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Sample records for beating heart coronary

  1. Triple coronary artery revascularization on the stabilized beating heart: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Cartier, Raymond; Hébert, Yves; Blain, Robert; Tremblay, Normand; Desjardins, Jacques; Leclerc, Yves

    1998-01-01

    Objective To decrease health costs and morbidity related to extracorporeal circulation, surgeons have modified the coronary artery bypass (CAB) technique so that it can be completed without the use of extra-corporeal circulation. This study summarizes initial experience with direct coronary artery revascularization on the beating heart using a coronary stabilizer. Design A case series. Setting The Montreal Heart Institute, a university-affiliated centre, specializing in the treatment of cardiac illnesses. Patients Ten patients underwent CAB by this technique. They presented with double or triple coronary artery disease with no intramyocardial, heavily calcified, diffused atheromatous coronary vessels, or left main coronary disease. Intervention CAB grafting in the beating heart. The anterior wall was grafted in all patients, the inferior wall in 7 and the posterior wall in 7. Main outcome measures Patient survival and graft patency. Results One patient died of multiple organ failure not related to the grafting technique itself, and 1 patient suffered a non-Q myocardial infarction. Early coronary angiography performed on 8 patients showed 100% graft patency, most with excellent distal runoff (21/22 grafts). Conclusion In patients with adequate anatomy, performance of CAB without extracorporeal circulation can achieve excellent early results provided there is appropriate mechanical stabilization of the beating heart. PMID:9711161

  2. Reduced cerebral embolic signals in beating heart coronary surgery detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Watters, M P; Cohen, A M; Monk, C R; Angelini, G D; Ryder, I G

    2000-05-01

    Cerebral emboli detected by transcranial Doppler imaging were recorded in 20 patients undergoing multiple-vessel coronary artery bypass surgery, either with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, in a prospective unblinded comparative study. Emboli were recorded continuously from the time of pericardial incision until 10 min after the last aortic instrumentation. The numbers of coronary grafts and of aortic clampings were also documented. Patients undergoing revascularization with cardiopulmonary bypass had more emboli (median 79, range 38-876) per case compared with patients having off-pump surgery (median 3, range 0-18). No clinically detectable neurological deficits were seen in either group. Beating heart surgery is associated with fewer emboli than coronary surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Further research is necessary to determine whether a smaller number of emboli alters the incidence of neurological deficit after cardiac surgery.

  3. Reduced cerebral embolic signals in beating heart coronary surgery detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Watters, M P; Cohen, A M; Monk, C R; Angelini, G D; Ryder, I G

    2000-05-01

    Cerebral emboli detected by transcranial Doppler imaging were recorded in 20 patients undergoing multiple-vessel coronary artery bypass surgery, either with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, in a prospective unblinded comparative study. Emboli were recorded continuously from the time of pericardial incision until 10 min after the last aortic instrumentation. The numbers of coronary grafts and of aortic clampings were also documented. Patients undergoing revascularization with cardiopulmonary bypass had more emboli (median 79, range 38-876) per case compared with patients having off-pump surgery (median 3, range 0-18). No clinically detectable neurological deficits were seen in either group. Beating heart surgery is associated with fewer emboli than coronary surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Further research is necessary to determine whether a smaller number of emboli alters the incidence of neurological deficit after cardiac surgery. PMID:10844840

  4. Relationship between beat to beat coronary artery motion and image quality in prospectively ECG-gated two heart beat 320-detector row coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Komatsu, Shuhei; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Kiryu, Shigeru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the influence of the beat-to-beat movement of the coronary arteries on image quality of multi-segment reconstruction (MSR) images. Although MSR improves temporal resolution, image quality would be degraded by beat-to-beat movement of the coronary arteries. In a retrospectively review, 18 patients (mean age, 67.0 years) who underwent coronary CT angiography using a 320-detector row CT were included. The displacement and diameter of coronary artery segments for each of the identified nine landmarks was recorded. The motion ratio was calculated as the division of displacement by diameter. Image quality (IQ) was graded by a four-point scale. The correlation between MSR IQ score and the motion ratio showed stronger negative correlation than that between MSR IQ score and the displacement (r = -0.54 vs. r = -0.36). The average motion ratio for segments in which half-scan reconstruction (HSR) IQ was better than MSR IQ (29.1%, group A) was higher than that for segments in which MSR IQ was better than HSR IQ (16.0%, group C). The motion ratio in group C was lower than 25%. Difference in IQ scores of the HSR images was more frequent in group A than in the remaining segments in which the motion ratio was lower than 25% (16.7% vs. 66.0%; P < 0.0002). The motion ratio could be a better index than the displacement to evaluate the influence of the motion of coronary arteries on image quality. MSR images would be impaired by a motion ratio larger than 25%. Image impairment of one of the HSR images might also impair MSR images.

  5. Measuring heart beats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Frank

    2014-03-01

    A simple instrument has been constructed to measure heart beats via an earlobe sensor. The pulse rate is determined from a Picoscope trace and pupils may wish to see how this rate changes after modest exertion.

  6. [Coronary surgery on the beating heart under extracorporeal circulation in high-risk patients. An acceptable compromise?].

    PubMed

    Bel, A; Menasché, P; Faris, B; Perrault, L P; Peynet, J; de Chaumaray, T; Gatecel, C; Touchot, B; Moalic, J M; Bloch, G

    1998-07-01

    Coronary artery surgery with cardioplegia in high risk patients carries a risk of myocardial ischaemia and, without cardiopulmonary bypass, is not always technically feasible. The authors assessed an alternative, surgery on the beating heart with haemodynamic assist by cardiopulmonary bypass in 43 consecutive patients with poor left ventricular function (mean ejection fraction: 0.26), evolving myocardial ischaemia or acute myocardial infarction, old age (mean: 79.5 years) and comorbid conditions. Results were assessed mainly on clinical criteria. In addition, 9 patients had pre- and post-cardiopulmonary bypass measurements of markers of myocardial ischaemia (troponine Ic) and systemic inflammation (interleukines 6 and 10, elastase). In 6 cases, right atrial biopsy was analysed for expression of messenger ribonucleic acid coding for heat shock protein (HSP) 70; the data were compared with those of patients operated under warm blood cardioplegia. There was one cardiac death and one myocardial infarction. Myocardial conservation was confirmed by the minimal increase in troponine Ic levels and the significant increase in HSP 70 in RNA suggesting myocardial adaptation to stress. On the other hand, the minimal concentrations of mediators of inflammation were not significantly changed. In selected high risk patients, coronary revascularisation on the beating heart under cardiopulmonary bypass could be a valuable alternative. It conserves the potentially deleterious effects of cardiopulmonary bypass but peroperative global myocardial ischaemia, an important factor in the aggressivity of cardiac surgery, is eliminated.

  7. Adaptive beat-to-beat heart rate estimation in ballistocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Brüser, Christoph; Stadlthanner, Kurt; de Waele, Stijn; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2011-09-01

    A ballistocardiograph records the mechanical activity of the heart. We present a novel algorithm for the detection of individual heart beats and beat-to-beat interval lengths in ballistocardiograms (BCGs) from healthy subjects. An automatic training step based on unsupervised learning techniques is used to extract the shape of a single heart beat from the BCG. Using the learned parameters, the occurrence of individual heart beats in the signal is detected. A final refinement step improves the accuracy of the estimated beat-to-beat interval lengths. Compared to many existing algorithms, the new approach offers heart rate estimates on a beat-to-beat basis. The agreement of the proposed algorithm with an ECG reference has been evaluated. A relative beat-to-beat interval error of 1.79% with a coverage of 95.94% was achieved on recordings from 16 subjects.

  8. Iodinated Contrast Opacification Gradients in Normal Coronary Arteries Imaged with Prospectively ECG-Gated Single Heart Beat 320-Detector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Steigner, Michael L.; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Whitmore, Amanda G.; Otero, Hansel J.; Wang, Chunliang; Buckley, Orla; Levit, Noah A.; Hussain, Alia Z.; Cai, Tianxi; Mather, Richard T.; Smedby, Örjan; DiCarli, Marcelo F.; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Background To define and evaluate coronary contrast opacification gradients using prospectively ECG-gated single heart beat 320-detector row coronary angiography (CTA). Methods and Results Thirty-six patients with normal coronary arteries determined by 320 × 0.5 mm detector row coronary CTA were retrospectively evaluated with customized image post-processing software to measure Hounsfield Units (HU) at 1 mm intervals orthogonal to the artery center line. Linear regression determined correlation between mean HU and distance from the coronary ostium (regression slope defined as the distance gradient Gd), lumen cross-sectional area (Ga), and lumen short axis diameter (Gs). For each gradient, differences between the three coronary arteries were analyzed with ANOVA. Linear regression determined correlations between measured gradients, heart rate, body-mass index (BMI), and cardiac phase. To determine feasibility in lesions, all three gradients were evaluated in 22 consecutive patients with left anterior descending artery lesions greater than or equal to 50% stenosis. For all 3 coronary arteries in all patients, the gradients Ga and Gs were significantly different from zero (p<0.0001), highly linear (Pearson r values 0.77-0.84), and had no significant difference between the LAD, LCx, and RCA (p>0.503). The distance gradient Gd demonstrated nonlinearities in a small number of vessels and was significantly smaller in the RCA when compared to the left coronary system (p<0.001). Gradient variations between cardiac phases, heart rates, BMI, and readers were low. Gradients in patients with lesions were significantly different (p<0.021) than in patients considered normal by CTA. Conclusions Measurement of contrast opacification gradients from temporally uniform coronary CTA demonstrates feasibility and reproducibility in patients with normal coronary arteries. For all patients the gradients defined with respect to the coronary lumen cross-sectional area and short axis

  9. Thermographic imaging in the beating heart: a method for coronary flow estimation based on a heat transfer model.

    PubMed

    Gordon, N; Rispler, S; Sideman, S; Shofty, R; Beyar, R

    1998-09-01

    Intraoperative thermographic imaging in open-chest conditions can provide the surgeon with important qualitative information regarding coronary flow by utilizing heat transfer analysis following injection of cold saline into the aortic root. The heat transfer model is based on the assumption that the epicardial temperature changes are mainly due to convection of heat by the blood flow, which may, therefore, be estimated by measuring the temperature variations. Hearts of eight dogs were exposed and imaged by a thermographic camera. Flow in the left arterial descending (LAD) coronary branch was measured by a transit-time flowmeter. 20 ml of cold saline were injected into the aortic root (just after the aortic valve) and the epicardial temperature images were recorded at end-diastole, for 20-30 s. Different flow rates were achieved by 1 min occlusion of the LAD, which affected a reactive hyperemic response. The dynamics of the temperature in the arterial coronary tree was obtained by averaging the temperature over an edge-detected arterial segment for each frame. The heat transfer equation was curve-fitted, and the flow-dependent heat transfer index was correlated with the experimentally determined coronary flow (r = 0.69, p < 0.001). In summary: a method for quantitative estimation of coronary blood flow by thermography and heat transfer analysis was developed and tested in animal experiments. This method can provide important information regarding coronary blood flow during open-chest surgical procedures. PMID:9796950

  10. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  11. Up-Beat UK: A programme of research into the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease and depression are both common health problems and by 2020 will be the two leading causes of disability worldwide. Depression has been found to be more common in patients with coronary heart disease but the nature of this relationship is uncertain. In the United Kingdom general practitioners are now being remunerated for case-finding for depression in patients with coronary heart disease, however it is unclear how general practitioners should manage these patients. We aim to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in a primary care population and to develop an intervention for patients with coronary heart disease and depression. Methods/design This programme of research will consist of 4 inter-related studies. A 4 year prospective cohort study of primary care patients with coronary heart disease will be conducted to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression. Within this, a nested case-control biological study will investigate genetic and blood-biomarkers as predictors of depression in this sample. Two qualitative studies, one of patients' perspectives of treatments for coronary heart disease and co-morbid depression and one of primary care professionals' views on the management of patients with coronary heart disease and depression will inform the development of an intervention for this patient group. A feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial will then be conducted. Discussion This study will provide information on the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression that will allow health services to determine the efficiency of case-finding for depression in this patient group. The results of the cohort study will also provide information on risk factors for depression. The study will provide evidence on the efficacy and feasibility of a joint patient and professional led intervention and data necessary to plan a definitive randomised controlled

  12. Should we consider beating-heart on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting over conventional cardioplegic arrest to improve postoperative outcomes in selected patients?

    PubMed

    Al Jaaly, Emad; Chaudhry, Umar A R; Harling, Leanne; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2015-04-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether beating-heart on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (BH-ONCAB) offered superior mortality and morbidity outcomes when compared with conventional on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (C-ONCAB). Morbidity outcomes consisted of renal failure, stroke (transient or permanent), myocardial infarction, angina, congestive cardiac failure, reintervention and arrhythmias. Best evidence papers investigating BH-ONCAB versus C-ONCAB were considered. Where data were duplicated, the more credible evidence-based and recently published study was included. Two hundred and thirty-one papers were found using the reported search, of which 11 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Two were prospective randomized controlled trials and the remaining 10 observational studies, of which one was propensity-matched. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Five of these studies demonstrated significantly improved mortality following BH-ONCAB; however, one study exhibited better survival after C-ONCAB. Notably, this study incorporated BH-ONCAB patients with significantly more haemodynamic instability, thus possibly explaining the worse mortality outcomes. In terms of morbidity, a slightly more mixed picture is drawn. Five studies report morbidity in favour of BH-ONCAB, whereas three studies include individual outcomes favouring C-ONCAB. The remaining studies showed equivalent mortality and morbidity data. In summary, the results presented here suggest that BH-ONCAB may improve survival following coronary artery bypass surgery. A key observation is that the greatest benefits of BH-ONCAB appear to be in studies including patients with considerably higher risk characteristics at the time of surgery (haemodialysis, end-stage coronary artery

  13. Dynamic focusing in the zebrafish beating heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Delgado, L.; Peralta, M.; Mercader, N.; Ripoll, J.

    2016-03-01

    Of the large amount of the animal models available for cardiac research, the zebrafish is extremely valuable due to its transparency during early stages of development. In this work a dual illumination laser sheet microscope with simultaneous dual camera imaging is used to image the beating heart at 200 fps, dynamically and selectively focusing inside the beating heart through the use of a tunable lens. This dual color dynamic focusing enables imaging with cellular resolution at unprecedented high frame rates, allowing 3D imaging of the whole beating heart of embryonic zebrafish.

  14. The initiation of the heart beat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng-Sheng; Joung, Boyoung; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Das, Mithilesh; Chen, Zhenhui; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2010-02-01

    During a normal lifetime, the heart may beat over 2 billion times, but the mechanisms by which the heart beats are initiated remain a subject of intense investigation. Since the discovery of a pacemaker current (I(f)) in 1978, multiple studies have shown that rhythmic changes in membrane voltage (the "membrane voltage clock") underlie the mechanisms of automaticity. The I(f) is a depolarization current activated during hyperpolarization. Therefore, when the cardiac cells recover, the I(f) is activated and slowly depolarizes the cell membrane, leading to the onset of action potential. Recent studies, however, suggest that increased intracellular Ca (Ca(i)) induced by spontaneous rhythmic sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca release (the "calcium clock") is also jointly responsible for the initiation of the heart beat. Elevated Ca(i) activates another ionic current (the sodium-calcium exchanger current or I(NCX)), leading to spontaneous phase 4 depolarization. Under normal conditions, both clocks are needed to initiate the heart beat. Malfunction of the clocks is associated with sinus node dysfunction in heart failure and atrial fibrillation. More studies are needed to determine how both clocks work together to initiate heart beat under normal and disease conditions.

  15. Detection of heart beats in multimodal data: a robust beat-to-beat interval estimation approach.

    PubMed

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    The heart rate and its variability play a vital role in the continuous monitoring of patients, especially in the critical care unit. They are commonly derived automatically from the electrocardiogram as the interval between consecutive heart beat. While their identification by QRS-complexes is straightforward under ideal conditions, the exact localization can be a challenging task if the signal is severely contaminated with noise and artifacts. At the same time, other signals directly related to cardiac activity are often available. In this multi-sensor scenario, methods of multimodal sensor-fusion allow the exploitation of redundancies to increase the accuracy and robustness of beat detection.In this paper, an algorithm for the robust detection of heart beats in multimodal data is presented. Classic peak-detection is augmented by robust multi-channel, multimodal interval estimation to eliminate false detections and insert missing beats. This approach yielded a score of 90.70 and was thus ranked third place in the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Muthmodal Data follow-up analysis.In the future, the robust beat-to-beat interval estimator may directly be used for the automated processing of multimodal patient data for applications such as diagnosis support and intelligent alarming.

  16. Computer Simulation of the Beating Human Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskin, Charles S.; McQueen, David M.

    2001-06-01

    The mechanical function of the human heart couples together the fluid mechanics of blood and the soft tissue mechanics of the muscular heart walls and flexible heart valve leaflets. We discuss a unified mathematical formulation of this problem in which the soft tissue looks like a specialized part of the fluid in which additional forces are applied. This leads to a computational scheme known as the Immersed Boundary (IB) method for solving the coupled equations of motion of the whole system. The IB method is used to construct a three-dimensional Virtual Heart, including representations of all four chambers of the heart and all four valves, in addition to the large arteries and veins that connect the heart to the rest of the circulation. The chambers, valves, and vessels are all modeled as collections of elastic (and where appropriate, actively contractile) fibers immersed in viscous incompressible fluid. Results are shown as a computer-generated video animation of the beating heart.

  17. Non-heart beating organ donation. A case study.

    PubMed

    Stirling, John

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this case study is to discuss the clinical management of a non-heart beating organ donor. This case study will concentrate in particular on the clinical assessment of the potential donor patient undertaken by the donor transplant coordinator (DTC) and the donation process up to the time of transplantation. The author will also describe the differences between heart beating and non-heart beating donors and discuss how transplantation can benefit renal recipient patients.

  18. Correlations in heart beat data as quantitative characterization of heart pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbikas, J.; Cenys, A.; Zemaityte, D.; Varoneckas, G.

    1996-06-01

    Correlation between heart pathology and statistical properties of heart beat data has been studied. It is shown that heart beat data has different scaling behavior for healthy and disease cases. Possibilities to develop new monitoring technique based on the permanent control of the correlations in heart beat data are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  20. Adaptive Heartbeat Modeling for Beat-to-Beat Heart Rate Measurement in Ballistocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Paalasmaa, Joonas; Toivonen, Hannu; Partinen, Markku

    2015-11-01

    We present a method for measuring beat-to-beat heart rate from ballistocardiograms acquired with force sensors. First, a model for the heartbeat shape is adaptively inferred from the signal using hierarchical clustering. Then, beat-to-beat intervals are detected by finding positions where the heartbeat shape best fits the signal. The method was validated with overnight recordings from 46 subjects in varying setups (sleep clinic, home, single bed, double bed, two sensor types). The mean beat-to-beat interval error was 13 ms and on an average 54% of the beat-to-beat intervals were detected. The method is part of a home-use e-health system for an unobtrusive sleep measurement.

  1. Image-based coronary tracking and beat-to-beat motion compensation: feasibility for improving coronary MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Maneesh; Hager, Gregory D; Lorenz, Christine H

    2008-09-01

    A method to reduce the effect of motion variability in MRI of the coronary arteries is proposed. It involves acquiring real-time low-resolution images in specific orthogonal orientations, extracting coronary motion from these images, and then using this motion information to guide high-resolution MR image acquisition on a beat-to-beat basis. The present study establishes the feasibility and efficacy of the proposed approach using human motion data in an offline implementation, prior to future online implementation on an MRI scanner. To track the coronary arteries in low-resolution real-time MR images in an accurate manner, a tracking approach is presented and validated. The tracking algorithm was run on real-time images acquired at 15-20 frames per second in four-chamber, short-axis, and coronal views in five volunteers. The systolic and diastolic periods in the cardiac cycles, computed from the extracted motion information, had significant variability during the short time periods typical of cardiac MRI. It is also demonstrated through simulation analysis using human tracked coronary motion data that accounting for this cardiac variability by adaptively changing the trigger delay for acquisition on a beat-to-beat basis improves overall motion compensation and hence MR image quality evaluated in terms of SNR and CNR values. PMID:18727098

  2. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Yee, K C; Chou, C K; Guy, A W

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  3. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, K.C.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  4. Heart rate estimation on a beat-to-beat basis via ballistocardiography - a hybrid approach.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, David; Aubert, Xavier L; Fuhr, Hartmut; Brauers, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for obtaining the heart rate from the signal of a single, contact-less sensor recording the mechanical activity of the heart. This vital parameter is required on a beat-to-beat basis for applications in sleep analysis and heart failure disease management. Our approach bundles information from various sources for first robust estimates. These estimates are further refined in a second step. An unambiguous comparison with the ECG RR-intervals taken as reference is possible for 98.5% of the heart beats. In these cases, a mean absolute error of 17 ms for the inter-beat interval lengths has been achieved, over a test corpus of 20 whole nights.

  5. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  6. Effects of the Selective Stretch-Activated Channel Blocker GsMtx4 on Stretch-Induced Changes in Refractoriness in Isolated Rat Hearts and on Ventricular Premature Beats and Arrhythmias after Coronary Occlusion in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Barrabés, José A.; Inserte, Javier; Agulló, Luis; Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Alburquerque-Béjar, Juan J.; Garcia-Dorado, David

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical factors may contribute to ischemic ventricular arrhythmias. GsMtx4 peptide, a selective stretch-activated channel blocker, inhibits stretch-induced atrial arrhythmias. We aimed to assess whether GsMtx4 protects against ventricular ectopy and arrhythmias following coronary occlusion in swine. First, the effects of 170-nM GsMtx4 on the changes in the effective refractory period (ERP) induced by left ventricular (LV) dilatation were assessed in 8 isolated rat hearts. Then, 44 anesthetized, open-chest pigs subjected to 50-min left anterior descending artery occlusion and 2-h reperfusion were blindly allocated to GsMtx4 (57 μg/kg iv. bolus and 3.8 μg/kg/min infusion, calculated to attain the above concentration in plasma) or saline, starting 5-min before occlusion and continuing until after reflow. In rat hearts, LV distension induced progressive reductions in ERP (35±2, 32±2, and 29±2 ms at 0, 20, and 40 mmHg of LV end-diastolic pressure, respectively, P<0.001) that were prevented by GsMTx4 (33±2, 33±2, and 32±2 ms, respectively, P=0.002 for the interaction with LV end-diastolic pressure). Pigs receiving GsMtx4 had similar number of ventricular premature beats during the ischemic period as control pigs (110±28 vs. 103±21, respectively, P=0.842). There were not significant differences among treated and untreated animals in the incidence of ventricular fibrillation (13.6 vs. 22.7%, respectively, P=0.696) or tachycardia (36.4 vs. 50.0%, P=0.361) or in the number of ventricular tachycardia episodes during the occlusion period (1.8±0.7 vs. 5.5±2.6, P=0.323). Thus, GsMtx4 administered under these conditions does not suppress ventricular ectopy following coronary occlusion in swine. Whether it might protect against malignant arrhythmias should be tested in studies powered for these outcomes. PMID:25938516

  7. Heart motion uncertainty compensation prediction method for robot assisted beating heart surgery - Master-slave Kalman Filters approach.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fan; Yu, Yang; Cui, Shigang; Zhao, Li; Wu, Xingli

    2014-05-01

    Robot Assisted Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) allows the heart keep beating in the surgery by actively eliminating the relative motion between point of interest (POI) on the heart surface and surgical tool. The inherited nonlinear and diverse nature of beating heart motion gives a huge obstacle for the robot to meet the demanding tracking control requirements. In this paper, we novelty propose a Master-slave Kalman Filter based on beating heart motion Nonlinear Adaptive Prediction (NAP) algorithm. In the study, we describe the beating heart motion as the combination of nonlinearity relating mathematics part and uncertainty relating non-mathematics part. Specifically, first, we model the nonlinearity of the heart motion via quadratic modulated sinusoids and estimate it by a Master Kalman Filter. Second, we involve the uncertainty heart motion by adaptively change the covariance of the process noise through the slave Kalman Filter. We conduct comparative experiments to evaluate the proposed approach with four distinguished datasets. The results indicate that the new approach reduces prediction errors by at least 30 μm. Moreover, the new approach performs well in robustness test, in which two kinds of arrhythmia datasets from MIT-BIH arrhythmia database are assessed.

  8. Mercury Beating Heart: Modifications to the Classical Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najdoski, Metodija; Mirceski, Valentin; Petrusevski, Vladimir M.; Demiri, Sani

    2007-01-01

    The mercury beating heart (MBH) is a commonly performed experiment, which is based on varying oxidizing agents and substituting other metals for iron. Various modified versions of the classical demonstration of the experiment are presented.

  9. [Non-heart-beating donors are ineligible].

    PubMed

    Heide, W

    2016-02-01

    The death of the donor is a mandatory prerequisite for organ transplantation (dead donor rule) worldwide. It is a medical, legal and ethical consensus to accept the concept of brain death, as first proposed in 1968 by the ad hoc committee of the Harvard Medical School, as a certain criterion of death. In isolated cases where the diagnosis of brain death was claimed to be wrong, it could be demonstrated that the diagnostic procedure for brain death had not been correctly performed. In March 2014 a joint statement by the German neuromedical societies emphasized that 1) the diagnosis of brain death is one of the safest diagnoses in medicine if performed according to accepted medical standards and criteria and 2) the concept of non-heart-beating donors (NHBD, i. e. organ donation after an arbitrarily defined duration of circulatory and cardiac arrest) practiced in some European countries must be absolutely rejected because it implicates a high risk of diagnostic error. According to the current literature it is unclear at what time cardiac and circulatory arrest is irreversible and leads to irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain including the brainstem, even though clinical signs of cessation of brain functions are always found after 10 min. Furthermore, is it often an arbitrary decision to exactly define the duration of cardiac arrest if continuous echocardiographic monitoring has not been carried out from the very beginning. Last but not least there are ethical concerns against the concept of NHBD because it might influence therapeutic efforts to resuscitate a patient with cardiac arrest. Therefore, the German Medical Council (BÄK) has repeatedly rejected the concept of NHBD for organ transplantation since 1995. PMID:26830897

  10. Model for the heart beat-to-beat time series during meditation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, A.; Diambra, L.; Malta, C. P.

    2003-09-01

    We present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a pacemaker, that simulates the membrane potential of the sinoatrial node, modulated by a periodic input signal plus correlated noise that simulates the respiratory input. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce in the phase space the trajectory of experimental heart beat-to-beat interval data. The data sets were recorded during meditation practices of the Chi and Kundalini Yoga techniques. Our study indicates that in the first case the respiratory signal has the shape of a smoothed square wave, and in the second case it has the shape of a smoothed triangular wave.

  11. Model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat time interval series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, Alberto; Diambra, Luis; Malta, C. P.

    2005-09-01

    In this study we present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a set of differential equations used to simulate the membrane potential of a single rabbit sinoatrial node cell, excited with a periodic input signal with added correlated noise. This signal, which simulates the input from the autonomous nervous system to the sinoatrial node, was included in the pacemaker equations as a modulation of the iNaK current pump and the potassium current iK. We focus at modeling the heart beat-to-beat time interval series from normal subjects during meditation of the Kundalini Yoga and Chi techniques. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that while the embedding of pre-meditation and control cases have a roughly circular shape, it acquires a polygonal shape during meditation, triangular for the Kundalini Yoga data and quadrangular in the case of Chi data. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce the trajectory of the experimental data in the phase space. The embedding of the Chi data could be reproduced using a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a square wave. In the case of Kundalini Yoga data, the embedding was reproduced with a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a triangular wave having a rising branch of longer duration than the decreasing branch. Our study provides an estimation of the respiratory signal using only the heart beat-to-beat time interval series.

  12. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...

  13. Nickel chloride inhibits metabolic coronary vasodilatation in isolated rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Edoute, Y.; Rubanyi, G.M.; Vanhoutte, P.M.

    1986-03-01

    Nickel is a potent coronary vasoconstrictor and it is released from ischemic myocardium. To determine whether or not nickel ions cause coronary vasoconstriction when local vasodilator mechanisms are stimulated the authors studied the inter-relation between exogenous nickel chloride (NiCl/sub 2/) and metabolic coronary vasodilatation in isolated rat hearts perfused by a modified Langendorff technique. NiCl/sub 2/ induced dose-dependent (10/sup -7/-10/sup -5/M) increases in coronary vascular resistance in spontaneously beating hearts. Pacing of the hearts (380/min) and infusing adenosine (10/sup -6/M) evoked comparable increases in coronary flow but did not affect the coronary vasoconstriction caused by NiCl/sub 2/. At concentrations (> 10/sup -7/M) which evoked vasoconstriction, NiCl/sub 2/ significantly reduced vasodilator responses evoked by pacing, transient coronary occlusion and adenosine. Lower concentrations, which did not cause vasoconstriction, had no effect on these vasodilator responses. Thus, at relative low concentrations NiCl/sub 2/ inhibits metabolic dilatation of the coronary vessels which may contribute to the increased vascular resistance caused by the trace metal under ischemic/hypoxic conditions.

  14. Constant magnetic field influence on a heart beat in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lazetic, B.; Pekaric-Nadj, N.; Kasas-Lazetic, K.

    1991-03-11

    The authors used uretan narcose to implant constant magnets of 50 mT under the skin of rats in head region. The ECG was registrated in the next 6 hours. From it they found much slower heart beat which culminated in the first 105 minutes. After 6 weeks of continual exposure the heart beat of the exposed rats was still slower then in the controls. It is concluded that a chronical exposition to the constant magnetic field affected rats organisms and no regulatory mechanism could prevent it.

  15. Beat-to-beat heart rate detection in multi-lead abdominal fetal ECG recordings.

    PubMed

    Peters, C H L; van Laar, J O E H; Vullings, R; Oei, S G; Wijn, P F F

    2012-04-01

    Reliable monitoring of fetal condition often requires more information than is provided by cardiotocography, the standard technique for fetal monitoring. Abdominal recording of the fetal electrocardiogram may offer valuable additional information, but unfortunately is troubled by poor signal-to-noise ratios during certain parts of pregnancy. To increase the usability of abdominal fetal ECG recordings, an algorithm was developed that enhances fetal QRS complexes in these recordings and thereby provides a promising method for detecting the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate in recordings with poor signal-to-noise ratios. The method was evaluated on generated recordings with controlled signal-to-noise ratios and on actual recordings that were performed in clinical practice and were annotated by two independent experts. The evaluation on the generated signals demonstrated excellent results (sensitivity of 0.98 for SNR≥1.5). Only for SNR<2, the inaccuracy of the fetal heart rate detection exceeded 2 ms, which may still suffice for cardiotocography but is unacceptable for analysis of the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate variability. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of the method in actual recordings were reduced to approximately 90% for SNR≤2.4, but were excellent for higher signal-to-noise ratios.

  16. Outward sodium current in beating heart cells.

    PubMed

    Wellis, D P; DeFelice, L J; Mazzanti, M

    1990-01-01

    This article is a study of the fast Na current during action potentials. We have investigated the outward Na current (Mazzanti, M., and L.J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 52:95-100) in more detail, and we have asked whether it goes through the same channels associated with the rapid depolarization phase of action potentials. We address the question by patch clamping single, spontaneously beating, embryonic chick ventricle cells, using two electrodes to record the action potential and the patch current simultaneously. The chief limitation is the capacitive current, and in this article we describe a new method to subtract it. Varying the potential and the Na concentration in the patch pipette, and fitting the corrected currents to a standard model (Ebihara, L., and E.A. Johnson. 1980. Biophys. J. 32:779-790), provides evidence that the outward current is carried by the same channels that conduct the inward current. We compare the currents in beating cells to currents in nonbeating cells using whole-cell and cell-attached patch clamp recordings. The latter tend to show more positive Na reversal potentials, with the implication that internal Na is higher in beating cells. We propose that the plateau of the action potential, which is partly due to an inward Ca current, exceeds Na action current reversal potentials, and that this driving force gives rise to an outward movement of Na ions. The existence of such a current would imply that the fast repolarization phase after the upstroke of cardiac action potentials is partly due to the Na action current.

  17. Robotic Force Stabilization for Beating Heart Intracardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Shelten G; Yip, Michael C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Perrin, Douglas P; Del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2009-10-01

    The manipulation of fast moving, delicate tissues in beating heart procedures presents a considerable challenge to surgeons. We present a new robotic force stabilization system that assists surgeons by maintaining a constant contact force with the beating heart. The system incorporates a novel, miniature uniaxial force sensor that is mounted to surgical instrumentation to measure contact forces during surgical manipulation. Using this sensor in conjunction with real-time tissue motion information derived from 3D ultrasound, we show that a force controller with feed-forward motion terms can provide safe and accurate force stabilization in an in vivo contact task against the beating mitral valve annulus. This confers a 50% reduction in force fluctuations when compared to a standard force controller and a 75% reduction in fluctuations when compared to manual attempts to maintain the same force. PMID:20431713

  18. Robotic force stabilization for beating heart intracardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Shelten G; Yip, Michael C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Perrin, Douglas P; del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    The manipulation of fast moving, delicate tissues in beating heart procedures presents a considerable challenge to surgeons. We present a new robotic force stabilization system that assists surgeons by maintaining a constant contact force with the beating heart. The system incorporates a novel, miniature uniaxial force sensor that is mounted to surgical instrumentation to measure contact forces during surgical manipulation. Using this sensor in conjunction with real-time tissue motion information derived from 3D ultrasound, we show that a force controller with feed-forward motion terms can provide safe and accurate force stabilization in an in vivo contact task against the beating mitral valve annulus. This confers a 50% reduction in force fluctuations when compared to a standard force controller and a 75% reduction in fluctuations when compared to manual attempts to maintain the same force. PMID:20425967

  19. Heart beat detection using a multimodal data coupling method.

    PubMed

    Mollakazemi, M Javad; Atyabi, S Abbas; Ghaffari, Ali

    2015-08-01

    The most straightforward method for heart beat estimation is R-peak detection based on an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. Current R-peak detection methods do not work properly when the ECG signal is contaminated or missing, which leads to the incorrect estimation of the heart rate. This raises the need for reliable algorithms which can locate heart beats in continuous long-term multimodal data, allowing robust analysis.In this paper, three peak detectors are evaluated for heart beat detection using various cardiovascular signals. One of the peak detectors is a new general peak detector (GPD) algorithm which is applicable on ECG and other pulsatile signals to compensate for the limitation of QRS detection. This peak detector algorithm is adaptive and independently finds amplitude characteristics for every recording, while not tuned for ECG or other pulsatile signals. Three strategies, which are different disciplines of detectors, are then proposed while the fusion method remains the same in all strategies. In the first strategy, the ECG and the lowest-indexed signal of general blood pressure (BP), arterial blood pressure (ART) and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) are processed through gqrs and wabp (from the PhysioNet library), respectively. In the second strategy, all beats in different signals are detected by GPD. In the third strategy, ECG and other signals are processed by gqrs and GPD, respectively. In all three strategies two criteria are used in order to fuse the detections. The first criterion is based on the number of candidate detections in a specific time period, based on which signals of interest are selected. The second fusion criterion is based on the regularity of the derived intervals between subsequent candidate detections. If the number of detections in ECG and one of BP, ART and PAP signals have reasonable physiological range, a new signal is generated in which they are coupled with each other. Heart beats can more easily be detected in noisy

  20. ECG Morphological Variability in Beat Space for Risk Stratification After Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Syed, Zeeshan; Scirica, Benjamin M.; Morrow, David A.; Guttag, John V.; Stultz, Collin M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of patients who are at high risk of adverse cardiovascular events after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a major challenge in clinical cardiology. We hypothesized that quantifying variability in electrocardiogram (ECG) morphology may improve risk stratification post‐ACS. Methods and Results We developed a new metric to quantify beat‐to‐beat morphologic changes in the ECG: morphologic variability in beat space (MVB), and compared our metric to published ECG metrics (heart rate variability [HRV], deceleration capacity [DC], T‐wave alternans, heart rate turbulence, and severe autonomic failure). We tested the ability of these metrics to identify patients at high risk of cardiovascular death (CVD) using 1082 patients (1‐year CVD rate, 4.5%) from the MERLIN‐TIMI 36 (Metabolic Efficiency with Ranolazine for Less Ischemia in Non‐ST‐Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome—Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 36) clinical trial. DC, HRV/low frequency–high frequency, and MVB were all associated with CVD (hazard ratios [HRs] from 2.1 to 2.3 [P<0.05 for all] after adjusting for the TIMI risk score [TRS], left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], and B‐type natriuretic peptide [BNP]). In a cohort with low‐to‐moderate TRS (N=864; 1‐year CVD rate, 2.7%), only MVB was significantly associated with CVD (HR, 3.0; P=0.01, after adjusting for LVEF and BNP). Conclusions ECG morphological variability in beat space contains prognostic information complementary to the clinical variables, LVEF and BNP, in patients with low‐to‐moderate TRS. ECG metrics could help to risk stratify patients who might not otherwise be considered at high risk of CVD post‐ACS. PMID:24963105

  1. [Analysis of scalp potential activity and heart rate variability during volitional control of heart beat].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Jian-Bao; Wang, Jue

    2009-07-01

    In the study the changes of scalp potential and cardiac autonomic nervous system during volitional control of heart beat are explored with the wavelet packet parameters and approximate entropy (ApEn) of Electroencephalogram (EEG) and heart rate variability. The results show that volition can control heart beat and the changes of brain activity are earlier than that of autonomic activity. But its control of heart beat is very different from the motor nervous system because different cortical positions are respectively concerned during the quick and slow control of heart beat. The pre-central areas of brain are correlated with parasympathetic activity by which HR is controlled to slow down. The post-central areas of brain are correlated with sympathetic activity by which HR is controlled to accelerate.

  2. Keeping a Beat on the Heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liszka, Kathy J.; Mackin, Michael A.; Liehter, Michael J.; York, David W.; Pillai, Dilip; Rosenbaum, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Feel the relief of a patient suffering from heart arrhythmia, who is able to return home while having her heart monitored by health professionals 24 hours a day, without the fear that she will miss an important indicator and suffer a fatal heart attack - using technology originally developed to conduct experiments on the Space Shuttle. Approximately 400,000 Americans die every year from sudden heart attacks . Medical research revealed that patterns of electrical activity in the heart can act as predictors of these lethal cardiac events known as arrhythmias. Fortunately, certain arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation (loss of regular heartbeat and subsequent loss of function) and ventricular tachycardia (rapid heartbeats), can be detected and appropriately treated. Today, patients at moderate risk of arrhythmias can benefit from technology that would permit long- term continuous monitoring of electrical cardiac rhythms outside the hospital environment in the comfort of their own homes. Medical telemetry systems, also known as telemedicine, are evolving rapidly as wireless communication technology advances, evidenced by the commercial products and research prototypes for remote health monitoring that have appeared in recent years. Wireless systems allow patients to move freely in their home and work environment while being monitored remotely by health care professionals.

  3. Editorial: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Behar, Joachim; Johnson, Alistair; Oster, Julien; Clifford, Gari D.; Moody, George B.

    2015-01-01

    This editorial reviews the background issues, the design, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology (CinC) 2014 Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Our major focus was to accelerate the development and facilitate the comparison of robust methods for locating heart beats in long-term multi-channel recordings. A public (training) database consisting of 151,032 annotated beats was compiled from records that contained ECGs as well as pulsatile signals that directly reflect cardiac activity, and other signals that may have few or no observable markers of heart beats. A separate hidden test data set (consisting of 152,478 beats) is permanently stored at PhysioNet, and a public framework has been developed to provide researchers the ability to continue to automatically score and compare the performance of their algorithms. A scoring criteria based on the averaging of gross sensitivity, gross positive predictivity, average sensitivity, and average positive predictivity is proposed. The top three scores (as of March 2015) on the hidden test data set were 93.64%, 91.50%, and 90.70%. PMID:26217894

  4. Beat-to-beat interplay of heart rate, ventricular depolarization, and repolarization.

    PubMed

    Kozmann, György; Haraszti, Kristóf; Préda, István

    2010-01-01

    To improve malignant arrhythmia risk stratification, the causal and random components of spatiotemporal dynamics of heart rate (RR distances), ventricular depolarization sequence, and repolarization disparity were studied based on body surface potential map records taken for 5 minutes, in resting, supine position on 14 healthy subjects (age range, 20-65 years) and on 6 arrhythmia patients (age range, 59-70 years). Beat-to-beat QRS and QRST integral maps, Karhunen-Loève (KL) coefficients, RR, and nondipolarity index time series were computed. Tight relationship was found between RR and QRS integrals in healthy subjects with less association in arrhythmia patients. Tight KL-domain multiple linear association (r(2) > 0.72) was found between the QRS and QRST integral dynamics (ie, depolarization sequence and repolarization disparity). Beat-to-beat probability of the generation of significant nondipolarity index spikes was proportional to the QRST KL-component standard deviations (SD(i)) and inversely proportional with the mean dipolar KL components (M(i)) of the average QRST integral map.

  5. Evaluation of the beat-to-beat detection accuracy of PulseOn wearable optical heart rate monitor.

    PubMed

    Parak, Jakub; Tarniceriu, Adrian; Renevey, Philippe; Bertschi, Mattia; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) provides significant information about the health status of an individual. Optical heart rate monitoring is a comfortable alternative to ECG based heart rate monitoring. However, most available optical heart rate monitoring devices do not supply beat-to-beat detection accuracy required by proper HRV analysis. We evaluate the beat-to-beat detection accuracy of a recent wrist-worn optical heart rate monitoring device, PulseOn (PO). Ten subjects (8 male and 2 female; 35.9±10.3 years old) participated in the study. HRV was recorded with PO and Firstbeat Bodyguard 2 (BG2) device, which was used as an ECG based reference. HRV was recorded during sleep. As compared to BG2, PO detected on average 99.57% of the heartbeats (0.43% of beats missed) and had 0.72% extra beat detection rate, with 5.94 ms mean absolute error (MAE) in beat-to-beat intervals (RRI) as compared to the ECG based RRI BG2. Mean RMSSD difference between PO and BG2 derived HRV was 3.1 ms. Therefore, PO provides an accurate method for long term HRV monitoring during sleep.

  6. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  7. Robotic Tissue Tracking for Beating Heart Mitral Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Shelten G.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid motion of the heart presents a significant challenge to the surgeon during intracardiac beating heart procedures. We present a 3D ultrasound-guided motion compensation system that assists the surgeon by synchronizing instrument motion with the heart. The system utilizes the fact that certain intracardiac structures, like the mitral valve annulus, have trajectories that are largely constrained to translation along one axis. This allows the development of a real-time 3D ultrasound tissue tracker that we integrate with a 1 degree-of-freedom (DOF) actuated surgical instrument and predictive filter to devise a motion tracking system adapted to mitral valve annuloplasty. In vivo experiments demonstrate that the system provides highly accurate tracking (1.0 mm error) with 70% less error than manual tracking attempts. PMID:23973122

  8. Metal MEMS Tools for Beating-heart Tissue Approximation.

    PubMed

    Butler, Evan J; Folk, Chris; Cohen, Adam; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Chen, Rich; Del Nido, Pedro J; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-05-01

    Achieving superior outcomes through the use of robots in medical applications requires an integrated approach to the design of the robot, tooling and the procedure itself. In this paper, this approach is applied to develop a robotic technique for closing abnormal communication between the atria of the heart. The goal is to achieve the efficacy of surgical closure as performed on a stopped, open heart with the reduced risk and trauma of a beating-heart catheter-based procedure. In the proposed approach, a concentric tube robot is used to percutaneously access the right atrium and deploy a tissue approximation device. The device is constructed using a metal MEMS fabrication process and is designed to both fit the manipulation capabilities of the robot as well as to reproduce the beneficial features of surgical closure by suture. Experimental results demonstrate device efficacy through manual in-vivo deployment and bench-top robotic deployment.

  9. Metal MEMS Tools for Beating-heart Tissue Removal

    PubMed Central

    Gosline, Andrew H.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Veeramani, Arun; Wu, MingTing; Schmitz, Greg; Chen, Rich; Arabagi, Veaceslav; del Nido, Pedro J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel robotic tool is proposed to enable the surgical removal of tissue from inside the beating heart. The tool is manufactured using a unique metal MEMS process that provides the means to fabricate fully assembled devices that incorporate micron-scale features in a millimeter scale tool. The tool is integrated with a steerable curved concentric tube robot that can enter the heart through the vasculature. Incorporating both irrigation and aspiration, the tissue removal system is capable of extracting substantial amounts of tissue under teleoperated control by first morselizing it and then transporting the debris out of the heart through the lumen of the robot. Tool design and robotic integration are described and ex vivo experimental results are presented. PMID:24232076

  10. Investigating the beat by beat phase synchronization between maternal and fetal heart rates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Khandoker, Ahsan H; Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Funamoto, Kiyoe; Sugibayashi, Rika; Endo, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2013-01-01

    The development of the fetal cardiovascular system plays a crucial role in fetal health. The evolution of the relationship between fetal and maternal cardiac systems during fetal maturation is a characterizing feature for fetal cardiac development. This paper aims to evaluate this relationship by investigating the beat-to-beat synchronization between fetal and maternal heart rates and its variation at different stages of pregnancy. Synchronization epochs and phase locking patterns are analyzed at certain synchronization ratios (SRs) for three gestational age groups (16-26 weeks, 27-33 weeks, 34-40 weeks). Results show that the normalized synchronization epoch is significantly different for three age groups with the p-value of 6.72*10(-6) and 2.89*10(-4) at SR of 1:2 and 4:5 respectively. The variance of phase locking also shows significant difference for three groups with the p-value less than 10(-7) at four SRs. Results also suggest that synchronization may be the force behind the increase in the maternal heart rate to maintain the fetal development and provide supplies for the fetus. Overall, the findings propose new clinical markers for evaluating the antenatal development.

  11. Efficient heart beat detection using embedded system electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Oh, Sechang; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    The present day bio-technical field concentrates on developing various types of innovative ambulatory and wearable devices to monitor several bio-physical, physio-pathological, bio-electrical and bio-potential factors to assess a human body's health condition without intruding quotidian activities. One of the most important aspects of this evolving technology is monitoring heart beat rate and electrocardiogram (ECG) from which many other subsidiary results can be derived. Conventionally, the devices and systems consumes a lot of power since the acquired signals are always processed on the receiver end. Because of this back end processing, the unprocessed raw data is transmitted resulting in usage of more power, memory and processing time. This paper proposes an innovative technique where the acquired signals are processed by a microcontroller in the front end of the module and just the processed signal is then transmitted wirelessly to the display unit. Therefore, power consumption is considerably reduced and clearer data analysis is performed within the module. This also avoids the need for the user to be educated about usage of the device and signal/system analysis, since only the number of heart beats will displayed at the user end. Additionally, the proposed concept also eradicates the other disadvantages like obtrusiveness, high power consumption and size. To demonstrate the above said factors, a commercial controller board was used to extend the monitoring method by using the saved ECG data from a computer.

  12. The relationship between the strength of the human heart beat and the interval between beats.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, J; Miller, G A; Noble, M I; Papadoyannis, D; Seed, W A

    1982-06-01

    In 15 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and pacing tests, the left ventricular (LV) pressure and its maximum rate of rise (LV dP/dt max) were measured with catheter-tip manometers. Atrial or ventricular pacing at a single steady frequency (the priming frequency) was followed by a test pulse at a varying interval (test pulse interval). In 14 subjects in whom it was examined, the contractile response after the test pulse increased with test pulse interval to reach a maximum plateau value--the optimum contractile response (OCR). In five cases, further prolongation of the test pulse interval decreased the contractile response. The optimum test pulse interval occurred at 800-900 msec. An increase in the priming frequency before the introduction of the test pulse caused a progressive increase in OCR, in contrast to the minor effects on LV dP/dt max of the control beats. Similar results were recorded in four other patients in whom contractile response was assessed from the rate of rise of right ventricular pressure. These results indicate that with tachycardia, the interval between beats is insufficient to allow maximum contractile performance (presumed to be activated by calcium ions) to develop. The true effect of increasing heart rate is only revealed by the relationship between OCR and the preceding frequency of contraction.

  13. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  14. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  15. Beat-to-beat systolic time-interval measurement from heart sounds and ECG.

    PubMed

    Paiva, R P; Carvalho, P; Couceiro, R; Henriques, J; Antunes, M; Quintal, I; Muehlsteff, J

    2012-02-01

    Systolic time intervals are highly correlated to fundamental cardiac functions. Several studies have shown that these measurements have significant diagnostic and prognostic value in heart failure condition and are adequate for long-term patient follow-up and disease management. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using heart sound (HS) to accurately measure the opening and closing moments of the aortic heart valve. These moments are crucial to define the main systolic timings of the heart cycle, i.e. pre-ejection period (PEP) and left ventricular ejection time (LVET). We introduce an algorithm for automatic extraction of PEP and LVET using HS and electrocardiogram. PEP is estimated with a Bayesian approach using the signal's instantaneous amplitude and patient-specific time intervals between atrio-ventricular valve closure and aortic valve opening. As for LVET, since the aortic valve closure corresponds to the start of the S2 HS component, we base LVET estimation on the detection of the S2 onset. A comparative assessment of the main systolic time intervals is performed using synchronous signal acquisitions of the current gold standard in cardiac time-interval measurement, i.e. echocardiography, and HS. The algorithms were evaluated on a healthy population, as well as on a group of subjects with different cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In the healthy group, from a set of 942 heartbeats, the proposed algorithm achieved 7.66 ± 5.92 ms absolute PEP estimation error. For LVET, the absolute estimation error was 11.39 ± 8.98 ms. For the CVD population, 404 beats were used, leading to 11.86 ± 8.30 and 17.51 ± 17.21 ms absolute PEP and LVET errors, respectively. The results achieved in this study suggest that HS can be used to accurately estimate LVET and PEP.

  16. Kuramoto transition in an ensemble of mercury beating heart systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P.; Contractor, A. Q.; Rivera, M.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied, experimentally, the collective behavior of the electrically coupled autonomous Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) systems exhibiting the breathing mode, by varying both the coupling strength and the population size (from N = 3 to N = 16). For a fixed N, the electrical and the mechanical activities of the MBH systems achieve complete synchronization at different coupling strengths. The electrical activity of each MBH system is measured by the corresponding electrode potential (Ei = Vi). Additionally, the mechanical activity of each MBH oscillator is visually observed (snapshots and video clips). Subsequently, this activity is quantified by calculating the temporal variation in the area (Ai) of the Hg drop. As a result, the synchronization of the electrical (Ei = Vi) and the mechanical (Ai) activities can be measured. The extent of synchronization was quantified by employing the order parameter (r). Our experimental results are found to be in agreement with the Kuramoto theory.

  17. Beating heart mitral valve repair with integrated ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John T.; Peters, Terry M.

    2015-03-01

    Beating heart valve therapies rely extensively on image guidance to treat patients who would be considered inoperable with conventional surgery. Mitral valve repair techniques including the MitrClip, NeoChord, and emerging transcatheter mitral valve replacement techniques rely on transesophageal echocardiography for guidance. These images are often difficult to interpret as the tool will cause shadowing artifacts that occlude tissue near the target site. Here, we integrate ultrasound imaging directly into the NeoChord device. This provides an unobstructed imaging plane that can visualize the valve lea ets as they are engaged by the device and can aid in achieving both a proper bite and spacing between the neochordae implants. A proof of concept user study in a phantom environment is performed to provide a proof of concept for this device.

  18. Synchronization using environmental coupling in mercury beating heart oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Tanu; Montoya, Fernando; Rivera, M.; Tajima, Shunsuke; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Parmananda, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report synchronization of Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) oscillators using the environmental coupling mechanism. This mechanism involves interaction of the oscillators with a common medium/environment such that the oscillators do not interact among themselves. In the present work, we chose a modified MBH system as the common environment. In the absence of coupling, this modified system does not exhibit self sustained oscillations. It was observed that, as a result of the coupling of the MBH oscillators with this common environment, the electrical and the mechanical activities of both the oscillators synchronized simultaneously. Experimental results indicate the emergence of both lag and the complete synchronization in the MBH oscillators. Simulations of the phase oscillators were carried out in order to better understand the experimental observations.

  19. Kuramoto transition in an ensemble of mercury beating heart systems.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P; Contractor, A Q; Rivera, M

    2015-06-01

    We have studied, experimentally, the collective behavior of the electrically coupled autonomous Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) systems exhibiting the breathing mode, by varying both the coupling strength and the population size (from N = 3 to N = 16). For a fixed N, the electrical and the mechanical activities of the MBH systems achieve complete synchronization at different coupling strengths. The electrical activity of each MBH system is measured by the corresponding electrode potential (Ei = Vi). Additionally, the mechanical activity of each MBH oscillator is visually observed (snapshots and video clips). Subsequently, this activity is quantified by calculating the temporal variation in the area (Ai) of the Hg drop. As a result, the synchronization of the electrical (Ei = Vi) and the mechanical (Ai) activities can be measured. The extent of synchronization was quantified by employing the order parameter (r). Our experimental results are found to be in agreement with the Kuramoto theory. PMID:26117134

  20. Robotic Motion Compensation for Beating Heart Intracardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Shelten G.; Kettler, Daniel T.; Novotny, Paul M.; Plowes, Richard D.; Howe, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    3D ultrasound imaging has enabled minimally invasive, beating heart intracardiac procedures. However, rapid heart motion poses a serious challenge to the surgeon that is compounded by significant time delays and noise in 3D ultrasound. This paper investigates the concept of using a one-degree-of-freedom motion compensation system to synchronize with tissue motions that may be approximated by 1D motion models. We characterize the motion of the mitral valve annulus and show that it is well approximated by a 1D model. The subsequent development of a motion compensation instrument (MCI) is described, as well as an extended Kalman filter (EKF) that compensates for system delays. The benefits and robustness of motion compensation are tested in user trials under a series of non-ideal tracking conditions. Results indicate that the MCI provides an approximately 50% increase in dexterity and 50% decrease in force when compared with a solid tool, but is sensitive to time delays. We demonstrate that the use of the EKF for delay compensation restores performance, even in situations of high heart rate variability. The resulting system is tested in an in vitro 3D ultrasound-guided servoing task, yielding accurate tracking (1.15 mm root mean square) in the presence of noisy, time-delayed 3D ultrasound measurements. PMID:20436927

  1. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia during anaesthesia: assessment of respiration related beat-to-beat heart rate variability analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Loula, P; Jäntti, V; Yli-Hankala, A

    1997-11-01

    Beat-to-beat heart rate variability analysis is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of neuropathy. Respiration-related heart rate variability (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) reflects the function of parasympathetic nervous system during spontaneous ventilation while awake. RSA is also claimed to monitor the depth of anaesthesia. Power spectrum analysis or various averaging techniques of the heart rate variability are usually applied. The current literature, however, does not usually interpret the ground rules and limitations of the method used, and this may sometimes lead to erroneous conclusions on the data. The aim of our study was to compare and analyse critically the performance of different methods of evaluating RSA during anaesthesia and positive pressure ventilation. Power spectrum analysis, the root mean square of the successive RR-interval difference (RMSSD), and two respiration related methods, RSA index and average phase RSA, were included in the comparison. To test these methods, 11 patients were anaesthetised with isoflurane and their lungs were ventilated mechanically with a frequency of 6 cycles min-1. Each patient received a bolus dose of atropine (20 micrograms kg-1) during the trial. Electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram and tracheal pressure signal from respirator were recorded and analyses were performed off-line. We demonstrated that general indices, such as RMSSD, may be strongly affected by heart rate level and other non-respiration related variations in heart rate. We also showed that the effect of unwanted fluctuations on RSA can be reduced with respiration dependent beat-to-beat methods. Furthermore we confirmed that in addition to the amplitude, also the pattern of respiratory sinus arrhythmia is of interest: the pattern is reversed in phase compared to spontaneous breathing while awake, as we have shown earlier. To analyse RSA during anaesthesia, we recommend the use of an average phase RSA method based on beat-to-beat variability

  2. Heart Motion Prediction Based on Adaptive Estimation Algorithms for Robotic Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, E. Erdem; Franke, Timothy J.; Bebek, Özkan; Shiose, Akira; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Robotic assisted beating heart surgery aims to allow surgeons to operate on a beating heart without stabilizers as if the heart is stationary. The robot actively cancels heart motion by closely following a point of interest (POI) on the heart surface—a process called Active Relative Motion Canceling (ARMC). Due to the high bandwidth of the POI motion, it is necessary to supply the controller with an estimate of the immediate future of the POI motion over a prediction horizon in order to achieve sufficient tracking accuracy. In this paper, two least-square based prediction algorithms, using an adaptive filter to generate future position estimates, are implemented and studied. The first method assumes a linear system relation between the consecutive samples in the prediction horizon. On the contrary, the second method performs this parametrization independently for each point over the whole the horizon. The effects of predictor parameters and variations in heart rate on tracking performance are studied with constant and varying heart rate data. The predictors are evaluated using a 3 degrees of freedom test-bed and prerecorded in-vivo motion data. Then, the one-step prediction and tracking performances of the presented approaches are compared with an Extended Kalman Filter predictor. Finally, the essential features of the proposed prediction algorithms are summarized. PMID:23976889

  3. Dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography: image quality and stenosis diagnosis in patients with high heart rates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minwen; Li, Jiayi; Xu, Jian; Chen, Kang; Zhao, Hongliang; Huan, Yi

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate prospectively the effects of heart rate and heart-rate variability on dual-source computed tomographic coronary image quality in patients whose heart rates were high, and to determine retrospectively the accuracy of dual-source computed tomographic diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis in the same patients.We compared image quality and diagnostic accuracy in 40 patients whose heart rates exceeded 70 beats/min with the same data in 40 patients whose heart rates were 70 beats/min or slower. In both groups, we analyzed 1,133 coronary arterial segments. Five hundred forty-five segments (97.7%) in low-heart-rate patients and 539 segments (93.7%) in high-heart-rate patients were of diagnostic image quality. We considered P < 0.05 to be statistically significant. No statistically significant differences between the groups were found in diagnostic-image quality scores of total segments or of any coronary artery, nor were any significant differences found between the groups in the accurate diagnosis of angiographically significant stenosis.Calcification was the chief factor that affected diagnostic accuracy. In high-heart-rate patients, heart-rate variability was significantly related to the diagnostic image quality of all segments (P = 0.001) and of the left circumflex coronary artery (P = 0.016). Heart-rate variability of more than 5 beats/min most strongly contributed to an inability to evaluate segments in both groups. When heart rates rose, the optimal reconstruction window shifted from diastole to systole.The image quality of dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography at high heart rates enables sufficient diagnosis of stenosis, although variability of heart rates significantly deteriorates image quality. PMID:19436804

  4. Sheep heart RNA stimulates myofibril formation and beating in cardiac mutant axolotl hearts in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; LaFrance, Sherrie M; Lemanski, Sharon L; Huang, Xupei; Dube, Dipak K; Lemanski, Larry F

    2003-05-01

    In the Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, recessive mutant gene c, when homozygous, results in a failure of the heart to form sarcomeric myofibrils and contract normally. Previous studies have shown that purified RNA from normal anterior endoderm or from medium conditioned with anterior endoderm/pre-cardiac mesoderm has the capacity to rescue mutant hearts in organ culture. In the present study, RNA extracted from adult sheep heart was tested for its capacity to promote differentiation in the mutant axolotl hearts. Mutant hearts cultured in the presence of the sheep heart RNA in Steinberg's solution for 48 h displayed rhythmic contractions. Ultrastructural studies showed that the rescued mutant axolotl ventricular myocardial cells contained myofibrils of normal morphology. Mutant hearts cultured in Steinberg's solution alone did not beat throughout their lengths and myofibrils were not observable in the ventricles. Confocal microscopy confirmed the increase of Tropomyosin expression and formation of myofibrils in mutant hearts treated by sheep heart RNA. Thus, sheep heart RNA promotes myofibrillogenesis and the development of contractile function in embryonic cardiac mutant axolotl hearts. PMID:12684761

  5. Genetic research in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, A G

    1984-01-01

    Coronary heart disease research along genetic lines is difficult. Studies in molecular genetics of apolipoprotein and receptor variability appear most promising in the near future. However, unexpected discoveries and methodology may turn up that may completely change the field. Exclusive concentration on lipid research therefore should be avoided. It is likely that most advances will come from carefully designed studies that ask specific questions. Such research design is appropriate not only for laboratory studies but also for clinical and epidemiological investigations. The collaboration of clinicians, biochemists, geneticists, epidemiologists, and statisticians is likely to lead to better understanding of coronary heart disease.

  6. Real-time optical gating for three-dimensional beating heart imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Jonathan M.; Saunter, Christopher D.; Love, Gordon D.; Girkin, John M.; Henderson, Deborah J.; Chaudhry, Bill

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate real-time microscope image gating to an arbitrary position in the cycle of the beating heart of a zebrafish embryo. We show how this can be used for high-precision prospective gating of fluorescence image slices of the moving heart. We also present initial results demonstrating the application of this technique to 3-D structural imaging of the beating embryonic heart.

  7. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  8. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  9. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  10. 3D force control for robotic-assisted beating heart surgery based on viscoelastic tissue model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Moreira, Pedro; Zemiti, Nabil; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Current cardiac surgery faces the challenging problem of heart beating motion even with the help of mechanical stabilizer which makes delicate operation on the heart surface difficult. Motion compensation methods for robotic-assisted beating heart surgery have been proposed recently in literature, but research on force control for such kind of surgery has hardly been reported. Moreover, the viscoelasticity property of the interaction between organ tissue and robotic instrument further complicates the force control design which is much easier in other applications by assuming the interaction model to be elastic (industry, stiff object manipulation, etc.). In this work, we present a three-dimensional force control method for robotic-assisted beating heart surgery taking into consideration of the viscoelastic interaction property. Performance studies based on our D2M2 robot and 3D heart beating motion information obtained through Da Vinci™ system are provided.

  11. Remote muscle salvage by regional substrate enhancement during on-bypass beating-heart treatment of cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Pocar, Marco; Passolunghi, Davide; Moneta, Andrea; Donatelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Surgical revascularization for postinfarction cardiogenic shock carries 20-50% mortality. Beating-heart techniques have been favoured, but their impact on the avoidance of additional myocardial injury is unknown. Ten consecutive patients with postinfarction cardiogenic shock, unsuitable anatomy for percutaneous coronary intervention (Syntax score 34.0±7.5; triple-vessel disease, 10/10; left main stenosis, 5/10), and no associated cardiac procedure, were selected for salvage/emergent on-pump beating-heart coronary bypass surgery. Remote muscle was sequentially substrate-enhanced reperfused through the grafts after construction of distal anastomoses. Early/late mortality, preoperative/peak postoperative enzyme release, and baseline/pre-discharge ventricular function were analysed. One early death occurred. Patients received 2.9±0.6 grafts, always employing the left internal mammary artery. Cardiopulmonary bypass duration was 140±62 min. Left ventricular ejection fraction (29.4±5.8 vs. 37.5±8.3%), wall motion score index (2.10±0.29 vs. 1.86±0.28), and end-systolic volume index (42.1±11.5 vs. 33.1±14.0 ml/m(2)) acutely improved (P≤0.001), whereas functional mitral regurgitation decreased from 1.4±0.8 to 0.8±0.4 (P=0.051). Total creatine kinase levels significantly increased (P=0.017), but myocardial band isoenzyme did not (P=0.18). After 3.1±1.4 years, eight patients are alive and seven are free of recurrent heart failure. Satisfactory functional outcome can be achieved with beating-heart on-pump revascularization for postinfarction cardiogenic shock. Perioperative enzyme releases and ventricular functional variables may suggest reduced perioperative myocardial injury.

  12. Non-heart-beating organ donation in Italy.

    PubMed

    Geraci, P M; Sepe, V

    2011-06-01

    In 2007 the non-heart-beating organ donation (NHBD) "Programma Alba" (Sunrise Programme) started in Pavia, Italy. The initial plan was to cut down waiting list for kidney transplantation, while its final aim is to shorten organ transplantation waiting lists. When compared to European countries and the USA, the Italian NHBD program has taken longer to get established. Initially Italian physicians were not entirely aware of the NHBD organ viability for transplantation, furthermore ethical issues and the need to regulate medical requirements to Italian law slowed down the NHBD program. In particular, Italian legislation provides for death ascertainment after irreversible cardiac arrest, 20-minute flat electrocardiogram. This no-touch period is longer when compared to worldwide legislation, and organ viability has been a main concern for Italian transplant doctors over the years. However, recent data let up to 40-minute warm ischemia time to preserve organ viability; this has encouraged Pavia's group to establish the NHBD "Programma Alba". It was designed according to Italian legislation from death diagnosis to graft placement, from this perspective must the significant role of the Transplant coordinator be recognized. Since 2007 seven kidneys have been gathered from seven NHBD. Of these, six NHBD kidneys have been transplanted. Currently, four patients are out of dialysis. This report is a detailed description of NHBD "Programma Alba" and its preliminary results. PMID:21617625

  13. Microwave radiation and heart-beat rate of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chou, C K; Han, L F; Guy, A W

    1980-06-01

    Each of three adult New Zealand rabbits, 2 male and 1 female albinos, was exposed dorsally or ventrally, to 2450-MHz plane waves for 20 min under each of several field conditions: 1) to continuous waves (CW) at 5 mW/cm2; 2) to pulsed waves (PW) of 1-microsecond width that recurred 700 pps at an average of 5 mW/cm2 and at a peak of 7.1 W/cm2; 3) to PW of 10-microseconds width at a peak of 13.7 W/cm2 that were synchronized with and triggered by the R wave of the electrocardiogram (EKG) at various delay times (0, 100, and 200 ms; and 4) to CW at 80 mW/cm2. Carbon-loaded Teflon electrodes were used to record the EKG from forelimbs of an animal before, during, and after irradiation whilst it was maintained in a constant exposure geometry in a wooden squeeze box. Field induced changes in the heart-beat rate were observed at 80 mW/cm2 but not a lower average power densities, although a peak positive chronotropic effect might have been occasioned by PM introduced at 100 and 200 ms after the R wave peak. No cumulative effect was observed over a period of four months. Thermographic analysis revealed relatively little absorption of microwave energy by the myocardium irrespective of anatomical aspect of exposure.

  14. "Keep the Beat" Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease ... Contents Your blood pressure rises and falls during the day. But when it stays elevated over time, ...

  15. Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke More Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack Updated:May 24,2016 Sometimes a heart attack ... Disease Go Red For Women Types of aneurysms Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) • ...

  16. Modern risk stratification in coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Ginghina, C.; Bejan, I.; Ceck, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of cardiovascular diseases in the world are growing. There are 2 million deaths due to cardiovascular disease each year in the European Union; the main cause of death being the coronary heart disease responsible for 16% of deaths in men and 15% in women. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease in Romania is estimated at 7 million people, of which 2.8 million have ischemic heart disease. In this epidemiological context, risk stratification is required for individualization of therapeutic strategies for each patient. The continuing evolution of the diagnosis and treatment techniques combines personalized medicine with the trend of therapeutic management leveling, based on guidelines and consensus, which are in constant update. The guidelines used in clinical practice have involved risk stratification and identification of patient groups in whom the risk-benefit ratio of using new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques has a positive value. Presence of several risk factors may indicate a more important total risk than the presence / significant increase from normal values of a single risk factor. Modern trends in risk stratification of patients with coronary heart disease are polarized between the use of simple data versus complex scores, traditional data versus new risk factors, generally valid scores versus personalized scores, depending on patient characteristics, type of coronary artery disease, with impact on the suggested therapy. All known information and techniques can be integrated in a complex system of risk assessment. The current trend in risk assessment is to identify coronary artery disease in early forms, before clinical manifestation, and to guide therapy, particularly in patients with intermediate risk, which can be classified in another class of risk based on new obtained information. Abbreviations: ACS = acute coronary syndrome; AMI = acute myocardial infarction; BNP = brain natriuretic peptide; BP = blood pressure; BPs

  17. Probabilistic model-based approach for heart beat detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hugh; Erol, Yusuf; Shen, Eric; Russell, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, hospitals are ubiquitous and integral to modern society. Patients flow in and out of a veritable whirlwind of paperwork, consultations, and potential inpatient admissions, through an abstracted system that is not without flaws. One of the biggest flaws in the medical system is perhaps an unexpected one: the patient alarm system. One longitudinal study reported an 88.8% rate of false alarms, with other studies reporting numbers of similar magnitudes. These false alarm rates lead to deleterious effects that manifest in a lower standard of care across clinics. This paper discusses a model-based probabilistic inference approach to estimate physiological variables at a detection level. We design a generative model that complies with a layman's understanding of human physiology and perform approximate Bayesian inference. One primary goal of this paper is to justify a Bayesian modeling approach to increasing robustness in a physiological domain. In order to evaluate our algorithm we look at the application of heart beat detection using four datasets provided by PhysioNet, a research resource for complex physiological signals, in the form of the PhysioNet 2014 Challenge set-p1 and set-p2, the MIT-BIH Polysomnographic Database, and the MGH/MF Waveform Database. On these data sets our algorithm performs on par with the other top six submissions to the PhysioNet 2014 challenge. The overall evaluation scores in terms of sensitivity and positive predictivity values obtained were as follows: set-p1 (99.72%), set-p2 (93.51%), MIT-BIH (99.66%), and MGH/MF (95.53%). These scores are based on the averaging of gross sensitivity, gross positive predictivity, average sensitivity, and average positive predictivity.

  18. Characterization of the respiratory and heart beat signal from an air pressure-based ballistocardiographic setup.

    PubMed

    Willemen, Tim; Van Deun, Dorien; Verhaert, Vincent; Van Huffel, Sabine; Haex, Bart; Vander Sloten, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Off-body detection of respiratory and cardiac activity presents an enormous opportunity for general health, stress and sleep quality monitoring. The presented setup detects the mechanical activity of both heart and lungs by measuring pressure difference fluctuations between two air volumes underneath the chest area of the subject. The registered signals were characterized over four different sleep postures, three different base air pressures within the air volumes and three different mattress top layer materials. Highest signal strength was detected in prone posture for both the respiratory and heart beat signal. Respiratory signal strength was the lowest in supine posture, while heart beat signal strength was lowest for right lateral. Heart beat cycle variability was highest in prone and lowest in supine posture. Increasing the base air pressure caused a reduction in signal amplitude for both the respiratory and the heart beat signal. A visco-elastic poly-urethane foam top layer had significantly higher respiration amplitude compared to high resilient poly-urethane foam and latex foam. For the heart beat signal, differences between the top layers were small. The authors conclude that, while the influence of the mattress top layer material is small, the base air pressure can be tuned for optimal mechanical transmission from heart and lungs towards the registration setup.

  19. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy P.; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. Findings: The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. Conclusions: The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD. PMID:24171883

  20. Beat-to-beat heart rate estimation fusing multimodal video and sensor data

    PubMed Central

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Gao, Hanno; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Coverage and accuracy of unobtrusively measured biosignals are generally relatively low compared to clinical modalities. This can be improved by exploiting redundancies in multiple channels with methods of sensor fusion. In this paper, we demonstrate that two modalities, skin color variation and head motion, can be extracted from the video stream recorded with a webcam. Using a Bayesian approach, these signals are fused with a ballistocardiographic signal obtained from the seat of a chair with a mean absolute beat-to-beat estimation error below 25 milliseconds and an average coverage above 90% compared to an ECG reference. PMID:26309754

  1. Beat-to-beat heart rate estimation fusing multimodal video and sensor data.

    PubMed

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Gao, Hanno; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    Coverage and accuracy of unobtrusively measured biosignals are generally relatively low compared to clinical modalities. This can be improved by exploiting redundancies in multiple channels with methods of sensor fusion. In this paper, we demonstrate that two modalities, skin color variation and head motion, can be extracted from the video stream recorded with a webcam. Using a Bayesian approach, these signals are fused with a ballistocardiographic signal obtained from the seat of a chair with a mean absolute beat-to-beat estimation error below 25 milliseconds and an average coverage above 90% compared to an ECG reference.

  2. Beat-to-beat heart rate estimation fusing multimodal video and sensor data.

    PubMed

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Gao, Hanno; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    Coverage and accuracy of unobtrusively measured biosignals are generally relatively low compared to clinical modalities. This can be improved by exploiting redundancies in multiple channels with methods of sensor fusion. In this paper, we demonstrate that two modalities, skin color variation and head motion, can be extracted from the video stream recorded with a webcam. Using a Bayesian approach, these signals are fused with a ballistocardiographic signal obtained from the seat of a chair with a mean absolute beat-to-beat estimation error below 25 milliseconds and an average coverage above 90% compared to an ECG reference. PMID:26309754

  3. Why does the heart beat? The discovery of the electrical system of the heart.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Mark E; Grove, Daniel; Upshaw, Charles B

    2006-06-13

    Why does the heart beat? This question--known as the myogenic versus neurogenic theory--dominated cardiac research in the 19th century. In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered gelatinous fibers in the ventricular subendocardium that he thought were muscular. Walter Gaskell, in 1886, demonstrated specialized muscle fibers joining the atria and ventricles that caused "block" when cut and found that the sinus venosus was the area of first excitation of the heart. By examining serial embryologic sections, Wilhelm His, Jr, showed that a connective tissue sheet became a bundle connecting the upper and lower cardiac chambers, the bundle of His. Sunao Tawara traced the atrioventricular (AV) bundle of His backward to find a compact node of fibers at the base of the atrial septum and forward where it connected with the bundles of cells discovered by Purkinje in 1839. Tawara concluded that this "AV connecting system" originated in the AV node, penetrated the septum as the His bundle, and then divided into left and right bundle branches that terminated in the Purkinje fibers. Martin Flack and Arthur Keith studied the conduction system of a mole and found a structure in the sinoauricular junction that histologically resembled the AV node. They felt that this was where "the dominating rhythm of the heart normally begins" and named it the sinoauricular node in 1907. The ECG of Einthoven soon brought a new understanding to the complex electrical system that makes the heart beat. In 2006 and 2007, we celebrate the 100th anniversaries of the publication of the exciting discovery of the AV and sinus nodes, truly landmarks in our understanding of cardiac structure and physiology. PMID:16769927

  4. Why does the heart beat? The discovery of the electrical system of the heart.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Mark E; Grove, Daniel; Upshaw, Charles B

    2006-06-13

    Why does the heart beat? This question--known as the myogenic versus neurogenic theory--dominated cardiac research in the 19th century. In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered gelatinous fibers in the ventricular subendocardium that he thought were muscular. Walter Gaskell, in 1886, demonstrated specialized muscle fibers joining the atria and ventricles that caused "block" when cut and found that the sinus venosus was the area of first excitation of the heart. By examining serial embryologic sections, Wilhelm His, Jr, showed that a connective tissue sheet became a bundle connecting the upper and lower cardiac chambers, the bundle of His. Sunao Tawara traced the atrioventricular (AV) bundle of His backward to find a compact node of fibers at the base of the atrial septum and forward where it connected with the bundles of cells discovered by Purkinje in 1839. Tawara concluded that this "AV connecting system" originated in the AV node, penetrated the septum as the His bundle, and then divided into left and right bundle branches that terminated in the Purkinje fibers. Martin Flack and Arthur Keith studied the conduction system of a mole and found a structure in the sinoauricular junction that histologically resembled the AV node. They felt that this was where "the dominating rhythm of the heart normally begins" and named it the sinoauricular node in 1907. The ECG of Einthoven soon brought a new understanding to the complex electrical system that makes the heart beat. In 2006 and 2007, we celebrate the 100th anniversaries of the publication of the exciting discovery of the AV and sinus nodes, truly landmarks in our understanding of cardiac structure and physiology.

  5. Modern risk stratification in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ginghina, C; Bejan, I; Ceck, C D

    2011-11-14

    The prevalence and impact of cardiovascular diseases in the world are growing. There are 2 million deaths due to cardiovascular disease each year in the European Union; the main cause of death being the coronary heart disease responsible for 16% of deaths in men and 15% in women. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease in Romania is estimated at 7 million people, of which 2.8 million have ischemic heart disease. In this epidemiological context, risk stratification is required for individualization of therapeutic strategies for each patient. The continuing evolution of the diagnosis and treatment techniques combines personalized medicine with the trend of therapeutic management leveling, based on guidelines and consensus, which are in constant update. The guidelines used in clinical practice have involved risk stratification and identification of patient groups in whom the risk-benefit ratio of using new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques has a positive value. Presence of several risk factors may indicate a more important total risk than the presence / significant increase from normal values of a single risk factor. Modern trends in risk stratification of patients with coronary heart disease are polarized between the use of simple data versus complex scores, traditional data versus new risk factors, generally valid scores versus personalized scores, depending on patient characteristics, type of coronary artery disease, with impact on the suggested therapy. All known information and techniques can be integrated in a complex system of risk assessment. The current trend in risk assessment is to identify coronary artery disease in early forms, before clinical manifestation, and to guide therapy, particularly in patients with intermediate risk, which can be classified in another class of risk based on new obtained information.

  6. Basis for recurring ventricular fibrillation in the absence of coronary heart disease and its management.

    PubMed

    Lown, B; Temte, J V; Reich, P; Gaughan, C; Regestein, Q; Hal, H

    1976-03-18

    A 39-year-old man twice experienced ventricular fibrillation and exhibited numerous ventricular premature beats. Coronary arteries were normal, and no impaired cardiac function was found upon catheterization. Evidence was adduced that the ventricular premature beats were related to higher nervous activity. The patient had serious psychiatric problems; the ventricular premature beats were provoked by psychophysiologic stress, increased during REM sleep, were reduced by meditation, and were controlled by beta-adrenergic blockade, phenytoin and digitalization. We conclude that psychologic and neurophysiologic factors may predispose to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia in the absence of organic heart disease. Effective management of the recurrent ventricular arrhythmia involved; acute drug testing for assessing antiarrhythmic efficacy; use of programmed trendscription to provide on-line information on drug action; a treatment program involving more than one agent; and use of measures to reduce sympathetic nervous activity.

  7. The establishment of regular beating in populations of pacemaker heart cells. A study with tissue-cultured rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, H J; Tsjernina, L; de Bruijne, J

    1983-02-01

    Single isolated neonatal rat heart cells beat slowly (mean beating interval duration in the range of seconds) and irregularly (coefficient of variation greater than 40%). It is shown that slowness and irregularity of beating are intrinsic properties of the cells and are not caused by dissociation damage or lack of conditioning factors in the culture medium. When cell contacts are established either by letting the cultures grow for given amounts of time or by plating cells at increasing densities both interval duration and irregularity decrease. The beating regularity of small groups of interconnected cells (3 to 35 cells) and larger groups (200 to 15000 cells) is comparable. There is no clear cut proportionality between number of interconnected cells and beating regularity. Confluent monolayers beat fast (mean interval duration ranging between 200 and 400 ms and regular (coefficient of variation less than 5%). The hypothesis is discussed that this clock-like behavior of monolayers of heart cells is caused by the interaction of several pacemaker centers which are by themselves less regular and beat more slowly. PMID:6854658

  8. Low-cost, take-home, beating heart simulator for health-care education.

    PubMed

    Berg, Devin R; Carlson, Andrew; Durfee, William K; Sweet, Robert M; Reihsen, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Intended for medical students studying the evaluation and diagnosis of heart arrhythmias, the beating heart arrhythmia simulator combines visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli to enhance the student's retention of the subtle differences between various conditions of the heart necessary for diagnosis. Unlike existing heart arrhythmia simulators, our simulator is low cost and easily deployable in the classroom setting. A design consisting of solenoid actuators, a silicon heart model, and a graphical user interface has been developed and prototyped. Future design development and conceptual validation is necessary prior to deployment. PMID:21335758

  9. A Miniature Mobile Robot for Navigation and Positioning on the Beating Heart

    PubMed Central

    Patronik, Nicholas A.; Ota, Takeyoshi; Zenati, Marco A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2010-01-01

    Robotic assistance enhances conventional endoscopy; yet, limitations have hindered its mainstream adoption for cardiac surgery. HeartLander is a miniature mobile robot that addresses several of these limitations by providing precise and stable access over the surface of the beating heart in a less-invasive manner. The robot adheres to the heart and navigates to any desired target in a semiautonomous fashion. The initial therapies considered for HeartLander generally require precise navigation to multiple surface targets for treatment. To balance speed and precision, we decompose any general target acquisition into navigation to the target region followed by fine positioning to each target. In closed-chest, beating-heart animal studies, we demonstrated navigation to targets located around the circumference of the heart, as well as acquisition of target patterns on the anterior and posterior surfaces with an average error of 1.7 mm. The average drift encountered during station-keeping was 0.7 mm. These preclinical results demonstrate the feasibility of precise semiautonomous delivery of therapy to the surface of the beating heart using HeartLander. PMID:20179783

  10. Heart transplant coronary artery disease: Multimodality approach in percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Leite, Luís; Matos, Vítor; Gonçalves, Lino; Silva Marques, João; Jorge, Elisabete; Calisto, João; Antunes, Manuel; Pego, Mariano

    2016-06-01

    Coronary artery disease is the most important cause of late morbidity and mortality after heart transplantation. It is usually an immunologic phenomenon termed cardiac allograft vasculopathy, but can also be the result of donor-transmitted atherosclerosis. Routine surveillance by coronary angiography should be complemented by intracoronary imaging, in order to determine the nature of the coronary lesions, and also by assessment of their functional significance to guide the decision whether to perform percutaneous coronary intervention. We report a case of coronary angiography at five-year follow-up after transplantation, using optical coherence tomography and fractional flow reserve to assess and optimize treatment of coronary disease in this challenging population.

  11. Fruits, vegetables and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dauchet, Luc; Amouyel, Philippe; Dallongeville, Jean

    2009-09-01

    Diet plays an important part in the maintenance of optimal cardiovascular health. This Review summarizes the evidence for a relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and the occurrence of coronary heart disease. This evidence is based on observational cohort studies, nutrition prevention trials with fruit and vegetables, and investigations of the effects of fruit and vegetables on cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the evidence supporting a cardioprotective effect comes from observational epidemiological studies; these studies have reported either weak or nonsignificant associations. Controlled nutritional prevention trials are scarce and the existing data do not show any clear protective effects of fruit and vegetables on coronary heart disease. Under rigorously controlled experimental conditions, fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a decrease in blood pressure, which is an important cardiovascular risk factor. However, the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on plasma lipid levels, diabetes, and body weight have not yet been thoroughly explored. Finally, the hypothesis that nutrients in fruit and vegetables have a protective role in reducing the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and preventing complications of atherosclerosis has not been tested in prevention trials. Evidence that fruit and vegetable consumption reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease remains scarce thus far.

  12. To beat or not to beat: degradation of Cx43 imposes the heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Martins-Marques, Tânia; Catarino, Steve; Marques, Carla; Pereira, Paulo; Girão, Henrique

    2015-06-01

    The main function of the heart is to pump blood to the different parts of the organism, a task that is efficiently accomplished through proper electric and metabolic coupling between cardiac cells, ensured by gap junctions (GJ). Cardiomyocytes are the major cell population in the heart, and as cells with low mitotic activity, are highly dependent upon mechanisms of protein degradation. In the heart, both the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy participate in the fine-tune regulation of cardiac remodelling and function, either in physiological or pathological conditions. Indeed, besides controlling cardiac signalling pathways, UPS and autophagy have been implicated in the turnover of several myocardial proteins. Degradation of Cx43, the major ventricular GJ protein, has been associated to up-regulation of autophagy at the onset of heart ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which can have profound implications upon cardiac function. In this review, we present recent studies devoted to the involvement of autophagy and UPS in heart homoeostasis, with a particular focus on GJ.

  13. Peak misdetection in heart-beat-based security: Characterization and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Seepers, Robert M; Strydis, Christos; Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Sourdis, Ioannis; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-01

    The Inter-Pulse-Interval (IPI) of heart beats has previously been suggested for security in mobile health (mHealth) applications. In IPI-based security, secure communication is facilitated through a security key derived from the time difference between heart beats. However, there currently exists no work which considers the effect on security of imperfect heart-beat (peak) detection. This is a crucial aspect of IPI-based security and likely to happen in a real system. In this paper, we evaluate the effects of peak misdetection on the security performance of IPI-based security. It is shown that even with a high peak detection rate between 99.9% and 99.0%, a significant drop in security performance may be observed (between -70% and -303%) compared to having perfect peak detection. We show that authenticating using smaller keys yields both stronger keys as well as potentially faster authentication in case of imperfect heart beat detection. Finally, we present an algorithm which tolerates the effect of a single misdetected peak and increases the security performance by up to 155%.

  14. Neurotensin stimulates histamine release from the isolated, spontaneously beating heart of rats.

    PubMed

    Rioux, F; Kérouac, R; St-Pierre, S

    1984-07-23

    Neurotensin (NT) evoked a transient, dose-dependent histamine release (ED50 170 ng ml-1) from the rat perfused heart. Histamine release by NT occurred within seconds and lasted less than 2 min. The histamine releasing effect of NT was followed by a dose-dependent increase of the perfusion pressure and a slight tachycardia. The histamine releasing effect of NT was completely abolished in hearts derived from rats pretreated for 3 days with high doses of compound 48/80. The coronary vasoconstrictor effect of NT was increased in hearts derived from compound 48/80-pretreated rats. The mast cell inhibitor cromoglycate markedly inhibited NT-induced histamine release without affecting the coronary vasoconstrictor effect of NT. The histamine releasing effect of NT was inhibited, while its coronary vasoconstrictor effect was markedly potentiated, in hearts derived from rats pretreated with the antiallergic and antiinflammatory steroid dexamethasone. The increase of perfusion pressure evoked by NT was not modified by antihistamine drugs. Infusions of exogenous histamine (10(-6)-10(-5) g ml-1) caused a dose-dependent coronary vasodilation in the rat perfused heart. The results suggest that NT stimulates histamine release from cardiac mast cells. These results together with those obtained in previous studies suggest that mast cell mediators (particularly histamine and serotonin) are unlikely to be responsible for the coronary vasoconstrictor effect of NT in the rat perfused heart.

  15. Fetal growth and coronary heart disease in south India.

    PubMed

    Stein, C E; Fall, C H; Kumaran, K; Osmond, C; Cox, V; Barker, D J

    1996-11-01

    People from India living overseas have high rates of coronary heart disease which are not explained by known coronary risk factors. In India, coronary heart disease is predicted to become the most common cause of death within 15 years. Small size at birth is a newly described risk factor for coronary heart disease. The authors studied 517 men and women born between 1934 and 1954 in a mission hospital in Mysore, South India, and who still lived near the hospital. Researchers related the prevalence of coronary heart disease, defined by standard criteria, to individual birth size. 25 men and 27 women had coronary heart disease. Low birth weight, short birth length, and small head circumference were associated with a raised prevalence of the disease. The associations were stronger and statistically significant among people aged 45 years and over. High rates of disease were also found in those whose mothers had a low body weight during pregnancy. The highest prevalence of coronary heart disease was in people who weighed 2.5 kg or less at birth and whose mothers weighed less than 45 kg during pregnancy. These associations were largely independent of known coronary risk factors.

  16. Smith predictor-based robot control for ultrasound-guided teleoperated beating-heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Bowthorpe, Meaghan; Tavakoli, Mahdi; Becher, Harald; Howe, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Performing surgery on fast-moving heart structures while the heart is freely beating is next to impossible. Nevertheless, the ability to do this would greatly benefit patients. By controlling a teleoperated robot to continuously follow the heart's motion, the heart can be made to appear stationary. The surgeon will then be able to operate on a seemingly stationary heart when in reality it is freely beating. The heart's motion is measured from ultrasound images and thus involves a non-negligible delay due to image acquisition and processing, estimated to be 150 ms that, if not compensated for, can cause the teleoperated robot's end-effector (i.e., the surgical tool) to collide with and puncture the heart. This research proposes the use of a Smith predictor to compensate for this time delay in calculating the reference position for the teleoperated robot. The results suggest that heart motion tracking is improved as the introduction of the Smith predictor significantly decreases the mean absolute error, which is the error in making the distance between the robot's end-effector and the heart follow the surgeon's motion, and the mean integrated square error.

  17. An Update on Gender Disparities in Coronary Heart Disease Care.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tina; Palaskas, Nicolas; Ahmed, Ameera

    2016-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), traditionally considered a male disease, causes far more deaths in women than cancer. The prevalence of CHD is lower in women at any age, but with advancing age, this differential decreases. The clinical outcomes including myocardial infarction mortality, all-cause mortality, and reinfarction rates are also worse in women with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) than in men. Yet, women appear to be underdiagnosed and undertreated for coronary heart disease. There is still a gap in the knowledge, understanding, and general awareness of CHD in women. This review provides updates in gender disparities in the management of risk factors, treatments, and outcomes of coronary heart disease.

  18. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  19. Dietary fats and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Willett, W C

    2012-07-01

    The relation of dietary fat to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been studied extensively using many approaches, including controlled feeding studies with surrogate end-points such as plasma lipids, limited randomized trials and large cohort studies. All lines of evidence indicate that specific dietary fatty acids play important roles in the cause and the prevention of CHD, but total fat as a percent of energy is unimportant. Trans fatty acids from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils have clear adverse effects and should be eliminated. Modest reductions in CHD rates by further decreases in saturated fat are possible if saturated fat is replaced by a combination of poly- and mono-unsaturated fat, and the benefits of polyunsaturated fat appear strongest. However, little or no benefit is likely if saturated fat is replaced by carbohydrate, but this will in part depend on the form of carbohydrate. Because both N-6 and N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential and reduce risk of heart disease, the ratio of N-6 to N-3 is not useful and can be misleading. In practice, reducing red meat and dairy products in a food supply and increasing intakes of nuts, fish, soy products and nonhydrogenated vegetable oils will improve the mix of fatty acids and have a markedly beneficial effect on rates of CHD.

  20. The epidemic of the 20(th) century: coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S; Goldberg, Robert J; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2014-09-01

    Heart disease was an uncommon cause of death in the US at the beginning of the 20th century. By mid-century it had become the commonest cause. After peaking in the mid-1960s, the number of heart disease deaths began a marked decline that has persisted to the present. The increase in heart disease deaths from the early 20th century until the 1960s was due to an increase in the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis with resultant coronary heart disease, as documented by autopsy studies. This increase was associated with an increase in smoking and dietary changes leading to an increase in serum cholesterol levels. In addition, the ability to diagnose acute myocardial infarction with the aid of the electrocardiogram increased the recognition of coronary heart disease before death. The substantial decrease in coronary heart disease deaths after the mid-1960s is best explained by the decreased incidence, and case fatality rate, of acute myocardial infarction and a decrease in out-of-hospital sudden coronary heart disease deaths. These decreases are very likely explained by a decrease in coronary atherosclerosis due to primary prevention, and a decrease in the progression of nonobstructive coronary atherosclerosis to obstructive coronary heart disease due to efforts of primary and secondary prevention. In addition, more effective treatment of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction has led to a substantial decrease in deaths due to acute myocardial infarction. It is very likely that the 20th century was the only century in which heart disease was the most common cause of death in America.

  1. Synchronization of sinoatrial node pacemaker cell clocks and its autonomic modulation impart complexity to heart beating intervals Short title: Beating-rate variability of sinoatrial node cells

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Ahmet, Ismayil; Liu, Jie; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Guiriba, Toni-Rose; Okamoto, Yosuke; Ziman, Bruce D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Background A reduction of complexity of heart-beat interval variability (BIV) that is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease states is thought to derive from the balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic neural impulses to the heart. But rhythmic clock-like behavior intrinsic to pacemaker cells within the sinoatrial node (SAN) drives their beating, even in the absence of autonomic neural input. Objective To test how this rhythmic clock-like behavior intrinsic to pacemaker cells interacts with autonomic impulses to the heart-beat interval variability in vivo. Methods We analyzed BIV in the time and frequency domains and by fractal and entropy analyses: i) in vivo, when the brain input to the SAN is intact; ii) during autonomic denervation in vivo; iii) in isolated SAN tissue (i.e., in which the autonomic-neural input is completely absent); iv) in single pacemaker cells isolated from the SAN; and v) following autonomic receptor stimulation of these cells. Results Spontaneous-beating intervals of pacemaker cells residing within the isolated SAN tissue exhibit fractal-like behavior and have lower approximate entropy than in the intact heart. Isolation of pacemaker cells from SAN tissue, however, leads to a loss in the beating-interval order and fractal-like behavior. β adrenergic receptor stimulation of isolated pacemaker cells increases intrinsic clock synchronization, decreases their action potential period and increases system complexity. Conclusions Both the average-beating interval in vivo and beating interval complexity are conferred by the combined effects of clock periodicity intrinsic to pacemaker cells and their response to autonomic-neural input. PMID:24713624

  2. Beat to beat variability of embryonic chick heart cells under septic conditions: application and evaluation of entropy as well as fractal measures.

    PubMed

    Ahammer, Helmut; Scherubel, Susanne; Arnold, Robert; Zorn-Pauly, Klaus; Pelzmann, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Extracardiac factors of heart rate variability have commonly been investigated using linear and nonlinear methods for a long time. Recently, intracardiac mechanisms on an electrophysiological basis have been found to be also important. This work is focused on the evaluation of complex measures of temporal signals gained with microelectrode measurements of embryonic chick heart aggregates. Septic conditions were mimicked in vitro by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in order to investigate the influence on beat to beat variability. Surrogate data analysis revealed high statistical significances for normalized complexity measures.

  3. Dynamic holographic imaging of the beating human heart

    PubMed

    Hunziker; Smith; Scherrer-Crosbie; Liel-Cohen; Levine; Nesbitt; Benton; Picard

    1999-02-01

    Background--Currently, the reporting and archiving of echocardiographic data suffer from the difficulty of representing heart motion on printable 2-dimensional (2D) media. Methods and Results--We studied the capability of holography to integrate motion into 2D echocardiographic prints. Images of normal human hearts and of a variety of mitral valve function abnormalities (mitral valve prolapse, systolic anterior motion of the mitral leaflets, and obstruction of the mitral valve by a myxoma) were acquired digitally on standard echocardiographic machines. Images were processed into a data format suitable for holographic printing. Angularly multiplexed holograms were then printed on a prototype holographic "laser" printer, with integration of time in vertical parallax, so that heart motion became visible when the hologram was tilted up and down. The resulting holograms displayed the anatomy with the same resolution as the original acquisition and allowed detailed study of valve motion with side-by-side comparison of normal and abnormal findings. Comparison of standard echocardiographic measurements in original echo frames and corresponding hologram views showed an excellent correlation of both methods (P<0.0001, r2=0.979, mean bias=2.76 mm). In this feasibility study, both 2D and 3D holographic images were produced. The equipment needed to view these holograms consists of only a simple point-light source. Conclusions--Holographic representation of myocardial and valve motion from echocardiographic data is feasible and allows the printing on a 2D medium of the complete heart cycle. Combined with the recent development of online holographic printing, this novel technique has the potential to improve reporting, visualization, and archiving of echocardiographic imaging.

  4. Robust detection of heart beats in multimodal records using slope- and peak-sensitive band-pass filters.

    PubMed

    Pangerc, Urška; Jager, Franc

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present the development, architecture and evaluation of a new and robust heart beat detector in multimodal records. The detector uses electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, and/or pulsatile (P) signals, such as: blood pressure, artery blood pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, if present. The base approach behind the architecture of the detector is collecting signal energy (differentiating and low-pass filtering, squaring, integrating). To calculate the detection and noise functions, simple and fast slope- and peak-sensitive band-pass digital filters were designed. By using morphological smoothing, the detection functions were further improved and noise intervals were estimated. The detector looks for possible pacemaker heart rate patterns and repairs the ECG signals and detection functions. Heart beats are detected in each of the ECG and P signals in two steps: a repetitive learning phase and a follow-up detecting phase. The detected heart beat positions from the ECG signals are merged into a single stream of detected ECG heart beat positions. The merged ECG heart beat positions and detected heart beat positions from the P signals are verified for their regularity regarding the expected heart rate. The detected heart beat positions of a P signal with the best match to the merged ECG heart beat positions are selected for mapping into the noise and no-signal intervals of the record. The overall evaluation scores in terms of average sensitivity and positive predictive values obtained on databases that are freely available on the Physionet website were as follows: the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database (99.91%), the MGH/MF Waveform database (95.14%), the augmented training set of the follow-up phase of the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 (97.67%), and the Challenge test set (93.64%).

  5. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  6. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  7. Cardiac and coronary function in the Langendorff-perfused mouse heart model.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Melissa E; Willems, Laura; Hack, Benjamin A; Peart, Jason N; Headrick, John P

    2009-01-01

    The Langendorff mouse heart model is widely employed in studies of myocardial function and responses to injury (e.g. ischaemia). Nonetheless, marked variability exists in its preparation and functional properties. We examined the impact of early growth (8, 16, 20 and 24 weeks), sex, perfusion fluid [Ca(2+)] and pacing rate on contractile function and responses to 20 min ischaemia followed by 45 min reperfusion. We also assessed the impact of strain, and tested the utility of the model in studying coronary function. Under normoxic conditions, hearts from 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice (2 mm free perfusate [Ca(2+)], 420 beats min(-1)) exhibited 145 +/- 2 mmHg left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP). Force development declined by approximately 15% (126 +/- 5 mmHg) with a reduction in free [Ca(2+)] to 1.35 mm, and by 25% (108 +/- 3 mmHg) with increased pacing to 600 beats min(-1). While elevated heart rate failed to modify ischaemic outcome, the lower [Ca(2+)] significantly improved contractile recovery (by >30%). We detected minimal sex-dependent differences in normoxic function between 8 and 24 weeks, although age modified contractile function in males (increased LVDP at 24 versus 8 weeks) but not females. Both male and female hearts exhibited age-related reductions in ischaemic tolerance, with a significant decline in recovery evident at 16 weeks in males and later, at 20-24 weeks, in females (versus recoveries in hearts at 8 weeks). Strain also modified tolerance to ischaemia, with similar responses in hearts from C57BL/6, 129/sv, Quackenbush Swiss and FVBN mice, but substantially greater tolerance in BALB/c hearts. In terms of vascular function, baseline coronary flow (20-25 ml min(-1) g(-1)) was 50-60% of maximally dilated flows, and coronary reactive and functional hyperaemic responses were pronounced (up to 4-fold elevations in flow in hearts lacking ventricular balloons). These data indicate that attention to age (and sex) of mice will reduce variability in

  8. Heart-beat-phase-coherent Doppler optical coherence tomography for measuring pulsatile ocular blood flow.

    PubMed

    Schmoll, Tilman; Leitgeb, Rainer A

    2013-03-01

    We introduce a Doppler OCT (DOCT) platform that is fully synchronized with the heart-beat via a pulse oximeter. The system allows reconstructing heart-beat-phase-coherent quantitative DOCT volumes. The method is to acquire a series of DOCT volumes and to record the pulse in parallel. The heartbeat data is used for triggering the start of each DOCT volume acquisition. The recorded volume series is registered to the level of capillaries using a cross-volume registration. The information of the pulse phase is used to rearrange the tomograms in time, to obtain a series of phase coherent DOCT volumes over a pulse. We present Doppler angle independent quantitative evaluation of the absolute pulsatile blood flow within individual retinal vessels as well as of the total retinal blood flow over a full heartbeat cycle.

  9. Coronary bifurcations as you have never seen them: the Visible Heart® Laboratory bifurcation programme.

    PubMed

    Burzotta, Francesco; Cook, Brian; Iaizzo, Paul A; Singh, Jasvindar; Louvard, Yves; Latib, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    The Visible Heart® Laboratory is an original experimental laboratory in which harvested animal hearts are resuscitated and connected to a support machine in order to beat outside the animal body. Resuscitated animal hearts may be exposed to various types of endovascular intervention under full, multimodality inspection. This unique experimental setting allows the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in a setting which resembles a standard catheterisation laboratory set-up, and contemporaneously allows unique multimodality imaging. For these reasons, the performance of PCI on bifurcations in the Visible Heart® Laboratory may improve the knowledge of the dynamic stent deformations and stent-vessel wall interactions associated with the different steps of the various techniques for bifurcation stenting. Furthermore, the collected images may also serve as a novel educative resource for physicians. The performance of bifurcation stenting in the Visible Heart® Laboratory is a promising experimental setting to gain novel information regarding any existing or future PCI technique to treat coronary bifurcations. PMID:25983169

  10. Coronary bifurcations as you have never seen them: the Visible Heart® Laboratory bifurcation programme.

    PubMed

    Burzotta, Francesco; Cook, Brian; Iaizzo, Paul A; Singh, Jasvindar; Louvard, Yves; Latib, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    The Visible Heart® Laboratory is an original experimental laboratory in which harvested animal hearts are resuscitated and connected to a support machine in order to beat outside the animal body. Resuscitated animal hearts may be exposed to various types of endovascular intervention under full, multimodality inspection. This unique experimental setting allows the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in a setting which resembles a standard catheterisation laboratory set-up, and contemporaneously allows unique multimodality imaging. For these reasons, the performance of PCI on bifurcations in the Visible Heart® Laboratory may improve the knowledge of the dynamic stent deformations and stent-vessel wall interactions associated with the different steps of the various techniques for bifurcation stenting. Furthermore, the collected images may also serve as a novel educative resource for physicians. The performance of bifurcation stenting in the Visible Heart® Laboratory is a promising experimental setting to gain novel information regarding any existing or future PCI technique to treat coronary bifurcations.

  11. Heart beat detection in multimodal data using automatic relevant signal detection.

    PubMed

    De Cooman, Thomas; Goovaerts, Griet; Varon, Carolina; Widjaja, Devy; Willemen, Tim; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    Accurate R peak detection in the electrocardiogram (ECG) is a well-known and highly explored problem in biomedical signal processing. Although a lot of progress has been made in this area, current methods are still insufficient in the presence of extreme noise and/or artifacts such as loose electrodes. Often, however, not only the ECG is recorded, but multiple signals are simultaneously acquired from the patient. Several of these signals, such as blood pressure, can help to improve the heart beat detection. These signals of interest can be detected automatically by analyzing their power spectral density or by using the available signal type identifiers. Individual peaks from the signals of interest are combined using majority voting, heart beat location estimation and Hjorth's mobility of the resulting RR intervals. Both multimodal algorithms showed significant increases in performance of up to 8.65% for noisy multimodal datasets compared to when only the ECG signal is used. A maximal performance of 90.02% was obtained on the hidden test set of the Physionet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data.

  12. Coronary Heart Disease Attributable to Passive Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lightwood, James M.; Coxson, Pamela G.; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Williams, Lawrence W.; Goldman, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background Passive smoking is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), and existing estimates are out of date due to recent and substantial changes in the level of exposure. Objective To estimate the annual clinical burden and cost of CHD treatment attributable to passive smoking. Outcome measures Annual attributable CHD deaths, myocardial infarctions (MI), total CHD events, and the direct cost of CHD treatment. Methods A Monte Carlo simulation estimated the CHD events and costs as a function of the prevalence of CHD risk factors, including passive-smoking prevalence and a low (1.26) and high (1.65) relative risk of CHD due to passive smoking. Estimates were calculated using the CHD Policy Model, calibrated to reproduce key CHD outcomes in the baseline Year 2000 in the U.S. Results At 1999–2004 levels, passive smoking caused 21,800 (SE=2400) to 75,100 (SE=8000) CHD deaths and 38,100 (SE=4300) to 128,900 (SE=14,000) MIs annually, with a yearly CHD treatment cost of $1.8 (SE=$0.2) to $6.0 (SE=$0.7) billion. If recent trends in the reduction in the prevalence of passive smoking continue from 2000 to 2008, the burden would be reduced by approximately 25%–30%. Conclusions Passive smoking remains a substantial clinical and economic burden in the U.S. PMID:19095162

  13. Control of hypertension in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Banegas, J R; de la Sierra, A; Segura, J; Gorostidi, M; de la Cruz, J; Rodríguez-Artalejo, F; Ruilope, L M

    2009-05-15

    This observational study investigates, for the first time, the actual or out-of-office control of hypertension among coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, by using 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). We used the Spanish Society of Hypertension ABPM Registry, based on a large-scale network of primary-care physicians consecutively recruiting hypertensive patients with conventional clinical indications for ABPM. The average of two office BP measurements was used for analyses. Thereafter, 24-h ABPM was performed, using a SpaceLabs 90207 device. Out-of-office control of hypertension among 2434 treated essential hypertensive patients with clinically documented CHD was much higher (46.4%) than in-office BP control (28.7%). This considerable difference was partly due to the presence of 25.2% of patients with "office resistance", i.e., normal ambulatory BP but with high office BP despite treatment. Although further efforts in controlling BP are needed in CHD patients, physicians should be also comforted by BP results better than previously believed based on office data. PMID:18353471

  14. Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease The Coronary Arterial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2012-01-01

    Background: The coronary circulation in cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) includes the extramural coronary arteries, basal coronary blood flow, flow reserve, the coronary microcirculation, and coronary atherogenesis. Methods: Coronary arteriograms were analyzed in 59 adults with CCHD. Dilated extramural coronaries were examined histologically in six patients. Basal coronary blood flow was determined with N-13 positron emission tomography in 14 patients and in 10 controls. Hyperemic flow was induced by intravenous dipyridamole pharmacologic stress. Immunostaining against SM alpha-actin permitted microcirculatory morphometric analysis. Non-fasting total cholesterols were retrieved in 279 patients divided into four groups: Group A---143 cyanotic unoperated, Group B---47 rendered acyanotic by reparative surgery, Group C---41 acyanotic unoperated, Group D---48 acyanotic before and after operation. Results: Extramural coronary arteries were mildly or moderately dilated to ectatic in 49/59 angiograms. Histologic examination disclosed loss of medial smooth muscle, increased medial collagen, and duplication of internal elastic lamina. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased. Hyperemic flow was comparable to controls. Remodeling of the microcirculation was based upon coronary arteriolar length, volume and surface densities. Coronary atherosclerosis was absent in both the arteriograms and the necropsy specimens. Conclusions: Extramural coronary arteries in CCHD dilate in response to endothelial vasodilator substances supplemented by mural attenuation caused by medial abnormalities. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased, but hyperemic flow was normal. Remodeling of the microcirculation was responsible for preservation of flow reserve. The coronaries were atheroma-free because of the salutory effects of hypocholesterolemia, hypoxemia, upregulated nitric oxide, low platelet counts, and hyperbilirubinrmia. PMID:22845810

  15. Memory beyond memory in heart beating, a sign of a healthy physiological condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegrini, P.; Grigolini, P.; Hamilton, P.; Palatella, L.; Raffaelli, G.

    2002-04-01

    We describe two types of memory and illustrate each using artificial and actual heartbeat data sets. The first type of memory, yielding anomalous diffusion, implies the inverse power-law nature of the waiting time distribution and the second the correlation among distinct times, and consequently also the occurrence of many pseudoevents, namely, not genuinely random events. Using the method of diffusion entropy analysis, we establish the scaling that would be determined by the real events alone. We prove that the heart beating of healthy patients reveals the existence of many more pseudoevents than in the patients with congestive heart failure.

  16. Memory beyond memory in heart beating, a sign of a healthy physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Allegrini, P; Grigolini, P; Hamilton, P; Palatella, L; Raffaelli, G

    2002-04-01

    We describe two types of memory and illustrate each using artificial and actual heartbeat data sets. The first type of memory, yielding anomalous diffusion, implies the inverse power-law nature of the waiting time distribution and the second the correlation among distinct times, and consequently also the occurrence of many pseudoevents, namely, not genuinely random events. Using the method of diffusion entropy analysis, we establish the scaling that would be determined by the real events alone. We prove that the heart beating of healthy patients reveals the existence of many more pseudoevents than in the patients with congestive heart failure.

  17. Motion prediction using dual Kalman filter for robust beating heart tracking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Liu, Chao; Poignet, Philippe; Zheng, Wenfeng; Liu, Shan

    2015-08-01

    A novel prediction method for robust beating heart tracking is proposed. The dual time-varying Fourier series is used to model the heart motion. The frequency parameters and Fourier coefficients in the model are estimated respectively by using a dual Kalman filter scheme. The instantaneous frequencies of breathing and heartbeat motion are measured online from the 3D trajectory of the point of interest using an orthogonal decomposition algorithm. The proposed method is evaluated based on both the simulated signals and the real motion signals, which are measured from the videos recorded using the da Vinci surgical system.

  18. Heart rate recovery and heart rate variability are unchanged in patients with coronary artery disease following 12 weeks of high-intensity interval and moderate-intensity endurance exercise training.

    PubMed

    Currie, Katharine D; Rosen, Lee M; Millar, Philip J; McKelvie, Robert S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2013-06-01

    Decreased heart rate variability and attenuated heart rate recovery following exercise are associated with an increased risk of mortality in cardiac patients. This study investigated the effects of 12 weeks of moderate-intensity endurance exercise (END) and a novel low-volume high-intensity interval exercise protocol (HIT) on measures of heart rate recovery and heart rate variability in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Fourteen males with CAD participated in 12 weeks of END or HIT training, each consisting of 2 supervised exercise sessions per week. END consisted of 30-50 min of continuous cycling at 60% peak power output (PPO). HIT involved ten 1-min intervals at 88% PPO separated by 1-min intervals at 10% PPO. Heart rate recovery at 1 min and 2 min was measured before and after training (pre- and post-training, respectively) using a submaximal exercise bout. Resting time and spectral and nonlinear domain measures of heart rate variability were calculated. Following 12 weeks of END and HIT, there was no change in heart rate recovery at 1 min (END, 40 ± 12 beats·min(-1) vs. 37 ± 19 beats·min(-1); HIT, 31 ± 8 beats·min(-1) vs. 35 ± 8 beats·min(-1); p ≥ 0.05 for pre- vs. post-training) or 2 min (END, 44 ± 18 beats·min(-1) vs. 43 ± 19 beats·min(-1); HIT, 42 ± 10 beats·min(-1) vs. 50 ± 6 beats·min(-1); p ≥ 0.05 for pre- vs. post-training). All heart rate variability indices were unchanged following END and HIT training. In conclusion, neither END nor HIT exercise programs elicited training-induced improvements in cardiac autonomic function in patients with CAD. The absence of improvements with training may be attributed to the optimal medical management and normative pretraining state of our sample.

  19. Multimodal heart beat detection using signal quality indices.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alistair E W; Behar, Joachim; Andreotti, Fernando; Clifford, Gari D; Oster, Julien

    2015-08-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is a well studied signal from which many clinically relevant parameters can be derived, such as heart rate. A key component in the estimation of these parameters is the accurate detection of the R peak in the QRS complex. While corruption of the ECG by movement artefact or sensor failure can result in poor delineation of the R peak, use of synchronously measured signals could allow for resolution of the R peak even scenarios with poor quality ECG recordings. Robust estimation of R peak locations from multimodal signals facilitates real time monitoring and is likely to reduce false alarms due to inaccurate derived parameters.We propose a method which fuses R peaks detected on the ECG using an energy detector with those detected on the arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform using the length transform. A signal quality index (SQI) for the two signals is then derived. The ECG SQI is based upon the agreement between two distinct peak detectors. The ABP SQI estimates the blood pressure at various phases in the cardiac cycle and only accepts the signal as good quality if the values are physiologically plausible. Detections from these two signals were merged by selecting the R peak detections from the signal with a higher SQI. The approach presented in this paper was evaluated on datasets provided for the Physionet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014. The algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 95.1% and positive predictive value of 89.3% on an external evaluation set, and achieved a score of 91.5%.The method here demonstrated excellent performance across a variety of signal morphologies collected during clinical practice. Fusion of R peaks from other signals has the potential to provide informed estimates of the R peak location in situations where the ECG is noisy or completely absent. Source code for the algorithm is made available freely online.

  20. Fabric heart retractor for coronary artery bypass operations.

    PubMed

    Kazama, S; Ishihara, A

    1993-06-01

    A new device for heart retraction during coronary artery bypass operations has been developed. It provides safe and steady support and an unobstructed view of the lateral, posterior, and inferior surfaces of the heart; in addition, it is easy to handle.

  1. Towards robust 3D visual tracking for motion compensation in beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Richa, Rogério; Bó, Antônio P L; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    In the context of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, active vision-based motion compensation schemes have been proposed for mitigating problems related to physiological motion. However, robust and accurate visual tracking remains a difficult task. The purpose of this paper is to present a robust visual tracking method that estimates the 3D temporal and spatial deformation of the heart surface using stereo endoscopic images. The novelty is the combination of a visual tracking method based on a Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) model for representing the heart surface deformations with a temporal heart motion model based on a time-varying dual Fourier series for overcoming tracking disturbances or failures. The considerable improvements in tracking robustness facing specular reflections and occlusions are demonstrated through experiments using images of in vivo porcine and human beating hearts.

  2. Towards robust 3D visual tracking for motion compensation in beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Richa, Rogério; Bó, Antônio P L; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    In the context of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, active vision-based motion compensation schemes have been proposed for mitigating problems related to physiological motion. However, robust and accurate visual tracking remains a difficult task. The purpose of this paper is to present a robust visual tracking method that estimates the 3D temporal and spatial deformation of the heart surface using stereo endoscopic images. The novelty is the combination of a visual tracking method based on a Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) model for representing the heart surface deformations with a temporal heart motion model based on a time-varying dual Fourier series for overcoming tracking disturbances or failures. The considerable improvements in tracking robustness facing specular reflections and occlusions are demonstrated through experiments using images of in vivo porcine and human beating hearts. PMID:21277821

  3. Comparison of real beat-to-beat signals with commercially available 4 Hz sampling on the evaluation of foetal heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Hernâni; Costa, Antónia; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Costa-Santos, Cristina; Rocha, Ana Paula; Bernardes, João

    2013-06-01

    Evaluation of foetal heart rate (FHR) variability is an essential part of foetal monitoring, but a precise quantification of this parameter depends on the quality of the signal. In this study, we compared real FHR beat-to-beat signals with 4 Hz sampling provided by commercial foetal monitors on linear and nonlinear indices and analysed their clinical implications. Simultaneous acquisition of beat-to-beat signals and their 4 Hz sampling rate counterparts was performed using a scalp electrode, during the last hour of labour in 21 fetuses born with an umbilical artery blood (UAB) pH ≥ 7.20 and 6 born with an UAB pH < 7.20. For each case, the first and last 10 min segments were analysed, using time and frequency domain linear, and nonlinear FHR indices, namely mean FHR, low frequency, high frequency, approximate, sample and multiscale entropy. Significant differences in variability indices were found between beat-to-beat and 4 Hz sampled signals, with a lesser effect seen with 2 Hz sampling. These differences did not affect physiological changes observed during labour progression, such as decreased entropy and linear time domain indices, and increased frequency domain indices. However, significant differences were found in the discrimination between fetuses born with different UAB pHs, with beat-to-beat sampling providing better results in linear indices and 4 Hz sampling better results in entropy indices. In conclusion, different FHR sampling frequencies can significantly affect the quantification of variability indices. This needs to be taken into account in the interpretation of FHR variability and in the development of new equipment.

  4. Position Estimation of an Epicardial Crawling Robot on the Beating Heart by Modeling of Physiological Motion

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Nathan A.; del Agua, Diego Moral; Zenati, Marco A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2012-01-01

    HeartLander, a small mobile robot designed to provide treatments to the surface of the beating heart, overcomes a major difficulty of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, providing a stable operating platform. This is achieved inherently in the way the robot adheres to and crawls over the surface of the heart. This mode of operation does not require physiological motion compensation to provide this stable environment; however, modeling of physiological motion is advantageous in providing more accurate position estimation as well as synchronization of motion to the physiological cycles. The work presented uses an Extended Kalman Filter framework to estimate parameters of non-stationary Fourier series models of the motion of the heart due to the respiratory and cardiac cycles as well as the position of the robot as it moves over the surface of the heart. The proposed method is demonstrated in the laboratory with HeartLander operating on a physiological motion simulator. Improved performance is demonstrated in comparison to the filtering methods previously used with HeartLander. The use of detected physiological cycle phases to synchronize locomotion of HeartLander is also described. PMID:23066511

  5. Position Estimation of an Epicardial Crawling Robot on the Beating Heart by Modeling of Physiological Motion.

    PubMed

    Wood, Nathan A; Del Agua, Diego Moral; Zenati, Marco A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2011-12-01

    HeartLander, a small mobile robot designed to provide treatments to the surface of the beating heart, overcomes a major difficulty of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, providing a stable operating platform. This is achieved inherently in the way the robot adheres to and crawls over the surface of the heart. This mode of operation does not require physiological motion compensation to provide this stable environment; however, modeling of physiological motion is advantageous in providing more accurate position estimation as well as synchronization of motion to the physiological cycles. The work presented uses an Extended Kalman Filter framework to estimate parameters of non-stationary Fourier series models of the motion of the heart due to the respiratory and cardiac cycles as well as the position of the robot as it moves over the surface of the heart. The proposed method is demonstrated in the laboratory with HeartLander operating on a physiological motion simulator. Improved performance is demonstrated in comparison to the filtering methods previously used with HeartLander. The use of detected physiological cycle phases to synchronize locomotion of HeartLander is also described.

  6. Beating intraocular hearts: light-controlled rate by autonomic innervation from host iris.

    PubMed

    Olson, L; Seiger, A

    1976-05-01

    The sympathetic adrenergic ground plexus of the rat iris is able to innervate whole embryonic hearts transplanted to the anterior eye chamber. The transplants beat continuously from the time of transplantation and for at least five months, initially at 150-200 beats/min, and later approximately 250 beats/min. From seven days postoperatively onwards increased light to the eye produced deceleration while decreased light produced acceleration of the transplants. The rate changes coincided with changes in pupil diameter. Topical atropine reduced the light dependent rate variations of the transplants, especically the dramatic decrease in rate at white light. Waking stress caused a large rate increase. The "waking-effect" was strongly reduced by sympathetic decentralization and completely abolished by propranolol. The high rate seen in red light was decreased to the low rate of white light by decentralization. Isoprenaline restored red light rate levels in the decentralized transplant. The intraocular heart thus receives a dual functional autonomic input from the host iris and becomes a sensitive monitor of an autonomic nervous activity that can easily be varied at will in a physiological way by changing the light influx to the eye. PMID:178826

  7. [Prevention of coronary heart disease: smoking].

    PubMed

    Heitzer, T; Meinertz, T

    2005-01-01

    Smoking is the leading preventable cause of illness and premature death in Germany, claiming over 110,000 lives a year because it directly increases the risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, emphysema and a variety of cancers. The overwhelming majority of smokers begin tobacco use before they reach adulthood. Among those young people who smoke, the average age is now 13-14. In Germany, about 39% of male and 31% of female adults (age 18-60 years) continue to smoke, despite information about the unequivocally negative health consequences of smoking. The exact mechanisms of smoking-related vascular disease are not yet known. Smoking causes acute hemodynamic alterations such as increase in heart rate, systematic and coronary vascular resistance, myocardial contractility, and myocardial oxygen demand. These short-term effects could lower the ischemic threshold in smokers with coronary artery disease and contribute to the increased risk for acute cardiovascular events. Endothelial damage is thought to be an initiating event in atherosclerosis and early studies have demonstrated that long-term smoking has direct toxic effects with structural changes of human endothelial cells. Recent research has shown the importance of the functional role of the endothelium in regulating vascular tone, platelet-endothelial interactions, leukocyte adhesion and smooth muscle cell proliferation via synthesis and release of a variety of substances such as nitric oxide. There is strong evidence that smoking leads to endothelial dysfunction mainly by increased inactivation of nitric oxide by oxygen-derived free radicals. Smoking also increases oxidative modification of LDL and is associated with lower HDL plasma levels. Smoking induces a systemic inflammatory response with increased leukocyte count and elevation of the C-reactive protein level. Importantly, the prothrombotic effects of smoking have been repeatedly demonstrated to cause alterations in platelet function, imbalance of

  8. A supervised learning approach for the robust detection of heart beat in plethysmographic data.

    PubMed

    Grisan, Enrico; Cantisani, Giorgia; Tarroni, Giacomo; Seung Keun Yoon; Rossi, Michele

    2015-08-01

    Wearable devices equipped with photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors are gaining an increased interest in the context of biometric signal monitoring within clinical, e-health and fitness settings. When used in everyday life and during exercise, PPG traces are heavily affected by artifacts originating from motion and from a non constant positioning and contact of the PPG sensor with the skin. Many algorithms have been developed for the estimation of heart-rate from photoplethysmography signals. We remark that they were mainly conceived and tested in controlled settings and, in turn, do not provide robust performance, even during moderate exercise. Only a few of them have been designed for signals acquired at rest and during fitness. However, they provide the required resilience to motion artifacts at the cost of using computationally demanding signal processing tools. At variance with other methods from the literature, we propose a supervised learning approach, where a classifier is trained on a set of labelled data to detect the presence of heart beats at each position of a PPG signal, with only little preprocessing and postprocessing. We show that the results obtained on the TROIKA dataset using our approach are comparable with those shown in the original paper, providing a classification error of 14% in the detection of heart beat positions, that reduces to 2.86% on the heart-rate estimates after the postprocessing step.

  9. On Two Hearts and Other Coronary Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1998-01-01

    Speculates as to how understanding of heart disease has developed and provides insight into how medical science makes progress. Summarizes the state of knowledge on arteriosclerosis, heart attacks, and exercising the heart. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  10. An accurate heart beat detection method in the EKG recorded in fMRI system.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sung Suk; Chung, Jun-Young; Yoon, Hyo Woon; Park, HyunWook

    2007-01-01

    The simultaneous recording of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG) provides an efficient signal for the high spatiotemporal brain mapping because each modality provides complementary information. The peak detection in the EEG signal measured in the MR scanner is necessary for removal of the ballistocardiac artifact. Especially, it would be affected by the quality of the EKG signal and the variation of the heart beat rate. Therefore, we propose the peak detection method using a K-teager energy operator (K-TEO) as well as further refinement processes in order to detect precise peaks. We applied this technique to the analysis of simulation waves with random noise and abrupt heat beat changes.

  11. The relationship of spirituality to coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, E L

    2001-01-01

    Several studies suggest that religious involvement or spiritual well-being may affect health outcomes. This study was designed to investigate whether the scores from a questionnaire measuring spiritual well-being correlated with progression or regression of coronary heart disease as measured with computerized cardiac catheterization data. Participants in Dr Dean Ornish's Lifestyle Heart Trial were given the "Spiritual Orientation Inventory." A significant difference was found in the spirituality scores between a control group and a research group that practiced daily meditation. The spirituality scores were significantly correlated with the degree of progression or regression of coronary artery obstruction over a 4-year time period. The lowest scores of spiritual well-being had the most progression of coronary obstruction and the highest scores had the most regression. This study suggests that the degree of spiritual well-being may be an important factor in the development of coronary artery disease.

  12. Percutaneous intracardiac beating-heart surgery using metal MEMS tissue approximation tools.

    PubMed

    Gosline, Andrew H; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Butler, Evan J; Folk, Chris; Cohen, Adam; Chen, Rich; Lang, Nora; Del Nido, Pedro J; Dupont, Pierre E

    2012-08-01

    Achieving superior outcomes through the use of robots in medical applications requires an integrated approach to the design of the robot, tooling and the procedure itself. In this paper, this approach is applied to develop a robotic technique for closing abnormal communication between the atria of the heart. The goal is to achieve the efficacy of surgical closure as performed on a stopped, open heart with the reduced risk and trauma of a beating-heart catheter-based procedure. In the proposed approach, a concentric tube robot is used to percutaneously access the right atrium and deploy a tissue approximation device. The device is constructed using a metal microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabrication process and is designed to both fit the manipulation capabilities of the robot as well as to reproduce the beneficial features of surgical closure by suture. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated through ex vivo and in vivo experiments.

  13. Percutaneous intracardiac beating-heart surgery using metal MEMS tissue approximation tools

    PubMed Central

    Gosline, Andrew H; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Butler, Evan J; Folk, Chris; Cohen, Adam; Chen, Rich; Lang, Nora; del Nido, Pedro J; Dupont, Pierre E

    2013-01-01

    Achieving superior outcomes through the use of robots in medical applications requires an integrated approach to the design of the robot, tooling and the procedure itself. In this paper, this approach is applied to develop a robotic technique for closing abnormal communication between the atria of the heart. The goal is to achieve the efficacy of surgical closure as performed on a stopped, open heart with the reduced risk and trauma of a beating-heart catheter-based procedure. In the proposed approach, a concentric tube robot is used to percutaneously access the right atrium and deploy a tissue approximation device. The device is constructed using a metal microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabrication process and is designed to both fit the manipulation capabilities of the robot as well as to reproduce the beneficial features of surgical closure by suture. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated through ex vivo and in vivo experiments. PMID:23750066

  14. Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary arteries in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Freire, Grace; Miller, Michelle S

    2015-12-01

    Among populations of patients with the congenital heart disease, there is considerable diversity in the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Understanding these anatomical differences is vitally important in directing interventions and surgical repair. In this report, the authors describe the echocardiographic evaluation of the variants of coronary artery anatomy in the following lesions: transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double-inlet left ventricle, common arterial trunk, tetralogy of Fallot, and double-outlet right ventricle.

  15. Associated influence of hypertension and heart rate greater than 80 beats per minute on mortality rate in patients with anterior wall STEMI

    PubMed Central

    Davidovic, Goran; Iric-Cupic, Violeta; Milanov, Srdjan

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction as a form of coronary heart disease is characterized by permanent damage/loss of anatomical and functional cardiac tissue. Diagnosis of STEMI includes data on anginal pain and persistent ST-segment elavation. According to the numerous epidemiological studies, arterial blood pressure and heart rate are offten increased especially during the first hours of pain due to domination of sympathetic response. We wanted to investigate the associated influence of heart rate greater than 80 beats per minute and hypertension on the mortality in patients with anterior wall STEMI. Research included 140 patients treated in Coronary Unit, Clinical Center Kragujevac form January 2001 to June 2006. Heart rate was calculated as the mean value of baseline and heart rate in the first 30 minutes after admission, recorded on monitor and electrocardiogram. Data for history of hypertension were collected and blood pressure levels were measured in a lying position after 5 minutes of rest, and classified according to the VII JNC recommendations as confirmation of hypertension. Collected data were analyzed in SPSS 13.0 for Windows. Heart rate greater than 80 bpm influences the hospital mortality. Systolic blood pressure levels were higher in the survivors, while for the diastolic there was no difference. History of hypertension was singled out as a significant predictor of mortality without difference between the respondents with heart rate greater and lower than 80 bpm in the survivors and fatal. Increased heart rate and hypertension at admission are significant predictors of mortality in patients with anterior wall STEMI. PMID:23724155

  16. Experimental evidence of explosive synchronization in mercury beating-heart oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Parmananda, P.; Boccaletti, S.

    2015-06-01

    We report experimental evidence of explosive synchronization in coupled chemo-mechanical systems, namely in mercury beating-heart (MBH) oscillators. Connecting four MBH oscillators in a star network configuration and setting natural frequencies of each oscillator in proportion to the number of its links, a gradual increase of the coupling strength results in an abrupt and irreversible (first-order-like) transition from the system's unordered to ordered phase. On its turn, such a transition indicates the emergence of a bistable regime wherein coexisting states can be experimentally revealed. Finally, we prove how such a regime allows an experimental implementation of magneticlike states of synchronization, by the use of an external signal.

  17. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management.

  18. 'And the beat goes on.' The cardiac conduction system: the wiring system of the heart.

    PubMed

    Boyett, Mark R

    2009-10-01

    The cardiac conduction system (CCS), consisting of the sino-atrial node, atrioventricular node and His-Purkinje system, is responsible for the initiation and co-ordination of the heart beat. In the last decade, our understanding of the CCS has been transformed. Immunohistochemistry, used in conjunction with anatomical techniques, has transformed our understanding of its anatomy; arguably, we now understand the position of the sino-atrial node (not the same as in medical textbooks), and our new understanding of the atrioventricular node anatomy means that we can compute its physiological and pathophysiological behaviour. Ion channel expression in the CCS has been shown to be fundamentally different from that in the working myocardium. Dysfunction of the CCS has previously been attributed to fibrosis, but it is now clear that remodelling of ion channels plays an important role in dysfunction during ageing, heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Differences in ion channel expression may even be responsible for the bradycardia in the athlete and differences in heart rate among different species (such as humans and mice). Recent work has highlighted less well-known components of the CCS, including tricuspid, mitral and aortic rings and even a third (retro-aortic) node. These additional tissues do not participate in the initiation and co-ordination of the heart beat and instead they are likely to be the source of various life-threatening arrhythmias. During embryological development, all parts of the CCS have been shown to develop from the primary myocardium of the linear heart tube, partly under the influence of the transcription factor, Tbx3.

  19. Assessment of autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia using point process models of human heart beat dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2009-07-01

    Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm based on an inverse Gaussian model to track heart beat intervals that incorporates respiratory measurements as a covariate and provides an analytic form for computing a dynamic estimate of RSA gain. We use Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests and autocorrelation function analyses to assess model goodness-of-fit. We illustrate the properties of the new dynamic estimate of RSA in the analysis of simulated heart beat data and actual heart beat data recorded from subjects in a four-state postural study of heart beat dynamics: control, sympathetic blockade, parasympathetic blockade, and combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade. In addition to giving an accurate description of the heart beat data, our adaptive filter algorithm confirms established findings pointing at a vagally mediated RSA and provides a new dynamic RSA estimate that can be used to track cardiovascular control between and within a broad range of postural, pharmacological, and age conditions. Our paradigm suggests a possible framework for designing a device for ambulatory monitoring and assessment of autonomic control in both laboratory research and clinical practice.

  20. Assessment of Autonomic Control and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Using Point Process Models of Human Heart Beat Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N.; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm based on an inverse Gaussian model to track heart beat intervals that incorporates respiratory measurements as a covariate and provides an analytic form for computing a dynamic estimate of RSA gain. We use Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests and autocorrelation function analyses to assess model goodness-of-fit. We illustrate the properties of the new dynamic estimate of RSA in the analysis of simulated heart beat data and actual heart beat data recorded from subjects in a four-state postural study of heart beat dynamics: control, sympathetic blockade, parasympathetic blockade, and combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade. In addition to giving an accurate description of the heart beat data, our adaptive filter algorithm confirms established findings pointing at a vagally mediated RSA, and it provides a new dynamic RSA estimate that can be used to track cardiovascular control between and within a broad range of postural, pharmacological and age conditions. Our paradigm suggests a possible framework for designing a device for ambulatory monitoring and assessment of autonomic control in both laboratory research and clinical practice. PMID:19272971

  1. The ethics of non-heart-beating donation: how new technology can change the ethical landscape.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, K; Furberg, E; Tufveson, G; Welin, S

    2008-07-01

    The global shortage of organs for transplantation and the development of new and better medical technologies for organ preservation have resulted in a renewed interest in non-heart-beating donation (NHBD). This article discusses ethical questions related to controlled and uncontrolled NHBD. It argues that certain preparative measures, such as giving anticoagulants, should be acceptable before patients are dead, but when they have passed a point where further curative treatment is futile, they are in the process of dying and they are unconscious. Furthermore, the article discusses consequences of technological developments based on improvement of a chest compression apparatus used today to make mechanical heart resuscitation. Such technological development can be used to transform cases of non-controlled NHBD to controlled NHBD. In our view, this is a step forward since the ethical difficulties related to controlled NHBD are easier to solve than those related to non-controlled NHBD. However, such technological developments also evoke other ethical questions.

  2. Design a Wearable Device for Blood Oxygen Concentration and Temporal Heart Beat Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myint, Cho Zin; Barsoum, Nader; Ing, Wong Kiing

    2010-06-01

    The wireless network technology is increasingly important in healthcare as a result of the aging population and the tendency to acquire chronic disease such as heart attack, high blood pressure amongst the elderly. A wireless sensor network system that has the capability to monitor physiological sign such as SpO2 (Saturation of Arterial Oxygen) and heart beat rate in real-time from the human's body is highlighted in this study. This research is to design a prototype sensor network hardware, which consists of microcontroller PIC18F series and transceiver unit. The sensor is corporate into a wearable body sensor network which is small in size and easy to use. The sensor allows a non invasive, real time method to provide information regarding the health of the body. This enables a more efficient and economical means for managing the health care of the population.

  3. Linear and nonlinear energy harvesters for powering pacemakers from heart beat vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, M. Amin; Inman, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of the pacemakers is very low. At the same time, after about 10 years from the original implantation of the pacemakers, patients have to go through another surgical operation just to replace the batteries of their pacemakers. We investigate using vibration energy harvesters to significantly increase the battery life of the pace makers. The major source of vibrations in chest area is due to heartbeats. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variations of heart beat frequency and can meet the power requirement of the pacemakers.

  4. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR) pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. Results. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9–1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. Conclusion. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26185756

  5. Robust algorithm to locate heart beats from multiple physiological waveforms by individual signal detector voting.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Loriano; Scully, Christopher G; Vicente, Jose; Johannesen, Lars; Strauss, David G

    2015-08-01

    Alarm fatigue is a top medical device hazard in patient monitoring that could be reduced by merging physiological information from multiple sensors, minimizing the impact of a single sensor failing. We developed a heart beat detection algorithm that utilizes multi-modal physiological signals (e.g. electrocardiogram, blood pressure, stroke volume, photoplethysmogram and electro-encephalogram) by merging the heart beats obtained from signal-specific detectors. We used the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 training set to develop the algorithm, and we refined it with a mix of signals from the multiparameter intelligent monitoring in intensive care (MIMIC II) database and artificially disrupted waveforms. The algorithm had an average sensitivity of 95.67% and positive predictive value (PPV) of 92.28% when applied to the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 200 record training set. On a refined dataset obtained by removing 5 records with arrhythmias and inconsistent reference annotations we obtained an average sensitivity of 97.43% and PPV of 94.17%. Algorithm performance was assessed with the Physionet Challenge 2014 test set that consisted of 200 records (each up to 10 min length) containing multiple physiological signals and reference annotations verified by the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 organizers. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 92.74% and PPV of 87.37% computed over all annotated beats, and a record average sensitivity of 91.08%, PPV of 86.96% and an overall score (average of all 4 measures) of 89.53%. Our algorithm is an example of a data fusion approach that can improve patient monitoring and reduce false alarms by reducing the effect of individual signal failures. PMID:26218439

  6. Validation of four-dimensional ultrasound for targeting in minimally-invasive beating-heart surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Danielle F.; Wiles, Andrew D.; Moore, John; Wedlake, Chris; Gobbi, David G.; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound is garnering significant interest as an imaging modality for surgical guidance, due to its affordability, real-time temporal resolution and ease of integration into the operating room. Minimally-invasive intracardiac surgery performed on the beating-heart prevents direct vision of the surgical target, and procedures such as mitral valve replacement and atrial septal defect closure would benefit from intraoperative ultrasound imaging. We propose that placing 4D ultrasound within an augmented reality environment, along with a patient-specific cardiac model and virtual representations of tracked surgical tools, will create a visually intuitive platform with sufficient image information to safely and accurately repair tissue within the beating heart. However, the quality of the imaging parameters, spatial calibration, temporal calibration and ECG-gating must be well characterized before any 4D ultrasound system can be used clinically to guide the treatment of moving structures. In this paper, we describe a comprehensive accuracy assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the performance of 4D ultrasound systems while imaging moving targets. We image a dynamic phantom that is comprised of a simple robot and a tracked phantom to which point-source, distance and spherical objects of known construction can be attached. We also follow our protocol to evaluate 4D ultrasound images generated in real-time by reconstructing ECG-gated 2D ultrasound images acquired from a tracked multiplanar transesophageal probe. Likewise, our evaluation framework allows any type of 4D ultrasound to be quantitatively assessed.

  7. First in vivo traveling wave magnetic particle imaging of a beating mouse heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, P.; Rückert, M. A.; Klauer, P.; Kullmann, W. H.; Jakob, P. M.; Behr, V. C.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a non-invasive imaging modality for direct detection of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles based on the nonlinear magnetization response of magnetic materials to alternating magnetic fields. This highly sensitive and rapid method allows both a quantitative and a qualitative analysis of the measured signal. Since the first publication of MPI in 2005 several different scanner concepts have been presented and in 2009 the first in vivo imaging results of a beating mouse heart were shown. However, since the field of view (FOV) of the first MPI-scanner only covers a small region several approaches and hardware enhancements were presented to overcome this issue and could increase the FOV on cost of acquisition speed. In 2014 an alternative scanner concept, the traveling wave MPI (TWMPI), was presented, which allows scanning an entire mouse-sized volume at once. In this paper the first in vivo imaging results using the TWMPI system are presented. By optimizing the trajectory the temporal resolution is sufficiently high to resolve the dynamic of a beating mouse heart.

  8. Measurement of Respiration, Heart Beat and Body Movement on a Bed Using Dynamic Air-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Hiroaki; Takashima, Mitsuru; Okawai, Hiroaki

    In this study, the possibility of the measurement of respiration, heart beat, and body movement on a bed was examined using the dynamic air-pressure sensor aiming at a daily health monitoring. The dynamic air-pressure sensor measures vital information using a change of air pressure. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in this study. The dynamic air-pressure sensor was installed under the bed mat and respiration and heart beat information were measured. This information was compared with the standard waveforms obtained from respiratory belt transducer and the electrocardiograph. As a result, both waveforms demonstrate a high correlation, and confirmed the validity of this method. A change of waveform and a quantitative evaluation of respiration, heart beat, and body movement measured from during sleep using this sensor can be useful for a daily health monitoring.

  9. Aspirin and coronary heart disease: findings of a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, E C; Garfinkel, L

    1975-01-01

    Over 1 000 000 men and women answered a confidential questionnaire and were traced for up to six years afterwards. Among other questions each person was asked how often he or she took aspirin-"never", "seldom," or "often." Coronary heart disease death rates were no lower among people who took aspirin often than among those who did not do so. PMID:1131582

  10. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  11. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    PubMed

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins.

  12. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    PubMed

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins. PMID:7582364

  13. Atherosclerotic and Non-Atherosclerotic Coronary Heart Disease in Women.

    PubMed

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Kolovou, Vana; Koutelou, Maria; Mavrogeni, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic Coronary heart disease (CHD) and non-atherosclerotic CHD in individuals less than 50 years of age is considered a "men's case". Undoubtedly, premenopausal women develop atherosclerotic/non-atherosclerotic CHD relatively rarely compared with men. This is attributed mostly to the cardioprotective role of estrogens (mainly estradiol). Nevertheless, there are predisposing conditions, which also make young women vulnerable to develop atherosclerotic/non-atherosclerotic CHD. Women who have classical cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity, and dyslipidaemia, are more likely to develop cardiac events, even at a young age. Moreover, there are also other conditions that cause acute coronary syndromes, even in the absence of coronary atheromatic plaques such as myocardial bridge, coronary artery dissection, coronary artery spasm, coronary artery embolism and congenital anomalies of coronary arteries. Also, autoimmune diseases, some of which are more prevalent in women can cause atherosclerotic/ non-atherosclerotic CHD. In this narrative review we have summarized some of the causes that predispose young women to develop atherosclerotic/non-atherosclerotic CHD. PMID:26337108

  14. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  15. Egg consumption and coronary heart disease: an epidemiologic overview.

    PubMed

    Kritchevsky, S B; Kritchevsky, D

    2000-10-01

    Serum cholesterol has been established as a modifiable risk factor for coronary heart disease. Experimental feeding studies show that saturated fat and cholesterol increase serum cholesterol levels; thus, dietary recommendations for lowering the risk of heart disease proscribe the intake of both substances. Recommendations have also included limits on the intake of eggs because of their high cholesterol content. In free-living populations, diet reflects a pattern of associated choices. Increases in one food may lead to changes in the consumption of other foods that may modulate disease risk. Epidemiologic data are helpful in assessing the importance of foods and nutrients in the context in which they are actually consumed. We review epidemiologic data relating dietary cholesterol and eggs to coronary disease risk. Cholesterol intake was associated with a modest increase in the risk of coronary events. The true magnitude of the association is difficult to estimate because most studies fail to account for potential confounding by other features of the diet. When a full-range of confounding factors was considered, the association between cholesterol intake and heart disease risk was small (6% increase in risk for 200mg/1,000kcal/day difference in cholesterol intake). Several studies have examined egg intake and its relationship with coronary outcomes. All but one failed to consider the role of other potentially confounding dietary factors. When dietary confounders were considered, no association was seen between egg consumption at levels up to 1 + egg per day and the risk of coronary heart disease in non-diabetic men and women.

  16. Heart rate variability indices for very short-term (30 beat) analysis. Part 2: validation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anne-Louise; Owen, Harry; Reynolds, Karen J

    2013-10-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis over shorter periods may be useful for monitoring dynamic changes in autonomic nervous system activity where steady-state conditions are not maintained (e.g. during drug administration, or the start or end of exercise). This study undertakes a validation of 70 HRV indices that have previously been identified as possible for short-term use. The indices were validated over 10 × 30 beat windows using PhysioNet databases with physiological states of rest, active, exercising, sleeping, and meditating (N from 12 to 20). Baseline 95 % confidence intervals of the median were established with bootstrap resampling (10,000x). Statistical significance was assessed using the overlap of 95 % confidence intervals. Thirty-one indices could differentiate between resting and at least one physiological state using 30 beat windows. All respiratory sinus arrhythmia indices and Poincaré plot indices were strongly correlated to time domain measures (SDNN or RMSSD). Spectral indices using the Lomb-Scargle algorithm were able to correctly identify paradoxical shifts in power with meditation and reduced power in exercise. Some less-known indices gave interesting results: PolVar20 identified the higher sympathetic activity of exercise with the largest positive magnitude. These indices should now be considered for rigorous gold standard tests with pharmacological blockade.

  17. Change in myocardial oxygen consumption employing continuous-flow LVAD with cardiac beat synchronizing system, in acute ischemic heart failure models.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Akihide; Nishimura, Takashi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Ando, Masahiko; Arakawa, Mamoru; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2013-06-01

    Aiming the 'Bridge to Recovery' course, we have developed a novel left ventricular assist device (LVAD) controlling system. It can change the rotational speed of the continuous flow LVAD, EVAHEART, synchronized with the cardiac beat. Employing this system, we have already demonstrated that myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2), which is considered to be equivalent to native heart load, changes in the hearts of normal goats. Herein, we examined changes in goats with acute ischemic heart failure. We studied 14 goats (56.1 ± 6.9 kg) with acute ischemic heart failure due to coronary microsphere embolization. We installed the EVAHEART and drive in four modes: "circuit-clamp", "continuous support", "counter-pulse", and "co-pulse", with 50 and 100 % bypass. In comparison to the circuit-clamp mode, MVO2 was reduced to 70.4 ± 17.9 % in the counter-pulse mode and increased to 90.3 ± 14.5 % in the co-pulse mode, whereas it was 80.0 ± 14.5 % in the continuous mode, with 100 % bypass (p < 0.05). The same difference was confirmed with 50 % bypass. This means that we may have a chance to change the native heart load by controlling the LVAD rotation in synchrony with the cardiac rhythm, so we named our controller as the Native Heart Load Control System (NHLCS). Employing changeable MVO2 with NHLCS according to the patient's condition may provide more opportunity for native heart recovery with LVAD, especially for patients with ischemic heart diseases.

  18. Dynamic 3-D virtual fixtures for minimally invasive beating heart procedures.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing; Patel, Rajni V; McIsaac, Kenneth A; Guiraudon, Gerard; Peters, Terry M

    2008-08-01

    Two-dimensional or 3-D visual guidance is often used for minimally invasive cardiac surgery and diagnosis. This visual guidance suffers from several drawbacks such as limited field of view, loss of signal from time to time, and in some cases, difficulty of interpretation. These limitations become more evident in beating-heart procedures when the surgeon has to perform a surgical procedure in the presence of heart motion. In this paper, we propose dynamic 3-D virtual fixtures (DVFs) to augment the visual guidance system with haptic feedback, to provide the surgeon with more helpful guidance by constraining the surgeon's hand motions thereby protecting sensitive structures. DVFs can be generated from preoperative dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomograph (CT) images and then mapped to the patient during surgery. We have validated the feasibility of the proposed method on several simulated surgical tasks using a volunteer's cardiac image dataset. Validation results show that the integration of visual and haptic guidance can permit a user to perform surgical tasks more easily and with reduced error rate. We believe this is the first work presented in the field of virtual fixtures that explicitly considers heart motion.

  19. RF communication with implantable wireless device: effects of beating heart on performance of miniature antenna

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Alessandro; Bahmanyar, Mohammad Reza; McLeod, Christopher N.; Navaratnarajah, Manoraj; Yacoub, Magdi; Toumazou, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    The frequency response of an implantable antenna is key to the performance of a wireless implantable sensor. If the antenna detunes significantly, there are substantial power losses resulting in loss of accuracy. One reason for detuning is because of a change in the surrounding environment of an antenna. The pulsating anatomy of the human heart constitutes such a changing environment, so detuning is expected but this has not been quantified dynamically before. Four miniature implantable antennas are presented (two different geometries) along with which are placed within the heart of living swine the dynamic reflection coefficients. These antennas are designed to operate in the short range devices frequency band (863–870 MHz) and are compatible with a deeply implanted cardiovascular pressure sensor. The measurements recorded over 27 seconds capture the effects of the beating heart on the frequency tuning of the implantable antennas. When looked at in the time domain, these effects are clearly physiological and a combination of numerical study and posthumous autopsy proves this to be the case, while retrospective simulation confirms this hypothesis. The impact of pulsating anatomy on antenna design and the need for wideband implantable antennas is highlighted. PMID:26609377

  20. Are we ready to utilize non-heart-beating donors for clinical allotransplantation in China?

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Zhu, B; Yun, P; Wang, P; Wang, X; Xu, H

    2008-05-01

    The concept of brain death has not been accepted by the majority of Chinese. Importantly, it is not recognized as a legal entity. We have developed a non-heart-beating donation protocol based on literature searches (Medline, Ovid, and CNKI) and issues related to Chinese customs and ethics. The principles guiding protocol development included: separation of the decision to terminate life support from the donation decision, family-centered donation, freedom of conflict interest, and prohibition of organ sales. This protocol covers donation policy, potential donor identification and evaluation, family consent, determination of death, procurement, and special legal documents/organ distribution policy. A random survey was performed regarding donation. There have been several arguments about the development of this protocol. First, do donor family members have the right to make a decision to withdraw life support? Another issue is whether family members have the right to consent to donation without a will from the donor. Our survey found that over 96.1% of people do not have a will and have not discussed their interests in donation with family members. The last issue is whether the hospital can financially help for the funeral after donation. We have debated these issues nationwide with various opinions. We hope to find the right solutions through international debate. We believe that the use of non-heart-beating-donor organs has potential in China. We are hopeful that it will become a major organ source that is developed in such a way so as to be accepted internationally as well as in China.

  1. Cannabinoids and atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sandeep; Sachdeva, Rajesh; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2012-06-01

    Marijuana is the most abused recreational drug in the United States. Cannabinoids, the active ingredients of marijuana, affect multiple organ systems in the human body. The pharmacologic effects of marijuana, based on stimulation of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, which are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, have been well described. Activation of these receptors modulates the function of various cellular elements of the vessel wall, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Clinically, there are reports linking marijuana smoking to the precipitation of angina and acute coronary syndromes. Recently, large published clinical trials with CB1 antagonist rimonabant did not show any significant benefit of this agent in preventing progression of atherosclerosis. In light of these findings and emerging data on multiple pathways linking cannabinoids to atherosclerosis, we discuss the literature on the role of cannabinoids in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We also propose a marijuana paradox, which implies that inhalation of marijuana may be linked to precipitation of acute coronary syndromes, but modulation of the endocannabinoid system by a noninhalation route may have a salutary effect on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22278660

  2. High-pitch coronary CT angiography with third generation dual-source CT: limits of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Gordic, Sonja; Husarik, Daniela B; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2014-08-01

    To determine the average heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) required for diagnostic imaging of the coronary arteries in patients undergoing high-pitch CT-angiography (CTA) with third-generation dual-source CT. Fifty consecutive patients underwent CTA of the thoracic (n = 8) and thoracoabdominal (n = 42) aorta with third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT with prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gating at a pitch of 3.2. No β-blockers were administered. Motion artifacts of coronary arteries were graded on a 4-point scale. Average HR and HRV were noted. The average HR was 66 ± 11 beats per minute (bpm) (range 45-96 bpm); the HRV was 7.3 ± 4.4 bpm (range 3-20 bpm). Interobserver agreement on grade of image quality for the 642 coronary segments evaluated by both observers was good (κ = 0.71). Diagnostic image quality was found for 608 of the 642 segments (95%) in 43 of 50 patients (86%). In 14% of the patients, image quality was nondiagnostic for at least one segment. HR (p = 0.001) was significantly higher in patients with at least one non-diagnostic segment compared to those without. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in HRV between patients with nondiagnostic segments and those with diagnostic images of all segments. All patients with a HR < 70 bpm had diagnostic image quality in all coronary segments. The effective radiation dose and scan time for the heart were 0.4 ± 0.1 mSv and 0.17 ± 0.02 s, respectively. Third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT allows for coronary angiography in the prospectively ECG-gated high-pitch mode with diagnostic image quality at HR up to 70 bpm. HRV is not significantly related to image quality of coronary CTA.

  3. The Counselor and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottens, Allen J.

    1977-01-01

    It is clear that steps can be taken for heart disease prevention and that counselors must give thought to adapting existing ideas and techniques and to developing and experimenting with new and innovative preventive tactics. Of utmost importance is the belief that behavioral intervention is both warranted and worthwhile. (Author)

  4. [High altitude stay and air travel in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Allemann, Y; Saner, H; Meier, B

    1998-04-25

    Acute exposure to high altitude produces hypoxia-associated stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. This response is further enhanced by physical activity and induces an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. Consequently, cardiac work, myocardial oxygen consumption, and coronary blood flow are also increased. During the first 4 days of acute exposure to moderate or high altitude, coronary patients are at greatest risk of untoward events. Gradual ascent, early limitation of activity to a lower level than tolerated at low altitude, pre-ascent physical conditioning and rigorous blood pressure control should all help to minimise the cardiac risk. At altitudes of 2500 to 3000 m or lower, an asymptomatic coronary patient with good exercise tolerance, without exercise induced signs or symptoms of ischemia, and with an ejection fraction of the left ventricle > 50%, is at very low risk. However, several days' acclimatization before high-level activity at moderate or high altitude is recommended. High risk coronary patients should be investigated more carefully and precautionary measures should be more stringent. Left and right cardiac function and pulmonary artery pressure are the most helpful parameters for evaluation and counselling of patients with non-ischemic heart disease who plan to ascend to moderate or high altitudes. When advising patients who intend to fly as passengers in commercial aircraft, it is important to know that in-flight atmospheric pressure conditions in commercial jet aircraft approach altitude equivalents of 1500 to 2400 m. Propeller-driven planes are rarely pressurized but usually fly at altitudes below 3300 m. Relatively strict contraindications for air travel by coronary patients are uncomplicated myocardial infarction within the last 2 weeks, complicated myocardial infarction within the last 6 weeks, unstable angina, thoracic surgery within the last 3 weeks, and poorly controlled congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, or hypertension.

  5. Management of Hypertension among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Zizi, Ferdinand; Brimah, Perry; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Makaryus, Amgad N; McFarlane, Samy; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common outcome of hypertension. Hypertension accelerates the development of atherosclerosis, and sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) can destabilize vascular lesions and precipitate acute coronary events. Hypertension can cause myocardial ischemia in the absence of CHD. These cardiovascular risks attributed to hypertension can be reduced by optimal BP control. Although several antihypertensive agents exist, the choice of agent and the appropriate target BP for patients with CHD remain controversial. In this succinct paper, we examine the evidence and the mechanisms for the linkage between hypertension and CHD and we discuss the treatment options and the goals of therapy that are consistent with the report of the seventh Joint National Committee on the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) and American Heart Association scientific statement. We anticipate changes in the recommendations of the forthcoming JNC 8. PMID:21785704

  6. Lipids, lipoproteins, and coronary heart disease: implications for antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Feher, M D; Betteridge, D J

    1989-06-01

    There is now considerable evidence that treatment of abnormalities of lipids and lipoproteins reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD). Treatment of hypertension, another major cardiovascular risk factor, has not been shown to have the same impact on CHD. Possible explanations for this are that cardiovascular risk factors may occur in combination in an individual or that therapy for hypertension has adversely affected one or several of the other risk factors for CHD, thereby offsetting the benefit gained by lowering blood pressure. This article reviews the relationship between lipids, lipoproteins, and coronary heart disease, and the impact of cholesterol lowering on CHD. The evidence that antihypertensive drugs are associated with lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities is introduced by a critical appraisal of the several studies for such evidence. Implications for the treatment of the hypertensive patient are discussed. PMID:2487804

  7. Diabetes is a predictor of coronary artery stenosis in patients hospitalized with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kosuga, Tsuneharu; Komukai, Kimiaki; Miyanaga, Satoru; Kubota, Takeyuki; Nakata, Kotaro; Suzuki, Kenichiro; Yamada, Takayuki; Yoshida, Jun; Kimura, Haruka; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2016-05-01

    In patients with heart failure, coronary artery disease is the most common underlying heart disease, and is associated with increased mortality. However, estimating the presence or absence of coronary artery disease in patients with heart failure is sometimes difficult without coronary imaging. We reviewed 155 consecutive patients hospitalized with heart failure who underwent coronary angiography. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with (N = 59) and without (N = 96) coronary artery stenosis. The clinical characteristics and blood sampling data were compared between the two groups. The patients with coronary artery stenosis were older than those without. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia and a history of revascularization was higher in the patients with coronary artery stenosis. Patients with coronary artery stenosis tended to have wall motion asynergy more frequently than those without. On the other hand, the prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) was lower in patients with coronary artery stenosis. The serum hemoglobin level and estimated glomerular filtration rate were lower in patients with coronary artery stenosis than in those without. In the multivariate analysis, DM (odds ratio 3.517, 95 % CI 1.601-7.727) was found to be the only the predictor of the presence of coronary artery stenosis in patients with heart failure. In conclusion, coronary imaging is strongly recommended for heart failure patients with DM to confirm the presence of coronary artery stenosis.

  8. An efficient method of addressing ectopic beats: new insight into data preprocessing of heart rate variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; He, Fang-Tian

    2011-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is affected by ectopic beats. An efficient method was proposed to deal with the ectopic beats. The method was based on trend correlation of the heart timing signal. Predictor of R-R interval (RRI) value at ectopic beat time was constructed by the weight calculation and the slope estimation of preceding normal RRI. The type of ectopic beat was detected and replaced by the predictor of RRI. The performance of the simulated signal after ectopic correction was tested by the standard value using power spectrum density (PSD) estimation, whereas the results of clinical data with ectopic beats were compared with the adjacent ectopic-free data. The result showed the frequency indexes after ectopy corrected had less error than other methods with the test of simulated signal and clinical data. It indicated our method could improve the PSD estimation in HRV analysis. The method had advantages of high accuracy and real time properties to recover the sinus node modulation.

  9. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in the U.S. It is a likely cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial formula developed by the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population who require medical evaluation for job certification. Those individuals assessed to have a high risk probability will be targeted for intervention.

  10. Linoleic acid content in adipose tissue and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Riemersma, R A; Wood, D A; Butler, S; Elton, R A; Oliver, M; Salo, M; Nikkari, T; Vartiainen, E; Puska, P; Gey, F

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of an inverse relation between essential fatty acids in adipose tissue, in particular linoleic acid, and mortality from coronary heart disease was studied by a cross sectional survey of random population samples of apparently healthy men aged 40-49 from four European regions with differing mortality from coronary heart disease. The proportion of linoleic acid in adipose tissue was lowest in men from north Karelia, Finland, where mortality from coronary heart disease is highest, and highest in men from Italy, where mortality is lowest, with intermediate proportions in men from Scotland and south west Finland. Similar gradients were observed for the desaturation and elongation products dihomo-gamma-linolenic and arachidonic acid. The proportion of saturated fatty acids in adipose tissue was highest in Finland, intermediate in Scotland, and lowest in Italy. Italian men also had the highest proportion of oleate in their adipose tissue and the lowest proportion of myristoleate and palmitoleate. Finnish men were more obese and had a higher blood pressure. Serum cholesterol concentration was higher in north Karelia and south west Finland than in Scotland or Italy. High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations reflected the regional differences in serum cholesterol, being higher in Finland and lower in Italy. The ratios of HDL cholesterol to total cholesterol, however, did not differ. The regional differences in linoleic acid in adipose tissue remained highly significant when the observed differences in other known risk factors for coronary heart disease among the four areas were taken into account by multivariate analysis. The gradients in proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids probably reflect differences in dietary intake of linoleic acid. PMID:3087455

  11. [Shift work and risk of cancer and coronary heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Johnni; Lassen, Christina Funch

    2014-01-20

    Shift and night work are among the most frequent occupational exposures. Such work schedules involve exposure to light-at-night, which may reduce normal nocturnal melatonin production, create circadian rhythm disruption, sleep deprivation and unhealthy lifestyle. There is strong experimental evidence that light-at-night and circadian disruption may increase the risk of cancer and coronary heart diseases. There is emerging, but limited epidemiologic evidence that night shift work may increase breast cancer and certain cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24629681

  12. Optical Mapping of Membrane Potential and Epicardial Deformation in Beating Hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanyu; Iijima, Kenichi; Huang, Jian; Walcott, Gregory P; Rogers, Jack M

    2016-07-26

    Cardiac optical mapping uses potentiometric fluorescent dyes to image membrane potential (Vm). An important limitation of conventional optical mapping is that contraction is usually arrested pharmacologically to prevent motion artifacts from obscuring Vm signals. However, these agents may alter electrophysiology, and by abolishing contraction, also prevent optical mapping from being used to study coupling between electrical and mechanical function. Here, we present a method to simultaneously map Vm and epicardial contraction in the beating heart. Isolated perfused swine hearts were stained with di-4-ANEPPS and fiducial markers were glued to the epicardium for motion tracking. The heart was imaged at 750 Hz with a video camera. Fluorescence was excited with cyan or blue LEDs on alternating camera frames, thus providing a 375-Hz effective sampling rate. Marker tracking enabled the pixel(s) imaging any epicardial site within the marked region to be identified in each camera frame. Cyan- and blue-elicited fluorescence have different sensitivities to Vm, but other signal features, primarily motion artifacts, are common. Thus, taking the ratio of fluorescence emitted by a motion-tracked epicardial site in adjacent frames removes artifacts, leaving Vm (excitation ratiometry). Reconstructed Vm signals were validated by comparison to monophasic action potentials and to conventional optical mapping signals. Binocular imaging with additional video cameras enabled marker motion to be tracked in three dimensions. From these data, epicardial deformation during the cardiac cycle was quantified by computing finite strain fields. We show that the method can simultaneously map Vm and strain in a left-sided working heart preparation and can image changes in both electrical and mechanical function 5 min after the induction of regional ischemia. By allowing high-resolution optical mapping in the absence of electromechanical uncoupling agents, the method relieves a long

  13. Fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pu-Ping; Qu, Yong-Qiang; Shuai, Qun; Tao, Si-Ming; Bao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shang-Wen; Wang, Dian-Hua

    2013-01-15

    Fibrocytes contribute significantly to fibrosis in many cardiac diseases. However, it is not clear whether fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis in coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes are involved in cardiac fibrosis in CHD. We identified the presence of fibrocytes in CHD heart by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, examined the collagen volume fraction by Masson's Trichrome staining, and evaluated the correlation between fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis. In conjunction, we examined the location of CXCL12, a homing factor and specific ligand for CXCR4, by immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes were identified in 26 out of 27 CHD hearts and in 10 out of 11 normal hearts. Combinations, including CD34/αSMA, CD34/procollagen-I, CD45/αSMA, CXCR4/procollagen-I and CXCR4/αSMA, stained significantly more fibrocytes in CHD hearts as compared with those in normal hearts (p<0.05). There were positive correlations between the collagen volume fraction and the amount of fibrocytes (r=0.558; p=0.003<0.01) and between the number of CXCR4(+) fibrocytes and the CXCL12(+) cells (r=0.741; p=0.000<0.01) in CHD hearts. Based upon these findings, we conclude that fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, may contribute to the increase in the fibroblast population in CHD heart. PMID:23177618

  14. Quality metrics for high order meshes: analysis of the mechanical simulation of the heart beat.

    PubMed

    Lamata, Pablo; Roy, Ishani; Blazevic, Bojan; Crozier, Andrew; Land, Sander; Niederer, Steven A; Hose, D Rod; Smith, Nicolas P

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a computational mesh is an important characteristic for stable and accurate simulations. Quality depends on the regularity of the initial mesh, and in mechanical simulations it evolves in time, with deformations causing changes in volume and distortion of mesh elements. Mesh quality metrics are therefore relevant for both mesh personalization and the monitoring of the simulation process. This work evaluates the significance, in meshes with high order interpolation, of four quality metrics described in the literature, applying them to analyse the stability of the simulation of the heart beat. It also investigates how image registration and mesh warping parameters affect the quality and stability of meshes. Jacobian-based metrics outperformed or matched the results of coarse geometrical metrics of aspect ratio or orthogonality, although they are more expensive computationally. The stability of simulations of a complete heart cycle was best predicted with a specificity of 61%, sensitivity of 85%, and only nominal differences were found changing the intra-element and per-element combination of quality values. A compromise between fitting accuracy and mesh stability and quality was found. Generic geometrical quality metrics have a limited success predicting stability, and an analysis of the simulation problem may be required for an optimal definition of quality.

  15. Simulation of the Beating Heart Based on Physically Modeling aDeformable Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Rohmer, Damien; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-07-18

    The motion of the beating heart is complex and createsartifacts in SPECT and x-ray CT images. Phantoms such as the JaszczakDynamic Cardiac Phantom are used to simulate cardiac motion forevaluationof acquisition and data processing protocols used for cardiacimaging. Two concentric elastic membranes filled with water are connectedto tubing and pump apparatus for creating fluid flow in and out of theinner volume to simulate motion of the heart. In the present report, themovement of two concentric balloons is solved numerically in order tocreate a computer simulation of the motion of the moving membranes in theJaszczak Dynamic Cardiac Phantom. A system of differential equations,based on the physical properties, determine the motion. Two methods aretested for solving the system of differential equations. The results ofboth methods are similar providing a final shape that does not convergeto a trivial circular profile. Finally,a tomographic imaging simulationis performed by acquiring static projections of the moving shape andreconstructing the result to observe motion artifacts. Two cases aretaken into account: in one case each projection angle is sampled for ashort time interval and the other case is sampled for a longer timeinterval. The longer sampling acquisition shows a clear improvement indecreasing the tomographic streaking artifacts.

  16. Heart beat detection in multimodal physiological data using a hidden semi-Markov model and signal quality indices.

    PubMed

    A F Pimentel, Marco; Santos, Mauro D; Springer, David B; Clifford, Gari D

    2015-08-01

    Accurate heart beat detection in signals acquired from intensive care unit (ICU) patients is necessary for establishing both normality and detecting abnormal events. Detection is normally performed by analysing the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal, and alarms are triggered when parameters derived from this signal exceed preset or variable thresholds. However, due to noisy and missing data, these alarms are frequently deemed to be false positives, and therefore ignored by clinical staff. The fusion of features derived from other signals, such as the arterial blood pressure (ABP) or the photoplethysmogram (PPG), has the potential to reduce such false alarms. In order to leverage the highly correlated temporal nature of the physiological signals, a hidden semi-Markov model (HSMM) approach, which uses the intra- and inter-beat depolarization interval, was designed to detect heart beats in such data. Features based on the wavelet transform, signal gradient and signal quality indices were extracted from the ECG and ABP waveforms for use in the HSMM framework. The presented method achieved an overall score of 89.13% on the hidden/test data set provided by the Physionet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data. PMID:26218536

  17. Heart beat detection in multimodal physiological data using a hidden semi-Markov model and signal quality indices.

    PubMed

    A F Pimentel, Marco; Santos, Mauro D; Springer, David B; Clifford, Gari D

    2015-08-01

    Accurate heart beat detection in signals acquired from intensive care unit (ICU) patients is necessary for establishing both normality and detecting abnormal events. Detection is normally performed by analysing the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal, and alarms are triggered when parameters derived from this signal exceed preset or variable thresholds. However, due to noisy and missing data, these alarms are frequently deemed to be false positives, and therefore ignored by clinical staff. The fusion of features derived from other signals, such as the arterial blood pressure (ABP) or the photoplethysmogram (PPG), has the potential to reduce such false alarms. In order to leverage the highly correlated temporal nature of the physiological signals, a hidden semi-Markov model (HSMM) approach, which uses the intra- and inter-beat depolarization interval, was designed to detect heart beats in such data. Features based on the wavelet transform, signal gradient and signal quality indices were extracted from the ECG and ABP waveforms for use in the HSMM framework. The presented method achieved an overall score of 89.13% on the hidden/test data set provided by the Physionet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data.

  18. Association between resting heart rate and coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Wang, Weijing; Li, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resting heart rate is linked to risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess these associations in general populations and in populations of patients with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE from inception to Mar. 5, 2016. We used a random-effects model to combine study-specific relative risks (RRs). We used restricted cubic splines to assess the dose–response relation. Results: We included 45 nonrandomized prospective cohort studies in the meta-analysis. The multivariable adjusted RR with an increment of 10 beats/min in resting heart rate was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09–1.14) for coronary artery disease, 1.05 (95% CI 1.01–1.08) for stroke, 1.12 (95% CI 1.02–1.24) for sudden death, 1.16 (95% CI 1.12–1.21) for noncardiovascular diseases, 1.09 (95% CI 1.06–1.12) for all types of cancer and 1.25 (95% CI 1.17–1.34) for noncardiovascular diseases excluding cancer. All of these relations were linear. In an analysis by category of resting heart rate (< 60 [reference], 60–70, 70–80 and > 80 beats/min), the RRs were 0.99 (95% CI 0.93–1.04), 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.16) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.19–1.43), respectively, for coronary artery disease; 1.08 (95% CI 0.98–1.19), 1.11 (95% CI 0.98–1.25) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.93–1.25), respectively, for stroke; and 1.17 (95% CI 0.94–1.46), 1.31 (95% CI 1.12–1.54) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.39–1.77), respectively, for noncardiovascular diseases. After excluding studies involving patients with hypertension or diabetes, we obtained similar results for coronary artery disease, stroke and noncardiovascular diseases, but found no association with sudden death. Interpretation: Resting heart rate was an independent predictor of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases over all of the studies combined. When the analysis included only studies

  19. Multi-channel System for Beat to Beat QT Interval Variability and its Use in Screening for Coronary Artery Disease and Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starc, V.; Schlegel, T. T.; Arenare, B.; Greco, E. C.; DePalma, J. L.; Nunez, T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Rahman, M. A.; Delgado, R.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the ability of beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) and related parameters to differentiate healthy individuals from patients with obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiomyopathy (CM). For this purpose we developed a PC-based ECG software program that in real time, acquires, analyzes and displays QTV in each of the eight independent channels that constitute the 12-lead conventional ECG. The system also analyzes and displays the QTV from QT interval signals that are derived from multiple channels and from singular value decomposition (SVD) to substantially reduce the effect of noise and other artifacts on the QTV results. It also provides other useful SVD-related parameters such as the normalized 3-dimensional volume of the T wave (nTV) = 100*(rho(sub 2)*rho(sub 3)rho(sub 1^2). Advanced high-fidelity 12-lead ECG tests (approx. 5-min supine) were first performed on a "training set" of 99 individuals: 33 with ischemic or dilated CM and low ejection fraction (EF less than 40%); 33 with catheterization-proven obstructive CAD but normal EF; and 33 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All QTV parameters that were studied for their accuracy in detecting CM and CAD significantly differentiated both CM and CAD from controls (p less than 0.0001). Retrospective areas under the ROC curve (AUC) of SDNN-QTV, rmsSD-QTV, and QTV Index (QTVI) for CM vs. controls in the lead V5 were 0.85, 0.90, and 0.99, respectively, and those for CAD vs. controls in the lead II were 0.82, 0.82, and 0.89. Other advanced ECG parameters, such as HFQRS RAZ score, LF Lomb of RRV or QRS-T angle, differentiated both CM and CAD from controls less significantly, with the respective AUC values of 0.89, 0.88 and 0.98 for CM vs. controls, and 0.73, 0.71 and 0.80 for CAD vs. controls. QTV parameters (especially QTVI, which is QTV as indexed to RRV) were, diagnostically speaking, amongst the best performing of the advanced ECG techniques studied thus far.

  20. [Diabetus mellitus and surgical treatment of coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Akchurin, R S; Vlasova, É E; Mershin, K V

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 40-year experience of surgical treatment of coronary heart disease testifies to higher coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality rates among diabetes mellitus patients in comparison to non-diabetic patients. At the same time, comparative study of CHD treatment methods efficacy in diabetes mellitus patients has shown that surgery is preferred to angioplasty, especially in the most severe cases--in presence of coronary occlusion, insulin-dependent diabetes and left-ventricle dysfunction. More inferior results of coronary bypass surgery in diabetic patients in comaparison to non-diabetic were conditional on a more pronounced arterial calcinosis and diffuse distal arterial involvement, as well as more severe aortal ateromatosis, flebopathy and more often wound infection occurrence. In the department of cardio-vascular surgery in Russian cardiologic scientific productive complex a quarter of all patients waiting for the coronary bypass surgery are diabetic. Selection algorithm, preoperation preparation, peculiarities of surgical technique and principles of postoperative supervision of these patients were specially designed. With adequate preparation, remission of diabetes and use of microsurgery, postoperative prognosis for these patients (both stratified and real) is comparative to that for the main group of patients. One-year follow up after the bypass surgery data testifies to the low difference in autovenous and autoarterial shunt patency in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Long-term (10 years) survival rate is significantly lower in the group of diabetic patients. Proposed cardioprotective postoperative strategy is designed to improve both short and long-term efficacy ofsurgical revascularization in CHD patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus.

  1. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  2. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  3. Effects of bileaflet mechanical heart valve orientation on coronary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The aortic sinus is approximately tri-radially symmetric, but bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs), which are commonly used to replace diseased aortic valves, are bilaterally symmetric. This mismatch in symmetry suggests that the orientation in which a BMHV is implanted within the aortic sinus affects the flow characteristics downstream of it. This study examines the effect of BMHV orientation on the flow in the coronary arteries, which originate in the aortic sinus and supply the heart tissue with blood. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were made past a BMHV mounted at the inlet of an anatomical aorta model under physiological flow conditions. The complex interactions between the valve jets, the sinus vortex and the flow in the right coronary artery were elucidated for three valve orientations. The coronary flow rate was directly affected by the size, orientation, and time evolution of the vortex in the sinus, all of which were sensitive to the valve's orientation. The total flow through the artery was highest when the valve was oriented with its axis of symmetry intersecting the artery's opening. The findings of this research may assist surgeons in choosing the best orientation for BMHV implantation. The bileaflet valve was donated by St. Jude Medical. Financial support was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  4. Power Spectrum Analysis of Heart Rate Fluctuation: A Quantitative Probe of Beat-To-Beat Cardiovascular Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akselrod, Solange; Gordon, David; Ubel, F. Andrew; Shannon, Daniel C.; Barger, A. Clifford; Cohen, Richard J.

    1981-07-01

    Power spectrum analysis of heart rate fluctuations provides a quantitative noninvasive means of assessing the functioning of the short-term cardiovascular control systems. We show that sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activity make frequency-specific contributions to the heart rate power spectrum, and that renin-angiotensin system activity strongly modulates the amplitude of the spectral peak located at 0.04 hertz. Our data therefore provide evidence that the reninangiotensin system plays a significant role in short-term cardiovascular control on the time scale of seconds to minutes.

  5. [Obesity and coronary heart disease: the mechanism of atherogenic impact].

    PubMed

    Micić, Dragan; Polovina, Snezana

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity and overweight leads to many diseases including cardiovascular disease. Having an influence on function and heart structure, obesity and overweight are in connection with coronary heart disease, heart failure and sudden heart death. Cardiomyopathy in obesity (adipositas cordis) appears due to accumulation of adipose tissue between the heart muscle fibers and degeneration of myocites. The degeneration of myocardial could be due to lipotoxicity of free fatty acids in adipose tissue. The left ventricle hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, increasing blood volume, ejection fraction lead to heart failure. Obesity is low inflammation state with increased adipocitokine production from truncal adipose tissue which causes endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Adipocitokines include leptin, adiponectin, resistin, visfatin, RBP 4 (retinol binding protein), angiotenzinogen, TNF alpha (tumor necrosis factor), PAI 1 (plazminogen activator inhibitor), fatty acids, sex steroids and different growth factors. Adipocitokines act synergistically or competitively with insulin, that explaining their impact on insulin resistance. Inflammatory citokines from adipose tissue could have influence on blood vessels endothelial function without their increase in plasma concentrations.

  6. Thyroid Function, Prevalent Coronary Heart Disease, and Severity of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Yan; Jiang, Jingjing; Gui, Minghui; Liu, Lin; Aleteng, Qiqige; Wu, Bingjie; Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaojing; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if free T4 and TSH concentrations or thyroid function categories were associated with prevalent CHD and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in a population undergoing coronary angiography. This was a cross-sectional study including 1799 patients who were consecutively admitted and underwent coronary angiography. We evaluated the severity of coronary atherosclerosis using Gensini score. In the entire study population, free T4 level was inversely associated with prevalent CHD (OR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.91–0.99, P = 0.01) and the natural log-transformed Gensini score (ln(Gensini score)) (β = −0.03, 95% CI −0.05–−0.01, P = 0.005). The odds of CHD increased gradually across hyperthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, and overt hypothyroidism groups using the euthyroid group as the reference, and the trend is borderline significant (P for trend = 0.051). When comparing to the euthyroid group, ln(Gensini score) of the overt hypothyroidism group was significantly higher (P = 0.009), but the trend was not significant (P for trend = 0.08). A significant association of thyroid function with CHD or ln(Gensini score) in euthyroid patients was not observed. The present study demonstrated an association of thyroid function with prevalent CHD and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in a population undergoing coronary angiography. However, this association was not observed in euthyroid individuals. PMID:26770196

  7. Coronary heart disease. The size and nature of the problem.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    In the U.K., coronary heart disease has reached epidemic proportions. It is the commonest cause of death after the age of 35 years and the fastest rate of increase is in early middle age. The epidemic is due mainly to our way of life. The most important factors are dietary, with smoking, physical inactivity and stress also contributing. Twenty independent working parties from different countries have reviewed the dietary evidence and reached a strong consensus on dietary recommendations. Little action has been taken in the U.K. The Coronary Prevention Group has been formed to consider the reasons for this inaction and also the implication for research, the government, the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, the Department of Health and Social Security, the food and agriculture industries, caterers, nutrition education and for individuals, of the dietary recommendations. PMID:7465457

  8. Potential benefits of weight loss in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ades, Philip A; Savage, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight, obesity and insulin resistance in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) exceeds that of the general population. Obesity is associated with a constellation of coronary risk factors that predispose to the development and progression of CHD. Intentional weight loss, accomplished through behavioral weight loss and exercise, improves insulin sensitivity and associated cardio-metabolic risk factors such as lipid measures, blood pressure, measures of inflammation and vascular function both in healthy individuals and patients with CHD. Additionally, physical fitness, physical function and quality of life all improve. There is evidence that intentional weight loss prevents the onset of CHD in high risk overweight individuals. While weight loss associated improvements in insulin resistance, fitness and related risk factors strongly supports favorable prognostic effects in individuals with established CHD, further study is needed to determine if long-term clinical outcomes are improved.

  9. [Features of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    RUS

    2015-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current data of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Numerous studies have shown that the diet can affect the modifiable risk factors for CHD that is the basis of primary and secondary prevention of this disease. The main areas of personalization of nutrition is the selection of an adequate energy value, a certain quota of protein,fats and carbohydrates in the diet, as well as other micronutrients that may influence the development of coronary artery disease. Caloric restriction of the diet in overweight patients is the most important factor of weight loss, independent of macronutrient composition of the diet. Diets with higher dietary protein content increase the rate of weight loss and improve blood lipid profile, but have a short-term effect. Excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. As a result, numerous studies have shown that replacing saturated fats with mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids have a beneficial effect on blood lipid profile in patients with coronary artery disease. Several studies have shown that increasing the glycemic load is accompanied by an elevated risk of CHD, especially in women. Personalized dietary treatment on the basis of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of CHD and with the individual characteristics of a particular patient (sex, age, heredity, nutritional status, physical activity) is becoming increasingly important. Personalization of the diet provides a positive effect on risk factors for coronary heart disease, on the quality of life and increases the effectiveness of diet-therapy.

  10. [Features of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    RUS

    2015-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current data of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Numerous studies have shown that the diet can affect the modifiable risk factors for CHD that is the basis of primary and secondary prevention of this disease. The main areas of personalization of nutrition is the selection of an adequate energy value, a certain quota of protein,fats and carbohydrates in the diet, as well as other micronutrients that may influence the development of coronary artery disease. Caloric restriction of the diet in overweight patients is the most important factor of weight loss, independent of macronutrient composition of the diet. Diets with higher dietary protein content increase the rate of weight loss and improve blood lipid profile, but have a short-term effect. Excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. As a result, numerous studies have shown that replacing saturated fats with mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids have a beneficial effect on blood lipid profile in patients with coronary artery disease. Several studies have shown that increasing the glycemic load is accompanied by an elevated risk of CHD, especially in women. Personalized dietary treatment on the basis of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of CHD and with the individual characteristics of a particular patient (sex, age, heredity, nutritional status, physical activity) is becoming increasingly important. Personalization of the diet provides a positive effect on risk factors for coronary heart disease, on the quality of life and increases the effectiveness of diet-therapy. PMID:26852529

  11. Dynamic 2D ultrasound and 3D CT image registration of the beating heart.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xishi; Moore, John; Guiraudon, Gerard; Jones, Douglas L; Bainbridge, Daniel; Ren, Jing; Peters, Terry M

    2009-08-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound (US) is widely used in minimally invasive cardiac procedures due to its convenience of use and noninvasive nature. However, the low quality of US images often limits their utility as a means for guiding procedures, since it is often difficult to relate the images to their anatomical context. To improve the interpretability of the US images while maintaining US as a flexible anatomical and functional real-time imaging modality, we describe a multimodality image navigation system that integrates 2D US images with their 3D context by registering them to high quality preoperative models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) images. The mapping from such a model to the patient is completed using spatial and temporal registrations. Spatial registration is performed by a two-step rapid registration method that first approximately aligns the two images as a starting point to an automatic registration procedure. Temporal alignment is performed with the aid of electrocardiograph (ECG) signals and a latency compensation method. Registration accuracy is measured by calculating the TRE. Results show that the error between the US and preoperative images of a beating heart phantom is 1.7 +/-0.4 mm, with a similar performance being observed in in vivo animal experiments.

  12. Ultrasound based mitral valve annulus tracking for off-pump beating heart mitral valve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng P.; Rajchl, Martin; Moore, John; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) occurs when the mitral valve cannot close properly during systole. The NeoChordtool aims to repair MR by implanting artificial chordae tendineae on flail leaflets inside the beating heart, without a cardiopulmonary bypass. Image guidance is crucial for such a procedure due to the lack of direct vision of the targets or instruments. While this procedure is currently guided solely by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), our previous work has demonstrated that guidance safety and efficiency can be significantly improved by employing augmented virtuality to provide virtual presentation of mitral valve annulus (MVA) and tools integrated with real time ultrasound image data. However, real-time mitral annulus tracking remains a challenge. In this paper, we describe an image-based approach to rapidly track MVA points on 2D/biplane TEE images. This approach is composed of two components: an image-based phasing component identifying images at optimal cardiac phases for tracking, and a registration component updating the coordinates of MVA points. Preliminary validation has been performed on porcine data with an average difference between manually and automatically identified MVA points of 2.5mm. Using a parallelized implementation, this approach is able to track the mitral valve at up to 10 images per second.

  13. Pancreatic islet cell transplantation using non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    Recent dramatic improvements in clinical islet cell transplantation demonstrated by the Edmonton group have increased the demand for this treatment, and donor shortage could become a major problem. Utilization of marginal donors could alleviate the donor shortage, and non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs) might be good resources. The University of Pennsylvania group demonstrated that it was possible to isolate islets from NHBDs, and the group actually transplanted islets from NHBDs, for the first time. The patient became insulin-independent; however, there had been no more cases using NHBDs until our group initiated islet transplantations from NHBDs in Japan. In order to utilize NHBDs effectively, we modified the standard islet isolation method. These modifications included minimizing the warm ischemic time, the use of trypsin inhibition during isolation, carrying out density measurement before purification and the use of a less toxic islet purification solution. With these modifications we were able to transplant nine of ten islet preparations from ten NHBDs (90%), into five type-1 diabetic patients. The first transplantation was performed on April 7, 2004 (the first time in Japan), and this patient became insulin-independent after the second islet transplantation (first time in Japan). All patients showed improved glycemic control and reduced insulin requirements, without hypoglycemic events. We also performed living-donor islet transplantation, with our modified islet isolation protocol, on January 19, 2005. The improved islet isolation protocol enabled us to perform effective islet transplantations from NHBDs, and it also enabled us to perform the living-donor islet transplantation.

  14. Beating heart on a chip: a novel microfluidic platform to generate functional 3D cardiac microtissues.

    PubMed

    Marsano, Anna; Conficconi, Chiara; Lemme, Marta; Occhetta, Paola; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Votta, Emiliano; Cerino, Giulia; Redaelli, Alberto; Rasponi, Marco

    2016-02-01

    In the past few years, microfluidic-based technology has developed microscale models recapitulating key physical and biological cues typical of the native myocardium. However, the application of controlled physiological uniaxial cyclic strains on a defined three-dimension cellular environment is not yet possible. Two-dimension mechanical stimulation was particularly investigated, neglecting the complex three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. For this purpose, we developed a heart-on-a-chip platform, which recapitulates the physiologic mechanical environment experienced by cells in the native myocardium. The device includes an array of hanging posts to confine cell-laden gels, and a pneumatic actuation system to induce homogeneous uniaxial cyclic strains to the 3D cell constructs during culture. The device was used to generate mature and highly functional micro-engineered cardiac tissues (μECTs), from both neonatal rat and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM), strongly suggesting the robustness of our engineered cardiac micro-niche. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic strain was effectively highly uniaxial and uniformly transferred to cells in culture. As compared to control, stimulated μECTs showed superior cardiac differentiation, as well as electrical and mechanical coupling, owing to a remarkable increase in junction complexes. Mechanical stimulation also promoted early spontaneous synchronous beating and better contractile capability in response to electric pacing. Pacing analyses of hiPSC-CM constructs upon controlled administration of isoprenaline showed further promising applications of our platform in drug discovery, delivery and toxicology fields. The proposed heart-on-a-chip device represents a relevant step forward in the field, providing a standard functional three-dimensional cardiac model to possibly predict signs of hypertrophic changes in cardiac phenotype by mechanical and biochemical co-stimulation.

  15. Beating heart on a chip: a novel microfluidic platform to generate functional 3D cardiac microtissues.

    PubMed

    Marsano, Anna; Conficconi, Chiara; Lemme, Marta; Occhetta, Paola; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Votta, Emiliano; Cerino, Giulia; Redaelli, Alberto; Rasponi, Marco

    2016-02-01

    In the past few years, microfluidic-based technology has developed microscale models recapitulating key physical and biological cues typical of the native myocardium. However, the application of controlled physiological uniaxial cyclic strains on a defined three-dimension cellular environment is not yet possible. Two-dimension mechanical stimulation was particularly investigated, neglecting the complex three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. For this purpose, we developed a heart-on-a-chip platform, which recapitulates the physiologic mechanical environment experienced by cells in the native myocardium. The device includes an array of hanging posts to confine cell-laden gels, and a pneumatic actuation system to induce homogeneous uniaxial cyclic strains to the 3D cell constructs during culture. The device was used to generate mature and highly functional micro-engineered cardiac tissues (μECTs), from both neonatal rat and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM), strongly suggesting the robustness of our engineered cardiac micro-niche. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic strain was effectively highly uniaxial and uniformly transferred to cells in culture. As compared to control, stimulated μECTs showed superior cardiac differentiation, as well as electrical and mechanical coupling, owing to a remarkable increase in junction complexes. Mechanical stimulation also promoted early spontaneous synchronous beating and better contractile capability in response to electric pacing. Pacing analyses of hiPSC-CM constructs upon controlled administration of isoprenaline showed further promising applications of our platform in drug discovery, delivery and toxicology fields. The proposed heart-on-a-chip device represents a relevant step forward in the field, providing a standard functional three-dimensional cardiac model to possibly predict signs of hypertrophic changes in cardiac phenotype by mechanical and biochemical co

  16. Fate of Patients With Coronary Perforation Complicating Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Euro Heart Survey Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Timm; Boeder, Niklas; Nef, Holger M; Möllmann, Helge; Hochadel, Matthias; Marco, Jean; Weidinger, Franz; Zeymer, Uwe; Gitt, Anselm K; Hamm, Christian W

    2015-11-01

    Coronary perforation (CP) is a life-threatening complication that can occur during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Little is known, however, about the incidence and clinical outcome of CP. We sought to investigate the occurrence of CP and its determinants and risk profile in a large-scale, prospective registry. From 2005 to 2008, unselected patients (n = 42,068) from 175 centers in 33 countries who underwent a PCI procedure were prospectively enrolled in the PCI registry of the Euro Heart Survey program. For the present analysis, patients experiencing CP during PCI (n = 124, 0.3%) were compared with those who underwent PCI without CP. Patients with CP were older, more often women, had more severe coronary disease, and underwent more complex types of coronary intervention. Independent factors associated with CP were the use of rotablation, intravascular ultrasound-guided PCI, bypass PCI, a totally occluded vessel, a type C lesion, peripheral arterial disease, and body mass index <25. More than 10% of the patients developed cardiac tamponade. In a small minority (3.3%), emergency bypass surgery had to be performed. The inhospital death rate was markedly elevated in patients with CP (7.3% vs 1.5%, p <0.001). After adjustment for the EuroHeart score, CP remained a strong predictor of hospital mortality (odds ratio 5.21, 95% confidence interval 2.34 to 11.60). In conclusion, in this real world, all-comers registry, the incidence of CP was low, occurred more often in patients who underwent more complex coronary interventions, and was associated with a fivefold higher hospital mortality. PMID:26341189

  17. Fate of Patients With Coronary Perforation Complicating Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Euro Heart Survey Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Timm; Boeder, Niklas; Nef, Holger M; Möllmann, Helge; Hochadel, Matthias; Marco, Jean; Weidinger, Franz; Zeymer, Uwe; Gitt, Anselm K; Hamm, Christian W

    2015-11-01

    Coronary perforation (CP) is a life-threatening complication that can occur during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Little is known, however, about the incidence and clinical outcome of CP. We sought to investigate the occurrence of CP and its determinants and risk profile in a large-scale, prospective registry. From 2005 to 2008, unselected patients (n = 42,068) from 175 centers in 33 countries who underwent a PCI procedure were prospectively enrolled in the PCI registry of the Euro Heart Survey program. For the present analysis, patients experiencing CP during PCI (n = 124, 0.3%) were compared with those who underwent PCI without CP. Patients with CP were older, more often women, had more severe coronary disease, and underwent more complex types of coronary intervention. Independent factors associated with CP were the use of rotablation, intravascular ultrasound-guided PCI, bypass PCI, a totally occluded vessel, a type C lesion, peripheral arterial disease, and body mass index <25. More than 10% of the patients developed cardiac tamponade. In a small minority (3.3%), emergency bypass surgery had to be performed. The inhospital death rate was markedly elevated in patients with CP (7.3% vs 1.5%, p <0.001). After adjustment for the EuroHeart score, CP remained a strong predictor of hospital mortality (odds ratio 5.21, 95% confidence interval 2.34 to 11.60). In conclusion, in this real world, all-comers registry, the incidence of CP was low, occurred more often in patients who underwent more complex coronary interventions, and was associated with a fivefold higher hospital mortality.

  18. [Adipokines: adiponectin, leptin, resistin and coronary heart disease risk].

    PubMed

    Kopff, Barbara; Jegier, Anna

    2005-01-01

    lesions. Correlation between resistin concentration and the extent of atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary vessels has also been found. The disturbances in secretion, function and balance of adiponectin, leptin and resistin are to be considered not only a link between visceral adiposity and cardiovascular risk but also independent risk factor of coronary heart disease.

  19. [Adherence to cardioprotective medications in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Scardi, Sabino; Mazzone, Carmine; Di Lenarda, Andrea

    2009-04-01

    Treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease relies on evidence-based medications such as beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers, aspirin and statins, which are considered cornerstones to control symptoms, improve quality of life, reduce future events, and prolong survival. In spite of the clear benefits of therapy, previous studies have shown differences between the large randomized populations and the "real world" about long-term treatment in terms of efficacy, tolerability, costs, side effects and drug interactions. Moreover, a different awareness of the patient's compliance has been highlighted in relation to the setting (hospital, family doctor, etc.). The analysis and assessment of the prescription and efficacy of therapy for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease represent one of the most important challenges for the healthcare system, because reliable data are necessary to verify usefulness and results of therapy, prescribed at discharge after an acute coronary syndrome and/or coronary artery bypass graft, but above all the actual application of treatments should be pursued in every clinical setting. The Cardiology School of the Trieste University has constituted a working group of cardiology students that during the year 2009 will enroll and follow for 1 year all patients with coronary artery disease discharged from the Cardiovascular Department and Emergency Unit of the University Hospital of Trieste to assess: (1) if evidence-based medicine for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease is applied in the Trieste area; (2) adherence to prescribed treatment; (3) factors that are associated with non-adherence and consequences of non-adherence. PMID:19475879

  20. Coronary arteries of the roe deer (Capreolus capreolus; Linnaeus 1758) heart.

    PubMed

    Frackowiak, H; Jasiczak, K; Pluta, K; Godynicki, S

    2007-01-01

    A study of the coronary arteries of the roe deer heart was performed on 21 hearts of animals of both sexes and various ages. The roe deer heart is supplied by two arteries: the left coronary artery and the right coronary artery. The left coronary artery arises from the left aortic sinus and forms a short common trunk. The left coronary artery reaches the coronary groove, then divides into the paraconal interventricular branch and the circumflex branch. The circumflex branch gives off several branches to the left ventricle wall and terminates in the subsinuosal interventricular groove as the subsinuosal interventricular branch. The right coronary artery is less pronounced than the left coronary artery. It arises from the right aortic sinus and enters the coronary groove as the right circumflex branch. We found the left arterial cone branch in 75% and the right arterial cone branch in 80% of the cases investigated. The coronary arteries of the heart run subepicardially. In 9 cases we found muscular bridges over the coronary arteries, mostly on the paraconal interventricular branch. In conclusion we affirm the left type of the arterial vascularisation in the roe deer heart.

  1. Multiphoton light-sheet microscopy using wavelength mixing: fast multicolor imaging of the beating Zebrafish heart with low photobleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahou, Pierre; Vermot, Julien; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Supatto, Willy

    2015-03-01

    Two-photon laser scanning microscopy has become a standard to map thick and live tissues. However, its application for fast and multicolor imaging remains challenging. To address this issue, we report on the implementation of mixed wavelength excitation in a two-photon light-sheet microscope. We illustrate the potential of the technique by recording sustained multicolor two-photon movies of the beating heart in zebrafish embryos with negligible photobleaching at 28 million pixels/second. In particular, 3D reconstructions of the heart periodic motion are obtained with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to track the fast movements of individual cells during a cardiac cycle.

  2. Myocardial apoptosis and injury of donor hearts kept in completely beating status with normothermic blood perfusion for transplants

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jun; Sun, Yanpeng; Wang, Wei; Ke, Han; Ye, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Normothermic blood perfusion is the developing trend of donor heart preservation. Theoretically, donor hearts preserved in a beating status may be the perfect method to reduce time-dependent ischemic injury, resuscitate marginal hearts expanding the donor pool and potentially improve the function of isolated hearts. In this study, to investigate the protective effect of normothermic blood perfusion, we maintained the donor hearts in a beating status and compared the changes of myocardial apoptosis and injury with standard hypothermic and static storage. Methods: Thirty rat hearts were preserved in static cold storage (Group A, n=10, stored in 4°C histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution), or in static normothermic blood perfusion (Group B, n=10, perfused with normothermic blood) or in beating status (Group C, n=10, perfused continuously with normothermic blood) for 9 hours. Myocardial injury markers including creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI), myocardial metabolic rate related indicators including Methane Dicarboxylic Aldehyde (MDA) and Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) were investigated before and after preservation. And also TUNEL staining and mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis markers such as Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3 and Cleaved Caspase-3 were used to evaluated the degree of myocardial apoptosis. Results: It is found that the levels of CK-MB and cTnI in Group C were significantly lower than those of Group A and Group B (P<0.05). However, there was no significant statistical difference of ATP content among three groups. When compared with Group A and B, the quality of MDA in Group C was obviously lower. In addition, it showed that a remarkable reduction in TUNEL-positive nuclear staining in Group C but higher in other two groups. And inhibited apoptosis was also confirmed by the results of mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis markers including Bax and Bcl-2. Conclusions: It is an effective and appropriate approach to

  3. [Pathology of the heart conducting system in the thanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Larev, Z V; Fedulova, M V; Denisova, O P; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The present literature review is focused on the contribution of various pathological changes in the heart conducting system to the tanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease viewed from the perspective of a forensic medical expert. The currently available data on the disorders in the heart conducting system in the subjects with these diseases are presented. Various aspects of pathology of the heart conducting system are considered in the modern and historical contexts. The prospects for the further investigations into the tanatogenic mechanisms of sudden death by reason of alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are outlined. PMID:22686063

  4. [Pathology of the heart conducting system in the thanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Larev, Z V; Fedulova, M V; Denisova, O P; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The present literature review is focused on the contribution of various pathological changes in the heart conducting system to the tanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease viewed from the perspective of a forensic medical expert. The currently available data on the disorders in the heart conducting system in the subjects with these diseases are presented. Various aspects of pathology of the heart conducting system are considered in the modern and historical contexts. The prospects for the further investigations into the tanatogenic mechanisms of sudden death by reason of alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are outlined.

  5. Coronary CT Angiography as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Tool: Perspectives from the SCOT-HEART Trial.

    PubMed

    Doris, Mhairi; Newby, David E

    2016-02-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Many trials to date have investigated the diagnostic accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) when compared to the gold standard diagnostic test, invasive coronary angiography. However, whether the use of a non-invasive anatomical test, such as CCTA, can translate into improved patient risk stratification, management and outcome has yet to be established. The Scottish COmputed Tomography of the HEART (SCOT-HEART) trial sought to address these questions and determined whether CCTA, when used in addition to standard care, could aid the diagnosis, further investigation and treatment of patients referred to the cardiology clinic with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. In this trial, CCTA clarified the diagnosis of angina due to coronary heart disease in a quarter of patients and this led to major alterations in treatment and management that appeared to reduce the risk of subsequent coronary heart disease death or non-fatal myocardial infarction. The SCOT-Heart trial has established that CCTA is a valuable diagnostic test in patients with suspected angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease and leads to greater clarity, more focused appropriate treatments and better coronary heart disease outcomes.

  6. Non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart: CT angiography findings.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ersin; Kafadar, Cahit; Tutar, Süleyman; Bozlar, Uğur; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is most commonly performed for the evaluation of the coronary arteries; however, non-coronary cardiac pathologies are frequently detected on these scans. In cases where magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used, cardiac CT can serve as the first-line imaging modality to evaluate many non-coronary cardiac pathologies. In this article, we discuss congenital non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart and their cardiac CT imaging features. PMID:27609435

  7. Cardiovascular metabolic syndrome: mediators involved in the pathophysiology from obesity to coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Roos, Cornelis J; Quax, Paul H A; Jukema, J Wouter

    2012-02-01

    Patients with obesity and diabetes mellitus are at increased risk for cardiovascular events and have a higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This worse prognosis is partly explained by the late recognition of coronary heart disease in these patients, due to the absence of symptoms. Early identification of coronary heart disease is vital, to initiate preventive medical therapy and improve prognosis. At present, with the use of cardiovascular risk models, the identification of coronary heart disease in these patients remains inadequate. To this end, biomarkers should improve the early identification of patients at increased cardiovascular risk. The first part of this review describes the pathophysiologic pathway from obesity to coronary heart disease. The second part evaluates several mediators from this pathophysiologic pathway for their applicability as biomarkers for the identification of coronary heart disease.

  8. Can patients with coronary heart disease go to high altitude?

    PubMed

    Dehnert, Christoph; Bärtsch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tourism to high altitude is very popular and includes elderly people with both manifest and subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). Thus, risk assessment regarding high altitude exposure of patients with CHD is of increasing interest, and individual recommendations are expected despite the lack of sufficient scientific evidence. The major factor increasing cardiac stress is hypoxia. At rest and for a given external workload, myocardial oxygen demand is increased at altitude, particularly in nonacclimatized individuals, and there is some evidence that blood-flow reserve is reduced in atherosclerotic coronary arteries even in the absence of severe stenosis. Despite a possible imbalance between oxygen demand and oxygen delivery, studies on selected patients have shown that exposure and exercise at altitudes of 3000 to 3500 m is generally safe for patients with stable CHD and sufficient work capacity. During the first days at altitude, patients with stable angina may develop symptoms of myocardial ischemia at slightly lower heart rate x  blood-pressure products. Adverse cardiac events, however, such as unstable angina coronary syndromes, do not occur more frequently compared with sea level except for those who are unaccustomed to exercise. Therefore, training should start before going to altitude, and the altitude-related decrease in exercise capacity should be considered. Travel to 3500 m should be avoided unless patients have stable disease, preserved left ventricular function without residual capacity, and above-normal exercise capacity. CHD patients should avoid travel to elevations above 4500 m owing to severe hypoxia at these altitudes. The risk assessment of CHD patients at altitude should always consider a possible absence of medical support and that cardiovascular events may turn into disaster. PMID:20919884

  9. Effects of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention on Serum Angiopoietin-2 in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhi-Yu; Gui, Chun; Li, Lang; Wei, Xiao-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background: Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) plays a crucial role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis and is expressed only in sites of vascular remodeling. Ang-2 expression can be regulated by hypoxia inducible factors and other regulators with exposure to hypoxia. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on serum Ang-2 concentrations, and analyze the correlation between serum Ang-2 and the severity of coronary artery stenosis in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: Sixty-four patients with CHD were selected as the study group, each undergone PCI. Thirty-two healthy subjects were selected as the control group. Pre-PCI and post-PCI serum Ang-2 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The severity of coronary artery stenosis was evaluated using angiographic Gensini scores, and the coronary collateral vessels were scored according to Rentrop's classification. Results: Concentrations of pre-PCI serum Ang-2 in the study group were significantly higher than those in the control group (4625.06 ± 1838.06 vs. 1945.74 ± 1588.17 pg/ml, P < 0.01); however, concentrations of post-PCI serum Ang-2 were significantly lower than those of pre-PCI (3042.63 ± 1845.33 pg/ml vs. 4625.06 ± 1838.06 pg/ml, P < 0.01). Concentrations of pre-PCI serum Ang-2 were significantly correlated with Gensini scores (r = 0.488, P < 0.01); however, the decrease in serum Ang-2 after PCI was not correlated with Gensini scores, coronary collateral vessel grading, or left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: Serum Ang-2 concentrations significantly increased in patients with CHD, and PCI treatment significantly decreased these concentrations. Serum Ang-2 concentrations, but not the decrease in serum Ang-2 concentrations, were significantly correlated with the severity of coronary artery stenosis. These results suggested that Ang-2 may be a biomarker of myocardial ischemia and vessel remodeling. PMID:26960364

  10. Microvascular coronary dysfunction and ischemic heart disease: where are we in 2014?

    PubMed

    Petersen, John W; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Many patients with angina and signs of myocardial ischemia on stress testing have no significant obstructive epicardial coronary disease. There are many potential coronary and non-coronary mechanisms for ischemia without obstructive epicardial coronary disease, and prominent among these is coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction. Patients with coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction are often at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including ischemic events and heart failure despite preserved ventricular systolic function. In this article, we will review the diagnosis and treatment of coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction, discuss their potential contribution to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and highlight recent advances in the evaluation of atherosclerotic morphology in these patients, many of whom have non-obstructive epicardial disease.

  11. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.

  12. [Atorvastatin and oxidative stress in coronary heart disease with obesity].

    PubMed

    Bondar, K Yu; Belaya, O L; Lazutina, O M; Kuropteva, Z V; Raider, L M; Artamoshina, N E; Yakovleva, T V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study the role of atorvastatin in the correction of oxidative stress manifestations in patients with coronary heart disease and dyslipidemnia (DLP). It included 122 patients with stable forms of CHD and 20 practically healthy subjects. Plasma lipids and products of lipid peroxidation (dienic conjugates and compounds reacting with 2-thiobarbituric acid), eryhrocyte antioxidative enzymes glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase were determined by standard methods; activity of the ceruloplasmin/transferrin antioxidant system) was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance. The patients underwent 24 hr ECG Holter monitoring. Atorvastatin at a dose of 20 mg/d given during 6 months exerted antioxidative and antiperoxidative effects in 90% of the patients. It normalized parameters of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection thereby improving the clinical course of CHD.

  13. Family coronary heart disease: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Superko, H Robert; Roberts, Robert; Garrett, Brenda; Pendyala, Lakshmana; King, Spencer

    2010-12-01

    A family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) is an accepted risk factor for cardiovascular events and is independent of common CHD risk factors. Advances in the understanding of genetic influences on CHD risk provide the opportunity to apply this knowledge and improve patient care. Utility of inherited cardiovascular risk testing exists by utilizing both phenotypes and genotypes and includes improved CHD risk prediction, selection of the most appropriate treatment, prediction of outcome, and family counseling. The major impediment to widespread clinical adoption of this concept involves un-reimbursed staff time, educational needs, access to a standardized and efficient assessment mechanism, and privacy issues. The link between CHD and inheritance is indisputable and the evidence strong and consistent. For clinicians, the question is how to utilize this information, in an efficient manner, in order to improve patient care and detection of high-risk family members.

  14. Blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-05-01

    Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Volumetric blood flow velocity was supporting on constant level (1 ml/h). Silicone tube of diameter comparable with coronary arteries diameter was used as vessel model. Cell-cell interactions were studied under glucose and anticoagulants influence. Increased adhesiveness of blood cells to tube walls was revealed in patient with coronary heart disease (CHD) compare to practically healthy persons (PHP). In patients with stable angina pectoris of high functional class and patients with AMI shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were predominating in blood flow structure up to microclots formation. Clotting and erythrocytes aggregation increase as response to glucose solution injection, sharply defined in patients with CHD. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with CHD and PHP. After compare our results with other author's data we can consider that method used in our study is sensible enough to investigate blood flow structure violations in patients with CHD and PHP. Several differences of cell-cell interaction in flow under glucose and anticoagulant influence were found out in patients with CHD and PHP.

  15. [Risk management of coronary heart disease-prevention].

    PubMed

    Dorner, Thomas; Rieder, Anita

    2004-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and is responsible for 45% of deaths in the western world and 24.5% of deaths in the developing countries. In the 21st century these diseases will continue to dominate the disease spectrum and death statistics in both the industrialised and developing worlds. Since 1975 mortality from cardiovascular disease has decreased by about 24 to 28% in most countries. About 45% of this reduction can be attributed to an improvement in treatment of coronary heart disease and around 55% are attributable to a reduction in risk factors, in particular, stopping smoking and control of hypertension. However, especially in the case of ischaemic heart disease, it is not clear whether the reduction in mortality reflects a reduction in incidence of this disease. Due to the aging population and the reduction in age-related mortality, it is expected that the absolute number of people with heart disease will increase. Furthermore, the increase in prevalence of obesity, metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes as well as the higher prevalence of female smokers compared with thirty years ago could result in an increase in mortality over the next years and decades. It has been shown that prevention strategies, such as education campaigns aimed at the general public, can potentially greatly contribute to a reduction in incidence of cardiovascular disease at every stage. In order for such campaigns to be effective, it is necessary to understand and reduce the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A large proportion of these risk factors are associated with lifestyle and are therefore modifiable. These modifiable risk factors include smoking, hypertension, poor diet, dyslipidemia, lack of exercise, overweight, adiposity and diabetes mellitus and optimisation of these should be a key aim for all adults. Gender differences also play a role in the incidence and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Incidence of myocardial

  16. Regulation of coronary blood flow in health and ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Duncker, Dirk J; Koller, Akos; Merkus, Daphne; Canty, John M

    2015-01-01

    The major factors determining myocardial perfusion and oxygen delivery have been elucidated over the past several decades, and this knowledge has been incorporated into the management of patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). The basic understanding of the fluid mechanical behavior of coronary stenoses has also been translated to the cardiac catheterization laboratory where measurements of coronary pressure distal to a stenosis and coronary flow are routinely obtained. However, the role of perturbations in coronary microvascular structure and function, due to myocardial hypertrophy or coronary microvascular dysfunction, in IHD is becoming increasingly recognized. Future studies should therefore be aimed at further improving our understanding of the integrated coronary microvascular mechanisms that control coronary blood flow, and of the underlying causes and mechanisms of coronary microvascular dysfunction. This knowledge will be essential to further improve the treatment of patients with IHD.

  17. Relationship between ventricular ectopic beat frequency and heart rate: study in patients with severe arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Acanfora, D; De Caprio, L; Di Palma, A; Furgi, G; Ing, F M; Migaux, M L; Rengo, F

    1993-04-01

    To evaluate and quantify the relationship between premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) and heart rate (HR), 57 patients (48 men and 8 women, mean age 59.8 +/- 7.9 years) with severe PVCs (Lown-Wolf grade > or = 3a) over 24 hours of Holter monitoring were studied. Twenty had no coronary artery disease (CAD), 25 had angiographically documented CAD, and 12 had acute myocardial infarction. All parameters of the 24-hour recordings from two ECG leads were measured by a Holter analyzer designed in our laboratory, based on fast microprocessors and controlled by a microcomputer. Scatter diagrams of the number of PVCs per minute as a function of HR and correlation coefficient were computed for various HR values corresponding to a total number of minutes greater than five. A positive correlation (r > or = 0.35) was found in most patients without CAD (85%); there was a complex relationship between the strength of the correlation and the presence of CAD or acute myocardial infarction because of a greater variability in the results of correlation coefficient analysis (coefficient of variation 62%, 208%, and 145% in patients without CAD, with CAD, and with acute myocardial infarction, respectively). The incidence of a positive correlation was similar in patients with Lown-Wolf grade III (63%), IVa (82%), or > or = IVb (67%) arrhythmias. The reproducibility of the correlation coefficient of the relationship between PVC frequency and HR was tested in 15 patients. The mean value of the correlation coefficient was 0.801 +/- 0.169 for the first test and 0.805 +/- 0.22 (p = NS) for the second test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682033

  18. Relationship between ventricular ectopic beat frequency and heart rate: study in patients with severe arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Acanfora, D; De Caprio, L; Di Palma, A; Furgi, G; Ing, F M; Migaux, M L; Rengo, F

    1993-04-01

    To evaluate and quantify the relationship between premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) and heart rate (HR), 57 patients (48 men and 8 women, mean age 59.8 +/- 7.9 years) with severe PVCs (Lown-Wolf grade > or = 3a) over 24 hours of Holter monitoring were studied. Twenty had no coronary artery disease (CAD), 25 had angiographically documented CAD, and 12 had acute myocardial infarction. All parameters of the 24-hour recordings from two ECG leads were measured by a Holter analyzer designed in our laboratory, based on fast microprocessors and controlled by a microcomputer. Scatter diagrams of the number of PVCs per minute as a function of HR and correlation coefficient were computed for various HR values corresponding to a total number of minutes greater than five. A positive correlation (r > or = 0.35) was found in most patients without CAD (85%); there was a complex relationship between the strength of the correlation and the presence of CAD or acute myocardial infarction because of a greater variability in the results of correlation coefficient analysis (coefficient of variation 62%, 208%, and 145% in patients without CAD, with CAD, and with acute myocardial infarction, respectively). The incidence of a positive correlation was similar in patients with Lown-Wolf grade III (63%), IVa (82%), or > or = IVb (67%) arrhythmias. The reproducibility of the correlation coefficient of the relationship between PVC frequency and HR was tested in 15 patients. The mean value of the correlation coefficient was 0.801 +/- 0.169 for the first test and 0.805 +/- 0.22 (p = NS) for the second test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease depending on different glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2002-07-01

    The aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease comparing to practically healthy persons and patients with coronary heart disease combined with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus depending on different glucose concentration in unguentums of blood incubates with the help of computer microphotometer - visual analyzer was studied. Two-phase behavior of erythrocytes size changing of practically healthy persons depending on glucose concentration in an incubation medium and instability erythrocyte systems of a whole blood to the influence of high glucose concentration were revealed. Influence of high glucose concentration on aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease and its combination with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was revealed.

  20. Activity of creatinol O-phosphate on persistent ventricular premature beats in ischemic heart disease. Double blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, F; Neri, A; Soccorsi, P; Sciacca, A

    1979-01-01

    In a double-blind investigation N-methyl-N-(beta-hydroxyethyl) guanidine O-phosphate (creatinol O-phosphate, COP) was checked versus a reference substance (solvent of COP) on volunteers affected by ischemic heart disease with persistent ventricular premature beats (VPB). COP was able to reduce VPB by 50--100% in 85% of the volunteers treated with this drug. This fact and the virtual absence of side-effects of COP lead the authors to the conclusion that COP merits more extensive investigations in this field in view of its clinical employment alone or in association with specific antiarrhythmic agents.

  1. Modified Arch-First Technique Performed on a Beating Heart for an Arch Aneurysm with Atheromatous Plaques

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A shaggy aorta with unstable atheromatous plaques has a high risk of neurologic complications in cases of arch aneurysm. We report the use of a modified arch-first technique involving arch replacement for a beating heart after reconstruction of supra-aortic vessels while maintaining normal blood pressure. The procedure was performed in a patient who had an arch aneurysm, complicated by an aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) and a shaggy aorta ascending to the aortic arch. This modified arch-first technique is an alternative surgical approach that is used for arch aneurysms involving a shaggy aorta, in order to prevent embolic debris-related complications. PMID:23825510

  2. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  3. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  4. Dual-Axis Rotational Coronary Angiography: A New Technique for Detecting Graft Coronary Vasculopathy in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gudausky, Todd M.; Pelech, Andrew N.; Stendahl, Gail; Tillman, Kathryn; Mattice, Judy; Berger, Stuart; Zangwill, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Annual surveillance coronary angiograpyhy to screen for graft coronary vasculopathy is routine practice after orthotopic heart transplantation. Traditionally, this is performed with direct coronary angiography using static single-plane or biplane angiography. Recently, technological advances have made it possible to perform dual-axis rotational coronary angiography (RA). This technique differs from standard static single-plane or biplane angiography in that a single detector is preprogrammed to swing through a complex 80° arc during a single injection. It has the advantage of providing a perspective of the vessels from a full arc of images rather than from one or two static images per contrast injection. The current study evaluated two coronary angiography techniques used consecutively at a single center to evaluate pediatric heart transplant recipients for graft coronary vasculopathy. A total of 23 patients underwent routine coronary angiography using both biplane static coronary angiography (BiP) and RA techniques at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin from February 2009 to September 2010. Demographic and procedure data were collected from each procedure and analyzed for significance utilizing a Wilcoxon rank sum test. No significant demographic or procedural differences between the BiP and the RA procedures were noted. Specific measures of radiation dose including fluoroscopy time and dose area product were similar among the imaging techniques. The findings show that RA can be performed safely and reproducibly in pediatric heart transplant recipients. Compared with standard BiP, RA does not increase radiation exposure or contrast use and in our experience has provided superior angiographic imaging for the evaluation of graft coronary vasculopathy. PMID:22956061

  5. Seasonal variation in coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, A S; Dunnigan, M G; Allan, T M; Rawles, J M

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--Seasonality of coronary heart disease (CHD) was examined to determine whether fatal and non-fatal disease have the same annual rhythm. DESIGN--Time series analysis was carried out on retrospective data over a 10 year period and analysed by age groups ( < 45 to > 75 years) and gender. SETTING--Data by month were obtained for the years 1962-71. The Registrar General provided information on deaths and the Research and Intelligence Unit of the Scottish Home and Health Department on hospital admissions. SUBJECTS--In Scotland, between 1962 and 1971, 123 000 patients were admitted to hospital for CHD, of whom 29 000 died. There were a further 97 000 CHD deaths outside hospital. These two groups were also examined as one (coronary incidence) - that is, all coronary deaths and coronary admissions discharged alive. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND MAIN RESULTS: Where there was a single annual peak, the sine curve was analysed by cosinor analysis. When there were two peaks the analysis was by normal approximation to Poisson distribution. In younger men (under 45 years) admitted to hospital there was a dominant spring peak and an autumn trough. A bimodal pattern of spring and winter peaks was evident for hospital admissions in older male age groups: with increasing age the spring peak diminished and the winter peak increased. In contrast, female hospital admissions showed a dominant winter/summer pattern of seasonal variation. In male and female CHD deaths seasonal variation showed a dominant pattern of winter peaks and summer troughs, with the winter peak spreading into spring in the two youngest male age groups. CHD incidence in women showed a winter/summer rhythm, but in men the spring peak was dominant up to the age of 55. CONCLUSION--The male, age related spring peak in CHD hospital admissions suggests there is an androgenic risk factor for myocardial infarction operating through an unknown effector mechanism. As age advances and reproduction becomes less

  6. Detecting variations of blood volume shift due to heart beat from respiratory inductive plethysmography measurements in man.

    PubMed

    Fontecave-Jallon, J; Videlier, B; Baconnier, P; Tanguy, S; Calabrese, P; Guméry, P-Y

    2013-09-01

    The simultaneous study of the cardiac and respiratory activities and their interactions is of great physiological and clinical interest. For this purpose, we want to investigate if respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) can be used for cardiac functional exploration. We propose a system, based on RIP technology and time-scale approaches of signal processing, for the extraction of cardiac information. This study focuses on the monitoring of blood volume shift due to heart beat, noted ▵Vtr_c and investigates RIP for the detection of ▵Vtr_c variations by comparison to stroke volume (SV) variations estimated by impedance cardiography (IMP). We proposed a specific respiratory protocol assumed to induce significant variations of the SV. Fifteen healthy volunteers in the seated and supine positions were asked to alternate rest respiration and maneuvers, consisting in blowing into a manometer. A multi-step treatment including a variant of empirical mode decomposition was applied on RIP signals to extract cardiac volume signals and estimate beat-to-beat ▵Vtr_c. These were averaged in quasi-stationary states at rest and during the respiratory maneuvers, and analysed in view of SV estimations from IMP signals simultaneously acquired. Correlation and statistical tests over the data show that RIP can be used to detect variations of the cardiac blood shift in healthy young subjects.

  7. Milk and other dietary influences on coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    While dietary links to ischemic heart disease (IHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality have been studied for many years, the correlation has not clearly been resolved, especially for older populations. In this paper, a multi-country statistical approach involving 32 countries is used to find dietary links to IHD and CHD for various age groups aged 35+. For IHD, milk carbohydrates were found to have the highest statistical association for males aged 35+ and females aged 65+, while for females aged 35-64, sugar was found to have the highest association. In the case of CHD, non-fat milk was found to have the highest association for males aged 45+ and females aged 75+, while for females 65-74, milk carbohydrates and sugar had the highest associations, and for females aged 45-64, sugar had the highest association. A number of mechanisms have been proposed in the literature that might explain the milk carbohydrate or non-fat milk association. One of the most prominent theories is that animal proteins contribute to homocysteine (Hcy) production; however, milk more than meat lacks adequate B vitamins to convert Hcy to useful products. Lactose and calcium in conjunction with Hcy from consumption of non-fat milk may also contribute to calcification of the arteries.

  8. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies.

  9. Changes in Heart Rate Variability after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Clinical Importance of These Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lakusic, Nenad; Mahovic, Darija; Cerkez Habek, Jasna; Novak, Miroslav; Cerovec, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability is a physiological feature indicating the influence of the autonomic nervous system on the heart rate. Association of the reduced heart rate variability due to myocardial infarction and the increased postinfarction mortality was first described more than thirty years ago. Many studies have unequivocally demonstrated that coronary artery bypass grafting surgery generally leads to significant reduction in heart rate variability, which is even more pronounced than after myocardial infarction. Pathophysiologically, however, the mechanisms of heart rate variability reduction associated with acute myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass grafting are different. Generally, heart rate variability gradually recovers to the preoperative values within six months of the procedure. Unlike the reduced heart rate variability in patients having sustained myocardial infarction, a finding of reduced heart rate variability after coronary artery bypass surgery is not considered relevant in predicting mortality. Current knowledge about changes in heart rate variability in coronary patients and clinical relevance of such a finding in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are presented. PMID:26078960

  10. Hear the beat: decellularized mouse heart regenerated with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Lu, Tung-Ying; Yang, Lei

    2014-02-01

    Heart tissue engineering holds a great potential for human heart disease therapy. Regeneration of whole biofunctional human heart is the ultimate goal of tissue engineering. Recent advances take the first step towards whole heart regeneration. However, a substantial amount of challenges have to be overcome.

  11. Alteration of LV end-diastolic volume by controlling the power of the continuous-flow LVAD, so it is synchronized with cardiac beat: development of a native heart load control system (NHLCS).

    PubMed

    Umeki, Akihide; Nishimura, Takashi; Ando, Masahiko; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Yamazaki, Kenji; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2012-06-01

    There are many reports comparing pulsatile and continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). But continuous-flow LVAD with the pulsatile driving technique had not been tried or discussed before our group's report. We have previously developed and introduced a power-control unit for a centrifugal LVAD (EVAHEART®; Sun Medical), which can change the speed of rotation so it is synchronized with the heart beat. By use of this unit we analyzed the end-diastolic volume (EDV) to determine whether it is possible to change the native heart load. We studied 5 goats with normal hearts and 5 goats with acute LV dysfunction because of micro-embolization of the coronary artery. We used 4 modes, "circuit-clamp", "continuous", "counter-pulse", and "co-pulse", with the bypass rate (BR) 100%. We raised the speed of rotation of the LVAD in the diastolic phase with the counter-pulse mode, and raised it in the systolic phase with the co-pulse mode. As a result, the EDV decreased in the counter-pulse mode and increased in the co-pulse mode, compared with the continuous mode (p < 0.05), in both the normal and acute-heart-failure models. This result means it may be possible to achieve favorable EDV and native heart load by controlling the rotation of continuous-flow LVAD, so it is synchronized with the cardiac beat. This novel driving system may be of great benefit to patients with end-stage heart failure, especially those with ischemic etiology.

  12. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Heran, Balraj S; Chen, Jenny MH; Ebrahim, Shah; Moxham, Tiffany; Oldridge, Neil; Rees, Karen; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) worldwide is one of great concern to patients and healthcare agencies alike. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore patients with heart disease to health. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) on mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life of patients with CHD. Search methods RCTs have been identified by searching CENTRAL, HTA, and DARE (using The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009), as well as MEDLINE (1950 to December 2009), EMBASE (1980 to December 2009), CINAHL (1982 to December 2009), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to December 2009). Selection criteria Men and women of all ages who have had myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), or who have angina pectoris or coronary artery disease defined by angiography. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected and data extracted independently by two reviewers. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results This systematic review has allowed analysis of 47 studies randomising 10,794 patients to exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation or usual care. In medium to longer term (i.e. 12 or more months follow-up) exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduced overall and cardiovascular mortality [RR 0.87 (95% CI 0.75, 0.99) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.63, 0.87), respectively], and hospital admissions [RR 0.69 (95% CI 0.51, 0.93)] in the shorter term (< 12 months follow-up) with no evidence of heterogeneity of effect across trials. Cardiac rehabilitation did not reduce the risk of total MI, CABG or PTCA. Given both the heterogeneity in outcome measures and methods of reporting findings, a meta-analysis was not undertaken for health-related quality of life. In seven out of 10 trials reporting health

  13. Current Role of Ivabradine in Stable Coronary Artery Disease Without Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Muñoz, Oscar C; Abbas, Aamer

    2016-02-01

    Increase in heart rate represents a significant contribution in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, by promoting atherosclerotic process and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, it negatively influences cardiovascular risk in the general population. The aim of this review is to analyze the current, controversial, and future role of ivabradine as an anti-anginal agent in the setting of coronary artery disease without heart failure. Ivabradine represents a selective heart rate-lowering agent that increased diastolic perfusion time and improving energetics in the ischemic myocardium.

  14. Number of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors and Mortality in Patients With First Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Canto, John G.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Rogers, William J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Frederick, Paul D.; French, William J.; Gibson, C. Michael; Pollack, Charles V.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J.; Greenland, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Context Few studies have examined the association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors and outcomes of acute myocardial infarction in community practice. Objective To determine the association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors in patients with first myocardial infarction and hospital mortality. Design Observational study from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction, 1994-2006. Patients We examined the presence and absence of 5 major traditional coronary heart disease risk factors (hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and family history of coronary heart disease) and hospital mortality among 542 008 patients with first myocardial infarction and without prior cardiovascular disease. Main Outcome Measure All-cause in-hospital mortality. Results A majority (85.6%) of patients who presented with initial myocardial infarction had at least 1 of the 5 coronary heart disease risk factors, and 14.4% had none of the 5 risk factors. Age varied inversely with the number of coronary heart disease risk factors, from a mean age of 71.5 years with 0 risk factors to 56.7 years with 5 risk factors (P for trend <.001). The total number of in-hospital deaths for all causes was 50 788. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were 14.9%, 10.9%, 7.9%, 5.3%, 4.2%, and 3.6% for patients with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. After adjusting for age and other clinical factors, there was an inverse association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors and hospital mortality adjusted odds ratio (1.54; 95% CI, 1.23-1.94) among individuals with 0 vs 5 risk factors. This association was consistent among several age strata and important patient subgroups. Conclusion Among patients with incident acute myocardial infarction without prior cardiovascular disease, in-hospital mortality was inversely related to the number of coronary heart disease risk factors. PMID:22089719

  15. Systemic chemokine levels, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke events

    PubMed Central

    Canouï-Poitrine, F.; Luc, G.; Mallat, Z.; Machez, E.; Bingham, A.; Ferrieres, J.; Ruidavets, J.-B.; Montaye, M.; Yarnell, J.; Haas, B.; Arveiler, D.; Morange, P.; Kee, F.; Evans, A.; Amouyel, P.; Ducimetiere, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the association between systemic levels of the chemokine regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and eotaxin-1 (CCL11) with future coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke events and to assess their usefulness for CHD and ischemic stroke risk prediction in the PRIME Study. Methods: After 10 years of follow-up of 9,771 men, 2 nested case-control studies were built including 621 first CHD events and 1,242 matched controls and 95 first ischemic stroke events and 190 matched controls. Standardized hazard ratios (HRs) for each log-transformed chemokine were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Results: None of the 4 chemokines were independent predictors of CHD, either with respect to stable angina or to acute coronary syndrome. Conversely, RANTES (HR = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.74), IP-10 (HR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.06–2.20), and eotaxin-1 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI 1.02–2.46), but not MCP-1 (HR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.68–1.46), were associated with ischemic stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. When the first 3 chemokines were included in the same multivariate model, RANTES and IP-10 remained predictive of ischemic stroke. Their addition to a traditional risk factor model predicting ischemic stroke substantially improved the C-statistic from 0.6756 to 0.7425 (p = 0.004). Conclusions: In asymptomatic men, higher systemic levels of RANTES and IP-10 are independent predictors of ischemic stroke but not of CHD events. RANTES and IP-10 may improve the accuracy of ischemic stroke risk prediction over traditional risk factors. PMID:21849651

  16. [Anatomy and physiology of the heart and coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence

    2015-03-01

    The myocardium assures the supply of oxygen to the body. The provision of oxygen to the myocardium by the coronary arteries is dependent on two key parameters: the coronary blood flow and the ability to extract oxygen from the arterial blood. Coronary artery disease is almost always the consequence of atherosclerosis and can lead to myocardial infarction.

  17. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa de Barros, Bruno; Weber dos Santos, Rodrigo; Lobosco, Marcelo; Alonso, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action potential propagation. Next, an equivalent discrete model is implemented, which permits a faster integration of the equations. This discrete model is a simplified version of the microscopic model that maintains the distribution of connections between cells. Both models produce similar results when describing action potential propagation in homogeneous tissue; however, they slightly differ in the generation of ectopic beats in heterogeneous tissue. Nevertheless, both models present the generation of reentry inside fibrotic tissues. This kind of reentry restricted to microfibrosis regions can result in the formation of ectopic pacemakers, that is, regions that will generate a series of ectopic stimulus at a fast pacing rate. In turn, such activity has been related to trigger fibrillation in the atria and in the ventricles in clinical and animal studies. PMID:26583127

  18. An Update on the Utility of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring for Coronary Heart Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Prediction.

    PubMed

    Kianoush, Sina; Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Umapathi, Priya; Graham, Garth; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Estimating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is necessary for determining the potential net benefit of primary prevention pharmacotherapy. Risk estimation relying exclusively on traditional CVD risk factors may misclassify risk, resulting in both undertreatment and overtreatment. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring personalizes risk prediction through direct visualization of calcified coronary atherosclerotic plaques and provides improved accuracy for coronary heart disease (CHD) or CVD risk estimation. In this review, we discuss the most recent studies on CAC, which unlike historical studies, focus sharply on clinical application. We describe the MESA CHD risk calculator, a recently developed CAC-based 10-year CHD risk estimator, which can help guide preventive therapy allocation by better identifying both high- and low-risk individuals. In closing, we discuss calcium density, regional distribution of CAC, and extra-coronary calcification, which represent the future of CAC and CVD risk assessment research and may lead to further improvements in risk prediction.

  19. [Induction of myocardial neoangiogenesis by human growth factors. A new therapeutic approach in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Stegmann, T J; Hoppert, T; Schneider, A; Gemeinhardt, S; Köcher, M; Ibing, R; Strupp, G

    2000-09-01

    Currently available approaches for treating human coronary heart disease aim to relieve symptoms and the risk of myocardial infarction either by reducing myocardial oxygen demand, preventing further disease progression, restoring coronary blood flow pharmacologically or mechanically, or bypassing the stenotic lesions and obstructed coronary artery segments. Gene therapy, especially using angiogenic growth factors, has emerged recently as a potential new treatment for cardiovascular disease. Following extensive experimental research on angiogenic growth factors, the first clinical studies on patients with coronary heart disease and peripheral vascular lesions have been performed. The polypeptides fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) appear to be particularly effective in initiating neovascularization (neoangiogenesis) in hypoxic or ischemic tissues. The first clinical study on patients with coronary heart disease treated by local intramyocardial injection of FGF-1 showed a 3-fold increase of capillary density mediated by the growth factor. Also, angiogenic growth factor injection intramyocardially as sole therapy for end-stage coronary disease showed an improvement of myocardial perfusion in the target areas as well as a reduction of symptoms and an increase in working capacity. Angiogenic therapy of the human myocardium introduces a new modality of treatment for coronary heart disease in terms of regulation of blood vessel growth. Beyond drug therapy, angioplasty and bypass surgery, this new approach may evolve into a fourth principle of treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:11076317

  20. Trends in Coronary Heart Disease Epidemiology in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajeev; Mohan, Indu; Narula, Jagat

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary heart disease (CHD), are epidemic in India. The Registrar General of India reported that CHD led to 17% of total deaths and 26% of adult deaths in 2001-2003, which increased to 23% of total and 32% of adult deaths in 2010-2013. The World Health Organization (WHO) and Global Burden of Disease Study also have highlighted increasing trends in years of life lost (YLLs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from CHD in India. In India, studies have reported increasing CHD prevalence over the last 60 years, from 1% to 9%-10% in urban populations and <1% to 4%-6% in rural populations. Using more stringent criteria (clinical ± Q waves), the prevalence varies from 1%-2% in rural populations and 2%-4% in urban populations. This may be a more realistic prevalence of CHD in India. Case-control studies have reported that important risk factors for CHD in India are dyslipidemias, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, abdominal obesity, psychosocial stress, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Suitable preventive strategies are required to combat this epidemic. PMID:27372534

  1. [Is hypertriglyceridaemia a risk factor for coronary heart disease?].

    PubMed

    Reiner, Zeljko; Muacević-Katanec, Diana; Katanec, Davor; Tedeschi-Reiner, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Although it is still not clear whether elevated serum triglycerides are directly atherogenic or not, the results of many studies indicate that they are undoubtedly an important risk factor/biomarker for coronary heart disease (CHD). Therefore, targeting hypertriglyceridaemia should be beneficial for subjects at high risk for CHD. Elevated triglycerides are often accompanied with low HDL cholesterol, particularly in high risk patients with diabetes type 2 and/or metabolic syndrome. Such a disturbance is called atherogenic dyslipidaemia and has an increasing prevalence. The treatment of hypertriglyceridaemia has to be focused primarily on intensive lifestyle changes (weight reduction in obesity, reduction of alcohol consumption as well as reduction of added sugars, fructose and trans-fatty acids, regular aerobic physical activity) by which reduction of up to 50% in triglycerides can be achieved. Subjects with high CHD risk who cannot lower hypertriglyceridaemia by lifestyle measures should be treated with pharmacological therapy. The available medications include fibrates, niacin and prescription omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. If LDL cholesterol is elevated too, combination therapy is needed. Based upon recent studies in such patients a combination of a statin with fenofibrate and/or omega-3 fatty acids can be recommended.

  2. Depression risk in patients with coronary heart disease in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Marcel; Jacob, Louis; Rapp, Michael A; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of depression and its risk factors among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) treated in German primary care practices. METHODS Longitudinal data from nationwide general practices in Germany (n = 1072) were analyzed. Individuals initially diagnosed with CHD (2009-2013) were identified, and 59992 patients were included and matched (1:1) to 59992 controls. The primary outcome measure was an initial diagnosis of depression within five years after the index date among patients with and without CHD. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for confounders. RESULTS Mean age was equal to 68.0 years (SD = 11.3). A total of 55.9% of patients were men. After a five-year follow-up, 21.8% of the CHD group and 14.2% of the control group were diagnosed with depression (P < 0.001). In the multivariate regression model, CHD was a strong risk factor for developing depression (HR = 1.54, 95%CI: 1.49-1.59, P < 0.001). Prior depressive episodes, dementia, and eight other chronic conditions were associated with a higher risk of developing depression. Interestingly, older patients and women were also more likely to be diagnosed with depression compared with younger patients and men, respectively. CONCLUSION The risk of depression is significantly increased among patients with CHD compared with patients without CHD treated in primary care practices in Germany. CHD patients should be routinely screened for depression to ensure improved treatment and management. PMID:27721937

  3. Epidemiological basis for the prevention of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Marmot, M. G.

    1979-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have laid the basis for a preventive approach to coronary heart disease (CHD). On balance, present evidence indicates that the following should form the basis of a preventive programme: low-fat diet, cessation of smoking, and control of blood pressure. Other factors likely to produce a beneficial effect on CHD occurrence include reduction of obesity and increased physical activity. Although psychosocial factors are most likely to be causally related to CHD, it is not possible at present to provide clear guidelines as to their role in a preventive programme. Trials are being conducted to investigate the possibility of preventing CHD by a variety of approaches: a doctor-centred approach or health education in certain sectors of a community or in whole communities. These trials have shown that it is possible to achieve behavioural changes and a reduction in the levels of risk factors in a proportion of the participants. It is not yet clear to what extent these changes in levels of risk factors in middle-aged people will lead to a reduction in the incidence of CHD. It can be calculated, however, that the greatest benefit is likely to come from approaches to prevention that involve the whole community, rather than only high-risk groups. PMID:314348

  4. Coronary heart disease in Indians: implications of the INTERHEART study.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Vamadevan S; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2010-11-01

    Coronary heart diseases (CHD) have reached epidemic proportions among Indians. The recently concluded INTERHEART study emphasizes the role of behavioural and conventional risk factors in the prediction of CHD risk among Indians. These findings have implication for the health care providers and policy makers in the country due to the fact that all these conventional risk factors are potentially modifiable and are good starting points for prevention. The policy measures by means of legislation and regulatory approaches on agriculture and food industry or tobacco or physical activity will have large impact on CHD risk factor reduction in the population. In addition, the health system needs to focus on: (i) providing information for increasing awareness and an enabling environment for adoption of healthy living habits by the community; (ii) early detection of persons with risk factors and cost-effective interventions for reducing risk; and (iii) early detection of persons with clinical disease and cost-effective secondary prevention measures to prevent complications. The evidence from INTERHEART provides rationale for developing treatment algorithms and treatment guidelines for CHD at various levels of health care. In addition, INTERHEART provides answer for the quest for a single reliable biomarker, Apo B/ApoA 1 ratio that can predict the future CHD risk among individuals. Further to this, the INTERHEART study also opens up several unanswered questions on the pathobiology of the premature onset of myocardial infarction among Indians and calls for the need to developing capacity in clinical research in CHD in India.

  5. The potential protective effects of taurine on coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Oktawia P; Koenig, Karen L; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2010-01-01

    In humans, taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is mainly obtained from diet. Despite the fact that the health effects of taurine are largely unknown, taurine has become a popular supplement and ingredient in energy drinks in recent years. Evidence from mechanistic and animal studies has shown that the main biological actions of taurine include its ability to conjugate bile acids, regulate blood pressure (BP), and act as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. These actions suggest that high levels of taurine may be protective against coronary heart disease (CHD). However, data from epidemiologic and intervention studies in humans are limited. We review what is known about taurine's metabolism, its transportation in the body, its food sources, and evidence of its effect on cardiovascular health from in vitro, animal, and epidemiologic studies. We also discuss shortcomings of the human studies that need to be addressed in the future. The identification of taurine as a preventive factor for CHD may be of great public health importance. PMID:19592001

  6. Social and contextual etiology of coronary heart disease in women.

    PubMed

    Fleury, J; Keller, C; Murdaugh, C

    2000-11-01

    We explored the social and contextual etiology of coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention and management in women. Social and contextual influences on CHD risk include such factors as socioeconomic status, access to healthcare, cultural mores, working conditions including work overload, multiple role responsibilities, and social isolation. Women, particularly economically disadvantaged women, occupy lower levels on the social status hierarchy and, therefore, experience more stressful life experiences, less favorable living conditions, and less opportunity to affect positive health behavior and outcomes. Women are often discriminated against economically, politically, and socially, and this discrimination may adversely affect their efforts at CHD health promotion and treatment. Multiple role responsibilities within the family and psychosocial factors, including chronic life stress, are critical to an understanding of the health status of women, particularly poor and minority women. Although community-based interventions appear to be ideal for addressing the contextual risks related to CHD in women, a number of issues need to be considered, for example, the limited acknowledgment of secular trends in economic development that influence lifestyle decisions and health promotion efforts. Directions for research and interventions include recognition of the full spectrum of CHD risk in women, recognition of culturally competent interventions, and recognition of the need for empowerment of women.

  7. Arterial and venous coronary pressure-flow relations in anesthetized dogs. Evidence for a vascular waterfall in epicardial coronary veins.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, P N; Baer, R W; Vlahakes, G J; Hanley, F L; Messina, L M; Hoffman, J I

    1984-08-01

    The coronary circulation of anesthetized dogs was tested for the presence of vascular waterfalls by manipulating coronary arterial and coronary venous pressures. The left main coronary artery and the coronary sinus were cannulated, and relationships between coronary artery pressure, coronary sinus pressure, and coronary flow were studied. Experiments were conducted during diastolic arrests, under steady state conditions, in the absence of autoregulation. Relations of coronary flow to coronary sinus pressure at constant coronary artery pressure were consistent with the presence of a vascular waterfall in the coronary sinus. When the great cardiac vein was cannulated, relations of great vein flow to great vein pressure at constant coronary artery pressure were consistent with the presence of a vascular waterfall in the great vein, indicating that waterfall behavior can occur in epicardial veins other than the coronary sinus. In dogs on right heart bypass, with the coronary sinus and great vein uncannulated, the relationship between right atrial pressure and coronary sinus pressure showed a waterfall pattern, indicating that the waterfall is not an artifact of venous cannulation. In the right heart bypass experiments, venous waterfall behavior was seen in beating hearts as well as during diastolic arrests. We conclude that a vascular waterfall is present in epicardial coronary veins which can significantly influence coronary blood flow. PMID:6611215

  8. Arterial and venous coronary pressure-flow relations in anesthetized dogs. Evidence for a vascular waterfall in epicardial coronary veins.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, P N; Baer, R W; Vlahakes, G J; Hanley, F L; Messina, L M; Hoffman, J I

    1984-08-01

    The coronary circulation of anesthetized dogs was tested for the presence of vascular waterfalls by manipulating coronary arterial and coronary venous pressures. The left main coronary artery and the coronary sinus were cannulated, and relationships between coronary artery pressure, coronary sinus pressure, and coronary flow were studied. Experiments were conducted during diastolic arrests, under steady state conditions, in the absence of autoregulation. Relations of coronary flow to coronary sinus pressure at constant coronary artery pressure were consistent with the presence of a vascular waterfall in the coronary sinus. When the great cardiac vein was cannulated, relations of great vein flow to great vein pressure at constant coronary artery pressure were consistent with the presence of a vascular waterfall in the great vein, indicating that waterfall behavior can occur in epicardial veins other than the coronary sinus. In dogs on right heart bypass, with the coronary sinus and great vein uncannulated, the relationship between right atrial pressure and coronary sinus pressure showed a waterfall pattern, indicating that the waterfall is not an artifact of venous cannulation. In the right heart bypass experiments, venous waterfall behavior was seen in beating hearts as well as during diastolic arrests. We conclude that a vascular waterfall is present in epicardial coronary veins which can significantly influence coronary blood flow.

  9. Coronary arterial anatomy in bicuspid aortic valve. Necropsy study of 100 hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Lerer, P K; Edwards, W D

    1981-01-01

    In a necropsy study, the conjoined cusps of 50 congenitally and 50 acquired bicuspid aortic valves most commonly involved the right and left aortic cusps. In hearts with congenitally bicuspid aortic valves, the left coronary ostium arose at or above the aortic sinotubular junction in 44 per cent, whereas the incidence for the left coronary ostium in the acquired group was 20 per cent and that for the right coronary ostium in both groups was less than 20 per cent. In hearts with congenitally bicuspid aortic valves, the incidence of left coronary dominance (26%) was higher than in normal hearts. In hearts with apparently acquired bicuspid aortic valves, this incidence was also higher than normal, possibly because of acquired fusion of atypical congenitally bicuspid valves in some cases. In both types of aortic valve disease, the length of the left main coronary artery was similar; this length, however, was significantly shorter in hearts with left coronary dominance than in those with right or shared dominance. PMID:7459173

  10. Incidence of coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, G W; Thomas, R D; Grimmer, S F; Silverton, P N; Smith, D R

    1980-01-01

    The case notes, cardiac catheterisation data, and coronary arteriograms of 239 patients investigated for valvular heart disease during a five year period were reviewed. Angina present in 13 of 95 patients with isolated mitral valve disease, 43 of 90 patients with isolated aortic valve disease, and 18 of 54 patients with combined mitral and aortic valve disease. Significant coronary artery disease was present in 85 per cent of patients with mitral valve disease and angina, but in only 33 per cent of patients with aortic valve disease and angina. Patients with no chest pain still had a high incidence of coronary artery disease, significant coronary obstruction being present in 22 per cent with mitral valve disease, 22 per cent with aortic valve disease, and 11 per cent with combine mitral and aortic valve disease. Several possible clinical markers of coronary artery disease were examined but none was found to be of practical help. There was, however, a significant inverse relation between severity of coronary artery disease and severity of valve disease in patients with aortic valve disease. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease is not uncommon in patients with valvular heart disease and if it is policy to perform coronary artery bypass grafting in such patients, routine coronary arteriography must be part of the preoperative investigation. PMID:7459146

  11. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    The number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be

  12. Whole Heart Coronary Imaging with Flexible Acquisition Window and Trigger Delay

    PubMed Central

    Kawaji, Keigo; Foppa, Murilo; Roujol, Sébastien; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires a correctly timed trigger delay derived from a scout cine scan to synchronize k-space acquisition with the quiescent period of the cardiac cycle. However, heart rate changes between breath-held cine and free-breathing coronary imaging may result in inaccurate timing errors. Additionally, the determined trigger delay may not reflect the period of minimal motion for both left and right coronary arteries or different segments. In this work, we present a whole-heart coronary imaging approach that allows flexible selection of the trigger delay timings by performing k-space sampling over an enlarged acquisition window. Our approach addresses coronary motion in an interactive manner by allowing the operator to determine the temporal window with minimal cardiac motion for each artery region. An electrocardiogram-gated, k-space segmented 3D radial stack-of-stars sequence that employs a custom rotation angle is developed. An interactive reconstruction and visualization platform is then employed to determine the subset of the enlarged acquisition window for minimal coronary motion. Coronary MRI was acquired on eight healthy subjects (5 male, mean age = 37 ± 18 years), where an enlarged acquisition window of 166–220 ms was set 50 ms prior to the scout-derived trigger delay. Coronary visualization and sharpness scores were compared between the standard 120 ms window set at the trigger delay, and those reconstructed using a manually adjusted window. The proposed method using manual adjustment was able to recover delineation of five mid and distal right coronary artery regions that were otherwise not visible from the standard window, and the sharpness scores improved in all coronary regions using the proposed method. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a whole-heart coronary imaging approach that allows interactive selection of any subset of the enlarged acquisition window for a tailored reconstruction for each branch

  13. Self-management of coronary heart disease in older patients after elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dawkes, Susan; Smith, Graeme D; Elliott, Lawrie; Raeside, Robert; Donaldson, Jayne H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore how older patients self-manage their coronary heart disease (CHD) after undergoing elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Methods This mixed methods study used a sequential, explanatory design and recruited a convenience sample of patients (n = 93) approximately three months after elective PTCA. The study was conducted in two phases. Quantitative data collected in Phase 1 by means of a self-administered survey were subject to univariate and bivariate analysis. Phase 1 findings informed the purposive sampling for Phase 2 where ten participants were selected from the original sample for an in-depth interview. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. This paper will primarily report the findings from a sub-group of older participants (n = 47) classified as 65 years of age or older. Results 78.7% (n = 37) of participants indicated that they would manage recurring angina symptoms by taking glyceryl trinitrate and 34% (n = 16) thought that resting would help. Regardless of the duration or severity of the symptoms 40.5% (n = 19) would call their general practitioner or an emergency ambulance for assistance during any recurrence of angina symptoms. Older participants weighed less (P = 0.02) and smoked less (P = 0.01) than their younger counterparts in the study. Age did not seem to affect PTCA patients' likelihood of altering dietary factors such as fruit, vegetable and saturated fat consumption (P = 0.237). Conclusions The findings suggest that older people in the study were less likely to know how to correctly manage any recurring angina symptoms than their younger counterparts but they had fewer risk factors for CHD. Age was not a factor that influenced participants' likelihood to alter lifestyle factors. PMID:27594866

  14. Transmural distribution and connectivity of coronary collaterals within the human heart.

    PubMed

    van Lier, Monique G J T B; Oost, Elco; Spaan, Jos A E; van Horssen, Pepijn; van der Wal, Allard C; vanBavel, Ed; Siebes, Maria; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of collateral vessels in human hearts, a detailed analysis of their distribution within the coronary vasculature based on three-dimensional vascular reconstructions is lacking. This study aimed to classify the transmural distribution and connectivity of coronary collaterals in human hearts. One normotrophic human heart and one hypertrophied human heart with fibrosis in the inferior wall from a previous infarction were obtained. After filling the coronary arteries with fluorescent replica material, hearts were frozen and alternately cut and block-face imaged using an imaging cryomicrotome. Transmural distribution, connectivity, and diameter of collaterals were determined. Numerous collateral vessels were found (normotrophic heart: 12.3 collaterals/cm(3); hypertrophied heart: 3.7 collaterals/cm(3)), with 97% and 92%, respectively, of the collaterals located within the perfusion territories (intracoronary collaterals). In the normotrophic heart, intracoronary collaterals {median diameter [interquartile range (IQR)]: 91.4 [73.0-115.7] μm} were most prevalent (74%) within the left anterior descending (LAD) territory. Intercoronary collaterals [median diameter (IQR): 94.3 (79.9-107.4) μm] were almost exclusively (99%) found between the LAD and the left circumflex artery (LCX). In the hypertrophied heart, intracoronary collaterals [median diameter (IQR): 101.1 (84.8-126.0) μm] were located within both the LAD (48%) and LCX (46%) territory. Intercoronary collaterals [median diameter (IQR): 97.8 (89.3-111.2) μm] were most prevalent between the LAD-LCX (68%) and LAD-right coronary artery (28%). This study shows that human hearts have abundant coronary collaterals within all flow territories and layers of the heart. The majority of these collaterals are small intracoronary collaterals, which would have remained undetected by clinical imaging techniques.

  15. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  16. A Group Therapy Approach to the Treatment of Coronary Heart Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Grace S.

    This study investigates the coronary heart patient's "here and now" feelings and attitudes toward his illness prior to and following group treatment. This study also attempts to investigate the change in a patient's acceptance of his heart condition. To measure the change in general health level, a questionnaire was administered to eight patients…

  17. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J.

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  18. Recent trends in coronary heart disease epidemiology in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajeev

    2008-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is epidemic in India and one of the major causes of disease-burden and deaths. Mortality data from the Registrar General of India shows that cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of death in India now. Studies to determine the precise causes of death in urban Chennai and rural areas of Andhra Pradesh have revealed that cardiovascular diseases cause about 40% of the deaths in urban areas and 30% in rural areas. Analysis of cross-sectional CHD epidemiological studies performed over the past 50 years reveals that this condition is increasing in both urban and rural areas. The adult prevalence has increased in urban areas from about 2% in 1960 to 6.5% in 1970, 7.0% in 1980, 9.7% in 1990 and 10.5% in 2000; while in rural areas, it increased from 2% in 1970, to 2.5% in 1980, 4% in 1990, and 4.5% in 2000. In terms of absolute numbers this translates into 30 million CHD patients in the country. The disease occurs at a much younger age in Indians as compared to those in North America and Western Europe. Rural-urban differences reveal that risk factors like obesity, truncal obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol and diabetes are more in urban areas. Case-control studies also confirm the importance of these risk factors. The INTERHEART-South Asia study identified that eight established coronary risk factors--abnormal lipids, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, abdominal obesity, psychosocial factors, low fruit and vegetable consumption, and lack of physical activity--accounted for 89% of the cases of acute myocardial infarction in Indians. There is epidemiological evidence that all these risk factors are increasing. Over the past fifty years prevalence of obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes have increased significantly in urban (R2 0.45-0.74) and slowly in rural areas (R2 0.19-0.29). There is an urgent need for development and implementation of suitable primordial, primary, and secondary prevention

  19. Dual Prosthetic Heart Valve Presented with Chest Pain: A Case Report of Coronary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Siwamogsatham, Sarawut

    2015-01-01

    Coronary embolism from a prosthetic heart valve is a rare but remarkable cause of acute coronary syndrome. There is no definite management of an entity like this. Here we report a case of 54-year-old male with a history of rheumatic heart disease with dual prosthetic heart valve and atrial fibrillation who developed chest pain from acute myocardial infarction. The laboratory values showed inadequate anticoagulation. Cardiac catheterization and thrombectomy with the aspiration catheter were chosen to be the treatment for this patient, and it showed satisfactory outcome. PMID:25785203

  20. Sleep and wake phase of heart beat dynamics by artificial insymmetrised patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowska, A.; Makowiec, D.

    2004-05-01

    In order to determine differences between healthy patients and patients with congestive heart failure we apply the artificial insymmetrised pattern (AIP) method. The AIP method by exploring a human eye ability to extract regularities and read symmetries in a dot pattern, serves a tool for qualitative discrimination of heart rate states.

  1. "And the Beat Goes Ona... Building Artificial Hearts in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, David L.

    2000-01-01

    Among the many ideas and theories in anatomy and physiology, one particular topic provides all the potential benefits of learning about the human body: the circulatory system, specifically the heart. Describes a distinctive way to study circulation and the heart that allows students to explore the basic principles of vertebrate anatomy and…

  2. Preservation of non-heart-beating donor livers in extracorporeal liver perfusion and histidine-trytophan-ketoglutarate solution

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jin; Lao, Xue-Jun; Wang, Xi-Mo; Long, Gang; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Shi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the preservation of non-heart-beating donor (NHBD) livers in cold histidine-trytophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution and extracorporeal liver perfusion (ECLP). METHODS: Livers harvested from health pigs were stored for 10 h in cold HTK solution (group A, n = 4) or perfused with oxygenated autologous blood at body temperature (group B, n = 4). Both groups were then tested on the circuit for 4 h. Bile production, hemodynamic parameters, hepatocyte markers and reperfusion injury of extracorporeal livers were tested in each group. Liver tissues from each group were examined at the end of reperfusion. RESULTS: At 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after reperfusion, bile production, hemodynamic parameters, hepatocyte markers and reperfusion injury of livers in group A were statistically different from those in group B (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: ECLP is better than HTK solution to preserve NHBD livers. ECLP can assess the graft viability before liver transplantation. PMID:18416459

  3. Kyoto islet isolation method: the optimized one for non-heart-beating donors with highly efficient islet retrieval.

    PubMed

    Okitsu, T; Matsumoto, S; Iwanaga, Y; Noguchi, H; Nagata, H; Yonekawa, Y; Maekawa, T; Tanaka, K

    2005-10-01

    The availability of pancreata for clinical cadaveric islet transplantation is restricted to non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs) in Japan. This forced us to modify the current standard islet isolation protocol that was made up for brain-dead donors and make it suitable for NHBDs. The Kyoto islet isolation method is the one with induction of several steps based on the ideas both already reported literally and invented originally by ourselves. Using this islet isolation method, we isolated islets from 13 human pancreata of NHBDs and transplanted 11 preparations to six type-1 diabetic patients. The rate to meet release criteria of Edmonton protocol was 84.6%. Establishment of this method allowed us to begin a clinical islet transplantation program in Japan and to continue to perform the preparation of islets from NHBDs with high rate to meet the release criteria of the Edmonton protocol.

  4. Preoperative prediction of significant coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdale, D R; Faragher, E B; Bennett, D H; Bray, C L; Ward, C; Beton, D C

    1982-01-01

    A prognostic index for predicting significant coronary artery disease was established using multiple logistic regression analysis of clinical data from 643 patients with valvular heart disease who had undergone routine coronary arteriography before valve replacement. The index or equation obtained incorporated the presence of angina, a family history of ischaemic heart disease, age, cigarette smoking habits, mitral valve disease, sex, and electrocardiographic evidence of myocardial infarction. The equation was validated using prospective data from 387 patients with valvular disease and shown to enable almost a third of routine coronary arteriograms to be omitted while maintaining 95% sensitivity for patients with coronary artery disease. Similar analysis of the more detailed prospective data produced a second discriminant function incorporating diastolic blood pressure, total cigarettes smoked in life, the severity of angina, family history of ischaemic heart disease, age, current cigarette smoking habits, and the ratio of total to high density lipoprotein cholesterol. This method improved the discrimination between patients with and without coronary artery disease, allowing omission of 30% of routine coronary arteriograms with 100% sensitivity for patients with coronary disease and omission of 41% with a 96% sensitivity level. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:6799111

  5. Coronary wall MR imaging in patients with rapid heart rates: a feasibility study of black-blood steady-state free precession (SSFP).

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai; Bi, Xiaoming; Taimen, Kirsi; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Lu, Biao; Carr, James; Li, Debiao

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the hypothesis that black-blood steady-state free precession (SSFP) would provide coronary wall images comparable to images from TSE and have better performance than TSE under conditions of fast heart rate. With IRB approval, thirty participants without a history of coronary artery disease (19 men, 11 women, 26-83 y/o) were scanned with a 1.5 T MR scanner. Cross-sectional black-blood images of the proximal portions of coronary arteries were acquired with a two-dimensional (2D), double inversion recovery (DIR) prepared TSE sequence and a 2D DIR SSFP sequence on the same planes. Image quality (ranked with a 4-point system, scored from 0 to 3), vessel wall area and thickness, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the wall and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, wall to lumen) were compared between SSFP and TSE with SPSS software (v 13.0). Totally 28 scans were completed. For SSFP and TSE, there was no difference in image quality. SSFP had a higher SNR (23.7 ± 10.1 vs. 14.4 ± 5.2, P < 0.001) and wall-lumen CNR (8.8 ± 4.5 vs. 6.7 ± 3.2, P = 0.001). Good agreements between measured wall area (r = 0.701, P < 0.001) and thickness (r = 0.560, P < 0.001) were found. For 10 participants with heart rate more than 80 beats/min, the image quality of SSFP was higher than TSE (P = 0.016). SSFP provided image quality and measurement accuracy that was comparable to TSE. With its higher performance under fast heart rate conditions, SSFP may break through the existing thresholds for heart rate and extend clinical applicability of coronary wall MR imaging to a larger population.

  6. From Cardiac Tissue Engineering to Heart-on-a-Chip: Beating Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Aleman, Julio; Arneri, Andrea; Bersini, Simone; Piraino, Francesco; Shin, Su Ryon; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The heart is one of the most vital organs in the human body, which actively pumps the blood through the vascular network to supply nutrients to as well as to extract wastes from all other organs, maintaining the homeostasis of the biological system. Over the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been exerted in engineering functional cardiac tissues for heart regeneration via biomimetic approaches. More recently, progresses have been achieved towards the transformation of knowledge obtained from cardiac tissue engineering to building physiologically relevant microfluidic human heart models (i.e. heart-on-chips) for applications in drug discovery. The advancement in the stem cell technologies further provides the opportunity to create personalized in vitro models from cells derived from patients. Here starting from the heart biology, we review recent advances in engineering cardiac tissues and heart-on-a-chip platforms for their use in heart regeneration and cardiotoxic/cardiotherapeutic drug screening, and then briefly conclude with characterization techniques and personalization potential of the cardiac models. PMID:26065674

  7. From cardiac tissue engineering to heart-on-a-chip: beating challenges.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Aleman, Julio; Arneri, Andrea; Bersini, Simone; Piraino, Francesco; Shin, Su Ryon; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The heart is one of the most vital organs in the human body, which actively pumps the blood through the vascular network to supply nutrients to as well as to extract wastes from all other organs, maintaining the homeostasis of the biological system. Over the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been exerted in engineering functional cardiac tissues for heart regeneration via biomimetic approaches. More recently, progress has been made toward the transformation of knowledge obtained from cardiac tissue engineering to building physiologically relevant microfluidic human heart models (i.e. heart-on-chips) for applications in drug discovery. The advancement in stem cell technologies further provides the opportunity to create personalized in vitro models from cells derived from patients. Here, starting from heart biology, we review recent advances in engineering cardiac tissues and heart-on-a-chip platforms for their use in heart regeneration and cardiotoxic/cardiotherapeutic drug screening, and then briefly conclude with characterization techniques and personalization potential of the cardiac models.

  8. Effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolong; Lu, Yan; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our objective is to explore the effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. Methods: 45 healthy male Wistar rats of clean grade were selected and divided into treatment group, model control group and blank control group. The rats in the treatment group and model control group received high-fat diet for 12 weeks and intraperitoneal injection of VD3 to establish rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. After modeling, the rats in the treatment group received gavage of 100 mg/(kg·d) curcimin, and the rats in the model control group and blank control group received gavage of 5 ml/(kg·d) distilled water, the intervention time was 4 weeks. After intervention, the rats were killed, and the hearts were dissected to obtain the samples of coronary artery. After embedding and frozen section, immunofluorescence method was used to detect the change of endarterium permeability in 3 groups, Western blot was used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and CD40L in coronary artery tissue, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and C reaction protein (CRP). Results: After modeling, compared with the blank control group, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterin (LDL-c) in the treatment group and model control group were significantly higher (P<0.05), however, high density lipoprotein cholesterin (HDL-c) was significantly lower. The pathological sections showed that there was lipidosis in rat coronary artery in treatment group and model control group, indicating that the modeling was successful. Immunofluorescence showed that there was only a little fluorochrome permeability in artery in blank control group, there was some fluorochrome permeability in artery in the treatment group and there was a lot of fluorochrome permeability in artery in the model

  9. Genetic Loci Influencing C-reactive Protein Levels and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul; Chambers, John C.; Zhang, Weihua; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Peden, John F.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Braund, Peter; Engert, James C.; Bennett, Derrick; Coin, Lachlan; Ashby, Deborah; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Brown, Ian J.; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; McCarthy, Mark I.; Peltonen, Leena; Freimer, Nelson B.; Farrall, Martin; Ruokonen, Aimo; Hamsten, Anders; Lim, Noha; Froguel, Philippe; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Scott, James; Hall, Alistair S.; Schunkert, Heribert; Anand, Sonia S.; Collins, Rory; Samani, Nilesh J.; Watkins, Hugh; Kooner, Jaspal S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are independently associated with risk of coronary heart disease, but whether CRP is causally associated with coronary heart disease or merely a marker of underlying atherosclerosis is uncertain. Objective: To investigate association of genetic loci with CRP levels and risk of coronary heart disease. Design, setting and participants: We first carried out a genome-wide association (n=17,967) and replication study (n=14,747) to identify genetic loci associated with plasma CRP concentrations. Data collection took place between 1989 and 2008 and genotyping between 2003 and 2008. We carried out a Mendelian randomisation study of the most closely associated SNP in the CRP locus and published data on other CRP variants involving a total of 28,112 cases and 100,823 controls, to investigate the association of CRP variants with coronary heart disease. We compared our finding with that predicted from meta-analysis of observational studies of CRP levels and risk of coronary heart disease. For the other loci associated with CRP levels, we selected the most closely associated SNP for testing against coronary heart disease among 14,365 cases and 32,069 controls. Main outcome measure: Risk of coronary heart disease. Results: Polymorphisms in five genetic loci were strongly associated with CRP levels (% difference per minor allele): SNP rs6700896 in LEPR (−14.7% [95% Confidence Interval {CI}], −17.5 – −11.9, P=1.6×10−21), rs4537545 in IL6R (−10.8% [95% CI, −13.8 – −7.7], P=5.1×10−11), rs7553007 in CRP locus (−20.7% [95% CI, −23.5 – −17.9], P=3.3×10−38), rs1183910 in HNF1A (−13.6% [95% CI, −16.4 – −10.6], P=1.2×10−17) and rs4420638 in APOE-CI-CII (−21.8% [95% CI, −25.4 – −18.1], P=2.1×10−25). Association of SNP rs7553007 in the CRP locus with coronary heart disease gave odds ratio (OR) 0.98 (95% CI, 0.94 – 1.01) per 20% lower CRP. Our Mendelian randomisation study of variants

  10. Role of Adiponectin in Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Debbie A.; de Oliveira, Cesar; White, Jon; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Barros, Aluísio J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Hypoadiponectinemia correlates with several coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. However, it is unknown whether adiponectin is causally implicated in CHD pathogenesis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the causal effect of adiponectin on CHD risk. Methods and Results: We undertook a Mendelian randomization study using data from genome-wide association studies consortia. We used the ADIPOGen consortium to identify genetic variants that could be used as instrumental variables for the effect of adiponectin. Data on the association of these genetic variants with CHD risk were obtained from CARDIoGRAM (22 233 CHD cases and 64 762 controls of European ancestry) and from CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Metabochip (63 746 cases and 130 681 controls; ≈ 91% of European ancestry) consortia. Data on the association of genetic variants with adiponectin levels and with CHD were combined to estimate the influence of blood adiponectin on CHD risk. In the conservative approach (restricted to using variants within the adiponectin gene as instrumental variables), each 1 U increase in log blood adiponectin concentration was associated with an odds ratio for CHD of 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.68–1.01) in CARDIoGRAM and 0.97 (95% confidence interval, 0.84–1.12) in CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Metabochip. Findings from the liberal approach (including variants in any locus across the genome) indicated a protective effect of adiponectin that was attenuated to the null after adjustment for known CHD predictors. Conclusions: Overall, our findings do not support a causal role of adiponectin levels in CHD pathogenesis. PMID:27252388

  11. Obesity and hypertension, heart failure, and coronary heart disease-risk factor, paradox, and recommendations for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Artham, Surya M; Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2009-01-01

    Obesity prevalence has reached epidemic proportions and is independently associated with numerous cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cancers, sleep apnea, and other major CVDs. Obesity has significant negative impact on CVD, including hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, and arrhythmias via its maladaptive effects on individual CVD risk factors and cardiac structure and function. Despite this negative association between obesity and the incidence and prevalence of CVD, many studies have demonstrated that obese patients with established CVD might have better short- and long-term prognosis, suggesting an "obesity paradox." This intriguing phenomenon has been well documented in populations with heart failure, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. This review summarizes the adverse effects of obesity on individual CVD risk factors; its role in the genesis of CVDs, including heart failure, coronary heart disease, and hypertension; and the obesity paradox observed in these populations and the potential underlying mechanisms behind this puzzling phenomenon and concludes with a discussion on the potential benefits of weight reduction.

  12. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rehabilitation Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Surgery Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... include lifestyle changes, medicines, and a procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as coronary angioplasty. PCI is ...

  13. [Advance in diagnosis and treatment of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease with traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Rong; Wang, Jiel; Liu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, therapies and prescriptions of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease. According to the advance in modern diagnosis and treatment, the authors believed that psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease is closely related with mental stresses, like anxiety, depression and insomnia. It is mostly caused by emotional injury and expressed in heart, liver, spleen and kidney. The pathogenesis is heart-liver hyperactivity, yin deficiency in heart and kidney, and insufficiency in heart and spleen. The full recognition of etiology and pathogenesis of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease and the combined treatment of disease and syndromes are of great significance to reduce mental stress and other risk factors, prevent and treat coronary heart disease and improve prognosis.

  14. Influence of ectopic heart beats in gated ventricular blood-pool studies

    SciTech Connect

    Brash, H.M.; Wraith, P.K.; Hannan, W.J.; Dewhurst, N.G.; Muir, A.L.

    1980-04-01

    Direct data collection from ventricular blood-pool studies were stored in frame mode in a computer and by means of a modified tape recorder, the blood-pool image and ECG were recorded on tape. At the end of the study the tape data were replayed into the computer. The ECG signal was passed through a trigger circuit that detected the R wave which was sampled by the computer once every msec. Contractions outside of the desired range could be rejected along with the subsequent contraction. Of seven patients whose calculated ejection fractions were changed by more than 0.03, all had frequent (one in 20) ectopic contractions. The distorted ventricular volume curves were effectively restructured by the constraining procedure, changing the end-systolic volume and EF. Computer modeling showed a linear relationship between the percent of ectopic contractions and the underestimate of ejection fraction. One ectopic beat in ten led to a 5% underestimate of EF.

  15. The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Registry of Anomalous Aortic Origin of a Coronary Artery: an update.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Julie A; Gaynor, J William; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Poynter, Jeffrey A; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-12-01

    The anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery from the wrong sinus of Valsalva with an interarterial, intramural, and/or intraconal course is a relatively rare congenital defect of the heart that may be associated with an increased risk of ischaemia of the myocardium and sudden death, notably in children and young adults. Data are limited regarding stratification of risk and long-term outcomes of these patients. In 2009, the Anomalous Coronary Artery Working Group formed the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Registry of Anomalous Aortic Origin of a Coronary Artery to obtain information on large numbers of young patients with anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery with the goal to better understand the natural and surgical history of this anomaly as well as to develop evidence-based treatment and management guidelines. In this report, we describe the data we have collected from the registry and the current state of the registry.

  16. [DIAGNOSIS OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE CAUSED BY TORTUOSITY OF CORONARY ARTERIES].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, E O; Lazoryshynets, V V; Beshliaga, V M; Grusha, M M

    2015-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problems of diagnostics of coronary artery tortuosity phenomenon. Given the lack of literature about the role of phenomenon tortuosity of coronary arteries in the genesis of ischemic myocardial damage, the purpose of study was to determine the clinical relevance as well as necessity for prevention and treatment of this vascular anomaly. Therefore were analyzed medical history, laboratory and clinical database as well as data functional studies of the heart and cardiovascular system in 1404 patients which were divided into four groups on the results of coronary angiography. The results of the study indicate tortuosity of coronary arteries may be independent and additional burdening factor in the development of ischemic heart disease.

  17. Coronary arterial pattern in superoinferior ventricular heart. Implications on significance of morphogenesis of this anomaly.

    PubMed Central

    Schneeweiss, A; Shem-Tov, A; Neufeld, H N

    1981-01-01

    The coronary arterial pattern was studied in two patients with superoinferior ventricular heart and haemodynamically complete transposition. In one of them the aorta was dextro-positioned and in the other laevo-positioned. In both the right coronary artery arose from the posterior aortic sinus and the left coronary artery from the left aortic sinus. This pattern is similar to the common coronary arterial pattern in complete transposition of the great arteries. The similarity supports the theory that in the superoinferior ventricular heart the connections between the ventricles and the great arteries (concordant or discordant) area those of the basic condition--complete transposition or corrected transposition. The angiocardiographic findings indicate that relations are not always as expected for a given connection. Images PMID:7317222

  18. Association of serum SPARC level with severity of coronary artery lesion in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Song, Hai-Yan; An, Meng-Meng; Zhu, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association of serum SPARC level with the severity of coronary artery lesion in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: 120 patients with type 2 diabetic patients were the subjects. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect levels of serum SPARC and Gensini score was used to assess extent of coronary artery lesions. The patients were divided into 4 groups: A group was the healthy control group with 40 patients. According to angiography and the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria for diabetes the rest were divided into B, C, D group: there were 40 cases in group B (simple type 2 diabetes mellitus group), 40 cases were in group C (simple CHD group), and 40 cases were in D group (type 2 diabetes combined with coronary heart disease group). Results: Compared with that in group A, the serum SPARC level in group B, C and D increased significantly (4.22±1.19) μg/L, (3.71±1.05) μg/L and (5.96±1.40) μg/L vs (3.60±0.40) μg/L (P<0.05 ). Moreover, the serum SPARC level in group D was the highest (P<0.05). Serum SPARC level, insulin resistance (IR), and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were the vital factors contributing to coronary heart disease. Serum SPARC level was positively correlated with the Gensini scores in group D (r=0.770, P<0.05), whereas it was not related to the Gensini scores in group C (r=0.520, P>0.05). Pearson correlation analysis showed that serum SPARC level was positively correlated with triglyceride, fasting insulin, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance Index (r=0.780, 0.762 and 0.891, respectively; P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum SPARC level elevated in T2DM patients with coronary heart disease, which was correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease significantly. PMID:26770566

  19. Quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease after myocardial infarction and with ischemic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Bellwon, Jerzy; Höfer, Stefan; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Gruchała, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Quality of life measures are useful when interventions or treatments are indicated for several reasons such as improvement of physical functioning, pain relief, to estimate the effectiveness of therapies or to predict mortality. The aim of the current study was to describe quality of life in patients with stable coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and heart failure and to evaluate the relationship between depression and health-related quality of life. Material and methods Patients after STEMI, with stable coronary artery disease, and heart failure (n = 332) completed the MacNew Heart Disease Health-related Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results Patients with myocardial infarction had significantly higher scores than patients with stable coronary artery disease or heart failure on the MacNew global scale (p < 0.001) and the physical (p < 0.001), emotional (p < 0.001) and social (p < 0.001) subscales. The anxiety scores were significantly higher in the group of patients with stable coronary artery disease than in patients with myocardial infarction (p < 0.05). The depression scores were significantly higher in patients with heart failure (p < 0.01). Conclusions In patients with stable CAD, anxiety correlated mainly with symptoms, i.e. angina, than with the history of MI. Patients with symptoms of angina react to the illness with anxiety more than depression, whereas patients with heart failure with dyspnea react to the illness with depressive symptoms more than anxiety. In patients after MI and with stable CAD, cognitive-behavioral techniques could be useful to quickly reduce the level of anxiety, while patients with heart failure require long-term support therapy to reduce the risk of depressive symptoms. PMID:27186176

  20. The effects of hypothermia on myocardial oxygen consumption and transmural coronary blood flow in the potassium-arrested heart.

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, W R; Sink, J D; Hill, R C; Wechsler, A S; Sabiston, D C

    1979-01-01

    Hypothermia remains the primary adjunct employed to lower cellular metabolism during various cardiac procedures. In these experiments, left ventricular myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) and transmural blood flow (TBF) were measured during cardiopulmonary bypass with the range of temperatures used clinically. Determinations were made in empty beating normothermic hearts and after potassium cardioplegia at 37, 32, 28, 22, 18, and 15 degrees (K+ = 15--37 meq/L: Hct 25 volumes %). Oxygen content of the total coronary sinus collection was compared with a large volume arterial sample using a Lex-O2-Con-TL analyzer (vs Van Slyke, R = 0.98). Transmural blood flow was measured at each temperature using microspheres (8 microns), and perfusion was maintained at 80 mmHg. Asystole (37 degrees) alone decreased MVO2 from 5.18 +/- 0.55 to 1.85 +/- 0.20 ml O2/min/100 g of left ventricle or approximately 65% (p less than 0.001). With progressive cooling to 15 degrees an additional 82% decrement in oxygen uptake occurred during asystole (p less than 0.001). During asystole at 37 degrees the decrease in MVO2 was reflected mainly by a large decrement (p less than 0.01) in TBF (1.27 +/- 0.19 to 0.74 +/- 0.17 ml/min/g of mean left ventricular flow). However, with cooling below 32 degrees, the arteriovenous oxygen difference narrowed progressively (p less than 0.001) while TBF paradoxically returned to control levels. Endocardial/epicardial flow ratios were not altered by cooling. These data not only confirm earlier reports describing a sequential drop in MVO2 with incremental myocardial cooling, but also establish MVO2 levels for perfused hearts arrested by potassium at lower temperatures (18--15 degrees). Moreover, as transmural blood flow becomes independent of metabolic necessity during hypothermia, coronary autoregulation appears to be impaired, possibly affecting detrimental tissue over perfusion. PMID:464672

  1. [CONTRIBUTION OF CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION TO THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE BEFORE AGE 40].

    PubMed

    Meurice, C; Legrand, V; Piérard, L

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery disease is the most frequent heart disease in our population. Its pathogenesis is well known and the first manifestation of the disease can occur in young adults. The main cause is atherosclerosis. The prevention and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors are key elements. The clinician's diagnosis is crucial before coronary arteriography, since the rate of percutaneous procedures decreases with the gravity of the starting diagnosis.

  2. A Striking Coronary Artery Pattern in a Grown-Up Congenital Heart Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Iacovelli, Fortunato; Pepe, Martino; Contegiacomo, Gaetano; Alberotanza, Vito; Masi, Filippo; Bortone, Alessandro Santo; Favale, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a myocardial disorder probably due to the arrest of normal embryogenesis of the left ventricle. It could be isolated or associated with other extracardiac and cardiac abnormalities, including coronary artery anomalies. Despite the continuous improvement of imaging resolution quality, this cardiomyopathy still remains frequently misdiagnosed, especially if associated with other heart diseases. We report a case of LVNC association with both malposition of the great arteries and a very original coronary artery pattern. PMID:26881144

  3. A Striking Coronary Artery Pattern in a Grown-Up Congenital Heart Disease Patient.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Fortunato; Pepe, Martino; Contegiacomo, Gaetano; Alberotanza, Vito; Masi, Filippo; Bortone, Alessandro Santo; Favale, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a myocardial disorder probably due to the arrest of normal embryogenesis of the left ventricle. It could be isolated or associated with other extracardiac and cardiac abnormalities, including coronary artery anomalies. Despite the continuous improvement of imaging resolution quality, this cardiomyopathy still remains frequently misdiagnosed, especially if associated with other heart diseases. We report a case of LVNC association with both malposition of the great arteries and a very original coronary artery pattern. PMID:26881144

  4. Reconstitution of coronary vasculature by an active fraction of Geum japonicum in ischemic hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiaping; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Ming

    2014-02-01

    Chronic coronary heart disease (cCHD) is characterized by atherosclerosis, which progressively narrows the coronary artery lumen and impairs myocardial blood flow. Restoration of occluded coronary vessels with newly formed collaterals remains an ideal therapeutic approach due to the need for redirecting blood flow into the ischemic heart. In this study, we investigated the effect of an active fraction isolated from Geum joponicum (AFGJ) on angiogenesis in cCHD hearts. Our results demonstrated that AFGJ not only enhanced capillary tube formation of endothelial cells, but also promoted the growth of new coronary collaterals (at the diameter 0.021-0.21 mm) in the ischemic region of hearts in rat cCHD model. Our study also indicated that the growth of new collaterals in ischemic hearts resulted in improved functional recovery of the cCHD hearts as demonstrated by ECG and echocardiography analyses. These data suggest that AFGJ may provide a novel therapeutic method for effective treatment of cCHD.

  5. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease: a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    PubMed Central

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Gaunt, Tom R; Warren, Helen; Davies, Teri-Louise; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Day, Ian N; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Strachan, Mark W J; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Plagnol, Vincent; Whittaker, John C; Smith, George Davey; Dudbridge, Frank; Casas, Juan P; Holmes, Michael V; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease. We then used a conventional Mendelian randomisation approach to investigate the causal relevance using a genetic instrument based on 31 urate-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To account for potential pleiotropic associations of certain SNPs with risk factors other than urate, we additionally did both a multivariable Mendelian randomisation analysis, in which the genetic associations of SNPs with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were included as covariates, and an Egger Mendelian randomisation (MR-Egger) analysis to estimate a causal effect accounting for unmeasured pleiotropy. Findings In the meta-analysis of 17 prospective observational studies (166 486 individuals; 9784 coronary heart disease events) a 1 SD higher urate concentration was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for coronary heart disease of 1·07 (95% CI 1·04–1·10). The corresponding OR estimates from the conventional, multivariable adjusted, and Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis (58 studies; 198 598 individuals; 65 877 events) were 1·18 (95% CI 1·08–1·29), 1·10 (1·00–1·22), and 1·05 (0·92–1·20), respectively, per 1 SD increment in plasma urate. Interpretation Conventional and multivariate Mendelian randomisation analysis implicates a causal role for urate in the development of coronary heart disease, but these estimates might be inflated by hidden pleiotropy. Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis, which accounts for

  6. Motion compensation of optical mapping signals from isolated beating rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stender, B.; Ernst, F.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Z. X.; Schlaefer, A.

    2013-09-01

    Optical mapping is a well established technique for recording monophasic action potential traces on the epicardial surface of isolated hearts. This measuring technique offers a high spatial resolution but it is sensitive towards myocardial motion. Motion artifacts occur because the mapping between a certain tissue portion sending out fluorescent light and a pixel of the photo detector changes over time. So far this problem has been addressed by suppressing the motion or ratiometric imaging. We developed a different approach to compensate the motion artifacts based on image registration. We could demonstrate how an image deformation field temporally changing with the heart motion could be determined. Using these deformation field time series for image transformation motion signals could be generated for each image pixel which were then successfully applied to remove baseline shift and compensate motion artifacts potentially leading to errors within maps of the first arrival time. The investigation was based on five different rat hearts stained with Di-4-ANEPPS.

  7. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  8. Assessing the relationship between dental disease and coronary heart disease in elderly U.S. veterans.

    PubMed

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Dominguez, B L; Grossman, N

    1998-03-01

    Several recent studies have shown a link between dental disease and coronary heart disease. The authors studied 320 U.S. veterans in a convenience sample to assess the relationship between oral health and systemic diseases among older people. They present cross-sectional data confirming that a statistically significant association exists between a diagnosis of coronary heart disease and certain oral health parameters, such as the number of missing teeth, plaque benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide test scores, salivary levels of Streptococcus sanguis and complaints of xerostomia. The oral parameters in these subjects were independent of and more strongly associated with coronary heart disease than were recognized risk factors, such as serum cholesterol levels, body mass index, diabetes and smoking status. However, because of the convenience sample studied, these findings cannot be generalized to other populations. PMID:9529805

  9. The Decline and Rise of Coronary Heart Disease: Understanding Public Health Catastrophism

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Jeremy A.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of coronary heart disease mortality in the United States and Western Europe is one of the great accomplishments of modern public health and medicine. Cardiologists and cardiovascular epidemiologists have devoted significant effort to disease surveillance and epidemiological modeling to understand its causes. One unanticipated outcome of these efforts has been the detection of early warnings that the decline had slowed, plateaued, or even reversed. These subtle signs have been interpreted as evidence of an impending public health catastrophe. This article traces the history of research on coronary heart disease decline and resurgence and situates it in broader narratives of public health catastrophism. Juxtaposing the coronary heart disease literature alongside the narratives of emerging and reemerging infectious disease helps to identify patterns in how public health researchers create data and craft them into powerful narratives of progress or pessimism. These narratives, in turn, shape public health policy. PMID:23678895

  10. A beating heart model 3D printed from specific patient data.

    PubMed

    Markert, Mathias; Weber, Stefan; Lueth, Tim C

    2007-01-01

    In this article, a method for manufacturing of heart models is presented. These models are created from CT or MRI data and are patient specific. They are applied to surgical planning in cardiac surgery to obtain more information of the anatomical structure. The models were produced using a 3d printing technology based on starch, allowing highlighting different sections of the model by colors and creation of flexible models, which can be handled easily. In addition, the motion of the heart was coarsely simulated with such a model.

  11. Serum cholesterol concentration and coronary heart disease in population with low cholesterol concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Peto, R; Collins, R; MacMahon, S; Lu, J; Li, W

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between serum cholesterol concentration and mortality (from coronary heart disease and from other causes) below the range of cholesterol values generally seen in Western populations. DESIGN--Prospective observational study based on 8-13 years of follow up of subjects in a population with low cholesterol concentrations. SETTING--Urban Shanghai, China. SUBJECTS--9021 Chinese men and women aged 35-64 at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death from coronary heart disease and other causes. RESULTS--The average serum cholesterol concentration was 4.2 mmol/l at baseline examination, and only 43 (7%) of the deaths that occurred during 8-13 years of follow up were attributed to coronary heart disease. There was a strongly positive, and apparently independent, relation between serum cholesterol concentration and death from coronary heart disease (z = 3.47, p less than 0.001), and within the range of usual serum cholesterol concentration studied (3.8-4.7 mmol/l) there was no evidence of any threshold. After appropriate adjustment for the regression dilution bias, a 4 (SD 1)% difference in usual cholesterol concentration was associated with a 21 (SD 6)% (95% confidence interval 9% to 35%) difference in mortality from coronary heart disease. There was no significant relation between serum cholesterol concentration and death from stroke or all types of cancer. The 79 deaths due to liver cancer or other chronic liver disease were inversely related to cholesterol concentration at baseline. CONCLUSION--Blood cholesterol concentration was directly related to mortality from coronary heart disease even in those with what was, by Western standards, a "low" cholesterol concentration. There was no good evidence of an adverse effect of cholesterol on other causes of death. PMID:1888927

  12. Risk of coronary heart disease among HIV-infected patients: a multicenter study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sandra C; Alencastro, Paulo R; Ikeda, Maria Letícia R; Barcellos, Nêmora T; Wolff, Fernando H; Brandão, Ajácio B M; Ximenes, Ricardo A A; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de B; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima P M; Montarroyos, Ulisses Ramos; Nery, Max W; Turchi, Marilia D

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease has emerged as a crescent problem among HIV-infected population. This study aimed to determine the 10-year risk of coronary heart disease using the Framingham risk score among HIV-infected patients from three regions of Brazil. This is a pooled analysis of three cohort studies, which enrolled 3,829 individuals, 59% were men, 66% had white skin color, and mean age 39.0 ± 9.9 years. Comparisons among regions showed that there were marked differences in demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and HIV-related characteristics. Prevalence of Framingham score ≥10 was 4.5% in the Southern, 4.2% in the Midwest, and 3.9% in the Northeast of Brazil. The Framingham score ≥10 was similar between regions for males, patients aged ≥60 years, with obesity, central obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Women were three times more likely to have coronary heart disease in 10 years than men. Hypertension and diabetes increased more than four times the risk of coronary heart disease, followed by central obesity, obesity, and prehypertension. The use of antiretroviral agents and time since HIV diagnosis were not risk factors for coronary artery disease in 10 years. In conclusion, hypertension and diabetes are the strongest independent predictors of 10-year risk of coronary heart disease among HIV-infected population.

  13. A Health Education Program for Parents and Children Who Exhibit High Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopp, Joyce W.; And Others

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of joint parent-child education to change the behaviors known to be associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Earlier studies have shown that parents who are at increased risk of coronary heart disease can be identified by studying certain factors in the children. Utilizing a combined risk…

  14. Relation between heart beat fluctuations and cyclic alternating pattern during sleep in insomnia patients.

    PubMed

    de Leon-Lomeli, R; Murguia, J S; Chouvarda, I; Mendez, M O; Gonzalez-Galvan, E; Alba, A; Milioli, G; Grassi, A; Terzano, M G; Parrino, L

    2014-01-01

    Insomnia is a condition that affects the nervous and muscular system. Thirty percent of the population between 18 and 60 years suffers from insomnia. The effects of this disorder involve problems such as poor school or job performance and traffic accidents. In addition, patients with insomnia present changes in the cardiac function during sleep. Furthermore, the structure of electroencephalographic A-phases, which builds up the Cyclic Alternating Pattern during sleep, is related to the insomnia events. Therefore, the relationship between these brain activations (A-phases) and the autonomic nervous system would be of interest, revealing the interplay of central and autonomic activity during insomnia. With this goal, a study of the relationship between A-phases and heart rate fluctuations is presented. Polysomnography recording of five healthy subjects, five sleep misperception patients and five patients with psychophysiological insomnia were used in the study. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) was used in order to evaluate the heart rate dynamics and this was correlated with the number of A-phases. The results suggest that pathological patients present changes in the dynamics of the heart rate. This is reflected in the modification of A-phases dynamics, which seems to modify of heart rate dynamics.

  15. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Palmer, Tom M.; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Dale, Caroline E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C.; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Hall, Alistair S.; North, Kari E.; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R.; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hofker, Marten H.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Bots, Michiel L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Lange, Leslie A.; Davey Smith, George; Reiner, Alex P.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimäki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. Methods and results We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with established associations with HDL-C, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). For each trait, we constructed two scores. The first was unrestricted, including all independent SNPs associated with the lipid trait identified from a prior meta-analysis (threshold P < 2 × 10−6); and the second a restricted score, filtered to remove any SNPs also associated with either of the other two lipid traits at P ≤ 0.01. Mendelian randomization meta-analyses were conducted in 17 studies including 62,199 participants and 12,099 CHD events. Both the unrestricted and restricted allele scores for LDL-C (42 and 19 SNPs, respectively) associated with CHD. For HDL-C, the unrestricted allele score (48 SNPs) was associated with CHD (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.70), per 1 mmol/L higher HDL-C, but neither the restricted allele score (19 SNPs; OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.42, 1.98) nor the unrestricted HDL-C allele score adjusted for triglycerides, LDL-C, or statin use (OR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.44, 1.46) showed a robust association. For triglycerides, the unrestricted allele score (67 SNPs) and the restricted allele score (27 SNPs) were both associated with CHD (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.24, 2.11 and 1.61; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.59, respectively) per 1-log unit increment. However, the unrestricted triglyceride score adjusted for HDL-C, LDL-C, and statin use gave an OR for CHD of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.75). Conclusion The genetic findings support a causal effect of triglycerides on CHD risk, but a causal role for HDL-C, though possible, remains less certain. PMID:24474739

  16. Cadmium in the blood and heart tissue of patients (smokers/non-smokers) with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Spieker, C.; Bertram, H.P.; Stratmann, T.; Achatzy, R.; Kisters, K.; Zumkley, H.

    1986-01-01

    Cadmium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human hypertension and arteriosclerotic heart disease. Various experiments showed that cadmium could influence the vasopressor-induced reactivity and the stress-strain characteristics of the blood vessel wall. Smoking is considered to be one of the risk factors in accumulating high amounts of cadmium in human organic tissue. Therefore, in the present study the cadmium content of the blood and the heart tissue was evaluated in smoking and non-smoking patients who suffered from coronary heart diseases and various vascular defects. Blood and heart tissue samples of 49 patients undergoing a heart operation were examined. The measurements were carried out with atomic absorption spectometry. Cadmium concentration in the blood was elevated significantly in smoking patients versus non-smokers. In the heart tissue samples of smoking patients cadmium was increased as well towards non-smoking patients. These data show that smoking influences the cadmium intake and it may support the opinion of different research groups that cadmium might have a toxic effect on the myocardium and that cadmium accumulation is another risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease. 10 references, 1 figure.

  17. Factors predictive of stress, organizational effectiveness, and coronary heart disease potential.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, W H

    1985-07-01

    Research to predict stress, organizational effectiveness, and potential for developing coronary heart disease (CHD) is presented based on two samples (n = 357 and n = 225). Results indicate that perceived stress is predicted by a combination of individual and job related characteristics. The data suggest that stress, in turn, affects individual and organizational health and effectiveness, by causing increases in cold/flu episodes, somatic symptoms, while decreasing job satisfaction. In addition, stress has an indirect effect on job performance and absenteeism. Models for predicting the ratio of total serum cholesterol divided by HDL cholesterol as an indicator of coronary heart disease potential are provided and a CHD screening model is proposed.

  18. Multiple capture locations for 3D ultrasound-guided robotic retrieval of moving bodies from a beating heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thienphrapa, Paul; Ramachandran, Bharat; Elhawary, Haytham; Taylor, Russell H.; Popovic, Aleksandra

    2012-02-01

    Free moving bodies in the heart pose a serious health risk as they may be released in the arteries causing blood flow disruption. These bodies may be the result of various medical conditions and trauma. The conventional approach to removing these objects involves open surgery with sternotomy, the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, and a wide resection of the heart muscle. We advocate a minimally invasive surgical approach using a flexible robotic end effector guided by 3D transesophageal echocardiography. In a phantom study, we track a moving body in a beating heart using a modified normalized cross-correlation method, with mean RMS errors of 2.3 mm. We previously found the foreign body motion to be fast and abrupt, rendering infeasible a retrieval method based on direct tracking. We proposed a strategy based on guiding a robot to the most spatially probable location of the fragment and securing it upon its reentry to said location. To improve efficacy in the context of a robotic retrieval system, we extend this approach by exploring multiple candidate capture locations. Salient locations are identified based on spatial probability, dwell time, and visit frequency; secondary locations are also examined. Aggregate results indicate that the location of highest spatial probability (50% occupancy) is distinct from the longest-dwelled location (0.84 seconds). Such metrics are vital in informing the design of a retrieval system and capture strategies, and they can be computed intraoperatively to select the best capture location based on constraints such as workspace, time, and device manipulability. Given the complex nature of fragment motion, the ability to analyze multiple capture locations is a desirable capability in an interventional system.

  19. Remodeling of left circumflex coronary arterial tree in pacing-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yunlong; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-08-15

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a very serious heart disease that manifests an imbalance between left ventricle supply and demand. Although the mechanical demand of the failing heart has been well characterized, the systematic remodeling of the entire coronary arterial tree that constitutes the supply of the myocardium is lacking. We hypothesize that the well-known increase in ventricle wall stress during CHF causes coronary vascular rarefaction to increase the vascular flow resistance, which in turn compromises the perfusion of the heart. Morphometric (diameters, length, and numbers) data of the swine left circumflex (LCx) arterial tree were measured in both CHF (n = 6) and control (n = 6) groups, from which a computer reconstruction of the entire LCx tree was implemented down to the capillary level to enable a hemodynamic analysis of coronary circulation. The vascular flow resistance was increased by ∼75% due to a significant decrease of vessel numbers (∼45%) and diameters in the first capillary segments (∼10%) of the LCx arterial tree after 3-4 wk of pacing. The structural remodeling significantly changed the wall shear stress in vessel segments of the entire LCx arterial tree of CHF animals. This study enhances our knowledge of coronary arterial tree remodeling in heart failure, which provides a deeper understanding of the deterioration of supply-demand relation in left ventricle.

  20. Remodeling of left circumflex coronary arterial tree in pacing-induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a very serious heart disease that manifests an imbalance between left ventricle supply and demand. Although the mechanical demand of the failing heart has been well characterized, the systematic remodeling of the entire coronary arterial tree that constitutes the supply of the myocardium is lacking. We hypothesize that the well-known increase in ventricle wall stress during CHF causes coronary vascular rarefaction to increase the vascular flow resistance, which in turn compromises the perfusion of the heart. Morphometric (diameters, length, and numbers) data of the swine left circumflex (LCx) arterial tree were measured in both CHF (n = 6) and control (n = 6) groups, from which a computer reconstruction of the entire LCx tree was implemented down to the capillary level to enable a hemodynamic analysis of coronary circulation. The vascular flow resistance was increased by ∼75% due to a significant decrease of vessel numbers (∼45%) and diameters in the first capillary segments (∼10%) of the LCx arterial tree after 3-4 wk of pacing. The structural remodeling significantly changed the wall shear stress in vessel segments of the entire LCx arterial tree of CHF animals. This study enhances our knowledge of coronary arterial tree remodeling in heart failure, which provides a deeper understanding of the deterioration of supply-demand relation in left ventricle. PMID:26159756

  1. [Transcutaneous transcatheter use of laser recanalization of coronary arteries in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Natsvlishvili, Z G; Rabkin, I Kh; Abugov, A M; Babunashvili, A M; Levina, G A

    1991-09-01

    The paper discusses the potential possibility and effectiveness of X-ray endovascular laser recanalization (ELR) of the coronary arteries in order to treat coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary heart disease. The intervention was performed in 4 patients (into the anterior interventricular artery in 3 and into the right coronary artery in 1). In 3 of 4 cases, X-ray ELR proved to be successful, in one case the intervention failed due to technological reasons. Recanalization of a completely occluded segment of the coronary artery with a residual stenosis of no more than 40% was observed in two cases. Laser recanalization of profound local coronary stenosis was made in the mid-third of the vessel in one case. It can be stated that X-ray ELR of the coronary artery may extend the scope of X-ray surgical therapeutical tools of the treatment of coronary atherosclerosis. At the same time, accumulation of clinical experience and further improvement of laser and laser catheter engineering are essential in defining the value and possible scope for the application of this method.

  2. Single-centre cohort study of gender influence in coronary CT angiography in patients with a low to intermediate pretest probability of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Nørgaard, Kirsten Schou; Isaksen, Christin; Buhl, Jørgen Selmer; Kirk Johansen, Jane; Nielsen, Agnete Hedemann; Nørgaard, Aage; Urbonaviciene, Grazina; Lindholt, Jes S; Frost, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background In ‘real-world’ patient populations undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), it is unclear whether a correlation exists between gender, coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and subsequent referral for invasive coronary angiography and coronary revascularisation. We therefore investigated the relationship between gender, CAC and use of subsequent invasive coronary angiography and coronary revascularisation in a cohort of patients with chest discomfort and low to intermediate pretest probability of coronary artery disease who underwent a CCTA at our diagnostic centre. Methods This is a cohort study that included patients examined between 2010 and 2013. Data were obtained from the Western Denmark Heart Registry. The follow-up ended 11 March 2014. Results A total of 3541 people (1621 men and 1920 women) were examined by CCTA. The rate of invasive coronary angiography during follow-up was 28.5% in men versus 18.3% in women (p<0.001). The rate of coronary revascularisation during follow-up was 11.4% in men versus 5.1% in women (p<0.001). The CAC-adjusted HR in women versus men was 0.98 (95% CI 0.85 to 1.13) for invasive coronary angiography and 0.73 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.93) for coronary revascularisation. Further adjustment for age and other risk factors did not change these estimates. Conclusions Women had a lower CAC score than men and a corresponding lower rate of invasive coronary angiography. The risk of coronary revascularisation was modestly reduced in women, irrespective of CAC. This may reflect a gender-specific difference in coping with chest discomfort, gender-specific referral bias for CCTA, and/or a gender-specific difference in the balance between coronary calcification and obstructive coronary heart disease. PMID:26196016

  3. Heart beat dynamics during sleep and wake phases: a feedback control approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Carlos Echeverria, Juan; de Luca, Adriano; Velasco, Alejandra

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we study some aspects of the heart rate variability (HRV) of subjects with normal sinus rhythm (NSR) during wake and sleep phases. To this end, a structure function is employed to quantify the fluctuations of the heart rhythm, which is subsequently used to interpret the HRV from a feedback control framework. As made in classical control theory, a frequency-domain methodology is used to gain some insights on the main mechanisms controlling the dynamics of the cardio-respiratory system. In this way, it is shown that the HRV of young NSR subjects reflects a cardio-respiratory system with the same robust frequency response during sleep and wake conditions. On the contrary, for a significant percentage of old NSR subjects one finds a different response performance during the wake phase, which, according to a feedback control framework, could indicate a reduced capacity of the cardio-respiratory system to respond to daily activity. The HRV of subjects with congestive heart failure (CHF) was used to compare the results. It is found that the HRV of CHF subjects reflects a cardio-respiratory system with a decreased sensitivity in a wide frequency range during both sleep and wake phases. These results seem to indicate that discrimination between NSR and anomalous states can be made on the basis of HRV measurements of both sleep and wake phases.

  4. An apparent case of undiagnosed donor Kawasaki disease manifesting as coronary artery aneurysm in a pediatric heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Friedland-Little, Joshua; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Gajarski, Robert J; Schumacher, Kurt R

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of coronary ectasia and LAD coronary artery aneurysm with angiographic characteristics of Kawasaki disease in a three-yr-old girl two-yr status post-orthotopic heart transplant. Coronary anomalies were noted during initial screening coronary angiography two yr after transplant. Subsequent review of the donor echocardiogram revealed that the LMCA had been mildly dilated prior to transplant. In the absence of any symptoms consistent with Kawasaki disease in the transplant recipient, this appears to be a case of Kawasaki disease in the organ donor manifesting with coronary anomalies in the transplant recipient. The patient has done well clinically, and repeat coronary angiography has revealed partial regression of coronary anomalies. Given multiple reports in the literature of persistent abnormalities of coronary artery morphology and function after Kawasaki disease, close monitoring is warranted, with consideration of potential coronary protective medical therapies.

  5. The prognostic effects of ventricular heart rate among patients with permanent atrial fibrillation with and without coronary artery disease: a multicenter prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Wan, Huaibin; Yang, Yanmin; Zhu, Jun; Shao, Xinghui; Wang, Juan; Huang, Bi; Zhang, Han

    2015-06-01

    Heart rate control is important among patients with either atrial fibrillation (AF) or coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the relationship between the ventricular heart rate and adverse outcomes among patients with AF and CAD remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the prognostic effects of ventricular heart rate in patients with permanent AF (permAF) and CAD. We performed a multicenter, prospective, observational study of patients with AF in China. Patients≥18 years old with permAF were included and divided into a CAD group and a non-CAD group. All patients underwent 1 year of follow-up. The primary outcome was total mortality. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the relationship between risk factors and the survival rate in the study population.A total of 852 patients (69.1±12.7 years old, 43.3% male, 44.7% with CAD) were included in the analysis. Patients with CAD were older, were more likely to be male and exhibited higher prevalences of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, LV dysfunction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and stroke compared with patients without CAD. During the follow-up period, a higher total mortality rate was noted in the CAD group than in the non-CAD group (21.5% vs 15.5%, P = 0.023). In the patients without CAD, the lowest quartile (≤76  beats/min) exhibited the best 1-year survival rate; however, in the patients with CAD, the highest quartile (>110  beats/min) exhibited the worst survival rate. Multivariate adjusted Cox analysis indicated that age (HR 1.039, 95% CI 1.025-1.055, P < 0.001) and heart rate (P = 0.004) were each independently associated with total mortality. Patients with CAD have more risk factors, and comorbidities and higher mortality rates than patients without CAD. In the patients with permAF without CAD, a ventricular rate of ≤76  beats/minute was associated with the best survival rate; however, among the patients with CAD, no increased mortality was observed

  6. Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology?

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Amir; Stone, Gregg W; Leipsic, Jonathon; Shaw, Leslee J; Villines, Todd C; Kern, Morton J; Hecht, Harvey; Erlinge, David; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Maehara, Akiko; Arbustini, Eloisa; Serruys, Patrick; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Narula, Jagat

    2016-07-01

    Risk stratification in patients with stable ischemic heart disease is essential to guide treatment decisions. In this regard, whether coronary anatomy, physiology, or plaque morphology is the best determinant of prognosis (and driver an effective therapeutic risk reduction) remains one of the greatest ongoing debates in cardiology. In the present report, we review the evidence for each of these characteristics and explore potential algorithms that may enable a practical diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease.

  7. Role of coronary endothelium in cyclic AMP formation by the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, K.; Schrader, J.

    1986-03-01

    In order to quantify the activation of adenylate cyclase of the coronary endothelium in vivo, endothelial adenine nucleotides of isolated guinea pig hearts were selectively pre-labeled by intracoronary infusion of tritiated (H3)-adenosine, and the coronary efflux of H3-cAMP was measured. The adenosine receptor agonist, NECA (12 ..mu..M), increased total cAMP release 4 fold, and raised H3-cAMP release 22 fold. Several classes of coronary vasodilators (adenosine, L-PIA, D-PIA, the beta 2-adrenergic agonist procaterol, and PGE1) caused dose-dependent increases in endothelial-derived H3-cAMP release. These increases were accompanied by decreases in vascular resistance, at agonist doses without positive intropic effects. Hypoxic perfusion also raised H3-cAMP release, and this was antagonized by theophylline. It is concluded: (1) cyclic AMP formation by coronary endothelium can dominate total cAMP production by the heart; (2) coronary endothelial adenylate cyclase-coupled receptors for adenosine (A2), catecholamines (beta2) and prostaglandins are activated in parallel with coronary vasodilation; (3) endothelial adenylate cyclase can be activated by endogenous adenosine.

  8. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes. Photoplethysmography, which measures changes in arterial blood volume, is commonly used to obtain heart rate and blood oxygen saturation. The digitized PPG signals are used as inputs into the beat-to-beat blood

  9. [THEORETICAL BACKGROUND OF FINDING ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANTATION AMONG NON-HEART BEATING DONORS UNDER UNSUCCESSFUL EXTRACORPOREAL RESUSCITATION (LITERATURE REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Khodeli, N; Chkhaidze, Z; Partsakhashvili, D; Pilishvili, O; Kordzaia, D

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients who are in the "Transplant Waiting List" is increasing each year. At the same time, as a result of the significant shortage of donor organs, part of the patients dies without waiting till surgery. According to the Maastricht classification for non-heart beating donors, the patients, who had cardiac arrest outside the hospital (in the uncontrolled by medical staff conditions) should be considered as a potential donors of category II. For these patients, the most effective resuscitation is recommended. The extracorporeal life support (ECLS) considers the connection to a special artificial perfusion system for the restoration of blood circulation out-of-hospital with further transportation to the hospital. If restoration of independent cardiac activity does not occur, in spite of the full range of resuscitative measures, these patients may be regarded as potential donors. The final decision should be received in the hospital, by the council of physicians, lawyers and patient's family members. Until the final decision, the prolongation of ECLS and maintaining adequate systemic and organic circulation is recommended. PMID:27348175

  10. Detection of inflating balloon in optical coherence tomography images of a porcine artery in a beating heart experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarnoush, Hamed; Vergnole, Sébastien; Hewko, Mark; Boulet, Benoit; Sowa, Mike; Lamouche, Guy

    2011-03-01

    Suboptimal results of angioplasty procedures have been correlated to arterial damage during balloon inflation. We propose to monitor balloon inflation during the angioplasty procedure by detecting the balloon contours with intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT). This will shed more light on the interaction between the balloon and the artery and to assess the artery's mechanical response. An automatic edge detection algorithm is applied for detection of the outer surface of an inflating balloon in a porcine artery in a beating heart experiment. A compliant balloon is inflated to deform the artery. IVOCT monitoring of balloon inflation is performed at a rate of 30 frames per second. During inflation, the balloon engages the arterial wall. Therefore, the characterization of the diameter of the inflated balloon leads to a characterization of the luminal diameter of the vessel. This provides precise information about the artery response to a simulated angioplasty procedure, information currently not provided by any other existing technique. In the current experiment, balloon inflation characterization is based on 356 IVOCT frames during which the estimated balloon diameter increases approximately from 1.8 mm to 2.9 mm.

  11. Hypothermic machine perfusion versus cold storage in the rescuing of livers from non-heart-beating donor rats.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Matías E; Balaban, Cecilia L; Guibert, Edgardo E; Bottai, Hebe; Rodriguez, Joaquin V

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the efficiency of cold storage (CS) and hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) methods of preserving grafts excised from non-heart-beating donors that had suffered 45 minutes of warm ischemia. We developed a new solution for HMP to use in liver transplantation, based on BES, gluconate, and polyethylene glycol (BGP-HMP solution). After 24 h of HMP or CS, livers were reperfused at 37°C with Krebs-Henseleit solution with added dextran. For both procedures, portal pressure and flow were measured and the intrahepatic resistance (IR) was calculated. The pH oscillations and enzyme activities (LDH, AST, and ALT) were evaluated for the perfusion buffer during normothermic reperfusion. O2 consumption of the liver, glycogen production, and bile flow were also measured during the normothermic reperfusion period. Portal flow and IR showed statistical differences (P < 0.05) between the two groups (n = 5). HMP with BGP-HMP solution resulted in higher values of portal flow and lower IR than CS with HTK solution. Enzyme release after 90 min of reperfusion did not show statistical differences between groups. With regard to bile flow and O2 consumption, livers preserved by both processes were able to produce bile, but livers preserved with HMP were able to take up more O2 than livers preserved by CS.

  12. [THEORETICAL BACKGROUND OF FINDING ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANTATION AMONG NON-HEART BEATING DONORS UNDER UNSUCCESSFUL EXTRACORPOREAL RESUSCITATION (LITERATURE REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Khodeli, N; Chkhaidze, Z; Partsakhashvili, D; Pilishvili, O; Kordzaia, D

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients who are in the "Transplant Waiting List" is increasing each year. At the same time, as a result of the significant shortage of donor organs, part of the patients dies without waiting till surgery. According to the Maastricht classification for non-heart beating donors, the patients, who had cardiac arrest outside the hospital (in the uncontrolled by medical staff conditions) should be considered as a potential donors of category II. For these patients, the most effective resuscitation is recommended. The extracorporeal life support (ECLS) considers the connection to a special artificial perfusion system for the restoration of blood circulation out-of-hospital with further transportation to the hospital. If restoration of independent cardiac activity does not occur, in spite of the full range of resuscitative measures, these patients may be regarded as potential donors. The final decision should be received in the hospital, by the council of physicians, lawyers and patient's family members. Until the final decision, the prolongation of ECLS and maintaining adequate systemic and organic circulation is recommended.

  13. Hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease in the survivors of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Roche, S Lucy; Silversides, Candice K

    2013-07-01

    Obesity, hypertension, and coronary artery disease are prevalent in the general population and well recognized as contributors to cardiac morbidity and mortality. With surgical and medical advances, there is a growing and aging population with congenital heart disease who are also at risk of developing these comorbidities. In addition, some congenital cardiac lesions predispose patients to conditions such as hypertension or coronary artery disease. The effect of these comorbidities on the structurally abnormal heart is not well understood, but might be very important, especially in those with residual abnormalities. Thus, in addition to surveillance for and treatment of late complications it is important for the congenital cardiologist to consider and aggressively manage acquired comorbidities. In this review we explore the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease, discuss congenital lesions that predispose to these conditions and review management strategies for this unique population.

  14. Coronary heart disease prevention: nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Tucker, Katherine L

    2011-08-17

    Diet is a key modifiable risk factor in the prevention and risk reduction of coronary heart disease (CHD). Results from the Seven Countries Study in the early 1970s spurred an interest in the role of single nutrients such as total fat in CHD risk. With accumulating evidence, we have moved away from a focus on total fat to the importance of considering the quality of fat. Recent meta-analyses of intervention studies confirm the beneficial effects of replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids on CHD risk. Scientific evidence for a detrimental role of trans fat intake from industrial sources on CHD risk has led to important policy changes including listing trans fatty acid content on the "Nutrition Facts" panel and banning the use of trans fatty acids in food service establishments in some cities. The effects of such policy changes on changes in CHD incidence are yet to be evaluated. There has been a surging interest in the protective effects of vitamin D in primary prevention. Yet, its associations with secondary events have been mixed and intervention studies are needed to clarify its role in CHD prevention. Epidemiological and clinical trial evidence surrounding the benefit of B vitamins and antioxidants such as carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C, have been contradictory. While pharmacological supplementation of these vitamins in populations with existing CHD has been ineffective and, in some cases, even detrimental, data repeatedly show that consumption of a healthy dietary pattern has considerable cardioprotective effects for primary prevention. Results from these studies and the general ineffectiveness of nutrient-based interventions have shifted interest to the role of foods in CHD risk reduction. The strongest and most consistent protective associations are seen with fruit and vegetables, fish, and whole grains. Epidemiological and clinical trial data also show risk reduction with moderate alcohol consumption. In the past decade, there has

  15. Coronary heart disease prevention: nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Tucker, Katherine L

    2011-08-17

    Diet is a key modifiable risk factor in the prevention and risk reduction of coronary heart disease (CHD). Results from the Seven Countries Study in the early 1970s spurred an interest in the role of single nutrients such as total fat in CHD risk. With accumulating evidence, we have moved away from a focus on total fat to the importance of considering the quality of fat. Recent meta-analyses of intervention studies confirm the beneficial effects of replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids on CHD risk. Scientific evidence for a detrimental role of trans fat intake from industrial sources on CHD risk has led to important policy changes including listing trans fatty acid content on the "Nutrition Facts" panel and banning the use of trans fatty acids in food service establishments in some cities. The effects of such policy changes on changes in CHD incidence are yet to be evaluated. There has been a surging interest in the protective effects of vitamin D in primary prevention. Yet, its associations with secondary events have been mixed and intervention studies are needed to clarify its role in CHD prevention. Epidemiological and clinical trial evidence surrounding the benefit of B vitamins and antioxidants such as carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C, have been contradictory. While pharmacological supplementation of these vitamins in populations with existing CHD has been ineffective and, in some cases, even detrimental, data repeatedly show that consumption of a healthy dietary pattern has considerable cardioprotective effects for primary prevention. Results from these studies and the general ineffectiveness of nutrient-based interventions have shifted interest to the role of foods in CHD risk reduction. The strongest and most consistent protective associations are seen with fruit and vegetables, fish, and whole grains. Epidemiological and clinical trial data also show risk reduction with moderate alcohol consumption. In the past decade, there has

  16. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, Nabila; Gaunt, Tom R

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction) is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21), non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93), patients with unstable angina (n = 16), stable coronary artery disease (n = 14) and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207). We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6) and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7). In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN) classification method (k = 3). The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms.

  17. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kazmi, Nabila; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction) is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21), non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93), patients with unstable angina (n = 16), stable coronary artery disease (n = 14) and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207). We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6) and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7). In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN) classification method (k = 3). The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms. PMID:26930047

  18. Cognition and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Late Midlife: The Whitehall II Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Severine; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive function in midlife predicts incident coronary heart disease (CHD), followed up over 6 years. Data on 5292 (28% women, mean age 55) individuals free from CHD at baseline were drawn from the British Whitehall II study. We used Cox regression to model the association between cognition…

  19. Overweight Status, Obesity, and Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, C. Michael; Robinson, Laura M.; Davidson, Philip W.; Haveman, Meindert; Janicki, Matthew P.; Albertini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have high rates of overweight status/obesity (OSO). OSO is associated with several important risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). This study focused on assessing whether such risk factors are being identified in adults with ID who are receiving their healthcare in…

  20. Small dense low density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease: results from the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sought to establish reference values for a new direct assay for small dense LDL cholesterol (sdLDL-C) and to measure sdLDL-C concentrations in patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) vs controls. Direct LDL-C and sdLDL-C were measured in samples from 3188 male and female participan...

  1. Adiponectin: an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease in men in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our aim was to determine whether plasma adiponectin levels were an independent predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma adiponectin levels were measured in 3,188 male and female participants from cycle 6 of the Framingham Offspring Study (mean age: 57 years in both men and women; BMI:...

  2. Fibrinogen: a possible link between social class and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Markowe, H L; Marmot, M G; Shipley, M J; Bulpitt, C J; Meade, T W; Stirling, Y; Vickers, M V; Semmence, A

    1985-01-01

    Mortality from coronary heart disease in civil servants in the lowest grade of employment has been found to be about three times that of men in the highest grade of employment. As part of an investigation of this finding several haemostatic variables were measured in a sample of 29 men in lower grades of employment and 45 men in higher grades. There was a significant difference in plasma fibrinogen concentrations between men in lower grades of employment and those in higher grades (mean 3.39 g/l v 2.95 g/l, respectively; p less than 0.01) but not in other haemostatic variables. Multiple regression analyses showed significant independent associations of fibrinogen concentration with smoking (p less than 0.05) and grade of employment (p less than 0.05). The size of the observed difference between the grades of employment was similar to that between those dying of coronary heart disease or surviving during longitudinal study; it may therefore be an important part of the mechanism underlying social class differences in coronary heart disease. The statistical relation between fibrinogen concentrations and other characteristics that may be concerned in the aetiology of coronary heart disease was examined. A summary measure of job stress was significantly related to fibrinogen concentration (p less than 0.01) and made a substantial contribution to explaining the differences between grades of employment. Behaviour type and a score of physical activity were not significantly related to fibrinogen concentration. PMID:3933646

  3. The Effect of a Physiological Evaluation Program on Coronary Heart Disease Risk Scores for Sedentary Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkenberg, Mel; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to compare the coronary heart disease (CHD) probability estimates of a group of sedentary males involved in an exercise stress test program from 1968 through 1974 with those of a comparison group of sedentary males not involved in the program. The program was designed to evaluate cardiopulmonary function and improve…

  4. Elders' Knowledge about Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease, Their Perceived Risk, and Adopted Preventive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khayyal, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; El Shazly, Somaya Abdel Moneim

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most frequent single cause of death among persons over 65 years of age and it seems to continue to be a significant threat to the health and wellbeing of the elderly population all over the world, yet the condition is largely preventable. The aims of this study to assess and determine the relations among elder's…

  5. Addressing Health Inequities: Coronary Heart Disease Training within Learning Disabilities Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holly, Deirdre; Sharp, John

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Research suggests this may be due to inequalities in health status and inequities in the way health services respond to need. Little is known about the most effective way to improve health outcomes for people with learning disabilities. A previously developed…

  6. Hospitalization Cost Offset of a Hostility Intervention for Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Karina W.; Gidron, Yori; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors evaluated hospitalization cost offset of hostility management group therapy for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) from a previously published randomized controlled trial (Y. Gidron, K. Davidson, & I. Bata, 1999). Twenty-six male patients with myocardial infarction or unstable angina were randomized to either 2 months of…

  7. Blood lead and coronary heart disease risk among elderly men in Zutphen, The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    Kromhout, D

    1988-01-01

    Information about blood lead and other coronary heart disease risk factors was collected in 1977 among 152 men aged 57 to 76 years in the town of Zutphen, the Netherlands. Blood lead was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The blood lead distribution was skewed to the right. The median blood lead concentration was 167 micrograms/L, and the mean was 183 micrograms/L. Blood lead levels above 300 micrograms/L were present among 8.6% and levels above 400 micrograms/L among 1.3% of the Zutphen men. Blood lead was of borderline significance to cigarette smoking. After both univariate and multivariate analyses, a significant association was found between blood lead and blood pressure. This relation was stronger for systolic than for diastolic blood pressure. Of the 141 elderly men free of coronary heart disease in 1977, 26 developed coronary heart disease between 1977 and 1985. Blood lead was not associated with coronary heart disease incidence in both univariate and multivariate analyses. PMID:3203644

  8. Education and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: Potential Mechanisms Such as Literacy, Perceived Constraints, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in…

  9. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Young People of Differing Socio-Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Williams, Simon P.; Baker, Julien S.; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in young people of differing socio-economic status (SES). A cohort of 100 boys and 108 girls, aged 12.9, SD 0.3 years drawn of differing SES were assessed for CHD risk factors. Measurements included indices of obesity, blood pressure, aerobic fitness, diet, blood…

  10. Coronary Heart Disease Knowledge and Risk Factors among Tri-Ethnic College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutoubi, Samer; Huffman, Fatma G.; Ciccazzo, Michele W.; Himburg, Susan P.; Johnson, Paulette

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and Europe. This study identified and compared nutritional knowledge associated with CHD risk factors among tri-ethnic college students. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, observational study using questionnaires. Setting: University laboratory.…

  11. Genetic APOC3 mutation, serum triglyceride concentrations, and coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent decades have witnessed an increased awareness of the importance of lowering triglyceride concentrations in conjunction with lowering LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) to achieve optimal reduction of the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Historically, LDL-C was the only target of pharmacologic ther...

  12. Primary Care Physicians and Coronary Heart Disease Prevention: A Practice Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makrides, Lydia; Veinot, Paula L.; Richard, Josie; Allen, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of primary care physicians in coronary heart disease prevention is explored, and a model for patient education by physicians is offered. A qualitative study in Nova Scotia examines physicians' expectations about their role in prevention, obstacles to providing preventive care, and mechanisms by which preventive care occurs. (Author/EMK)

  13. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease Among Inpatients Who Have Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, S.; Haw, C.; Kirk, J.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. The aim of this study was to screen inpatients with mild or borderline intellectual disability, many of whom also have mental illness, for risk factors for CHD. Participants were interviewed, measured and had blood samples taken. Of the 53 participants, 20 (37.7%)…

  14. Radiologic evaluation of coronary artery disease in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, David M; Ordovas, Karen G

    2016-01-01

    Improved surgical and medical therapy have prolonged survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) such that general medical conditions like coronary artery disease (CAD) are now the main determinants of mortality. A summary of the association of CAD with CHD, as well as a discussion of the radiologic evaluation of the coronary arteries in adults with CHD is described herein. Cross sectional imaging to evaluate CAD in adults with CHD should follow the same appropriateness criteria as gender and aged matched patients without CHD. Coronary CT imaging may be particularly valuable in evaluating the coronary arteries in this patient population as invasive coronary angiography may prove challenging secondary to complicated or unconventional anatomy of the coronary arteries. Further, typical methods for evaluating CAD such as stress or echocardiography may be impractical in adults with CHD. Finally, delineating the anatomic relationship of the coronary arteries and their relationship with the sternum, chest wall, conduits, grafts, and valves is highly recommended in patients with CHD prior to reintervention to avoid iatrogenic complications.

  15. Reconsidering the back door approach by targeting the coronary sinus in ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Giovanni Luigi; Kassimis, George; Raina, Tushar; Banning, Adrian P

    2016-08-15

    Coronary sinus interventions (CSI) are a class of invasive techniques (surgical and percutaneous) originally proposed in the first half of the 20th century, aiming to treat ischaemic heart disease by acting on the venous coronary system. Three main classes of CSI have been proposed and tested: (1) retroperfusion technique, (2) retroinfusion technique and (3) coronary sinus occlusion techniques. They all share the principle that a controlled increased pressure within the coronary sinus may promote a retrograde perfusion of the ischaemic myocardium with consequent cardioprotection. Development of arterial treatments including coronary aortic bypass grafting and then percutaneous coronary intervention deflected interest from interventions on the coronary venous system. However, CSI may still have a possible niche role today in specific and selected clinical contexts in which existing therapies are insufficient. In this review paper, we aim to revise the rationale for CSI, describing the details and the evidence collected so far about these techniques and to provide insights about the main clinical scenarios in which these strategies may find a contemporary application in combination or as an alternative to existing approaches.

  16. [ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID RELATIVE CONTENT CHANGES IN ERYTHROCYTES AND PLATELETS PHOSPHOLIPIDS MEMBRANES FEATURES IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Lizogub, V G; Zavalska, T V; Merkulova, I O; Bryuzgina, T S

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes and platelets phospholipid membranes fatty acid spectrum was detected in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients and in patients with coronary heart disease without atrial fibrillation. 87 patients were investigated. Significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease patients compared with healthy individuals was related. As well as a significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients compared with coronary heart disease patients without atrial fibrillation was related too. These dates may indicate that decreasing relative content arachidonic acid can be possible pathogenetic link in the development of arrhythmias.

  17. Copeptin in acute coronary syndromes and heart failure management: State of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Schurtz, Guillaume; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe; Goldstein, Patrick; Lemesle, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the use of multiple biomarkers has changed cardiovascular disease management. Recently, several trials have assessed the diagnostic and prognostic performances of copeptin, especially in patients with heart failure or acute coronary syndromes. Primary results are interesting, with copeptin looking promising for: the management of patients who present at emergency departments early after chest pain onset and the risk stratification of patients with heart failure. The purpose of this article is to review the data on the place of copeptin in the management of patients with chest pain or heart failure.

  18. Copeptin in acute coronary syndromes and heart failure management: State of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Schurtz, Guillaume; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe; Goldstein, Patrick; Lemesle, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the use of multiple biomarkers has changed cardiovascular disease management. Recently, several trials have assessed the diagnostic and prognostic performances of copeptin, especially in patients with heart failure or acute coronary syndromes. Primary results are interesting, with copeptin looking promising for: the management of patients who present at emergency departments early after chest pain onset and the risk stratification of patients with heart failure. The purpose of this article is to review the data on the place of copeptin in the management of patients with chest pain or heart failure. PMID:26071835

  19. Ethnic Minorities and Coronary Heart Disease: an Update and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J Adam; Alvarez, Manrique; Rodriguez, Carlos J

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA. Overall, heart disease accounts for about 1 in 4 deaths with coronary heart disease (CHD) being responsible for over 370,000 deaths per year. It has frequently and repeatedly been shown that some minority groups in the USA have higher rates of traditional CHD risk factors, different rates of treatment with revascularization procedures, and excess morbidity and mortality from CHD when compared to the non-Hispanic white population. Numerous investigations have been made into the causes of these disparities. This review aims to highlight the recent literature which examines CHD in ethnic minorities and future directions in research and care.

  20. Comparison of different QT interval correction methods for heart rate and QT beat-to-beat method in a thorough QT study of triple monoamine reuptake inhibitor BMS-820836.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming; Burt, David; Chan, Wai; Hawthorne, Dara; Gasior, Maciej; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Keswani, Sanjay; AbuTarif, Malaz; Bertz, Richard

    2015-10-01

    As BMS-820836 causes dose-dependent heart rate increases, QTcI, QTcF, QTcB, and QT beat-to-beat methods were compared in this thorough QT study in healthy subjects. Two parallel groups of subjects (n = 60 per group) received 2 mg (maximum therapeutic) or 4 mg (supratherapeutic) of BMS-820836 once daily for 14 days with uptitration. Another 60 subjects received encapsulated moxifloxacin (400 mg) or matching placebo in a nested-crossover study design. Compared with QTcF and QTcB, baseline QTcI had the smallest and near-zero Pearson correlation coefficient with heart rate (0.0938), which supported the choice of QTcI as the primary electrocardiographic end point. BMS-820836 was not associated with prolongation of the QT interval at the doses tested; however, ΔΔQTbtb showed the smallest deviation from 0 milliseconds compared with ΔΔQTcI and ΔΔQTcF. The ΔΔQTbtb results appeared to be more consistent with the very low likelihood of any effect on the QT interval by BMS-820836 based on the wide margin (>400×) of the in vitro hERG IC50 and free plasma concentration. Further, this is the first published study that used the nested-crossover design and QTbtb analysis in a thorough QT study. Assay sensitivity was confirmed with encapsulated moxifloxacin.

  1. How does the ‘Heart Team’ decision get enacted for patients with coronary artery disease?

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Luckraz, Heyman; Aktuerk, Dincer; Thekkudan, Joyce; Mahboob, Sophia; Norell, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A heart team approach has been recommended for managing patients with coronary artery disease. Although this seems to be a new concept, we have been developing such a practice for over 8 years. In this report, the enactment of the heart team decision is reviewed and possible improvement is discussed. Design Review of 1000 heart team decisions over a 1-year period for patients with coronary artery disease. These decisions were recorded contemporaneously at the time of the team discussion. Thereafter, patient's notes were reviewed 6 months following the heart team meeting to assess whether the decision was enacted and, if not, what were the reasons for aberration. Results The heart team decision was enacted in 95.5% of patients. The reasons for aberration in the remaining 45 patients included patient's choice (refusal), unrecognised comorbidities at the time of the heart team discussion, change in patient's clinical condition requiring urgent intervention and death while awaiting procedure, among others. Conclusions The decision of a well set-up heartteam meeting is carried out for most patients. Aberration is uncommon and usually due to unknown factors at the time of the discussion. The heart team approach ensures that patients receive best available care (most likely evidence-based), and demonstrates transparency. PMID:27326160

  2. [The effectiveness of pioglitazone in the treatment of patients with coronary heart disease on the background of metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vinnik, N I; Kutsenko, L A; Kutsenko, N L; Solokhina, I L; Mikitiuk, M V; Mamontova, T V; Kaĭdashev, I P

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of pioglitazone in the treatment of patients with coronary heart disease in combination with MS. In the conduct of research revealed that the addition to standard therapy in patients with coronary heart disease on the background of metabolic syndrome pioglitazone led to a reliable slight decrease in body weight, BMI, hip circumference, waist their relationship. Receiving pioglitazone also significantly reduces the concentration of immunoreactive insulin and blood glucose levels, significantly altered lipid metabolism, which generally leads to a lower level of systemic inflammation, metabolism and reduces the severity of insulin resistance. This allows you to recommend the inclusion of pioglitazone in complex coronary heart disease and metabolic syndrome.

  3. Myocardium-derived angiopoietin-1 is essential for coronary vein formation in the developing heart

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Yoh; Nakaoka, Yoshikazu; Matsunaga, Taichi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Yamamizu, Kohei; Arima, Yuichiro; Kataoka-Hashimoto, Takahiro; Ikeoka, Kuniyasu; Yasui, Taku; Masaki, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kaori; Higuchi, Kaori; Park, Jin-Sung; Shirai, Manabu; Nishiyama, Koichi; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Otsu, Kinya; Kurihara, Hiroki; Minami, Takashi; Yamauchi-Takihara, Keiko; Koh, Gou Y.; Mochizuki, Naoki; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Sakata, Yasushi; Yamashita, Jun K.; Komuro, Issei

    2014-01-01

    The origin and developmental mechanisms underlying coronary vessels are not fully elucidated. Here we show that myocardium-derived angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) is essential for coronary vein formation in the developing heart. Cardiomyocyte-specific Ang1 deletion results in defective formation of the subepicardial coronary veins, but had no significant effect on the formation of intramyocardial coronary arteries. The endothelial cells (ECs) of the sinus venosus (SV) are heterogeneous population, composed of APJ-positive and APJ-negative ECs. Among these, the APJ-negative ECs migrate from the SV into the atrial and ventricular myocardium in Ang1-dependent manner. In addition, Ang1 may positively regulate venous differentiation of the subepicardial APJ-negative ECs in the heart. Consistently, in vitro experiments show that Ang1 indeed promotes venous differentiation of the immature ECs. Collectively, our results indicate that myocardial Ang1 positively regulates coronary vein formation presumably by promoting the proliferation, migration and differentiation of immature ECs derived from the SV. PMID:25072663

  4. Cardiogenic shock and coronary endothelial dysfunction predict cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Fernandez, Silvia; Manito-Lorite, Nicolas; Gómez-Hospital, Joan Antoni; Roca, Josep; Fontanillas, Carles; Melgares-Moreno, Rafael; Azpitarte-Almagro, José; Cequier-Fillat, Angel

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains one of the major causes of death post-heart transplantation. Its etiology is multifactorial and prevention is challenging. The aim of this study was to prospectively determine factors related to cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation. This research was planned on 179 patients submitted to heart transplant. Performance of an early coronary angiography with endothelial function evaluation was scheduled at three-month post-transplant. Patients underwent a second coronary angiography after five-yr follow-up. At the 5- ± 2-yr follow-up, 43% of the patients had developed cardiac allograft vasculopathy (severe in 26% of them). Three independent predictors of cardiac allograft vasculopathy were identified: cardiogenic shock at the time of the transplant operation (OR: 6.49; 95% CI: 1.86-22.7, p = 0.003); early coronary endothelial dysfunction (OR: 3.9; 95% CI: 1.49-10.2, p = 0.006), and older donor age (OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.00-1.10, p = 0.044). Besides early endothelial coronary dysfunction and older donor age, a new predictor for development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy was identified: cardiogenic shock at the time of transplantation. In these high-risk patient subgroups, preventive measures (treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, use of novel immunosuppressive agents such as mTOR inhibitors) should be earlier and much more aggressive.

  5. Components of the complete blood count as risk predictors for coronary heart disease: in-depth review and update.

    PubMed

    Madjid, Mohammad; Fatemi, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, and several inflammatory biomarkers, such as C-reactive protein, have been used to predict the risk of coronary heart disease. High white blood cell count is a strong and independent predictor of coronary risk in patients of both sexes, with and without coronary heart disease. A high number of white blood cells and their subtypes (for example, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils) are associated with the presence of coronary heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and stroke. The coronary heart disease risk ratios associated with a high white blood cell count are comparable to those of other inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein. In addition, other components of the complete blood count, such as hematocrit and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, also are associated with coronary heart disease, and the combination of the complete blood count with the white blood cell count can improve our ability to predict coronary heart disease risk. These tests are inexpensive, widely available, and easy to order and interpret. They merit further research.

  6. Association between growth differentiation factor-15 and chronic heart failure in coronary atherosclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Z D; Sun, T

    2015-03-27

    We explored the association between plasma growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) levels and chronic heart failure (CHF) in coronary heart disease patients. We measured plasma GDF-15 and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels in 269 untreated coronary heart disease patients (98 with CHF, 84 without CHF, and 87 control patients) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All subjects were examined by echocardiography and left ventricular ejection fraction. We found that plasma GDF-15 levels in coronary atherosclerosis patients with CHF [median 1622.48 (25-75th percentile: 887.53-1994.93) ng/L] were higher than those in coronary atherosclerosis patients without CHF [944.99 (856.12-999.78) ng/L] and control patients (P < 0.05). NT-proBNP showed the same trend as GDF-15. We also used the New York Heart Association functional classification to subgroup CHF patients and found that the GDF-15 level was higher in all subgroup patients with CHF. After adjusting for covariates, plasma GDF-15 levels were found to be positively related to NT-proBNP (r = 0.861, P < 0.001) and negatively related to left ventricular ejection fraction (r = -0.936, P < 0.001). Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic curves of GDF-15 and NT-proBNP were constructed and the area under the curve for the untransformed GDF-15 and NT-proBNP was 0.804 and 0.795, respectively. Plasma GDF-15 levels and NT-proBNP are associated with CHF in coronary atherosclerosis patients and can be used as biomarkers.

  7. Change in Leukocyte Telomere Length Predicts Mortality in Patients with Stable Coronary Heart Disease from the Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Goglin, Sarah E.; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Short telomere length independently predicts mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. Whether 5-year change in telomere length predicts subsequent mortality in patients with coronary heart disease has not been evaluated. Methods In a prospective cohort study of 608 individuals with stable coronary artery disease, we measured leukocyte telomere length at baseline and after five years of follow-up. We divided the sample into tertiles of telomere change: shortened, maintained or lengthened. We used Cox survival models to evaluate 5-year change in telomere length as a predictor of mortality. Results During an average of 4.2 years follow-up, there were 149 deaths. Change in telomere length was inversely predictive of all-cause mortality. Using the continuous variable of telomere length change, each standard deviation (325 base pair) greater increase in telomere length was associated with a 24% reduction in mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61–0.94; p = 0.01), adjusted for age, sex, waist to hip ratio, exercise capacity, LV ejection fraction, serum creatinine, and year 5 telomere length. Mortality occurred in 39% (79/203) of patients who experienced telomere shortening, 22% (45/203) of patients whose telomere length was maintained, and 12% (25/202) of patients who experienced telomere lengthening (p<0.001). As compared with patients whose telomere length was maintained, those who experienced telomere lengthening were 56% less likely to die (HR 0.44, 95% CI, 0.23–0.87). Conclusions In patients with coronary heart disease, an increase in leukocyte telomere length over 5 years is associated with decreased mortality. PMID:27783614

  8. [An investigation on the association between incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke and meteorological factors].

    PubMed

    Wu, Y

    1990-04-01

    Analysis of association between acute onset of coronary heart disease, stroke and meteorological factors, including temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity etc, was done by simple correlation and multiple stepwise regression analysis, for a period of 2 years, 1984 to 1985. This study covered a population approximately of 700,000, scattered in defined areas of Beijing. The result showed that there was a negative correlation between incidence of stroke and acute myocardial infarction and some meteorological factors, such as temperature and clouds. A negative correlation between coronary sudden death and temperature had been observed by simple correlation analysis.

  9. Comparison of HTK and hypertonic citrate to intraarterial cooling in human non-heart-beating kidney donors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C H; Asher, J F; Gupta, A; Vijayanand, D; Wyrley-Birch, H; Stamp, S; Rix, D A; Soomro, N; Manas, D M; Jaques, B C; Peaston, R; Talbot, D

    2007-03-01

    Intraarterial cooling (IAC) of non-heart-beating donors (NHBD) for renal donation requires a cheap, low-viscosity solution. HTK contains a high hydrogen ion buffer level that theoretically should reduce the observable acidosis associated with ongoing anaerobic metabolism. A retrospective comparison of all retrieved NHBD kidneys as well as of viability on the Organ Recovery Systems Lifeporter machine perfusion circuit was performed with respect to the preservation solution HTK or Marshall's HOC. Forty-two NHBD kidneys (19 HTK and 23 HOC) were machine perfused between February 2004 and May 2005. Most of the HTK kidneys were obtained from uncontrolled donors (12 vs 5; Fisher exact test, P = .01). As a consequence, the glutathione-s-transferase viability assay (411 vs 292 IU/L, P = .12) and the lactate concentrations (2.33 vs 1.94 mmol/L, P = .13) were higher among the HTK cohort. There was evidence of greater buffering capacity in HTK, since the lactate:hydrogen ion ratios were consistently lower during the first 2 perfusion hours (1 hour P = .03, 2 hour P = .02). A linear regression analysis confirmed that this was related to the IAC solution (ANCOVA, P < .001). All controlled donor kidneys passed viability testing and were transplanted. In contrast, 83% (10/12) of the uncontrolled donor kidneys preserved with HTK passed the viability test and were transplanted, compared with only 20% (1/5) of the HOC-treated comparators (Fisher exact test, P = .03). It may be concluded that the postulated advantages of improved pH buffering with HTK appear to have clinical relevance. PMID:17362727

  10. Machine perfusion at 20°C reduces preservation damage to livers from non-heart beating donors.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Rizzo, Vittoria; Boncompagni, Eleonora; Bianchi, Alberto; Gringeri, Enrico; Neri, Daniele; Richelmi, Plinio; Freitas, Isabel; Cillo, Umberto; Vairetti, Mariapia

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that machine perfusion (MP) performed at 20°C enhanced the preservation of steatotic rat livers. Here, we tested whether rat livers retrieved 30 min after cardiac arrest (NHBDs) were better protected by MP at 20°C than with cold storage. We compared the recovery of livers from NHBDs with organs obtained from heart beating donors (HBDs) preserved by cold storage. MP technique: livers were perfused for 6h with UW-G modified at 20°C. Cold storage: livers were perfused in situ and preserved with UW solution at 4°C for 6h. Both MP and cold storage preserved livers were reperfused with Krebs-Heinselet buffer (2h at 37°C). AST and LDH release and mitochondrial glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) levels were evaluated. Parameters assessed included: bile production and biliary enzymes; tissue ATP; reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG); protein-SH group concentration. Livers preserved by MP at 20°C showed significantly lower hepatic damage at the end of reperfusion compared with cold storage. GDH release was significantly reduced and bile production, ATP levels, GSH/GSSG and protein-SH groups were higher in livers preserved by MP at 20°C than with cold storage. The best preserved morphology and high glycogen content was obtained with livers submitted to MP at 20°C. Liver recovery using MP at 20°C was comparable to recovery with HBDs. MP at 20°C improves cell survival and gives a better-quality of preservation for livers obtained from NHBDs and may provide a new method for the successful utilization of marginal livers.

  11. Quality of Life and Coping Strategies in Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Seyedeh-Monavar; Hosseinian, Simin; Eslami, Mansoure; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali

    This study aims to find the relationship between quality of life and coping strategies in coronary heart disease patients. Two hundred coronary heart disease patients at Tehran Heart Center, who had been diagnosed with the disease 3 months before, were selected and filled out The Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and Quality of Life-SF36. Results showed a discrepancy between quality of life indices and coping strategies. Task-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with total quality of life and PF indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with MH, RE and RP indices. Emotional-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with RP and RE indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with PF, GH, PH, total psychological health and total quality of life indices. Avoidance-oriented strategy had a negative and significant relationship only with MH index. Furthermore, quality of life aspects (physical and psychological) had a positive and significant relationship with emotional-oriented strategy, but it did not have a significant relationship with task-oriented and avoidance-oriented strategies. Also, the social aspect of quality of life did not have a significant relationship with any of the strategies. Considering the effect of stress on decreasing the quality of life, we recommend a psychologist train coping strategies to coronary heart disease patients along with medical treatments in order to improve recovery, maintain health and reduce recurrence.

  12. CYP11B2 gene polymorphism among coronary heart disease patients and blood donors in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Normaznah, Y; Azizah, M R; Kuak, S H; Rosli, M A

    2015-04-01

    Various previous studies have reported the implication of CYP11B2 gene polymorphism in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, the -344T/C polymorphism, which is located at a putative binding site for the steroidogenic transcription factor (SF-1) has been associated with essential hypertension, left ventricular dilation and coronary heart disease. In the present study, we aim to determine the allele and genotype frequencies of the CYP11B2 gene in patients with clinical manifestation of coronary heart disease and confirmed by angiography and blood donors and to calculate the association of the gene polymorphism with CHD. A total of 79 DNA from patients with coronary heart disease admitted to the National Heart Institute and 84 healthy blood donors have been genotyped using polymerase chain reaction technique followed by restriction enzyme digestion (RFLP). Results of the study demonstrated that out of 79 for the patients, 40 were homozygous T, 10 were homozygous C and 29 were heterozygous TC. The frequencies of genotype TT, CC and TC for patients were 0.5, 0.13 and 0.36 respectively. The frequencies of allele T and C in patients were 0.68 and 0.31 respectively. While for the blood donors, 40 subjects were of homozygous T, 7 were homozygous C and 37 were heterozygous TC. The genotype frequencies for the TT, CC and TC were 0.47, 0.08 and 0.44 respectively. The frequency of the allele T was 0.69 and allele C was 0.3. Chi-Square analysis showed that there was no significant difference in the genotype and C allele frequencies between the CHD patients and the blood donors. Our study suggests that there is lack of association between -344T/C polymorphism of CYP11B2 gene and coronary heart disease.

  13. Who Needs Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rehabilitation Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Surgery Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... coronary arteries that can't be treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as coronary angioplasty. Your doctor ...

  14. A novel type of self-beating cardiomyocytes in adult mouse ventricles

    SciTech Connect

    Omatsu-Kanbe, Mariko; Matsuura, Hiroshi

    2009-04-10

    This study was designed to investigate the presence of resident heart cells that are distinct from terminally-differentiated cardiomyocytes. Adult mouse heart was coronary perfused with collagenase, and ventricles were excised and further digested. After spinning cardiomyocyte-containing fractions down, the supernatant fraction was collected and cultured without adding any chemicals. Two to five days after plating, some of rounded cells adhered to the culture dish, gradually changed their shape and then started self-beating. These self-beating cells did not appreciably proliferate but underwent a further morphological maturation process to form highly branched shapes with many projections. These cells were mostly multinucleated, well sarcomeric-organized and expressed cardiac marker proteins, defined as atypically-shaped cardiomyocytes (ACMs). Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ACMs exhibited spontaneous action potentials arising from the preceding slow diastolic depolarization. We thus found a novel type of resident heart cells in adult cardiac ventricles that spontaneously develop into self-beating cardiomyocytes.

  15. Effectiveness of Remote Patient Monitoring After Discharge of Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure: The Better Effectiveness After Transition–Heart Failure (BEAT-HF) Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Michael K.; Romano, Patrick S.; Edgington, Sarah; Aronow, Harriet U.; Auerbach, Andrew D.; Black, Jeanne T.; De Marco, Teresa; Escarce, Jose J.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Hanna, Barbara; Ganiats, Theodore G.; Greenberg, Barry H.; Greenfield, Sheldon; Kaplan, Sherrie H.; Kimchi, Asher; Liu, Honghu; Lombardo, Dawn; Mangione, Carol M.; Sadeghi, Bahman; Sadeghi, Banafsheh; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Tong, Kathleen; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2016-01-01

    Importance It remains unclear whether telemonitoring approaches provide benefits for patients with heart failure (HF) after hospitalization. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a care transition intervention using remote patient monitoring in reducing 180-day all-cause readmissions among a broad population of older adults hospitalized with HF. Design, Setting, and Participants We randomized 1437 patients hospitalized for HF between October 12, 2011, and September 30, 2013, to the intervention arm (715 patients) or to the usual care arm (722 patients) of the Better Effectiveness After Transition–Heart Failure (BEAT-HF) study and observed them for 180 days. The dates of our study analysis were March 30, 2014, to October 1, 2015. The setting was 6 academic medical centers in California. Participants were hospitalized individuals 50 years or older who received active treatment for decompensated HF. Interventions The intervention combined health coaching telephone calls and telemonitoring. Telemonitoring used electronic equipment that collected daily information about blood pressure, heart rate, symptoms, and weight. Centralized registered nurses conducted telemonitoring reviews, protocolized actions, and telephone calls. Main outcomes and measures The primary outcome was readmission for any cause within 180 days after discharge. Secondary outcomes were all-cause readmission within 30 days, all-cause mortality at 30 and 180 days, and quality of life at 30 and 180 days. Results Among 1437 participants, the median age was 73 years. Overall, 46.2% (664 of 1437) were female, and 22.0% (316 of 1437) were African American. The intervention and usual care groups did not differ significantly in readmissions for any cause 180 days after discharge, which occurred in 50.8% (363 of 715) and 49.2% (355 of 722) of patients, respectively (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.88-1.20; P = .74). In secondary analyses, there were no significant differences in 30-day

  16. Socioeconomic inequalities in coronary heart disease risk in older age: contribution of established and novel coronary risk factors

    PubMed Central

    RAMSAY, S E; MORRIS, R W; WHINCUP, P H; PAPACOSTA, O; RUMLEY, A; LENNON, L; LOWE, G; WANNAMETHEE, S G

    2009-01-01

    Background:Evidence on socioeconomic inequalities in coronary heart disease (CHD) and their pathways in the elderly is limited. Little is also known about the contributions that novel coronary risk factors (particularly inflammatory/hemostatic markers) make to socioeconomic inequalities in CHD. Objectives:To examine the extent of socioeconomic inequalities in CHD in older age, and the contributions (relative and absolute) of established and novel coronary risk factors. Methods:A population-based cohort of 3761 British men aged 60–79 years was followed up for 6.5 years for CHD mortality and incidence (fatal and non-fatal). Social class was based on longest-held occupation recorded at 40–59 years. Results:There was a graded relationship between social class and CHD incidence. The hazard ratio for CHD incidence comparing social class V (unskilled workers) with social class I (professionals) was 2.70 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37–5.35; P-value for trend = 0.008]. This was reduced to 2.14 (95% CI 1.06–4.33; P-value for trend = 0.11) after adjustment for behavioral factors (cigarette smoking, physical activity, body mass index, and alcohol consumption), which explained 38% of the relative risk gradient (41% of absolute risk). Additional adjustment for inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and von Willebrand factor) explained 55% of the relative risk gradient (59% of absolute risk). Blood pressure and lipids made little difference to these estimates; results were similar for CHD mortality. Conclusions:Socioeconomic inequalities in CHD persist in the elderly and are at least partly explained by behavioral risk factors; novel (inflammatory) coronary risk markers made some further contribution. Reducing inequalities in behavioral factors (especially cigarette smoking) could reduce these social inequalities by at least one-third. PMID:20015318

  17. Diagnostic value of plasma morphology in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Sergeeva, Yuliya V.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Denisova, Tatiana P.

    2006-08-01

    Blood plasma can be considered as a special water system with self-organization possibilities. Plasma slides as the results of wedge dehydration reflect its stereochemical interaction and their study can be used in diagnostic processes. 46 patients with coronary heart disease were studied. The main group was formed of men in age ranged from 54 to 72 years old with stable angina pectoris of II and III functional class (by Canadian classification) (n=25). The group of compare was of those who was hospitalized with diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, men in age range 40-82. Clinical examination, basic biochemical tests and functional plasma morphology characteristics were studied. A number of qualitative and quantitative differences of blood plasma morphology of patients with chronic and acute coronary disease forms was revealed.

  18. Effect of dynamic cardiomyoplasty on phasic coronary arterial flow velocity in canine hearts.

    PubMed

    Tsukube, T; Okada, M; Mukai, T; Kashem, M A; Ota, T

    1994-10-01

    The usefulness of dynamic cardiomyoplasty has been demonstrated repeatedly, both experimentally and clinically. Although clinical applications of dynamic cardiomyoplasty to ischemic heart disease have been reported, its effect on the coronary blood flow has never been discussed. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that dynamic cardiomyoplasty might adversely affect coronary arterial blood flow through compression of the coronary arteries during systolic skeletal muscular contraction and incomplete relaxation of the skeletal muscle flap during diastole. Dynamic cardiomyoplasty was performed in seven mongrel dogs with the use of a left latissimus dorsi-muscle flap, paced synchronously with the R wave of the electrocardiogram. A 3F Doppler catheter was placed in the left main trunk of the coronary artery to assess the instantaneous changes of coronary flow velocity by fast Fourier transformation analysis, We compared systolic and diastolic properties during assisted versus unassisted cardiac cycles by calculating the peak velocity and the time-velocity integral. During assisted cardiac cycles, a significant enhancement of coronary arterial blood flow velocity was demonstrated by significant increases in both systolic and diastolic peak velocity (26.9% +/- 6.5%, p < 0.005; 4.0% +/- 1.6%, p < 0.05, respectively) and time-velocity integral (20.9% +/- 4.8%, p < 0.05; 10.0% +/- 4.6%, p < 0.05, respectively). Enhancement of coronary arterial blood flow velocity was associated with an increase in mean aortic pressure (16.4% +/- 1.3%, p < 0.005) and descending aortic flow (67.5% +/- 5.3%, p < 0.005). Also, the improved systolic coronary arterial blood flow velocity was consistent with an increase in systolic aortic pressure (15.8% +/- 1.5%, p < 0.005), and enhancement of diastolic coronary arterial blood flow velocity was associated with an increase in diastolic aortic pressure (8.6% +/- 2.3%, p < 0.01). We concluded that coronary arterial blood flow velocity was increased by

  19. [Diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Clodi, Martin; Säly, Christoph; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Resl, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens; Eber, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and heart failure are interacting dynamically. Patients being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease should be screened for diabetes mellitus. Enhanced cardiovascular risk stratification based on biomarkers, symptoms and classical risk factors should be performed in patients with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. PMID:27052249

  20. [Explore Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet effecting on treatment outcome of coronary heart disease based on propensity score].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Xie, Yan-ming; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet is a Chinese patent medicine for treating chest pain caused by blood stasis. It is widely used in clinical prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease. In order to understand the treatment effect of Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet in patients with coronary heart disease, we extracted electronic medical record data from 18 large hospitals nationwide. We matched the coronary artery disease patients with or without Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet treatment on gender, age, condition at admission and whether combined with cardiac insufficiency on a one to one ratio. After matching, both groups, patients using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet (group A) and patients not using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet (group B), ended up with 1,122 people. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment, the endpoint of effective group was defined as "cure" and "better" while the endpoint of invalid group was defined as "invalid" and "death". Chi-square test showed a statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) between the two groups of patients with coronary heart disease, with a higher efficiency in Xueshuan Xinmaining group. Classic logistic regression analysis showed no statistical significant difference between the two groups on treatment outcome efficiency. Generalized boosted models (GBM) and propensity score (PS) weighted Logistic regression were then applied to balance 45 variables between the two groups. The results showed a regression coefficient greater than 0 and a statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) between the two groups. Based on the existing results of the analysis, we considered that coronary heart disease patients using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet had a higher efficiency in clinical efficiency than the patients not using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet. Since this study did not certainly eliminate all the possible confounders and patients from the hospitals included in this study were not yet well represent the overall situation of the source

  1. [Explore Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet effecting on treatment outcome of coronary heart disease based on propensity score].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Xie, Yan-ming; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet is a Chinese patent medicine for treating chest pain caused by blood stasis. It is widely used in clinical prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease. In order to understand the treatment effect of Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet in patients with coronary heart disease, we extracted electronic medical record data from 18 large hospitals nationwide. We matched the coronary artery disease patients with or without Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet treatment on gender, age, condition at admission and whether combined with cardiac insufficiency on a one to one ratio. After matching, both groups, patients using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet (group A) and patients not using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet (group B), ended up with 1,122 people. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment, the endpoint of effective group was defined as "cure" and "better" while the endpoint of invalid group was defined as "invalid" and "death". Chi-square test showed a statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) between the two groups of patients with coronary heart disease, with a higher efficiency in Xueshuan Xinmaining group. Classic logistic regression analysis showed no statistical significant difference between the two groups on treatment outcome efficiency. Generalized boosted models (GBM) and propensity score (PS) weighted Logistic regression were then applied to balance 45 variables between the two groups. The results showed a regression coefficient greater than 0 and a statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) between the two groups. Based on the existing results of the analysis, we considered that coronary heart disease patients using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet had a higher efficiency in clinical efficiency than the patients not using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet. Since this study did not certainly eliminate all the possible confounders and patients from the hospitals included in this study were not yet well represent the overall situation of the source

  2. [Sympathetic block as a part of the treatment of coronary heart disease (Literature review)].

    PubMed

    Lishchuk, A N; Kornienko, E A

    2015-10-01

    The given literature review is devoted to the urgent problem of improving the effectiveness of conservative treatment of patients with coronary heart disease through the use of sympathetic blockade. The authors highlight the. current understanding of the morbid physiology of cardiac angina, in particular, pain syndrome, of the state of analgesia in cardiology. Considered in detail the use of thoracic epidural block in case of coronary heart disease, shows the mechanism of action of epidural blockade, clinical features, its antiischemic effect on the myocardium, the impact on hemodynamic. Also described are the possible side effects and complications of epidural blockade. In conclusion, the authors emphasize the prospect of a wide practical application of regional blockade of local anaesthetics and narcotic analgesics in cardiac patients.

  3. Coronary Heart Disease in Women: A Challenge for the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Solimene, Maria Cecília

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the first killer of women in the modern era, regardless of age, race and of ethnicity, although its prevalence rises after menopause. Modern women have professional and housewife responsibilities, consume excess of fat and carbohydrates, smoke, do not exercise regularly and do not have enough time to rest. This situation leads to overweight, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Women do not often participate in preventive studies and still undergo less intensive and invasive evaluation and treatment for chest pain when compared to men. However, the rate of coronary death is twice higher in women than in men after myocardial infarction and revascularization procedures. The objective of this review is to analyze the main gender differences regarding symptoms, diagnosis, management and prognosis of coronary heart disease and to discuss the influence of hormonal replacement therapy in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. PMID:20126352

  4. Ethnic Disparities in Coronary Heart Disease Management and Pay for Performance in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jeremy; Wall, Martin; Majeed, Azeem

    2008-01-01

    Background Few pay for performance schemes have been subject to rigorous evaluation, and their impact on disparities in chronic disease management is uncertain. Objective To examine disparities in coronary heart disease management and intermediate clinical outcomes within a multiethnic population before and after the introduction of a major pay for performance initiative in April 2004. Design Comparison of two cross-sectional surveys using electronic general practice records. Setting Thirty-two family practices in south London, United Kingdom (UK). Patients Two thousand eight hundred and ninety-one individuals with coronary heart disease registered with participating practices in 2003 and 3,101 in 2005. Measurements Percentage achievement by ethnic group of quality indicators in the management of coronary heart disease Results The proportion of patients reaching national treatment targets increased significantly for blood pressure (51.2% to 58.9%) and total cholesterol (65.7% to 73.8%) after the implementation of a major pay for performance initiative in April 2004. Improvements in blood pressure control were greater in the black group compared to whites, with disparities evident at baseline being attenuated (black 54.8% vs. white 58.3% reaching target in 2005). Lower recording of blood pressure in the south Asian group evident in 2003 was attenuated in 2005. Statin prescribing remained significantly lower ( < 0.001) in the black group compared with the south Asian and white groups after the implementation of pay for performance (black 74.8%, south Asian 83.8%, white 80.2% in 2005). Conclusions The introduction of pay for performance incentives in UK primary care has been associated with better and more equitable management of coronary heart disease across ethnic groups. PMID:18953616

  5. Impact of obesity on the pathogenesis and prognosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Todd Miller, M; Lavie, Carl J; White, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    Obesity has a significant adverse effect on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome/diabetes. Obesity is an independent risk factor for CHD events; however, obese patients with CHD generally have a more favorable prognosis, with the worst prognosis associated with either underweight or morbidly obese patients. In this manuscript, the authors review the impact of obesity on overall CHD risk as well as the prognosis of obese patients with established CHD.

  6. Increased production of nitric oxide in coronary arteries during congestive heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    O'Murchu, B; Miller, V M; Perrella, M A; Burnett, J C

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were designed to determine whether a heterogeneity of endothelium-dependent relaxations in arteries from different vascular beds exists in experimental congestive heart failure (CHF) and to determine the mediators of those responses. CHF was produced in dogs by rapid ventricular pacing for 15 d. Rings of coronary, femoral, and renal arteries with and without endothelium from control and CHF dogs were suspended in organ chambers for measurement of isometric force. In arteries contracted with prostaglandin F2 alpha, endothelium-dependent relaxations to BHT 920 (an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist) were increased in coronary arteries from dogs with CHF (maximal relaxation: control -15 +/- 9% vs CHF -92 +/- 5%; n = 5-6; P < 0.05), with a modest enhancement in renal arteries. Relaxations to adenosine diphosphate and the calcium ionophore were unchanged. Relaxations to BHT 920 in CHF were reduced by NG monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and pertussis toxin but not by indomethacin. These data suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxations are affected heterogeneously in CHF. The enhanced response to alpha 2-adrenergic agonists in the coronary artery is mediated by nitric oxide through a mechanism sensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin. This selective increase in endothelium-dependent relaxations in the coronary artery may contribute to preserving coronary blood flow during CHF. Images PMID:8282783

  7. NMR-based lipidomic analysis of blood lipoproteins differentiates the progression of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kostara, Christina E; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Cung, Manh Thong; Elisaf, Moses S; Goudevenos, John; Bairaktari, Eleni T

    2014-05-01

    Abnormal lipid composition and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD). A (1)H NMR-based lipidomic approach was used to investigate the correlation of coronary artery stenosis with the atherogenic (non-HDL) and atheroprotective (HDL) lipid profiles in 99 patients with CHD of various stages of disease and compared with 60 patients with normal coronary arteries (NCA), all documented in coronary angiography. The pattern recognition models created from lipid profiles predicted the presence of CHD with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 88% in the HDL model and with 90% and 89% in the non-HDL model, respectively. Patients with mild, moderate, and severe coronary artery stenosis were progressively differentiated from those with NCA in the non-HDL model with a statistically significant separation of severe stage from both mild and moderate. In the HDL model, the progressive differentiation of the disease stages was statistically significant only between patients with mild and severe coronary artery stenosis. The lipid constituents of lipoproteins that mainly characterized the initial stages and then the progression of the disease were the high levels of saturated fatty acids in lipids in both HDL and non-HDL particles, the low levels of HDL-phosphatidylcholine, HDL-sphingomyelin, and omega-3 fatty acids and linoleic acid in lipids in non-HDL particles. The conventional lipid marker, total cholesterol, found in low levels in HDL and in high levels in non-HDL, also contributed to the onset of the disease but with a much lower coefficient of significance. (1)H NMR-based lipidomic analysis of atherogenic and atheroprotective lipoproteins could contribute to the early evaluation of the onset of coronary artery disease and possibly to the establishment of an appropriate therapeutic option.

  8. Beating Heart of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelin, Daniel A., II

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a critical and comparative look at how two theatre programs help young people develop an artistic voice and sense of self as an artist. Each program begins with art. Individuals explore basic tenets of dramatic expression through foundational activities. As they play and experiment, the individuals discover their capacity for…

  9. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael; Ginsberg, Henry N; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2008-04-01

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) include atherogenic TG-rich lipoproteins, cholesteryl ester-enriched remnants of TG-rich lipoproteins, and lipoprotein(a). Recent observational and intervention studies suggest that the predictive value of non-HDL-C for cardiovascular risk and mortality is better than low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and that non-HDL-C correlates highly with plasma apolipoprotein B levels. Currently, the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines identify non-HDL-C as a secondary target of therapy in patients with TG elevation (> or =200 mg/dl) after the attainment of LDL-C target goals. In patients with coronary heart disease or coronary heart disease risk equivalents, an optional non-HDL-C goal is <100 mg/dl. To achieve the non-HDL-C goal, statin therapy may be intensified or combined with ezetimibe, niacin, a fibrate, or omega-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, non-HDL-C remains an important target of therapy for patients with elevated TGs, although its widespread adoption has yet to gain a foothold among health care professionals treating patients with dyslipidemia. PMID:18359322

  10. [Risk factor management of coronary heart disease : what is evidence-based?].

    PubMed

    Winzer, E B; Schuler, G C

    2014-06-01

    In patients with coronary heart disease the further course of the disease can be substantially influenced by means of a targeted treatment of risk factors. A reduction of hospital referrals, an improvement in quality of life and an extension in life expectation by secondary prophylactic measures have been well documented. In addition to an optimized medicinal therapy, an often drastic change in lifestyle with a focus on a consistent abstinence from nicotine, a healthy diet and regular physical exercise is necessary. Data from healthcare research show that these targets are only insufficiently achieved. The implementation of current guidelines should therefore be rigorously applied. There is a need for research particularly with respect to the prognostic significance of beta blocker therapy for patients with stable coronary heart disease and preserved left ventricular function, the prognostic significance of targeted weight loss for overweight or obese coronary heart disease patients, the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in the various patient groups and their implementation into routine care. Research is also necessary with respect to optimization of structured rehabilitation programs and improvement in patient compliance.

  11. Can the transtheoretical model motivate patients with coronary heart disease to exercise?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Xia; Ho, Shuk-Ching; Sit, Janet Wh; He, Hong-Gu

    2014-06-01

    The preliminary effects of a transtheoretical model-based exercise stage-matched intervention on exercise behavior in sedentary patients with coronary heart disease were examined in this study. This was a pilot randomized, controlled trial. A total of 18 eligible patients with coronary heart disease were recruited and randomized to either a conventional group, a patient-education group, or an exercise stage-matched intervention group. Exercise behavior was measured by exercise stages of change, exercise self-efficacy, exercise decisional balance, and moderate-intensity exercise duration (min/week) at baseline and immediately after the eight week intervention. When compared to baseline, only patients in the exercise stage-matched intervention group demonstrated significant progress in the exercise stages of change, higher exercise self-efficacy, fewer exercise barriers, and longer duration of moderate-intensity exercise after the eight week intervention. A significant difference in the progress in the exercise stages of change was found among the three groups after the eight week intervention. The findings suggest that the transtheoretical model-based exercise stage-matched intervention has potentially-positive effects on motivating sedentary patients with coronary heart disease to engage in exercise. PMID:24894654

  12. Ex Vivo Rehabilitation of Non-Heart-Beating Donor Lungs in a Preclinical Porcine Model: Delayed Perfusion Results in Superior Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, Daniel P.; Stone, Matthew L.; Crosby, Ivan K.; LaPar, Damien J.; Sharma, Ashish K.; Webb, David V.; Lau, Christine L.; Laubach, Victor E.; Kron, Irving L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a promising modality for the evaluation and treatment of marginal donor lungs. The optimal timing of EVLP initiation and potential for rehabilitation of donor lungs with extended warm-ischemic times is unknown. This study compares the efficacy of different treatment strategies for uncontrolled non-heart-beating donor lungs. Methods Mature swine underwent hypoxic arrest followed by 60 minutes of no-touch warm-ischemia. Lungs were harvested and flushed with 4°C Perfadex®. Three groups (n=5/group) were stratified according to preservation method: cold-static preservation (CSP: 4 hrs 4°C storage), immediate EVLP (I-EVLP: 4 hrs EVLP at 37°C), and delayed EVLP (D-EVLP: 4 hrs cold storage followed by 4 hrs EVLP). EVLP groups were perfused with Steen solution™ supplemented with heparin, methylprednisolone, cefazolin, and an adenosine 2A receptor agonist. Lungs then underwent allotransplantation and four hours of recipient reperfusion prior to allograft assessment for resultant ischemia-reperfusion injury. Results Donor blood oxygenation (PO2:FiO2) prior to euthanasia was not different between groups. Oxygenation after transplantation was significantly higher in the D-EVLP group compared to the I-EVLP or CSP groups. Mean airway pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, and expression of IL-8, IL-1β, and TNF-α were all significantly reduced in the D-EVLP group. Importantly, post-transplant oxygenation exceeded acceptable clinical levels only in D-EVLP lungs. Conclusions Uncontrolled non-heart-beating donor lungs with extended warm-ischemia can be reconditioned for successful transplantation. The combination of CSP and EVLP present in the D-EVLP group was necessary to obtain optimal post-transplant function. This finding, if confirmed clinically, will allow expanded use of non-heart-beating donor lungs. PMID:22944084

  13. Coronary artery problems and disease in adults with congenital heart disease: how to evaluate, how to prevent, how to treat.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, S; Stuart, A G

    2014-10-01

    There are a wide variety of coronary artery anomalies and disease in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). In fact, the increasing burden of acquired coronary artery disease (CAD) has to be considered in addition to congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries, isolated or associated to other congenital diseases. This is largely a consequence of the increasing number of patients reaching older age. Due to complex underlying cardiac anatomy, previous surgery and comorbidities, treatment can be challenging. Individualized and multidisciplinary management involving congenital heart cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, coronary interventionists and imaging specialists is essential. This review gives an overview of coronary artery involvement in adults with CHD, summarizes the current literature and focuses on prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The potential role of cardiovascular risk factors for CAD is also discussed.

  14. Reducing coronary heart disease in the Australian Coalfields: evaluation of a 10-year community intervention.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, N; Heading, G; McElduff, P; Dobson, A; Heller, R

    1999-03-01

    Coronary heart disease is a leading cause of death in Australia with the Coalfields district of New South Wales having one of the country's highest rates. Identification of the Coalfields epidemic in the 1970's led to the formation of a community awareness program in the late 1980's (the healthy heart support group) followed by a more intense community action program in 1990, the Coalfields Healthy Heartbeat (CHHB). CHHB is a coalition of community members, local government officers, health workers and University researchers. We evaluate the CHHB program, examining both the nature and sustainability of heart health activities undertaken, as well as trends in risk factor levels and rates of coronary events in the Coalfields in comparison with nearby local government areas. Process data reveal difficulties mobilising the community as a whole; activities had to be selected for interested subgroups such as families of heart disease patients, school children, retired people and women concerned with family nutrition and body maintenance. Outcome data show a significantly larger reduction in case fatality for Coalfields men (although nonfatal heart attacks did not decline) while changes in risk factors levels were comparable with surrounding areas. We explain positive responses to the CHHB by schools, heart attack survivors and women interested in body maintenance in terms of the meaning these subgroups find in health promotion discourses based on their embodied experiences. When faced with a threat to one's identity, health discourse suddenly becomes meaningful along with the regimens for health improvement. General public disinterest in heart health promotion is examined in the context of historical patterns of outsiders criticising the lifestyle of miners, an orientation toward communal rather than individual responsibility for health (i.e. community 'owned' emergency services and hospitals) and anger about risks from environmental hazards imposed by industrialists

  15. From hair to heart: nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells differentiate to beating cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the neural stem-cell marker nestin is expressed in hair follicle stem cells located in the bulge area which are termed hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. HAP stem cells from mouse and human could form spheres in culture, termed hair spheres, which are keratin 15-negative and CD34-positive and could differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that nestin-expressing stem cells could effect nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. In the present study, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. We separated the mouse vibrissa hair follicle into 3 parts (upper, middle, and lower), and suspended each part separately in DMEM containing 10% FBS. All three parts of hair follicle differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells as well as neurons, glial cells, keratinocytes and smooth muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle is greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol and inhibited by propanolol. HAP stem cells have potential for regenerative medicine for heart disease as well as nerve and spinal cord repair.

  16. Men's and Women's Health Beliefs Differentially Predict Coronary Heart Disease Incidence in a Population-Based Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korin, Maya Rom; Chaplin, William F.; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Butler, Mark J.; Ojie, Mary-Jane; Davidson, Karina W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in the association between beliefs in heart disease preventability and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods: A total of 2,688 Noninstitutionalized Nova Scotians without prior CHD enrolled in the Nova Scotia Health Study (NSHS95) and were followed for 10…

  17. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING... system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and refers... include a family history of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cigarette smoking, obesity...

  18. A focus on the prognosis and management of ischemic heart disease in patients without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Scalone, Giancarla; Niccoli, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a common phenotype comprising different coronary syndromes with either stable or unstable clinical presentation. In this context, the clinical outcome and management appear extremely variable, due to different etiologies. Of note, coronary microvascular dysfunction is the pathogenetic mechanism linking different clinical scenarios in most of the cases. Hence, in this article, we aim to provide a systematic approach of reviewing the prognosis and management of angina or myocardial infarction without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Moreover, we will propose a new scheme of classification by distinguishing between angina with normal coronary artery and myocardial infarction with normal coronary artery in order to facilitate clinicians to perform a proper management workflow.

  19. Psychological risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease: Findings from the Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Beth E.; Panguluri, Praveen; Na, Beeya; Whooley, Mary A.

    2010-01-01

    Psychological factors, such as depression and anxiety, are independently associated with an increased risk of both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, but the reasons for these associations are unknown. We sought to determine whether psychological factors were associated with a greater prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease, and the extent to which such an association may be explained by socioeconomic status, health behaviors, and biological mediators. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1024 outpatients with stable coronary heart disease. Psychological factors, including depressive and anxiety symptoms, hostility, anger, and optimism–pessimism, were assessed using validated standardized questionnaires. The presence or absence of the metabolic syndrome was determined using the criteria outlined by the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. Higher levels of depression, anger expression, hostility, and pessimism were significantly associated with increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. These associations were explained by differences in socioeconomic status and health behaviors. Additional adjustment for potential biological mediators had little impact. Further research is needed to determine whether addressing socioeconomic and behavioral factors in people with depression or high levels of anger or hostility could reduce the burden of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:19969373

  20. Spanish flu and early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Azambuja, Maria Inês Reinert

    2004-01-01

    According to Stephen Jay Gould, "we have a strong preference for seeing trends as entities moving somewhere." However, trends may instead be the product of relative expansions and contractions of different subpopulations constituting the system. Variation in attributes of coronary heart disease cases during the decline in coronary heart disease mortality suggests a change in the primary source-subpopulation of cases over time. It is proposed that an early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation, characterized by high serum-cholesterol phenotype and high case-fatality--which contributed to most of the coronary heart disease cases and deaths during the 1960s--may have been a late result of the 1918 influenza pandemic. The same unusual immune response to infection that in 1918 killed preferentially men, whites, and those born from 1880 to 1900 (20-40 years old) may have "primed" survivors of those birth cohorts to late coronary heart disease mortality. Ecologic evidence in favor of a birth cohort and geographic association between both epidemics is presented. Cross-reactive auto-immune response upon reinfection could explain the excess coronary heart disease deaths reported during influenza epidemics from the late 1920s onward. Mimicry between the viral hemagglutinin and the apolipoprotein B or the low-density lipoprotein receptor could be the link between infection and hypercholesterolemia. The extinction of those birth cohorts would result in a relative increase in cases coming from a 2nd subpopulation, which was characterized by insulin resistance and chronic expression of low-grade inflammation markers and was comparatively less vulnerable to die acutely from coronary heart disease.

  1. Ethnic Minorities and Coronary Heart Disease: an Update and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, J. Adam; Alvarez, Manrique

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA. Overall, heart disease accounts for about 1 in 4 deaths with coronary heart disease (CHD) being responsible for over 370,000 deaths per year. It has frequently and repeatedly been shown that some minority groups in the USA have higher rates of traditional CHD risk factors, different rates of treatment with revascularization procedures, and excess morbidity and mortality from CHD when compared to the non-Hispanic white population. Numerous investigations have been made into the causes of these disparities. This review aims to highlight the recent literature which examines CHD in ethnic minorities and future directions in research and care. PMID:26792015

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation programs improve metabolic parameters in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Ignacio P; Zapata, Maria A; Cervantes, Carlos E; Jarabo, Rosario M; Grande, Cristina; Plaza, Rose; Garcia, Sara; Rodriguez, Miriam L; Crespo, Silvia; Perea, Jesús

    2010-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training program on metabolic parameters and coronary risk factors in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease. The study involved 642 patients with coronary heart disease. Of them, 171 (26.7%) fulfilled criteria for the metabolic syndrome. Clinical data, laboratory tests, and exercise testing were performed before and after the program, which lasted 2 to 3 months. Except for waist circumference, there were no significant differences between groups; blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose improvements during the follow-up were higher in patients with the metabolic syndrome (all P<.001). At study end, in patients with the metabolic syndrome, functional capacity increased by 26.45% ( P<.001), as measured by metabolic equivalents, with a slight increase of 1.25% ( P=not significant) in the double product. Patients with the metabolic syndrome who took part in this secondary prevention program reported improvements in cardiovascular risk profile and functional capacity.

  3. Dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Dynamics of glucose concentration in human organism is an important diagnostic characteristic for it's parameters correlate significantly with the severity of metabolic, vessel and perfusion disorders. 36 patients with stable angina pectoris of II and III functional classes were involved in this study. All of them were men in age range of 45-59 years old. 7 patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (aged from 49 to 59 years old) form the group of compare. Control group (n = 5) was of practically healthy men in comparable age. To all patients intravenous glucose solution (40%) in standard loading dose was injected. Capillary and vein blood samples were withdrawn before, and 5, 60, 120, 180 and 240 minutes after glucose load. At these time points blood pressure and glucose concentration were measured. In prepared blood smears shape, deformability and sizes of erythrocytes, quantity and degree of shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were studied. Received data were approximated by polynomial of high degree to receive concentration function of studied parameters, which first derivative elucidate velocity characteristics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease and practically healthy persons. Received data show principle differences in dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease as a possible mechanism of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  4. Fast Gated EPR Imaging of the Beating Heart: Spatiotemporally-Resolved 3D Imaging of Free Radical Distribution during the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiyu; Reyes, Levy A.; Johnson, David H.; Velayutham, Murugesan; Yang, Changjun; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo or ex vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a powerful technique for determining the spatial distribution of free radicals and other paramagnetic species in living organs and tissues. However, applications of EPRI have been limited by long projection acquisition times and the consequent fact that rapid gated EPRI was not possible. Hence in vivo EPRI typically provided only time-averaged information. In order to achieve direct gated EPRI, a fast EPR acquisition scheme was developed to decrease EPR projection acquisition time down to 10 – 20 ms, along with corresponding software and instrumentation to achieve fast gated EPRI of the isolated beating heart with submillimeter spatial resolution in as little as 2 to 3 minutes. Reconstructed images display temporal and spatial variations of the free radical distribution, anatomical structure, and contractile function within the rat heart during the cardiac cycle. PMID:22473660

  5. Cell-sheet Therapy With Omentopexy Promotes Arteriogenesis and Improves Coronary Circulation Physiology in Failing Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kainuma, Satoshi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Pearson, James; Chen, Yi Ching; Saito, Atsuhiro; Harada, Akima; Shiozaki, Motoko; Iseoka, Hiroko; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Horitsugi, Genki; Ishibashi, Mana; Ikeda, Hayato; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Sonobe, Takashi; Fujii, Yutaka; Naito, Hisamichi; Umetani, Keiji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo; Kobayashi, Eiji; Daimon, Takashi; Ueno, Takayoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Toda, Koichi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hatazawa, Jun; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Cell-sheet transplantation induces angiogenesis for chronic myocardial infarction (MI), though insufficient capillary maturation and paucity of arteriogenesis may limit its therapeutic effects. Omentum has been used clinically to promote revascularization and healing of ischemic tissues. We hypothesized that cell-sheet transplantation covered with an omentum-flap would effectively establish mature blood vessels and improve coronary microcirculation physiology, enhancing the therapeutic effects of cell-sheet therapy. Rats were divided into four groups after coronary ligation; skeletal myoblast cell-sheet plus omentum-flap (combined), cell-sheet only, omentum-flap only, and sham operation. At 4 weeks after the treatment, the combined group showed attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and a greater amount of functionally (CD31+/lectin+) and structurally (CD31+/α-SMA+) mature blood vessels, along with myocardial upregulation of relevant genes. Synchrotron-based microangiography revealed that the combined procedure increased vascularization in resistance arterial vessels with better dilatory responses to endothelium-dependent agents. Serial 13N-ammonia PET showed better global coronary flow reserve in the combined group, mainly attributed to improvement in the basal left ventricle. Consequently, the combined group had sustained improvements in cardiac function parameters and better functional capacity. Cell-sheet transplantation with an omentum-flap better promoted arteriogenesis and improved coronary microcirculation physiology in ischemic myocardium, leading to potent functional recovery in the failing heart. PMID:25421595

  6. Socioeconomic inequalities in access to treatment for coronary heart disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sara L; Richter, Matthias; Schröder, Jochen; Frantz, Stefan; Fink, Astrid

    2016-09-15

    Strong socioeconomic inequalities exist in cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The current review aims to synthesize the current evidence on the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and access to treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined quantitative studies analyzing the relationship between SES and access to CHD treatment that were published between 1996 and 2015. Our data sources included Medline and Web of Science. Our search yielded a total of 2066 records, 57 of which met our inclusion criteria. Low SES was found to be associated with low access to coronary procedures and secondary prevention. Access to coronary procedures, especially coronary angiography, was mainly related to SES to the disadvantage of patients with low SES. However, access to drug treatment and cardiac rehabilitation was only associated with SES in about half of the studies. The association between SES and access to treatment for CHD was stronger when SES was measured based on individual-level compared to area level, and stronger for individuals living in countries without universal health coverage. Socioeconomic inequalities exist in access to CHD treatment, and universal health coverage shows only a minor effect on this relationship. Inequalities diminish along the treatment pathway for CHD from diagnostic procedures to secondary prevention. We therefore conclude that CHD might be underdiagnosed in patients with low SES. Our results indicate that there is an urgent need to improve access to CHD treatment, especially by increasing the supply of diagnostic angiographies, to reduce inequalities across different healthcare systems.

  7. Cell-sheet therapy with omentopexy promotes arteriogenesis and improves coronary circulation physiology in failing heart.

    PubMed

    Kainuma, Satoshi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Pearson, James; Chen, Yi Ching; Saito, Atsuhiro; Harada, Akima; Shiozaki, Motoko; Iseoka, Hiroko; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Horitsugi, Genki; Ishibashi, Mana; Ikeda, Hayato; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Sonobe, Takashi; Fujii, Yutaka; Naito, Hisamichi; Umetani, Keiji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo; Kobayashi, Eiji; Daimon, Takashi; Ueno, Takayoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Toda, Koichi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hatazawa, Jun; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-02-01

    Cell-sheet transplantation induces angiogenesis for chronic myocardial infarction (MI), though insufficient capillary maturation and paucity of arteriogenesis may limit its therapeutic effects. Omentum has been used clinically to promote revascularization and healing of ischemic tissues. We hypothesized that cell-sheet transplantation covered with an omentum-flap would effectively establish mature blood vessels and improve coronary microcirculation physiology, enhancing the therapeutic effects of cell-sheet therapy. Rats were divided into four groups after coronary ligation; skeletal myoblast cell-sheet plus omentum-flap (combined), cell-sheet only, omentum-flap only, and sham operation. At 4 weeks after the treatment, the combined group showed attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and a greater amount of functionally (CD31(+)/lectin(+)) and structurally (CD31(+)/α-SMA(+)) mature blood vessels, along with myocardial upregulation of relevant genes. Synchrotron-based microangiography revealed that the combined procedure increased vascularization in resistance arterial vessels with better dilatory responses to endothelium-dependent agents. Serial (13)N-ammonia PET showed better global coronary flow reserve in the combined group, mainly attributed to improvement in the basal left ventricle. Consequently, the combined group had sustained improvements in cardiac function parameters and better functional capacity. Cell-sheet transplantation with an omentum-flap better promoted arteriogenesis and improved coronary microcirculation physiology in ischemic myocardium, leading to potent functional recovery in the failing heart. PMID:25421595

  8. Direct effects of smoking on the heart: silent ischemic disturbances of coronary flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deanfield, J.E.; Shea, M.J.; Wilson, R.A.; Horlock, P.; de Landsheere, C.M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1986-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is strongly associated with ischemic heart disease and acute coronary events. The effect of smoking a single cigarette on regional myocardial perfusion was studied in 13 chronic smokers with typical stable angina pectoris using positron emission tomography and rubidium-82 (/sup 82/Rb). Findings were compared with the effects of physical exercise. After exercise, 8 patients (61%) had angina, ST depression and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion. Uptake of /sup 82/Rb increased from 49 +/- 8 to 60 +/- 7 in remote myocardium, but decreased from 46 +/- 3 to 37 +/- 5 in an ischemic area. The remaining 5 patients (39%) had homogeneous increases in /sup 82/Rb uptake without angina or ST depression. After smoking, 6 of the 8 patients with positive exercise test responses had a decrease in /sup 82/Rb uptake, from 47 +/- 3 to 35 +/- 6 in the same segment of myocardium affected during exercise. However, in contrast to exercise, the events during smoking were largely silent. The absolute decreases in regional /sup 82/Rb uptake after smoking occurred at significantly lower levels of myocardial oxygen demand than after exercise. This suggests that an impairment of coronary blood supply is responsible. Thus, in smokers with coronary artery disease, each cigarette can cause profound silent disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion that are likely to occur frequently during daily life. Such repeated insults may represent an important mechanism linking smoking with coronary events.

  9. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and mortality: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Whittle, Jeff; Lynch, Amy I.; Colantonio, Lisandro D.; Simpson, Lara M.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Levitan, Emily B.; Whelton, Paul K; Cushman, William C.; Louis, Gail T.; Davis, Barry R.; Oparil, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Variability of blood pressure (BP) across outpatient visits is frequently dismissed as random fluctuation around a patient’s underlying BP. Objective: Examine the association between visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes. Design Prospective cohort study Setting Post-hoc analysis of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). Participants 25,814 ALLHAT participants. Measurements VVV of SBP was defined as the standard deviation (SD) across BP measurements obtained at 7 visits conducted from 6 to 28 months following ALLHAT enrollment. Participants free of cardiovascular disease events during the first 28 months of follow-up were followed from the month 28 study visit through the end of active ALLHAT follow-up. Outcomes included fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure. Results There were 1194 cases of fatal CHD or non-fatal MI, 1948 deaths, 606 cases of stroke and 921 cases of heart failure during follow-up. After multivariable adjustment including mean SBP, the hazard ratio comparing participants in the highest versus lowest quintile of SD of SBP (≥14.4 mmHg versus <6.5 mmHg) was 1.30 (1.06–1.59) for fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, 1.58 (1.32–1.90) for all-cause mortality, 1.46 (1.06–2.01) for stroke, and 1.25 (0.97–1.61) for heart failure. Higher VVV of DBP was also associated with cardiovascular disease events and mortality. Limitations Long-term outcomes were not available. Conclusions Higher VVV of SBP is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Future studies should examine whether reducing VVV of BP lowers this risk. Primary funding source National Institutes of Health PMID:26215765

  10. Correlation of coronary artery stenosis evaluation with left heart structure and function by multi-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Song, L N; Cao, A D; Niu, Y J; Liu, N

    2014-08-07

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) evaluation of coronary artery stenosis on left heart structure and systolic function. Coronary artery CT angiography was performed in 200 patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease, and then according to the AHA coronary artery 17-segment fractionation method, the Gensini score (GS) was determined for every narrow segment, and one-stop assessment of the correlation between left heart structure and function was performed. After the grouping of GS quartiles from low to high, there were differences between different patients with regard to LVDD, LADD, LVEDV, LVESV, MM, LVEF, and FS, while no difference in SV and CO. GS showed linear negative correlation with LVEF and FS, and linear positive correlation with LVDD, LADD, LVEDV, LVESV, and MM, while no correlation with SV and CO. That is, GS of coronary artery stenosis was negatively correlated with left ventricular systolic function and positively correlated with myocardial mass. The narrower the coronary artery, the worse the cardiac function and the higher the myocardial hypertrophy. Coronary artery stenosis was one of the important causes of the decrease in left ventricular systolic function and cardiac remodeling.

  11. Body size and fat distribution as predictors of coronary heart disease among middle-aged and older US men.

    PubMed

    Rimm, E B; Stampfer, M J; Giovannucci, E; Ascherio, A; Spiegelman, D; Colditz, G A; Willett, W C

    1995-06-15

    Obesity, android fat distribution, and other anthropometric measures have been associated with coronary heart disease in long-term prospective studies. However, fluctuations in weight due to age-related hormonal changes and changes in lifestyle practices may bias relative risk estimates over a long follow-up period. The authors prospectively studied the association between body mass index (BMI) (kg/m2), waist-to-hip ratio, and height as independent predictors of incident coronary heart disease in a 3-year prospective study among 29,122 US men aged 40-75 years in 1986. The authors documented 420 incident coronary events during the follow-up period. Body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, short stature, and weight gain since age 21 were associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. Among men younger than 65, after adjusting for other coronary risk factors, the relative risk was 1.72 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-2.69) for men with BMI of 25-28.9, 2.61 (95% CI 1.54-4.42) for BMI of 29.0-32.9, and 3.44 (95% CI 1.67-7.09) for obese men with BMI > or = 33 compared with lean men with BMI < 23.0. Among men > or = 65 years of age, the association between BMI and risk of coronary heart disease was much weaker. However, in this age group, the waist-to-hip ratio was a much stronger predictor of risk (relative risk = 2.76, 95% CI 1.22-6.23 between extreme quintiles). These results suggest that for younger men, obesity, independent of fat distribution, is a strong risk factor for coronary heart disease. For older men, measures of fat distribution may be better than body mass index at predicting risk of coronary disease.

  12. Socioeconomic Status and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: The Role of Social Cognitive Factors

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Jennifer E.; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine existing research on social cognitive factors that may, in part, mediate the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and coronary heart disease (CHD). We focus on how social status is ‘carried’ in the mental systems of individuals, and how these systems differentially affect CHD risk and associated behaviors. To this end, literatures documenting the association of various social cognitive factors (e.g., social comparison, perceived discrimination, and self-efficacy) with cardiovascular disease are reviewed as are literatures regarding the relationship of these factors to SES. Possible mechanisms through which social cognitions may affect health are addressed. In addition, directions for future research are discussed, and a model identifying the possible associations between social cognitive factors, SES, and coronary disease is provided. PMID:21785652

  13. Amaranth oil application for coronary heart disease and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Danik M; Miroshnichenko, Lidia A; Kulakova, Svetlana N; Pogojeva, Ala V; Zoloedov, Vladimir I

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the Nation's leading killer for both men and women among all racial and ethnic groups. Development and progression of CVD is linked to the presence of risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. It is known that cholesterol is an indicator of increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Low-density cholesterol (LDL) above 130 mg/dl high-density cholesterol (HDL) cholesterol below 35 mg/dl and total blood cholesterol above 200 mg/dl are indicators of problematic cholesterol. Proper ranges of cholesterol are important in the prevention of CVD. It has been suggested that a reduction in the consumption of saturated and an increase in unsaturated fatty acids is beneficial and prevents CVD. Amaranth grain contains tocotrienols and squalene compounds, which are known to affect cholesterol biosynthesis. The cholesterol precursors squalene, lanosterol and other methyl sterols, reflect cholesterol synthesis [1-3], whereas plant sterols and cholestanol, a metabolite of cholesterol, reflect the efficiency of cholesterol absorption in normal and hyperlipidemic populations [4-6]. Qureshi with co-authors [7] showed that feeding of chickens with amaranth oil decreases blood cholesterol levels, which are supported by the work of others [8]. Previously, we have shown that Amaranth oil modulates the cell membrane fluidity [9] and stabilized membranes that could be one reason as to why it is beneficial to those who consume it. It is known that in hypertension, the cell membrane is defective and hence, the movement of the Na and K ions across the cell membranes could defective that could contribute to the development of increase in blood pressure. Based on these properties of amaranth oil we hypothesize that it could be of significant benefit for patients with CVD. PMID:17207282

  14. Personality traits as risk factors for stroke and coronary heart disease mortality: pooled analysis of three cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Markus; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Elovainio, Marko; Kivimäki, Mika

    2014-10-01

    We examined whether personality traits are differently associated with coronary heart disease and stroke mortality. Participants were pooled from three prospective cohort studies (Health and Retirement Study, Wisconsin Longitudinal Study graduate and sibling samples; n = 24,543 men and women, mean age 61.4 years, mortality follow-up between 3 and 15 years). There were 423 coronary heart disease deaths and 88 stroke deaths during 212,542 person-years at risk. Higher extraversion was associated with an increased risk of stroke (hazard ratio per each standard deviation increase in personality trait HR = 1.41, 95 % CI 1.10-1.80) but not with coronary heart disease mortality (HR = 0.93, 0.83-1.05). High neuroticism, in turn, was more strongly related to the risk of coronary heart disease (HR = 1.16, 1.04-1.29) than stroke deaths (HR = 0.95, 0.78-1.17). High conscientiousness was associated with lower mortality risk from both coronary heart disease (HR = 0.74, 0.67-0.81) and stroke (HR = 0.78, 0.63-0.97). Cardiovascular risk associated with personality traits appears to vary between main cardiac and cerebral disease endpoints.

  15. Triad of metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, and coronary heart disease with a focus on microalbuminuria death by overeating.

    PubMed

    Gobal, Freij; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Shah, Sudhir; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2011-06-01

    Coronary heart disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and its incidence is rising worldwide. Because atherosclerosis is a chronic process, and it is often associated with certain lifestyle and risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, much emphasis is being placed on lifestyle modification and control of risk factors. It is being recognized that some lifestyle patterns such as overeating result in metabolic syndrome, which may play a role in the development of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease. Here, we focus on an important relationship between these 3 conditions, and we provide evidence that microalbuminuria develops in many patients with metabolic syndrome, may be an important correlate of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease, and may represent an important prognostic marker. Although the pathogenesis of microalbuminuria in metabolic syndrome is not clear, we suggest that microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, and coronary heart disease share common pathways involving inflammation and oxidative stress. We also discuss that a healthy lifestyle is essential for preventing and treating chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease seen in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  16. Long-term planning to meet UK government coronary heart disease revascularization targets.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Cameron; Duff, Celia; Harper, Paul; Shahani, Arjan; Wilderspin, Hilary; Yates, Jan

    2004-05-01

    The National Service Framework (NSF) for Coronary Heart Disease, published in the UK in 2000, gave target intervention rates of 750 procedures per million population (pmp) for both percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTCA) and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). This paper describes how one Regional Office of the Department of Health, with CABG and PTCA rates of around half the NSF target levels, designed a strategy to plan rationally to meet the derived population need for these procedures. A bottom-up needs assessment model was used to predict the population need for these procedures for the Eastern Region of the UK. The Excel-based model took account of the effects of demographic change, anticipated reduction in incidence of heart disease due to primary prevention programmes and the expected improvement in cardiology and cardiac surgery technologies. The model predicted that excess procedures would be required across the region over the next 20 years. Further access study modelling was used to determine the best location for additional tertiary cardiac centres. Further, a commissioning tool was produced that could compare the predicted need, including additional procedures needed to meet waiting list targets, with capacity available from a range of providers. These tools have been used successfully in the Eastern Region to increase the regional revascularization rates from 371 pmp CABG and 322 pmp PTCA in 2000 to planned rates of 453 pmp CABG and 447 pmp PTCA in 2002/2003, to recommend the building of a new tertiary cardiac centre in Essex in the next decade and to inform the commissioning of revascularization rates in three coronary heart disease networks.

  17. Intelligence System for Diagnosis Level of Coronary Heart Disease with K-Star Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kusnanto, Hari; Herianto, Herianto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, and it is important to diagnose the level of the disease. Intelligence systems for diagnosis proved can be used to support diagnosis of the disease. Unfortunately, most of the data available between the level/type of coronary heart disease is unbalanced. As a result system performance is low. Methods This paper proposes an intelligence systems for the diagnosis of the level of coronary heart disease taking into account the problem of data imbalance. The first stage of this research was preprocessing, which included resampled non-stratified random sampling (R), the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE), clean data out of range attribute (COR), and remove duplicate (RD). The second step was the sharing of data for training and testing using a k-fold cross-validation model and training multiclass classification by the K-star algorithm. The third step was performance evaluation. The proposed system was evaluated using the performance parameters of sensitivity, specificity, positive prediction value (PPV), negative prediction value (NPV), area under the curve (AUC) and F-measure. Results The results showed that the proposed system provides an average performance with sensitivity of 80.1%, specificity of 95%, PPV of 80.1%, NPV of 95%, AUC of 87.5%, and F-measure of 80.1%. Performance of the system without consideration of data imbalance provide showed sensitivity of 53.1%, specificity of 88,3%, PPV of 53.1%, NPV of 88.3%, AUC of 70.7%, and F-measure of 53.1%. Conclusions Based on these results it can be concluded that the proposed system is able to deliver good performance in the category of classification. PMID:26893948

  18. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  19. Regional myocardial blood flow and coronary vascular reserve in unanesthetized ponies during pacing-induced ventricular tachycardia

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.; Manohar, M.; Lundeen, G.

    1983-08-01

    To examine the effects of tachycardia on coronary circulation, transmural distribution of myocardial blood flow (MBF, 15-micron diameter radionuclide-labeled microspheres) was studied in six healthy adult ponies at rest (heart rate . 60 +/- 7 beats . min-1), during ventricular pacing at 150 and 200 beats . min-1, as well as with ventricular pacing at 250 beats . min-1 before and during maximal coronary vasodilatation (iv adenosine infusion; 4 mumole . kg-1 . min-1). Mean aortic pressure and cardiac output were unchanged from control values with ventricular pacing. Whereas ventricular pacing at 150 and 200 beats . min-1 resulted in a progressive uniform increase in transmural MBF and well-maintained endo:epi perfusion ratio, pacing at 250 beats . min-1 did not result in a further increase in MBF compared to pacing at 200 beats . min-1 and the left ventricular (LV) subendocardial:subepicardial (endo:epi) perfusion ratio was significantly less than 1.00 (0.87 +/- 0.05). Blood flow to the LV papillary muscles and subendocardium was significantly less than that recorded at 200 beats . min-1. The LV endo:epi perfusion ratio with ventricular pacing at 250 beats . min-1 during adenosine infusion resulted in a decrease in mean aortic pressure (63% of control value) and a marked further reduction in blood flow to the LV papillary muscles as well as the LV subendocardium, while MBF increased dramatically in the LV subepicardium compared to values observed during ventricular pacing at 250 beats . min-1 alone. These data demonstrate that coronary vasomotion functions to maintain LV subendocardial blood flow in the pony myocardium at a heart rate of 200 beats . min-1, while at 250 beats . min-1 exhaustion of coronary vasodilator reserve in the deeper layers limits further increase in MBF.

  20. Dietary patterns and their association with acute coronary heart disease: Lessons from the REGARDS Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2015-01-01

    Shikany et al used data from 17,418 participants in the REGARDS study, a national, population-based, longitudinal study of white and black adults aged ≥ 45 years, enrolled between 2003–2007. They examined 536 acute coronary heart disease events at follow-up (median 5.8 years) in relation to five dietary patterns (Convenience, Plant-based, Sweets, Southern, and Alcohol and Salad). After adjustment for baseline variables, the highest consumers of the Southern pattern experienced a 56% higher hazard for acute CHD. PMID:26779528

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease Is Often Unrecognized among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: The REGARDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, William M.; Newsome, Britt B.; McClure, Leslie A.; Cushman, Mary; Howard, George; Audhya, Paul; Abramson, Jerome L.; Warnock, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with kidney disease are at increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and CHD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Awareness of CKD may potentially influence diagnostic decisions, life-style changes and pharmacologic interventions targeted at modifiable CHD risk factors. We describe here the degree to which persons with CHD are aware of their CKD. Methods The Reasons for Geographical and Racial Difference in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study, a population-based sample of US residents aged 45 and older. We included in our analyses 28,112 REGARDS participants recruited as of June 2007. We estimated GFR (eGFR) using the MDRD equation, defined CKD as a GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and ascertained awareness of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease through self-report. We used the odds ratio to compare the association between awareness of kidney disease, as measured by GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, among individuals with and without self-reported CHD by both the presence of CKD and the severity of impaired kidney function. Results Coronary heart disease was reported by 3,803 (14.1%) of subjects, and 11.3% of subjects had CKD by eGFR. Among all individuals with a GFR <60 ml/min/ 1.73 m2, 9.6% reported having been told by a physician that they had kidney disease. Among those with CHD and CKD, 5.0% were aware of their CKD compared to 2.0% in those without CHD [OR (95% CI) = 2.57 (2.08, 3.28)]. This difference persisted after controlling for the level of kidney function [aOR (95% CI) = 1.87 (1.43, 2.41)]. Conclusion There was a high prevalence of CKD and a low prevalence of awareness of kidney disease among older adults in the US population with or without coronary heart disease. These findings support recent recommendations that patients with cardiovascular disease be systematically screened for and educated about CKD. PMID:18663284

  2. Possible connection between milk and coronary heart disease: the calcium hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Seely, S

    2000-05-01

    Excessive milk consumption may adversely affect the circulation on account of the high calcium content of milk and because lactose promotes the intestinal absorption of calcium. Excessive calcium intake may cause calcification and rigidification of the large elastic arteries, which could be an important factor in causing myocardial ischaemia. The calcium hypothesis can throw light on some puzzling peculiarities of arterial disease, for instance the changing ratio of male and female mortality rates in various age groups, the apparently beneficial effect of a warm environment and the entirely different worldwide distribution of coronary heart disease and strokes.

  3. An integrated and coordinated approach to preventing recurrent coronary heart disease events in Australia.

    PubMed

    Briffa, Tom G; Kinsman, Leigh; Maiorana, Andrew J; Zecchin, Robert; Redfern, Julie; Davidson, Patricia M; Paull, Glenn; Nagle, Amanda; Denniss, A Robert

    2009-06-15

    Implementing existing knowledge about cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and heart failure management could markedly reduce mortality after acute coronary syndromes and revascularisation therapy. Contemporary CR and secondary prevention programs are cost-effective, safe and beneficial for patients of all ages, leading to improved survival, fewer revascularisation procedures and reduced rehospitalisation. Despite the proven benefits attributed to these secondary prevention interventions, they are not well attended by patients. Modern programs must be flexible, culturally safe, multifaceted and integrated with the patient's primary health care provider to achieve optimal and sustainable benefits for most patients.

  4. Analysis of physical fitness and coronary heart disease risk of Dallas area police officers.

    PubMed

    Pollock, M L; Gettman, L R; Meyer, B U

    1978-06-01

    Two hundred thirteen male police officers between 21 and 52 years of age volunteered to participate in a physical evaluation and conditioning program. Information concerning the physical fitness status and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) of police officers were shown. Younger police officers (less than 30 years of age) were average in physical fitness levels and CHD risk compared to the population of the same age. Middle-aged police officers were shown to be lower in physical fitness levels and higher in CHD risk compared to their cohorts. The results from this investigation support the need for physical fitness and preventive medicine programs for police officers.

  5. Biomarkers in Cardiology - Part 2: In Coronary Heart Disease, Valve Disease and Special Situations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality and morbidity in Brazil. Their primary and secondary preventions are a priority for the health system and require multiple approaches for increased effectiveness. Biomarkers are tools used to identify with greater accuracy high-risk individuals, establish a faster diagnosis, guide treatment, and determine prognosis. This review aims to highlight the importance of biomarkers in clinical cardiology practice and raise relevant points regarding their application and perspectives for the next few years. This document was divided into two parts. This second part addresses the application of biomarkers in coronary heart disease, valvular diseases, cardio-oncology, pulmonary embolism, and cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:26083777

  6. Plasma levels of IL-8 predict early complications in patients with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoyong; Li, Junyong; Gu, Jian; Li, Shuren; Dang, Yi; Wang, Tianhong

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of plasma interleukin-8 (IL-8) for early complications after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The pre- and postprocedural plasma levels of IL-8 and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) were examined by immunoassay, and the expression of CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils was assessed by flow cytometry. Early complications (abrupt occlusion, threatened abrupt occlusion, early recurrence of ischemia, myocardial infarction, cardiac sudden death, and target vessel revascularization) occurred intra-procedure and 30 days after PCI and were observed in 121 consecutive patients with coronary heart disease. Sixteen patients with early complications had high preprocedural levels and high postprocedural differentials of IL-8, CRP, and CD11b/CD18 compared to those without complications (all P < 0.05). The occurrence of complications showed a significant increase in the patients according to the tertiles of IL-8, CRP, and CD11b/CD18. Preprocedural levels of IL-8 (RR = 5.864, CI = 1.658-20.734, P = 0.006) and diabetes (RR = 1.587, CI = 1.246-2.132, P = 0.038) were independent predictors of early complications. There were significant correlations in the postprocedural differential between IL-8 and CD11b/CD18 (r = 0.776, P = 0.002) in patients with complications. The results reveal that the early complications after PCI contribute to preprocedural inflammatory responses. Normal levels of IL-8 may be powerful negative predictors of early complications in patients with CHD following PCI. PMID:12906027

  7. Chronic skeletal muscle ischemia preserves coronary flow in the ischemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Varnavas, Varnavas C; Kontaras, Konstantinos; Glava, Chryssoula; Maniotis, Christos D; Koutouzis, Michael; Baltogiannis, Giannis G; Papalois, Apostolos; Kolettis, Theofilos M; Kyriakides, Zenon S

    2011-10-01

    Chronic skeletal muscle ischemia confers cytoprotection to the ventricular myocardium during infarction, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Although neovascularization in the left ventricular myocardium has been proposed as a possible mechanism, the functional capacity of such vessels has not been studied. We examined the effects of chronic limb ischemia on infarct size, coronary blood flow, and left ventricular function after ischemia-reperfusion. Hindlimb ischemia was induced in 65 Wistar rats by excision of the left femoral artery, whereas 65 rats were sham operated. After 4 wk, myocardial infarction was generated by permanent coronary artery ligation. Infarct size was measured 24 h postligation. Left ventricular function was evaluated in isolated hearts after ischemia-reperfusion, 4 wk after limb ischemia. Neovascularization was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and coronary flow was measured under maximum vasodilatation at different perfusion pressures before and after coronary ligation. Infarct size was smaller after limb ischemia compared with controls (24.4 ± 8.1% vs. 46.2 ± 9.5% of the ventricle and 47.6 ± 8.7% vs. 80.1 ± 9.3% of the ischemic area, respectively). Indexes of left ventricular function at the end of reperfusion (divided by baseline values) were improved after limb ischemia (developed pressure: 0.68 ± 0.06 vs. 0.59 ± 0.05, P = 0.008; maximum +dP/dt: 0.70 ± 0.08 vs. 0.59 ± 0.04, P = 0.004; and maximum -dP/dt: 0.86 ± 0.14 vs. 0.72 ± 0.10, P = 0.041). Coronary vessel density was markedly higher (P = 0.00021) in limb ischemic rats. In contrast to controls (F = 5.65, P = 0.00182), where coronary flow decreased, it remained unchanged (F = 1.36, P = 0.28) after ligation in limb ischemic rats. In conclusion, chronic hindlimb ischemia decreases infarct size and attenuates left ventricular dysfunction by increasing coronary collateral vessel density and blood flow.

  8. Effects of diltiazem on postextrasystolic potentiation in coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, M; Maioli, M; Marchionni, N; Barletta, G A; Fantini, F

    1990-07-01

    The effects of the calcium antagonist, diltiazem (D), on left ventricular (LV) response to postextrasystolic potentiation (PESP) were investigated in 15 coronary artery disease patients. Several haemodynamic and LV function parameters, as well as regional wall kinetics, were analysed. During LV angiography, which was performed before and after D administration (0.25 mg kg-1 bolus and 1.4 microgram kg-1 min-1 infusion), programmed atrial stimulation was applied with the sequence: S1-S1 = 600 ms; S1-S2 = 400 ms; S2-S3 = 800 ms. The results indicate that D exerts a mild negative inotropic effect which is more evident in the postextrasystolic beat (postextrasystolic ESP/ESV and dP/dtmax were significantly lower after D) but the postextrasystolic increase of EF is maintained by the effects of the drug on loading conditions of the left ventricle. Our results indicate that both a reduction of afterload and an increase of preload take place after D. The greater preload reserve induced by the drug (EDVI was significantly higher in each patient after D) was associated with a slight increase in left ventricular filling rate, while end-diastolic compliance and pressure did not show significant variations. These results suggest that the increase in left ventricular preload is due to an increase in left atrial driving pressure, an improvement of left ventricular relaxation or both. D does not affect regional wall kinetics either in basal or in the postextrasystolic beat when overall areas are considered, however its effect seems to be related to the degree of basal regional contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Release kinetics of cardiac troponin T in coronary effluent from isolated rat hearts during hypoxia and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Asayama, J; Yamahara, Y; Ohta, B; Miyazaki, H; Tatsumi, T; Matsumoto, T; Inoue, D; Nakagawa, M

    1992-01-01

    A newly developed troponin T (TnT) test for the detection of myocardial cell necrosis has been reported to be very efficient in the detection of acute myocardial infarction. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cardiac TnT in coronary effluent from isolated heart perfused with albumin-free perfusion medium could be detected using the enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay developed by Katus et al. Isolated rat hearts were perfused according to the method of Langendorff. Coronary flow rate was measured by timed collection of the coronary perfusate that dripped from the hearts during 5 h of hypoxia (protocol A) or 4 h of hypoxia followed by 1 h of reoxygenation (protocol B). Creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LD) levels were compared with that of TnT. Myocardial adenine nucleotides were measured by HPLC. There was a strong correlation between TnT levels in albumin-free coronary effluent and TnT levels in coronary effluent diluted 1:1 with 5% bovine serum albumin (r = 0.996, N = 72). The coefficients of correlation between TnT and CK or LD during hypoxia and reoxygenation were 0.891 (N = 88) and 0.871 (N = 88), respectively. The coefficient of correlation between CK and LD was 0.993 (N = 88). There were no significant differences in either the decrease of coronary flow or the increase of TnT content between the hearts in the two protocols. There was no significant correlation between sigma TnT and energy charge of adenine nucleotides. These results indicate that cardiac TnT levels can be easily measured in albumin-free coronary effluent of isolated heart preparations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. A quantitative high resolution voxel-wise assessment of myocardial blood flow from contrast-enhanced first-pass magnetic resonance perfusion imaging: microsphere validation in a magnetic resonance compatible free beating explanted pig heart model

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Andreas; Sinclair, Matthew; Zarinabad, Niloufar; Ishida, Masaki; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P.H.M.; Paul, Matthias; van Horssen, Pepijn; Hussain, Shazia T.; Perera, Divaka; Schaeffter, Tobias; Spaan, Jos A.E.; Siebes, Maria; Nagel, Eike; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the feasibility of high-resolution quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) voxel-wise perfusion imaging using clinical 1.5 and 3 T sequences and to validate it using fluorescently labelled microspheres in combination with a state of the art imaging cryomicrotome in a novel, isolated blood-perfused MR-compatible free beating pig heart model without respiratory motion. Methods and results MR perfusion imaging was performed in pig hearts at 1.5 (n = 4) and 3 T (n = 4). Images were acquired at physiological flow (‘rest’), reduced flow (‘ischaemia’), and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia (‘stress’) in control and coronary occlusion conditions. Fluorescently labelled microspheres and known coronary myocardial blood flow represented the reference standards for quantitative perfusion validation. For the comparison with microspheres, the LV was divided into 48 segments based on a subdivision of the 16 AHA segments into subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial subsegments. Perfusion quantification of the time-signal intensity curves was performed using a Fermi function deconvolution. High-resolution quantitative voxel-wise perfusion assessment was able to distinguish between occluded and remote myocardium (P < 0.001) and between rest, ischaemia, and stress perfusion conditions at 1.5 T (P < 0.001) and at 3 T (P < 0.001). CMR-MBF estimates correlated well with the microspheres at the AHA segmental level at 1.5 T (r = 0.94, P < 0.001) and at 3 T (r = 0.96, P < 0.001) and at the subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial level at 1.5 T (r = 0.93, r = 0.9, r = 0.88, P < 0.001, respectively) and at 3 T (r = 0.91, r = 0.95, r = 0.84, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion CMR-derived voxel-wise quantitative blood flow assessment is feasible and very accurate compared with microspheres. This technique is suitable for both clinically used field strengths and may provide the tools to assess extent and severity of myocardial

  11. Applications of Data Mining Methods in the Integrative Medical Studies of Coronary Heart Disease: Progress and Prospect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixin; Guo, Fang

    2014-01-01

    A large amount of studies show that real-world study has strong external validity than the traditional randomized controlled trials and can evaluate the effect of interventions in a real clinical setting, which open up a new path for researches of integrative medicine in coronary heart disease. However, clinical data of integrative medicine in coronary heart disease are large in amount and complex in data types, making exploring the appropriate methodology a hot topic. Data mining techniques are to analyze and dig out useful information and knowledge from the mass data to guide people's practices. The present review provides insights for the main features of data mining and their applications of integrative medical studies in coronary heart disease, aiming to analyze the progress and prospect in this field. PMID:25544853

  12. Coronary tree extraction using motion layer separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ling, Haibin; Prummer, Simone; Zhou, Kevin Shaohua; Ostermeier, Martin; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2009-01-01

    Fluoroscopic images contain useful information that is difficult to comprehend due to the collapse of the 3D information into 2D space. Extracting the informative layers and analyzing them separately could significantly improve the task of understanding the image content. Traditional Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) is not applicable for coronary angiography because of heart beat and breathing motion. In this work, we propose a layer extraction method for separating transparent motion layers in fluoroscopic image sequences, so that coronary tree can be better visualized.. The method is based on the fact that different anatomical structures possess different motion patterns, e.g., heart is beating fast, while lung is breathing slower. A multiscale implementation is used to further improve the efficiency and accuracy. The proposed approach helps to enhance the visibility of the vessel tree, both visually and quantitatively.

  13. Trace metals and coronary heart disease risk indicators in 152 elderly men (the Zutphen study)

    SciTech Connect

    Kromhout, D.; Wibowo, A.A.E.; Herber, R.F.M.; Dalderup, L.M.; Heerdink, H.; de Lezenne Coulander, C.; Zielhuis, R.L.

    1985-09-01

    Information about trace metals and coronary heart disease risk indicators was collected in 1977 among 152 men aged 57-76 years in the town of Zutphen, the Netherlands. Serum zinc, serum copper, blood cadmium, and blood lead were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry and serum lithium by flame emission spectrometry. After uni- and multivariate regression analysis, the following statistically significant relations were found: serum zinc was inversely related to resting heart rate; serum copper was positively related to cigarette smoking and inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol; blood cadmium was strongly positively related to cigarette smoking and inversely to Quetelet index; the positive relation between blood lead and cigarette smoking was of borderline significance; and blood lead was related to blood pressure, with the relation being stronger for systolic than for diastolic blood pressure.

  14. Design and baseline characteristics of a coronary heart disease prospective cohort: two-year experience from the strategy of registry of acute coronary syndrome study (ERICO study)

    PubMed Central

    Goulart, Alessandra; Santos, Itamar S; Sitnik, Debora; Staniak, Henrique L; Fedeli, Ligia M; Pastore, Carlos Alberto; Samesima, Nelson; Bittencourt, Marcio S; Pereira, Alexandre C; Lotufo, Paulo A; Bensenor, Isabela M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the ERICO study (Strategy of Registry of Acute Coronary Syndrome), a prospective cohort to investigate the epidemiology of acute coronary syndrome. METHODS: The ERICO study, which is being performed at a secondary general hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil, is enrolling consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients who are 35 years old or older. The sociodemographic information, medical assessments, treatment data and blood samples are collected at admission. After 30 days, the medical history is updated, and additional blood and urinary samples are collected. In addition, a retinography, carotid intima-media thickness, heart rate variability and pulse-wave velocity are performed. Questionnaires about food frequency, physical activity, sleep apnea and depression are also applied. At six months and annually after an acute event, information is collected by telephone. RESULTS: From February 2009 to September 2011, 738 patients with a diagnosis of an acute coronary syndrome were enrolled. Of these, 208 (28.2%) had ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), 288 (39.0%) had non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and 242 (32.8%) had unstable angina (UA). The mean age was 62.7 years, 58.5% were men and 77.4% had 8 years or less of education. The most common cardiovascular risk factors were hypertension (76%) and sedentarism (73.4%). Only 29.2% had a prior history of coronary heart disease. Compared with the ST-elevation myocardial infarction subgroup, the unstable angina and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients had higher frequencies of hypertension, diabetes, prior coronary heart disease (p<0.001) and dyslipidemia (p = 0.03). Smoking was more frequent in the ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients (p = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with other hospital registries, our findings revealed a higher burden of CV risk factors and less frequent prior CHD history. PMID:23644870

  15. Low-dose copper infusion into the coronary circulation induces acute heart failure in diabetic rats: New mechanism of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carlos Chun Ho; Soon, Choong Yee; Chuang, Chia-Lin; Phillips, Anthony R J; Zhang, Shaoping; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impairs copper (Cu) regulation, causing elevated serum Cu and urinary Cu excretion in patients with established cardiovascular disease; it also causes cardiomyopathy and chronic cardiac impairment linked to defective Cu homeostasis in rats. However, the mechanisms that link impaired Cu regulation to cardiac dysfunction in diabetes are incompletely understood. Chronic treatment with triethylenetetramine (TETA), a Cu²⁺-selective chelator, improves cardiac function in diabetic patients, and in rats with heart disease; the latter displayed ∼3-fold elevations in free Cu²⁺ in the coronary effluent when TETA was infused into their coronary arteries. To further study the nature of defective cardiac Cu regulation in diabetes, we employed an isolated-perfused, working-heart model in which we infused micromolar doses of Cu²⁺ into the coronary arteries and measured acute effects on cardiac function in diabetic and non-diabetic-control rats. Infusion of CuCl₂ solutions caused acute dose-dependent cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts. Several measures of baseline cardiac function were impaired in diabetic hearts, and these defects were exacerbated by low-micromolar Cu²⁺ infusion. The response to infused Cu²⁺ was augmented in diabetic hearts, which became defective at lower infusion levels and underwent complete pump failure (cardiac output = 0 ml/min) more often (P < 0.0001) at concentrations that only moderately impaired function of control hearts. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the acute effects on cardiac function of pathophysiological elevations in coronary Cu²⁺. The effects of Cu²⁺ infusion occur within minutes in both control and diabetic hearts, which suggests that they are not due to remodelling. Heightened sensitivity to the acute effects of small elevations in Cu²⁺ could contribute substantively to impaired cardiac function in patients with diabetes and is thus identified as a new mechanism of heart disease.

  16. Mendelian Randomisation study of the influence of eGFR on coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Charoen, Pimphen; Nitsch, Dorothea; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; White, Jonathan; Zabaneh, Delilah; Jefferis, Barbara; Wannamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Mulick Cassidy, Amy; Gaunt, Tom; Day, Ian; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Brunner, Eric; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hingorani, Aroon; Whittaker, John; Pablo Casas, Juan; Dudbridge, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Impaired kidney function, as measured by reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), has been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in observational studies, but it is unclear whether this association is causal or the result of confounding or reverse causation. In this study we applied Mendelian randomisation analysis using 17 genetic variants previously associated with eGFR to investigate the causal role of kidney function on CHD. We used 13,145 participants from the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium and 194,427 participants from the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis plus Coronary Artery Disease (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D) consortium. We observed significant association of an unweighted gene score with CHD risk (odds ratio = 0.983 per additional eGFR-increasing allele, 95% CI = 0.970-0.996, p = 0.008). However, using weights calculated from UCLEB, the gene score was not associated with disease risk (p = 0.11). These conflicting results could be explained by a single SNP, rs653178, which was not associated with eGFR in the UCLEB sample, but has known pleiotropic effects that prevent us from drawing a causal conclusion. The observational association between low eGFR and increased CHD risk was not explained by potential confounders, and there was no evidence of reverse causation, therefore leaving the remaining unexplained association as an open question.

  17. Optimal use of available claims to identify a Medicare population free of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kent, Shia T; Safford, Monika M; Zhao, Hong; Levitan, Emily B; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Kilpatrick, Ryan D; Kilgore, Meredith L; Muntner, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We examined claims-based approaches for identifying a study population free of coronary heart disease (CHD) using data from 8,937 US blacks and whites enrolled during 2003-2007 in a prospective cohort study linked to Medicare claims. Our goal was to minimize the percentage of persons at study entry with self-reported CHD (previous myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization). We assembled 6 cohorts without CHD claims by requiring 6 months, 1 year, or 2 years of continuous Medicare fee-for-service insurance coverage prior to study entry and using either a fixed-window or all-available look-back period. We examined adding CHD-related claims to our "base algorithm," which included claims for myocardial infarction and coronary revascularization. Using a 6-month fixed-window look-back period, 17.8% of participants without claims in the base algorithm reported having CHD. This was reduced to 3.6% using an all-available look-back period and adding other CHD claims to the base algorithm. Among cohorts using all-available look-back periods, increasing the length of continuous coverage from 6 months to 1 or 2 years reduced the sample size available without lowering the percentage of persons with self-reported CHD. This analysis demonstrates approaches for developing a CHD-free cohort using Medicare claims.

  18. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  19. [Endothelial dysfunction as a marker of vascular aging syndrome on the background of hypertension, coronary heart disease, gout and obesity].

    PubMed

    Vatseba, M O

    2013-09-01

    Under observation were 40 hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease, gout and obesity I and II degree. Patients with hypertension in combination with coronary heart disease, gout and obesity, syndrome of early vascular aging is shown by increased stiffness of arteries, increased peak systolic flow velocity, pulse blood presure, the thickness of the intima-media complex, higher level endotelinemia and reduced endothelial vasodilation. Obtained evidence that losartan in complex combination with basic therapy and metamaks in complex combination with basic therapy positively affect the elastic properties of blood vessels and slow the progression of early vascular aging syndrome.

  20. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... signal to your heart. The signal makes your heart beat at the correct pace. Pacemakers may be used: To correct abnormal heart rhythms. The heart may beat too slowly, too fast, or in an irregular ...

  1. A decrease in the percentage of circulating mDC precursors in patients with coronary heart disease: a relation to the severity and extent of coronary artery lesions?

    PubMed

    Wen, Jin; Wen, Yan; Zhiliang, Li; Lingling, Chen; Longxing, Cao; Ming, Wang; Qiang, Fu

    2013-03-01

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in coronary heart disease. Dendritic cells (DCs) are principal players in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Although the percentage of circulating DC precursors in coronary heart disease have been investigated, circulating myeloid DC (mDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC) precursors have not been extensively studied, particularly in relation to the severity of coronary artery lesions in patients with coronary heart disease. In this study, we recruited controls (n = 29), patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP, n = 30), patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP, n = 56), and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI, n = 50). The severity and extent of coronary artery lesions was evaluated by Gensini score, following coronary angiograms. The percentage of circulating mDC and pDC precursors was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Plasma levels of MCP-1 and MMP-9, which correlate with atherosclerosis and DC migration, were also measured. The percentage of circulating mDC precursors was reduced in patients with AMI and UAP compared with control and SAP patients, respectively (p < 0.01 for AMI vs. SAP and Control, p < 0.05 for UAP vs. SAP and Control). The percentage of circulating pDC precursors was not significant changed. The levels of plasma MMP-9 and MCP-1 and Genisi score were all increased in patients with AMI and UAP, compared to control and SAP patients, respectively (p < 0.01 for AMI vs. SAP and control, p < 0.05 for UAP vs. SAP and control). Overall, the percentage of circulating mDC precursors was negatively correlated with MCP-1 (p < 0.001), MMP-9 (p < 0.001) and Genisi scores (p < 0.001). Genisi scores were positively correlated with the levels of MCP-1 (p < 0.001) and MMP-9 (p < 0.001). Our study suggested that the percentage of circulating mDC precursors is negatively correlated with the severity and extent of coronary artery lesions in patients with coronary heart disease.

  2. [The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate].

    PubMed

    Kiljander, Toni; Toikka, Jyri; Koskenvuo, Juha; Jaakkola, Ilkka

    2011-01-01

    The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate Most doctoral candidates find the public defense of a doctoral thesis an exciting and stressful experience. In this study, Holter recording during the defense was made for four doctoral candidates of the Faculty of Medicine. Maximum heart rate among the subjects was on the average 172 beats/min with a median heart rate of 116 beats/min. Sympathicotonia and release of stress hormones associated with the defense raise the heart rate to levels that may be very high for several hours. This is a risk factor for a coronary event and should be considered, if the doctoral candidate has coronary heart disease, carries risk factors for coronary heart disease, or is an elderly person.

  3. [The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate].

    PubMed

    Kiljander, Toni; Toikka, Jyri; Koskenvuo, Juha; Jaakkola, Ilkka

    2011-01-01

    The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate Most doctoral candidates find the public defense of a doctoral thesis an exciting and stressful experience. In this study, Holter recording during the defense was made for four doctoral candidates of the Faculty of Medicine. Maximum heart rate among the subjects was on the average 172 beats/min with a median heart rate of 116 beats/min. Sympathicotonia and release of stress hormones associated with the defense raise the heart rate to levels that may be very high for several hours. This is a risk factor for a coronary event and should be considered, if the doctoral candidate has coronary heart disease, carries risk factors for coronary heart disease, or is an elderly person. PMID:21805898

  4. Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness, Carotid Plaque and Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Kuo-Liong; Su, Ta-Chen; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Ming-Fong; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Hu, Frank B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Our aim was to prospectively investigate the association between carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) as well as carotid plaque and incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in Chinese, among whom data are limited. Methods and Findings We conducted a community-based cohort study composed of 2190 participants free of cardiovascular disease at baseline in one community. During a median 10.5-year follow up, we documented 68 new cases of coronary heart disease and 94 cases of stroke. The multivariate relative risks (RRs) associated with a change of 1 standard deviation of maximal common carotid IMT were 1.38 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–1.70) for CHD and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.28–1.69) for stroke. The corresponding RRs with internal carotid IMT were 1.47 (95% CI, 1.21–1.79) for CHD and 1.52 (95% CI, 1.31–1.76) for stroke. Carotid plaque measured by the degree of diameter stenosis was also significantly associated with increased risk of CHD (p for trend<0.0001) and stroke (p for trend<0.0001). However, these associations were largely attenuated when adjusting for IMT measurements. Conclusions This prospective study indicates a significant association between carotid IMT and incidence of CHD and stroke in Chinese adults. These measurements may be useful for cardiovascular risk assessment and stratification in Chinese. PMID:18927612

  5. Lifestyle of Asian Indians with coronary heart disease: the Australian context.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Shantala; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to report lifestyle factors of Asian Indians in Australia in relation to coronary heart disease. This issue has not been previously explored in the Australian context. This study also seeks to identify factors that could inform health education and rehabilitation programs for migrant Asian Indians in Australia. The qualitative descriptive approach of constructivism was used for this study. Semi-structured, in-depth conversations were conducted with eight patients and five family members. Participants were at risk for coronary heart disease either due to unhealthy diet and/or lack of physical exercise and irregular health checks. Although lifestyle modifications were implemented by participants after the cardiac event; these changes were implemented inconsistently and without continuity. Knowledge of the beneficial effects of a healthy diet did not deter the participants from continuing to follow unhealthy dietary habits. The introduction of any exercise or physical activity by participants in this study lacked consistency. A positive aspect revealed from this study was the influence of culture and religious faith, which helped patients and family members to cope with the illness trajectory. The results of this study suggest that health education and rehabilitation programs need to be designed specifically for this high-risk group would be beneficial when initiated early in life and need to be targeted to the individual.

  6. Endochondral bone formation in the heart: a possible mechanism of coronary calcification.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, L A; Turner, R T; Ritman, E R

    2003-06-01

    During the atherosclerotic process, calcification occurs and is associated with a high likelihood of adverse events. Coronary calcification has been perceived as a passive precipitation of mineral. Recently, calcification associated with atherosclerosis has been found to be the result of an organized, regulated process that is similar to the process of calcification in bone. Mineralization in skeletal tissue can form by endochondral ossification in which mesenchymal cells differentiate into chondroblasts and produce a cartilage matrix which then degenerates and is remodeled to form bone. In this study, hearts from oophorectomized, aged female Sprague Dawley rats were found to contain areas of cartilage. Micro-computerized tomography radiogrammetry provided quantitative images of the architecture and confirmed the calcified tissue. Histological analysis revealed staining for several markers consistent with cartilage and bone tissue: acid phosphatase and bone matrix proteins, osteocalcin, osteopontin, osteonectin, and bone sialoprotein. In addition, cartilage types II, X, and procollagen type I were present. The presence of chondrocytes in the aged rat heart provides insights into the process of calcification in coronary arteries. Many proteins associated with calcification in bone are present in the cartilage that is present in vascular tissue, suggesting that endochondral calcification is another possible mechanism by which calcification of vascular tissue may occur.

  7. Risk factors for coronary heart disease among Asian Indians living in Australia.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ritin; Rolley, John X; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Sundar, Subbaram; Patel, Navin C; Davidson, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the coronary heart disease risk factors in the Asian Indian community living in a large city in Australia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the Australia India Friendship Fair in 2010. All people of Asian Indian descent who attended the Fair and visited the health promotion stall were eligible to participate in the study if they self-identified as of Asian Indian origin, were aged between 18 and 80 years, and were able to speak English. Blood pressure, blood glucose, waist circumference, height, and weight were measured by a health professional. Smoking, cholesterol levels, and physical activity status were obtained through self-reports. Data were analyzed for 169 participants. More than a third of the participants under the age of 65 years had high blood pressure. Prevalence of diabetes (16%) and obesity (61%) was significantly higher compared with the national average. Ten women identified themselves as smokers. Physical activity patterns were similar to that of the wider Australian population. The study has provided a platform for raising awareness among nurses and promoting advocacy on the cardiovascular risk among Asian Indians. Strategies involving Asian Indian nurses and other Asian Indian health professionals as well as support from the private and public sectors can assist in the reduction of the coronary heart disease risk factors among this extremely susceptible population.

  8. Parity and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Middle-aged and Older Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lijun; Wu, Jing; Xu, Guiqiang; Song, Lulu; Yang, Siyi; Yuan, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Wang, Youjie

    2015-11-26

    Pregnancy leads to physiological changes in lipid, glucose levels, and weight, which may increase the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in later life. The purpose of this study was to examine whether parity is associated with CHD in middle-aged and older Chinese women. A total of 20,207 women aged 37 to 94 years from Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort who completed the questionnaire, were medically examined and provided blood samples, were included in our analysis. CHD cases were determined by self-report of physician diagnosis through face-to-face interviews. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between parity and CHD. The rate of CHD was 15.8%. Parity had a positive association with CHD without adjustment of covariates. After controlling for the potential confounders, increasing risk of coronary heart disease was observed in women who had two (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.41-1.93), three (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.44-2.16), and four or more live births (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.33-2.20) compared with women with just one live birth. High parity was significantly associated with increasing risk of CHD in Chinese women. This suggests that multiparity may be a risk factor for CHD among Chinese women.

  9. Coronary heart disease and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the elderly diabetic.

    PubMed

    Chanudet, X; Bonnevie, L; Bauduceau, B

    2007-04-01

    Diabetes and old age come together to increase the frequency and severity of coronary heart disease. Often clinically nearly silent, symptoms frequently manifest dramatically, to such an extent that the question of screening should be raised, as in younger subjects. Preventing these manifestations relies on better management of the cardiovascular risk factors and obtaining good blood glucose control, but here progress remains necessary, which also requires adapting to the older patient's clinical and psychological condition. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a frequent degenerative complication in diabetics, particularly in the oldest subjects. The most severe types have serious clinical consequences, thus a higher mortality factor, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. As for coronary heart disease, the therapeutic tools have expanded these last few years and should be thought out in relation to the geriatric evaluation, with the objective of improving these patients' quality of life. Therefore, a necessary distinction should be made between subjects who have aged successfully, whose management, ultimately, differs little from younger subjects, and frail elderly individuals for whom exploratory techniques and treatment should be adapted. PMID:17702096

  10. Randomised trial of normothermic versus hypothermic coronary bypass surgery. The Warm Heart Investigators.

    PubMed

    1994-03-01

    Warm heart surgery--37 degrees C cardioplegia with systemic normothermia--has been introduced as an alternative to conventional hypothermic cardiac surgery. A randomised trial comparing warm (W) and cold (C) methods was done in 1732 patients undergoing isolated coronary bypass surgery in three adult cardiac surgery centres at the University of Toronto, Canada. Allocation to W (860 patients) or C (872) was stratified by urgent versus elective operations and by surgeon. There were no striking baseline differences in patients' demographics, angiographic findings, or operative procedures. All but 4.2% of patients initially received antegrade cardioplegia; a further 2.1% switched to retrograde delivery intra-operatively. Crossovers to C occurred in 7.7% of cases either due to difficulty in sustaining cardiac arrest or due to coronary flooding. Analysis, however, was on an intention-to-treat basis. The 30-day all-cause mortality was 2.5% in C patients and 1.4% in the W group (p 0.12). There was no difference in non-fatal Q-wave infarction rates (W 10.1%, C 11.1%), but enzymatic infarction by serial creatine kinase MB fraction (CK-MB) measurements was reduced (W 12.3% vs C 17.3%, p < 0.001) as was the mean area under the CK-MB curve. Postoperative low-output syndrome was less frequent in W patients (6.1% vs 9.3%, p 0.01). There were no differences in the rates of stroke, reoperation for bleeding or tamponade, or sternal rewiring/debridement for dehiscence or infection. Warm heart surgery is a safe and effective alternative to conventional hypothermic techniques for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery.

  11. Coronary response to large decreases of hemoglobin-O2 affinity in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Stücker, O; Vicaut, E; Villereal, M C; Ropars, C; Teisseire, B P; Duvelleroy, M A

    1985-12-01

    In this study, the consequences of large increases of P50 (O2 partial pressure at 50% oxyhemoglobin saturation) on coronary blood flow (CBF) were investigated in isolated Wistar rat heart. Rightward shifts of the O2 dissociation curve (ODC), obtained by lysing and resealing erythrocytes to encapsulate inositol hexaphosphate (IHP), led to a very large increase in P50 without side effects. Each heart was perfused alternatively with control stored human blood [P50 = 18.8 +/- 0.3 (SE) mmHg] and IHP-treated human blood (P50 = 47.1 +/- 1.7 mmHg), according to the technique of Langendorff (mean perfusion pressure 80 mmHg; hematocrit 25%). Arterial PO2 of 180 mmHg was maintained to keep arterial O2 content identical for both types of blood. When hemoglobin affinity was lowered, CBF decreased from 5.32 +/- 0.20 to 3.40 +/- 0.14 ml X min-1 X g-1, coronary sinus PO2 (PcsO2) rose from 39.9 +/- 0.9 to 69.9 +/- 4.2 mmHg, and myocardial O2 consumption (MVO2) rose slightly from 0.125 +/- 0.005 to 0.149 +/- 0.010 ml O2 X min-1 X g-1 (P less than 0.05). A significant negative correlation was found between CBF and P50 (r = -0.90; n = 32) and a significant positive correlation between PcsO2 and P50 (r = +0.84; n = 28). The coronary blood flow response to high P50 values was not abolished when maximal dilation was induced by adenosine, so this response seems independent of metabolic needs. These experiments have demonstrated that if O2 uptake by erythrocytes remains constant, in the presence of a high P50, sufficient O2 supply may be achieved with substantially less blood flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Computed Tomography for Coronary Artery Calcification Scoring: Mammogram for the Heart.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Abdul H; Zallaghi, Forough; Torres-Acosta, Noel; Thompson, Randall C; O'Keefe, James H

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC), identified via low-radiation, non-contrast computed tomography of the heart, quantifies the burden of calcified coronary atherosclerosis. This modality is highly useful for cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification among individuals without known coronary heart disease (CHD), especially for those at intermediate risk. The presence of CAC is associated with up to a 10-fold higher risk of adverse CV events, even after fully adjusting for the standard CV risk factors. In fact, the CAC score is among the strongest clinically available predictors of future risk of adverse CV events among primary prevention patients. Additionally, the absence of CAC in asymptomatic individuals confers a very low risk of CV events. Even in the presence of a benign CV risk factor profile and normal cardiac stress test, a very high CAC score portends a high risk of adverse CV events. On the other hand, a CAC score of zero is associated with a low CHD risk despite significant CV risk factor profiles. CAC scoring is a quick, low-cost screening tool to help risk-stratify patients and identify those likely to benefit from aggressive preventive treatments (such as high-intensity statin therapy, ezetimibe, PCSK9 inhibitors, and aspirin) and to identify those likely who warrant close monitoring. Moreover, individuals with a zero CAC score may be at low enough risk to avoid or defer daily aspirin therapy and pharmacological therapy for cholesterol management, and instead work on therapeutic lifestyle changes. An abnormal CAC score may also lead to better adherence to pharmacological regimens and suggested lifestyle changes. PMID:26892393

  13. Remote ischemic conditioning improves coronary microcirculation in healthy subjects and patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yasushi; Fukuda, Shota; Hanatani, Akihisa; Nakanishi, Koki; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Taguchi, Haruyuki; Shimada, Kenei

    2014-01-01

    Background Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) is a treatment modality that suppresses inflammation and improves endothelial function, which are factors involved in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) is a physiological index of coronary microcirculation and is noninvasively measured by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTDE). This study aimed to investigate the effects of RIC on CFR in healthy subjects and patients with HF, through the assessment by TTDE. Methods Ten patients with HF with left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 40%, and ten healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. RIC treatment was performed twice a day for 1 week. Our custom-made RIC device was programmed to automatically conduct 4 cycles of 5 minutes inflation and 5 minutes deflation of a blood pressure cuff to create intermittent arm ischemia. CFR measurements and laboratory tests were examined before, and after 1 week of RIC treatment. Results One week of RIC treatment was well tolerated in both groups. RIC treatment increased CFR from 4.0±0.9 to 4.6±1.3 (mean ± standard deviation) in healthy subjects (P=0.02), and from 1.9±0.4 to 2.3±0.7 in patients with HF (P=0.03), respectively. Systolic blood pressure in healthy subjects, and heart rate in HF patients decreased after RIC treatment (both P<0.01). Conclusion This study demonstrated that a 1 week course of RIC treatment improved coronary microcirculation in healthy subjects and patients with HF associated with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:25210440

  14. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, P<0.001). In conclusion, the decrease in HR with ivabradine was associated with an increase in central systolic pressure, which may have antagonized possible benefits of HR lowering in coronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. PMID:27091900

  15. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  16. Introducing the Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort: THC-PAC Study

    PubMed Central

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Sadeghian, Saeed; Karimi, Abbasali; Saadat, Soheil; Peyvandi, Flora; Jalali, Arash; Davarpasand, Tahereh; Shahmansouri, Nazila; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Abchouyeh, Maryam Amiri; Isfahani, Farah Ayatollahzade; Rosendaal, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Data on premature coronary artery disease (CAD) are scarce. The Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort Study (THC-PAC) is the first study of its kind in the Middle East to assess major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in young CAD patients. Methods: The cohort consists of CAD patients, males ≤ 45 years old and females ≤ 55 years old. The participants are residents of Tehran or its suburbs and underwent coronary angiography between June 2004 and July 2011. A 10-year follow-up, via either clinical visits or telephone calls at least once a year, was commenced in August 2012. The end point is considered MACE, encompassing death, myocardial infarction, stroke, new coronary involvement, percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Results: The cohort comprises 1232 eligible patients (613 [49.8%] males) at a mean age of 45.1 years (SD = 5.8). High frequencies of conventional risk factors, including hyperlipidemia (884 [71.8%]), hypertension (575 [46.7%]), positive family history (539 [43.8%]), cigarette smoking (479 [38.8%]), and diabetes mellitus (390 [31.7%]), were seen in the participants. The mean body mass index (BMI) of the enrolled patients was high (29.2 ± 4.8 kg/m2), and 532 (43.3%) and 440 (35.8%) of them were overweight and obese, respectively. The females’ BMI was higher (30.4 ± 5.3 vs. 28.0 ± 3.9 kg/m2; P < 0.001) and they had a greater mean abdominal circumference (99.9 ± 13.5 vs. 98.1 ± 9.3 cm; P = 0.035). Between August 2012 and August 2013, follow-up was successful in 1173 (95.2%) patients (median follow-up duration = 55.3 months, 95%CI: 53.5–57.0 months). Conclusion: Our younger patients with CAD had a high frequency of risk factors compared to the same-age general population and all-age CAD patients, which may predispose them to higher incidence of recurrent MACE. PMID:26157461

  17. Use of Medicare Data to Identify Coronary Heart Disease Outcomes In the Women's Health Initiative (WHI)

    PubMed Central

    Hlatky, Mark A; Ray, Roberta M; Burwen, Dale R; Margolis, Karen L; Johnson, Karen C; Kucharska-Newton, Anna; Manson, JoAnn E; Robinson, Jennifer G; Safford, Monika M; Allison, Matthew; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bavry, Anthony A; Berger, Jeffrey; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Heckbert, Susan R; Li, Wenjun; Liu, Simin; Martin, Lisa W; Perez, Marco V; Tindle, Hilary A; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Stefanick, Marcia L

    2015-01-01

    Background Data collected as part of routine clinical practice could be used to detect cardiovascular outcomes in pragmatic clinical trials, or in clinical registry studies. The reliability of claims data for documenting outcomes is unknown. Methods and Results We linked records of Women's Health Initiative (WHI) participants aged 65 years and older to Medicare claims data, and compared hospitalizations that had diagnosis codes for acute myocardial infarction (MI) or coronary revascularization with WHI outcomes adjudicated by study physicians. We then compared the hazard ratios for active versus placebo hormone therapy based solely on WHI adjudicated events with corresponding hazard ratios based solely on claims data for the same hormone trial participants. Agreement between WHI adjudicated outcomes and Medicare claims was good for the diagnosis for MI (kappa = 0.71 to 0.74), and excellent for coronary revascularization (kappa=0.88 to 0.91). The hormone:placebo hazard ratio for clinical MI was 1.31 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03 to 1.67) based on WHI outcomes, and 1.29 (CI 1.00 to 1.68) based on Medicare data. The hazard ratio for coronary revascularization was 1.09 (CI 0.88 to 1.35) based on WHI outcomes and 1.10 (CI 0.89 to 1.35) based on Medicare data. The differences between hazard ratios derived from WHI and Medicare data were not significant in 1,000 bootstrap replications. Conclusion Medicare claims may provide useful data on coronary heart disease outcomes among patients aged 65 years and older in clinical research studies. Clinical Trials Registration Information www.clinicaltrials.gov, Trial Number NCT00000611 PMID:24399330

  18. Non-heart-beating donors of organs: are the distinctions between direct and indirect effects & between killing and letting die relevant and helpful?

    PubMed

    Childress, J F

    1993-06-01

    This essay analyzes the principle of double effect and, to a lesser extent, the distinction between killing and letting die in the context of the Pittsburgh protocol for managing patients who may become non-heart-beating donors or sources of organs for transplantation. It notes several ambiguities and unresolved issues in the Pittsburgh protocol but concludes that neither the principle of double effect nor the distinction between killing and letting die (with the prohibition of the former and the allowance of the latter under some circumstances) erects insurmountable obstacles to the implementation of the protocol. Nevertheless, the requirement of the principle of double effect that the intended good effects outweigh the unintended side effects necessitates careful attention to the probable overall impact of the proposed policy on organ procurement, particularly because public mistrust plays such a significant role in limiting the number of organ donations. PMID:10126533

  19. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Yu, Yanan; Li, Bing; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Yijun; Shen, Chunti; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  20. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, YE; ZHANG, YINGYING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; YU, YANAN; LI, BING; WANG, PENGQIAN; LI, HAIXIA; ZHAO, YIJUN; SHEN, CHUNTI; WANG, ZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  1. Image Quality of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography with 320-Row Area Detector Computed Tomography in Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Tada, Akihiro; Sato, Shuhei; Kanie, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Takashi; Inai, Ryota; Akagi, Noriaki; Morimitsu, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess factors affecting image quality of 320-row computed tomography angiography (CTA) of coronary arteries in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). We retrospectively reviewed 28 children up to 3 years of age with CHD who underwent prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction. We assessed image quality of proximal coronary artery segments using a five-point scale. Age, body weight, average heart rate, and heart rate variability were recorded and compared between two groups: patients with good diagnostic image quality in all four coronary artery segments and patients with at least one coronary artery segment with nondiagnostic image quality. Altogether, 96 of 112 segments (85.7 %) had diagnostic-quality images. Patients with nondiagnostic segments were significantly younger (10.0 ± 11.6 months) and had lower body weight (5.9 ± 2.9 kg) (each p < 0.05) than patients with diagnostic image quality of all four segments (20.6 ± 13.8 months and 8.4 ± 2.5 kg, respectively; each p < 0.05). Differences in heart rate and heart rate variability between the two imaging groups were not significant. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for predicting patients with nondiagnostic image quality revealed an optimal body weight cutoff of ≤5.6 kg and an optimal age cutoff of ≤12.5 months. Prospective ECG-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction provided feasible image quality of coronary arteries in children with CHD. Younger age and lower body weight were factors that led to poorer image quality of coronary arteries.

  2. A beating heart cell model to predict cardiotoxicity: effects of the dietary supplement ingredients higenamine, phenylethylamine, ephedrine and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Richard; Vohra, Sanah; Ferguson, Martine; Wiesenfeld, Paddy

    2015-04-01

    Some dietary supplements may contain cardiac stimulants and potential cardiotoxins. In vitro studies may identify ingredients of concern. A beating human cardiomyocyte cell line was used to evaluate cellular effects following phenylethylamine (PEA), higenamine, ephedrine or caffeine treatment. PEA and higenamine exposure levels simulated published blood levels in humans or animals after intravenous administration. Ephedrine and caffeine levels approximated published blood levels following human oral intake. At low or midrange levels, each chemical was examined plus or minus 50 µM caffeine, simulating human blood levels reported after consumption of caffeine-enriched dietary supplements. To measure beats per minute (BPM), peak width, etc., rhythmic rise and fall in intracellular calcium levels following 30 min of treatment was examined. Higenamine 31.3 ng/ml or 313 ng/ml significantly increased BPM in an escalating manner. PEA increased BPM at 0.8 and 8 µg/ml, while 80 µg/ml PEA reduced BPM and widened peaks. Ephedrine produced a significant BPM dose response from 0.5 to 5.0 µM. Caffeine increased BPM only at a toxic level of 250 µM. Adding caffeine to PEA or higenamine but not ephedrine further increased BPM. These in vitro results suggest that additional testing may be warranted in vivo to further evaluate these effects.

  3. The 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update: focus on rehabilitation and exercise and surgical coronary revascularization.

    PubMed

    Moe, Gordon W; Ezekowitz, Justin A; O'Meara, Eileen; Howlett, Jonathan G; Fremes, Steve E; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Heckman, George A; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Grzeslo, Adam; Harkness, Karen; Lepage, Serge; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert S; Nigam, Anil; Rajda, Miroslaw; Rao, Vivek; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Van Le, Vy; Zieroth, Shelley; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Ashton, Tom; D'Astous, Michel; Dorian, Paul; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Isaac, Debra L; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Liu, Peter; Ross, Heather J; Sussex, Bruce; White, Michel

    2014-03-01

    The 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update provides focused discussions on the management recommendations on 2 topics: (1) exercise and rehabilitation; and (2) surgical coronary revascularization in patients with heart failure. First, all patients with stable New York Heart Association class I-III symptoms should be considered for enrollment in a tailored exercise training program, to improve exercise tolerance and quality of life. Second, selected patients with suitable coronary anatomy should be considered for bypass graft surgery. As in previous updates, the topics were chosen in response to stakeholder feedback. The 2013 Update also includes recommendations, values and preferences, and practical tips to assist the clinicians and health care workers manage their patients with heart failure.

  4. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... attaches to one of the chambers of the heart (the atrium or ventricle) or another blood vessel ( ...

  5. [Approaches potentiating cardioprotective effect of ambulatory physical training in patients with ischemic heart disease and multivessel coronary artery involvement after coronary stenting].

    PubMed

    Liamina, N P; Kotel'nikova, E V; Biziaeva, E A; Karpova, É S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorehabilitation of patients with multivessel coronary lesions is an obligatory component of ambulatory stage of care. With the aim of potentiating cardioprotective and antiischemic impact of rehabilitative preventive measures in 36 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and multivessel coronary artery involvement who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention we studied cardioprotective and antiischemic effect of long-term (24 weeks) administration of 70 mg/day trimetazidine in combination with moderate intensity physical training with the use of distance surveillance by a physician. The chosen therapeutic approach in patients with residual ischemia after incomplete anatomical revascularization provided early persistent formation of cardioprotective and antiischemic effect proven by increase of tolerance to physical exercise, improvement of diastolic function, and positive dynamics of both ECG parameters and biochemical markers of myocardial ischemia.

  6. [Intrathoracic movement of the normal and hypertrophied hearts measured by biplane coronary cineangiography].

    PubMed

    Osato, S; Ishikawa, K; Kanamasa, K; Ogai, T; Oda, A; Katori, R

    1984-06-01

    The shift of the heart during systole within the thorax was measured using bifurcations of the left coronary artery as cineangiographic markers. Biplane coronary cineangiography was performed in 13 normal subjects and 6 patients with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The spatial coordinates (X, Y, Z) of the bifurcations on the cineangiograms were measured using a motion analizer-digitizer-computer system. The systolic excursion of the motion of a bifurcation located at the anterior-basal point of the heart was 1.4 +/- 0.1 (+/-SD) cm leftward, 3.0 +/- 0.3 cm caudally and 2.5 +/- 0.1 cm anteriorly in normal subjects. In the cases with HCM, on the other hand, the bifurcation moved 2.2 +/- 1.1, 2.7 +/- 1.2 and 2.2 +/- 0.6 cm during systole, respectively. The movement at the apex in the normal subjects was 1.7 +/- 0.2 cm rightward, 1.5 +/- 0.2 cm caudally and 1.5 +/- 0.2 cm posteriorly, although the direction was reversed as compared to that of the anterior wall of the cardiac base. The amplitude of the excursion was also reduced at the apex, suggesting the systolic twist of the ventricular wall. The excursion of the apex in HCM was 0.6 +/- 1.7, 1.5 +/- 1.8 and 2.5 +/- 1.4 cm, respectively, toward the base of the heart as in the normal subjects. The maximum speeds of these motions were 34.0 +/- 9.2 cm/sec leftward, caudally and anteriory at the anterior-basal point and 36.2 +/- 7.3 cm/sec rightward, caudally and posteriorly in the normal subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Relationship Between Exercise Workload During Cardiac Rehabilitation and Outcomes in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Brawner, Clinton A; Abdul-Nour, Khaled; Lewis, Barry; Schairer, John R; Modi, Shalini S; Kerrigan, Dennis J; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Keteyian, Steven J

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of this retrospective, observational study was to describe the relation between exercise workload during cardiac rehabilitation (CR), expressed as metabolic equivalents of task (METs), and prognosis among patients with coronary heart disease. We included patients with coronary heart disease who participated in CR between January 1998 and June 2007. METs were calculated from treadmill workload. Cox regression analysis was used to describe the relationship between METs and time to a composite outcome of all-cause mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or heart failure hospitalization. Among 1,726 patients (36% women; median age 59 years [interquartile range, 52 to 66]), there were 467 events (27%) during a median follow-up of 5.8 years (interquartile range, 2.6 to 8.7). In analyses adjusted for age, sex, Charlson co-morbidity index, hypertension, diabetes, and CR referral diagnosis, METs were independently related to the composite outcome at CR start (Wald chi-square 43, hazard ratio 0.59 [95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.70]) and CR end (Wald chi-square 47, hazard ratio 0.68 [95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.76]). Patients exercising below 3.5 METs on exit from CR represent a high-risk group with 1- and 3-year event rates ≥7% and ≥18%, respectively. In conclusion, METs during CR is available at no additional cost and can be used to identify patients at increased risk for an event who may benefit from closer follow-up, extended length of stay in CR, and/or participation in other strategies aimed at maximizing adherence to secondary preventive behaviors and improving exercise capacity.

  8. Is population coronary heart disease risk screening justified? A discussion of the National Service Framework for coronary heart disease (Standard 4).

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, A; Adab, P

    2001-01-01

    Standard 4 of the National Service Framework (NSF) for coronary heart disease (CHD) describes population cardiovascular risk screening at primary care level. General practitioners (GPs) are expected to deliver this standard and have their performance monitored as part of their clinical governance programme. Although CHD is an important preventable health problem in the United Kingdom (UK), the effectiveness of primary prevention screening programmes are minimal, even within clinical trial settings, and their cost-effectiveness is not clear. The National Screening Committee has identified clear standards for establishing a screening programme in the UK and the activities described in Standard 4 do not fulfill many of these criteria. Specifically, there are no plans for central organisation and co-ordination, no agreed quality assurance standards, and no uniform system for performance management. The clinical, social, and ethical acceptability of the interventions mandated have not been established, and GPs are left to consider how to redirect resources to achieve the standard. We argue that the benefits of population cardiovascular screening must be established through properly conducted trials and, if a programme is introduced, adequate resources and management structures must first be identified. PMID:11677709

  9. Clarithromycin for 2 Weeks for Stable Coronary Heart Disease: 6-Year Follow-Up of the CLARICOR Randomized Trial and Updated Meta-Analysis of Antibiotics for Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gluud, Christian; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Damgaard, Morten; Fischer Hansen, Jørgen; Hansen, Stig; Helø, Olav H.; Hildebrandt, Per; Hilden, Jørgen; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Kastrup, Jens; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Kjøller, Erik; Lind, Inga; Nielsen, Henrik; Petersen, Lars; Jespersen, Christian M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We have reported increased 2.6-year mortality in clarithromycin- versus placebo-exposed stable coronary heart disease patients, but meta-analysis of randomized trials in coronary heart disease patients showed no significant effect of antibiotics on mortality. Here we report the 6-year mortality of clarithromycin- versus placebo-exposed patients and updated meta-analyses. Methods Centrally randomized, placebo controlled multicenter trial. All parties were blinded. Analyses were by intention to treat. Meta-analyses followed the Cochrane Collaboration methodology. Results We randomized 4,372 patients with stable coronary heart disease to clarithromycin 500 mg (n = 2,172) or placebo (n = 2,200) once daily for 2 weeks. Mortality was followed through public register. Nine hundred and twenty-three patients (21.1%) died. Six-year mortality was significantly higher in the clarithromycin group (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% confidence interval 1.06–1.38). Adjustment for entry characteristics (sex, age, prior myocardial infarction, center, and smoking) did not change the results (1.18, 1.04–1.35). Addition of our data to that of other randomized trials on antibiotics for patients with coronary heart disease versus placebo/no intervention (17 trials, 25,271 patients, 1,877 deaths) showed a significantly increased relative risk of death from antibiotics of 1.10 (1.01–1.20) without heterogeneity. Conclusions Our results stress the necessity to consider carefully the strength of the indication before administering antibiotics to patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:18451646

  10. [Real-world study in analysis of effects on concomitant medications with parenterally administered shenmai for coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Jie; Tang, Hao; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Hu; Zhuang, Yan

    2013-09-01

    In order to understand the treatment of coronary heart disease with parenterally administered Shenmai and the efficacy of combination therapies, the study selected 18 hospitals for analysis. Data from each hospital's hospital injection system (HIS) was collected. Data of in-patients receiving parenterally administered Shenmai for a diagnosis of coronary heart disease was analyzed using; the Apriori algorithm to model use, Clementine 12.0 linkage analysis to find correlations between various drugs, and chi-square test for commonly used combination therapies to ascertain the cure rate. In 5 583 patients with coronary heart disease, it was found that Shenmai was commonly used with isosorbide mononitrate, aspirin, clopidogrel hydrogen and common combinations of combination therapy, and that the cure rate was better in these combinations than for other treatment regimes. When Shenmai is used with combination therapies for coronary heart disease, treatment guidelines should be complied with. In clinical application, the types of concomitant medications and their interactions, should be observed so as to prevent of adverse reactions.

  11. Lipoprotein(a) levels, apo(a) isoform size, and coronary heart disease risk in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], Lp(a) cholesterol, and of apo(a) isoform size to prospective coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma Lp(a) and Lp(a) cholesterol levels, and apo(a) isoform size were measured at examinati...

  12. Red blood cell membrane concentration of cis-palmitoleic and cis-vaccenic acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although previous studies have suggested associations between plasma palmitoleic acid and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including blood pressure, inflammation, and insulin resistance, little is known about the relation of palmitoleic acid and CHD. This ancillary study of the Physicians'...

  13. Fatty acid profile of the erythrocyte membranes of healthy Bahraini citizens in comparison with coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Freije, Afnan

    2009-01-01

    We compared the fatty acid compositions including the n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids families in the red blood cell membranes of 26 healthy normal subjects to those with coronary heart disease. The main finding was a significant decrease in the level of docosahexanoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) in coronary heart disease patients. In addition, an increase in n-6/n-3 ratio, and a decrease in the ratio of 22:6/18:3 (n-3) and in omega-3 index was also observed in coronary heart disease patients. The reduction in 22:6/18:3 (n-3) ratio suggests a defect in the elongation and desaturation steps in the n-3 series. The findings in this study also suggest that the low dietary value of fish from Bahrain water may have resulted in a modest dietary intake of DHA and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3), which might have been the reason behind the high incidence of coronary heart disease in Bahrain.

  14. Regular Exercise and Plasma Lipid Levels Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A 20-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teramoto, Masaru; Golding, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of regular exercise on the plasma lipid levels that contribute to coronary heart disease (CHD), of 20 sedentary men who participated in an exercise program over 20 consecutive years. The men, whose initial ages ranged from 30-51 years, participated in the University of Nevada-based exercise program for an average of 45…

  15. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  16. Gendered Uncertainty and Variation in Physicians' Decisions for Coronary Heart Disease: The Double-Edged Sword of "Atypical Symptoms"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Lisa C.; Lutfey, Karen E.; Gerstenberger, Eric; Grace, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Nonmedical factors and diagnostic certainty contribute to variation in clinical decision making, but the process by which this occurs remains unclear. We examine how physicians' interpretations of patient sex-gender affect diagnostic certainty and, in turn, decision making for coronary heart disease. Data are from a factorial experiment of 256…

  17. Health Gain through Screening--Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: Developing Primary Health Care Services for People with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, M. B.; Turner, S.; Martin, D. M.; Roy, A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 120 British adults with intellectual disability found they had higher risk factors of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than the general population. There was a greater incidence of obesity and considerably lower physical activity levels than the general population. Several also had abnormal cholesterol readings. (CR)

  18. Evidence of the Role of Physical Activity and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in the Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Arthur S.; Norstrom, Jane

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents epidemiologic evidence on the contributions of physical inactivity and reduced cardiorespiratory fitness to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The types and dose of physical activity to reduce risk of CHD and plausible biologic mechanisms for the partial protective effect are reviewed. (Author/SM)

  19. Community Health Representatives: A Valuable Resource for Providing Coronary Heart Disease Health Education Activities for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Vicki L.

    1989-01-01

    This article addresses select health issues of Native Americans, emphasizing coronary heart disease (CHD). The link between lifestyle and CHD is discussed. CHD risk data from a study of 67 Community Health Representatives is presented, and the role these paraprofessionals can play in health education among Native Americans is discussed. (IAH)

  20. Relationship between QT/QS2 ratio and angiographic severity of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, S; Acanfora, D; Papa, M; Covelluzzi, F; Tedeschi, C; Furgi, G; Rengo, F; De Caprio, L

    1988-08-01

    The relationship between QT/QS2 ratio and angiographic severity of coronary heart disease (CHD) was determined in 99 patients who underwent coronary arteriography because of chest pain. Sixteen control patients with normal coronary arteriograms and normal left ventricular function and 83 patients with angiographic evidence of CHD were studied. QT/QS2 ratio and systolic time intervals were calculated from poligraphic recordings taken at rest. In control subjects QT/QS2 ratio was significantly shorter (0.91 +/- 0.04) than in patients with double (0.95 +/- 0.07; p less than 0.05 versus control subjects) and triple vessel coronary artery disease (0.95 +/- 0.05; p less than 0.05 versus control subjects). QT/QS2 ratio was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) in patients with 3 areas or more of left ventricular abnormal wall motion (LV AWM) (0.98 +/- 0.05) than in patients with none (0.92 +/- 0.06) or just 1-2 areas (0.93 +/- 0.06) of LV AWM. Multiple regression analysis revealed no relation between the number of coronary stenoses and QT/QS2 (t = 0.86; p = NS), while a relation was identified between the number of asynergic segments and QT/QS2 (t = 1.99; p less than 0.05). A significant correlation was found between QT/QS2 and PEP/LVET (r = 0.39; p less than 0.001). Setting the upper normal limit at 2 standard deviations from the mean of control subjects (QT/QS2 = 0.99), QT/QS2 criterion yielded a 30% sensitivity, a 94% specificity and a 96% predictive accuracy in diagnosing CHD. We conclude that in CHD patients QT/QS2 ratio is influenced by the extension of LV AWM. Although a low sensitivity may limit its use, a QT/QS2 value higher than 0.99 in a patient with chest pain strongly suggests CHD and thus this criterion may be diagnostically useful. PMID:3243415

  1. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of multiple risk factor interventions for preventing coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, S.; Smith, G. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of multiple risk factor intervention in reducing cardiovascular risk factors, total mortality, and mortality from coronary heart disease among adults. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials in workforces and in primary care in which subjects were randomly allocated to more than one of six interventions (stopping smoking, exercise, dietary advice, weight control, antihypertensive drugs, and cholesterol lowering drugs) and followed up for at least six months. SUBJECTS: Adults aged 17-73 years, 903000 person years of observation were included in nine trials with clinical event outcomes and 303000 person years in five trials with risk factor outcomes alone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking rates, blood cholesterol concentrations, total mortality, and mortality from coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Net decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking prevalence, and blood cholesterol were 4.2 mm Hg (SE 0.19 mm Hg), 2.7 mm Hg (0.09 mm Hg), 4.2% (0.3%), and 0.14 mmol/l (0.01 mmol/l) respectively. In the nine trials with clinical event end points the pooled odds ratios for total and coronary heart disease mortality were 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.92 to 1.02) and 0.96 (0.88 to 1.04) respectively. Statistical heterogeneity between the studies with respect to changes in mortality and risk factors was due to trials focusing on hypertensive participants and those using considerable amounts of drug treatment, with only these trials showing significant reductions in mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The pooled effects of multiple risk factor intervention on mortality were insignificant and a small, but potentially important, benefit of treatment (about a 10% reduction in mortality) may have been missed. Changes in risk factors were modest, were related to the amount of pharmacological treatment used, and in some cases may have been overestimated

  2. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  3. Usefulness of Beta blockade in contemporary management of patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Winchester, David E; Pepine, Carl J

    2014-11-15

    Considerable progress has been made over the last few decades in the management of clinically stable coronary heart disease (SCHD), including improvements in interventions (e.g., percutaneous revascularization), pharmacological management, and risk factor control (e.g., smoking, diet, activity level, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension). Although β blockers have long been used for the treatment of SCHD, their efficacy was established in the era before widespread use of reperfusion interventions, modern medical therapy (e.g., angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers), or preventive treatments (e.g., aspirin, statins). On the basis of these older data, β blockers are assumed beneficial, and their use has been extrapolated beyond patients with heart failure and previous myocardial infarction, which provided the best evidence for efficacy. However, there are no randomized clinical trials demonstrating that β blockers decrease clinical events in patients with SCHD in the modern era. Furthermore, these agents are associated with weight gain, problems with glycemic control, fatigue, and bronchospasm, underscoring the fact that their use is not without risk. In conclusion, data are currently lacking to support the widespread use of β blockers for all SCHD patients, but contemporary data suggest that they be reserved for a well-defined high-risk group of patients with evidence of ongoing ischemia, left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, and perhaps some arrhythmias.

  4. Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Young Male with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Porcelain Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Chainani, Vinod; Hanno, Ram; Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo; Martinez-Clark, Pedro; Alfonso, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the presence of a calcified mass in the left main coronary artery without significant atherosclerosis seen in the other coronary arteries or in the peripheral large arteries. In our view, the calcified character of the obstruction and the calcification of the aortic valve are characteristic of a variant type of coronary artery disease (CAD) not associated with the same risk factors as diffuse coronary atherosclerosis, but, in this case, with rheumatic heart disease. This case report also emphasizes the interventional approach for patients with aortic valve stenosis secondary to rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27418982

  5. Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Young Male with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Porcelain Aorta.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Vinod; Perez, Osman; Hanno, Ram; Hourani, Patrick; Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo; Martinez-Clark, Pedro; Alfonso, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the presence of a calcified mass in the left main coronary artery without significant atherosclerosis seen in the other coronary arteries or in the peripheral large arteries. In our view, the calcified character of the obstruction and the calcification of the aortic valve are characteristic of a variant type of coronary artery disease (CAD) not associated with the same risk factors as diffuse coronary atherosclerosis, but, in this case, with rheumatic heart disease. This case report also emphasizes the interventional approach for patients with aortic valve stenosis secondary to rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27418982

  6. Frequency of angina pectoris and secondary events in patients with stable coronary heart disease (from the Heart and Soul Study).

    PubMed

    Beatty, Alexis L; Spertus, John A; Whooley, Mary A

    2014-10-01

    The extent to which angina pectoris (AP) predicts secondary cardiovascular events beyond independent of measures of disease severity is unknown. We evaluated the association between AP frequency and secondary events in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). We administered the Seattle Angina Questionnaire to 1,023 participants with stable CHD enrolled from September 2000 to December 2002 and followed for a median of 8.9 years. We used Cox proportional hazards to evaluate the association of AP frequency with death and subsequent hospitalization for AP, revascularization, myocardial infarction (MI), or heart failure. At enrollment, 633 (62%) participants reported no AP, 279 (27%) reported monthly AP, and 111 (11%) reported daily or weekly AP. During follow-up, 396 participants died, 204 were hospitalized for AP, 194 for revascularization, 140 for MI, and 188 for heart failure. Compared with participants without AP, participants with daily or weekly AP were more likely to be hospitalized for AP (hazard ratio [HR] 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3 to 4.7; p<0.001), revascularization (HR 2.0; 95% CI 1.3 to 2.9; p=0.001), or heart failure (HR 1.6; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.5; p=0.03) and more likely to die (HR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.0; p=0.01). AP was not independently associated with MI (HR 1.3; 95% CI 0.8 to 2.3; p=0.29). After adjusting for demographics, co-morbidities, treadmill exercise capacity, ejection fraction, and inducible ischemia, frequency of AP remained independently associated with hospitalization for AP (HR 2.4; 95% CI 1.6 to 3.6; p<0.001), revascularization (HR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.7; p=0.02), and death (HR 1.4; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.0; p=0.045). In conclusion, in outpatients with stable CHD, AP frequency predicts higher rates of secondary cardiovascular events and death, independent of objective measures of disease severity.

  7. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Free Radicals in the Intact Beating Heart: A Technique for Detection and Characterization of Free Radicals in Whole Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweier, Jay L.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    1988-08-01

    Free radicals have been hypothesized to be important mediators of disease in a variety of organs and tissues. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can be applied to directly measure free radicals; however, it has not been possible to measure important biological radicals in situ because conventional spectrometer designs are not suitable for the performance of measurements on whole organs or tissues. We report the development of an EPR spectrometer designed for optimum performance in measuring free radicals in intact biological organs or tissues. This spectrometer consists of a 1- to 2-GHz microwave bridge with the source locked to the resonant frequency of a recessed gap loop-gap resonator. With this spectrometer, radical concentrations as low as 0.4 μ M can be measured. Isolated beating hearts were studied in which simultaneous real time measurements of free radicals and cardiac contractile function were performed. This in vivo EPR technique was applied to study the kinetics of free radical uptake and metabolism in normally perfused and globally ischemic hearts. In addition, we show that this technique can be used to noninvasively measure tissue oxygen consumption. Thus, it is demonstrated that EPR spectroscopy can be applied to directly measure in vivo free radical metabolism and tissue oxygen consumption. This technique offers great promise in the study of in vivo free radical generation and the effects of this radical generation on whole biological tissues.

  8. Blood cellular mutant LXR-α protein stability governs initiation of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mansi; Kaul, Deepak; Sharma, Yash Paul

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of [breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1)-associated RING domain 1 (BARD1)]/BRCA1 E3-ubiquitin ligase complex in governing the stability of mutant liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) protein in coronary heart disease (CHD) subjects. METHODS: The expression analysis of various genes was carried out by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting within blood mononuclear cells of human CHD subjects at various stages of coronary occlusion and their corresponding normal healthy counterparts. Immunoprecipitation experiments were performed to establish protein interactions between LXR-α and BARD1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured and exposed to Vitamin D3 and Cisplatin to validate the degradation of mutant LXR-α protein in CHD subjects by BARD1/BRCA1 complex. RESULTS: The expression of mutant LXR-α protein in CHD subjects was found to decrease gradually with the severity of coronary occlusion exhibiting a strong negative correlation, r = -0.975 at P < 0.001. Further, the expression of BARD1 and BRCA1 also increased with the disease severity, r = 0.895 and 0.873 respectively (P < 0.001). Immunoprecipitation studies established that BARD1/BRCA1 complex degrades mutant LXR-α via ubiquitination. The absence of functional LXR-α protein resulted in increased expression of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and interferon-γ and decreased expression of ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette A1) (r = 0.932, 0.949, 0.918 and -0.902 with respect to Gensini score; P < 0.001). Additionally, cell culture experiments proved that Vitamin D3 could prevent the degradation of mutant LXR-α and restore its functional activity to some extent. CONCLUSION: Mutant LXR-α protein in CHD subjects is degraded by BARD1/BRCA1 complex and Vitamin D3 can rescue and restore its function. PMID:24009820

  9. Blood stasis syndrome of coronary heart disease: A perspective of modern medicine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gui; Wang, Jie

    2014-04-01

    The medical community as a whole is attempting to start preventive therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD) patients earlier in life. However, the main limitations of such interventions are drug resistance and adverse reactions. Additionally, traditional biomarker discovery methods for CHD focus on the behavior of individual biomarkers regardless of their relevance. These limitations have led to attempting novel approaches to multi-dimensionally investigate CHD and identify safe and efficacious therapies for preventing CHD. Recently, the benefit of Chinese medicine (CM) in CHD has been proven by increasing clinical evidence. More importantly, linking CM theory with modern biomedicine may lead to new scientific discoveries. According to CM theory, all treatments for patients should be based on patients' syndromes. A recent epidemiological investigation has demonstrated that blood stasis syndrome (BSS) is the major syndrome type of CHD. BSS is a type of complex pathophysiological state characterized by decreased or impeded blood flow. Common clinical features of BSS include a darkish complexion, scaly dry skin, and cyanosis of the lips and nails, a purple or dark tongue with purple spots, a thready and hesitant pulse, and stabbing or pricking pain fixed in location accompanied by tenderness, mass formation and ecchymosis or petechiae. The severity of BSS is significantly correlated with the complexity of coronary lesions and the degree of stenosis, and is an important factor affecting the occurrence of restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. The mechanisms of BSS of CHD patients should be investigated from a modern medicine perspective. Although many studies have attempted to explore the biomedical mechanisms of BSS of CHD, from hemorheological disorders to inflammation and immune responses, the global picture of BSS of CHD is still unclear. In this article, the current status of studies investigating the biomedical mechanisms of BSS of CHD and future

  10. Coronary heart disease incidence in women by waist circumference within categories of body mass index.

    PubMed

    Canoy, Dexter; Cairns, Benjamin J; Balkwill, Angela; Wright, F Lucy; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie

    2013-10-01

    High body mass index (BMI) and large waist circumference are separately associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk but these measures are highly correlated. Their separate associations with incident CHD, cross-classifying one variable by the other, are less investigated in large-scale studies. We examined these associations in a large UK cohort (the Million Women Study), which is a prospective population-based study. We followed 496,225 women (mean age 60 years) with both waist circumference and BMI measurements who had no vascular disease or cancer. Adjusted relative risk and 20-year cumulative CHD incidence (first coronary hospitalization or death) from age 55 to 74 years were calculated using Cox regression. Plasma apolipoproteins were assayed in 6295 randomly selected participants. There were 10,998 incident coronary events after mean follow up of 5.1 years. Within each BMI category (<25, 25-29.9, ≥30 kg/m(2)), CHD risk increased with increasing waist circumference; within each waist circumference category (<70, 70-79.9, ≥79 cm), CHD risk increased with increasing BMI. The cumulative CHD incidence was lowest in women with BMI <25 kg/m(2) and waist circumference <70 cm, with 1 in 14 (95% confidence interval 1 in 12 to 16) women developing CHD in the 20 years from age 55 to 74 years, and highest in women with BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) and waist circumference ≥80 cm, with 1 in 8 (95% confidence interval 1 in 7 to 9) women developing CHD over the same period. Similar associations for apolipoprotein B to A1 ratio across adiposity categories were observed, particularly in non-obese women. Our conclusions were that both waist circumference and BMI are independently associated with incident CHD.

  11. Serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease--Causal association or epiphenomenon?

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, Setor K

    2015-12-01

    Observational epidemiological evidence supports a linear inverse and independent association between serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but whether this association is causal remains to be ascertained. A Mendelian randomization approach was employed to test whether serum total bilirubin is causally linked to CHD. The genetic variant rs6742078--well known to specifically modify levels of serum total bilirubin and accounting for up to 20% of the variance in circulating serum total bilirubin levels--was used as an instrumental variable. In pooled analysis of estimates reported from published genome-wide association studies, every copy of the T allele of rs6742078 was associated with 0.42 standard deviation (SD) higher levels of serum total bilirubin (95% confidence interval, 0.40 to 0.43). Based on combined data from the Coronary Artery Disease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analyses and the Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics Consortium involving a total of 36,763 CHD cases and 76,997 controls, the odds ratio for CHD per copy of the T allele was 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.04). The odds ratio of CHD for a 1 SD genetically elevated serum total bilirubin level was 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.98 to 1.09). The current findings casts doubt on a strong causal association of serum total bilirubin levels with CHD. The inverse associations demonstrated in observational studies may be driven by biases such as unmeasured confounding and/or reverse causation. However, further research in large-scale consortia is needed. PMID:26408227

  12. Relationship of lipoprotein(a) levels to physical activity and family history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Martín, S; Elosua, R; Covas, M I; Pavesi, M; Vila, J; Marrugat, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association of physical activity with serum lipoprotein(a) [La(a)] levels in individuals according to whether they had a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: Lp(a) levels in 332 healthy Spanish men aged 20 to 60 years were measured. Physical activity and family history of CHD were assessed. RESULTS: For men with a family history of CHD, the odds ratio for Lp(a) levels above the median value was 0.13 (95% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.50) in very active men (energy expended in physical activity > 300 kcal/day) compared with active men (energy expended in physical activity < 300 kcal/day). CONCLUSIONS: Regular daily physical activity in individuals with a family history of CHD could be useful for controlling Lp(a) levels. PMID:10076490

  13. Integrative Western and chinese medicine on coronary heart disease: where is the orientation?

    PubMed

    Li, Siming; Xu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death. As the main treatment of CHD, modern medicine has improved dramatically in recent years. Although researches of TCM and integrative medicine on CHD are witnessed encouraging progress in many respects, the role TCM playing in the prevention and treatment of CHD has been unprecedentedly challenged under such circumstance of the very fast development of modern medicine. In order to share mutual complementary advantages of TCM and western medicine, this review summarizes the relatively prominent researches of TCM and integrative medicine on CHD in recent years, and illuminates the issue of the orientation of the further research of integrative medicine on CHD, including (1) original innovation of TCM etiology and pathogenesis, (2) combination of disease and TCM syndrome, (3) biological basis of TCM syndrome of CHD, (4) clinical design and quality control of integrative medicine research, (5) herb-drug interaction, (6) difficulties and hot issues of modern medicine.

  14. Coronary heart disease risk factors in men with light and dark skin in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed Central

    Costas, R; Garcia-Palmieri, M R; Sorlie, P; Hertzmark, E

    1981-01-01

    The association of skin color with coronary heart disease risk factors was studied in 4,000 urban Puerto Rican men. Skin color on the inner upper arm was classified according to the von Luschan color tiles. Using this grading, men were separated into two groups of light or dark skin color. The dark group had a lower socioeconomic status (SES) based on income, education, and occupation. Dark men had slightly higher mean systolic blood pressures (SBP) and lower mean serum cholesterol levels than the light, but the relative weights and cigarette smoking habits of both groups were similar. After controlling for the differences in SES, skin color showed a small but statistically significant association with SBP. Whether this association with skin color represents genetic or environmental influences on SBP could not be determined from this study. PMID:7235099

  15. The relationship between urban sprawl and coronary heart disease in women.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Beth Ann; Eibner, Christine; Bird, Chloe E; Jewell, Adria; Margolis, Karen; Shih, Regina; Ellen Slaughter, Mary; Whitsel, Eric A; Allison, Matthew; Escarce, Jose J

    2013-03-01

    Studies have reported relationships between urban sprawl, physical activity, and obesity, but - to date - no studies have considered the relationship between sprawl and coronary heart disease (CHD) endpoints. In this analysis, we use longitudinal data on post-menopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Clinical Trial to analyze the relationship between metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level urban compactness (the opposite of sprawl) and CHD endpoints including death, any CHD event, and myocardial infarction. Models control for individual and neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics. Women who lived in more compact communities at baseline had a lower probability of experiencing a CHD event and CHD death or MI during the study follow-up period. One component of compactness, high residential density, had a particularly noteworthy effect on outcomes. Finally, exploratory analyses showed evidence that the effects of compactness were moderated by race and region.

  16. Support and coronary heart disease: the importance of significant other responses.

    PubMed

    Itkowitz, Norman I; Kerns, Robert D; Otis, John D

    2003-02-01

    In addition to the recognized benefits of social support, there is evidence across several health-related disorders suggesting that specific types of support can contribute to negative outcomes. Informed by theory and research examining the role of pain-related interpersonal interactions in the perpetuation of chronic pain, this study examined whether specific responses from significant others to expressions of coronary heart disease(CHD) related symptoms and incapacity are associated with level of symptoms, degree of disability, and depressive symptom severity among persons with symptomatic CHD. Forty-nine persons with CHD completed self-report questionnaires of the constructs of interest. Regression analyses revealed that degree of perceived solicitious responding to CHD symptoms was associated with increased symptom severity, disability, and depressive symptoms. Results are consistent with an operant-conditioning model and suggest that positive attention from significant others contingent on expressions of CHD symptoms may unwittingly serve to reinforce symptom occurrence and expression, concomitant disability, and emotional distress.

  17. Growing Epidemic of Coronary Heart Disease in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Gaziano, Thomas A.; Bitton, Asaf; Anand, Shuchi; Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika; Murphy, Adrianna

    2010-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single largest cause of death in the developed countries and is one of the leading causes of disease burden in developing countries. In 2001, there were 7.3 million deaths due to CHD worldwide. Three-fourths of global deaths due to CHD occurred in the low and middle-income countries. The rapid rise in CHD burden in most of the low and middle and income countries is due to socio-economic changes, increase in life span and acquisition of lifestyle related risk factors. The CHD death rate, however, varies dramatically across the developing countries. The varying incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates reflect the different levels of risk factors, other competing causes of death, availability of resources to combat CVD, and the stage of epidemiologic transition that each country or region finds itself. The economic burden of CHD is equally large but solutions exist to manage this growing burden. PMID:20109979

  18. [Effects of mexidol on the antioxidative status of patients suffering from coronary heart disease with dislipidemia].

    PubMed

    Belaia, O L; Baĭder, L M; Kuropteva, Z V; Fomina, I G

    2005-01-01

    The subjects of the study were 36 patients suffering from coronary heart disease with exertional angina and postinfarction cardiosclerosis with dislipidemia. The patients were administered mexidol (2-ethyl-6-methyl-3-oxipyridin succinate), a domestically produced antioxidative agent, for 1 month in a dose of 325 mg/day together with conventional cardial therapy. The result was good and included clinical improvements and improvements in biochemical serum parameters: cholesterol level decreased by 10%, the level of low density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased by 25%, high density cholesterol level elevated by 15%. The intensity of lipid peroxidation lowered, which was manifested by decrease of the level of diene conjugates and TBA-reactive products by 27% and 42%, respectively. The patients' antioxidative status increased.

  19. Understanding of stroke and coronary heart disease in the UK: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Beverley N; Myers, Lynn B

    2010-08-01

    It has been suggested by the UK's 2007 National Stroke strategy for England (NSSFE) that general population awareness is high for coronary heart disease (CHD) but low for stroke. This was investigated in the present study. One hundred eighty-two members of the general public completed a questionnaire about understanding of stroke/CHD. Data were analysed using ANOVA, t-tests and chi square. The main findings were that although members of the general public understood some of the main aspects of stroke and CHD, there was more awareness of general facts about CHD than stroke but symptoms of stroke were better identified compared to CHD. Therefore, our findings only partially supported the NSSFE view. PMID:20677085

  20. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among Croatian hospitalized coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vrazić, Hrvoje; Sikić, Jozica; Lucijanić, Tomo; Starcević, Boris; Samardzić, Pejo; Trsinski, Dubravko; Sutalo, Kresimir; Mirat, Jure; Zaputović, Luka; Bergovec, Mijo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity using selected anthropometric variables in a sample of hospitalized coronary heart disease (CHD) patients in Croatia (N = 1,298). Prevalence of overweight and obesity in surveyed patient population was high: 48.2% of participants were overweight and 28.6% were obese according to their body mass index; measured through waist-to-hip ratio 54.5% of participants were centrally obese. These data on prevalences of overweight, obesity and central obesity show that although there are some reassuring trends, there is still considerable amount of work to be done if the prevalence of this cardiovascular risk factor is to be reduced further among Croatian CHD patients. While the prevalence of obesity seems to be on the decline, the prevalence of overweight is rising, which may be just an early warning sign of an incoming wave of obesity epidemic in future years.

  1. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time.

  2. The relationship between urban sprawl and coronary heart disease in women.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Beth Ann; Eibner, Christine; Bird, Chloe E; Jewell, Adria; Margolis, Karen; Shih, Regina; Ellen Slaughter, Mary; Whitsel, Eric A; Allison, Matthew; Escarce, Jose J

    2013-03-01

    Studies have reported relationships between urban sprawl, physical activity, and obesity, but - to date - no studies have considered the relationship between sprawl and coronary heart disease (CHD) endpoints. In this analysis, we use longitudinal data on post-menopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Clinical Trial to analyze the relationship between metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level urban compactness (the opposite of sprawl) and CHD endpoints including death, any CHD event, and myocardial infarction. Models control for individual and neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics. Women who lived in more compact communities at baseline had a lower probability of experiencing a CHD event and CHD death or MI during the study follow-up period. One component of compactness, high residential density, had a particularly noteworthy effect on outcomes. Finally, exploratory analyses showed evidence that the effects of compactness were moderated by race and region. PMID:23376728

  3. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time. PMID:21625092

  4. Type A Behavior Pattern and Coronary Heart Disease: Philip Morris’s “Crown Jewel”

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley; McKee, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The type A behavior pattern (TABP) was described in the 1950s by cardiologists Meyer Friedman and Ray Rosenman, who argued that TABP was an important risk factor for coronary heart disease. This theory was supported by positive findings from the Western Collaborative Group Study and the Framingham Study. We analyzed tobacco industry documents to show that the tobacco industry was a major funder of TABP research, with selected results used to counter concerns regarding tobacco and health. Our findings also help explain inconsistencies in the findings of epidemiological studies of TABP, in particular the phenomenon of initially promising results followed by negative findings. Our analysis suggests that these “decline effects” are partly explained by tobacco industry involvement in TABP research. PMID:22994187

  5. Genetics of coronary heart disease with reference to ApoAI-CIII-AIV gene region.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Suraksha; Mastana, Sarabjit

    2014-08-26

    Cardiovascular diseases are affected by multiple factors like genetic as well as environmental hence they reveal factorial nature. The evidences that genetic factors are susceptible for developing cardiovascular diseases come from twin studies and familial aggregation. Different ethnic populations reveal differences in the prevalence coronary artery disease (CAD) pointing towards the genetic susceptibility. With progression in molecular techniques different developments have been made to comprehend the disease physiology. Molecular markers have also assisted to recognize genes that may provide evidences to evaluate the role of genetic factors in causation of susceptibility towards CAD. Numerous studies suggest the contribution of specific "candidate genes", which correlate with various roles/pathways that are involved in the coronary heart disease. Different studies have revealed that there are large numbers of genes which are involved towards the predisposition of CAD. However, these reports are not consistent. One of the reasons could be weak contribution of genetic susceptibility of these genes. Genome wide associations show different chromosomal locations which dock, earlier unknown, genes which may attribute to CAD. In the present review different ApoAI-CIII-AIV gene clusters have been discussed.

  6. Genetics of coronary heart disease with reference to ApoAI-CIII-AIV gene region

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Suraksha; Mastana, Sarabjit

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are affected by multiple factors like genetic as well as environmental hence they reveal factorial nature. The evidences that genetic factors are susceptible for developing cardiovascular diseases come from twin studies and familial aggregation. Different ethnic populations reveal differences in the prevalence coronary artery disease (CAD) pointing towards the genetic susceptibility. With progression in molecular techniques different developments have been made to comprehend the disease physiology. Molecular markers have also assisted to recognize genes that may provide evidences to evaluate the role of genetic factors in causation of susceptibility towards CAD. Numerous studies suggest the contribution of specific “candidate genes”, which correlate with various roles/pathways that are involved in the coronary heart disease. Different studies have revealed that there are large numbers of genes which are involved towards the predisposition of CAD. However, these reports are not consistent. One of the reasons could be weak contribution of genetic susceptibility of these genes. Genome wide associations show different chromosomal locations which dock, earlier unknown, genes which may attribute to CAD. In the present review different ApoAI-CIII-AIV gene clusters have been discussed. PMID:25228954

  7. Association analysis of GWAS and candidate gene loci in a Chinese population with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Tang, Haiqin; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Fusheng; Lu, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Coronary heart disease (CHD), the most severe form of coronary artery disease (CAD), is a complex disease that involves a variety of genetic and environmental factors. Recently, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with CAD in Caucasians by genome-wide association (GWA) studies.However, the association of these SNPs with CHD in Asian populations has not yet been established. Here, we aim to investigate the genetic etiology of CHD in a Chinese population by genotyping SNPs previously been associated with CHD in other ethic origin in GWAS or candidate gene studies. Methods: Five SNPs, rs17114036, rs9369640, rs515135, rs579459 and rs8055236, from 5 different loci were genotyped using a sequenom Mass array system in 545CHD patients and 1008 unrelated controls from a Chinese population. Results: Our study showed that SNP rs515135 is strongly associated with CHD in a Chinese Han population (P-value=0.00333, OR=1.48). We also detected significant difference of SNP rs579459 in APOB gene in patients withsevere CAD compared to patients with mild CAD. Conclusion: SNP rs515135 is associated with the susceptibility of CHD in Chinese Han population. The location of rs515135 in the APOB gene supports its potential involvement in the pathogenesis of CAD. Our study data also support that SNP rs579459 may be associated with the severity of CHD. PMID:26221293

  8. [Minimum invasive coronary operations: indications, technique, contra-indications].

    PubMed

    Spasov, L

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the experience with the contemporary coronary chirurgery with classical bypass technology under the conditions of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are specified the complications that occurred in the patient. These complications, generalized as 'postperfusion syndrome' are filled out with common brain complications like embolism, insultus and these in neurokognitive sphere of the brain activity. For decrease the complications by the coronary operations from 1975 are developed new technologies for coronary revascularization under the conditions of 'beating heart' without CPB (off-pump technologies). From 1980 Benetti F. and Buffalo (1981) in Latin America widely use the coronary revascularization of 'beating heart' without CPB (off-pump coronary artery bypass = OPCAB). For the realization of these operations are developed miniinvasive operative technologies through different operative admissions: small anterolateral thoracotomy, dorsolateral thoracotomy, xiphoid transdiaphragmatic, transabdominal etc. A considerable facilitation by OPCAB is achieved with using vacuum or mechanical stabilizers of the cardiac activity. In the course of last decade OPCAB operations are taken with endoscope technics Mack and coll. (1997), Wolf (1998) etc. The technology for decreasing of the operative technology is developed by adopting robot assistance by the coronary bypass operations (RAVECAB) from Boyd and coll. (2001), Kiaii and coll. (2000), Mohr, Falk and Diegeler (1999) etc. The miniinvasive coronary revascularization can be applied by exact draft patients and help for decreasing the postoperative complications and the lethality. PMID:18846697

  9. Free-breathing respiratory motion of the heart measured from x-ray coronary angiograms (Second Place Student Paper Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechter, Guy; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Resar, Jon R.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2004-04-01

    Respiratory motion compensation for cardiac imaging requires knowledge of the heart's motion and deformation during breathing. We propose a method for measuring the natural tidal respiratory motion of the heart using free breathing coronary angiograms. A 3D deformation field describing the cardiac and respiratory motion of the coronary arteries is recovered from a biplane acquisition. Cardiac and respiratory phase are assigned to the images from an ECG signal synchronized to the image acquisition, and from the diaphragmatic displacement as observed in the images. The resulting motion field is decomposed into cardiac and respiratory components by fitting the field with periodic 2D parametric functions, where one dimension spans one cardiac cycle, and the second dimension spans one respiratory cycle. The method is applied to patient datasets, and an analysis of respiratory motion of the heart is presented.

  10. Optimal Cutoff Points of Anthropometric Parameters to Identify High Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several published studies have reported the need to change the cutoff points of anthropometric indices for obesity. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate anthropometric cutoff points predicting high coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in Korean adults. We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2007 to 2010. A total of 21,399 subjects aged 20 to 79 yr were included in this study (9,204 men and 12,195 women). We calculated the 10-yr Framingham coronary heart disease risk score for all individuals. We then estimated receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio to predict a 10-yr CHD risk of 20% or more. For sensitivity analysis, we conducted the same analysis for a 10-yr CHD risk of 10% or more. For a CHD risk of 20% or more, the area under the curve of waist-to-height ratio was the highest, followed by waist circumference and BMI. The optimal cutoff points in men and women were 22.7 kg/m2 and 23.3 kg/m2 for BMI, 83.2 cm and 79.7 cm for waist circumference, and 0.50 and 0.52 for waist-to-height ratio, respectively. In sensitivity analysis, the results were the same as those reported above except for BMI in women. Our results support the re-classification of anthropometric indices and suggest the clinical use of waist-to-height ratio as a marker for obesity in Korean adults. PMID:26770039

  11. Sweetened beverage consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women1234

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Teresa T; Malik, Vasanti; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Manson, JoAnn E; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have linked full-calorie sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) with greater weight gain and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Objective: We prospectively examined the association between consumption of SSBs and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. Design: Women (n = 88,520) from the Nurses' Health Study aged 34–59 y, without previously diagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, or diabetes in 1980, were followed from 1980 to 2004. Consumption of SSBs was derived from 7 repeated food-frequency questionnaires administered between 1980 and 2002. Relative risks (RRs) for CHD were calculated by using Cox proportional hazards models and adjusted for known cardiovascular disease risk factors. Results: During 24 y of follow-up, we ascertained 3105 incident cases of CHD (nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD). After standard and dietary risk factors were adjusted for, the RRs (and 95% CIs) of CHD according to categories of cumulative average of SSB consumption (<1/mo, 1–4/mo, 2–6/wk, 1/d, and ≥2 servings/d) were 1.0, 0.96 (0.87, 1.06), 1.04 (0.95, 1.14), 1.23 (1.06, 1.43), and 1.35 (1.07, 1.69) (P for trend < 0.001). Additional adjustment for body mass index, energy intake, and incident diabetes attenuated the associations, but they remained significant. Artificially sweetened beverages were not associated with CHD. Conclusion: Regular consumption of SSBs is associated with a higher risk of CHD in women, even after other unhealthful lifestyle or dietary factors are accounted for. PMID:19211821

  12. Optimal Cutoff Points of Anthropometric Parameters to Identify High Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Korean Adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Choi, Hyunrim; Won, Chang Won; Kim, Byung-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Several published studies have reported the need to change the cutoff points of anthropometric indices for obesity. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate anthropometric cutoff points predicting high coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in Korean adults. We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2007 to 2010. A total of 21,399 subjects aged 20 to 79 yr were included in this study (9,204 men and 12,195 women). We calculated the 10-yr Framingham coronary heart disease risk score for all individuals. We then estimated receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio to predict a 10-yr CHD risk of 20% or more. For sensitivity analysis, we conducted the same analysis for a 10-yr CHD risk of 10% or more. For a CHD risk of 20% or more, the area under the curve of waist-to-height ratio was the highest, followed by waist circumference and BMI. The optimal cutoff points in men and women were 22.7 kg/m(2) and 23.3 kg/m(2) for BMI, 83.2 cm and 79.7 cm for waist circumference, and 0.50 and 0.52 for waist-to-height ratio, respectively. In sensitivity analysis, the results were the same as those reported above except for BMI in women. Our results support the re-classification of anthropometric indices and suggest the clinical use of waist-to-height ratio as a marker for obesity in Korean adults.

  13. Associations of high HDL cholesterol level with all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure complicating coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Anping; Li, Xida; Zhong, Qi; Li, Minming; Wang, Rui; Liang, Yingcong; Chen, Wenzhong; Huang, Tehui; Li, Xiaohong; Zhou, Yingling; Li, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality in patients with ejection fraction reduced heart failure (EFrHF) complicating coronary heart disease (CHD). A total of 323 patients were retrospectively recruited. Patients were divided into low and high HDL cholesterol groups. Between-group differences and associations between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality were assessed. Patients in the high HDL cholesterol group had higher HDL cholesterol level and other lipid components (P <0.05 for all comparison). Lower levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and higher albumin (ALB) level were observed in the high HDL cholesterol group (P <0.05 for all comparison). Although left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were comparable (28.8 ± 4.5% vs 28.4 ± 4.6%, P = 0.358), mean mortality rate in the high HDL cholesterol group was significantly lower (43.5% vs 59.1%, P = 0.007). HDL cholesterol level was positively correlated with ALB level, while inversely correlated with ALT, Hs-CRP, and NYHA classification. Logistic regression analysis revealed that after extensively adjusted for confounding variates, HDL cholesterol level remained significantly associated with all-cause mortality although the magnitude of association was gradually attenuated with odds ratio of 0.007 (95% confidence interval 0.001–0.327, P = 0.012). Higher HDL cholesterol level is associated with better survival in patients with EFrHF complicating CHD, and future studies are necessary to demonstrate whether increasing HDL cholesterol level will confer survival benefit in these populations of patients. PMID:27428188

  14. Cardiac effects of the extract and active components of radix stephaniae tetrandrae. II. Myocardial infarct, arrhythmias, coronary arterial flow and heart rate in the isolated perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Yu, X C; Wu, S; Wang, G Y; Shan, J; Wong, T M; Chen, C F; Pang, K T

    2001-05-11

    The primary purpose of the present study was to compare the cardioprotective effects of the extract from radix stephaniae tetrandrae (RST) and its individual compounds, tetrandrine (Tet) and fanchinoline (Fan). Secondly, we also compared the cardiac effects of the individual compounds and the RST extract with those of verapamil, a classical Ca2+ channel blocker. The Langendorff isolated perfused rat heart preparation was used. Regional ischaemia and reperfusion was employed to induce myocardial infarct and arrhythmia. Infarct, arrhythmia, heart rate and coronary artery flow were determined in hearts treated with vehicle, RST extract, Tet, Fan, or verapamil. It was found that RST extract, of which only 9% was Tet, and Tet alone produced equally potent ameliorating effects on arrhythmia and infarct induced by ischaemia and reperfusion without further inhibiting ischaemia-reduced heart rate and coronary artery flow. Fan had no effects on arrhythmia and infarct induced by ischaemia and reperfusion; but it induced S-T segment elevation and further reduced heart rate and coronary artery flow during ischaemia. Verapamil also ameliorated the effects of ischaemia and reperfusion on arrhythmia and infarct. It should be noted that 1 microM verapamil, that produced comparable effects on infarct and arrhythmia to the RST extract and Tet, further inhibited heart rate during ischaemia. The results indicate that the RST extract produces equally potent cardioprotective and anti-arrhythmic effects as Tet alone. Both RST extract and Tet may be better choices for the treatment of arrhythmia and infarct induced by myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion than the classical Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil as they do not further reduce heart rate during ischaemia. PMID:11432452

  15. Design, fabrication and characterization of a very low frequency piezoelectric energy harvester designed for heart beat vibration scavenging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, M.; Basrour, S.; Rufer, L.

    2013-05-01

    Current version of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and pacemakers consists of a battery-powered pulse generator connected onto the heart through electrical leads inserted through the veins. However, it is known that long-term lead failure may occur and cause a dysfunction of the device. When required, the removal of the failed leads is a complex procedure associated with a potential risk of mortality. As a consequence, the main players in the field of intracardiac implants prepare a next generation of devices: miniaturized and autonomous leadless implants, which could be directly placed inside the heart. In this paper, we discuss the frequency content of a heart vibration spectrum, and the dimensional restrictions in the case of a leadless pacemaker. In combination with the requirements in terms of useable energy, we will present a design study of a resonant piezoelectric scavenger aimed at powering such a device. In particular, we will show how the frequency-volume-energy requirement leads to new challenges in terms of power densities, which are to be addressed through implementation of innovative piezoelectric thick films fabrication processes. This paper also presents the simulation, fabrication and the testing of an ultralow frequency (15Hz) resonant piezoelectric energy harvester prototype. Using both harmonic (50mg) and real heart-induced vibrations, we obtained an output power of 60μW and 10μW respectively. Finally, we will place emphasis on the new constraint represented by the gravitational (orientation) sensitivity inherent to these ultra low frequency resonant energy harvesters.

  16. Aspirate from human stented saphenous vein grafts induces epicardial coronary vasoconstriction and impairs perfusion and left ventricular function in rat bioassay hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Helmut R; Baars, Theodor; Kahlert, Philipp; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Stent implantation into aortocoronary saphenous vein grafts (SVG) releases particulate debris and soluble vasoactive mediators, for example, serotonin. We now analyzed effects of the soluble mediators released into the coronary arterial blood during stent implantation on vasomotion of isolated rat epicardial coronary artery segments and on coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary blood was retrieved during percutaneous SVG intervention using a distal occlusion/aspiration protection device in nine symptomatic patients with stable angina pectoris and a flow-limiting SVG stenosis. The blood was separated into particulate debris and plasma. Responses to coronary plasma were determined in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and in isolated, constant pressure-perfused rat hearts (±nitric oxide synthase [NOS] inhibition and ±serotonin receptor blockade, respectively). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induced a stronger vasoconstriction of rat epicardial coronary arteries (52 ± 8% of maximal potassium chloride induced vasoconstriction [% KClmax = 100%]) than plasma taken before stent implantation (12 ± 8% of KClmax); NOS inhibition augmented this vasoconstrictor response (to 110 ± 15% and 24 ± 9% of KClmax). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation reduced in isolated perfused rat hearts only under NOS inhibition coronary flow by 17 ± 3% and left ventricular developed pressure by 25 ± 4%. Blockade of serotonin receptors abrogated these effects. Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induces vasoconstriction in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and reduces coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27482071

  17. Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Attributable to Major Risk Factors is Similar in Argentina and the United States: the Coronary Heart Disease Policy Model

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Andrew; DeGennaro, Vincent; Ferrante, Daniel; Coxson, Pamela G.; Palmas, Walter; Mejia, Raul; Perez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Goldman, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in Argentina and the U.S. Argentina is 92% urban, with cardiovascular disease risk factor levels approximating the U.S. Methods The Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Policy Model is a national-scale computer model of CHD and stroke. Risk factor data were obtained from the Cardiovascular Risk Factor Multiple Evaluation in Latin America Study (2003–04), Argentina National Risk Factor Survey (2005) and U.S. national surveys. Proportions of cardiovascular events over 2005–2015 attributable to risk factors were simulated by setting risk factors to optimal exposure levels [systolic blood pressure (SBP) 115 mm Hg, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) 2.00 mmol/l (78 mg/dl), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) 1.03 mmol/l (60 mg/dl), absence of diabetes, and smoking]. Cardiovascular disease attributable to body mass index (BMI) > 21 kg/m2 was assumed mediated through SBP, LDL, HDL, and diabetes. Results Cardiovascular disease attributable to major risk factors was similar between Argentina and the U.S., except for elevated SBP in men (CHD 8 % points higher in Argentine men, 6% higher for stroke). CHD attributable to BMI > 21 kg/m2 was substantially higher in the U.S. (men 10–11 % points higher; women CHD 13–14% higher). Conclusions Projected cardiovascular disease attributable to major risk factors appeared similar in Argentina and the U.S., though elevated BMI may be responsible for more of U.S. cardiovascular disease. A highly urbanized middle-income nation can have cardiovascular disease rates and risk factor levels comparable to a high income nation, but fewer resources for fighting the epidemic. PMID:21550675

  18. [VIABILITY OF MYOCAROIUM AS RISK FACTOR FOR MORTALITY IN EARLY AND LATE PERIOD AFTER BYPASS SURGERY OF CORONARY ARTERIES IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND SEVERE LEFT VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION].

    PubMed

    Todurov, B M; Zelenchuk, V; Kuzmich, I M; Ivanyuk, N B; Nikolaichuk, M V

    2015-06-01

    In coronary heart disease and low ejection fraction of the left ventricle (LV) in patients after coronary artery bypass surgery tend mortality and complication rate higher than preserved LV systolic function. Significant preoperative predictors of early mortality and remote in these patients, and the incidence of complications in the early postoperative period were reveald.

  19. Complete reversibility of physiological coronary vascular abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts produced by pressure overload in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Isoyama, S; Ito, N; Kuroha, M; Takishima, T

    1989-01-01

    Using an experimental model of ascending aortic banding in the rat, we examined whether coronary circulation abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts are reversible after debanding. 4-wk banding produced significant increases in in vivo left ventricular (LV) pressure (194 +/- 13 vs. 114 +/- 9 mmHg in shamoperated controls) and LV dry wt/body wt (48 +/- 5% above controls). In isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer, coronary flow rate (CFR) was estimated under nonworking conditions. During maximal vasodilation after 1 min-ischemia, CFR at a coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) of 100 mmHg and CFR/myocardidial mass at CPPs of 100 and 150 mmHg decreased significantly (72 +/- 5%; 53 +/- 4 and 61 +/- 4% of controls). 1 or 4 wk after debanding, LV systolic pressures were similar to control values, and the degree of myocardial hypertrophy decreased to levels 23 +/- 6 (P less than 0.01) and 11 +/- 6% (P less than 0.01) above their control values, respectively. At 1 wk there was no significant increase in CFR/myocardial mass, compared to values in the banded group (67 +/- 8 vs. 53 +/- 4% of controls at 100 mmHg and 67 +/- 9 vs. 61 +/- 4% at 150 mmHg of CPP). At 4 wk, CFR and the ratio had increased toward normal. Thus, decreased coronary perfusion in hypertrophied hearts is completely reversible. Images PMID:2525568

  20. Maternal melatonin administration mitigates coronary stiffness and endothelial dysfunction, and improves heart resilience to insult in growth restricted lambs

    PubMed Central

    Tare, Marianne; Parkington, Helena C; Wallace, Euan M; Sutherland, Amy E; Lim, Rebecca; Yawno, Tamara; Coleman, Harold A; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with impaired cardiac function in childhood and is linked to short- and long-term morbidities. Placental dysfunction underlies most IUGR, and causes fetal oxidative stress which may impact on cardiac development. Accordingly, we investigated whether antenatal melatonin treatment, which possesses antioxidant properties, may afford cardiovascular protection in these vulnerable fetuses. IUGR was induced in sheep fetuses using single umbilical artery ligation on day 105–110 of pregnancy (term 147). Study 1: melatonin (2 mg h−1) was administered i.v. to ewes on days 5 and 6 after surgery. On day 7 fetal heart function was assessed using a Langendorff apparatus. Study 2: a lower dose of melatonin (0.25 mg h−1) was administered continuously following IUGR induction and the ewes gave birth normally at term. Lambs were killed when 24 h old and coronary vessels studied. Melatonin significantly improved fetal oxygenation in vivo. Contractile function in the right ventricle and coronary flow were enhanced by melatonin. Ischaemia–reperfusion-induced infarct area was 3-fold greater in IUGR hearts than in controls and this increase was prevented by melatonin. In isolated neonatal coronary arteries, endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability was reduced in IUGR, and was rescued by modest melatonin treatment. Melatonin exposure also induced the emergence of an indomethacin-sensitive vasodilation. IUGR caused marked stiffening of the coronary artery and this was prevented by melatonin. Maternal melatonin treatment reduces fetal hypoxaemia, improves heart function and coronary blood flow and rescues cardio-coronary deficit induced by IUGR. PMID:24710061