisphenol-A and its bispropargyl ether. The 71-71* ring excitation in the dicyanate ester has shifted 1530 cm-1 to the blue ... blue shift in the Bisphenol-A dicyanate ester spectrum has much the same origin as the much lower solubility of this material in the chosen

  13. Application of robots in space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, E. G.

    1971-01-01

    Robots are defined as electromechanical systems (with local computers) receiving inputs from sensors, and in turn, controlling motors and effectors to do tasks requiring some measure of intelligence and permitting the whole system to interact with the real world. Robot systems for space applications are categorized into three general groups consisting of roving exploration robots, spacecraft robots, and planet development robots. The functions of systems in each category are defined in terms of intended applications, and requirements for operating and decision making are outlined. Further developments which must be achieved in robot technology are summarized.

  14. Beamed energy for space craft propulsion - Conceptual status and development potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel C.; Frisbee, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of a brief study that sought to identify and characterize beamed energy spacecraft propulsion concepts that may have positive impact on the economics of space industrialization. It is argued that the technology of beamed energy propulsion systems may significantly improve the prospects for near-term colonization of outer space. It is tentatively concluded that, for space industrialization purposes, the most attractive near-term beamed energy propulsion systems are based on microwave technology. This conclusion is reached based on consideration of the common features that exist between beamed microwave propulsion and the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) concept. Laser power beaming also continues to be an attractive option for spacecraft propulsion due to the reduced diffraction-induced beam spread afforded by laser radiation wavelengths. The conceptual status and development potential of a variety of beamed energy propulsion concepts are presented. Several alternative space transportation system concepts based on beamed energy propulsion are described.

  15. The FLUKA code: New developments and application to 1 GeV/n iron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiginger, H.; Andersen, V.; Ballarini, F.; Battistoni, G.; Campanella, M.; Carboni, M.; Cerutti, F.; Empl, A.; Enghardt, W.; Fassò, A.; Ferrari, A.; Gadioli, E.; Garzelli, M. V.; Lee, K.; Ottolenghi, A.; Parodi, K.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinsky, L.; Ranft, J.; Roesler, S.; Sala, P. R.; Scannicchio, D.; Smirnov, G.; Sommerer, F.; Wilson, T.; Zapp, N.

    The modeling of ion transport and interactions in matter is a subject of growing interest, driven by the continuous increase of possible application fields. These include hadron therapy, dosimetry, and space missions, but there are also several issues involving fundamental research, accelerator physics, and cosmic ray physics, where a reliable description of heavy ion induced cascades is important. In the present work, the capabilities of the FLUKA code for ion beams will be briefly recalled and some recent developments presented. Applications of the code to the simulation of therapeutic carbon, nitrogen and oxygen ion beams, and of iron beams, which are of direct interest for space mission related experiments, will be also presented together with interesting consideration relative to the evaluation of dosimetric quantities. Both applications involve ion beams in the AGeV range.

  16. A new generation of IC based beam steering devices for free-space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedi, Vijit

    Free Space Optical (FSO) communication has tremendously advanced within the last decade to meet the ever increasing demand for higher communication bandwidth. Advancement in laser technology since its invention in the 1960's [1] attracted them to be the dominant source in FSO communication modules. The future of FSO systems lay in implementing semiconductor lasers due to their small size, power efficiency and mass fabrication abilities. In the near future, these systems are very likely to be used in space and ground based applications and revolutionary beam steering technologies will be required for distant communications in free-space. The highly directional characteristic inherent to a laser beam challenges and calls for new beam pointing and steering technologies for such type of communication. In this dissertation, research is done on a novel FSO communication device based on semiconductor lasers for high bandwidth communication. The "Fly eye transceiver" is an extremely wide steering bandwidth, completely non-mechanical FSO laser communication device primarily designed to replace traditional mechanical beam steering optical systems. This non-mechanical FSO device possesses a full spherical steering range and a very high tracking bandwidth. Inspired by the evolutionary model of a fly's eye, the full spherical steering range is assured by electronically controlled switching of its sub-eyes. Non mechanical technologies used in the past for beam steering such as acousto-optic Bragg cells, liquid crystal arrays or piezoelectric elements offer the wide steering bandwidth and fast response time, but are limited in their angular steering range. Mechanical gimbals offer a much greater steering range but face a much slower response time or steering bandwidth problem and often require intelligent adaptive controls with bulky driver amplifiers to feed their actuators. As a solution to feed both the fast and full spherical steering, the Fly-eye transceiver is studied as

  17. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  18. Science and Applications Space Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nein, Max E.; Ballance, James O.

    1981-04-01

    The advent of the "Space Shuttle Era" has spearheaded a new wave of thought in our approach to the exploitation of space. Through use of the Shuttle, science and applications payloads need no longer be abandoned at the scheduled end of a particular mission, or when struck with premature failure, or even when they simply become outdated through advancements in technology. Rather the option will now exist for on-orbit maintenance and/or recovery of the payload for potential reuse. The Shuttle itself can even serve as an operational base for the gathering of data. This will be accomplished primarily through the use of Spacelab and a multitude of "Spacelab Instruments," many of which are already being developed. Additionally, the Shuttle along with other members of the Space Transportation Systems. family, will allow the buildup of space structures which can be routinely maintained on-orbit, thereby allowing long-term technical and economic exploitation. One such structure being given increased consideration for use in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is the "Space Platform." Such platforms are envisioned to have lifetimes of many years and to provide basic stability, various utilities, and on-orbit accessibility to a number of temporarily emplaced payloads. Some payloads, depending on the mission for which they are being flown, would operate from a few weeks or months to many years. This paper reports current planning efforts by NASA for these space platforms directed towards determining the technically most suitable concepts and the approaches which might be followed to evolve these platforms as a cost-effective extension of the Spacelab era.

  19. Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat; Hogan, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium Program Space Technology presents the Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications. The topics include: 1) Capability; 2) Applications; and 3) Advantages. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  20. High order mode beam waveguide for technological medium power millimeter wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, C. del; Gonzalo, R.; Marin, M.; Sorolla, M.; Moebius, A.; Thumm, M.

    1995-12-31

    The use of medium power millimeter CW gyrotrons (10-30 kW and 30-100 GHz) has several potential applications in advanced materials processing. Since a stochastic field distribution in the applicator is desirable no pencil beam is necessary. Then the possibility to couple the circular symmetric gyrotron output to a higher order free space mode can be considered. Beam waveguides based on iterative reflection of such high order beams on properly disigned mirrors opens the possibility to increase the efficiency and to reduce costs of present compact transmission lines in gyrotron technological systems.

  1. Liquid Crystal-Based Beam Steering Device Development for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Miranda, Felix; Bos, Philip; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Wang, Xinghua

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program is supporting the development of liquid crystal-based beam steering devices. The device would use inexpensive, light-weight, optical components, and it would have the following capabilities: electronic beam scanning to angles above 1 milliradian, and submicroradian beam pointing accuracy. In order to correct for the imperfections resulting from the space-deployable optics, the technique of wave-front correction would be implemented. Hence, the output beam quality would be maintained. The potential applications could include satellite tracking, near-Earth inter-satellite communications, deep-space communications, and optical phased array systems. The status of the beam steering device development based on the liquid crystal technology and its relationship to prospective NASA mission scenarios will be described.

  2. Beam propagation analysis of a multi-laser diode FSO system through free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, F. D.; Hedayati Rad, M. Reza; Firozzadeh, Z.; Mahzoun, M. Reza

    2011-10-01

    In this paper beam propagation analysis of a multi-beam multi-collimator optical communication system through free space is studied. For this purpose, the propagation properties of Gaussian multi-beams through a multi-optical path including collimators in transmitters are studied and an analytical formula for intensity distribution is derived. The effects of beam divergence and beam separation distances on the propagation properties of Gaussian multi-beams are studied in detail by calculating the beam width and power in bucket (PIB). The analyses are illustrated by numerical examples.

  3. Key elements of space charge compensation on a low energy high intensity beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Shixiang; Lu Pengnan; Ren Haitao; Zhao Jie; Chen Jia; Xu Yuan; Guo Zhiyu; Chen Jia'er; Zhao Hongwei; Sun Liangting

    2013-03-15

    Space charge effect (SCE) along the beam line will decrease beam quality. Space charge compensation (SCC) with extra gas injection is a high-efficiency method to reduce SCE. In this paper, we will report the experimental results on the beam profile, potential distribution, beam emittance, and beam transmission efficiency of a 35 keV/90 mA H{sup +} beam and a 40 keV/10 mA He{sup +} beam compensated by Ar/Kr. The influence of gas type, gas flow, and injection location will be discussed. Emphasis is laid on the consideration of SCC when designing and commissioning a high intensity ion beam injector. Based on measured data, a new definition of space charge compensation degree is proposed.

  4. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R., LLNL

    1998-03-18

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center, the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques would play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of stockpile stewardship. The Livermore facilities now include the world`s highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. It was concluded that the positron microprobe under development at LLNL and other new instruments that would be relocated at LLNL at the high current keV source are an exciting step forward in providing results for the positron technique. These new data will impact a wide variety of applications.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  6. Dilution refrigeration for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, U. E.; Petrac, D.

    1990-01-01

    Dilution refrigerators are presently used routinely in ground based applications where temperatures below 0.3 K are required. The operation of a conventional dilution refrigerator depends critically on the presence of gravity. To operate a dilution refrigerator in space many technical difficulties must be overcome. Some of the anticipated difficulties are identified in this paper and possible solutions are described. A single cycle refrigerator is described conceptually that uses forces other than gravity to function and the stringent constraints imposed on the design by requiring the refrigerator to function on the earth without using gravity are elaborated upon.

  7. Inorganic composites for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malmendier, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The development of inorganic composite materials for space applications is reviewed. The composites do not contain any organic materials, and therefore, are not subject to degradation by ultraviolet radiation, volatilization of constituents, or embrittlement at low temperatures. The composites consist of glass, glass/ceramics or ceramic matrices, reinforced by refractory whiskers or fibers. Such composites have the low thermal expansion, refractories, chemical stability and other desirable properties usually associated with the matrix materials. The composites also have a degree of toughness which is extraordinary for refractory inorganic materials.

  8. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  9. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1 and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  10. Diffractionless beam in free space with adiabatic changing refractive index in a single mode tapered slab waveguide.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chang-Ching; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-11-23

    We propose a novel design to produce a free space diffractionless beam by adiabatically reducing the difference of the refractive index between the core and the cladding regions of a single mode tapered slab waveguide. To ensure only one propagating eigenmode in the adiabatic transition, the correlation of the waveguide core width and the refractive index is investigated. Under the adiabatic condition, we demonstrate that our waveguide can emit a diffractionless beam in free space up to 500 micrometers maintaining 72% of its original peak intensity. The proposed waveguide could find excellent applications for imaging purposes where an extended depth of field is required.

  11. Optimum Electron Distributions for Space Charge Dominated Beams in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Bolton, P.R.; /SLAC

    2006-06-15

    The optimum photo-electron distribution from the cathode of an RF photoinjector producing a space charge dominated beam is a uniform distribution contained in an ellipsoid. For such a bunch distribution, the space charge forces are linear and the emittance growth induced by those forces is totally reversible and consequently can be compensated. With the appropriate tuning of the emittance compensation optics, the emittance, at the end of photoinjector beamline, for an ellipsoidal laser pulse, would only have two contributions, the cathode emittance and the RF emittance. For the peak currents of 50A and 100 A required from the SBand and L-Band RF gun photoinjectors discussed here, the RF emittance contribution is negligible. If such an ellipsoidal photo-electron distribution were available, the emittance at the end of the beamline could be reduced to the cathode emittance. Its value would be reduced by more than 40% from that obtained using cylindrical shape laser pulses. This potentially dramatic improvement warrants review of the challenges associated with the production of ellipsoidal photo-electrons. We assume the photo-electrons emission time to be short enough that the ellipsoidal electron pulse shape will come directly from the laser pulse. We shift the challenge to ellipsoidal laser pulse shaping. To expose limiting technical issues, we consider the generation of ellipsoidal laser pulse shape in terms of three different concepts.

  12. Earth-To-Satellite Microwave Beams: Innovative Approach To Space Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffert, M. I.; Miller, G.; Heilweil, B.; Ziegler, W.; Kadiramangalam, M.

    1988-05-01

    A new space power concept incorporating earth-to-satellite microwave power beams coupled to onboard regenerative electrochemical energy storage is proposed for energizing defensive satellite constellations. The system addresses housekeeping, orbital maneuvering and burst mode power requirements, and offers an attractive alternative to the nuclear and solar space power systems currently envisioned for this application. This energy-conversion system incorporates six steps: (1) generate primary DC power at surface stations along the satellite ground-track, (2) convert to microwave (RF) frequencies, (3) transmit in a narrow beam to spacecraft using phased-array antennas which track and lock-on to satellite receivers as they pass in range during a fraction of their orbit, (4) receive the energy and convert to DC in space using lightweight and inexpensive rectennas; (5) store the energy onboard as chemical energy by electrolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen and (6) recover free energy onboard the spacecraft during the balance of the orbit continuously or on demand as pulsed power with a high power-density fuel cell. Component and overall systems considerations of this scheme are discussed in comparison with alternatives, outstanding research problems are defined and preliminary analyses are described. These include orbital mechanics and ground tracks of satellites, accessibility of orbiters to microwave beams, transmission efficiencies, electronic and mechanical designs of the transmitter and rectenna, regenerative fuel cell energy storage, power conditioning and thermal management. The development of readily space-deployable rectennae, their supporting structures, and high specific power solid oxide monolithic fuels cells are the main pacing technologies leading to a wholly non-nuclear space power system capable of supporting all defensive satellite power requirements.

  13. A survey of beam-combining technologies for laser space power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, J. H.; Williams, M. D.; Lee, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The combination of laser beams holds much promise for obtaining powerful beams. Methods are surveyed for beam combination (coherent and incoherent) and two of them are identified as the most effective means for achieving high power transmission in space. The two methods as applied to laser diode arrays are analyzed, and potentially productive work areas for the advancement of technology are delineated.

  14. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Harris, Jérémie; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Balboni, Roberto; Mafakheri, Erfan; Dennis, Mark R; Frabboni, Stefano; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-07-01

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process.

  15. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2012-09-07

    The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

  16. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H(-) beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  17. NASA wiring for space applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program and its relationship to NASA's space technology enterprise is given in viewgraph format. The mission of the space technology enterprise is to pioneer, with industry, the development and use of space technology to secure national economic competitiveness, promote industrial growth, and to support space missions. The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program is to improve the safety, performance, and reliability of wiring systems for space applications and to develop improved wiring technologies for NASA flight programs and commercial applications. Wiring system failures in space and commercial applications have shown the need for arc track resistant wiring constructions. A matrix of tests performed versus wiring constructions is presented. Preliminary data indicate the performance of the Tensolite and Filotex hybrid constructions are the best of the various candidates.

  18. Space applications for contactless coilguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, R. J.; Beard, S.; Boyes, J.; Cnare, E. C.; Cowan, M.; Duggin, B. W.; Kaye, R. J.; Morgan, R. M.; Outka, D.; Potter, D.

    Two space applications are considered for (electrically) contactless coilguns: launch of small satellites into low-earth orbit, and launch of lunar liquid oxygen (LLOX) from the moon to the stationary Lagrangian point L2. For the earth-to-orbit (ETO) application, the baseline conceptual design consists of a 960-m long gun sited in a tunnel at 25 degrees inclination. The gun launches an 1820-kg package that includes a 100-kg satellite and a 650-kg boost rocket for orbital insertion. For the lunar application, the launcher is 200 m long. A 100-kg load of LLOX is packaged in a 10-kg fiber-wrapped tank, accelerated at 2 kgees in an aluminum bucket (armature), and launched at 2.33 km/s at 30-minute intervals. The canisters arrive at L2 2.97 days later and are captured by robotic tugs that deliver them to a fuel depot. The total mass of LLOX derived per year is 867 Mg (metric tons).

  19. Recent Applications of Space Weather Research to NASA Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Emily M.; Howard, James W., Jr.; Miller, J. Scott; Minow, Joseph I.; NeergardParker, L.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s Space Environments Team is committed to applying the latest research in space weather to NASA programs. We analyze data from an extensive set of space weather satellites in order to define the space environments for some of NASA s highest profile programs. Our goal is to ensure that spacecraft are designed to be successful in all environments encountered during their missions. We also collaborate with universities, industry, and other federal agencies to provide analysis of anomalies and operational impacts to current missions. This presentation is a summary of some of our most recent applications of space weather data, including the definition of the space environments for the initial phases of the Space Launch System (SLS), acquisition of International Space Station (ISS) frame potential variations during geomagnetic storms, and Nascap-2K charging analyses.

  20. On the beam direction search space in computerized non-coplanar beam angle optimization for IMRT—prostate SBRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Linda; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Voet, Peter W. J.; Lanconelli, Nico; Aluwini, Shafak

    2012-09-01

    In a recent paper, we have published a new algorithm, designated ‘iCycle’, for fully automated multi-criterial optimization of beam angles and intensity profiles. In this study, we have used this algorithm to investigate the relationship between plan quality and the extent of the beam direction search space, i.e. the set of candidate beam directions that may be selected for generating an optimal plan. For a group of ten prostate cancer patients, optimal IMRT plans were made for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), mimicking high dose rate brachytherapy dosimetry. Plans were generated for five different beam direction input sets: a coplanar (CP) set and four non-coplanar (NCP) sets. For CP treatments, the search space consisted of 72 orientations (5° separations). The NCP CyberKnife (CK) space contained all directions available in the robotic CK treatment unit. The fully non-coplanar (F-NCP) set facilitated the highest possible degree of freedom in selecting optimal directions. CK+ and CK++ were subsets of F-NCP to investigate some aspects of the CK space. For each input set, plans were generated with up to 30 selected beam directions. Generated plans were clinically acceptable, according to an assessment of our clinicians. Convergence in plan quality occurred only after around 20 included beams. For individual patients, variations in PTV dose delivery between the five generated plans were minimal, as aimed for (average spread in V95: 0.4%). This allowed plan comparisons based on organ at risk (OAR) doses, with the rectum considered most important. Plans generated with the NCP search spaces had improved OAR sparing compared to the CP search space, especially for the rectum. OAR sparing was best with the F-NCP, with reductions in rectum DMean, V40Gy, V60Gy and D2% compared to CP of 25%, 35%, 37% and 8%, respectively. Reduced rectum sparing with the CK search space compared to F-NCP could be largely compensated by expanding CK with beams with relatively

  1. A Smart Filtering Method for Space-Charge Dominated Beam Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartz, Sean; Hess, Mark

    2007-11-01

    We present a ``smart'' filtering method that removes the small-wavelength noise in beam simulation programs which can occur due to numerical errors. This method utilizes Fourier transforms and a low-pass filtering scheme to remove noise from space-charge generated electric fields. In particular, for a uniform-density (beer can) beam distribution, we find the necessary amount of Fourier k-space for removing field errors while maintaining the electric field's maximum peak value and its full width at half maximum. The term ``smart'' refers to the method's applicability for general beam distributions which have equivalent root-mean-square sizes as the uniform-density case. We demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to filter the longitudinal and radial components of the electric field in both one dimension and two dimensions. This method has the potential to reduce computational run-time while maintaining a high level of accuracy, i.e. less than two percent field error.

  2. Simulation study of interactions of Space Shuttle-generated electron beams with ambient plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin S.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-1936. The objective of this report is to conduct large scale simulations of electron beams injected into space. The topics covered include the following: (1) simulation of radial expansion of an injected electron beam; (2) simulations of the active injections of electron beams; (3) parameter study of electron beam injection into an ionospheric plasma; and (4) magnetosheath-ionospheric plasma interactions in the cusp.

  3. Technology and applications of space nuclear power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, Gregory M.; Rosen, Robert; Bennett, Gary L.; Schnyer, A. D.

    1991-01-01

    Requirements for a number of potential NASA civil space missions are addressed, and the nuclear power technology base to meet these requirements is described. Particular attention is given to applications of space nuclear power to lunar, Mars, and science missions and the technology status of space nuclear power with emphasis on dynamic isotope and space nuclear reactor power systems.

  4. Advanced Materials for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Curto, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    Since NASA was created in 1958, over 6400 patents have been issued to the agency--nearly one in a thousand of all patents ever issued in the United States. A large number of these inventions have focused on new materials that have made space travel and exploration of the moon, Mars, and the outer planets possible. In the last few years, the materials developed by NASA Langley Research Center embody breakthroughs in performance and properties that will enable great achievements in space. The examples discussed below offer significant advantages for use in small satellites, i.e., those with payloads under a metric ton. These include patented products such as LaRC SI, LaRC RP 46, LaRC RP 50, PETI-5, TEEK, PETI-330, LaRC CP, TOR-LM and LaRC LCR (patent pending). These and other new advances in nanotechnology engineering, self-assembling nanostructures and multifunctional aerospace materials are presented and discussed below, and applications with significant technological and commercial advantages are proposed.

  5. Space tug applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This article is the final report of the conceptual design efforts for a `space tug`. It includes preliminary efforts, mission analysis, configuration analysis, impact analysis, and conclusions. Of the several concepts evaluated, the nuclear bimodal tug was one of the top candidates, with the two options being the NEBA-1 and NEBA-3 systems. Several potential tug benefits were identified during the mission analysis. The tug enables delivery of large (>3,500 kg) payloads to the outer planets and it increases the GSO delivery capability by 20% relative to current systems. By providing end of life disposal, the tug can be used to extend the life of existing space assets. It can also be used to reboost satellites which were not delivered to their final orbit by the launch system. A specific mission model is the key to validating the tug concept. Once a mission model can be established, mission analysis can be used to determine more precise propellant quantities and burn times. In addition, the specific payloads can be evaluated for mass and volume capability with the launch systems. Results of the economic analysis will be dependent on the total years of operations and the number of missions in the mission model. The mission applications evaluated during this phase drove the need for large propellant quantities and thus did not allow the payloads to step down to smaller and less expensive launch systems.

  6. Advanced materials for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Curto, Paul A.

    2007-12-01

    Since NASA was created in 1958, over 6400 patents have been issued to the agency—nearly one in a thousand of all patents ever issued in the United States. A large number of these inventions have focused on new materials that have made space travel and exploration of the moon, Mars, and the outer planets possible. In the last few years, the materials developed by NASA Langley Research Center embody breakthroughs in performance and properties that will enable great achievements in space. The examples discussed below offer significant advantages for use in small satellites, i.e., those with payloads under a metric ton. These include patented products such as LaRC SI, LaRC RP 46, LaRC RP 50, PETI-5, TEEK, PETI-330, LaRC CP, TOR-LM and LaRC LCR (patent pending). These and other new advances in nanotechnology engineering, self-assembling nanostructures and multifunctional aerospace materials are presented and discussed below, and applications with significant technological and commercial advantages are proposed.

  7. MEMS Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vandenBerg, A.; Spiering, V. L.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; Elwenspoek, M.; Bergveld, P.

    1995-01-01

    Micro-technology enables the manufacturing of all kinds of components for miniature systems or micro-systems, such as sensors, pumps, valves, and channels. The integration of these components into a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) drastically decreases the total system volume and mass. These properties, combined with the increasing need for monitoring and control of small flows in (bio)chemical experiments, makes MEMS attractive for space applications. The level of integration and applied technology depends on the product demands and the market. The ultimate integration is process integration, which results in a one-chip system. An example of process integration is a dosing system of pump, flow sensor, micromixer, and hybrid feedback electronics to regulate the flow. However, for many applications, a hybrid integration of components is sufficient and offers the advantages of design flexibility and even the exchange of components in the case of a modular set up. Currently, we are working on hybrid integration of all kinds of sensors (physical and chemical) and flow system modules towards a modular system; the micro total analysis system (micro TAS). The substrate contains electrical connections as in a printed circuit board (PCB) as well as fluid channels for a circuit channel board (CCB) which, when integrated, form a mixed circuit board (MCB).

  8. MOEMS for prospective space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viard, Thierry; Buisset, Christophe; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Costes, Vincent; Venancio, Luis

    2011-02-01

    We are involved with ESA and CNES since several years, in the analysis of space applications using MOEMS components. A first concept using a Programmable Micro Diffracting Device (PMDG) has been proposed for an astronomical spectrometer with a small field of view. In this application the introduction of a MOEMS component has allowed to reduce the focal plane complexity (one mono detector) and to increase the mission adaptability to the target (programmable mission). An opto mechanical concept has been proposed and first performance assessed. A second concept has been studied and deals with the use of a MOEMS component to realize an innovative spectrometer, so-called convolution spectrometer. In the proposed solution, a MOEMS is used to realize a shifting spectral window (large spectral width) associated to a slight spectral increment. The signal given by the detector being the convolution between the target spectral density and the spectral window, it is then possible to recover the target spectral signal by a deconvolution. A breadboard has been developed, and the concept of the convolution spectrometer has been successfully demonstrated. Finally, some results of analysis will be also given concerning the use of a DMD for Earth observation associated to a push broom detection mode and a large field of view.

  9. Space applicable DOE photovoltaic technology: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J.; Stella, P.; Berman, P.

    1981-01-01

    Photovoltaic development projects applicable to space power are identified. When appropriate, the type of NASA support that would be necessary to implement these technologies for space use is indicated. It is conducted that the relatively small market and divergent operational requirements for space power are mainly responsible for the limited transfer of terrestrial technology to space applications. Information on the factors which control the cost and type of technology is provided. Terrestrial modules using semiconductor materials are investigated.

  10. Intelligent tutoring systems for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckhardt-Redfield, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence has been used in many space applications. Intelligent tutoring systems (ITSs) have only recently been developed for assisting training of space operations and skills. An ITS at Southwest Research Institute is described as an example of an ITS application for space operations, specifically, training console operations at mission control. A distinction is made between critical skills and knowledge versus routine skills. Other ITSs for space are also discussed and future training requirements and potential ITS solutions are described.

  11. Commercial applications of electron beam advanced oxidation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Randy D.; Bosma, John T.

    1995-03-01

    Emerging commercial applications of electron-beam advanced oxidation technology offer a significant advancement in the treatment of waste steams. Both electron beam and X-ray (Brehmsstrahlung) advanced oxidation processes have been shown to be effective in the destruction of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. Emerging commercial applications, however, far exceed in scope current applications of oxidation technologies for the destruction of simple semivolatile and volatile organic compounds in water. Emerging applications include direct treatment of contaminated soil, removal of metal ions from water and sterilization of water, sludges, and food. Application of electron beam advanced oxidation technologies are reviewed, along with electron- beam-generated X-ray (Brehmsstrahlung) advanced oxidation processes. Advantages of each technology are discussed along with advanced accelerator technologies which are applicable for commercial processing of waste streams. An overview of the U.S. companies and laboratories participating in this research area are included in this discussion.

  12. Parametric instabilities in 3D periodically focused beams with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Parametric resonances of beam eigenmodes with a periodic focusing system under the effect of space charge—also called structural instabilities—are the collective counterparts to parametric resonances of single particles or of mechanical systems. Their common feature is that an exponential instability is driven by a temporal modulation of a system parameter. Thus, they are complementary to the more commonly considered space charge single particle resonances, where space charge pseudo-multipole terms are assumed to exist already at finite level in the initial distribution. This article elaborates on the characteristics of such parametric instabilities in 3D bunched beams—as typical in linear accelerators—for modes of second (envelope), third and fourth order, including the transverse coupled "sum envelope instabilities" recently discovered for 2D beams. Noteworthy results are the finding that parametric resonances can be in competition with single particle resonances of twice the order due to overlapping stopbands; furthermore the surprisingly good applicability of the stopband positions and widths obtained from previously published 2D linearised Vlasov stability theory to the 3D non-Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij particle-in-cell code studies presented here.

  13. Semilinear (topological) spaces and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, P.; Sertel, M. R.

    1971-01-01

    Semivector spaces are defined and some of their algebraic aspects are developed including some structure theory. These spaces are then topologized to obtain semilinear topological spaces for which a hierarchy of local convexity axioms is identified. A number of fixed point and minmax theorems for spaces with various local convexity properties are established. The spaces of concern arise naturally as various hyperspaces of linear and semilinear (topological) spaces. It is indicated briefly how all this can be applied in socio-economic analysis and optimization.

  14. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S. E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  15. Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2007-04-03

    Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  16. Generation of initial Vlasov distributions for simulation of charged particle beams with high space-charge intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Kikuchi, T; Davidson, R C

    2007-04-12

    Self-consistent Vlasov simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel, both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  17. Fundamentals of particle beam dynamics and phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.; Mane, S.R.

    1991-09-04

    This report discusses the following topics on synchrotron accelerators: Transverse motion---betatron oscillations; machine lattice; representation of a particle beam; and longitudinal motion---synchrotron oscillations.

  18. Emittance measurements of space-charge-dominated electron beam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Namkung, W.; Chojnacki, E.P.

    1985-06-01

    A diagnostic technique of the beam emittance is developed for electron beams with diverging envelopes under strong space-charge forces. Radial profiles of current density, local temperature, and divergence angle are measured by the slit-pinhole method for axisymmetric beams. The partical distribution function in transverse phase space is then constructed and the rms emittance is obtained by numerical integrations. A 5-kV, 200-mA, and 3-microsec electron beam is used in the comparison between theory and experiment on this diagnostic method.

  19. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongfeng, DENG; Jian, JIANG; Xianwei, HAN; Chang, TAN; Jianguo, WEI

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  20. Ultrasound Techniques for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound has proven to be a safe non-invasive technique for imaging organs and measuring cardiovascular function. It has unique advantages for application to problems with man in space including evaluation of cardiovascular function both in serial studies and during critical operations. In addition, specialized instrumentation may be capable of detecting the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. A spatial location and three-dimensional reconstruction system is being developed to improve the accuracy and reproducibility for serial comparative ultrasound studies of cardiovascular function. The three-dimensional method permits the acquisition of ultrasonic images from many views that can be recombined into a single reconstruction of the heart or vasculature. In addition to conventional imaging and monitoring systems, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to develop instrumentation for special purposes. One example of this type of development is the design of a pulsed-Doppler system to monitor cerebral blood flow during critical operations such as re-entry. A second example is the design of a swept-frequency ultrasound system for the detection of bubbles in the circulatory system and/or soft tissues as an early indication of the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. This system exploits the resonant properties of bubbles and can detect both fundamental and second harmonic emissions from the insonified region.

  1. A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

    2011-11-28

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

  2. Space-charged-induced emittance growth in the transport of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Carlsten, B.E.

    1987-03-01

    The emittance induced by space charge in a drifting beam of finite length has been investigated, and a scaling law has been obtained from simple considerations of the different rates of expansion of different portions of the beam. The scaling law predicts the initial rate of emittance growth, before the beam shape has distorted significantly, and thus represents an upper bound on the rate of emittance increase. This scaling law has been substantiated by particle-in-cell simulation and the dependence on geometric factors evaluated for specific choices of the beam profile. For long, axially nonuniform beams, the geometric factors have been evaluated explicitly for Gaussian profiles, and other shapes.

  3. Biomedical applications of ion-beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Gibbons, D. F.; Vankampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Microscopically-rough surface texture of various biocompatible alloys and polymers produced by ion-beam sputtering may result in improvements in response of hard or soft tissue to various surgical implants.

  4. Final Report for "Design calculations for high-space-charge beam-to-RF conversion".

    SciTech Connect

    David N Smithe

    2008-10-17

    Accelerator facility upgrades, new accelerator applications, and future design efforts are leading to novel klystron and IOT device concepts, including multiple beam, high-order mode operation, and new geometry configurations of old concepts. At the same time, a new simulation capability, based upon finite-difference “cut-cell” boundaries, has emerged and is transforming the existing modeling and design capability with unparalleled realism, greater flexibility, and improved accuracy. This same new technology can also be brought to bear on a difficult-to-study aspect of the energy recovery linac (ERL), namely the accurate modeling of the exit beam, and design of the beam dump for optimum energy efficiency. We have developed new capability for design calculations and modeling of a broad class of devices which convert bunched beam kinetic energy to RF energy, including RF sources, as for example, klystrons, gyro-klystrons, IOT's, TWT’s, and other devices in which space-charge effects are important. Recent advances in geometry representation now permits very accurate representation of the curved metallic surfaces common to RF sources, resulting in unprecedented simulation accuracy. In the Phase I work, we evaluated and demonstrated the capabilities of the new geometry representation technology as applied to modeling and design of output cavity components of klystron, IOT's, and energy recovery srf cavities. We identified and prioritized which aspects of the design study process to pursue and improve in Phase II. The development and use of the new accurate geometry modeling technology on RF sources for DOE accelerators will help spark a new generational modeling and design capability, free from many of the constraints and inaccuracy associated with the previous generation of “stair-step” geometry modeling tools. This new capability is ultimately expected to impact all fields with high power RF sources, including DOE fusion research, communications, radar and

  5. Applications with Intense OTR Images II: Microbunched Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Dejus, R. J.; Rule, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    In this second application for intense images we take advantage of the coherent enhancement of optical transition radiation (OTR) due to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL)-induced microbunching of the beam. A much smaller number of total particles is involved, but the microbunched fraction (NB) gives a NB2 enhancement. We report measurements on the z-dependent growth of the coherent OTR (COTR) and the effects of beam size and electron beam/photon beam coalignment in the COTR interferograms.

  6. High Intensity Laser Power Beaming Architecture for Space and Terrestrial Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Taysir; Fast, Brian; Raible, Daniel; Dinca, Dragos; Tollis, Nick; Jalics, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    High Intensity Laser Power Beaming (HILPB) has been developed as a technique to achieve Wireless Power Transmission (WPT) for both space and terrestrial applications. In this paper, the system architecture and hardware results for a terrestrial application of HILPB are presented. These results demonstrate continuous conversion of high intensity optical energy at near-IR wavelengths directly to electrical energy at output power levels as high as 6.24 W from the single cell 0.8 cm2 aperture receiver. These results are scalable, and may be realized by implementing receiver arraying and utilizing higher power source lasers. This type of system would enable long range optical refueling of electric platforms, such as MUAV s, airships, robotic exploration missions and provide power to spacecraft platforms which may utilize it to drive electric means of propulsion.

  7. Space applications of high temperature superconductivity technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Aron, P. R.; Leonard, R. F.; Wintucky, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the present status of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology and related areas of potential space application. Attention is given to areas of application that include microwave communications, cryogenic systems, remote sensing, and space propulsion and power. Consideration is given to HTS phase shifters, miniaturization of microwave filters, far-IR bolometers, and magnetic refrigeration using flux compression.

  8. Nonconventional applications of nuclear technology to space

    SciTech Connect

    Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The application of nuclear energy to power and propulsion to support President Bush's Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has received considerable technical attention. This paper discusses the application of other nuclear technologies in space, including nuclear fusion, advanced accelerator research, antimatter research, nuclear technologies for exploration and mining, and nuclear astronomy.

  9. Retro-modulators and fast beam steering for free-space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Trevor Keith

    Free-space optical (FSO) communications is a means of secure, high bandwidth communication through the use of a modulated laser beam in free-space as the information medium. The chaotic nature of the atmosphere and the motion of the communication nodes make laser alignment a crucial concern. The employment of retro-reflecting modulators makes the bidirectional quality of a communication link into a one sided alignment problem. While there are existing retro-reflecting modulators, their trade-offs create a lack of abilities (such as aperture size, angular range, high modulation speeds, economic viability) which do not fulfill the requirements for certain applications. Also, the beam must be directed towards the intended receiver. Form mobile or scintillated communication links, beam direction must be adaptable in real time. Once again, this area suffers from trade-offs where beamsteering speed is often limited. Research used to mitigate the trade-offs and adapt the devices into viable options for a wider range of applications is explored in this dissertation. Two forms of retro-modulators were explored; a MEMS deformable mirror retro-modulator and a solid silicon retro-modulator that modulated the light by frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR). The MEMS version offered a high speed, scalable, wavelength/angle insensitive retro-modulator which can be massed produced at low cost, while the solid retro-modulator offered a large field of view with low cost as well. Both modulator's design, simulated performances, fabrication and experimental characterization are described in this dissertation. An ultra-fast beamscanner was also designed using 2-dimensional dispersion. By using wavelength switching for directional control, a beamscanner was developed that could switch light faster than pre-existing beamscanners while the beams characteristics (most importantly its aperture) could be freely adjusted by the independent optics. This beamscanner was preceded by our

  10. Longitudinal phase-space coating of beam in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, I report on a novel scheme for beam stacking without any beam emittance dilution using a barrier rf system in synchrotrons. The general principle of the scheme called longitudinal phase-space coating, validation of the concept via multi-particle beam dynamics simulations applied to the Fermilab Recycler, and its experimental demonstration are presented. In addition, it has been shown and illustrated that the rf gymnastics involved in this scheme can be used in measuring the incoherent synchrotron tune spectrum of the beam in barrier buckets and in producing a clean hollow beam in longitudinal phase space. The method of beam stacking in synchrotrons presented here is the first of its kind.

  11. Space fabrication demonstration system composite beam cap fabricator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A detailed design for a prototype, composite beam cap fabricator was established. Inputs to this design included functional tests and system operating requirements. All required materials were procured, detail parts were fabricated, and one composite beam cap forming machine was assembled. The machine was demonstrated as a stand-alone system. Two 12-foot-long beam cap members were fabricated from laminates graphite/polysulfane or an equivalent material. One of these members, which as structurally tested in axial compression, failed at 490 pounds.

  12. High performance computing for beam physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.

    1994-09-01

    Several countries are now involved in efforts aimed at utilizing accelerator-driven technologies to solve problems of national and international importance. These technologies have both economic and environmental implications. The technologies include waste transmutation, plutonium conversion, neutron production for materials science and biological science research, neutron production for fusion materials testing, fission energy production systems, and tritium production. All of these projects require a high-intensity linear accelerator that operates with extremely low beam loss. This presents a formidable computational challenge: One must design and optimize over a kilometer of complex accelerating structures while taking into account beam loss to an accuracy of 10 parts per billion per meter. Such modeling is essential if one is to have confidence that the accelerator will meet its beam loss requirement, which ultimately affects system reliability, safety and cost. At Los Alamos, the authors are developing a capability to model ultra-low loss accelerators using the CM-5 at the Advanced Computing Laboratory. They are developing PIC, Vlasov/Poisson, and Langevin/Fokker-Planck codes for this purpose. With slight modification, they have also applied their codes to modeling mesoscopic systems and astrophysical systems. In this paper, they will first describe HPC activities in the accelerator community. Then they will discuss the tools they have developed to model classical and quantum evolution equations. Lastly they will describe how these tools have been used to study beam halo in high current, mismatched charged particle beams.

  13. Laser propulsion for space applications: Is it another myth or a real potential?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joung R.

    2007-05-01

    This paper discusses different principles of inducing propulsive power using lasers and examines the performance limits along with pros and cons with respect to different space propulsion applications: satellite launching, orbital transfer, space debris clearing, satellite propulsion, and space travels. It concludes that a use of electrical propulsion, in conjunction with laser power beaming, is the most feasible application with technological and economic advantages for commercial use within the next decades.

  14. Early experiments in charged particle beams from the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, P. M.; Williamson, P. R.; Baker, K. D.; Obayashi, T.; Burch, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of studies on board the Shuttle involving the interaction of particle beams with the atmosphere and the ionosphere, and the effects of the beams on the electrical potential of the platform, are discussed. Noting that the Shuttle allows greater weight and power demands by scientific payloads than previous satellite launches, the OSS-1 Vehicle Charging and Potential experiment and the Spacelab 1 Particle Accelerator and Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams are described. Instrumentation details are provided, including charge and current probes, the Spherical Retarding Potential Analyzer, the Fast Pulse Electron Generator, and digital control and interface units. The SEPAC equipment, which comprises an electron beam accelerator, and MPD plasma jet, and diagnostic units are detailed, and operating procedures and experiment objectives are outlined.

  15. Review of the Space Applications program, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide the participants in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/National Academy of Engineers' Summer Study in Applications a concise overview of the NASA Applications Program as it stands in 1974. The review covers the accomplishments of the various discipline-oriented programs that make up the total Applications Program, discusses the program plan for the 1975 to 1980 period, and examines the anticipated spaceflight capabilities of the 1980's. NASA has requested the National Academy of Engineers to conduct through its Space Applications Board a comprehensive study of the future Space Applications Program encompassing the following: (1) the Applications Program in general, with particular emphasis on practical approaches, including assessment of the socio-economic benefits and (2) how the broad comprehensive program envisioned above influences, or is influenced by, the shuttle system, the principal space transport system of the 1980's.

  16. Technologies applicable to space tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracat, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation is presented of technologies which have been accumulated over the years, both on Earth and in space, dealing with tethers, ropes and cables. Many of these technologies can be applied, with modification, to both on-going and future space tether research and demonstration missions. The major areas of tether research and technology developments presented include multimegawatt power transmission, materials and structures, dynamics and control, environmental interactions, and in-space operations. These major topical areas are presented within the context of their associated research program or study.

  17. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fokin, A. P.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2015-04-15

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations.

  18. Gamma beam industrial applications at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suliman, Gabriel; Iancu, Violeta; Ur, Calin A.; Iovea, Mihai; Daito, Izuru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    The Nuclear Physics oriented pillar of the pan-European Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI-NP) will host an ultra-bright, energy tunable, and quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beam system in the range of 0.2-19.5 MeV produced by laser Compton backscattering. This gamma beam satisfies the criteria for large-size product investigations with added capabilities like isotope detection through the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) and is ideal for non-destructive testing applications. Two major applications of gamma beams are being envisaged at ELI-NP: industrial applications based on NRF and industrial radiography and tomography. Both applications exploit the unique characteristics of the gamma beam to deliver new opportunities for the industry. Here, we present the experimental setups proposed at ELI-NP and discuss their performance based on analytical calculations and GEANT4 numerical simulations. One of the main advantages of using the gamma beam at ELI-NP for applications based on NRF is the availability of an advanced detector array, which can enhance the advantages already provided by the high quality of the gamma beam.

  19. Simulations of longitudinal beam dynamics of space-charge dominated beams for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Debra Ann Callahan

    1994-12-01

    The longitudinal instability has potentially disastrous effects on the ion beams used for heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion. This instability is a "resistive wall" instability with the impedance coining from the induction modules in the accelerator used as a driver. This instability can greatly amplify perturbations launched from the beam head and can prevent focusing of the beam onto the small spot necessary for fusion. This instability has been studied using the WARPrz particle-in-cell code. WARPrz is a 2 1/2 dimensional electrostatic axisymmetric code. This code includes a model for the impedance of the induction modules. Simulations with resistances similar to that expected in a driver show moderate amounts of growth from the instability as a perturbation travels from beam head to tail as predicted by cold beam fluid theory. The perturbation reflects off the beam tail and decays as it travels toward the beam head. Nonlinear effects cause the perturbation to steepen during reflection. Including the capacitive component of the, module impedance. has a partially stabilizing effect on the longitudinal instability. This reduction in the growth rate is seen in both cold beam fluid theory and in simulations with WARPrz. Instability growth rates for warm beams measured from WARPrz are lower than cold beam fluid theory predicts. Longitudinal thermal spread cannot account for this decrease in the growth rate. A mechanism for coupling the transverse thermal spread to decay of the longitudinal waves is presented. The longitudinal instability is no longer a threat to the heavy ion fusion program. The simulations in this thesis have shown that the growth rate for this instability will not be as large as earlier calculations predicted.

  20. High power linear pulsed beam annealer. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, M.D.; Sadana, D.K.; True, R.B.

    1980-11-26

    A high power pulsed electron beam system for annealing semiconductors is comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid and focus ring for confining the pulsed beam of electrons to a predetermined area, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube and an annular Faraday shield between the focus ring and the drift tube are maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring, thereby eliminating space charge limitations on the emission of electrons from said gun. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube. The magnetic field produced by the coil around the curved tube imparts motion to electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. It also produces a scalloped profile of the electron beam. A second drift tube spaced a predetermined distance from the curved tube is positioned with its axis aligned with the axis of the first drift tube. The second drift tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage between the cathode voltage and the curved tube voltage to decelerate the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube, maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube. The magnetic field of the second coil comprises the electron beam to the area of the semiconductor on the target holder.

  1. Free-space orbital angular momentum division multiplexing with Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatto, Alberto; Tacca, Matteo; Martelli, Paolo; Boffi, Pierpaolo; Martinelli, Mario

    2011-06-01

    We present an apparatus for multiplexing and demultiplexing free-space beams carrying different values of orbital angular momentum (OAM), at a wavelength of 633 nm. We have considered nondiffracting Bessel beams of order from 0 to 3, produced by means of suitable binary-amplitude computer-generated holograms and carrying an OAM per photon directly proportional to the beam order. The effectiveness of the OAM division multiplexing technique has been experimentally verified by monitoring the output ports of a demultiplexing interferometer with rotated Dove prisms in the arms. This interferometer is capable of discriminating the even-order Bessel beams from the odd-order ones.

  2. A low Earth orbit molecular beam space simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A brief synopsis of the low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite environment is presented including neutral and ionic species. Two ground based atomic and molecular beam instruments are described which are capable of simulating the interaction of spacecraft surfaces with the LEO environment and detecting the results of these interactions. The first detects mass spectrometrically low level fluxes of reactively and nonreactively surface scattered species as a function of scattering angle and velocity while the second ultrahigh velocity (UHV) molecular beam, laser induced fluorescence apparatus is capable of measuring chemiluminescence produced by either gas phase or gas-surface interactions. A number of proposed experiments are described.

  3. Ethernet for Space Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Evan; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is adapting current data networking technologies to fly on future spaceflight missions. The benefits of using commercially based networking standards and protocols have been widely discussed and are expected to include reduction in overall mission cost, shortened integration and test (I&T) schedules, increased operations flexibility, and hardware and software upgradeability/scalability with developments ongoing in the commercial world. The networking effort is a comprehensive one encompassing missions ranging from small University Explorer (UNEX) class spacecraft to large observatories such as the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). Mission aspects such as flight hardware and software, ground station hardware and software, operations, RF communications, and security (physical and electronic) are all being addressed to ensure a complete end-to-end system solution. One of the current networking development efforts at GSFC is the SpaceLAN (Spacecraft Local Area Network) project, development of a space-qualifiable Ethernet network. To this end we have purchased an IEEE 802.3-compatible 10/100/1000 Media Access Control (MAC) layer Intellectual Property (IP) core and are designing a network node interface (NNI) and associated network components such as a switch. These systems will ultimately allow the replacement of the typical MIL-STD-1553/1773 and custom interfaces that inhabit most spacecraft. In this paper we will describe our current Ethernet NNI development along with a novel new space qualified physical layer that will be used in place of the standard interfaces. We will outline our plans for development of space qualified network components that will allow future spacecraft to operate in significant radiation environments while using a single onboard network for reliable commanding and data transfer. There will be a brief discussion of some issues surrounding system implications of a flight Ethernet. Finally, we will

  4. Applications notice. [application of space techniques to earth resources, environment management, and space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The discipline programs of the Space and Terrestrial (S&T) Applications Program are described and examples of research areas of current interest are given. Application of space techniques to improve conditions on earth are summarized. Discipline programs discussed include: resource observations; environmental observations; communications; materials processing in space; and applications systems/information systems. Format information on submission of unsolicited proposals for research related to the S&T Applications Program are given.

  5. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  6. Methodological demonstration of laser beam pointing control for space gravitational wave detection missions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu-Hui; Liu, He-Shan; Luo, Zi-Ren; Li, Yu-Qiong; Jin, Gang

    2014-07-01

    In space laser interferometer gravitational wave (G.W.) detection missions, the stability of the laser beam pointing direction has to be kept at 10 nrad/√Hz. Otherwise, the beam pointing jitter noise will dominate the noise budget and make the detection of G.W. impossible. Disturbed by the residue non-conservative forces, the fluctuation of the laser beam pointing direction could be a few μrad/√Hz at frequencies from 0.1 mHz to 10 Hz. Therefore, the laser beam pointing control system is an essential requirement for those space G.W. detection missions. An on-ground test of such beam pointing control system is performed, where the Differential Wave-front Sensing technique is used to sense the beams pointing jitter. An active controlled steering mirror is employed to adjust the beam pointing direction to compensate the jitter. The experimental result shows that the pointing control system can be used for very large dynamic range up to 5 μrad. At the interested frequencies of space G.W. detection missions, between 1 mHz and 1 Hz, beam pointing stability of 6 nrad/√Hz is achieved.

  7. Ultra-thin anisotropic metasurface for polarized beam splitting and reflected beam steering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenlong; Wang, Guangming; Li, Tangjing; Li, Haipeng; Zhuang, Yaqiang; Hou, Haisheng

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a polarization beam splitter utilizing an ultra-thin anisotropic metasurface. The proposed anisotropic element is composed of triple-layered rectangular patches spaced with double-layered dielectric isolators. By tailoring the metallic patches, the cell is capable of transmitting x-polarized waves efficiently and reflecting y-polarized beams with almost 100% efficiency at 15 GHz. In addition to this, the reflected phases can be modulated by adjusting the size of the element, which contributes to beam steering in reflection mode. By assigning gradient phases on the metasurface, the constructed sample has the ability to refract x-polarized waves normally and reflect y-polarized beams anomalously. For verification, a sample with a size of 240 × 240 mm2 is fabricated and measured. Consistent numerical and experimental results have both validated the efficiently anomalous reflection for y-polarized waves and normal refraction for x-polarized beams operating from 14.6-15.4 GHz. Furthermore, the proposed sample has a thickness of 0.1λ at 15 GHz, which provides a promising approach for steering and splitting beams in a compact size.

  8. Aberrations of varied line-space grazing incidence gratings in converging light beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettrick, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses of the imaging properties of several designs for varied-line space gratings in converging beams of light in grazing-incidence spectrometers are presented. An explicit model is defined for the case of a plane-reflection grating intercepting light that converges and is reflected to a stigmatic point associated with the zero-order image of the grating. Smooth spatial variation of the grating constant then permits aberration correction. The aberrations are expressed as polynomials in the grating lens coordinates using power series expansions. Application of the model is illustrated in terms of aberrations experienced with the short wavelength spectrometer on the EUVE satellite. Attention is given to straight and parallel in-plane grooves, curved groove in-plane designs and off-plane grooves. Aberrations due to dispersions and misalignment are also considered.

  9. Novel multi-beam X-ray source for vacuum electronics enabled medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    For almost 100 of years, commercial medical X-ray applications have relied heavily on X-ray tube architectures based on the vacuum electronics design developed by William Coolidge at the beginning of the twentieth century. Typically, the Coolidge design employs one hot tungsten filament as the electron source; the output of the tube is one X-ray beam. This X-ray source architecture is the state of the art in today's commercial medical imaging applications, such as Computed Tomography. Recently, GE Global Research has demonstrated the most dramatic extension of the Coolidge vacuum tube design for Computed Tomography (CT) in almost a century: a multi-beam X-ray source containing thirty two cathodes emitting up to 1000 mA, in a cathode grounded - anode at potential architecture (anode up to 140 kV). This talk will present the challenges of the X-ray multi-beam vacuum source design - space charge electron gun design, beam focusing to compression ratios needed in CT medical imaging applications (image resolution is critically dependent on how well the electron beam is focused in vacuum X-ray tubes), electron emitter choice to fit the aggressive beam current requirements, novel electronics for beam control and focusing, high voltage and vacuum solutions, as well as vacuum chamber design to sustain the considerable G forces typically encountered on a CT gantry (an X-ray vacuum tube typically rotates on the CT gantry at less than 0.5 s per revolution). Consideration will be given to various electron emitter technologies available for this application - tungsten emitters, dispenser cathodes and carbon nano tubes (CNT) - and their tradeoffs. The medical benefits potentially enabled by this unique vacuum multi-beam X-ray source are: X-ray dose reduction, reduction of image artifacts and improved image resolution. This work was funded in part by NIH grant R01EB006837.

  10. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  11. Dual ion beam processed diamondlike films for industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Kussmaul, M. T.; Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Single and dual beam ion source systems are used to generate amorphous diamondlike carbon (DLC) films, which were evaluated for a variety of applications including protective coatings on transmitting materials, power electronics as insulated gates and corrosion resistant barriers. A list of the desirable properties of DLC films along with potential applications are presented.

  12. Exotic Optical Beam Classes for Free-Space Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    surprising connection between vortex evolution and infinite mathematics was uncovered. 15. SUBJECT TERMS atmospheric propagation, optical vortices...different types of optical singularities were discovered and analyzed, and a surprising connection between vortex evolution and infinite mathematics was...fields. DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. 6. Transfinite mathematics in optical vortex beams The investigation of other

  13. Space Application Requirements for Organic Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Minow, Joseph; Altstatt, Richard; Wertz, George; Semmel, Charles; Edwards, David; Ashley, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is currently evaluating polymer based components for application in launch vehicle and propulsion system avionics systems. Organic polymers offer great advantages over inorganic corollaries. Unlike inorganics with crystalline structures defining their sensing characteristics, organic polymers can be engineered to provide varying degrees of sensitivity for various parameters including electro-optic response, second harmonic generation, and piezoelectric response. While great advantages in performance can be achieved with organic polymers, survivability in the operational environment is a key aspect for their practical application. The space environment in particular offers challenges that must be considered in the application of polymer based devices. These challenges include: long term thermal stability for long duration missions, extreme thermal cycling, space radiation tolerance, vacuum operation, low power operation, high operational reliability. Requirements for application of polymer based devices in space avionics systems will be presented and discussed in light of current polymer materials.

  14. Regenerative fuel cells for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, A. John

    1987-01-01

    After several years of development of the regenerative fuel cell (RFC) as the electrochemical storage system to be carried by the future space station, the official stance has now been adopted that nickel hydrogen batteries would be a better system choice. RFCs are compared with nickel hydrogen and other battery systems for space platform applications.

  15. Space batteries for mobile battlefield power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, Patricia M.

    1991-01-01

    A review of space power systems was undertaken to identify advanced space batteries for mobile applications. State-of-the-art systems are described. The technology issues that need to be addressed in order to bring these systems along and meet the needs of the user are discussed. Future research directions are examined.

  16. NASA's Space Science and Applications Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Homer E.

    This booklet contains material prepared by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) office of Space Science and Applications for presentation to the United States Congress. It contains discussion of basic research, its value as a source of knowledge, techniques and skills that go into the development of technology, and practical…

  17. Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    The tethered satellite system is described including tether fundamentals. Applications of very long tethers in space to a broad spectrum of future space missions are explored. Topics covered include: science, transportation, constellations, artificial gravity, technology and test, and electrodynamic interactions. Recommendations to NASA are included.

  18. Issues with Phase Space Characterization of Laser-plasma Generated Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchi, A.; Alesini, D.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Di Giovenale, D.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Musumeci, P.; Pompili, R.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Villa, F.

    Plasma acceleration is the new frontier in particle beam accelerators. Using the strong electric fields inside a plasma it is possible to achieve accelerating gradients orders of magnitude larger with respect to current technologies. Different schemes, using completely different approaches, have been proposed and several already tested, producing beams of energy up to several GeV. Regardless of the technique used for acceleration a precise determination of the output beam parameters is mandatory for the fine tuning of the process. The measurement of these parameters, in particular the beam distribution in transverse and longitudinal phase space, is not trivial, mainly due to the large energy spread and to the tight focusing of these beams or to the background noise produced in the plasma channel. We illustrate the main problems related to the diagnostic of this kind of beams and some of the proposed or already realized solutions

  19. Liquid crystal cell for space-borne laser rangefinder to space mission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Raszewski, Z.; Soms, L.; Piecek, W.; Perkowski, P.; Kędzierski, J.; Dąbrowski, R.; Olifierczuk, M.; Garbat, K.; Miszczyk, E.

    2012-12-01

    Liquid crystal cell (LCC) for space-borne laser rangefinder to space mission applications was developed, manufactured and tested under cooperation between Military University of Technology (MUT) in Poland and Vavilov State Optical Institute (Vavilov SOI) in Russia. LCC operates in twisted nematic mode, commutating the polarization plane of a laser beam working at 1.064 μm and the energy density not smaller than 0,15 J/cm2 at the pulse duration about 8 ns. The transmission of LCC is not smaller than 95% at the aperture diameter not less than 15 mm. Switching on and switching off times in a 2.5-μm thick LCC driven by voltage of 10 V are not larger than 0.7 ms and 7 ms, respectively, in the operating temperature range from 20°C to 40°C. The LCCs developed in MUT were positively tested under space requirements in Vavilov SOI.

  20. Structural materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term performance of structural materials in the space environment is a key research activity within NASA. The primary concerns for materials in low Earth orbit (LEO) are atomic oxygen erosion and space debris impact. Atomic oxygen studies have included both laboratory exposures in atomic oxygen facilities and flight exposures using the Shuttle. Characterization of atomic oxygen interaction with materials has included surface recession rates, residual mechanical properties, optical property measurements, and surface analyses to establish chemical changes. The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is scheduled to be retrieved in 1989 and is expected to provide a wealth of data on atomic oxygen erosion in space. Hypervelocity impact studies have been conducted to establish damage mechanisms and changes in mechanical properties. Samples from LDEF will be analyzed to determine the severity of space debris impact on coatings, films, and composites. Spacecraft placed in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) will be subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation which for long term exposures will exceed the damage threshold of many polymeric materials. Radiation interaction with polymers can result in chain scission and/or cross-linking. The formation of low molecular weight products in the epoxy plasticize the matrix at elevated temperatures and embrittle the matrix at low temperatures. This affects both the matrix-dominated mechanical properties and the dimensional stability of the composite. Embrittlement of the matrix at low temperatures results in enhanced matrix microcracking during thermal cycling. Matrix microcracking changes the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of composite laminates and produces permanent length changes. Residual stress calculations were performed to estimate the conditions necessary for microcrack development in unirradiated and irradiated composites. The effects of UV and electron exposure on the optical properties of transparent

  1. Evolvable Hardware for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason; Globus, Al; Hornby, Gregory; Larchev, Gregory; Kraus, William

    2004-01-01

    This article surveys the research of the Evolvable Systems Group at NASA Ames Research Center. Over the past few years, our group has developed the ability to use evolutionary algorithms in a variety of NASA applications ranging from spacecraft antenna design, fault tolerance for programmable logic chips, atomic force field parameter fitting, analog circuit design, and earth observing satellite scheduling. In some of these applications, evolutionary algorithms match or improve on human performance.

  2. Application of MMIC modules in future multiple beam satellite antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, J.

    1982-01-01

    Multiple beam antenna systems for advanced communication satellites operating in the 30/20 GHz frequency bands (30 GHz uplink, 20 GHz downlink) were developed. Up to twenty 0.3 deg HPBW fixed spot beams and six 0.3 deg HPBW scanning spot beams will be required. Array-fed dual reflector antenna systems in which monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shift and amplifier modules are used with each radiating element of the feed array for beam pointing and power gain were developed. The feasibility of distributed power amplification and beam pointing with MMIC modules in the elements of an array and to develop a data base for future development were demonstrated. The technical discussion centers around the potential advantages of ""monolithic'' antennas for specific applications as compared to systems using high powered TWT's. These include: reduced losses in the beam forming network; advantage of space combining and graceful degradation; dynamic control of beam pointing and illumination contour; and possibilities for cost and weight reduction.

  3. Extraction design and low energy beam transport optimization of space charge dominated multispecies ion beam sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delferrière, O.; De Menezes, D.

    2004-05-01

    In all accelerator projects, the low energy part of the accelerator has to be carefully optimized to match the beam characteristic requirements of the higher energy parts. Since 1994 with the beginning of the Injector of Protons for High Intensity (IPHI) project and Source of Light Ions with High Intensities (SILHI) electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source development at CEA/Saclay, we are using a set of two-dimensional (2D) codes for extraction system optimization (AXCEL, OPERA-2D) and beam transport (MULTIPART). The 95 keV SILHI extraction system optimization has largely increased the extracted current, and improved the beam line transmission. From these good results, a 130 mA D+ extraction system for the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility project has been designed in the same way as SILHI one. We are also now involved in the SPIRAL 2 project for the building of a 40 keV D+ ECR ion source, continuously tunable from 0.1 to 5 mA, for which a special four-electrode extraction system has been studied. In this article we will describe the 2D design process and present the different extraction geometries and beam characteristics. Simulation results of SILHI H+ beam emittance will be compared with experimental measurements.

  4. Small Magnetic Sensors for Space Applications

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Michelena, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Small magnetic sensors are widely used integrated in vehicles, mobile phones, medical devices, etc for navigation, speed, position and angular sensing. These magnetic sensors are potential candidates for space sector applications in which mass, volume and power savings are important issues. This work covers the magnetic technologies available in the marketplace and the steps towards their implementation in space applications, the actual trend of miniaturization the front-end technologies, and the convergence of the mature and miniaturized magnetic sensor to the space sector through the small satellite concept. PMID:22574012

  5. Lightning Discharges Producing Beams of Relativistic Runaway Electrons Into Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M.; Said, R.; Carlson, B. E.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.; Briggs, M. S.; Fishman, G. J.; Connaughton, V.; Cummer, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Strong electric fields associated with lightning generate brief (~1 ms) but intense Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs). A few events are thought to be the signature of a relativistic electron beam escaping the atmosphere. Such an event is distinguishable from a TGF since the lightning discharge is along the geomagnetic field line from the spacecraft, rather than below. We present the first unambiguous detections of lightning along the geomagnetic field line from a satellite coincident with flashes of relativistic electrons. The associated discharges are detected by the new GLD360 VLF global lightning detection network, and by ELF/VLF and ULF radio receivers on the ground. The discharges are compared to others from the same storm, and to satellite data from the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Theoretical simulations are used to predict the electron-beam signature at the spacecraft, given the exact location of the lightning discharges.

  6. Generation And Applications Of Electron-Beam Plasma Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, M. N.; Tun Win, Aung

    2015-03-01

    Plasma flows generated by continuous or interrupted injection of an electron beam into subsonic or supersonic gaseous streams are considered. Liquid and powder spraying by the electron-beam plasma (EBP) flows is studied as a technique of the aerosol plasma generation. A number of experimental setups generating both free plasma jets and plasma flows in channels are described. Examples of the EBP flows applications for industrial and aerospace technologies are given. The applications are shown to be based on unique properties of the EBP and its stability within very wide ranges of the plasma generation conditions. Some applications of the Hybrid Plasma (HP) generated by combined action of the electron beam (EB) and intermittent gas discharge on flows of gaseous mixtures and aerosols are presented as well.

  7. The application of lidar in detecting space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Qianqian

    2008-12-01

    The accumulation of space debris is expected to present an increasing threat to orbital aerostat. To develop and use space resource continually and in security the detecting technology for space debris has to be improved. The paper firstly introduces the concept of space debris and their common detection means, and then introduces the application of lidar in detecting the space debris. Comparing with conventional optical observation systems lidar adopts active detecting mode, without the limitation of illumination and with a long detecting distance. It also can measure range and speed of targets. Comparing with microwave radar the beam of lidar is narrow and it has great orientation precision and resolving power. To satisfy detecting small-sized debris in long distance and big area the paper proposes the composite method to detect the space debris which uses millimeter wave radar and optic equipment. It firstly uses millimeter wave with long distance and big view field to confirm the position of debris in long distance. And then it uses optical system with high resolving and anti-jamming power for accurate orientation and identification. It also measure the distance, angle and speed exactly of debris. The study in theory indicates this composite method can complete the detecting and orientation and achieve the distance, angle and speed of the space debris more than 10cm range beyond 150km.

  8. Space science and applications: Strategic plan 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) 1991 Strategic Plan reflects a transitional year in which we respond to changes and focus on carrying out a vital space science program and strengthening our research base to reap the benefits of current and future missions. The Plan is built on interrelated, complementary strategies for the core space science program, for Mission to Planet Earth, and for Mission from Planet Earth. Each strategy has its own unique themes and mission priorities, but they share a common set of principles and a common goal - leadership through the achievement of excellence. Discussed here is the National Space Policy; an overview of OSSA activities, goals, and objectives; and the implications of the OSSA space science and applications strategy.

  9. Building ultra-precision laser interferometers for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, David; Fitzsimons, Ewan; Killow, Christian; Perreur-Lloyd, Michael; Ward, Henry

    Laser interferometry for space applications typically requires both great precision of optical component placing and alignment and high long-term stability. Construction therefore requires both precision measurement and a jointing technique that allows extremely fine initial adjust-ment and which provides high ultimate strength. We present techniques that allow us to measure mm scale optical beams to better than 10 microns and 20 microrad. These measurements are then combined with precision alignment and hydroxy-catalysis bonding of optical components. The results of applying these techniques to the construction of the four interferometers on each of the LISA Pathfinder optical benches are discussed.

  10. Future superconductivity applications in space - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar; Ignatiev, Alex

    1988-01-01

    High temperature superconductor (HISC) materials and devices can provide immediate applications for many space missions. The in-space thermal environment provides an opportunity to develop, test, and apply this technology to enhance performance and reliability for many applications of crucial importance to NASA. Specifically, the technology development areas include: (1) high current power transmission, (2) microwave components, devices, and antennas, (3) microwave, optical, and infrared sensors, (4) signal processors, (5) submillimeter wave components and systems, (6) ultra stable space clocks, (7) electromagnetic launch systems, and (8) accelerometers and position sensors for flight operations. HTSC is expected to impact NASA's Lunar Bases, Mars exploration, Mission to Earth, and Planetary exploration programs providing enabling and cost-effect technology. A review of the space applications of the HTSC technology is presented. Problem areas in technology development needing special attention are identified.

  11. Toward higher order particle simulation of space-charge-dominated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A., LLNL

    1998-01-12

    The intense particle beams to be used as drivers for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion exhibit dynamics which are dominated by space-charge (abbreviated s-c) forces, rather than by thermal pressure (as in most traditional accelerator applications). Such beams are non-neutral plasmas, and the particle-in-cell technique (with the addition of detailed models for the externally applied fields and the domain geometry) has proven effective in their study. Typically, the applied focusing, bending, and accelerating fields vary rapidly with axial position, while the s-c fields (which are comparable in strength to the applied fields) vary smoothly; it is desirable to avoid using many steps to resolve the applied field variations while still computing accurate orbits. We are exploring high-order particle advance methods and other techniques to enhance the efficiency of these simulations. The earlier stages of this work included initial studies of: sub-cycling of the particle advance relative to the field solution; higher-order time-advance algorithms; force-averaging by integration along approximate orbits; and orbit- averaging. In this paper we describe further progress: (1) development of prescriptions for ``smooth`` cutoffs of tabulated fringe-field data so as to preserve the convergence of a high-order advance, studied using the realistic-profile model problem described in (2) for a high order advance and the model problem, comparison of both ``true`` and ``approximate`` (old-data, non-symplectic) every-substep s-c force application to periodic (``operator-split``) s-c force application; and (3) 2-d PIC (WARPxy code) convergence studies of the Candy-Rozmus (C-R) explicit fourth-order symplectic integrator using both ``true`` (every-substep) s-c and operator-split s-c, and of the leapfrog mover, modeling a transport line with sharp-edged fields.

  12. Laser beacon adaptive optics for power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, R.Q.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the laser beam control system requirements for power beaming applications. Power beaming applications include electric and thermal engine propulsion for orbit transfer, station changing, and recharging batteries. Beam control includes satellite acquisition, high accuracy tracking, higher order atmospheric compensation using adaptive optics, and precision point-ahead. Beam control may also include local laser beam clean-up with a low order adaptive optics system. This paper also presents results of tracking and higher-order correction experiments on astronomical objects. The results were obtained with a laser beacon adaptive optics system at Phillips Laboratory`s Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM. At a wavelength of 0.85 {mu}m, the author has achieved Strehl ratios of {approximately}0.50 using laser beacons and {approximately}0.65 using natural stars for exposures longer than one minute on objects of {approximately}8{sup th} magnitude. The resulting point spread function has a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 arcsec.

  13. Damping Models for Shear-Deformable Beam with Applications to Spacecraft Wiring Harness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    Air Force Research Laboratory AFRL /RVSV Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave., SE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Kirtland AFB, NM 87117...Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official Record Copy AFRL /RVSV/Derek... AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0189 AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0189 DAMPING MODELS FOR SHEAR-DEFORMABLE BEAM WITH APPLICATIONS TO SPACECRAFT WIRING HARNESS

  14. Intra-beam scattering and its application to ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov A. V.

    2011-10-16

    Treatment of Coulomb collisions within the beam requires consideration of both large and small angle scattering. Such collisions lead to the Touschek effect and Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). The Touschek effect refers to particle loss as a result of a single collision, where only transfer from the transverse direction into longitudinal plays a role. It is important to consider this effect for ERL design to have an appropriate choice of collimation system. The IBS is a diffusion process which leads to changes of beam distribution but does not necessarily result in a beam loss. Evaluation of IBS in ERLs, where beam distribution is non-Gaussian, requires special treatment. Here we describe the IBS and Touschek effects with application to ERLs.

  15. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.; Albrecht, G.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  16. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Albrecht, G.; Beach, R.

    1994-12-31

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  17. In-Space and Terrestrial Solar Array Technologies for Beamed Laser Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2002-01-01

    The Stretched Lens Array (SLA) has been proposed as an integral part of the POWOW concept for an electrically propelled spacecraft traveling to Mars and using lasers to beam power to the surface. Significant advances in the design of the (SLA) have recently been accomplished. These advances include thinner lenses, more efficient cells, stiffer, lighter array structures, higher operating voltages, plus demonstration of a subscale model of the array concept. These advances will be described. The SLA has continued to evolve into a cost-effective, high specific power and high power density array and this array is applicable to a wide range of commercial, civil and other applications. This broad applicability stems in part because POWOW was a modular design using solar array building blocks in the 8 kW size. The integration of solar energy conversion in space with laser power transmission of that energy allows the use of photovoltaic receivers on the surface as well. Concentrator arrays built on the same concept as the SLA have been demonstrated on earth for some time. It is important to note that DoE tests over several years have shown the superior performance of this type of array. The results of these terrestrial tests will be described as well. Because the most likely location for a power beaming satellite is in a synchronous orbit (GEO for Earth), concentrator arrays appear well suited as the receivers for laser beams from those satellites. The ability to control operating temperature with appropriate design and to reduce the amount of more expensive solar cell material seems to be a cost-effective solution. Thus the adaptation of the linear Fresnel concentrators for this application is worthy of examination. The third issue that is critical for successful power conversion is selection of the laser wavelength/solar cell combination to maximize efficiency. Selection of the cell type involves several issues: laser wavelength, band gap (direct or indirect), operating

  18. Electromagnetic launchers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. M.; Gully, J. H.; Driga, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic launcher (EML) was designed for NASA-Langley to boost large models to hypervelocity for flight evaluation. Two different concepts were developed using railgun and coilgun principles. A coilgun was designed to accelerate a 14-kg mass to 6 km/s and, by adding additional equipment, to accelerate a 10-kg mass to 11 km/s. The railgun system was designed to accelerate only 14 kg to 6 km/s. Of significance in this development is the opportunity to use the launcher for aeroballistic research of the upper atmosphere, eventually placing packages in low earth orbit using a small rocket. The authors describe the railgun and coilgun launch designs and suggest a reconfiguration for placement of 150-kg parcels into low earth orbit for aeroballistic studies and possible space lab support. Each design is detailed along with the performance adjustments which would be required for circular orbit payload placement.

  19. Chemical sensors for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1992-01-01

    The payload of the Space Station Freedom will include sensors for frequent monitoring of the water recycling process and for measuring the many biochemical parameters related to onboard experiments. This paper describes the sensor technologies and the types of transducers and selectors considered for these sensors. Particular attention is given to such aspects of monitoring of the water recycling process as the types of water use, the sources of water and their hazards, the sensor systems for monitoring, microbial monitoring, and monitoring toxic metals and organics. An approach for monitoring water recycling is suggested, which includes microbial testing with a potentiometric device (which should be in first line of tests), the use of an ion-selective electrode for inorganic ion determinations, and the use of optic fiber techniques for the determination of total organic carbon.

  20. Chemical sensors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1992-07-01

    The payload of the Space Station Freedom will include sensors for frequent monitoring of the water recycling process and for measuring the many biochemical parameters related to onboard experiments. This paper describes the sensor technologies and the types of transducers and selectors considered for these sensors. Particular attention is given to such aspects of monitoring of the water recycling process as the types of water use, the sources of water and their hazards, the sensor systems for monitoring, microbial monitoring, and monitoring toxic metals and organics. An approach for monitoring water recycling is suggested, which includes microbial testing with a potentiometric device (which should be in first line of tests), the use of an ion-selective electrode for inorganic ion determinations, and the use of optic fiber techniques for the determination of total organic carbon.

  1. Using MCNPX for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, G. W.; Hendricks, J. S.; Waters, L. S.; Prettyman, T. H.

    2002-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle, eXtended-energy radiation transport code MCNPX is rapidly becoming an international standard for a wide spectrum of high-energy radiation transport applications. One such application includes the study of gamma rays produced by cosmic-ray interactions within a planetary surface. Such studies can be used to determine surface elemental composition. This paper presents various MCNPX enhancements that make these gamma ray spectroscopy (GRS) simulations possible, gives elemental spectra results for a specific lunar material, provides a comparison between various high-energy physics models, and shows results of an elemental least squares analysis using Lunar Prospector measurements. The analysis documented here demonstrates the usefulness of MCNPX in planetary gamma ray spectroscopy. Furthermore, new MCNPX features developed over the course of this analysis will prove extremely useful for other applications as well. Comparisons of MCNPX results to lunar GRS measurements are better than expected and have lead to the identification of spectral features previously unknown. Through a library least squares analysis, these simulation spectra have resulted in detailed maps of lunar composition.

  2. Simulations of beam emittance growth from the collectiverelaxation of space-charge nonuniformities

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Grote, David P.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-05-01

    Beams injected into a linear focusing channel typically have some degree of space-charge nonuniformity. For unbunched beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in linear focusing channels, Debye screening of self-field interactions tends to make the transverse density profile flat. An injected particle distribution with a large systematic charge nonuniformity will generally be far from an equilibrium of the focusing channel and the initial condition will launch a broad spectrum of collective modes. These modes can phase-mix and experience nonlinear interactions which result in an effective relaxation to a more thermal-equilibrium-like distribution characterized by a uniform density profile. This relaxation transfers self-field energy from the initial space-charge nonuniformity to the local particle temperature, thereby increasing beam phase space area (emittance growth). Here they employ two-dimensional electrostatic particle in cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the effects of initial transverse space-charge nonuniformities on the equality of beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in a continuous focusing channel. Results are compared to theoretical bounds of emittance growth developed in previous studies. Consistent with earlier theory, it is found that a high degree of initial distribution nonuniformity can be tolerated with only modest emittance growth and that beam control can be maintained. The simulations also provide information on the rate of relaxation and characteristic levels of fluctuations in the relaxed states. This research suggests that a surprising degree of initial space-charge nonuniformity can be tolerated in practical intense beam experiments.

  3. Terrestrial applications from space technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarks, H.

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Technology Utilization Program, which is concerned with transferring aerospace technologies to the public and private sectors, is described. The strategy for transferring the NASA technologies to engineering projects includes: (1) identification of the problem, (2) selection of an appropriate aerospace technology, (3) development of a partnership with the company, (4) implementation of the project, and (5) commercialization of the product. Three examples revealing the application of aerospace technologies to projects in biomedical engineering, materials, and automation and robotics are presented; the development of a programmable, implantable medication system and a programmable, mask-based optical correlator, and the improvement of heat and erosion resistance in continuous casting are examined.

  4. Composite materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawal, Suraj P.; Misra, Mohan S.; Wendt, Robert G.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to: generate mechanical, thermal, and physical property test data for as-fabricated advanced materials; design and fabricate an accelerated thermal cycling chamber; and determine the effect of thermal cycling on thermomechanical properties and dimensional stability of composites. In the current program, extensive mechanical and thermophysical property tests of various organic matrix, metal matrix, glass matrix, and carbon-carbon composites were conducted, and a reliable database was constructed for spacecraft material selection. Material property results for the majority of the as-fabricated composites were consistent with the predicted values, providing a measure of consolidation integrity attained during fabrication. To determine the effect of thermal cycling on mechanical properties, microcracking, and thermal expansion behavior, approximately 500 composite specimens were exposed to 10,000 cycles between -150 and +150 F. These specimens were placed in a large (18 cu ft work space) thermal cycling chamber that was specially designed and fabricated to simulate one year low earth orbital (LEO) thermal cycling in 20 days. With this rate of thermal cycling, this is the largest thermal cycling unit in the country. Material property measurements of the thermal cycled organic matrix composite laminate specimens exhibited less than 24 percent decrease in strength, whereas, the remaining materials exhibited less than 8 percent decrease in strength. The thermal expansion response of each of the thermal cycled specimens revealed significant reduction in hysteresis and residual strain, and the average CTE values were close to the predicted values.

  5. Space-time delta-sigma modulation for reception of multiple simultaneous independent RF beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Guoguang; Black, Bruce A.; Siahmakoun, Azad Z.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we introduce and analyze a multiple-RF-beam beamformer in receive mode utilizing the principle of space-time delta-sigma modulation. This principle is based on sampling input signals in both time and space and converting the sampled signals into a digital format by delta-sigma conversion. Noise shaping is achieved in 2D frequency domain. We show that the modulator can receive signals of narrow and wide bandwidths with steering capability, can receive multiple beams, and establish tradeoffs between sampling in time and in space. The ability of the modulator to trade off between time and space provides an effective way to sample high frequency RF signals without down conversion. In addition, a space-time delta-sigma modulator has better performance than a solely temporal delta-sigma modulator (for the same filter order), as is typically used in communication systems to digitize the down-converted analog signals.

  6. Simulation of space charge compensation in a multibeamlet negative ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Maceina, T. J.; Cavenago, M.

    2016-02-15

    Ion beam space charge compensation occurs by cumulating in the beam potential well charges having opposite polarity, usually generated by collisional processes. In this paper we investigate the case of a H{sup −} ion beam drift, in a bi-dimensional approximation of the NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization phase 1) negative ion source. H{sup −} beam ion transport and plasma formation are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. Differential cross sections are sampled to determine the velocity distribution of secondary particles generated by ionization of the residual gas (electrons and slow H{sub 2}{sup +} ions) or by stripping of the beam ions (electrons, H, and H{sup +}). The simulations include three beamlets of a horizontal section, so that multibeamlet space charge and secondary particle diffusion between separate generation regions are considered, and include a repeller grid biased at various potentials. Results show that after the beam space charge is effectively screened by the secondary plasma in about 3 μs (in agreement with theoretical expectations), a plasma grows across the beamlets with a characteristic time three times longer, and a slight overcompensation of the electric potential is verified as expected in the case of negative ions.

  7. Optical apparatus for conversion of whispering-gallery modes into a free space gaussian like beam

    DOEpatents

    Stallard, Barry W.; Makowski, Michael A.; Byers, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    An optical converter for efficient conversion of millimeter wavelength whispering-gallery gyrotron output into a linearly polarized, free-space Gaussian-like beam. The converter uses a mode-converting taper and three mirror optics. The first mirror has an azimuthal tilt to eliminate the k.sub..phi. component of the propagation vector of the gyrotron output beam. The second mirror has a twist reflector to linearly polarize the beam. The third mirror has a constant phase surface so the converter output is in phase.

  8. Phase-space analysis of charged and optical beam transport: Wigner rotation angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, Amalia

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of using the phase space formalism to establish a correspondence between the dynamical behavior of squeezed states and optical or charged beams, propagating through linear systems, has received a great deal of attention during the last years. In this connection, it has been indicated how optical experiments may be conceived to measure the Wigner rotation angle. In this paper we address the topic within the context of the paraxial propagation of optical or charged beams and suggest a possible experiment for measuring the Wigner angle using an electron beam passing through quadrupoles and drift sections. The analogous optical system is also discussed.

  9. Effects on flat-beam generation from space-charge force and beamline errors

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E.; Kim, K.-J.; Piot, P.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The transformation of a round, angular-momentum-dominated electron beam produced in a photoinjector into a flat beam using a transformer composed of three skew-quadrupoles [1] has been developed theoretically [2, 3] and experimentally [4]. In this paper, we present numerical and analytical studies of space-charge forces, and evaluate the corresponding limits on the ratio of vertical-to-horizontal emittances. We also investigate the sensitivities of flat-beam emittances on the quadrupole misalignments in each of the six degrees of freedom.

  10. Adaptive free-space optical communications through turbulence using self-healing Bessel beams

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize obstruction- and turbulence-tolerant free-space orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing link by using self-healing Bessel beams accompanied by adaptive compensation techniques. Compensation of multiple 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) data carrying Bessel beams through emulated atmospheric turbulence and obstructions is demonstrated. The obtained experimental results indicate that the compensation scheme can effectively reduce the inter-channel crosstalk, improve the bit-error rate (BER) performance, and recuperate the nondiffracting property of Bessel beams. The proposed scheme might be used in future high-capacity OAM links which are affected by atmospheric turbulence and obstructions. PMID:28230076

  11. Adaptive free-space optical communications through turbulence using self-healing Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2017-02-01

    We present a scheme to realize obstruction- and turbulence-tolerant free-space orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing link by using self-healing Bessel beams accompanied by adaptive compensation techniques. Compensation of multiple 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) data carrying Bessel beams through emulated atmospheric turbulence and obstructions is demonstrated. The obtained experimental results indicate that the compensation scheme can effectively reduce the inter-channel crosstalk, improve the bit-error rate (BER) performance, and recuperate the nondiffracting property of Bessel beams. The proposed scheme might be used in future high-capacity OAM links which are affected by atmospheric turbulence and obstructions.

  12. Propagation of Gaussian Schell-model Array beams in free space and atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yonghua; Mei, Zhangrong; Gu, Juguan

    2016-12-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, the evolution behavior of the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence of the beam produced by a recently introduced novel class of Gaussian Schell-model Arrays (GSMA) source in free space and turbulence atmospheric are explored and comparatively analyzed. And the influence of the fractal constant of the atmospheric power spectrum and refractive-index structure constant on the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence of beams are analyzed. It is shown that the optical lattice profile is stable when beams propagate in free space, but the spectral density eventually is suppressed and transformed into a Gaussian profiles when it passes at sufficiently large distances through the turbulent atmosphere. The distributions of the spectral degree of coherence in far field eventually transformed into a shrink Gaussian profile relative to free space which means that the degree of spatial coherence turns worse.

  13. Ion Compensation for Space Charge in the Helical Electron Beams of Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. N.; Semenov, V. E.

    2016-06-01

    We solve analytically the problem about ion compensation for the space charge of a helical electron beam in a gyrotron operated in the long-pulse regime. Elementary processes, which take place during ionization of residual gas in the tube under typical pressures of 10-6-10-7 mm Hg, are considered. It is shown that distribution of the space charge is affected mainly by the electrons of the initial beam and slow-moving ions produced by ionization of the residual gas. Steady-state density of ions in the operating space of the gyrotron after the end of the transitional processes is found, as well as the electron density profile in the channel of electron beam transportation. The results obtained allow us to evaluate the pitch-factor variations caused by partial compensations for the potential "sagging" in the gyrotron cavity, thus being useful for analysis of starting currents, efficiency, and mode competition in high-power gyrotrons.

  14. COMPENSATION FOR BUNCH EMITTANCE IN A MAGNETIZATION AND SPACE CHARGE DOMINATED BEAM.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    In order to obtain sufficient cooling rates for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) electron cooling, a bunched beam with high bunch charge, high repetition frequency and high energy is required and it is necessary to use a ''magnetized'' beam, i.e., an electron beam with non-negligible angular momentum. Applying a longitudinal solenoid field on the cathode can generate such a beam, which rotates around its longitudinal axis in a field-free region. This paper suggests how a magnetized beam can be accelerated and transported from a RF photocathode electron gun to the cooling section without significantly increasing its emittance. The evolution of longitudinal slices of the beam under a combination of space charge and magnetization is investigated, using paraxial envelope equations and numerical simulations. We find that we must modify the traditional method of compensating for emittance as used for normal non-magnetized beam with space charge to account for magnetization. The results of computer simulations of successful compensation are presented. Alternately, we show an electron bunch density distribution for which all slices propagate uniformly and which does not require emittance compensation.

  15. Graphics Technology in Space Applications (GTSA 1989)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Sandy (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This document represents the proceedings of the Graphics Technology in Space Applications, which was held at NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center on April 12 to 14, 1989 in Houston, Texas. The papers included in these proceedings were published in general as received from the authors with minimum modifications and editing. Information contained in the individual papers is not to be construed as being officially endorsed by NASA.

  16. ALL NATURAL COMPOSITE SANDWICH BEAMS FOR STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS. (R829576)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of developing an all natural composite roof for housing application,
    structural panels and unit beams were manufactured out of soybean oil based resin
    and natural fibers (flax, cellulose, pulp, recycled paper, chicken feathers)
    using vacuum assisted resin tran...

  17. High efficiency solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding solar cell response to pulsed laser outputs is important for the evaluation of power beaming applications. The time response of high efficiency GaAs and silicon solar cells to a 25 nS monochromatic pulse input is described. The PC-1D computer code is used to analyze the cell current during and after the pulse for various conditions.

  18. Vision Requirements For Space Station Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouse, Kenneth R.

    1985-12-01

    Video data is used in a wide variety of computer vision tasks. Applications range from mail sorting to medical diagnostics to industrial inspection. For Space Station applications, however, video imagery has certain limitations. Outside a spacecraft the ambient illumination and viewing background can cause problems for a video system. Identifying a satellite at an unknown attitude and distance may be very difficult to do with 2D imagery. Consequently, investigators are looking at other sources of data to supplement or replace video data for vision tasks on the Space Station. Laser systems can provide range information, and laser scanners can provide reflectance and depth information in image format. Yet other approaches are being considered. This paper will discuss some of the advantages of the different approaches in the context of anticipated Space Station applications. The issues associated with the problem of integrating data from various sources to most effectively and efficiently accomplish a given vision task will also be addressed.

  19. Space shuttle thermal scale modeling application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, K. N.; Foster, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    The critical thermal control problems and verification of thermal mathematical model results for the space shuttle concept are discussed. The use of a small scale thermal model of the space shuttle is proposed. It was determined that a one-third scale model of the space shuttle would serve as a useful tool throughout the entire thermal design and verification program. The major considerations in modeling the conduction-radiation-convection fields, the level of detail for modeling various systems, preliminary test requirements, and potential applications of the thermal scale model are summarized.

  20. Experimental Characterization of the Transverse Phase Space of a 60-MeV Electron Beam Through a Compressor Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, F.; Kabel, A.; Rosenzweig, J.; Agustsson, R.; Andonian, G.; Cline, D.; Murokh, A.; Yakimenko, V.; /UCLA /SLAC /Brookhaven

    2007-02-12

    Space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation may deteriorate electron beam quality when the beam passes through a magnetic bunch compressor. This paper presents the transverse phase-space tomographic measurements for a compressed beam at 60 MeV, around which energy the first stage of magnetic bunch compression takes place in most advanced linacs. Transverse phase-space bifurcation of a compressed beam is observed at that energy, but the degree of the space charge-induced bifurcation is appreciably lower than the one observed at 12 MeV.

  1. Experimental measurement of the 4-d transverse phase space map of a heavy ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, H S

    1997-12-01

    The development and employment of a new diagnostic instrument for characterizing intense, heavy ion beams is reported on. This instrument, the ''Gated Beam Imager'' or ''GBI'' was designed for use on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Project's ''Small Recirculator'', an integrated, scaled physics experiment and engineering development project for studying the transport and control of intense heavy ion beams as inertial fusion drivers in the production of electric power. The GBI allows rapid measurement and calculation of a heavy ion beam's characteristics to include all the first and second moments of the transverse phase space distribution, transverse emittance, envelope parameters and beam centroid. The GBI, with appropriate gating produces a time history of the beam resulting in a 4-D phase-space and time ''map'' of the beam. A unique capability of the GBI over existing diagnostic instruments is its ability to measure the ''cross'' moments between the two transverse orthogonal directions. Non-zero ''cross'' moments in the alternating gradient lattice of the Small Recirculator are indicative of focusing element rotational misalignments contributing to beam emittance growth. This emittance growth, while having the same effect on the ability to focus a beam as emittance growth caused by non-linear effects, is in principle removable by an appropriate number of focusing elements. The instrument uses the pepperpot method of introducing a plate with many pinholes into the beam and observing the images of the resulting beamlets as they interact with a detector after an appropriate drift distance. In order to produce adequate optical signal and repeatability, the detector was chosen to be a microchannel plate (MCP) with a phosphor readout screen. The heavy ions in the pepperpot beamlets are stopped in the MCP's thin front metal anode and the resulting secondary electron signal is amplified and proximity-focused onto the phosphor while maintaining

  2. Terrestrial applications of NASA space telerobotics technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, Dave

    1994-01-01

    In 1985 the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) instituted a research program in telerobotics to develop and provide the technology for applications of telerobotics to the United States space program. The activities of the program are intended to most effectively utilize limited astronaut time by facilitating tasks such as inspection, assembly, repair, and servicing, as well as providing extended capability for remotely conducting planetary surface operations. As the program matured, it also developed a strong heritage of working with government and industry to directly transfer the developed technology into industrial applications.

  3. Terahertz (THz) Wireless Systems for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; deSilva, Kanishka B.; Jih, Cindy T.

    2013-01-01

    NASA has been leading the Terahertz (THz) technology development for the sensors and instruments in astronomy in the past 20 years. THz technologies are expanding into much broader applications in recent years. Due to the vast available multiple gigahertz (GHz) broad bandwidths, THz radios offer the possibility for wireless transmission of high data rates. Multi-Gigabits per second (MGbps) broadband wireless access based on THz waves are closer to reality. The THz signal high atmosphere attenuation could significantly decrease the communication ranges and transmittable data rates for the ground systems. Contrary to the THz applications on the ground, the space applications in the atmosphere free environment do not suffer the atmosphere attenuation. The manufacturing technologies for the THz electronic components are advancing and maturing. There is great potential for the NASA future high data wireless applications in environments with difficult cabling and size/weight constraints. In this study, the THz wireless systems for potential space applications were investigated. The applicability of THz systems for space applications was analyzed. The link analysis indicates that MGbps data rates are achievable with compact sized high gain antennas.

  4. ELIMED, future hadrontherapy applications of laser-accelerated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Carpinelli, Massimo; Cuttone, Giacomo; Gammino, Santo; Bijan Jia, S.; Korn, Georg; Maggiore, Mario; Manti, Lorenzo; Margarone, Daniele; Prokupek, Jan; Renis, Marcella; Romano, Francesco; Schillaci, Francesco; Tomasello, Barbara; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Tramontana, Antonella; Velyhan, Andriy

    2013-12-01

    Laser-ion acceleration has recently gained a great interest as an alternative to conventional and more expensive acceleration techniques. These ion beams have desirable qualities such as small source size, high luminosity and small emittance to be used in different fields as Nuclear Physics, Medical Physics, etc. This is very promising specially for the future perspective of a new concept of hadrontherapy based on laser-based devices could be developed, replacing traditional accelerating machines. Before delivering laser-driven beams for treatments they have to be handled, cleaned from unwanted particles and characterized in order to have the clinical requirements. In fact ion energy spectra have exponential trend, almost 100% energy spread and a wide angular divergence which is the biggest issue in the beam transport and, hence, in a wider use of this technology. In order to demonstrate the clinical applicability of laser-driven beams new collaboration between ELI-Beamlines project researchers from Prague (Cz) and a INFN-LNS group from Catania (I) has been already launched and scientists from different countries have already express their will in joining the project. This cooperation has been named ELIMED (MEDical application at ELIBeamlines) and will take place inside the ELI-Beamlines infrastructure located in Prague. This work describes the schedule of the ELIMED project and the design of the energy selector which will be realized at INFN-LNS. The device is an important part of the whole transport beam line which will be realised in order to make the ion beams suitable for medical applications.

  5. Space data routers: Space networking for enhancing data exploitation for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I.; Anastasiadis, A.; Balasis, G.; Paronis, D.; Diamantopoulos, S.

    2013-09-01

    Data sharing and access are major issues in space sciences, as they influence the degree of data exploitation. The project “Space-Data Routers” relies on space internetworking and in particular on Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN), which marks the new era in space communications, unifies space and earth communication infrastructures and delivers a set of tools and protocols for space-data exploitation. The main goal is to allow space agencies, academic institutes and research centers to share space-data generated by single or multiple missions, in an efficient, secure and automated manner. Here we are presenting the architecture and basic functionality of a DTN-based application specifically designed in the framework of the SDR project, for data query, retrieval and administration that will enable to address outstanding science questions related to space weather, by providing simultaneous real- time sampling of space plasmas from multiple points with cost-effective means and measuring of phenomena with higher resolution and better coverage. This work has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2010-1, SP1 Cooperation, Collaborative project) under grant agreement No 263330 (project title: Space-Data Routers for Exploiting Space Data). This presentation reflects only the authors’ views and the Union is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

  6. Space Solar Power Technology Demonstration for Lunar Polar Applications: Laser-Photovoltaic Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, M. W.; Fikes, J. C.; Howell, J.; Mankins, J. C.; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Space Solar Power technology offers unique benefits for near-term NASA space science missions, which can mature this technology for other future applications. "Laser-Photo-Voltaic Wireless Power Transmission" (Laser-PV WPT) is a technology that uses a laser to beam power to a photovoltaic receiver, which converts the laser's light into electricity. Future Laser-PV WPT systems may beam power from Earth to satellites or large Space Solar Power satellites may beam power to Earth, perhaps supplementing terrestrial solar photo-voltaic receivers. In a near-term scientific mission to the moon, Laser-PV WPT can enable robotic operations in permanently shadowed lunar polar craters, which may contain ice. Ground-based technology demonstrations are proceeding, to mature the technology for this initial application, in the moon's polar regions.

  7. Potential of vortex beams with orbital angular momentum modulation for deep-space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaorui; Liu, Yejun; Guo, Lei; Li, Hui

    2014-05-01

    In order to achieve multigigabit transmission in deep-space optical communication, our study applies a new modulation mode named orbital angular momentum (OAM) modulation, and uses the encoded OAM states of single photon as data information carriers, thus providing a reliable and high-speed transmission of signals. According to the long link characteristic of deep-space communication, we conduct a reasonable deployment for communication nodes in deep-space environment. First, we present the reliability of deep-space channel and analyze the data rate and spectral efficiency of beams with OAM. Second, we study the characteristics and generations of vortex beams with OAM by simulation. Results show that vortex beams have better spatial multiplexing capability of realizing high capacity data transmission. Finally, we propose an encoding method with OAM states of single photon. The transceiver units are based on spatial light modulators to perform the modulation and demodulation of vortex beams. At the receiver, the charged-coupled device camera is used to detect the signal intensity and decodes the OAM states. Our proposal not only ensures the confidentiality of deep-space optical communication, but also greatly increases the transmission rate.

  8. Aerogel Insulation Systems for Space Launch Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2005-01-01

    New developments in materials science in the areas of solution gelation processes and nanotechnology have led to the recent commercial production of aerogels. Concurrent with these advancements has been the development of new approaches to cryogenic thermal insulation systems. For example, thermal and physical characterizations of aerogel beads under cryogenic-vacuum conditions have been performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Aerogel-based insulation system demonstrations have also been conducted to improve performance for space launch applications. Subscale cryopumping experiments show the thermal insulating ability of these fully breathable nanoporous materials. For a properly executed thermal insulation system, these breathable aerogel systems are shown to not cryopump beyond the initial cooldown and thermal stabilization phase. New applications are being developed to augment the thermal protection systems of space launch vehicles, including the Space Shuttle External Tank. These applications include a cold-boundary temperature of 90 K with an ambient air environment in which both weather and flight aerodynamics are important considerations. Another application is a nitrogen-purged environment with a cold-boundary temperature of 20 K where both initial cooldown and launch ascent profiles must be considered. Experimental results and considerations for these flight system applications are discussed.

  9. Aerogel insulation systems for space launch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.

    2006-02-01

    New developments in materials science in the areas of solution gelation processes and nanotechnology have led to the recent commercial production of aerogels. Concurrent with these advancements has been the development of new approaches to cryogenic thermal insulation systems. For example, thermal and physical characterizations of aerogel beads under cryogenic-vacuum conditions have been performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Aerogel-based insulation system demonstrations have also been conducted to improve performance for space launch applications. Subscale cryopumping experiments show the thermal insulating ability of these fully breathable nanoporous materials. For a properly executed thermal insulation system, these breathable aerogel systems are shown to not cryopump beyond the initial cooldown and thermal stabilization phase. New applications are being developed to augment the thermal protection systems of space launch vehicles, including the Space Shuttle External Tank. These applications include a cold-boundary temperature of 90 K with an ambient air environment in which both weather and flight aerodynamics are important considerations. Another application is a nitrogen-purged environment with a cold-boundary temperature of 20 K where both initial cooldown and launch ascent profiles must be considered. Experimental results and considerations for these flight system applications are discussed.

  10. Space Applications of Industrial Laser Systems (SAILS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert E.; McCay, T. Dwayne; McCay, Mary Helen; Bible, Brice

    1995-01-01

    A program is under way to develop a YAG laser based materials processing workstation to fly in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The system will be capable of cutting and welding steel, aluminum, and Inconel alloys of the type planned for use on Space Station Freedom. As well as demonstrating the ability of a YAG laser to perform remote (fiber-optic delivered) repair and fabrication operations in space, fundamental data will be collected on these interactions for comparison with terrestrial data and models. The flight system, scheduled to fly in 1995, will be constructed as two modules to fit into the standard Get Away Special (GAS) canisters. The first can holds the laser and its power supply, to be constructed by our industrial partner, Lumonics Industrial Processing Division. The second canister has the materials processing workstation and the command and data acquisition subsystems. These components will be provided by groups at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the University of Waterloo. The cans are linked by a fiber-optic cable which transmits the beam from the laser head to the workstation.

  11. Beam hardening and partial beam hardening of the bowtie filter: Effects on dosimetric applications in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Rendon, X.; Zhang, G.; Bosmans, H.; Oyen, R.; Zanca, F.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate the consequences on dosimetric applications when a CT bowtie filter is modeled by means of full beam hardening versus partial beam hardening. Method: A model of source and filtration for a CT scanner as developed by Turner et. al. [1] was implemented. Specific exposures were measured with the stationary CT X-ray tube in order to assess the equivalent thickness of Al of the bowtie filter as a function of the fan angle. Using these thicknesses, the primary beam attenuation factors were calculated from the energy dependent photon mass attenuation coefficients and used to include beam hardening in the spectrum. This was compared to a potentially less computationally intensive approach, which accounts only partially for beam hardening, by giving the photon spectrum a global (energy independent) fan angle specific weighting factor. Percentage differences between the two methods were quantified by calculating the dose in air after passing several water equivalent thicknesses representative for patients having different BMI. Specifically, the maximum water equivalent thickness of the lateral and anterior-posterior dimension and of the corresponding (half) effective diameter were assessed. Results: The largest percentage differences were found for the thickest part of the bowtie filter and they increased with patient size. For a normal size patient they ranged from 5.5% at half effective diameter to 16.1% for the lateral dimension; for the most obese patient they ranged from 7.7% to 19.3%, respectively. For a complete simulation of one rotation of the x-ray tube, the proposed method was 12% faster than the complete simulation of the bowtie filter. Conclusion: The need for simulating the beam hardening of the bow tie filter in Monte Carlo platforms for CT dosimetry will depend on the required accuracy.

  12. Advanced Space Propulsion Study - Antiproton and Beamed Power Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    a new concept for a very high performance laser-puwhed lightsail that uses near-teri high power laser systems to boost very light payloads to terminal...charged pions have a normal half-life of 26 ns. Because they are moving at 94% of the speed of light , however, their lives are lengthened to 70 ns...Given adequate supplies stashed along the way, a light -weight spacesuit, and enough time, Jack would be able to climb into space instead of having to use

  13. Inertial fusion power for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.R.; Hogan, W.J.; Hoffman, N.J.; Murray, K.A.; Olson, R.E.

    1986-05-19

    More than thirty-seven design concepts have been proposed for terrestrial ICF power plants. The design space is large because of the many allowable driver and reaction chamber combinations. These design studies have illustrated advantages of ICF power plants over other sources in lower impact on the environment, high safety, and almost no dependence on consumables like fuel. The fact that, once built, a 1000 MW/sub e/ ICF power plant would require only 240 kg of deuterium and from 770 to 9260 kg of lithium to run for five years (at 70% capacity factor) makes it potentially attractive for space power also. However, the designs proposed to date have emphasized features that would make the plant attractive for terrestrial applications, where economics, efficiency, and environmental considerations dominate. The resulting plants are large and contain many very heavy components that would not be at attractive for space applications. In this paper, we evaluate alternative ICF driver and reactor technologies using space application criteria and also discuss how some of those technologies can be altered to produce smaller, lighter fusion power sources for space.

  14. Propagation of a Pearcey-Gaussian-vortex beam in free space and Kerr media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yulian; Chen, Chidao; Chen, Bo; Peng, Xi; Zhou, Meiling; Zhang, Liping; Li, Dongdong; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-12-01

    The propagation of a Pearcey-Gaussian-vortex beam (PGVB) has been investigated numerically in free space and Kerr media. In addition, we have done a numerical experiment for the beam in free space. A PGVB maintains the characteristics of auto-focusing, self-healing and form-invariance which are possessed by a Pearcey beam and a Pearcey-Gaussian beam. Due to the influence of the optical vortex, a bright speck occurs in front of the main lobe. Compared with a Pearcey beam and a Pearcey-Gaussian beam, a PGVB has the most remarkable intensity singularity and the phase singularity. It is worth noting that the impact of the vortex at the coordinate origins means that a PGVB in the vicinity carries no angular momentum or transverse energy flow. We have investigated and numerically simulated the transverse intensity of a PGVB in Kerr media. We find that the auto-focusing of a PGVB in a Kerr medium becomes stronger with increasing power.

  15. Development of Laser Beam Transmission Strategies for Future Ground-to-Space Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith E.; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Biswas, Abhijit; Roberts, William T.

    2007-01-01

    Optical communications is a key technology to meet the bandwidth expansion required in the global information grid. High bandwidth bi-directional links between sub-orbital platforms and ground and space terminals can provide a seamless interconnectivity for rapid return of critical data to analysts. The JPL Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) is located in Wrightwood California at an altitude of 2.2.km. This 200 sq-m facility houses a state-of- the-art 1-m telescope and is used to develop operational strategies for ground-to-space laser beam propagation that include safe beam transmission through navigable air space, adaptive optics correction and multi-beam scintillation mitigation, and line of sight optical attenuation monitoring. JPL has received authorization from international satellite owners to transmit laser beams to more than twenty retro-reflecting satellites. This paper presents recent progress in the development of these operational strategies tested by narrow laser beam transmissions from the OCTL to retro-reflecting satellites. We present experimental results and compare our measurements with predicted performance for a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  16. Microwave integrated circuits for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Regis F.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), which incorporate all the elements of a microwave circuit on a single semiconductor substrate, offer the potential for drastic reductions in circuit weight and volume and increased reliability, all of which make many new concepts in electronic circuitry for space applications feasible, including phased array antennas. NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of MMICs for space applications. The first such circuits targeted for development were an extension of work in hybrid (discrete component) technology in support of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). It focused on power amplifiers, receivers, and switches at ACTS frequencies. More recent work, however, focused on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and emphasizes advanced materials in an effort to enhance efficiency, power handling capability, and frequency of operation or noise figure to meet the requirements of space systems.

  17. Intra-beam scattering and its application to ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.

    2011-10-16

    Treatment of Coulomb collisions within the beam requires consideration of both large and small angle scattering. Such collisions lead to the Touschek effect and Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). The Touschek effect refers to particle loss as a result of a single collision, where only transfer from the transverse direction into longitudinal plays a role. It is important to consider this effect for ERL design to have an appropriate choice of collimation system. The IBS is a diffusion process which leads to changes of beam distribution but does not necessarily result in a beam loss. Evaluation of IBS in ERLs, where beam distribution is non-Gaussian, requires special treatment. Here we describe the IBS and Touschek effects with application to ERLs. In circular accelerators both the Touschek effect and IBS were found important. The generalized formulas for Touschek calculations are available and are already being used in advanced tracking simulations of several ERL-based projects. The IBS (which is diffusion due to multiple Coulomb scattering) is not expected to cause any significant effect on beam distribution in ERLs, unless one considers very long transport of high-brightness beams at low energies. Both large and small-angle Coulomb scattering can contribute to halo formation in future ERLs with high-brightness beams, as follows from simple order-of-magnitude estimates. In this report, a test comparison between 'local' and 'sliced' IBS models within the BET ACOOL code was presented for an illustrative ERL distribution. We also presented accumulated current loss distribution due to Touschek scattering for design parameters of ERL proposed for the eRHIC project, as well as scaling for multi-pass ERLs.

  18. Software Component Technologies and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batory, Don

    1995-01-01

    In the near future, software systems will be more reconfigurable than hardware. This will be possible through the advent of software component technologies which have been prototyped in universities and research labs. In this paper, we outline the foundations for those technologies and suggest how they might impact software for space applications.

  19. Trapping antimatter for space propulsion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, W.A.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Lewis, R.A.; Rochet, J.; Schwartz, W.L.; Smith, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    Production and trapping of antiprotons for space propulsion applications are reviewed. Present and foreseeable production rates at Fermilab are discussed, and experiments on trapping, confinement and transport of large quantities of antiprotons are outlined. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. UWB Technology and Applications on Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Phong; Phan, Chau; Gross, Julia; Dusl, John; Ni, Jianjun; Rafford, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    Ultra-wideband (UWB), also known as impulse or carrier-free radio technology, is one promising new technology. In February 2002, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approved the deployment of this technology. It is increasingly recognized that UWB technology holds great potential to provide significant benefits in many terrestrial and space applications such as precise positioning/tracking and high data rate mobile wireless communications. This talk presents an introduction to UWB technology and some applications on space exploration. UWB is characterized by several uniquely attractive features, such as low impact on other RF systems due to its extremely low power spectral densities, immunity to interference from narrow band RF systems due to its ultra-wide bandwidth, multipath immunity to fading due to ample multipath diversity, capable of precise positioning due to fine time resolution, capable of high data rate multi-channel performance. The related FCC regulations, IEEE standardization efforts and industry activities also will be addressed in this talk. For space applications, some projects currently under development at NASA Johnson Space Center will be introduced. These include the UWB integrated communication and tracking system for Lunar/Mars rover and astronauts, UWB-RFID ISS inventory tracking, and UWB-TDOA close-in high resolution tracking for potential applications on robonaut.

  1. E-beam GIDC resolution enhancement technology in practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, S.; Butschke, J.; Galler, R.; Krüger, M.; Sailer, H.; Sülzle, M.

    2013-09-01

    For nearly all relevant applications of e-beam lithography the resolution and pattern quality requirements are approaching or exceeding the limits of the available process. On one hand, for shrinking feature dimensions, the e-beam proximity effect and process effects such as photo acid diffusion limit the pattern contrast and process window. On the other hand, e-beam process related parasitic effects such as shot noise, fogging, developer loading, heating, charging, and inhomogeneous bake introduce some significant errors. Even though e-beam tool and process tool suppliers continue to implement new or improve current strategies to avoid or correct these effects, the amount of residual errors requires some reasonable e-beam process window, in particular for high end applications. For some patterns the undersize-overdose approach (SIZE) improves the pattern fidelity and process window. However, for patterns with high fill factors this approach increases the overall deposited electron dose, which due to the increased backscattering diminishes or even eliminates the advantages. The geometrically induced dose correction (GIDC) method overcomes this issue by combining the SIZE concept with a short range framing technique, which reduces the deposited dose in large filled pattern areas. This paper provides a comparison of the standard, SIZE, and GIDC correction approaches for 1D test patterns as well as production patterns. For a broad comparison, patterns were printed onto negative and positive chemically amplified resists and on wafer and mask substrates using a Vistec SB352HR variable shape e-beam writer. Both wafers were also etched. The outcome of the study is that the SIZE and GIDC approaches often outperform the standard proximity effect correction. For dense patterns, GIDC still provides a better pattern quality and process window, while the SIZE approach suffers from the increased overall deposited electron dose and clearly falls behind GIDC in terms of process

  2. Sensor Applications at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.; Eckhoff, Anthony J.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Transducers used at KSC (Kennedy Space Center), in support of processing and launch of flight vehicles and payloads, are designed and tested to meet specific program requirements. Any equipment, transducer or support instrumentation in direct contact or in support to flight vehicle operations is considered ground support equipment (GSE) and required to meet strict program requirements (i.e. Space Shuttle Program, Space Station Program, Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles, etc.) Transducers used in KSC applications are based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) transducers and sensors. In order to fully meet KSC requirements, these transducers evolve from standard COTS to modified COTS. The Transducer and Data Acquisition Group of the Instrumentation Branch at Kennedy Space Center is responsible for providing the technical expertise as well as qualification-testing capability to transform these COTS transducers in modified COTS suitable for use around flight hardware.

  3. Long-lived laboratory plasmas sustained by a free-space microwave beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Remington

    2015-11-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory is developing a laboratory experiment to study the free-space interaction of microwave beams with low temperature, low density plasmas. A 10 kW, 4.5 GHz beam is passed through a vacuum chamber outfitted with pressure windows that are transparent to 4.5 Ghz radiation. The pressure windows are approximately 1m in diameter, allowing for minimal interaction between the beam and the chamber. The entire experiment is housed inside an anechoic chamber to minimize reflections. Plasmas generated by the beam have been observed to be stable for more than 10s. A series of optical and microwave diagnostics are being developed to measure the plasma properties, and to quantify the interaction of the plasma and the background neutral gas.

  4. Direct measurements of plasma characteristics in space-simulation beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1982-01-01

    Recent laboratory investigations of space-simulated electron-beam-plasma interactions are discussed. The plasma has been characterized with respect to its spatial distributions in density, temperature, and density fluctuation power spectra. The latter results have been further classified in terms of amplitude and spectral distributions. The overall results include: (1) detailed radial profiles of plasma density as a function of beam parameters; (2) the association of low-frequency large amplitude fluctuations with ion acoustic, ion cyclotron, and drift-wave modes; (3) the identification and spatial mapping of suprathermal electrons in the beam core; and (4) the experimental definition of a density-dependent criterion for the ignition of the beam-plasma-discharge.

  5. A linear accelerator in the space: The beam experiment aboard rocket

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P.G.; Butler, T.A.; Lynch, M.T.; McKenna, K.F.; Pongratz, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    On July 13, 1989 the BEAM experiment Aboard Rocket (BEAR) linear accelerator was successfully launched and operated in space. The flight demonstrated that a neutral hydrogen beam could be successfully propagated in an exoatmospheric environment. The accelerator, which was the result of an extensive collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and industrial partners, was designed to produce a 10 mA (equivalent), 1 MeV neutral hydrogen beam in 50 {mu}s pulses at 5 Hz. The major components were a 30 keV H{sup {minus}} injector a 1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, two 425 Mhz RF amplifiers, a gas cell neutralizer, beam optics, vacuum system and controls. The design was strongly constrained by the need for a lightweight rugged system that would survive the rigors of launch and operate autonomously. Following the flight the accelerator was recovered and operated again on the laboratory. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Fracture Probability of MEMS Optical Devices for Space Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fettig, Rainer K.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Orloff, Jon

    1999-01-01

    A bending fracture test specimen design is presented for thin elements used in optical devices for space flight applications. The specimen design is insensitive to load position, avoids end effect complications, and can be used to measure strength of membranes less than 2 microns thick. The theoretical equations predicting stress at failure are presented, and a detailed finite element model is developed to validate the equations for this application. An experimental procedure using a focused ion beam machine is outlined, and results from preliminary tests of 1.9 microns thick single crystal silicon are presented. These tests are placed in the context of a methodology for the design and evaluation of mission critical devices comprised of large arrays of cells.

  7. Space Solar Power Technology Demonstration for Lunar Polar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, M. W.; Fikes, J. C.; Howell, J.; Mankins, J. C.; Howell, J.

    2002-01-01

    A solar power generation station on a mountaintop near the moon's North or South pole can receive sunlight 708 hours per lunar day, for continuous power generation. Power can be beamed from this station over long distances using a laser-based wireless power transmission system and a photo-voltaic receiver. This beamed energy can provide warmth, electricity, and illumination for a robotic rover to perform scientific experiments in cold, dark craters where no other power source is practical. Radio-frequency power transmission may also be demonstrated in lunar polar applications to locate and recover sub-surface deposits of volatile material, such as water ice. High circular polarization ratios observed in data from Clementine spacecraft and Arecibo radar reflections from the moon's South pole suggest that water ice is indeed present in certain lunar polar craters. Data from the Lunar Prospector spacecraft's epi-thermal neutron spectrometer also indicate that hydrogen is present at the moon's poles. Space Solar Power technology enables investigation of these craters, which may contain a billion-year-old stratigraphic record of tremendous scientific value. Layers of ice, preserved at the moon's poles, could help us determine the sequence and composition of comet impacts on the moon. Such ice deposits may even include distinct strata deposited by secondary ejecta following significant Earth (ocean) impacts, linked to major extinctions of life on Earth. Ice resources at the moon's poles could provide water and air for human exploration and development of space as well as rocket propellant for future space transportation. Technologies demonstrated and matured via lunar polar applications can also be used in other NASA science missions (Valles Marineris. Phobos, Deimos, Mercury's poles, asteroids, etc.) and in future large-scale SSP systems to beam energy from space to Earth. Ground-based technology demonstrations are proceeding to mature the technology for such a near

  8. Method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam

    DOEpatents

    Hannon, Fay

    2016-08-02

    A method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam. The method includes 1) determining the bunch charge and the initial kinetic energy of the highly space-charge dominated input beam; 2) applying the bunch charge and initial kinetic energy properties of the highly space-charge dominated input beam to determine the number of accelerator cavities required to accelerate the bunches to relativistic speed; 3) providing the required number of accelerator cavities; and 4) setting the gradient of the radio frequency (RF) cavities; and 5) operating the phase of the accelerator cavities between -90 and zero degrees of the sinusoid of phase to simultaneously accelerate and bunch the charged particles to maximize brightness, and until the beam is relativistic and emittance-dominated.

  9. Optical apparatus for conversion of whispering-gallery modes into a free space gaussian like beam

    DOEpatents

    Stallard, B.W.; Makowski, M.A.; Byers, J.A.

    1992-05-19

    An optical converter for efficient conversion of millimeter wavelength whispering-gallery gyrotron output into a linearly polarized, free-space Gaussian-like beam is described. The converter uses a mode-converting taper and three mirror optics. The first mirror has an azimuthal tilt to eliminate the k[sub [phi

  10. Space-time adaptive processing with sum and multiple difference beams for airborne radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, John E.; Zhang, Yuhong; Wang, Hong

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes some new results on a signal processing approach for airborne surveillance radars. This is a space- time adaptive processing technique that simultaneously processes temporal data from sum and difference ((Sigma) (Delta) ) beams to suppress clutter returns. The approach also includes employing spatial adaptive pre- suppression to suppress wideband noise jammers in a two- stage processor.

  11. Figure of merit studies of beam power concepts for advanced space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Gabriel; Kadiramangalam, Murali N.

    1990-01-01

    Surface to surface, millimeter wavelength beam power systems for power transmission on the lunar base were investigated. Qualitative/quantitative analyses and technology assessment of 35, 110 and 140 GHz beam power systems were conducted. System characteristics including mass, stowage volume, cost and efficiency as a function of range and power level were calculated. A simple figure of merit analysis indicates that the 35 GHz system would be the preferred choice for lunar base applications, followed closely by the 110 GHz system. System parameters of a 35 GHz beam power system appropriate for power transmission on a recent lunar base concept studied by NASA-Johnson and the necessary deployment sequence are suggested.

  12. Technology Applications that Support Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Edward M.; Holderman, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Several enabling technologies have been identified that would provide significant benefits for future space exploration. In-Space demonstrations should be chosen so that these technologies will have a timely opportunity to improve efficiencies and reduce risks for future spaceflight. An early window exists to conduct ground and flight demonstrations that make use of existing assets that were developed for the Space Shuttle and the Constellation programs. The work could be mostly performed using residual program civil servants, existing facilities and current commercial launch capabilities. Partnering these abilities with the emerging commercial sector, along with other government agencies, academia and with international partners would provide an affordable and timely approach to get the launch costs down for these payloads, while increasing the derived benefits to a larger community. There is a wide scope of varied technologies that are being considered to help future space exploration. However, the cost and schedule would be prohibitive to demonstrate all these in the near term. Determining which technologies would yield the best return in meeting our future space needs is critical to building an achievable Space Architecture that allows exploration beyond Low Earth Orbit. The best mix of technologies is clearly to be based on our future needs, but also must take into account the availability of existing assets and supporting partners. Selecting those technologies that have complimentary applications will provide the most knowledge, with reasonable cost, for future use The plan is to develop those applications that not only mature the technology but actually perform a useful task or mission. These might include such functions as satellite servicing, a propulsion stage, processing lunar regolith, generating and transmitting solar power, cryogenic fluid transfer and storage and artificial gravity. Applications have been selected for assessment for future

  13. Brilliant gamma beams for industrial applications: new opportunities, new challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancu, V.; Suliman, G.; Turturica, G. V.; Iovea, M.; Daito, I.; Ohgaki, H.; Matei, C.; Ur, C. A.; Balabanski, D. L.

    2016-10-01

    The Nuclear Physics oriented pillar of the pan-European Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI-NP) will host an ultra-bright, energy tunable, and quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beam system in the range of 0.2-19.5 MeV produced by laser-Compton backscattering technique. The applied research program envisioned at ELI-NP targets to use nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) and computed tomography to provide new opportunities for industry and society. High sensitivity NRF-based investigations can be successfully applied to safeguard applications and management of radioactive wastes as well as to uncharted fields like cultural heritage and medical imaging. Gamma-ray radioscopy and computed tomography performed at ELI-NP has the potential to achieve high resolution in industrial-sized objects provided the detection challenges introduced by the unique characteristics of the gamma beam are overcome. Here we discuss the foreseen industrial applications that will benefit from the high quality and unique characteristics of ELI-NP gamma beam and the challenges they present. We present the experimental setups proposed to be implemented for this goal, discuss their performance based on analytical calculations and numerical Monte-Carlo simulations, and comment about constrains imposed by the limitation of current scintillator detectors. Several gamma-beam monitoring devices based on scintillator detectors will also be discussed.

  14. Far field beam pattern of one MW combined beam of laser diode array amplifiers for space power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Jin H.; Lee, Ja H.

    1989-01-01

    The far-field beam pattern and the power-collection efficiency are calculated for a multistage laser-diode-array amplifier consisting of about 200,000 5-W laser diode arrays with random distributions of phase and orientation errors and random diode failures. From the numerical calculation it is found that the far-field beam pattern is little affected by random failures of up to 20 percent of the laser diodes with reference of 80 percent receiving efficiency in the center spot. The random differences in phases among laser diodes due to probable manufacturing errors is allowed to about 0.2 times the wavelength. The maximum allowable orientation error is about 20 percent of the diffraction angle of a single laser diode aperture (about 1 cm). The preliminary results indicate that the amplifier could be used for space beam-power transmission with an efficiency of about 80 percent for a moderate-size (3-m-diameter) receiver placed at a distance of less than 50,000 km.

  15. Space Applications of Industrial Laser Systems (SAILS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert E.; McCay, T. Dwayne; McCay, Mary Helen; Bible, Brice

    1992-01-01

    A program is under way to develop a YAG laser based materials processing workstation to fly in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The system will be capable of cutting and welding steel, aluminum and Inconel alloys of the type planned for use on the Space Station Freedom. As well as demonstrating the ability of a YAG laser to perform remote (fiber-optic delivered) repair and fabrication operations in space, fundamental data will be collected on these interactions for comparison with terrestrial data and models. The flight system, scheduled to fly in 1995, will be constructed as two modules to fit into standard Get Away Special (GAS) canisters. The first can holds the laser and its power supply, to be constructed by our industrial partner, Lumonics Industrial Processing Division. The second canister has the materials processing workstation and the command and data acquisition subsystems. These components will be provided by groups at UTSI and the University of Waterloo. The cans are linked by a fiber-optic cable which transmits the beam from the laser head to the workstation.

  16. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The safety issue has been raised with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal could detach and come in contact with astronauts and burn through the fabric of the astronauts' Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding in space. Molten metal detachments from either the weld/cut substrate or weld wire could present harm to a astronaut if the detachment was to burn through the fabric of the EMU. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The primary molten metal detachment concerns were those cases of molten metal separation from the metal surface due to metal cutting, weld pool splashing, entrainment and release of molten metal due to filler wire snap-out from the weld puddle, and molten metal accumulation and release from the end of the weld wire. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were developed for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. The surface tension represents the force opposing the liquid metal drop from detaching whereas the weight of the liquid metal droplet represents a force that is tending to detach the molten metal drop. Theoretical calculations have indicated that only a small amount of energy is required to detach a liquid metal drop; however, much of the energy of an impact is absorbed in the sample or weld plate before it reaches the metal drop on the cut edge or surface. The tendency for detachment is directly proportional to the weld pool radius and metal density and inversely proportional to the surface

  17. Practical Applications of a Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The potential uses of a special station for civil and commercial applications is examined. Five panels of experts representing user-oriented communities, and a sixth panel which dealth with system design considerations, based their studies on the assumption that the station would be a large platform, capable of housing a wide array of diverse instruments, and could be either manned or unmanned. The Earth's Resources Panel dealt with applications of remote sensing for resource assessment. The Earth's Environment Panel dealt with the Earth's atmosphere and its impact on society. The Ocean Operations Panel looked at both science and applications. The Satellite Communications Panel assessed the potential role of a space station in the evolution of commercial telecommunication services up to the year 2000. The Materials Science and Engineering panel focused on the utility of a space station environment for materials processing.

  18. Optimal guidance for future space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradt, J. E.; Jessick, M. V.; Hardtla, J. W.

    Use of a powerful flight performance analysis technique is explored for application as a guidance algorithm for future space applications. The technique uses Hermite interpolation and collocation to implicitly integrate the equations of motion. This technique readily accepts flight path constraints such as structural loading or heating. It is an optimal, adaptive algorithm that adjusts to changing flight conditions and also has the necessary structure for performing on-board mission targeting. The capability of the algorithm is demonstrated for three potential applications: (1) a hypersonic gliding reentry to achieve maximum cross range while constraining the vehicle maximum temperature; (2) a low L/D reentry vehicle targeted to earth relative coordinates; and (3) an aerocapture of a Mars space probe targeting a minimum Delta V insertion into an elliptic orbit about the planet.

  19. Emerging, Photonic Based Technologies for NASA Space Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Lee, Richard; Levi, Anthony; Bos, Philip; Titus, Charles; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An objective of NASA's Computing, Information, and Communications Technology program is to support the development of technologies that could potentially lower the cost of the Earth science and space exploration missions, and result in greater scientific returns. NASA-supported photonic activities which will impact space communications will be described. The objective of the RF microphotonic research is to develop a Ka-band receiver that will enable the microwaves detected by an antenna to modulate a 1.55- micron optical carrier. A key element is the high-Q, microphotonic modulator that employs a lithium niobate microdisk. The technical approach could lead to new receivers that utilize ultra-fast, photonic signal processing techniques, and are low cost, compact, low weight and power efficient. The progress in the liquid crystal (LC) beam steering research will also be reported. The predicted benefits of an LC-based device on board a spacecraft include non-mechanical, submicroradian laser-beam pointing, milliradian scanning ranges, and wave-front correction. The potential applications of these emerging technologies to the various NASA missions will be presented.

  20. Automation of Space Processing Applications Shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosmer, W. E.; Neau, O. T.; Poe, J.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Processing Applications Program is examining the effect of weightlessness on key industrial materials processes, such as crystal growth, fine-grain casting of metals, and production of unique and ultra-pure glasses. Because of safety and in order to obtain optimum performance, some of these processes lend themselves to automation. Automation can increase the number of potential Space Shuttle flight opportunities and increase the overall productivity of the program. Five automated facility design concepts and overall payload combinations incorporating these facilities are presented.

  1. Practical Applications of Space Systems, Supporting Paper 9: Materials Processing in Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report summarizes the findings of one of fourteen panels that studied progress in space science applications and defined user needs potentially capable of being met by space-system applications. The study was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and was conducted by the Space Applications Board. The panels comprised…

  2. Practical Applications of Space Systems, Supporting Paper 6: Extractable Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report summarizes the findings of one of fourteen panels that studied progress in space science applications and defined user needs potentially capable of being met by space-system applications. The study was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and was conducted by the Space Applications Board. The panels…

  3. Practical Applications of Space Systems, Supporting Paper 7: Environmental Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report summarizes the findings of one of fourteen panels that studied progress in space science applications and defined user needs potentially capable of being met by space-system applications. The study was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and was conducted by the Space Applications Board. The panels…

  4. Practical Applications of Space Systems, Supporting Paper 10: Institutional Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report summarizes the findings of one of fourteen panels that studied progress in space science applications and defined user needs potentially capable of being met by space-system applications. The study was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and was conducted by the Space Applications Board. The panels…

  5. Practical Applications of Space Systems, Supporting Paper 14: Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report summarizes the findings of one of fourteen panels that studied progress in space science applications and defined user needs potentially capable of being met by space-system applications. The study was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and was conducted by the Space Applications Board. The panels…

  6. Large Space Telescopes Using Fresnel Lens for Power Beaming, Astronomy and Sail Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J T

    2002-10-15

    The concept of using Fresnel optics as part of power beaming, astronomy or sail systems has been suggested by several authors. The primary issues for large Fresnel optics are the difficulties in fabricating these structures and deploying them in space and for astronomy missions the extremely narrow frequency range of these optics. In proposals where the telescope is used to transmit narrow frequency laser power, the narrow bandwidth has not been an issue. In applications where the optic is to be used as part of a telescope, only around 10{sup -5} to limited frequency response of a Fresnel optic is addressed by the use of a corrective optic that will broaden the frequency response of the telescope by three or four orders of magnitude. This broadening will dramatically increase the optical power capabilities of the system and will allow some spectroscopy studies over a limited range. Both the fabrication of Fresnel optics as large as five meters and the use of corrector optics for telescopes have been demonstrated at LLNL. For solar and laser sail missions the use of Fresnel amplitude zone plates made of very thin sail material is also discussed.

  7. Hybrid laser beam steerer for laser communications applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofka, Jozef; Nikulin, Vladimir V.; Skormin, Victor A.; Nicholson, Donald J.

    2004-01-01

    Omniwrist is a new sensor mount developed under the Air Force funding that emulates the kinematics of a human wrist. Driven by two linear motors and equipped with a dedicated computer implementing advanced control laws, it is capable of a full 180° hemisphere of pitch/yaw motion and demonstrates performance characteristics comparable with an electro-mechanical beam steering system. While exceeding the bandwidth requirements for the coarse beam steering task, Omniwrist"s dynamic response is much slower than the one of the acousto-optic device (Bragg cell) that is virtually inertia-free. At the same time, the steering range of a Bragg cell, +/- .5°, is too small for many applications. The authors have been successful in the enhancement of the design and development of control laws improving its dynamic characteristics of a Bragg cell. This paper presents the research aimed at the development of a hybrid laser beam steering system comprising Bragg cells installed on the Omniwrist platform. An optimal control strategy facilitating such applications as scanning, search, rapid repositioning, tracking, feedback and feedforward compensation of environmental vibration of the optical platform (satellite-based and airborne) has been developed, implemented and tested. This includes the solution of such underlying problems as mathematical description of the hybrid system, optimal task distribution between the "coarse" and the "fine" positioning tasks, coordination of the operation of the "coarse" and "fine" system controllers. The efficiency of the developed system in various applications will be investigated further and compared against known designs.

  8. Beam experiments in the extreme space-charge limit on the University of Maryland Electron Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, S.; Li, H.; Godlove, T.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; Walter, M.; Zou, Y.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2004-05-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), designed for transport studies of space-charge dominated beams in a strong focusing lattice, is nearing completion. UMER models, for example, the recirculator accelerator envisioned as a possible driver for heavy-ion inertial fusion. The UMER lattice will consist of 36 alternating-focusing (FODO) periods over an 11.5 m circumference. The main diagnostics are phosphor screens and capacitive beam position monitors placed at the center of each 20° bending section. In addition, pepper-pot and slit-wire emittance meters are in operation. We present experimental results for three cases of strong space-charge dominated transport (7.2, 24, and 85 mA, at 10 keV) and contrast them with one case in the emittance-dominated regime (0.6 mA at 10 keV). With focusing given by σ0=76°, the zero-current betatron phase advance per period, the range of currents corresponds to a space-charge tune depression of 0.2 to 0.8. This range is unprecedented for a circular machine. The beam physics over three transport distances is considered: at or near the source, over the length of the matching section (about 1 m), and single turn (10 m). Issues associated with beam characterization, scaling of various parameters, alignment, and envelope matching are discussed.

  9. Two-axis Beam Steering Mirror Control system for Precision Pointing and Tracking Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ulander, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Precision pointing and tracking of laser beams is critical in numerous military and industrial applications. This is particularly true for systems requiring atmospheric beam propagation. Such systems are plagued by environmental influences which cause the optical signal to break up and wander. Example applications include laser communications, precision targeting, active imaging, chemical remote sensing, and laser vibrometry. The goal of this project is to build a beam steering system using a two-axis mirror to maintain precise pointing control. Ultimately, position control to 0.08% accuracy (40 {micro}rad) with a bandwidth of 200 Hz is desired. The work described encompasses evaluation of the instrumentation system and the subsequent design and implementation of an analog electronic controller for a two-axis mirror used to steer the beam. The controller operates over a wide temperature range, through multiple mirror resonances, and is independent of specific mirrors. The design was built and successfully fielded in a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory free-space optics experiment. All measurements and performance parameters are derived from measurements made on actual hardware that was built and field tested. In some cases, specific design details have been omitted that involve proprietary information pertaining to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory patent positions and claims. These omissions in no way impact the general validity of the work or concepts presented in this thesis.

  10. Space processing applications rocket project. SPAR 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassay, R. P. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The Space Processing Applications Rocket Project (SPAR) VIII Final Report contains the engineering report prepared at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as well as the three reports from the principal investigators. These reports also describe pertinent portions of ground-based research leading to the ultimate selection of the flight sample composition, including design, fabrication, and testing, all of which are expected to contribute immeasurably to an improved comprehension of materials processing in space. This technical memorandum is directed entirely to the payload manifest flown in the eighth of a series of SPAR flights conducted at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) and includes the experiments entitled Glass Formation Experiment SPAR 74-42/1R, Glass Fining Experiment in Low-Gravity SPAR 77-13/1, and Dynamics of Liquid Bubbles SPAR Experiment 77-18/2.

  11. Direct solar heating for Space Station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Early investigations have shown that a large percentage of the power generated on the Space Station will be needed in the form of high-temperature thermal energy. The most efficient method of satisfying this requirement is through direct utilization of available solar energy. A system concept for the direct use of solar energy on the Space Station, including its benefits to customers, technologists, and designers of the station, is described. After a brief discussion of energy requirements and some possible applications, results of selective tradeoff studies are discussed, showing area reduction benefits and some possible configurations for the practical use of direct solar heating. Following this is a description of system elements and required technologies. Finally, an assessment of available contributive technologies is presented, and a Space Shuttle Orbiter flight experiment is proposed.

  12. Development of a pepper pot emittance probe and its application for ECR ion beam studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashev, S.; Barcikowski, A.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Vinogradov, N.; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2009-07-21

    A pepper pot-scintillator screen system has been developed and used to measure the emittance of DC ion beams extracted from a high-intensity permanent magnet ECR ion source. The system includes a fast beam shutter with a minimum dwell time of 18 ms to reduce the degradation of the CsI(Tl) scintillator by DC ion beam irradiation and a CCD camera with a variable shutter speed in the range of 1 {micro}s-65 s. On-line emittance measurements are performed by an application code developed on a LabVIEW platform. The sensitivity of the device is sufficient to measure the emittance of DC ion beams with current densities down to about 100 nA/cm{sup 2}. The emittance of all ion species extracted from the ECR ion source and post-accelerated to an energy of 75-90 keV/charge have been measured downstream of the LEBT. As the mass-to-charge ratio of ion species increases, the normalized RMS emittances in both transverse phase planes decrease from 0.5-1.0 {pi} mm mrad for light ions to 0.05-0.09 {pi} mm mrad for highly charged {sup 209}Bi ions. The dependence of the emittance on ion's mass-to-charge ratio follows very well the dependence expected from beam rotation induced by decreasing ECR axial magnetic field. The measured emittance values cannot be explained by only ion beam rotation for all ion species and the contribution to emittance of ion temperature in plasma, non-linear electric fields and non-linear space charge is comparable or even higher than the contribution of ion beam rotation.

  13. Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-08-01

    Isotopes and accelerators, hallmarks of nuclear physics, are finding increasingly sophisticated and effective applications in the medical field. Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes are now a $10B/yr business worldwide, with over 10 million procedures and patient studies performed every year. This paper will discuss the use of isotopes for these applications. In addition, beams of protons and heavy ions are being more and more widely used clinically for treatment of malignancies. To be discussed here as well will be the rationale and techniques associated with charged-particle therapy, and the progress in implementation and optimization of these technologies for clinical use.

  14. Space applications of superconductivity - High field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickett, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses developments in superconducting magnets and their applications in space technology. Superconducting magnets are characterized by high fields (to 15T and higher) and high current densities combined with low mass and small size. The superconducting materials and coil design are being improved and new high-strength composites are being used for magnet structural components. Such problems as maintaining low cooling temperatures (near 4 K) for long periods of time and degradation of existing high-field superconductors at low strain levels can be remedied by research and engineering. Some of the proposed space applications of superconducting magnets include: cosmic ray analysis with magnetic spectrometers, energy storage and conversion, energy generation by magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear fusion techniques, and propulsion. Several operational superconducting magnet systems are detailed.

  15. A scanned beam THz imaging system for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Zachary D.; Li, Wenzao; Suen, Jon; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bennett, David; Bajwa, Neha; Brown, Elliott; Culjat, Martin; Grundfest, Warren; Singh, Rahul

    2011-10-01

    THz medical imaging has been a topic of increased interest recently due largely to improvements in source and detector technology and the identification of suitable applications. One aspect of THz medical imaging research not often adequately addressed is pixel acquisition rate and phenomenology. The majority of active THz imaging systems use translation stages to raster scan a sample beneath a fixed THz beam. While these techniques have produced high resolution images of characterization targets and animal models they do not scale well to human imaging where clinicians are unwilling to place patients on large translation stages. This paper presents a scanned beam THz imaging system that can acquire a 1 cm2 area with 1 mm2 pixels and a per-pixel SNR of 40 dB in less than 5 seconds. The system translates a focused THz beam across a stationary target using a spinning polygonal mirror and HDPE objective lens. The illumination is centered at 525 GHz with ~ 125 GHz of response normalized bandwidth and the component layout is designed to optically co-locate the stationary source and detector ensuring normal incidence across a 50 mm × 50 mm field of view at standoff of 190 mm. Component characterization and images of a test target are presented. These results are some of the first ever reported for a short standoff, high resolution, scanned beam THz imaging system and represent an important step forward for practical integration of THz medical imaging where fast image acquisition times and stationary targets (patients) are requisite.

  16. Beam manipulation with velocity bunching for PWFA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Galletti, M.; Gallo, A.; Giribono, A.; Li, W.; Marocchino, A.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Petrillo, V.; Di Pirro, G.; Romeo, S.; Rossi, A. R.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zhu, J.

    2016-09-01

    The activity of the SPARC_LAB test-facility (LNF-INFN, Frascati) is currently focused on the development of new plasma-based accelerators. Particle accelerators are used in many fields of science, with applications ranging from particle physics research to advanced radiation sources (e.g. FEL). The demand to accelerate particles to higher and higher energies is currently limited by the effective efficiency in the acceleration process that requires the development of km-size facilities. By increasing the accelerating gradient, the compactness can be improved and costs reduced. Recently, the new technique which attracts main efforts relies on plasma acceleration. In the following, the current status of plasma-based activities at SPARC_LAB is presented. Both laser- and beam-driven schemes will be adopted with the aim to provide an adequate accelerating gradient (1-10 GV/m) while preserving the brightness of the accelerated beams to the level of conventional photo-injectors. This aspect, in particular, requires the use of ultra-short (< 100 fs) electron beams, consisting in one or more bunches. We show, with the support of simulations and experimental results, that such beams can be produced using RF compression by velocity-bunching.

  17. Heat pipe applications for the space shuttle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawil, M.; Alario, J.; Prager, R.; Bullock, R.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of six specific applications for heat pipe (HP) devices on the space shuttle. These applications were chosen from 27 concepts formulated as part of a study to evaluate the potential benefits associated with HP use. The formulation process is briefly described along with the applications which evolved. The bulk of the discussion deals with the 'top' six - namely, HP radiators for waste heat rejection, an HP augmented cold rail, an HP circuit for electronic equipment cooling, modular heat sink for control of remote packages, an HP temperature control for compartments, and air-cooled equipment racks. The philosophy, physical design details, and performance data are presented for each concept along with a comparison with the baseline design where applicable.

  18. SPACEKIDS: kinetic inductance detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, M.; Baselmans, J.; Baryshev, A.; Doyle, S.; Grim, M.; Hargrave, P.; Klapwijk, T.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Monfardini, A.; Neto, A.; Steenbeek, H.; Walker, I.; Wood, K.; D'Addabbo, A.; Barry, P.; Bideaud, A.; Blázquez, B.; Bueno, J.; Calvo, M.; Costa-Kramer, J.-L.; Ferrari, L.; Gómez-Gutiérrez, A.; Goupy, J.; Llombart, N.; Yates, S.

    2016-07-01

    SPACEKIDS, a European Union FP-7 project, has recently been completed. It has focused on developing kinetic inductance detector (KID) arrays and demonstrating their suitability for space applications at far infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. KID arrays have been developed for both low-background (typical of astrophysical applications) and high-background (typical of Earth-observation applications), based on performance specifications derived from the science requirements of representative potential future missions. KID pixel and array designs have been developed, together with readout electronics necessary to read out large numbers of pixels. Two laboratory demonstrator systems have been built and used for comprehensive evaluation of large-format array characteristics and performance in environments representative of both astronomy and Earth observing applications. We present an overview of the SPACEKIDS project and a summary of its main results and conclusions.

  19. Electronic nose for space program applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Buttner, William J.; Linnell, Bruce R.; Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2003-01-01

    The ability to monitor air contaminants in the shuttle and the International Space Station is important to ensure the health and safety of astronauts, and equipment integrity. Three specific space applications have been identified that would benefit from a chemical monitor: (a) organic contaminants in space cabin air; (b) hypergolic propellant contaminants in the shuttle airlock; (c) pre-combustion signature vapors from electrical fires. NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is assessing several commercial and developing electronic noses (E-noses) for these applications. A short series of tests identified those E-noses that exhibited sufficient sensitivity to the vapors of interest. Only two E-noses exhibited sufficient sensitivity for hypergolic fuels at the required levels, while several commercial E-noses showed sufficient sensitivity of common organic vapors. These E-noses were subjected to further tests to assess their ability to identify vapors. Development and testing of E-nose models using vendor supplied software packages correctly identified vapors with an accuracy of 70-90%. In-house software improvements increased the identification rates between 90 and 100%. Further software enhancements are under development. Details on the experimental setup, test protocols, and results on E-nose performance are presented in this paper along with special emphasis on specific software enhancements. c2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Low energy CMOS for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Alkalaj, Leon

    1992-01-01

    The current focus of NASA's space flight programs reflects a new thrust towards smaller, less costly, and more frequent space missions, when compared to missions such as Galileo, Magellan, or Cassini. Recently, the concept of a microspacecraft was proposed. In this concept, a small, compact spacecraft that weighs tens of kilograms performs focused scientific objectives such as imaging. Similarly, a Mars Lander micro-rover project is under study that will allow miniature robots weighing less than seven kilograms to explore the Martian surface. To bring the microspacecraft and microrover ideas to fruition, one will have to leverage compact 3D multi-chip module-based multiprocessors (MCM) technologies. Low energy CMOS will become increasingly important because of the thermodynamic considerations in cooling compact 3D MCM implementations and also from considerations of the power budget for space applications. In this paper, we show how the operating voltage is related to the threshold voltage of the CMOS transistors for accomplishing a task in VLSI with minimal energy. We also derive expressions for the noise margins at the optimal operating point. We then look at a low voltage CMOS (LVCMOS) technology developed at Stanford University which improves the power consumption over conventional CMOS by a couple of orders of magnitude and consider the suitability of the technology for space applications by characterizing its SEU immunity.

  1. Electronic nose for space program applications.

    PubMed

    Young, Rebecca C; Buttner, William J; Linnell, Bruce R; Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2003-08-01

    The ability to monitor air contaminants in the shuttle and the International Space Station is important to ensure the health and safety of astronauts, and equipment integrity. Three specific space applications have been identified that would benefit from a chemical monitor: (a) organic contaminants in space cabin air; (b) hypergolic propellant contaminants in the shuttle airlock; (c) pre-combustion signature vapors from electrical fires. NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is assessing several commercial and developing electronic noses (E-noses) for these applications. A short series of tests identified those E-noses that exhibited sufficient sensitivity to the vapors of interest. Only two E-noses exhibited sufficient sensitivity for hypergolic fuels at the required levels, while several commercial E-noses showed sufficient sensitivity of common organic vapors. These E-noses were subjected to further tests to assess their ability to identify vapors. Development and testing of E-nose models using vendor supplied software packages correctly identified vapors with an accuracy of 70-90%. In-house software improvements increased the identification rates between 90 and 100%. Further software enhancements are under development. Details on the experimental setup, test protocols, and results on E-nose performance are presented in this paper along with special emphasis on specific software enhancements.

  2. Japanese photovoltaic power generation for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saga, T.; Kiyota, Y.; Matsutani, T.; Suzuki, A.; Kawasaki, O.; Hisamatsu, T.; Matsuda, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes Japanese activities on mainly silicon solar cell research development and applications. The high efficiency thin silicon solar cells and the same kinds of solar cells with integrated bypass function (IBF cells) were developed and qualified for space applications. The most efficient cells (NRS/LBSF cells) showed average 18% at AMO and 28 C conditions. After electron irradiation, NRS/BSF cells showed higher efficiency than NRS/LBSF cells. The IBF cells do not suffer high reverse voltage and can survive from shadowing. The designs and characteristics of these solar cells are presented. In the last section, our future plan for the solar cell calibration is presented.

  3. Scientific applications of frequency-stabilized laser technology in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumaker, Bonny L.

    1990-01-01

    A synoptic investigation of the uses of frequency-stabilized lasers for scientific applications in space is presented. It begins by summarizing properties of lasers, characterizing their frequency stability, and describing limitations and techniques to achieve certain levels of frequency stability. Limits to precision set by laser frequency stability for various kinds of measurements are investigated and compared with other sources of error. These other sources include photon-counting statistics, scattered laser light, fluctuations in laser power, and intensity distribution across the beam, propagation effects, mechanical and thermal noise, and radiation pressure. Methods are explored to improve the sensitivity of laser-based interferometric and range-rate measurements. Several specific types of science experiments that rely on highly precise measurements made with lasers are analyzed, and anticipated errors and overall performance are discussed. Qualitative descriptions are given of a number of other possible science applications involving frequency-stabilized lasers and related laser technology in space. These applications will warrant more careful analysis as technology develops.

  4. Complementary heterojunction FET technology for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, George

    1993-01-01

    A 32-bit serial integer multiplier was designed to investigate the yield and performance of complementary heterojunction FET (CHFET) technology. This is the largest reported CHFET logic circuit. The maximum operating frequency was 500 MHz. Very low power dissipation of 3 mW was obtained at 5 MHz operation. Single-event upset (SEU) characteristics of CHFET devices and latches were also measured and indicates the potential for SEU hard circuits for space and military applications.

  5. Advanced Interconnect Roadmap for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galbraith, Lissa

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the NASA electronic parts and packaging program for space applications. The topics include: 1) Forecasts; 2) Technology Challenges; 3) Research Directions; 4) Research Directions for Chip on Board (COB); 5) Research Directions for HDPs: Multichip Modules (MCMs); 6) Research Directions for Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS); 7) Research Directions for Photonics; and 8) Research Directions for Materials. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  6. Space Applications Industrial Laser System (SAILS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Bible, J. B.; Mueller, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    A program is underway to develop a YAG laser based materials processing workstation to fly in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. This workstation, called Space Applications Industrial Laser System (SAILS), will be capable of cutting and welding steel, aluminum, and Inconel alloys of the type planned for use in constructing the Space Station Freedom. As well as demonstrating the ability of a YAG laser to perform remote (fiber-optic delivered) repair and fabrication operations in space, fundamental data will be collected on these interactions for comparison with terrestrial data and models. The flight system, scheduled to fly in 1996, will be constructed as three modules using standard Get-Away-Special (GAS) canisters. The first module holds the laser head and cooling system, while the second contains a high peak power electrical supply. The third module houses the materials processing workstation and the command and data acquisition subsystems. The laser head and workstation cansisters are linked by a fiber-optic cable to transmit the laser light. The team assembled to carry out this project includes Lumonics Industrial Products (laser), Tennessee Technological University (structural analysis and fabrication), Auburn University Center for Space Power (electrical engineering), University of Waterloo (low-g laser process consulting), and CSTAR/UTSI (data acquisition, control, software, integration, experiment design). This report describes the SAILS program and highlights recent activities undertaken at CSTAR.

  7. Space Applications Industrial Laser System (SAILS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCay, T. D.; Bible, J. B.; Mueller, R. E.

    1993-10-01

    A program is underway to develop a YAG laser based materials processing workstation to fly in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. This workstation, called Space Applications Industrial Laser System (SAILS), will be capable of cutting and welding steel, aluminum, and Inconel alloys of the type planned for use in constructing the Space Station Freedom. As well as demonstrating the ability of a YAG laser to perform remote (fiber-optic delivered) repair and fabrication operations in space, fundamental data will be collected on these interactions for comparison with terrestrial data and models. The flight system, scheduled to fly in 1996, will be constructed as three modules using standard Get-Away-Special (GAS) canisters. The first module holds the laser head and cooling system, while the second contains a high peak power electrical supply. The third module houses the materials processing workstation and the command and data acquisition subsystems. The laser head and workstation cansisters are linked by a fiber-optic cable to transmit the laser light. The team assembled to carry out this project includes Lumonics Industrial Products (laser), Tennessee Technological University (structural analysis and fabrication), Auburn University Center for Space Power (electrical engineering), University of Waterloo (low-g laser process consulting), and CSTAR/UTSI (data acquisition, control, software, integration, experiment design). This report describes the SAILS program and highlights recent activities undertaken at CSTAR.

  8. Closely spaced nanomagnets by dual e-beam exposure for low-energy nanomagnet logic

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Faisal A.; Csaba, Gyorgy; Butler, Katherine; Bernstein, Gary H.

    2013-05-07

    The effect of nanomagnet spacing on required clock field has been studied by micromagnetic simulation for supermalloy (Ni{sub 79}Fe{sub 16}Mo{sub 5}) dots with dimensions 90 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 20 nm{sup 3} and 120 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 20 nm{sup 3}. Reduction of the inter-magnet spacing for both dimensions has resulted in reduction of the required clock field in the simulation. A dual e-beam exposure technique has been developed to allow fabrication of ultra dense features using conventional poly(methylmethacrylate) e-beam resist. Nanomagnet logic (NML) datalines of supermalloy dots with {approx}10 nm and {approx}15 nm spacing have been fabricated using dual e-beam exposure with a 3{sigma} overlay accuracy of {approx}4 nm. Fabricated NML datalines have been characterized using magnetic force microscopy for various clock fields. Datalines of both spacing have shown proper NML functionality with a clock field as low as 60 mT.

  9. EBQ code: transport of space-charge beams in axially symmetric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.C.

    1982-11-01

    Such general-purpose space charge codes as EGUN, BATES, WOLF, and TRANSPORT do not gracefully accommodate the simulation of relativistic space-charged beams propagating a long distance in axially symmetric devices where a high degree of cancellation has occurred between the self-magnetic and self-electric forces of the beam. The EBQ code was written specifically to follow high current beam particles where space charge is important in long distance flight in axially symmetric machines possessing external electric and magnetic field. EBQ simultaneously tracks all trajectories so as to allow procedures for charge deposition based on inter-ray separations. The orbits are treated in Cartesian geometry (position and momentum) with z as the independent variable. Poisson's equation is solved in cylindrical geometry on an orthogonal rectangular mesh. EBQ can also handle problems involving multiple ion species where the space charge from each must be included. Such problems arise in the design of ion sources where different charge and mass states are present.

  10. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  11. Theoretical modeling of the divergence of a flat-topped beam from a two-stage beam shaper into a conical intensity profile after propagation in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighatzadeh, A.; Saadat, Sh.

    2014-02-01

    In this article, a two-stage beam shaping device based on a plastic fiber-bundle prism duct coupled waveguide is theoretically and experimentally described. ZEMAX software is used to simulate and investigate the divergence phenomenon on the beam shape outputted and the radiance profiles in both position and angle space. The effect of prism's geometrical structure on the beam divergence is also investigated and the optimum geometric conditions are reported. According to the theoretical results, due to an asymmetrical divergence effect the beam's cross section is increased with distance by a variable aspect ratio. The results also show that propagation in free space transformed a square beam with a flat-top intensity distribution into a rectangular beam with a conical intensity distribution. For experimental study, an imaging technique is applied to investigate the beam's output images and intensity profiles. A source light is used to illuminate the optical beam shaping elements of the reported design. Digital photographs of the beam's output for different axial distances are taken by a camera and the image data is converted into a response curve for comparison with the simulated image profiles. The obtained experimental results are strongly in agreement with the theoretical ones.

  12. Science and applications of low-emittance electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    van Bibber, K

    2000-08-20

    The capability of making very low-emittance electron beams of temporally short, high charge bunches has opened up exciting new possibilities in basic and applied science. Two notable applications are high energy electron-positron linear colliders for particle physics, and fourth-generation light sources consisting of linac-driven Free-Electron Lasers (FEL), both of which represent significant programmatic potential for the Laboratory in the future. The technologies contributing to low-emittance electron beams and their applications, namely precision fabrication, ultra-short pulse lasers, and RF photocathode injectors, are all areas of Lab expertise, and the work carried out under this LDRD project further expanded our core-competency in advanced concept accelerators. Furthermore, high energy accelerators have become a cornerstone of the SBSS program, as illustrated by the recent development of proton radiography as a prime technology candidate for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF), which enhanced the significance of this project all the more. This was a one-year project to both advance the technology of, and participate in the science enabled by very low-emittance electron beams. The work centered around the two themes above, namely electron-positron linear colliders, and the new fourth-generation light sources. This work built upon previous LDRD investments, and was intended to emphasize accelerator physics experiments.

  13. Improvements in neutron beam applications by using capillary neutron optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, Robert G.; Xiao, Qi-Fan; Sharov, V. A.; Ponomarev, Igor Y.; Ullrich, Johannes B.; Gibson, David M.; Chen-Mayer, Huaiyu H.; Mildner, David F. R.; Lamaze, G. P.

    1997-02-01

    Capillary neutron optics improve the capabilities of neutron beam techniques such as neutron depth profiling and prompt gamma activation analysis. Millions of glass capillaries are configured to capture and guide low-energy neutrons by grazing total reflection from the smooth inner surface of the hollow channels. By precise orientation of the capillaries, beams of neutrons are readily collimated with good angular control or can be finely focused - as required by the application. In addition, the optics can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by diverting a neutron beam to a convenient off-axis direction, thereby circumventing interferences from gamma rays and fast neutrons characteristic of simple aperture collimation. The focused intensity of neutrons obtained in an area of 0.03 mm2 may be increased up to a hundred times over that previously available for NDP or PGAA techniques. Furthermore, the spatial resolution can be improved by up to 100 times. Consequently, small samples, or small volumes within larger samples, may be better and more rapidly investigated with neutron probe techniques. We report on developments in the application of capillary neutron optics.

  14. Commercial Application of In-Space Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lymer, John; Hanson, Mark; Tadros, Al; Boccio, Joel; Hollenstein, Bruno; Emerick, Ken; Doughtery, Sean; Doggett, Bill; Dorsey, John T.; King, Bruce D.; Bowman, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    In-Space assembly (ISA) expands the opportunities for cost effective emplacement of systems in space. Currently, spacecraft are launched into space and deploy into their operational configuration through a carefully choreographed sequence of operations. The deployment operation dictates the arrangement of the primary systems on the spacecraft, limiting the ability to take full advantage of launch vehicles volume and mass capability. ISA enables vastly different spacecraft architectures and emplacement scenarios to be achieved, including optimal launch configurations ranging from single launch and assembly to on-orbit aggregation of multiple launches at different orbital locations and times. The spacecraft can be visited at different orbital locations and times to effect expansion and maintenance of an operational capability. To date, the primary application of ISA has been in large programs funded by government organizations, such as the International Space Station. Recently, Space Systems Loral (SSL) led a study funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), called Dragonfly, to investigate the commercial applicability and economic advantages of ISA. In the study, it was shown that ISA enables SSL to double the capability of a commercial satellite system by taking advantage of alternate packaging approaches for the reflectors. The study included an ultra-light-weight robotic system, derived from Mars manipulator designs, to complete assembly of portions of the antenna system using a tool derived from DARPA orbital express and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) automated structural assembly experience. The mechanical connector that enables robotic ISA takes advantage of decades of development by NASA from the 1970's to 1980's during the Space Station Freedom program, the precursor to the ISS. The mechanical connector was originally designed for rapid astronaut assembly while also providing a high quality structural connection

  15. Design and application of electromechanical actuators for deep space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskew, Tim A.; Wander, John

    1994-01-01

    This progress report documents research and development efforts performed from August 16, 1993 through February 15, 1994 on NASA Grant NAG8-240, 'Design and Application of Electromechanical Actuators for Deep Space Missions.' Following the executive summary are four report sections: Motor Selection, Tests Stand Development, Health Monitoring and Fault Management, and Experiment Planning. Three specific motor types have been considered as prime movers for TVC EMA applications: the brushless dc motor, the permanent magnet synchronous motor, and the induction motor. The fundamental finding was that, in general, the primary performance issues were energy efficiency and thermal dissipation (rotor heating). In terms of all other issues, the three motor types were found to compare quite equally. Among the design changes made to the test stand since the last progress report is the addition of more mounting holes in the side beams. These additional holes allow the movable end beam to be attached in a greater number of positions than previously. With this change the movable end beam can move from full forward to full back in three inch increments. Specific mathematical details on the approach that have been employed for health monitoring and fault management (HMFM) have been reported previously. This approach is based on and adaptive Kalman filter strategy. In general, a bank of filters can be implemented for each primary fault type. Presently under consideration for the brushless dc machine are the following faults: armature winding open-circuits, armature winding short-circuits (phase-to-phase and phase-to-ground), bearing degradation, and rotor flux weakening. The mechanically oriented experiments include transient loading experiments, transverse loading experiment, friction experiment, motor performance experiment, and HMFM experiment.

  16. Beam profile and spectral characteristic of THz wave in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guozhong; Yang, Kun; Wu, Meng; Wu, Lizhong

    2008-12-01

    Beam profile and spectral characteristic of terahertz (THz) wave in free space are presented in this paper. The beam width of THz wave at the focus point of parabolic mirror is obtained by means of the narrow-slit measurement. By the spectroscopic imaging, we present the transverse mode distribution of THz beam on the cross-section of focus point. Our experimental results show that the centre wavelength of THz spectra has a distinguished red-shift when it is far away the centre of THz focus point. The spectral range of THz wave far from the focus point is less than that of the centre. This kind of spectral characteristic of THz wave is closely related to the diffraction effect of electromagnetic wave.

  17. New asymmetric propagation invariant beams obtained by amplitude and phase modulation in frequency space.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Hernández, J; Arroyo Carrasco, M L; Méndez Otero, M M; Chávez-Cerda, S; Iturbe Castillo, M D

    2014-12-12

    In this paper, we demonstrate, numerically and experimentally that using the mask-lens setup used by Durnin to generate Bessel beams Durnin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1499 (1987)], it is possible to generate different kinds of propagation invariant beams. A modification in the amplitude or phase of the field that illuminates the annular slit is proposed that corresponds to modulation in frequency space. In particular, we characterize the new invariant beams that were obtained by modulating the amplitude of the annular mask and when the incident field was modulated with a one-dimensional quadratic or cubic phase. Experimental results using an amplitude mask are shown in order to corroborate the numerical predictions.

  18. New asymmetric propagation invariant beams obtained by amplitude and phase modulation in frequency space

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Hernández, J.; Arroyo Carrasco, M.L.; Méndez Otero, M.M.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Iturbe Castillo, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate, numerically and experimentally that using the mask-lens setup used by Durnin to generate Bessel beams Durnin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1499 (1987)], it is possible to generate different kinds of propagation invariant beams. A modification in the amplitude or phase of the field that illuminates the annular slit is proposed that corresponds to modulation in frequency space. In particular, we characterize the new invariant beams that were obtained by modulating the amplitude of the annular mask and when the incident field was modulated with a one-dimensional quadratic or cubic phase. Experimental results using an amplitude mask are shown in order to corroborate the numerical predictions. PMID:25705088

  19. Longitudinal Space Charge Effects in Bunched Electron Beams Travelling through a Malmberg-Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Rome, M.; Cavaliere, F.; De Luca, F.; Pozzoli, R.; Cavenago, M.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.

    2010-06-16

    Nanosecond pulsed electron beams in the 1-10 keV energy range have been characterized by means of an electrostatic diagnostic in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP. The beam length has been inferred through the numerical analysis of the signals measured across the overall load impedance of a planar charge collector. The presence of space charge effects leading to a longitudinal spread of the beam during its transport are evidenced at low injection energies. This feature has also been tested with the use of a one-dimensional fluid model and with two-dimensional, cylindrically-symmetric Particle-In-Cell simulations, whose results are compared to the experimental observations.

  20. Honeycomb Betavoltaic Battery for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin R.; Ulmen, Ben; Miley, George H.

    2008-01-01

    Radioisotopic batteries offer advantages relative to conventional chemical batteries for applications requiring a long lifetime with minimum maintenance. Thus, thermoelectric type cells fueled with Pu have been used extensively on NASA space missions. The design for a small beta battery using nickel-63 (Ni-63) and a vacuum direct collection method is described here. A honeycomb nickel wire structure is employed to achieve bi-directional direct collection by seeding Ni-63 onto honeycomb shaped wires that will provide structural support as well. The battery design is intended to power low power electronics and distribute power needs in space probes as well as space colonies. Ni-63 is chosen as the source emitter because it has a long half-life and ease of manufacturing. The use of vacuum is especially well mated to space use; hence, vacuum insulation is employed to gain a higher efficiency than prior beta batteries with a dielectric insulator. A unique voltage down-converter is incorporated to efficiently reduce the inherent output voltage from 17.4 kV to ~17.4 V. This converter operates like a ``reverse'' Marx circuit where capacitor charging occurs in series but the discharge is in parallel. The reference battery module described here is about 100 cm×100 cm×218 cm and has a power of ~10 W with a conversion efficiency of ~15.8%. These modules can be stacked for higher powers and are very attractive for various applications in space colonization due to their long life (half-life for Ni-63~100 yrs) and low maintenance.

  1. Applications of Microwave Photonics in Radio Astronomy and Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Addario, Larry R.; Shillue, William P.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of narrow band vs wide band signals is given. Topics discussed included signal transmission, reference distribution and photonic antenna metrology. Examples of VLA, ALMA, ATA and DSN arrays are given. . Arrays of small antennas have become more cost-effective than large antennas for achieving large total aperture or gain, both for astronomy and for communication. It is concluded that emerging applications involving arrays of many antennas require low-cost optical communication of both wide bandwidth and narrow bandwidth; development of round-trip correction schemes enables timing precision; and free-space laser beams with microwave modulation allow structural metrology with approx 100 micrometer precision over distances of 200 meters.

  2. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-09-11

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles. At Fermilab, we are planning to install an electron lens in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA, a 40-m ring for 150-MeV electrons) as one of the proof-of-principle implementations of nonlinear integrable optics to achieve large tune spreads and more stable beams without loss of dynamic aperture.

  3. PATH: a lumped-element beam-transport simulation program with space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    PATH is a group of computer programs for simulating charged-particle beam-transport systems. It was developed for evaluating the effects of some aberrations without a time-consuming integration of trajectories through the system. The beam-transport portion of PATH is derived from the well-known program, DECAY TURTLE. PATH contains all features available in DECAY TURTLE (including the input format) plus additional features such as a more flexible random-ray generator, longitudinal phase space, some additional beamline elements, and space-charge routines. One of the programs also provides a simulation of an Alvarez linear accelerator. The programs, originally written for a CDC 7600 computer system, also are available on a VAX-VMS system. All of the programs are interactive with input prompting for ease of use.

  4. Third Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Space Applications, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Judith S. (Compiler); Freeman, Michael S. (Compiler); Vereen, Mary (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    Topics relative to the application of artificial intelligence to space operations are discussed. New technologies for space station automation, design data capture, computer vision, neural nets, automatic programming, and real time applications are discussed.

  5. Phase space tomography reconstruction of the Wigner distribution for optical beams separable in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Alejandro; Alieva, Tatiana; Rodrigo, José A; Calvo, María L

    2009-06-01

    We propose a simple approach for the phase space tomography reconstruction of the Wigner distribution of paraxial optical beams separable in Cartesian coordinates. It is based on the measurements of the antisymmetric fractional Fourier transform power spectra, which can be taken using a flexible optical setup consisting of four cylindrical lenses. The numerical simulations and the experimental results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  6. Gaps of free-space optics beams with the Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Bernard

    2009-05-10

    Lasers used in free-space optics propagate a beam within a truncated cone. Because of this shape, the intensity cannot follow the Beer-Lambert law. In the case of a homogeneous atmosphere, we calculate the gap from the cylinder case. We will see that the gap exists but is generally very weak and, therefore, that the use of the Beer-Lambert law is a justified approximation.

  7. Beam Space Formulation of the Maximum Signal-to-Noise Ratio Array Processor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    To investigate the dependance of the beam space gains on the number of input Sbeams used the crosspower spectral matrix was simulated for a number of...environments; in the first example (figure 9) the noise field exhibited only a weak azimuthal dependance whereas in figure 10 the presence of a strong...interference at 06-1 implied a strong azimuthal dependance of tile noise field. Both result, showed an improvement in the beamspace array gain estimates as the

  8. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  9. ELF oscillations associated with electron beam injections from the space shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, D.; Neubert, T.; Storey, L.R.O.; Banks, P.M. ); Sasaki, S. ); Abe, K. ); Burch, J.L. )

    1987-11-01

    ELF oscillations (f < 500 Hz) were observed during the electron beam emissions of the space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) flown on the Spacelab 1 shuttle mission. The beams had energies up to 5 keV and currents up to 300 mA, and the oscillations were present in the data from a Langmuir probe, a floating probe, an electron energy analyzer, and a photometer. The VLF (1 kHz < f < 10 kHz) wave stimulation monitored by a wave receiver during one particular beam sequence has already been reported by Neubert et al. (1986). The amplitudes of the ELF and VLF oscillations observed during this sequence have almost identical variations with beam pitch angle, the strongest emissions begin observed for parallel beams; the ELF power spectra for the strongest emissions have peaks about 10 dB above the broadband ELF noise at frequencies aroudn 50-60 Hz. In another beam sequence the power spectra had a harmonic structure with the fundamental frequency around 200 Hz. The power density and frequency of the fundamental increased with the shuttle charge-up potential. The emission level observed during the beam sequences increased with the charge-up potential of the orbiter, which largely depended on the wake structure. The authors find it most likely that the ELF oscillations are expressions of fluctuations in the return current and the shuttle potential and that these fluctuations are caused by processes involving charge imbalances in the near environment of the shuttle, possibly in a comoving plasma cloud. The observations suggest that the plasma cloud has a particle lifetime at least of the order of 100 ms.

  10. Near equilibrium distributions for beams with space charge in linear and nonlinear periodic focusing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnad, Kiran G.; Cary, John R.

    2015-04-15

    A procedure to obtain a near equilibrium phase space distribution function has been derived for beams with space charge effects in a generalized periodic focusing transport channel. The method utilizes the Lie transform perturbation theory to canonically transform to slowly oscillating phase space coordinates. The procedure results in transforming the periodic focusing system to a constant focusing one, where equilibrium distributions can be found. Transforming back to the original phase space coordinates yields an equilibrium distribution function corresponding to a constant focusing system along with perturbations resulting from the periodicity in the focusing. Examples used here include linear and nonlinear alternating gradient focusing systems. It is shown that the nonlinear focusing components can be chosen such that the system is close to integrability. The equilibrium distribution functions are numerically calculated, and their properties associated with the corresponding focusing system are discussed.

  11. Nuclear Cross Sections for Space Radiation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werneth, C. M.; Maung, K. M.; Ford, W. P.; Norbury, J. W.; Vera, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The eikonal, partial wave (PW) Lippmann-Schwinger, and three-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS3D) methods are compared for nuclear reactions that are relevant for space radiation applications. Numerical convergence of the eikonal method is readily achieved when exact formulas of the optical potential are used for light nuclei (A = 16) and the momentum-space optical potential is used for heavier nuclei. The PW solution method is known to be numerically unstable for systems that require a large number of partial waves, and, as a result, the LS3D method is employed. The effect of relativistic kinematics is studied with the PW and LS3D methods and is compared to eikonal results. It is recommended that the LS3D method be used for high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions and nucleus-nucleus reactions at all energies because of its rapid numerical convergence and stability for both non-relativistic and relativistic kinematics.

  12. Foam inflated rigidized structures for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, D. M.; Warner, M. J.; Blair, M.

    1993-11-01

    Large lightweight stowable structures that can be deployed in space without astronaut extra vehicular activity are vital to expanding space exploration and utilization. To meet this challenge Foam Inflated Rigidized (FIR) structures have been developed by Thiokol Corporation on the Air Forces's Gossamer Baggie Torus program. In this paper the development, proof of concept demonstration of an eight foot diameter octagonal torus, and design application of this technology for structural elements to stabilize the solar collector of a solar thermal rocket are discussed. A FIR structure uses foam to inflate and pre-stress a resin impregnated fabric skin. The predeployed foam used was a solvent swelled polymer that foams immediately when exposed to vacuum due to rapid solvent loss. This property allows a very simple deployment mechanism to be used in erecting these structures. Once inflated, the skin resin is cured using the available ultraviolet radiation. By using high strength and stiffness fiber materials a stiff, strong lightweight structure was produced.

  13. PTTI applications to deep space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curkendall, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Radio metric deep space navigation relies nearly exclusively upon coherent, two way, Doppler and ranging for all precise applications. These data types and the navigational accuracies they can produce are reviewed. The deployment of hydrogen maser frequency standards and the development of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) systems within the Deep Space Network are used in the development of non-coherent, one way data forms that promise much greater inherent navigational accuracy. The underlying structure between each data class and clock performance is charted. VLBI observations of the natural radio sources are the planned instrument for the synchronization task. This method and a navigational scheme using differential measurements between the spacecraft and nearby quasars are described.

  14. Evaluation of Magnetoresistive RAM for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidecker, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is a non-volatile memory that exploits electronic spin, rather than charge, to store data. Instead of moving charge on and off a floating gate to alter the threshold voltage of a CMOS transistor (creating different bit states), MRAM uses magnetic fields to flip the polarization of a ferromagnetic material thus switching its resistance and bit state. These polarized states are immune to radiation-induced upset, thus making MRAM very attractive for space application. These magnetic memory elements also have infinite data retention and erase/program endurance. Presented here are results of reliability testing of two space-qualified MRAM products from Aeroflex and Honeywell.

  15. Shape memory composite antennas for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Bellisario, Denise

    2016-11-01

    Future space missions will require large space infrastructures in order to achieve scientific and technological objectives characterized by an intrinsic complexity. In this study, the development of shape memory composite structures for aerospace applications is described. In particular, the structure of a small-scale self-deployable mast has been prototyped as a proof of concept for its feasibility. The mast structure is made by interlocking two shape memory polymer composite (SMPC) strips, each one made of two layers of carbon fiber fabric with a shape memory (SM) epoxy resin interlayer. A complete deployment of the SMC structure was achieved. The versatility of this technology has been also demonstrated in previous studies, in which small scale deploying solar panels were fabricated. Obtained results are very promising in terms of manufacturing technology, and shape recovery of manufactured parts.

  16. Varied line-space gratings and applications

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.

    1991-07-15

    This paper presents a straightforward analytical and numerical method for the design of a specific type of varied line-space grating system. The mathematical development will assume plane or nearly-plane spherical gratings which are illuminated by convergent light, which covers many interesting cases for synchrotron radiation. The gratings discussed will have straight grooves whose spacing varies across the principal plane of the grating. Focal relationships and formulae for the optical grating-pole-to-exist-slit distance and grating radius previously presented by other authors will be derived with a symbolic algebra system. It is intended to provide the optical designer with the tools necessary to design such a system properly. Finally, some possible advantages and disadvantages for application to synchrotron to synchrotron radiation beamlines will be discussed.

  17. Minimal interference beam size/profile measurement techniques applicable to the Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nexsen, W.; Dutt, S.; Kauffmann, S.; Lebedev, V.; Maschke, A.; Mokhov, N.; Richardson, R.; Tsyganov, E.; Zinchenko, A.

    1993-05-01

    The imaging of synchrotron radiation (SR) has been suggested as a technique for providing a continuous, non-interfering monitor of the beam profile in the Collider rings at the Superconducting Super Collider. A closer examination has raised questions concerning the applicability of SR imaging in this case because of the diffraction broadening of the image, the requirements for axial space and location in the lattice, and the complexity of the system. We have surveyed the known, alternative, minimal interference techniques for measuring beam size and have evaluated them for possible Collider usage. We conclude that of the approaches that appear feasible, all require at least some development for our usage and that the development of an electron beam probe offers the best promise. We recommend that flying wires be used for cross-checking and calibrating the electron beam probe diagnostic and for luminosity measurements when the highest accuracy is required, but flying wires should not be used as the primary diagnostic because of their limited lifetime.

  18. Ion beam applications research. A summary of Lewis Research Center Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the ion beam applications research (IBAR) program organized to enable the development of materials, products, and processes through the nonpropulsive application of ion thruster technology is given. Specific application efforts utilizing ion beam sputter etching, deposition, and texturing are discussed as well as ion source and component technology applications.

  19. Ranges of Applicability for the Continuum-beam Model in the Constitutive Analysis of Carbon Nanotubes: Nanotubes or Nano-beams?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harik, Vasyl Michael; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ranges of validity for the continuum-beam model, the length-scale effects and continuum assumptions are analyzed in the framework of scaling analysis of NT structure. Two coupled criteria for the applicability of the continuum model are presented. Scaling analysis of NT buckling and geometric parameters (e.g., diameter and length) is carried out to determine the key non-dimensional parameters that control the buckling strains and modes of NT buckling. A model applicability map, which represents two classes of NTs, is constructed in the space of non-dimensional parameters. In an analogy with continuum mechanics, a mechanical law of geometric similitude is presented for two classes of beam-like NTs having different geometries. Expressions for the critical buckling loads and strains are tailored for the distinct groups of NTs and compared with the data provided by the molecular dynamics simulations. Implications for molecular dynamics simulations and the NT-based scanning probes are discussed.

  20. Indium phosphide solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Lasers can be used to transmit power to photovoltaic cells. Solar cell efficiencies are enhanced significantly under monochromatic light, and therefore a laser beam of proper wavelength could be a very effective source of illumination for a solar array operating at very high efficiencies. This work reviews the modeling studies made on indium phosphide solar cells for such an application. These cells are known to be very radiation resistant and have a potential for high efficiency. Effects of cell series resistance, laser intensity, and temperature on cell performance have been discussed.

  1. Application of spherical diodes for megavoltage photon beams dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Barbés, Benigno; Azcona, Juan D.; Burguete, Javier; Martí-Climent, Josep M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) usually uses heterogeneous dose distributions in a given volume. Designing detectors for quality control of these treatments is still a developing subject. The size of the detectors should be small to enhance spatial resolution and ensure low perturbation of the beam. A high uniformity in angular response is also a very important feature in a detector, because it has to measure radiation coming from all the directions of the space. It is also convenient that detectors are inexpensive and robust, especially to performin vivo measurements. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new detector for measuring megavoltage photon beams and to assess its performance to measure relative dose in EBRT. Methods: The detector studied in this work was designed as a spherical photodiode (1.8 mm in diameter). The change in response of the spherical diodes is measured regarding the angle of incidence, cumulated irradiation, and instantaneous dose rate (or dose per pulse). Additionally, total scatter factors for large and small fields (between 1 × 1 cm{sup 2} and 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}) are evaluated and compared with the results obtained from some commercially available ionization chambers and planar diodes. Additionally, the over-response to low energy scattered photons in large fields is investigated using a shielding layer. Results: The spherical diode studied in this work produces a high signal (150 nC/Gy for photons of nominal energy of 15 MV and 160 for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and its angular dependence is lower than that of planar diodes: less than 5% between maximum and minimum in all directions, and 2% around one of the axis. It also has a moderated variation with accumulated dose (about 1.5%/kGy for 15 MV photons and 0.7%/kGy for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and a low variation with dose per pulse (±0.4%), and its behavior is similar to commercial diodes in total scatter factor measurements. Conclusions: The measurements of relative dose

  2. Nonvolatile Memory Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Irom, Farokh; Friendlich, Mark; Nguyen, Duc; Kim, Hak; Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews several forms of nonvolatile memory for use in space applications. The intent is to: (1) Determine inherent radiation tolerance and sensitivities, (2) Identify challenges for future radiation hardening efforts, (3) Investigate new failure modes and effects, and technology modeling programs. Testing includes total dose, single event (proton, laser, heavy ion), and proton damage (where appropriate). Test vehicles are expected to be a variety of non-volatile memory devices as available including Flash (NAND and NOR), Charge Trap, Nanocrystal Flash, Magnetic Memory (MRAM), Phase Change--Chalcogenide, (CRAM), Ferroelectric (FRAM), CNT, and Resistive RAM.

  3. Space Processing Applications Rocket project, SPAR 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results are summarized for six materials science experiments conducted during the second space processing applications rocket mission flown by NASA. The individual experiments discussed are: (1) solidification of Pb-Sb eutectic; (2) feasibility of producing closed-cell metal foams; (3) direct observation of dendrite remelting and macrosegregation in castings; (4) agglomeration in immiscible liquids; (5) casting dispersion - strengthened composites at zero gravity; and (6) solidification behavior of Al-In alloys under zero gravity conditions.

  4. Space Processing Applications Rocket project, SPAR 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, F. (Compiler); Chassay, R. (Compiler)

    1976-01-01

    The experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of nine scientific experiments conducted during the first Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight are summarized. The nine individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: solidification of Pb-Sb eutectic, feasibility of producing closed-cell metal foams, characterization of rocket vibration environment by measurement of mixing of two liquids, uniform dispersions of crystallization processing, direct observation of solidification as a function of gravity levels, casting thoria dispersion-strengthened interfaces, contained polycrystalline solidification, and preparation of a special alloy for manufacturing of magnetic hard superconductor under zero-g environment.

  5. Laser diode initiated detonators for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewick, David W.; Graham, J. A.; Hawley, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ensign Bickford Aerospace Company (EBAC) has over ten years of experience in the design and development of laser ordnance systems. Recent efforts have focused on the development of laser diode ordnance systems for space applications. Because the laser initiated detonators contain only insensitive secondary explosives, a high degree of system safety is achieved. Typical performance characteristics of a laser diode initiated detonator are described in this paper, including all-fire level, function time, and output. A finite difference model used at EBAC to predict detonator performance, is described and calculated results are compared to experimental data. Finally, the use of statistically designed experiments to evaluate performance of laser initiated detonators is discussed.

  6. Space Processing Applications Rocket project SPAR III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, F.

    1978-01-01

    This document presented the engineering report and science payload III test report and summarized the experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of five scientific experiments conducted during the third Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight flown by NASA in December 1976. The five individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: Liquid Mixing, Interaction of Bubbles with Solidification Interfaces, Epitaxial Growth of Single Crystal Film, Containerless Processing of Beryllium, and Contact and Coalescence of Viscous Bodies.

  7. Transport characteristics of a Glaser magnet for an axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric space charge dominated beam

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes the dynamics of space charge dominated beam through a Glaser magnet which is often used to focus charged particle beams in the low energy section of accelerators and in many other devices. Various beam optical properties of the magnet and emittance evolution that results from the coupling between the two transverse planes are studied. We have derived ten independent first order differential equations for the beam sigma matrix elements assuming the linear space-charge force consistent with the assumption of the canonically transformed KV like distribution. In addition, the feasibility of using a Glaser magnet doublet in a low energy beam injection line to match an initial non-axisymmetric high intensity beam with net angular momentum to an axisymmetric system to suppress effective emittance growth after transition back to an uncoupled system, has also been studied.

  8. Transport characteristics of a Glaser magnet for an axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric space charge dominated beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the dynamics of space charge dominated beam through a Glaser magnet which is often used to focus charged particle beams in the low energy section of accelerators and in many other devices. Various beam optical properties of the magnet and emittance evolution that results from the coupling between the two transverse planes are studied. We have derived ten independent first order differential equations for the beam sigma matrix elements assuming the linear space-charge force consistent with the assumption of the canonically transformed KV like distribution. In addition, the feasibility of using a Glaser magnet doublet in a low energy beam injection line to match an initial non-axisymmetric high intensity beam with net angular momentum to an axisymmetric system to suppress effective emittance growth after transition back to an uncoupled system, has also been studied.

  9. Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teofilo, V. L.; Choong, P.; Chen, W.; Chang, J.; Tseng, Y.-L.

    2006-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion cells have made steady and over the years considerable progress since first evaluated by Lockheed Martin for direct conversion using nuclear power sources in the mid 1980s. The design trades and evaluations for application to the early defensive missile satellites of the Strategic Defense Initiative found the cell technology to be immature with unacceptably low cell efficiencies comparable to thermoelectric of <10%. Rapid advances in the epitaxial growth technology for ternary compound semiconductors, novel double hetero-structure junctions, innovative monolithic integrated cell architecture, and bandpass tandem filter have, in concert, significantly improved cell efficiencies to 25% with the promise of 35% using solar cell like multi-junction approach in the near future. Recent NASA sponsored design and feasibility testing programs have demonstrated the potential for 19% system efficiency for 100 We radioisotopic power sources at an integrated specific power of ~14 We/kg. Current state of TPV cell technology however limits the operating temperature of the converter cells to < 400K due to radiator mass consideration. This limitation imposes no system mass penalty for the low power application for use with radioisotopes power sources because of the high specific power of the TPV cell converters. However, the application of TPV energy conversion for high power sources has been perceived as having a major impediment above 1 kWe due to the relative low waste heat rejection temperature. We explore this limitation and compare the integrated specific power of TPV converters with current and projected TPV cells with other advanced space power conversion technologies. We find that when the redundancy needed required for extended space exploration missions is considered, the TPV converters have a much higher range of applicability then previously understood. Furthermore, we believe that with a relatively modest modifications of the

  10. Study on controllable LC-micro blazed grating beam deflector in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junbo; Xu, Suzhi; Zhang, Jingjing; Chang, Shengli

    2015-02-01

    A liquid crystal (LC) beam deflector with a microblazed grating produced by stepping photolithography and reactive ion etching (RIE) was reported. A homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal (NLC) materials are filled inside the microcavity of blazed grating, and sandwiched between two glass plates. An indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrode is deposited on it to provide the beam steering capability. Our LC-micro blazed grating device gives a high diffractive efficiency (about 95%) and a controllable large steering angle over 7.2° (for ne) and 1.7° (for no), respectively. It was found that this type of non-mechanical beam steering without any moving parts is ideally suited for applications in optical communication and optical interconnection network.

  11. MEMS Micro-Valve for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, I.; Tang, W. C.; Bame, D. P.; Tang, T. K.

    1998-01-01

    We report on the development of a Micro-ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) valve that is designed to meet the rigorous performance requirements for a variety of space applications, such as micropropulsion, in-situ chemical analysis of other planets, or micro-fluidics experiments in micro-gravity. These systems often require very small yet reliable silicon valves with extremely low leak rates and long shelf lives. Also, they must survive the perils of space travel, which include unstoppable radiation, monumental shock and vibration forces, as well as extreme variations in temperature. Currently, no commercial MEMS valve meets these requirements. We at JPL are developing a piezoelectric MEMS valve that attempts to address the unique problem of space. We begin with proven configurations that may seem familiar. However, we have implemented some major design innovations that should produce a superior valve. The JPL micro-valve is expected to have an extremely low leak rate, limited susceptibility to particulates, vibration or radiation, as well as a wide operational temperature range.

  12. In Situ Biodosimetric Experiment for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Gergely; Kovaliczky, Éva; Szabó, József; Rontó, Györgyi; Bérces, Attila

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the principles and application of DNA based biological UV dosimeters, as developed by Research Group for Biophysics (RGB). These dosimeters are used for assessing the biological hazard of living systems on the Earth's surface and in different waters (rivers, lakes, seas, etc.). The UV dosimetry system has also been used in the space. In dosimeters a bacterial virus, bacteriophage T7 and polycrystalline uracil thin layers have been used as biological detectors. On the Earth's surface the UV radiation induces dimer formation in phage T7 and in the uracil detector, which was evaluated by loss of viability of the phage particles and by the decrease of the characteristic optical density (OD) of uracil thin layers. Recently the development of human space activities has also increased the need to measure the biological effect of extraterrestrial solar radiation, too. The evaluation of the space samples occurred on ground, thus only the starting and the final state were taken into account. A new improved, automated method is presented below which makes data collection more efficient and also makes the dynamics of the process observable.

  13. Verification of Autonomous Systems for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brat, G.; Denney, E.; Giannakopoulou, D.; Frank, J.; Jonsson, A.

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous software, especially if it is based on model, can play an important role in future space applications. For example, it can help streamline ground operations, or, assist in autonomous rendezvous and docking operations, or even, help recover from problems (e.g., planners can be used to explore the space of recovery actions for a power subsystem and implement a solution without (or with minimal) human intervention). In general, the exploration capabilities of model-based systems give them great flexibility. Unfortunately, it also makes them unpredictable to our human eyes, both in terms of their execution and their verification. The traditional verification techniques are inadequate for these systems since they are mostly based on testing, which implies a very limited exploration of their behavioral space. In our work, we explore how advanced V&V techniques, such as static analysis, model checking, and compositional verification, can be used to gain trust in model-based systems. We also describe how synthesis can be used in the context of system reconfiguration and in the context of verification.

  14. Development of ion beams for space effects testing using an ECR ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, Janilee; Hodgkinson, Adrian; Johnson, Mike; Loew, Tim; Lyneis, Claude; Phair, Larry

    2013-04-19

    At LBNL's 88-Inch Cyclotron and Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Facility, a range of ion beams at energies from 1 to 55 MeV/nucleon are used for radiation space effects testing. By bombarding a component with ion beams the radiation component of the space environment can be simulated and single event effects (SEEs) determined. The performance of electronic components used in space flight and high altitude aircraft can then be evaluated. The 88- Inch Cyclotron is coupled to the three electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECR, AECR-U, VENUS). These ion sources provide a variety of ion species, ranging from protons to heavy ions such as bismuth, for these tests. In particular the ion sources have been developed to provide {sup c}ocktails{sup ,} a mixture of ions of similar mass-to-charge ratio, which can be simultaneously injected into the cyclotron, but selectively extracted from it. The ions differ in both their linear energy transfer (LET) deposited to the part and in their penetration depth into the tested part. The current heavy ion cocktails available are the 4.5, 10, 16, and 30 MeV per nucleon.

  15. Fused silica challenges in sensitive space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criddle, Josephine; Nürnberg, Frank; Sawyer, Robert; Bauer, Peter; Langner, Andreas; Schötz, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    Space bound as well as earthbound spectroscopy of extra-terrestrial objects finds its challenge in light sources with low intensities. High transmission for every optical element along the light path requires optical materials with outstanding performance to enable the measurement of even a one-photon event. Using the Lunar Laser Ranging Project and the LIGO and VIRGO Gravitational Wave Detectors as examples, the influence of the optical properties of fused silica will be described. The Visible and Infrared Surveillance Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) points out the material behavior in the NIR regime, where the chemical composition of optical materials changes the performance. Special fibers are often used in combination with optical elements as light guides to the spectroscopic application. In an extended spectral range between 350 and 2,200 nm Heraeus developed STU fiber preforms dedicated for broad band spectroscopy in astronomy. STU fibers in the broad spectral range as well as SSU fibers for UV transmission (180 - 400 nm) show also high gamma radiation resistance which allows space applications.

  16. Three dimensional analysis of longitudinal plasma oscillations in a thermal relativistic electron beam: Application to an initial value problem

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, Agostino; Hemsing, Erik; Rosenzweig, James B.

    2012-06-15

    In this paper, we study the initial value problem of longitudinal plasma oscillations in a relativistic electron beam. Our analysis is based on the formalism developed in Marinelli et al.[Phys. Plasmas 18, 103105 (2011)]. We study the evolution of an arbitrary six-dimensional phase-space perturbation under the effect of longitudinal space-charge forces, with the inclusion of three-dimensional effects due to the finite size of the beam, transverse betatron motion, and longitudinal thermal motion induced by both energy-spread and transverse emittance. We expand the phase-space perturbation in a series of eigenmodes of a Schroedinger-like equation, corresponding to a set of propagating space-charge waves. We develop a general formalism, which we use to find explicit expressions for the evolution of an initial perturbation coupled to the fundamental plasma eigenmode. This work has important applications in the theory of space-charge instabilities in high brightness electron beams and control of shot-noise in seeded free-electron lasers. We discuss the application of the present theory to a specific experimental scenario corresponding to a shot-noise suppression scheme at optical wavelengths.

  17. Electron Beam Irradiated Intercalated CNT Yarns For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Deborah L.; Gaier, James R.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Lopez Calero, Johnny E.; Ramirez, Christopher; Meador, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-walled CNT yarns have been experimentally and commercially created to yield lightweight, high conductivity fibers with good tensile properties for application as electrical wiring and multifunctional tendons. Multifunctional tendons are needed as the cable structures in tensegrity robots for use in planetary exploration. These lightweight robust tendons can provide mechanical strength for movement of the robot in addition to power distribution and data transmission. In aerospace vehicles, such as Orion, electrical wiring and harnessing mass can approach half of the avionics mass. Use of CNT yarns as electrical power and data cables could reduce mass of the wiring by thirty to seventy percent. These fibers have been intercalated with mixed halogens to increase their specific electrical conductivity to that near copper. This conductivity, combined with the superior strength and fatigue resistance makes it an attractive alternative to copper for wiring and multifunctional tendon applications. Electron beam irradiation has been shown to increase mechanical strength in pristine CNT fibers through increased cross-linking. Both pristine and intercalated CNT yarns have been irradiated using a 5-megavolt electron beam for various durations and the conductivities and tensile properties will be discussed. Structural information obtained using a field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy will correlate microstructural details with bulk properties.

  18. Beam shaping applications in laser micromachining for the microelectronics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsky, Corey M.

    2001-10-01

    Laser micromachining has been a part of the manufacturing process for semiconductors and microelectronics devices for several decades. More recent applications such as the drilling of microvia holes in high-density electronic packages have recently entered broad industrial use for high-volume production. In such applications, process stability and throughput are key drivers of commercial success. Particularly in the UV, where solid-state laser power is growing rapidly but is still limited to less than 10 watts, innovations that permit the available laser power to be applied at the work surface more efficiently are of interest. Within the last two years, the use of beam shapers to create round laser spots with near-uniform irradiance at the work surface has been demonstrated. Shaping the irradiance profile has been shown to both increase process speed and improve the quality of the drilled holes, which range in diameter between 20 and 150 micrometers . This paper gives an historical overview of laser via drilling, presents the Gaussian-to-flattop beam shaping optics used in the microvia laser drills, and discusses the process results obtained.

  19. A non-docking intraoperative electron beam applicator system.

    PubMed

    Palta, J R; Suntharalingam, N

    1989-08-01

    A non-docking intraoperative radiation therapy electron beam applicator system for a linear accelerator has been designed to minimize the mechanical, electrical, and tumor visualization problems associated with a docking system. A number of technical innovations have been used in the design of this system. These include: (a) a new intraoperative radiation therapy cone design that gives a better dose uniformity in the treatment volume at all depths; (b) a collimation system which reduces the leakage radiation dose to tissues outside the intraoperative radiation therapy cone; (c) a non-docking system with a translational accuracy of 2 mm and a rotational accuracy of 0.5 degrees; and (d) a rigid clamping system for the cones. A comprehensive set of dosimetric characteristics of the intraoperative radiation therapy applicator system is presented.

  20. Physical simulation of the long-term dynamic action of a plasma beam on a space debris object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuvalov, Valentin A.; Gorev, Nikolai. B.; Tokmak, Nikolai A.; Kochubei, Galina S.

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed for physical (laboratory) simulation of the long-term dynamic action of plasma beam high-energy ions on a space debris object with the aim of removing it to a lower orbit followed by its burning in the Earth's atmosphere. The methodology is based on the use of a criterion for the equivalence of two plasma beam exposure regimes (in the Earth' ionosphere and in laboratory conditions) and an accelerated test procedure in what concerns space debris object material sputtering and space debris object erosion by a plasma beam in the Earth's ionosphere. The space debris coating material (blanket thermal insulation) sputtering yield and normal and tangential momentum transfer coefficients are determined experimentally as a function of the ion energy and the ion beam incidence angle.

  1. Transition from ring to beam arc distributions of water ions near the space shuttle orbiter

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, I.H. )

    1990-09-01

    The distribution function of water ions produced near the space shuttle by charge exchange between ionospheric oxygen ions and outgassed water molecules is investigated using solutions of Liouville's equation with a source term modeling the charge exchange process. A transition from ring distributions to beamlike distributions termed beam arc distributions is found with decreasing distance upstream from the orbiter. This beam arc distribution corresponds to a finite section of a ring distribution and not to a conventional beam distribution. The ratio of water ion number density to oxygen ion number density is calculated; typical values within 50 m of the shuttle are in excess of 2% with a maximum value of the order of 20% for nominal parameters, suggsting that these ions must be considered with interpreting particle data from near the space shuttle. An argument for a plasma density enhancement of the order of 10% very close to the shuttle, due to kinematic effects (corresponding to pileup of plasma) and not to plasma creation, is also presented. This kinetmatic density enhancement is insufficient, by an order of magnitude, to explain the plasma density enhancements inferred from Spacelab 2 data.

  2. Beam width and transmitter power adaptive to tracking system performance for free-space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Arnon, S; Rotman, S; Kopeika, N S

    1997-08-20

    The basic free-space optical communication system includes at least two satellites. To communicate between them, the transmitter satellite must track the beacon of the receiver satellite and point the information optical beam in its direction. Optical tracking and pointing systems for free space suffer during tracking from high-amplitude vibration because of background radiation from interstellar objects such as the Sun, Moon, Earth, and stars in the tracking field of view or the mechanical impact from satellite internal and external sources. The vibrations of beam pointing increase the bit error rate and jam communication between the two satellites. One way to overcome this problem is to increase the satellite receiver beacon power. However, this solution requires increased power consumption and weight, both of which are disadvantageous in satellite development. Considering these facts, we derive a mathematical model of a communication system that adapts optimally the transmitter beam width and the transmitted power to the tracking system performance. Based on this model, we investigate the performance of a communication system with discrete element optical phased array transmitter telescope gain. An example for a practical communication system between a Low Earth Orbit Satellite and a Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite is presented. From the results of this research it can be seen that a four-element adaptive transmitter telescope is sufficient to compensate for vibration amplitude doubling. The benefits of the proposed model are less required transmitter power and improved communication system performance.

  3. Trends for Electron Beam Accelerator Applications in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2011-02-01

    Electron beam (EB) accelerators are major pieces of industrial equipment used for many commercial radiation processing applications. The industrial use of EB accelerators has a history of more than 50 years and is still growing in terms of both its economic scale and new applications. Major applications involve the modification of polymeric materials to create value-added products, such as heat-resistant wires, heat-shrinkable sheets, automobile tires, foamed plastics, battery separators and hydrogel wound dressing. The surface curing of coatings and printing inks is a growing application for low energy electron accelerators, resulting in an environmentally friendly and an energy-saving process. Recently there has been the acceptance of the use of EB accelerators in lieu of the radioactive isotope cobalt-60 as a source for sterilizing disposable medical products. Environmental protection by the use of EB accelerators is a new and important field of application. A commercial plant for the cleaning flue gases from a coal-burning power plant is in operation in Poland, employing high power EB accelerators. In Korea, a commercial plant uses EB to clean waste water from a dye factory.

  4. Comprehensive report of aeropropulsion, space propulsion, space power, and space science applications of the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The research activities of the Lewis Research Center for 1988 are summarized. The projects included are within basic and applied technical disciplines essential to aeropropulsion, space propulsion, space power, and space science/applications. These disciplines are materials science and technology, structural mechanics, life prediction, internal computational fluid mechanics, heat transfer, instruments and controls, and space electronics.

  5. Miniature vibration isolation system for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenon, Dan; Boyd, Jim; Buchele, Paul; Self, Rick; Davis, Torey; Hintz, Timothy L.; Jacobs, Jack H.

    2001-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant interest in, and move towards using highly sensitive, precision payloads on space vehicles. In order to perform tasks such as communicating at extremely high data rates between satellites using laser cross-links, or searching for new planets in distant solar systems using sparse aperture optical elements, a satellite bus and its payload must remain relatively motionless. The ability to hold a precision payload steady is complicated by disturbances from reaction wheels, control moment gyroscopes, solar array drives, stepper motors, and other devices. Because every satellite is essentially unique in its construction, isolating or damping unwanted vibrations usually requires a robust system over a wide bandwidth. The disadvantage of these systems is that they typically are not retrofittable and not tunable to changes in payload size or inertias. Previous work, funded by AFRL, DARPA, BMDO and others, developed technology building blocks that provide new methods to control vibrations of spacecraft. The technology of smart materials enables an unprecedented level of integration of sensors, actuators, and structures; this integration provides the opportunity for new structural designs that can adaptively influence their surrounding environment. To date, several demonstrations have been conducted to mature these technologies. Making use of recent advances in smart materials, microelectronics, Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors, and Multi-Functional Structures (MFS), the Air Force Research Laboratory along with its partner DARPA, have initiated an aggressive program to develop a Miniature Vibration Isolation System (MVIS) (patent pending) for space applications. The MVIS program is a systems-level demonstration of the application of advanced smart materials and structures technology that will enable programmable and retrofittable vibration control of spacecraft precision payloads. The current effort has been awarded

  6. Health Management Applications for International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alena, Richard; Duncavage, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Traditional mission and vehicle management involves teams of highly trained specialists monitoring vehicle status and crew activities, responding rapidly to any anomalies encountered during operations. These teams work from the Mission Control Center and have access to engineering support teams with specialized expertise in International Space Station (ISS) subsystems. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) applications can significantly augment these capabilities by providing enhanced monitoring, prognostic and diagnostic tools for critical decision support and mission management. The Intelligent Systems Division of NASA Ames Research Center is developing many prototype applications using model-based reasoning, data mining and simulation, working with Mission Control through the ISHM Testbed and Prototypes Project. This paper will briefly describe information technology that supports current mission management practice, and will extend this to a vision for future mission control workflow incorporating new ISHM applications. It will describe ISHM applications currently under development at NASA and will define technical approaches for implementing our vision of future human exploration mission management incorporating artificial intelligence and distributed web service architectures using specific examples. Several prototypes are under development, each highlighting a different computational approach. The ISStrider application allows in-depth analysis of Caution and Warning (C&W) events by correlating real-time telemetry with the logical fault trees used to define off-nominal events. The application uses live telemetry data and the Livingstone diagnostic inference engine to display the specific parameters and fault trees that generated the C&W event, allowing a flight controller to identify the root cause of the event from thousands of possibilities by simply navigating animated fault tree models on their workstation. SimStation models the functional power flow

  7. Brassboard Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) development for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Kuan, Gary; Rud, Mike; Lin, Sean; Sutherland, Kristen; Moore, James; An, Xin

    2008-07-01

    The Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) is a critical element of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) that performs three key functions: coherently combine starlight from two siderostats; individually detect starlight for angle tracking; and disperse and detect the interferometric fringes. In addition, the ABC contains: a stimulus, cornercubes and shutters for in-orbit calibration; several tip/tilt mirror mechanisms for in-orbit alignment; and internal metrology beam launcher for pathlength monitoring. The detailed design of the brassboard ABC (which has the form, fit and function of the flight unit) is complete, procurement of long-lead items is underway, and assembly and testing is expected to be completed in Spring 2009. In this paper, we present the key requirements for the ABC, details of the completed optical and mechanical design as well as plans for assembly and alignment.

  8. Green Applications for Space Power Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Joel (Principal Investigator)

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft propulsion and power for many decades has relied on Hydrazine monopropellant technology for auxiliary power units (APU), orbital circularization, orbit raising/lowering and attitude control. However, Hydrazine is toxic and therefore requires special ground handling procedures to ensure launch crew safety. The Swedish Company ECAPS has developed a technology based upon the propellant Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN) that offers higher performance, higher density and reduced ground handling support than Hydrazine. This blended propellant is called LMP-103S. Currently, the United States Air Force (USAF) is pursuing a technology based on Hydroxyl Ammonium Nitrate (HAN, otherwise known as AF-M315E) with industry partners Aerojet and Moog. Based on the advantages offered by these propellants, MSFC should explore powering APU's with these propellants. Due to the availability of space hardware, the principal investigator has found a collection of USAF hardware, that will act as a surrogate, which operates on a Hydrazine derivative. The F-16 fighter jet uses H-70 or 30% diluted Hydrazine for an Emergency Power Unit (EPU) which supplies power to the plane. The PI has acquired two EPU's from planes slated for destruction at the Davis Monthan AFB. This CIF will include a partnership with 2 other NASA Centers who are individually seeking seed funds from their respective organizations: Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). KSC is preparing for future flights from their launch pads that will utilize green propellants and desire a low-cost testbed in which to test and calibrate new leak detection sensors. DFRC has access to F-16's which can be used by MSFC & KSC to perform a ground test that demonstrates emergency power supplied to the jet. Neither of the green propellant alternatives have been considered nor evaluated for an APU application. Work has already been accomplished to characterize and obtain the properties of these 2 propellants

  9. The 1993 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Carl F. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1993 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence held at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD on May 10-13, 1993. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed.

  10. Evaluation of risk from space radiation with high-energy heavy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Kim, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    The most challenging radiation in space consists of fully ionized atomic elements with high energy for which only the few lowest energy ions can be stopped in shielding materials. The health risk from exposure to these ions and their secondary radiations generated in shield materials is poorly understood since there are few human data and a systematic study in relevant animal model systems has not been made. The accuracy of risk prediction is described as the major limiting factor in the management of space radiation risk. The expected impact of systematic studies is examined using the limited available biological data and models. Given the limitations of current predictions, models must be developed that are able to incorporate the required fundamental scientific data into accurate risk estimates. The important radiation components that can be provided for laboratory testing are identified. The use of ground-based accelerator beams to simulate space radiation is explained and quantitative scientific constraints on such facilities are derived. Three facilities, one each in the United States, in Germany and in Japan, currently have the partial capability to satisfy these constraints. A facility has been proposed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster Synchrotron in the United States; in conjuction with other on-site accelerators, it will be able to provide the full range of heavy ion beams and energies required.

  11. Modeling and boundary control of translational and rotational motions of nonlinear slender beams in three-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, K. D.

    2017-02-01

    Equations of motion of extensible and shearable slender beams with large translational and rotational motions under external loads in three-dimensional space are first derived in a vector form. Boundary feedback controllers are then designed to ensure that the beams are practically K∞-exponentially stable at the equilibrium. The control design, well-posedness, and stability analysis are based on two Lyapunov-type theorems developed for a class of evolution systems in Hilbert space. Numerical simulations on a slender beam immersed in sea water are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design.

  12. A simulation study of interactions of Space-Shuttle generated electron beams with ambient plasma and neutral gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The object was to conduct large scale simulations of electron beams injected into space. The study of active injection of electron beams from spacecraft is important since it provides valuable insight into beam-plasma interactions and the development of current systems in the ionosphere. However, the beam injection itself is not simple, being constrained by the ability of the spacecraft to draw return current from the ambient plasma. The generation of these return currents is dependent on several factors, including the density of the ambient plasma relative to the beam density, the presence of neutrals around the spacecraft, the configuration of the spacecraft, and the motion of the spacecraft through the plasma. Two dimensional particle simulations with collisional processes included are used to show how these different and often coupled processes can be utilized to enhance beam propagation from the spacecraft. To understand the radical expansion of mechanism of an electron beam from a highly charged spacecraft, two dimensional particle in cell simulations were conducted for a high density electron beam injected parallel to magnetic fields from an isolated equipotential conductor into a cold background plasma. The simulations indicate that charge buildup at the beam stagnation point causes the beam to expand radially to the beam electron gyroradius.

  13. A simulation study of interactions of space-shuttle generated electron beams with ambient plasma and neutral gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to conduct large scale simulations of electron beams injected into space. The study of the active injection of electron beams from spacecraft is important, as it provides valuable insight into the plasma beam interactions and the development of current systems in the ionosphere. However, the beam injection itself is not simple, being constrained by the ability of the spacecraft to draw current from the ambient plasma. The generation of these return currents is dependent on several factors, including the density of the ambient plasma relative to the beam density, the presence of neutrals around the spacecraft, the configuration of the spacecraft, and the motion of the spacecraft through the plasma. Two dimensional (three velocity) particle simulations with collisional processes included are used to show how these different and often coupled processes can be used to enhance beam propagation from the spacecraft. To understand the radial expansion mechanism of an electron beam injected from a highly charged spacecraft, two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations were conducted for a high density electron beam injected parallel to magnetic fields from an isolated equipotential conductor into a cold background plasma. The simulations indicate that charge build-up at the beam stagnation point causes the beam to expand radially to the beam electron gyroradius.

  14. Propagation and scattering of optical light beams in free space, in atmosphere and in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Serkan

    With their first production implemented around 1960's, lasers have afterwards proven to be excellent light sources in building the technology. Subsequently, it has been shown that the extraordinary properties of lasers are related to their coherence properties. Recent developments in optics make it possible to synthesize partially coherent light beams from fully coherent ones. In the last several decades it was seen that using partially coherent light sources may be advantageous, in the areas such as laser surface processing, fiber and free-space optical communications, and medical diagnostics. In this thesis, I study extensively the generation, the propagation in different media, and the scattering of partially coherent light beams with respect to their spectral polarization and coherence states. For instance, I analyze the evolution of recently introduced degree of cross-polarization of light fields in free space; then develop a novel partially coherent light source which acquires and keeps a flat intensity profile around the axis at any distance in the far field; and investigate the interaction of electromagnetic random light with the human eye lens. A part of the thesis treats the effect of atmospheric turbulence on random light beams. Due to random variations in the refractive index, atmospheric turbulence modulates all physical and statistical properties of propagating beams. I have explored the possibility of employing the polarimetric domain of the beam for scintillation reduction, which positively affects the performance of free-space communication systems. I also discuss novel techniques for the sensing of rough targets in the turbulent atmosphere by polarization and coherence properties of light. The other contribution to the thesis is the investigation of light scattering from deterministic or random collections of particles, within the validity of first Born approximation. In the case of a random collection, I introduce and model the new quantity

  15. Power electronic applications for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickrell, Roy L.; Lazbin, Igor

    1990-01-01

    NASA plans to orbit a permanently manned space station in the late 1990s, which requires development and assembly of a photovoltaic (PV) power source system to supply up to 75 kW of electrical power average during the orbital period. The electrical power requirements are to be met by a combination of PV source, storage, and control elements for the sun and eclipse periods. The authors discuss the application of power electronics and controls to manage the generation, storage, and distribution of power to meet the station loads, as well as the computer models used for analysis and simulation of the PV power system. The requirements for power source integrated controls to adjust storage charge power during the insolation period current limiting, breaker interrupt current values, and the electrical fault protection approach are defined. Based on these requirements, operating concepts have been defined which then become drivers for specific system and element design.

  16. Wireless Power Transfer for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos, Gabriel Vazquez; Yuan, Jiann-Shiun

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces an implementation for magnetic resonance wireless power transfer for space applications. The analysis includes an equivalent impedance study, loop material characterization, source/load resonance coupling technique, and system response behavior due to loads variability. System characterization is accomplished by executing circuit design from analytical equations and simulations using Matlab and SPICE. The theory was validated by a combination of different experiments that includes loop material consideration, resonance coupling circuits considerations, electric loads considerations and a small scale proof-of-concept prototype. Experiment results shows successful wireless power transfer for all the cases studied. The prototype provided about 4.5 W of power to the load at a separation of -5 cm from the source using a power amplifier rated for 7 W.

  17. Steerable Space Fed Lens Array for Low-Cost Adaptive Ground Station Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Popovic, Zoya; Rondineau, Sebastien; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Fed Lens Array (SFLA) is an alternative to a phased array antenna that replaces large numbers of expensive solid-state phase shifters with a single spatial feed network. SFLA can be used for multi-beam application where multiple independent beams can be generated simultaneously with a single antenna aperture. Unlike phased array antennas where feed loss increases with array size, feed loss in a lens array with more than 50 elements is nearly independent of the number of elements, a desirable feature for large apertures. In addition, SFLA has lower cost as compared to a phased array at the expense of total volume and complete beam continuity. For ground station applications, both of these tradeoff parameters are not important and can thus be exploited in order to lower the cost of the ground station. In this paper, we report the development and demonstration of a 952-element beam-steerable SFLA intended for use as a low cost ground station for communicating and tracking of a low Earth orbiting satellite. The dynamic beam steering is achieved through switching to different feed-positions of the SFLA via a beam controller.

  18. Confocal scanning beam laser microscope/macroscope: applications in fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Arthur E.; Damaskinos, Savvas; Ribes, Alfonso

    1996-03-01

    A new confocal scanning beam laser microscope/macroscope is described that combines the rapid scan of a scanning beam laser microscope with the large specimen capability of a scanning stage microscope. This instrument combines an infinity-corrected confocal scanning laser microscope with a scanning laser macroscope that uses a telecentric f*(Theta) laser scan lens to produce a confocal imaging system with a resolution of 0.25 microns at a field of view of 25 microns and 5 microns at a field of view of 75,000 microns. The frame rate is 5 seconds per frame for a 512 by 512 pixel image, and 25 seconds for a 2048 by 2048 pixel image. Applications in fluorescence are discussed that focus on two important advantages of the instrument over a confocal scanning laser microscope: an extremely wide range of magnification, and the ability to image very large specimens. Examples are presented of fluorescence and reflected-light images of high quality printing, fluorescence images of latent fingerprints, packaging foam, and confocal autofluorescence images of a cricket.

  19. Development of mobile electron beam plant for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bumsoo; Kim, Jinkyu; Kang, Wongu; Choi, Jang Seung; Jeong, Kwang-Young

    2016-07-01

    Due to the necessity of pilot scale test facility for continuous treatment of wastewater and gases on site, a mobile electron beam irradiation system mounted on a trailer has developed. This mobile electron beam irradiation system is designed for the individual field application with self-shielded structure of steel plate and lead block which will satisfy the required safety figures of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Shielding of a mobile electron accelerator of 0.7 MeV, 30 mA has been designed and examined by Monte Carlo technique. Based on a 3-D model of electron accelerator shielding which is designed with steel and lead shield, radiation leakage was examined using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) Code. Simulations with two different versions (version 4c2 and version 5) of MCNP code showed agreements within statistical uncertainties, and the highest leakage expected is 5.5061×10-01 (1±0.0454) μSv/h, which is far below the tolerable radiation dose limit for occupational workers. This unit could treat up to 500 m3 of liquid waste per day at 2 kGy or 10,000 N m3 of gases per hour at 15 kGy.

  20. Application of an atomic oxygen beam facility to the investigation of shuttle glow chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, G. S.; Peplinski, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    A facility for the investigation of the interactions of energetic atomic oxygen with solids is described. The facility is comprised of a four chambered, differentially pumped molecular beam apparatus which can be equipped with one of a variety of sources of atomic oxygen. The primary source is a dc arc heated supersonic nozzle source which produces a flux of atomic oxygen in excess of 10 to the 15th power sq cm/sec at the target, at a velocity of 3.5 km/sec. Results of applications of this facility to the study of the reactions of atomic oxygen with carbon and polyimide films are briefly reviewed and compared to data obtained on various flights of the space shuttle. A brief discussion of possible application of this facility to investigation of chemical reactions which might contribute to atmosphere induced vehicle glow is presented.

  1. Electrostatic wave observation during a space simulation beam-plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D. N.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1985-01-01

    ELF waves which were observed during beam-plasma discharge in the large vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center are studied. Phase delays as a function of radius (obtained from cross-correlation measurements of density fluctuations) along with measurements of frequency and plasma potential, density, and temperature have been compared to a zero-order slab model of nonlocal azimuthal drift wave propagation. The inferred wave phase velocity in the plasma frame after Doppler correction is found to be near one half the electron diamagnetic drift velocity. Although the measurements presented do not uniquely define a propagation mode, a model of azimuthal drift wave propagation is found to be consistent with observations.

  2. Investigations for the improvement of space shuttle main engine electron beam welding equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smock, R. A.; Taylor, R. A.; Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made in the testing, evaluation, and correction of MSFC's 7.5 kW electron beam welder in support of space shuttle main engine component welding is summarized. The objective of this project was to locate and correct the deficiencies in the welder. Some 17 areas were deficient in the 7.5 kW ERI welding system and the associated corrective action was taken to improve its operational performance. An overall improvement of 20 times the original reliability was obtained at full rated capacity after the modifications were made.

  3. Space-charge compensation measurements in electron cyclotron resonance ion source low energy beam transport lines with a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D. Cole, D.; Machicoane, G.; Tobos, L.

    2014-02-15

    In this paper we describe the first systematic measurement of beam neutralization (space charge compensation) in the ECR low energy transport line with a retarding field analyzer, which can be used to measure the potential of the beam. Expected trends for the space charge compensation levels such as increase with residual gas pressure, beam current, and beam density could be observed. However, the overall levels of neutralization are consistently low (<60%). The results and the processes involved for neutralizing ion beams are discussed for conditions typical for ECR injector beam lines. The results are compared to a simple theoretical beam plasma model as well as simulations.

  4. Application of Interval Predictor Models to Space Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy,Daniel P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops techniques for predicting the uncertainty range of an output variable given input-output data. These models are called Interval Predictor Models (IPM) because they yield an interval valued function of the input. This paper develops IPMs having a radial basis structure. This structure enables the formal description of (i) the uncertainty in the models parameters, (ii) the predicted output interval, and (iii) the probability that a future observation would fall in such an interval. In contrast to other metamodeling techniques, this probabilistic certi cate of correctness does not require making any assumptions on the structure of the mechanism from which data are drawn. Optimization-based strategies for calculating IPMs having minimal spread while containing all the data are developed. Constraints for bounding the minimum interval spread over the continuum of inputs, regulating the IPMs variation/oscillation, and centering its spread about a target point, are used to prevent data over tting. Furthermore, we develop an approach for using expert opinion during extrapolation. This metamodeling technique is illustrated using a radiation shielding application for space exploration. In this application, we use IPMs to describe the error incurred in predicting the ux of particles resulting from the interaction between a high-energy incident beam and a target.

  5. A high-resolution multi-slit phase space measurement technique for low-emittance beams

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, J. C. T.; Piot, P.

    2012-12-21

    Precise measurement of transverse phase space of a high-brightness electron beamis of fundamental importance in modern accelerators and free-electron lasers. Often, the transverse phase space of a high-brightness, space-charge-dominated electron beam is measured using a multi-slit method. In this method, a transverse mask (slit/pepperpot) samples the beaminto a set of beamlets, which are then analyzed on to a screen downstream. The resolution in this method is limited by the type of screen used which is typically around 20 {mu}m for a high-sensitivity Yttrium Aluminum Garnet screen. Accurate measurement of sub-micron transverse emittance using this method would require a long drift space between the multi-slit mask and observation screen. In this paper, we explore a variation of the technique that incorporates quadrupole magnets between the multi-slit mask and the screen. It is shown that this arrangement can improve the resolution of the transverse-phase-space measurement with in a short footprint.

  6. ERDA with an external helium ion micro-beam: Advantages and potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calligaro, T.; Castaing, J.; Dran, J.-C.; Moignard, B.; Pivin, J.-C.; Prasad, G. V. R.; Salomon, J.; Walter, P.

    2001-07-01

    Preliminary ERDA experiments at atmospheric pressure have been performed with our external microprobe set-up currently used for the analysis of museum objects by PIXE, RBS and NRA. The objective was to check the feasibility of hydrogen (and deuterium) profiling with an external beam of 3-MeV helium ions. The standard scattering geometry (incident beam at 15° with respect to sample surface and emerging protons or deuterons at 15° in the forward direction) was kept, but the thin foil absorber was replaced by helium gas filling the space between the beam spot and the detector over a distance of about 84 mm. Several standards prepared by ion implantation, with well known H or D depth profiles, were first analysed, which indicated that the analytical capability was as good as under vacuum. A striking feature is the much lower surface peak than under vacuum, a fact that enhances the sensitivity for H analysis near the surface. The same type of measurement was then performed on different materials to show the usefulness of the technique. As a first example, we have checked that the incorporation of H or D into sapphire crystals during mechanical polishing is below the detection limit. Another example is the measurement of the H content in emeralds which can be used as an additional compositional criterion for determining the provenance of emeralds set in museum jewels. The advantages and limitations of our set-up are discussed and several possible applications in the field of cultural heritage are described.

  7. Advancing differential atom interferometry for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Williams, Jason; Yu, Nan

    2016-05-01

    Atom interferometer (AI) based sensors exhibit precision and accuracy unattainable with classical sensors, thanks to the inherent stability of atomic properties. Dual atomic sensors operating in a differential mode further extend AI applicability beyond environmental disturbances. Extraction of the phase difference between dual AIs, however, typically introduces uncertainty and systematic in excess of that warranted by each AI's intrinsic noise characteristics, especially in practical applications and real time measurements. In this presentation, we report our efforts in developing practical schemes for reducing noises and enhancing sensitivities in the differential AI measurement implementations. We will describe an active phase extraction method that eliminates the noise overhead and demonstrates a performance boost of a gravity gradiometer by a factor of 3. We will also describe a new long-baseline approach for differential AI measurements in a laser ranging assisted AI configuration. The approach uses well-developed AIs for local measurements but leverage the mature schemes of space laser interferometry for LISA and GRACE. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a Contract with NASA.

  8. Laser-beam power for lunar and space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Williams, Michael D.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Iles, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    Photovoltaic properties of GaAlAs/GaAs heteroface converters were measured using a 0.81-micron diode laser. Results indicate that the converters under consideration are promising devices for converting diode-laser radiation to electricity. Conversion efficiency as high as 45 percent has been obtained using GaAs devices, while Si converters of the SSF type give efficiencies up to 34.2 percent.

  9. Laser-beam power for lunar and space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Williams, Michael D.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Iles, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    GaAlAs/GaAs heteroface converters were experimentally tested using DIRECT laser irradiation of photovoltaic devices. It is concluded that the two types of converters are promising for converting diode-laser radiation to electricity. Conversion efficiency as high as 45 and 34.2 percent was obtained using GaAS and Si converters of the SSF type, respectively.

  10. Laser-beam power for lunar and space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Williams, Michael D.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Iles, Peter A.

    GaAlAs/GaAs heteroface converters were experimentally tested using DIRECT laser irradiation of photovoltaic devices. It is concluded that the two types of converters are promising for converting diode-laser radiation to electricity. Conversion efficiency as high as 45 and 34.2 percent was obtained using GaAS and Si converters of the SSF type, respectively.

  11. Laser-beam power for lunar and space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Williams, Michael D.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Iles, Peter A.

    Photovoltaic properties of GaAlAs/GaAs heteroface converters were measured using a 0.81-micron diode laser. Results indicate that the converters under consideration are promising devices for converting diode-laser radiation to electricity. Conversion efficiency as high as 45 percent has been obtained using GaAs devices, while Si converters of the SSF type give efficiencies up to 34.2 percent.

  12. Space Transportation Systems, Aeronautics and Space Technology, Space and Terrestrial Applications, and Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This report is prepared on an annual basis for the purposes of highlighting the fiscal year research and technology (R&T) activities. Its intent is to better inform the R&T Program Managers of significant accomplishments that promise practical and beneficial program application. The report is not inclusive of all R&T activities. The document is organized into two distinct sections: (1) a general summary of the major R&T activities in each program area, and (2) a description of significant individual completed activities and their results. This document will be updated November 1 of each year.

  13. Imaging pore space in tight gas sandstone reservoir: insights from broad ion beam cross-sectioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, G.; Enzmann, F.; Urai, J. L.; Baerle, C.; Kukla, P. A.; Konstanty, J.

    2010-06-01

    Monetization of tight gas reservoirs, which contain significant gas reserves world-wide, represents a challenge for the entire oil and gas industry. The development of new technologies to enhance tight gas reservoir productivity is strongly dependent on an improved understanding of the rock properties and especially the pore framework. Numerous methods are now available to characterize sandstone cores. However, the pore space characterization at pore scale remains difficult due to the fine pore size and delicate sample preparation, and has thus been mostly indirectly inferred until now. Here we propose a new method of ultra high-resolution petrography combining high resolution SEM and argon ion beam cross sectioning (BIB, Broad Ion Beam) which prepares smooth and damage free surfaces. We demonstrate this method using the example of Permian (Rotliegend) age tight gas sandstone core samples. The combination of Ar-beam cross-sectioning facility and high-resolution SEM imaging has the potential to result in a step change in the understanding of pore geometries, in terms of its morphology, spatial distribution and evolution based on the generation of unprecedented image quality and resolution enhancing the predictive reliability of image analysis.

  14. Antiproton Trapping for Advanced Space Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gerald A.

    1998-01-01

    The Summary of Research parallels the Statement of Work (Appendix I) submitted with the proposal, and funded effective Feb. 1, 1997 for one year. A proposal was submitted to CERN in October, 1996 to carry out an experiment on the synthesis and study of fundamental properties of atomic antihydrogen. Since confined atomic antihydrogen is potentially the most powerful and elegant source of propulsion energy known, its confinement and properties are of great interest to the space propulsion community. Appendix II includes an article published in the technical magazine Compressed Air, June 1997, which describes CERN antiproton facilities, and ATHENA. During the period of this grant, Prof. Michael Holzscheiter served as spokesman for ATHENA and, in collaboration with Prof. Gerald Smith, worked on the development of the antiproton confinement trap, which is an important part of the ATHENA experiment. Appendix III includes a progress report submitted to CERN on March 12, 1997 concerning development of the ATHENA detector. Section 4.1 reviews technical responsibilities within the ATHENA collaboration, including the Antiproton System, headed by Prof. Holzscheiter. The collaboration was advised (see Appendix IV) on June 13, 1997 that the CERN Research Board had approved ATHENA for operation at the new Antiproton Decelerator (AD), presently under construction. First antiproton beams are expected to be delivered to experiments in about one year. Progress toward assembly of the ATHENA detector and initial testing expected in 1999 has been excellent. Appendix V includes a copy of the minutes of the most recently documented collaboration meeting held at CERN of October 24, 1997, which provides more information on development of systems, including the antiproton trapping apparatus. On February 10, 1998 Prof. Smith gave a 3 hour lecture on the Physics of Antimatter, as part of the Physics for the Third Millennium Lecture Series held at MSFC. Included in Appendix VI are notes and

  15. , a Thermoelectric Material for Space Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    2014-09-01

    The compound Yb14MnSb11 is a p-type thermoelectric material of interest for space power applications. However, average rates of sublimation previously measured at 1000°C were unacceptably high. In at least one study, Yb2O3 was observed on the surface after testing. In this study, the rate of sublimation of Yb14MnSb11 was measured at 1000°C by use of a vacuum thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) which continuously measures weight loss as a result of sublimation. This experiment revealed that the rate of sublimation decreased with time, but also resulted in formation of Yb2O3 on the surface, even though the base pressure at the start of the test was 1.9 × 10-4 Pa (1.4 × 10-6 torr). Subsequently, the effect of the Yb2O3 on the rate of sublimation was evaluated by performing interrupted vacuum furnace tests in which the sample was weighed after exposure at 1000°C for different times. During the weighing periods, the accumulated oxide scale was either completely removed or left to accumulate further on the surface. The interrupted furnace tests showed that formation of Yb2O3 on the surface was the likely cause of the reduction in the rate of sublimation of the Yb14MnSb11 when measured by use of the vacuum TGA, at least for the measured test duration. Therefore, uncoated material in the vacuum of space, where oxygen is absent, would be likely to sublime at a continuous rate in excess of 5 × 10-3 g/cm2/h.

  16. New Generation Power System for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Loren; Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Lam, Barbara; Nelson, Ron; Pantaleon, Jose; Ruiz, Ian; Treicler, John; Wester, Gene; Sauers, Jim; Giampoli, Paul; Haskell, Russ; Mulvey, Jim; Repp, John

    2004-01-01

    The Deep Space Avionics (DSA) Project is developing a new generation of power system building blocks. Using application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and power switching modules a scalable power system can be constructed for use on multiple deep space missions including future missions to Mars, comets, Jupiter and its moons. The key developments of the DSA power system effort are five power ASICs and a mod ule for power switching. These components enable a modular and scalab le design approach, which can result in a wide variety of power syste m architectures to meet diverse mission requirements and environments . Each component is radiation hardened to one megarad) total dose. The power switching module can be used for power distribution to regular spacecraft loads, to propulsion valves and actuation of pyrotechnic devices. The number of switching elements per load, pyrotechnic firin gs and valve drivers can be scaled depending on mission needs. Teleme try data is available from the switch module via an I2C data bus. The DSA power system components enable power management and distribution for a variety of power buses and power system architectures employing different types of energy storage and power sources. This paper will describe each power ASIC#s key performance characteristics as well a s recent prototype test results. The power switching module test results will be discussed and will demonstrate its versatility as a multip urpose switch. Finally, the combination of these components will illu strate some of the possible power system architectures achievable fro m small single string systems to large fully redundant systems.

  17. Investigation of ion beam space charge compensation with a 4-grid analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, C. Adonin, A.; Berezov, R.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Kester, O.; Chauvin, N.; Delferrière, O.; Senée, F.; Tuske, O.

    2016-02-15

    Experiments to investigate the space charge compensation of pulsed high-current heavy ion beams are performed at the GSI ion source text benches with a 4-grid analyzer provided by CEA/Saclay. The technical design of the 4-grid analyzer is revised to verify its functionality for measurements at pulsed high-current heavy ion beams. The experimental investigation of space charge compensation processes is needed to increase the performance and quality of current and future accelerator facilities. Measurements are performed directly downstream a triode extraction system mounted to a multi-cusp ion source at a high-current test bench as well as downstream the post-acceleration system of the high-current test injector (HOSTI) with ion energies up to 120 keV/u for helium and argon. At HOSTI, a cold or hot reflex discharge ion source is used to change the conditions for the measurements. The measurements were performed with helium, argon, and xenon and are presented. Results from measurements with single aperture extraction systems are shown.

  18. Laser power beaming: an emerging technology for power transmission and propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.

    1997-05-01

    A ground based laser beam transmitted to space can be used as an electric utility for satellites. It can significantly increase the electric power available to operate a satellite or to transport it from low earth orbit (LEO) to mid earth or geosynchronous orbits. The increase in electrical power compared to that obtainable from the sun is as much as 1000% for the same size solar panels. An increase in satellite electric power is needed to meet the increasing demands for power caused by the advent of 'direct to home TV,' for increased telecommunications, or for other demands made by the burgeoning 'space highway.' Monetary savings as compared to putting up multiple satellites in the same 'slot' can be over half a billion dollars. To obtain propulsion, the laser power can be beamed through the atmosphere to an 'orbit transfer vehicle' (OTV) satellite which travels back and forth between LEO and higher earth orbits. The OTV will transport the satellite into orbit as does a rocket but does not require the heavy fuel load needed if rocket propulsion is used. Monetary savings of 300% or more in launch costs are predicted. Key elements in the proposed concept are a 100 to 200 kW free- electron laser operating at 0.84 m in the photographic infrared region of the spectrum and a novel adaptive optic telescope.

  19. Investigation of ion beam space charge compensation with a 4-grid analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, C.; Adonin, A.; Berezov, R.; Chauvin, N.; Delferrière, O.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Kester, O.; Senée, F.; Tuske, O.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments to investigate the space charge compensation of pulsed high-current heavy ion beams are performed at the GSI ion source text benches with a 4-grid analyzer provided by CEA/Saclay. The technical design of the 4-grid analyzer is revised to verify its functionality for measurements at pulsed high-current heavy ion beams. The experimental investigation of space charge compensation processes is needed to increase the performance and quality of current and future accelerator facilities. Measurements are performed directly downstream a triode extraction system mounted to a multi-cusp ion source at a high-current test bench as well as downstream the post-acceleration system of the high-current test injector (HOSTI) with ion energies up to 120 keV/u for helium and argon. At HOSTI, a cold or hot reflex discharge ion source is used to change the conditions for the measurements. The measurements were performed with helium, argon, and xenon and are presented. Results from measurements with single aperture extraction systems are shown.

  20. An iodine-based frequency reference for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuldt, Thilo; Johann, Ulrich; Doeringshoff, Klaus; Kovalchuk, Evgeny; Peters, Achim; Braxmaier, Claus; Pahl, Julia; Stuehler, Johannes; Franz, Matthias

    We present the development of an iodine-based frequency reference for future potential applications in space, including the gravitational wave detector LISA/eLISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna), the mini SpaceTime Asymmetry Research (mSTAR) program, the aperture-synthesis telescope Darwin and the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) follow on mission/NGGM (Next Generation Gravity Mission) exploring Earth's gravity. Based on a state-of-the-art laboratory iodine frequency reference, setups on elegant breadboard (EBB) and engineering model (EM) level were realized, taking into account specific design criteria for space compatibility such as compactness and robustness. Both setups employ modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS) in combination with balanced detection. They use a baseplate made of glass material in combination with a dedicated easy-to-handle assembly-integration technology (adhesive bonding) ensuring high pointing stability of the two counter-propagating laser beams in the iodine cell and therefore high long-term stability. The EBB setup utilizes a commercial off-the-shelf 30 cm long iodine cell in triple-pass configuration, the EM setup a specifically designed and manufactured compact iodine cell made of fused silica in a nine-pass configuration with a specific robust cold finger design. Both setups were characterized in beat measurements with a ULE cavity setup. Similar frequency stabilities of about 1*10 (-14) at an integration time of 1 s and below 5*10 (-15) at integration times between 10 s and 100 s were demonstrated. These values are comparable to the currently best laboratory setups. The EM setup was further subjected to environmental testing including thermal cycling and vibrational testing. Financial support by the German Space Agency DLR with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) under grant numbers 50 QT 1102 and 50 QT 1201 is highly appreciated. The authors thank Jan Hrabina and Josef Lazar

  1. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  2. Clinical aspects and potential clinical applications of laser accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatola, C.; Privitera, G.

    2013-07-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT), as well as the other forms of hadrontherapy, is in use in the treatment of neoplastic diseases, to realize a high selective irradiation with maximum sparing of surrounding organs. The main characteristic of such a particles is to have an increased radiobiological effectiveness compared to conventional photons (about 10% more) and the advantage to deposit the energy in a defined space through the tissues (Bragg peak phenomenon). The goal of ELIMED Project is the realization of a laser accelerated proton beam line to prove its potential use for clinical application in the field of hadrontherapy. To date, there are several potential clinical applications of PBRT, some of which have become the treatment of choice for a specific tumour, for others it is under investigation as a therapeutic alternative to conventional X-ray radiotherapy, to increase the dose to the tumour and reduce the side effects. For almost half of cancers, an increased local tumour control is the mainstay for increased cancer curability.

  3. The FLUKA code: new developments and applications for radiation protection in deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, A.; Fluka Collaboration

    The FLUKA code is used for dosimetry, radioprotection and physics simulations in several fields, ranging from accelerators, to commercial flight dosimetry and space radiation. It is the code used for all radioprotection and dosimetry applicatiuons at CERN, in particular for the Large Hadron Collider project, which when operational in 2008 will accelerate protons up to 7 TeV, and Pb ions up to 2.7 TeV/n. In recent years, the code underwent significant improvements in the treatment of heavy ion beams in an energy range covering therapy, space dosimetry and fundamental physics related to galactic cosmic rays and future LHC beams. The talk will present the latest developments in the modelling of nucleus-nucleus interactions, including the implementation of a model for ion electromagnetic dissociation. The talk will also include an application of FLUKA models to a a Fe ion beam of interest for dosimetry and radiobiological applications and experiments. Various results obtained with the models, as well as several issues related to hadron beam dosimetry will be presented and discussed.

  4. Space charge field in a FEL with axially symmetric electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, I.A.; Belyavskiy, E.D.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear two-dimensional theory of the space charge of an axially symmetric electron beam propagating in combined right-hand polarized wiggler and uniform axial guide fields in a presence of high-frequency electromagnetic wave is presented. The well-known TE{sub 01} mode in a cylindrical waveguide for the model of radiation fields and paraxial approximation for the wiggler field are used. Space charge field components are written in the Lagrange coordinates by the twice averaged Green`s functions of two equally charged infinitely thin discs. For that {open_quotes}compensating charges{close_quotes} method is applied in which an electron ring model is substituted by one with two different radii and signs discs. On this approach the initial Green`s functions peculiarities are eliminated and all calculations are considerably simplified. Coefficients of a twice averaged Green`s function expansion into a Fourier series are obtained by use of corresponding expansion coefficients of longitudinal Green`s functions of equal radii discs and identical rings known from the one-dimensional theory of super HF devices taking into account electron bunches periodicity. This approach permit the space charge field components for an arbitrary stratified stream to be expressed in a simple and strict enough form. The expressions obtained can be employed in a nonlinear two-dimensional FEL theory in order to investigate beam dynamical defocusing and electrons failing on the waveguide walls in the high gain regime. This is especially important for FEL operation in mm and submm.

  5. Medical applications of space light-emitting diode technology-space station and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Houle, John M.; Donohoe, Deborah L.; Bajic, Dawn M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Reichert, Kenneth W.; Weyenberg, George T.; Larson, David L.; Meyer, Glenn A.; Caviness, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Space light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment and wound healing. This LED technology has already flown on Space Shuttle missions, and shows promise for wound healing applications of benefit to Space Station astronauts.

  6. Medical Applications of Space Light-Emitting Diode Technology--Space Station and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, H.T.; Houle, J.M.; Donohoe, D.L.; Bajic, D.M.; Schmidt, M.H.; Reichert, K.W.; Weyenberg, G.T.; Larson, D.L.; Meyer, G.A.; Caviness, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Space light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment and wound healing. This LED technology has already flown on Space Shuttle missions, and shows promise for wound healing applications of benefit to Space Station astronauts.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Landi, Brian J.; Denno, Patrick L.; DiLeo, Roberta A.; VanDerveer, William; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be envisioned as an individual graphene sheet rolled into a seamless cylinder (single-walled, SWNT), or concentric sheets as in the case of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) (1). The role-up vector will determine the hexagonal arrangement and "chirality" of the graphene sheet, which will establish the nanotube to be metallic or semiconducting. The optoelectronic properties will depend directly on this chiral angle and the diameter of the SWNT, with semiconductor types exhibiting a band gap energy (2). Characteristic of MWNTs are the concentric graphene layers spaced 0.34 nm apart, with diameters from 10-200 nm and lengths up to hundreds of microns (2). In the case of SWNTs, the diameters range from 0.4 - 2 nm and lengths have been reported up to 1.5 cm (3). SWNTs have the distinguishable property of "bundling" together due to van der Waal's attractions to form "ropes." A comparison of these different structural types is shown in Figure 1. The use of SWNTS in space photovoltaic (PV) applications is attractive for a variety of reasons. Carbon nanotubes as a class of materials exhibit unprecedented optical, electrical, mechanical properties, with the added benefit of being nanoscale in size which fosters ideal interaction in nanomaterial-based devices like polymeric solar cells. The optical bandgap of semiconducting SWNTs can be varied from approx. 0.4 - 1.5 eV, with this property being inversely proportional to the nanotube diameter. Recent work at GE Global Research has shown where a single nanotube device can behave as an "ideal" pn diode (5). The SWNT was bridged over a SiO2 channel between Mo contacts and exhibited an ideality factor of 1, based on a fit of the current-voltage data using the diode equation. The measured PV efficiency under a 0.8 eV monochromatic illumination showed a power conversion efficiency of 0.2 %. However, the projected efficiency of these junctions is estimated to be > 5 %, especially when one considers the

  8. Experimental study on modulation of Stokes parameters on propagation of a Gaussian Schell model beam in free space.

    PubMed

    Verma, Manish; Senthilkumaran, P; Joseph, Joby; Kandpal, H C

    2013-07-01

    The effect on the Stokes parameters of a Gaussian Schell model beam on propagation in free space is studied experimentally and results are matched with the theory [X. H. Zhao, et al. Opt. Express 17, 17888 (2009)] that in general the degree of polarization of a Gaussian Schell model beam doesn't change on propagation if the three spectral correlation widths δ xx, δ yy, δ xy are equal and the beam width parameters σ x =σ y. It is experimentally shown that all the four Stokes parameters at the center of the beam decrease on propagation while the magnitudes of the normalized Stokes parameters and the spectral degree of polarization at the center of the beam remain constant for different propagation distances.

  9. Implementation of ordinary and extraordinary beams interference by application of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonina, S. N.; Karpeev, S. V.; Morozov, A. A.; Paranin, V. D.

    2016-07-01

    We apply diffractive optical elements in problems of transformation of Bessel beams in a birefringent crystal. Using plane waves expansion we show a significant interference between the ordinary and extraordinary beams due to the energy transfer in the orthogonal transverse components in the nonparaxial mode. A comparative analysis of the merits and lack of diffractive and refractive axicons in problems of formation non-paraxial Bessel beams has shown the preferability of diffractive optics application in crystal optics. The transformation of uniformly polarised Bessel beams in the crystal of Iceland spar in the nonparaxial mode by application of a diffractive axicon is investigated numerically and experimentally.

  10. Ghost reflections of Gaussian beams in anamorphic optical systems with an application to Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Maksoud, Rania H

    2016-02-20

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to model and analyze the effect of undesired (ghost) reflections of Gaussian beams that are produced by anamorphic optical systems. The superposition of these beams with the nominal beam modulates the nominal power distribution at the recording plane. This modulation may cause contrast reduction, veiling parts of the nominal image, and/or the formation of spurious interference fringes. The developed methodology is based on synthesizing the beam optical paths into nominal and ghost optical beam paths. Similar to the nominal beam, we present the concept that each ghost beam is characterized by a beam size, wavefront radius of curvature, and Gouy phase in the paraxial regime. The nominal and ghost beams are sequentially traced through the system and formulas for estimating the electric field magnitude and phase of each ghost beam at the recording plane are presented. The effective electric field is the addition of the individual nominal and ghost electric fields. Formulas for estimating Gouy phase, the shape of the interference fringes, and the central interference order are introduced. As an application, the theory of the formation of the interference fringes by Michelson interferometer is presented. This theory takes into consideration the ghost reflections that are formed by the beam splitter. To illustrate the theory and to show its wide applicability, simulation examples that include a Mangin mirror, a Michelson interferometer, and a black box optical system are provided.

  11. Effect of high current electron beam in a 30 MeV radio frequency linac for neutron-time-of-flight applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, B. Acharya, S.; Rajawat, R. K.; DasGupta, K.

    2016-01-15

    A high power pulsed radio frequency electron linac is designed by BARC, India to accelerate 30 MeV, 10 A, 10 ns beam for neutron-time-of-flight applications. It will be used as a neutron generator and will produce ∼10{sup 12}–10{sup 13} n/s. It is essential to reduce the beam instability caused by space charge effect and the beam cavity interaction. In this paper, the wakefield losses in the accelerating section due to bunch of RMS (Root mean square) length 2 mm (at the gun exit) is analysed. Loss and kick factors are numerically calculated using CST wakefield solver. Both the longitudinal and transverse wake potentials are incorporated in beam dynamics code ELEGANT to find the transverse emittance growth of the beam propagating through the linac. Beam loading effect is examined by means of numerical computation carried out in ASTRA code. Beam break up start current has been estimated at the end of the linac which arises due to deflecting modes excited by the high current beam. At the end, transverse beam dynamics of such high current beam has been analysed.

  12. Effect of high current electron beam in a 30 MeV radio frequency linac for neutron-time-of-flight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, B.; Acharya, S.; Rajawat, R. K.; DasGupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    A high power pulsed radio frequency electron linac is designed by BARC, India to accelerate 30 MeV, 10 A, 10 ns beam for neutron-time-of-flight applications. It will be used as a neutron generator and will produce ˜1012-1013 n/s. It is essential to reduce the beam instability caused by space charge effect and the beam cavity interaction. In this paper, the wakefield losses in the accelerating section due to bunch of RMS (Root mean square) length 2 mm (at the gun exit) is analysed. Loss and kick factors are numerically calculated using CST wakefield solver. Both the longitudinal and transverse wake potentials are incorporated in beam dynamics code ELEGANT to find the transverse emittance growth of the beam propagating through the linac. Beam loading effect is examined by means of numerical computation carried out in ASTRA code. Beam break up start current has been estimated at the end of the linac which arises due to deflecting modes excited by the high current beam. At the end, transverse beam dynamics of such high current beam has been analysed.

  13. Reliability Assessment for COTS Components in Space Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, G. S.; Mazzuchi, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Systems built for space flight applications usually demand very high degree of performance and a very high level of accuracy. Hence, the design engineers are often prone to selecting state-of-art technologies for inclusion in their system design. The shrinking budgets also necessitate use of COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf) components, which are construed as being less expensive. The performance and accuracy requirements for space flight applications are much more stringent than those for the commercial applications. The quantity of systems designed and developed for space applications are much lower in number than those produced for the commercial applications. With a given set of requirements, are these COTS components reliable? This paper presents a model for assessing the reliability of COTS components in space applications and the associated affect on the system reliability. We illustrate the method with a real application.

  14. Application of optical beams to electrons in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Matulis, A.; Masir, M. Ramezani; Peeters, F. M.

    2011-03-15

    The technique of beam optics is applied to the description of the wave function of Dirac electrons. This approach is illustrated by considering electron transmission through simple nonhomogeneous structures, such as flat and bent p-n junctions and superlattices. We found that a convex p-n junction compresses the beam waist, while a concave interface widens it without loosing its focusing properties. At a flat p-n junction the waist of the transmitted Gaussian beam can be narrowed or widened, depending on the angle of incidence. A general condition is derived for the occurrence of beam collimation in a superlattice which is less stringent than previous discussed.

  15. Applications review for a Space Program Imaging Radar (SPIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonett, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    The needs, applications, user support, research, and theoretical studies of imaging radar are reviewed. The applications of radar in water resources, minerals and petroleum exploration, vegetation resources, ocean radar imaging, and cartography are discussed. The advantages of space imaging radar are presented, and it is recommended that imaging radar be placed on the space shuttle.

  16. Second Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollman, Thomas (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings of the conference are presented. This second conference on Artificial Intelligence for Space Applications brings together a diversity of scientific and engineering work and is intended to provide an opportunity for those who employ AI methods in space applications to identify common goals and to discuss issues of general interest in the AI community.

  17. The 1994 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Carl F. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1994 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence held at the NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland, on 10-12 May 1994. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of TrueBeam flattening-filter-free beams using Varian phase-space files: Comparison with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Belosi, Maria F.; Fogliata, Antonella E-mail: afc@iosi.ch; Cozzi, Luca; Clivio, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Rodriguez, Miguel; Sempau, Josep; Krauss, Harald; Khamphan, Catherine; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Puxeu, Josep; Fedele, David; Mancosu, Pietro; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-space files for Monte Carlo simulation of the Varian TrueBeam beams have been made available by Varian. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the distributed phase-space files for flattening filter free (FFF) beams, against experimental measurements from ten TrueBeam Linacs. Methods: The phase-space files have been used as input in PRIMO, a recently released Monte Carlo program based on thePENELOPE code. Simulations of 6 and 10 MV FFF were computed in a virtual water phantom for field sizes 3 × 3, 6 × 6, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} using 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3} voxels and for 20 × 20 and 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} with 2 × 2 × 2 mm{sup 3} voxels. The particles contained in the initial phase-space files were transported downstream to a plane just above the phantom surface, where a subsequent phase-space file was tallied. Particles were transported downstream this second phase-space file to the water phantom. Experimental data consisted of depth doses and profiles at five different depths acquired at SSD = 100 cm (seven datasets) and SSD = 90 cm (three datasets). Simulations and experimental data were compared in terms of dose difference. Gamma analysis was also performed using 1%, 1 mm and 2%, 2 mm criteria of dose-difference and distance-to-agreement, respectively. Additionally, the parameters characterizing the dose profiles of unflattened beams were evaluated for both measurements and simulations. Results: Analysis of depth dose curves showed that dose differences increased with increasing field size and depth; this effect might be partly motivated due to an underestimation of the primary beam energy used to compute the phase-space files. Average dose differences reached 1% for the largest field size. Lateral profiles presented dose differences well within 1% for fields up to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}, while the discrepancy increased toward 2% in the 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} cases. Gamma analysis resulted in an agreement of 100% when a 2%, 2 mm criterion

  19. Advanced Mating System Development for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of space flight sealing and the work required for the further development of a dynamic interface seal for the use on space mating systems to support a fully androgynous mating interface. This effort has resulted in the advocacy of developing a standard multipurpose interface for use with all modern modular space architecture. This fully androgynous design means a seal-on-seal (SOS) system.

  20. Fiber coupling and field mixing of coherent free-space optical beams in satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliak, J.; Giggenbach, D.; Mata Calvo, R.; Bok, D.

    2016-03-01

    Effective coupling of the optical field from free-space to optical fiber is an essential prerequisite for modern free-space optical communications systems. It allows for easier system integration with active and passive optical fiber-coupled components as well as for efficient optical field mixing for coherent communications. While coupling into single-mode fiber provides the advantage of using low-noise erbium-doped fiber preamplifiers, its relatively small mode field diameter limits achievable fiber coupling efficiency. Coupling into multimode fiber (MMF) increases the fiber coupling efficiency while introducing other spurious effects the authors have set out to analyze. The study of free-space optical beam coupling in the context of satellite communications will be presented. Here, we assume satellite link scenarios with different elevations, which correspond to different index-of-refraction turbulence (IRT) conditions. IRT gives rise to both intensity and phase aberration of the received optical field, which then causes extended speckle patterns in the focus of the receiver telescope. The speckle field at the fiber input is calculated by means of Fourier transform of the received field. Using dedicated modelling software, study of the fiber coupling efficiency, polarization preservation and high-order mode coupling in different multi-mode fibers is carried out.

  1. Time-reversal transcranial ultrasound beam focusing using a k-space method.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yun; Meral, F Can; Clement, Greg T

    2012-02-21

    This paper proposes the use of a k-space method to obtain the correction for transcranial ultrasound beam focusing. Mirroring past approaches, a synthetic point source at the focal point is numerically excited, and propagated through the skull, using acoustic properties acquired from registered computed tomography of the skull being studied. The received data outside the skull contain the correction information and can be phase conjugated (time reversed) and then physically generated to achieve a tight focusing inside the skull, by assuming quasi-plane transmission where shear waves are not present or their contribution can be neglected. Compared with the conventional finite-difference time-domain method for wave propagation simulation, it will be shown that the k-space method is significantly more accurate even for a relatively coarse spatial resolution, leading to a dramatically reduced computation time. Both numerical simulations and experiments conducted on an ex vivo human skull demonstrate that precise focusing can be realized using the k-space method with a spatial resolution as low as only 2.56 grid points per wavelength, thus allowing treatment planning computation on the order of minutes.

  2. The Low Pressure Gas Effects On The Potency Of An Electron Beam On Ceramic Fabric Materials For Space Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Fragomeni, James M.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal or electron beam impingement could damage or burn through the fabric of the astronauts Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding exercises performed in space. An 8 kilovolt electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 milliamps from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 seconds at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6 to 24 inches. At both closer (2") and farther (48") standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  3. The Low Pressure Gas Effects on the Potency of AN Electron Beam on Ceramic Fabric Materials for Space Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Arthur C.; Fragomeni, James M.

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal or electron beam impingement could damage or burn through the fabric of the astronauts extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) during electron beam welding exercises performed in space. An 8 kV electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 mA from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427°C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 s at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6 to 24 in. At both closer (2 in) and farther (48 in) standoff distances, the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  4. Millimeter-Wave Wireless Power Transfer Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Mojarradi, Hadi; Bae, Sam Y.; Marzwell, Neville

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new compact, scalable, and low cost technology for efficient receiving of power using RF waves at 94 GHz. This technology employs a highly innovative array of slot antennas that is integrated on substrate composed of gold (Au), silicon (Si), and silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers. The length of the slots and spacing between them are optimized for a highly efficient beam through a 3-D electromagnetic simulation process. Antenna simulation results shows a good beam profile with very low side lobe levels and better than 93% antenna efficiency.

  5. Fifth Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, Steve L. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Fifth Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Space Applications brings together diverse technical and scientific work in order to help those who employ AI methods in space applications to identify common goals and to address issues of general interest in the AI community. Topics include the following: automation for Space Station; intelligent control, testing, and fault diagnosis; robotics and vision; planning and scheduling; simulation, modeling, and tutoring; development tools and automatic programming; knowledge representation and acquisition; and knowledge base/data base integration.

  6. Third NASA Workshop on Wiring for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad (Compiler); Stavnes, Mark (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This workshop addressed key technology issues in the field of electrical power wiring for space applications, and transferred information and technology related to space wiring for use in government and commercial applications. Speakers from space agencies, U.S. Federal labs, industry, and academia presented program overviews and discussed topics on arc tracking phenomena, advancements in insulation materials and constructions, and new wiring system topologies.

  7. Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed include tethered satellites, tether deployment, satellite systems, science applications, electrodynamic interactions, transportation applications, artificial gravity, constellations, and technology and testing.

  8. Artificial intelligence applications in space and SDI: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiala, Harvey E.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to survey existing and planned Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications to show that they are sufficiently advanced for 32 percent of all space applications and SDI (Space Defense Initiative) software to be AI-based software. To best define the needs that AI can fill in space and SDI programs, this paper enumerates primary areas of research and lists generic application areas. Current and planned NASA and military space projects in AI will be reviewed. This review will be largely in the selected area of expert systems. Finally, direct applications of AI to SDI will be treated. The conclusion covers the importance of AI to space and SDI applications, and conversely, their importance to AI.

  9. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    PubMed Central

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice – from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors’ clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled. PMID:27134420

  10. Naphthalene and acenaphthene decomposition by electron beam generated plasma application

    SciTech Connect

    Ostapczuk, A.; Hakoda, T.; Shimada, A.; Kojima, T.

    2008-08-15

    The application of non-thermal plasma generated by electron beam (EB) was investigated in laboratory scale to study decomposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like naphthalene and acenaphthene in flue gas. PAH compounds were treated by EB with the dose up to 8 kGy in dry and humid base gas mixtures. Experimentally established G-values gained 1.66 and 3.72 mol/100 eV for NL and AC at the dose of 1 kGy. NL and AC removal was observed in dry base gas mixtures showing that the reaction with OH radical is not exclusive pathway to initialize PAH decomposition; however in the presence of water remarkably higher decomposition efficiency was observed. As by-products of NL decomposition were identified compounds containing one aromatic ring and oxygen atoms besides CO and CO{sub 2}. It led to the conclusion that PAH decomposition process in humid flue gas can be regarded as multi-step oxidative de-aromatization analogical to its atmospheric chemistry.

  11. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist.

    PubMed

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R B

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice - from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors' clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  12. LSST system analysis and integration task for an advanced science and application space platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    To support the development of an advanced science and application space platform (ASASP) requirements of a representative set of payloads requiring large separation distances selected from the Science and Applications Space Platform data base. These payloads were a 100 meter diameter atmospheric gravity wave antenna, a 100 meter by 100 meter particle beam injection experiment, a 2 meter diameter, 18 meter long astrometric telescope, and a 15 meter diameter, 35 meter long large ambient deployable IR telescope. A low earth orbit at 500 km altitude and 56 deg inclination was selected as being the best compromise for meeting payload requirements. Platform subsystems were defined which would support the payload requirements and a physical platform concept was developed. Structural system requirements which included utilities accommodation, interface requirements, and platform strength and stiffness requirements were developed. An attitude control system concept was also described. The resultant ASASP concept was analyzed and technological developments deemed necessary in the area of large space systems were recommended.

  13. Large antenna experiments aboard the space shuttle: Application of nonuniform sampling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmatsamii, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Future satellite communication and scientific spacecraft will utilize antennas with dimensions as large as 20 meters. In order to commercially use these large, low sidelobe and multiple beam antennas, a high level of confidence must be established as to their performance in the 0-g and space environment. Furthermore, it will be desirable to demonstrate the applicability of surface compensation techniques for slowly varying surface distortions which could result from thermal effects. An overview of recent advances in performing RF measurements on large antennas is presented with emphasis given to the application of a space based far-field range utilizing the Space Shuttle and the concept of a newly developed nonuniform sampling technique.

  14. Passive damping augmentation of flexible beam-like lattice trusses for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, K.; Weller, T.

    1992-01-01

    A Timoshenko beam continuum model is developed to determine the transient response of a beam-like latticed large space structure, subjected to a unit impulse. It is demonstrated that an increase in diagonal stiffness, on account of the stiffness of the vertical girder, leads to a rise in the transverse shear rigidity. This results in higher natural frequencies and reduction in peak displacement. In addition, in an asymmetrical truss configuration, coupling between the extensional and shear modes raises the maximum peak displacement compared with that obtained for a symmetrical truss. The model is modified to investigate the introduction of passive damping in the form of several dynamic vibration absorbers. A unique absorber parameter optimization procedure, based on the classical steady-state criteria, is used to tune the absorbers, having a total allocated mass budget of 10%, to the first two frequencies of the latticed structure. It is found that inclusion of transverse shear rigidity as a design parameter in damping augmentation studies reduces settling time for predetermined maximum peak displacements.

  15. The application of multilayer elastic beam in MEMS safe and arming system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guozhong Shi, Gengchen; Sui, Li; Yi, Futing; Wang, Bo

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, a new approach for a multilayer elastic beam to provide a driving force and driving distance for a MEMS safe and arming system is presented. In particular this is applied where a monolayer elastic beam cannot provide adequate driving force and driving distance at the same time in limited space. Compared with thicker elastic beams, the bilayer elastic beam can provide twice the driving force of a monolayer beam to guarantee the MEMS safe and arming systems work reliably without decreasing the driving distance. In this paper, the theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental verification of the multilayer elastic beam is presented. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the bilayer elastic provides 1.8–2 times the driving force of a monolayer, and a method that improves driving force without reducing the driving distance.

  16. Directly solar-pumped iodine laser for beamed power transmission in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.; Meador, W. E.; Lee, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for development of a 50-kW directly solar-pumped iodine laser (DSPIL) system as a space-based power station was made using a confocal unstable resonator (CUR). The CUR-based DSPIL has advantages, such as performance enhancement, reduction of total mass, and simplicity which alleviates the complexities inherent in the previous system, master oscillator/power amplifier (MOPA) configurations. In this design, a single CUR-based DSPIL with 50-kW output power was defined and compared to the MOPA-based DSPIL. Integration of multiple modules for power requirements more than 50-kW is physically and structurally a sound approach as compared to building a single large system. An integrated system of multiple modules can respond to various mission power requirements by combining and aiming the coherent beams at the user's receiver.

  17. Application of Traditional and Nanostructure Materials for Medical Electron Beams Collimation: Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I. A.; Stuchebrov, S. G.; Zhaksybayeva, G. K.; Wagner, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays, the commercial application of the electron accelerators grows in the industry, in the research investigations, in the medical diagnosis and treatment. In this regard, the electron beam profile modification in accordance with specific purposes is an actual task. In this paper the model of the TPU microtron extracted electron beam developed in the program “Computer Laboratory (PCLab)” is described. The internal beam divergence influence for the electron beam profile and depth dose distribution in the air is considered. The possibility of using the nanostructure materials for the electron beam formation was analyzed. The simulation data of the electron beam shape collimated by different materials (lead, corund- zirconia nanoceramic, gypsum) are shown. The collimator material influence for the electron beam profile and shape are analyzed.

  18. Application of space benefits to education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, K. K.; Ordway, F. I., III

    1972-01-01

    Information on the conducting of a teacher workshop is presented. This educational pilot project updated instruction material, used improved teaching techniques, and increased student motivation. The NASA/MSFC industrial facilities, and the displays at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center (ASRC) were key elements of the program, including a permanent exhibit, at the latter, on selected benefits accruing from the space program.

  19. Complexity of Sizing for Space Suit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Benson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The `fit? of a garment is often considered to be a subjective measure of garment quality. However, some experts attest that a complaint of poor garment fit is a symptom of inadequate or excessive ease, the space between the garment and the wearer. Fit has traditionally been hard to quantify, and space suits are an extreme example, where fit is difficult to measure but crucial for safety and operability. A proper space suit fit is particularly challenging because of NASA?s need to fit an incredibly diverse population (males and females from the 1st to 99th percentile) while developing a minimum number of space suit sizes. Because so few sizes are available, the available space suits must be optimized so that each fits a large segment of the population without compromising the fit of any one wearer.

  20. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2016-01-01

    Dust mitigation technology has been highlighted by NASA and the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. Further development is underway to improve the operation and reliability of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the Moon.

  1. Study of plasma meniscus and beam halo in negative ion sources using three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space particle in cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, S. Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Fukano, A.

    2014-02-15

    Our previous study by two dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space-particle in cell model shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources. The negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. The purpose of this study is to verify this mechanism with the full 3D model. It is shown that the above mechanism is essentially unchanged even in the 3D model, while the fraction of the beam halo is significantly reduced to 6%. This value reasonably agrees with the experimental result.

  2. Space Environment Stability and Physical Properties of New Materials for Space Power and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1997-01-01

    To test and evaluate suitability of materials for use in space power systems and related space and commercial applications, and to achieve sufficient understanding of the mechanisms by which, the materials perform in their intended applications. Materials and proposed applications included but were not limited to: Improved anodes for lithium ion batteries, highly-transparent arc-proof solar array coatings, and improved surface materials for solar dynamic concentrators and receivers. Cooperation and interchange of data with industrial companies as appropriate.

  3. Planetary mission applications for space storable propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, R. L.; Cork, M. J.; Young, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study to compare space-storable with earth-storable spacecraft propulsion systems, space-storable with solid kick stages, and several space-storable development options on the basis of benefits received for cost expenditures required. The results show that, for a launch vehicle with performance less than that of Shuttle/Centaur, space-storable spacecraft propulsion offers an incremental benefit/cost ratio between 1.0 and 5.5 when compared to earth-storable systems for three of the four missions considered. In the case of VOIR 83, positive benefits were apparent only for a specific launch vehicle-spacecraft propulsion combination. A space-storable propulsion system operating at thrust of 600 lbf, 355 units of specific impulse, and with blowdown pressurization, represents the best choice for the JO 81 mission on a Titan/Centaur if only spacecraft propulsion modifications are considered. For still higher performance, a new solid-propellant kick stage with space-storable spacecraft propulsion is preferred over a system which uses space-storable propellants for both the kick stage and the spacecraft system.

  4. Thin film coatings for space electrical power system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines some of the ways in which thin film coatings can play a role in aerospace applications. Space systems discussed include photovoltaic and solar dynamic electric power generation systems, including applications in environmental protection, thermal energy storage, and radiator emittance enhancement. Potential applications of diamondlike films to both atmospheric and space based systems are examined. Also, potential uses of thin films of the recently discovered high-temperature superconductive materials are discussed.

  5. Thin film coatings for space electrical power system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines some of the ways in which thin film coatings can play a role in aerospace applications. Space systems discussed include photovoltaic and solar dynamic electric power generation systems, including applications in environmental protection, thermal energy storage, and radiator emittance enhancement. Potential applications of diamondlike films to both atmospheric and space based systems are examined. Also, potential uses of thin films of the recently discovered high-temperature superconductive materials are discussed.

  6. Review and evaluation of space processing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Materials research in space which offers advantages in studying phenomena and preparing materials under conditions which cannot be realized in the gravity field of the Earth is discussed. Many techniques were developed to improve processing systems and reduce the effect of gravitationally induced restrictions. The space-based devices take advantage of a wide range of low-gravity facilities including drop towers and tubes, aircraft and sounding rocket parabolic trajectories, simple materials experiment accommodations in the Space Shuttle, and more complex capabilities in Spacelab. All these systems are used to produce novel materials and to study material processing under unique conditions.

  7. Space Operations Learning Center Facebook Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) Facebook module, initially code-named Spaceville, is intended to be an educational online game utilizing the latest social networking technology to reach a broad audience base and inspire young audiences to be interested in math, science, and engineering. Spaceville will be a Facebook application/ game with the goal of combining learning with a fun game and social environment. The mission of the game is to build a scientific outpost on the Moon or Mars and expand the colony. Game activities include collecting resources, trading resources, completing simple science experiments, and building architectures such as laboratories, habitats, greenhouses, machine shops, etc. The player is awarded with points and achievement levels. The player s ability increases as his/her points and levels increase. A player can interact with other players using multiplayer Facebook functionality. As a result, a player can discover unexpected treasures through scientific missions, engineering, and working with others. The player creates his/her own avatar with his/her selection of its unique appearance, and names the character. The player controls the avatar to perform activities such as collecting oxygen molecules or building a habitat. From observations of other successful social online games such as Farmville and Restaurant City, a common element of these games is having eye-catching and cartoonish characters, and interesting animations for all activities. This will create a fun, educational, and rewarding environment. The player needs to accumulate points in order to be awarded special items needed for advancing to higher levels. Trophies will be awarded to the player when certain goals are reached or tasks are completed. In order to acquire some special items needed for advancement in the game, the player will need to visit his/her neighboring towns to discover the items. This is the social aspect of the game that requires the

  8. Vision requirements for Space Station applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, K. R.

    1985-01-01

    Problems which will be encountered by computer vision systems in Space Station operations are discussed, along with solutions be examined at Johnson Space Station. Lighting cannot be controlled in space, nor can the random presence of reflective surfaces. Task-oriented capabilities are to include docking to moving objects, identification of unexpected objects during autonomous flights to different orbits, and diagnoses of damage and repair requirements for autonomous Space Station inspection robots. The approaches being examined to provide these and other capabilities are television IR sensors, advanced pattern recognition programs feeding on data from laser probes, laser radar for robot eyesight and arrays of SMART sensors for automated location and tracking of target objects. Attention is also being given to liquid crystal light valves for optical processing of images for comparisons with on-board electronic libraries of images.

  9. Nodes packaging option for Space Station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, Kenneth T.; Hall, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Space Station nodes packaging analyses are presented relative to moving environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) equipment from the habitability (HAB) module to node 4, in order to provide more living space and privacy for the crew, remove inherently noisy equipment from the crew quarter, retain crew waste collection and processing equipment in one location, and keep objectionable odor away from the living quarters. In addition, options for moving external electronic equipment from the Space Station truss to pressurized node 3 were evaluated in order to reduce the crew extravehicular-activity time required to install and maintain the equipment. Node size considered in this analysis is 3.66 m in diameter and 5.38 m long. The analysis shows that significant external electronic equipment could be relocated from the Space Station truss structure to node 3, and nonlife critical ECLSS HAB module equipment could be moved to node 4.

  10. Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

  11. Binary micro optics: An application to beam steering

    SciTech Connect

    Goltsos, W.; Holz, M.

    1989-01-01

    Agile steering of a helium-neon laser beam (lambda = 632.8nm) was demonstrated using a complementary pair of 5-cm-aperture diffractive microlens arrays in the Galilean telescopic geometry. Having as many as 60,000 F/5 microlenses, each with parabolic phase profile and 200 micrometers diameter, results in nearly aberration-free beam steering over 11 deg. field of view for top + or - 100 micrometers lateral displacements of one array relative to the other. Wavefront quality and steering efficiency of the deflected beam has been measured as a function of steering angle and is compared to a simple theoretical model.

  12. GAS DISCHARGE SWITCH EVALUATION FOR RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER APPLICATION.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,W.; SANDBERG,J.; SHELDRAKE,R.; PIRRIE,C.

    2002-06-30

    A gas discharge switch EEV HX3002 is being evaluated at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a possible candidate of RHIC Beam Abort Kicker modulator main switch. At higher beam energy and higher beam intensity, the switch stability becomes very crucial. The hollow anode thyratron used in the existing system is not rated for long reverse current conduction. The reverse voltage arcing caused thyratron hold-off voltage de-rating has been the main limitation of the system operation. To improve the system reliability, a new type of gas discharge switch has been suggested by Marconi Applied Technology for its reverse conducting capability.

  13. Application of high power lasers to space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nored, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The transmission of laser power over long distances for applications such as direct conversion to propulsive thrust or electrical power is considered. Factors discussed include: problems inherent in transmitting, propagating, and receiving the laser beam over long ranges; high efficiency, closed-cycle, continuous wave operation; advancement of CO2 laser technology; and compatibility with photovoltaic power conversion devices.

  14. Ground Robotic Hand Applications for the Space Program study (GRASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grissom, William A.; Rafla, Nader I. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on a NASA-STDP effort to address research interests of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) through a study entitled, Ground Robotic-Hand Applications for the Space Program (GRASP). The primary objective of the GRASP study was to identify beneficial applications of specialized end-effectors and robotic hand devices for automating any ground operations which are performed at the Kennedy Space Center. Thus, operations for expendable vehicles, the Space Shuttle and its components, and all payloads were included in the study. Typical benefits of automating operations, or augmenting human operators performing physical tasks, include: reduced costs; enhanced safety and reliability; and reduced processing turnaround time.

  15. History and status of beamed power technology and applications at 2.45 Gigahertz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Various applications of beamed power technology are discussed. An experimental microwave powered helicopter, rectenna technology, the use of the Solar Power Satellite to beam energy to Earth via microwaves, the use of cyclotron resonance devices, microwave powered airships, and electric propulsion are discussed.

  16. Interference effects in phased beam tracing using exact half-space solutions.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Matthew A; Pluymers, Bert; Desmet, Wim

    2016-12-01

    Geometrical acoustics provides a correct solution to the wave equation for rectangular rooms with rigid boundaries and is an accurate approximation at high frequencies with nearly hard walls. When interference effects are important, phased geometrical acoustics is employed in order to account for phase shifts due to propagation and reflection. Error increases, however, with more absorption, complex impedance values, grazing incidence, smaller volumes and lower frequencies. Replacing the plane wave reflection coefficient with a spherical one reduces the error but results in slower convergence. Frequency-dependent stopping criteria are then applied to avoid calculating higher order reflections for frequencies that have already converged. Exact half-space solutions are used to derive two additional spherical wave reflection coefficients: (i) the Sommerfeld integral, consisting of a plane wave decomposition of a point source and (ii) a line of image sources located at complex coordinates. Phased beam tracing using exact half-space solutions agrees well with the finite element method for rectangular rooms with absorbing boundaries, at low frequencies and for rooms with different aspect ratios. Results are accurate even for long source-to-receiver distances. Finally, the crossover frequency between the plane and spherical wave reflection coefficients is discussed.

  17. Space charge modeling in electron-beam irradiated polyethylene: Fitting model and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Le Roy, S.; Laurent, C.; Teyssedre, G.; Baudoin, F.; Griseri, V.

    2012-07-15

    A numerical model for describing charge accumulation in electron-beam irradiated low density polyethylene has been put forward recently. It encompasses the generation of positive and negative charges due to impinging electrons and their transport in the insulation. However, the model was not optimized to fit all the data available regarding space charge dynamics obtained using up-to-date pulsed electro-acoustic techniques. In the present approach, model outputs are compared with experimental space charge distribution obtained during irradiation and post-irradiation, the irradiated samples being in short circuit conditions or with the irradiated surface at a floating potential. A unique set of parameters have been used for all the simulations, and it encompasses the transport parameters already optimized for charge transport in polyethylene under an external electric field. The model evolution in itself consists in describing the recombination between positive and negative charges according to the Langevin formula, which is physically more accurate than the previous description and has the advantage of reducing the number of adjustable parameters of the model. This also provides a better description of the experimental behavior underlining the importance of recombination processes in irradiated materials.

  18. Space charge modeling in electron-beam irradiated polyethylene: Fitting model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, S.; Baudoin, F.; Griseri, V.; Laurent, C.; Teyssèdre, G.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model for describing charge accumulation in electron-beam irradiated low density polyethylene has been put forward recently. It encompasses the generation of positive and negative charges due to impinging electrons and their transport in the insulation. However, the model was not optimized to fit all the data available regarding space charge dynamics obtained using up-to-date pulsed electro-acoustic techniques. In the present approach, model outputs are compared with experimental space charge distribution obtained during irradiation and post-irradiation, the irradiated samples being in short circuit conditions or with the irradiated surface at a floating potential. A unique set of parameters have been used for all the simulations, and it encompasses the transport parameters already optimized for charge transport in polyethylene under an external electric field. The model evolution in itself consists in describing the recombination between positive and negative charges according to the Langevin formula, which is physically more accurate than the previous description and has the advantage of reducing the number of adjustable parameters of the model. This also provides a better description of the experimental behavior underlining the importance of recombination processes in irradiated materials.

  19. Power beaming with FEL lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Michael C.; Curtin, Mark S.; Burke, Robert J.; Cover, Ralph A.; Rakowsky, George; Bennett, Glenn T.

    1993-06-01

    FEL power beaming has broad application to space operations. The Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation has examined the commercial applications of beamed power from Earth to space using the Radio Frequency LINAC Free Electron Laser (RF FEL) and has determined that there is a substantial addressable market. Rocketdyne's experience in developing and demonstrating FEL technologies, optics and atmospheric compensation and advanced power and power distribution systems ideally positions the Division to conduct the initial demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a FEL to beam power to space platforms.

  20. Laser ignition application in a space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Larry C.; Culley, Dennis E.

    1993-01-01

    A laser ignition system is proposed for the Combustion Experiment Module on an orbiting spacecraft. The results of a design study are given using the scheduled 'Flame Ball Experiment' as the design guidelines. Three laser ignition mechanisms and wavelengths are evaluated. A prototype laser is chosen and its specifications are given, followed by consideration of the beam optical arrangement, the ignition power requirement, the laser ignition system weight, size, reliability, and laser cooling and power consumption. Electromagnetic interference to the onboard electronics caused by the laser ignition process is discussed. Finally, ground tests are suggested.

  1. Microwave power tubes for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H.

    1976-01-01

    Feasibility evaluations of klystron amplifiers for conversion of solar power in synchronous orbit into microwave power at 2.4 GHz and transmission to earth were carried out. It was found that amplitrons and klystrons, using a depressed collector augmentation, can achieve efficiencies in excess of 80% if the power output is kept higher than 50 kW. Body wound selenoid provides the needed beam-focusing field. Narrow bandwidth requirements permit a low cathode loading density of 0.5 A/sq cm produced at approximately 850 centigrades. Emission tests indicate a potential life expectancy of 20 to 40 years.

  2. Applications Of Graphite Fluoride Fibers In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheng; Long, Martin; Dever, Therese

    1993-01-01

    Report characterizes graphite fluoride fibers made from commercially available graphitized carbon fibers and discusses some potential applications of graphite fluoride fibers in outer space. Applications include heat-sinking printed-circuit boards, solar concentrators, and absorption of radar waves. Other applications based on exploitation of increased resistance to degradation by atomic oxygen, present in low orbits around Earth.

  3. Applications of Tethers in Space: Workshop Proceedings, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracat, W. A. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The complete documentation of the workshop including all addresses, panel reports, charts, and summaries are presented. This volume presents all the reports on the fundamentals of applications of tethers in space. These applications include electrodynamic interactions, transportation, gravity utilization, constellations, technology and test, and science applications.

  4. Exact Dynamic Stiffness Matrix for Composite Timoshenko Beams with Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannerjee, J. R.; Williams, F. W.

    1996-07-01

    In this paper, an exact dynamic stiffness matrix is presented for a composite beam. It includes the effects of shear deformation and rotatory inertia: i.e., it is for a composite Timoshenko beam. The theory accounts for the (material) coupling between the bending and torsional deformations which usually occurs for such beams due to the anisotropic nature of fibrous composites. An explicit analytical expression for each of the elements of the dynamic stiffness matrix is derived by rigorous use of the symbolic computing package REDUCE. It is proved that the use of such expressions leads to substantial savings in computer time when compared with the matrix inversion method. The use of this dynamic stiffness matrix to investigate the free vibration characteristics of composite beams (with or without the effects of shear deformation and/or rotatory inertia included) is demonstrated by applying the Wittrick-Williams algorithm. Numerical results for which comparative results are available in the literature are discussed.

  5. Fourth Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, Stephen L. (Compiler); Denton, Judith S. (Compiler); Vereen, Mary (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    Proceedings of a conference held in Huntsville, Alabama, on November 15-16, 1988. The Fourth Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Space Applications brings together diverse technical and scientific work in order to help those who employ AI methods in space applications to identify common goals and to address issues of general interest in the AI community. Topics include the following: space applications of expert systems in fault diagnostics, in telemetry monitoring and data collection, in design and systems integration; and in planning and scheduling; knowledge representation, capture, verification, and management; robotics and vision; adaptive learning; and automatic programming.

  6. Watch Dog detector for beam diagnostic in hadrontherapy application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojatti, E.; Bazzano, G.; Bosser, J.; Caldara, M.; Calvi, G.; Lanzavecchia, L.; Parravicini, A.; Pullia, M.; Viviani, C.

    2013-12-01

    The "Watch Dog" is a beam monitor designed for medical accelerators, that will be installed at the end of the CNAO (Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica) extraction lines. Its main goal is to achieve a real time monitoring of the beam position during patient treatments; the system can generate an interlock signal in case the measured quantity is out of the nominal range. In this paper the Watch Dog is described, and preliminary tests are presented.

  7. The ESA Space Weather Applications Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, A.; Hilgers, A.; Daly, E.

    Following the completion in 2001 of two parallel studies to consider the feasibility of a European Space Weather Programme ESA embarked upon a space weather pilot study with the goal of prototyping European space weather services and assessing the overall market for such within Europe This pilot project centred on a number of targeted service development activities supported by a common infrastructure and making use of only existing space weather assets Each service activity included clear participation from at least one identified service user who was requested to provide initial requirements and regular feedback during the operational phase of the service These service activities are now reaching the end of their 2-year development and testing phase and are now accessible each with an element of the service in the public domain see http www esa-spaceweathet net swenet An additional crucial element of the study was the inclusion of a comprehensive and independent analysis of the benefits both economic and strategic of embarking on a programme which would include the deployment of an infrastructure with space-based elements The results of this study will be reported together with their implication for future coordinated European activities in this field

  8. Fuel Cells for Space Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2003-01-01

    Fuel cell technology has been receiving more attention recently as a possible alternative to the internal combustion engine for our automobile. Improvements in fuel cell designs as well as improvements in lightweight high-pressure gas storage tank technology make fuel cell technology worth a look to see if fuel cells can play a more expanded role in space missions. This study looks at the specific weight density and specific volume density of potential fuel cell systems as an alternative to primary and secondary batteries that have traditionally been used for space missions. This preliminary study indicates that fuel cell systems have the potential for energy densities of greater than 500 W-hr/kg, greater than 500W/kg and greater than 400 W-hr/liter, greater than 200 W/liter. This level of performance makes fuel cells attractive as high-power density, high-energy density sources for space science probes, planetary rovers and other payloads. The power requirements for these space missions are, in general, much lower than the power levels where fuel cells have been used in the past. Adaptation of fuel cells for space science missions will require down-sizing the fuel cell stack and making the fuel cell operate without significant amounts of ancillary equipment.

  9. A spectral element for laminated composite beams: theory and application to pyroshock analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruotolo, R.

    2004-02-01

    In this article a spectral element for anisotropic, laminated composite beams is developed. Firstly, the axial-bending coupled equations of motion are derived under the assumptions of the First order Shear Deformation Theory, then the spectral element matrix is formulated. The proposed spectral element is validated by comparing, with corresponding results from the scientific literature, natural frequencies of a number of both orthotropic and anisotropic laminated composite beams and the dynamic response of an anisotropic cantilever beam to high frequency transients. Finally, the application of the proposed element to the evaluation of the dynamic response to a simulated pyroshock of an idealized satellite structure made of sandwich beams is shown.

  10. Spatial correlation and irradiance statistics in a multiple-beam terrestrial free-space optical communication link.

    PubMed

    Anguita, Jaime A; Neifeld, Mark A; Vasic, Bane V

    2007-09-10

    By means of numerical simulations we analyze the statistical properties of the power fluctuations induced by the incoherent superposition of multiple transmitted laser beams in a terrestrial free-space optical communication link. The measured signals arising from different transmitted optical beams are found to be statistically correlated. This channel correlation increases with receiver aperture and propagation distance. We find a simple scaling rule for the spatial correlation coefficient in terms of the propagation distance and we are able to predict the scintillation reduction in previously reported experiments with good accuracy. We propose an approximation to the probability density function of the received power of a spatially correlated multiple-beam system in terms of the parameters of the single-channel gamma-gamma function. A bit-error-rate evaluation is also presented to demonstrate the improvement of a multibeam system over its single-beam counterpart.

  11. Space Biotechnology and Commercial Applications University of Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Winfred; Evanich, Peggy L.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Biotechnology and Commercial Applications grant was funded by NASA's Kennedy Space Center in FY 2002 to provide dedicated biotechnology and agricultural research focused on the regeneration of space flight environments with direct parallels in Earth-based applications for solving problems in the environment, advances in agricultural science, and other human support issues amenable to targeted biotechnology solutions. This grant had three project areas, each with multiple tasks. They are: 1) Space Agriculture and Biotechnology Research and Education, 2) Integrated Smart Nanosensors for Space Biotechnology Applications, and 3) Commercial Applications. The Space Agriculture and Biotechnology Research and Education (SABRE) Center emphasized the fundamental biology of organisms involved in space flight applications, including those involved in advanced life support environments because of their critical role in the long-term exploration of space. The SABRE Center supports research at the University of Florida and at the Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL) at the Kennedy Space Center. The Integrated Smart Nanosensors for Space Biotechnology Applications component focused on developing and applying sensor technologies to space environments and agricultural systems. The research activities in nanosensors were coordinated with the SABRE portions of this grant and with the research sponsored by the NASA Environmental Systems Commercial Space Technology Center located in the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences. Initial sensor efforts have focused on air and water quality monitoring essential to humans for living and working permanently in space, an important goal identified in NASA's strategic plan. The closed environment of a spacecraft or planetary base accentuates cause and effect relationships and environmental impacts. The limited available air and water resources emphasize the need for reuse, recycling, and system monitoring. It is essential to

  12. Interaction-Point Phase-Space Characterization using Single-Beam and Luminous-Region Measurements at PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kozanecki, W; Bevan, A.J.; Viaud, B.F.; Cai, Y.; Fisher, A.S.; O'Grady, C.; Lindquist, B.; Roodman, A.; J.M.Thompson, M.Weaver; /SLAC

    2008-09-09

    We present an extensive experimental characterization of the e{sup {+-}} phase space at the interaction point of the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory, that combines a detailed mapping of luminous-region observables using the BABAR detector, with stored-beam measurements by accelerator techniques.

  13. Electronics for Deep Space Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. L.; Hammond, A.; Dickman, J. E.; Gerber, S. S.; Elbuluk, M. E.; Overton, E.

    2002-01-01

    Deep space probes and planetary exploration missions require electrical power management and control systems that are capable of efficient and reliable operation in very cold temperature environments. Typically, in deep space probes, heating elements are used to keep the spacecraft electronics near room temperature. The utilization of power electronics designed for and operated at low temperature will contribute to increasing efficiency and improving reliability of space power systems. At NASA Glenn Research Center, commercial-off-the-shelf devices as well as developed components are being investigated for potential use at low temperatures. These devices include semiconductor switching devices, magnetics, and capacitors. Integrated circuits such as digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being evaluated. In this paper, results will be presented for selected analog-to-digital converters, oscillators, DC/DC converters, and pulse width modulation (PWM) controllers.

  14. Superresolution far-field diffraction spot in the free-space laser communication system due to radially polarized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Jiang, Lun; Hu, Yuan; Liu, Zhuang; Li, Ying-chao; Wang, Le

    2016-10-01

    In the free-space laser communication, there is a strong need for a technology that can decrease the size of the diffraction spot in the receiver port, because a smaller diffraction spot in the receive port makes the transmit data more secure. In this paper, instead of the usage of the larger size aperture lens in the free-space laser communication system, we introduce a diffractive superresolution technology that changing the received information laser beam into radially polarized beam which is focused on the detector array. In the paper, firstly, the conversion method of the information natural light which the optical antenna received to the radially polarized beam is discussed in detail. Then, in the focal plane, the transverse intensity distribution expression near the focal point for the radially polarized laser beam are presented, and the numerical simulation results of the intensity distributions around the focal point on different numerical apertures (NA) are given. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the main lobe are considered for the standard of the spot size. Through a comparison of the focal point FWHM values with the natural light and radially polarized beam, we judge the superresolution performance of the receiver optical system with radially polarized beam on different NA of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.75. We find that the method of focusing with radially polarized beam generates a smaller spot size than the Airy spot size when the NA is no less than 0.6; when the NA reach to 0.75, the resolution is 1.5 times than the diffraction limit. But it will decrease the light power in the process of natural light converted to radially polarized beam. When the communication laser is polarized laser, the energy loss can be reduced to around 20%. This technology can be applied when the laser energy is not the main concern in the communication.

  15. Application of advanced technology to space automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Polhemus, J. T.; Lowrie, J. W.; Hughes, C. A.; Stephens, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Automated operations in space provide the key to optimized mission design and data acquisition at minimum cost for the future. The results of this study strongly accentuate this statement and should provide further incentive for immediate development of specific automtion technology as defined herein. Essential automation technology requirements were identified for future programs. The study was undertaken to address the future role of automation in the space program, the potential benefits to be derived, and the technology efforts that should be directed toward obtaining these benefits.

  16. Selected tether applications in space: Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsen, M. H.; Lippy, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    System characteristics and design requirements are assessed for tether deployment. Criteria are established for comparing alternate concepts for: (1) deployment of 220 klb space shuttle from the space station; (2) tether assisted launch of a 20,000 lb payload to geosynchronous orbit; (3) placement of the 20,000 lb AXAF into 320 nmi orbit via orbiter; (4) retrieval of 20,000 lb AXAF from 205 nmi circular orbit for maintenance and reboost to 320 nmi; and (5) tethered OMV rendezvous and retrieval of OTV returning from a geosynchronous mission. Tether deployment systems and technical issues are discussed.

  17. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  18. Thulium heat sources for space power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J.

    1992-05-01

    Reliable power supplies for use in transportation and remote systems will be an important part of space exploration terrestrial activities. A potential power source is available in the rare earth metal, thulium. Fuel sources can be produced by activating Tm-169 targets in the space station reactor. The resulting Tm-170 heat sources can be used in thermoelectric generators to power instrumentation and telecommunications located at remote sites such as weather stations. As the heat source in a dynamic Sterling or Brayton cycle system, the heat source can provide a lightweight power source for rovers or other terrestrial transportation systems.

  19. Manifold parameter space and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Atsushi

    2004-11-01

    We review the several features of the new parameter space which we presented in the previous paper, and show the differentiable manifold properties of this parameter space coordinate. Using this parameter coordinate we calculate three Feynman amplitudes of the vacuum polarization with a gluon loop, a quark loop and a ghost loop in QCD and show that the results are perfectly equal to those of the usual calculations by the Feynman parametrization technique in the scheme of the dimensional regularization. Then we try to calculate the anomalous magnetic moment of an on-shell quark in QCD by using the dimensional regularization, our new parametrization and integral method.

  20. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.