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Sample records for beating rabbit atria

  1. Ethanol extract of Lycopus lucidus elicits positive inotropic effect via activation of Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release in beating rabbit atria.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hao Zhen; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Li, Xiang; Lee, Yun Jung; Cho, Kyung Woo; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2013-07-01

    Lycopus lucidus Turcz has been widely used as a traditional Oriental medicine (TOM) in Korea and China and prescribed for the enhancement of heart function. However, the precise effects have yet to be defined. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to address whether the ethanol extract of Lycopus lucidus Turcz (ELT) has a positive inotropic effect. ELT-induced changes in atrial mechanical dynamics (pulse pressure, dp/dt, and stroke volume), and cAMP efflux were measured in perfused beating rabbit atria. Three active components, rosmarinic acid, betulinic acid, and oleanolic acid were identified in ELT by high performance liquid chromatography analysis. ELT increased atrial dynamics in a concentration-dependent manner without changes in atrial cAMP levels and cAMP efflux. The ELT-induced positive inotropic effect was blocked by inhibition of the L-type Ca(2+) channels and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Inhibitors of β-adrenoceptors had no effect on the ELT-induced positive inotropic effect. The results suggest that ELT exerts a positive inotropic effect via activation of Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channel and Ca(2+) release from the SR in beating rabbit atria.

  2. Ethanol Extract of Lycopus lucidus Elicits Positive Inotropic Effect Via Activation of Ca2+ Entry and Ca2+ Release in Beating Rabbit Atria

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hao Zhen; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Li, Xiang; Lee, Yun Jung; Cho, Kyung Woo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Lycopus lucidus Turcz has been widely used as a traditional Oriental medicine (TOM) in Korea and China and prescribed for the enhancement of heart function. However, the precise effects have yet to be defined. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to address whether the ethanol extract of Lycopus lucidus Turcz (ELT) has a positive inotropic effect. ELT-induced changes in atrial mechanical dynamics (pulse pressure, dp/dt, and stroke volume), and cAMP efflux were measured in perfused beating rabbit atria. Three active components, rosmarinic acid, betulinic acid, and oleanolic acid were identified in ELT by high performance liquid chromatography analysis. ELT increased atrial dynamics in a concentration-dependent manner without changes in atrial cAMP levels and cAMP efflux. The ELT-induced positive inotropic effect was blocked by inhibition of the L-type Ca2+ channels and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Inhibitors of β-adrenoceptors had no effect on the ELT-induced positive inotropic effect. The results suggest that ELT exerts a positive inotropic effect via activation of Ca2+ entry through L-type Ca2+ channel and Ca2+ release from the SR in beating rabbit atria. PMID:23875903

  3. Naloxone's effect on the inotropic and chronotropic responses of isolated, electrically stimulated or spontaneously beating rat atria.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, J; St Onge, R; Gregor, L

    1990-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine (i) how naloxone administration alone could modify the inotropic (in electrically stimulated (ES) rat atria) and both the inotropic and chronotropic responses (in spontaneously beating (SB) rat atria) isolated from normotensive and hypotensive (hemorrhaged) rats, and (ii) how naloxone administration would modify the inotropic and chronotropic responses of isolated rat atria previously administered an opiate agonist (morphine), a muscarinic agonist (carbachol), or an alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist (noradrenaline). Naloxone (51-340 microM) added to ES atria caused a delayed but dose-related decrease in atrial tension (AT), whereas in SB atria, naloxone caused atrial heart rate (AHR) to fall and atrial tension (AT) to increase. Naloxone (68-340 microM), given to SB atria from acutely hypotensive rats, caused a similar increase in atrial tension as seen in the "normotensive" isolated (SB) atria and a similar decrease in atrial heart rate. Morphine sulphate (MS), 37-375 microM, administered to ES atria caused a delayed fall in AT; which was further decreased when naloxone (340 microM) was also added. In the SB atria, morphine caused a dose-related decrease in atrial heart rate whereas atrial tension increased. In SB preparations, atrial heart rate fell even further when naloxone was added to morphine compared with when morphine sulphate was given alone, whereas atrial tension was increased. Noradrenaline (3 or 12 microM) caused a positive, dose-related inotropic response in the ES atria, effects not influenced by the addition of naloxone. In the SB atria, naloxone caused no change in the dose-related increases in atrial tension and heart rate when combined with the lower dose of noradrenaline but decreased AT when combined with 12 microM noradrenaline, compared with when this dose of noradrenaline was given alone. Carbachol (683 nM-1.37 microM) caused a dose-related decrease in atrial tension in ES atria, which was reversed

  4. Stimulatory effect of lymphocytes from Chagas' patients on spontaneously beating rat atria.

    PubMed Central

    de Bracco, M M; Sterin-Borda, L; Fink, S; Finiasz, M; Borda, E

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of lymphocytes from individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' patients) on the contractile behaviour of living heart tissue. Chagas' lymphocytes (ChL) reacted with isolated rat atria preparations increasing the isometric development tension (IDT) and frequency of contractions (FC) in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal stimulatory effect was reached after 30-40 min of contract. In contrast, normal lymphocytes (NL) did not alter the basal IDT and FC values. beta-adrenergic antagonists, anti-histamine agents and inhibitors of the synthesis and action of arachidonic acid (AA) products were used to study the mechanisms of the reaction. (-)-propranolol (10(-7)M) and pyrilamine (10(-6)M) had no effect ruling out the participation of beta-adrenergic agonists or histamine. However, indomethacin (10(-6)M) and acetylsalicylic acid (1.8 X 10(-4)M) enhanced the effect of ChL. Inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway (5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, 10(-7)M; nordihydroguairetic acid, 10(-5)M) and FPL55712, an antagonist of one of its terminal products: the slow reacting substance of anaphilaxis (SRS-A), abolished the reaction. Therefore, a fundamental role for SRS-A in the production of the stimulatory effect is postulated. Lymphocytes of the T cell lineage (E rosette forming cells, ERFC) are the effector cells involved in this reaction, whereas non-rosetting ChL depressed IDT. T ascertain if effector cells could be replaced by soluble factors, ChL were reacted with homogenates of rat atria and the cell free supernatants were added to beating rat atria. Positive ino- and chronotropic effects were obtained, indicating that soluble factors generated during the reaction can substitute for the intact effector cells. On the other hand if the effector cells were purified from Chagas' patients that had been treated 1 month to 6 years before the assay with trypanocidal drugs (3-methyl-4-(5'-nitrofurfurylidene-amino)-tetrahydro-4H

  5. Effects of peroxyl radicals on contractility of rabbit aorta and guinea pig atria.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Ilaria; Romanelli, Luca; Manafikhi, Husseen; Palmery, Maura

    2013-12-01

    High-fat meals may lead to hypotension, oxidative stress and increases of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Contrasting results have been reported after treatment of isolated tissues with hydrogen peroxide and LPS, whereas the effects of peroxyl radicals, involved in the propagation reaction of lipoperoxidation, have not been investigated previously. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of peroxyl radicals on the contractile responses in isolated rabbit aorta and guinea pig atria. We treated isolated guinea pig atria, rabbit aorta strips and rings with 2,2'-Azobis (2- amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). AAPH did not affect isoprenaline-induced contraction in guinea pig atria, whilst it dose-dependently reduced the contractile responses induced in rabbit aorta strips by cumulative doses of adrenaline (ADR) and induced an endothelium-independent relaxation of noradrenaline (NA)-contracted aorta rings. The effects of KCl-induced and BaCl2-induced contractions were small. Furthermore, alkalinization with NH4Cl of NA-contracted aorta rings significantly reduced the vasodilatatory activity of AAPH. The present study suggests that peroxyl radicals induce acute functional alterations on vascular contraction through intracellular pH regulation. This finding could be related to the documented after meal increase in oxidative burst and endotoxin and the related hypotension.

  6. Effect of Mucuna pruriens Seed Extract Pretreatment on the Responses of Spontaneously Beating Rat Atria and Aortic Ring to Naja sputatrix (Javan Spitting Cobra) Venom.

    PubMed

    Fung, Shin Yee; Tan, Nget Hong; Sim, Si Mui; Aguiyi, John C

    2012-01-01

    Mucuna pruriens Linn. (velvet bean) has been used by native Nigerians as a prophylactic for snakebite. Rats pretreated with M. pruriens seed extract (MPE) have been shown to protect against the lethal and cardiovascular depressant effects of Naja sputatrix (Javan spitting cobra) venoms, and the protective effect involved immunological neutralization of the venom toxins. To investigate further the mechanism of the protective effect of MPE pretreatment against cobra venom toxicity, the actions of Naja sputatrix venom on spontaneously beating rat atria and aortic rings isolated from both MPE pretreated and untreated rats were studied. Our results showed that the MPE pretreatment conferred protection against cobra venom-induced depression of atrial contractility and atrial rate in the isolated atrial preparations, but it had no effect on the venom-induced contractile response of aortic ring preparation. These observations suggested that the protective effect of MPE pretreatment against cobra venom toxicity involves a direct protective action of MPE on the heart function, in addition to the known immunological neutralization mechanism, and that the protective effect does not involve action on blood vessel contraction. The results also suggest that M. pruriens seed may contain novel cardioprotective agent with potential therapeutic value.

  7. Modification by ouabain of the electrical and mechanical effects of acetylcholine in isolated rabbit atria

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, N.; Toda, N.

    1970-01-01

    1. Left atrial preparations isolated from rabbits were stimulated electrically at frequencies between 6 and 240/min. Tension-frequency curves were obtained from control preparations and preparations treated with ouabain and acetylcholine. Transmembrane potentials were recorded from single cells of the left atrium stimulated at different frequencies. 2. The tension-frequency curve was moved downwards by acetylcholine (10-6 g/ml). Ouabain (10-6 g/ml) caused characteristic alterations in the tension-frequency relationship, enhancing the contractile tension at low but not high frequencies. The negative inotropic effect of acetylcholine was reduced by treatment with ouabain. 3. Action potential durations were significantly influenced by alterations in frequency of contraction. The 10% duration increased with frequency within the range between 6 and 60/min but decreased at frequencies higher than 120/min. The 50% duration increased with frequency between 6 and 120/min but decreased at frequencies higher than 180/min. The dependence of the 50% duration upon frequency paralleled that of contractile tension. The 90% duration, the overshoot and the resting potential were not affected by frequency of contraction. 4. Acetylcholine (10-6 g/ml) shifted the 10%, 50% and 90% duration-frequency curves downwards, but did not significantly alter the overshoot and the resting potential. Ouabain (10-6 g/ml) shifted the duration-frequency curves downwards and also reduced the size of the overshoot and the resting potential. Treatment of atrial preparations with 10-6 g/ml ouabain potentiated the membrane effects of acetylcholine. 5. The inhibition by ouabain of the negative inotropic effect of acetylcholine did not appear to be due to antagonism at the receptor level, but to interference with the mechanisms responsible for the mechanical events. PMID:5425273

  8. Inhibitory vs. protective effects of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) on the electromechanical properties of the spontaneously beating atria of the frog (Rana ridibunda): an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Papaefthimiou, Chrisovalantis; Antonopoulou, Efthimia; Theophilidis, George

    2009-03-01

    The results of this study have shown that N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a compound used for protection of tissues or cell cultures against the deleterious effects of various environmental pollutants, has certain unusual effects on the contraction of the spontaneously beating atria of the frog isolated in saline (ex vivo): (1) NAC, 6.0 and 10.0mM, eliminated, in a concentration-dependent manner, the contractile properties of the atria (force and frequency) within minutes, without affecting its electrical properties; (2) the IC(50) of NAC for the force was 5.09+/-1.01 mM (n=6) [4.98-5.19 mM, 95% confidence interval (CI)], significantly lower than the IC(50) for the frequency, 6.15+/-1.01 mM, (6.02-6.29 mM, 95% CI), indicating that working atria cells are more sensitive to NAC than autorhythmic cells. The no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) was 1-2mM; (3) the pattern of NAC-induced inhibition of electromechanical activity was similar to that of verapamil, an indication that NAC possibly affects L-type voltage-gated calcium channels; (4) NAC at 2mM protected against cadmium-induced inhibition of atria contraction. The IC(50) for cadmium was 17.9+/-1.1 microM (n=6) (16.9-19.0 microM, 95% CI), while in the presence of 2mM NAC, it became 123.3+/-1.0 microM (n=6) (114.8-132.4 microM, 95% CI). The same concentration of NAC failed to exert any protective effects against rotenone (5 microM)-induced inhibition of atria contraction. The protective effects of NAC are probably due to chelation of cadmium, rather than scavenging of oxidants.

  9. Effects of adrenoceptor antagonists and neuronal uptake inhibitors on dimethylphenylpiperazinium-induced release of catecholamines from the rabbit isolated adrenal gland and guinea-pig atria

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, A.R.; Story, D.F.

    1984-11-01

    Isolated rabbit adrenal glands were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution at 37 degrees C and the catecholamine storage sites were labeled with (/sup 3/H)epinephrine. Release of radioactivity was evoked by 2-min periods of perfusion with dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP, 100 microM). DMPP-induced efflux of radioactivity was decreased by desipramine (1 microM), cocaine (30 microM), phenoxybenzamine (1 and 10 microM), phentolamine (1, 3 and 10 microM) and propranolol (1 microM). The reduction in DMPP-induced efflux cannot be accounted for by interactions with alpha adrenoceptors, as prazosin (1 microM) and yohimbine (1 microM) were without effect. There also was no correlation between inhibition of DMPP-induced efflux and ability of the drugs to inhibit catecholamine uptake as phentolamine (1 microM) and propranolol (1 microM) did not affect the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)epinephrine by the gland. In guinea-pig atria, in which the catecholamine storage sites had been labeled with (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine, efflux of radioactivity was elicited by 1-min periods of contact with DMPP. DMPP-induced efflux of radioactivity from atria was decreased by desipramine (1 microM), cocaine (30 microM), phenoxybenzamine (1 and 10 microM), phentolamine (1 and 10 microM) and propranolol (1 microM) but not by prazosin (1 microM) or yohimbine (1 microM). The inhibition of DMPP-induced efflux in guinea-pig atria could not be correlated with alpha adrenoceptor antagonism or blockade of neuronal uptake. There were differences between the two preparations in the degree of inhibition of DMPP-induced release produced by the above drugs.

  10. Ion Fluxes through KCa2 (SK) and Cav1 (L-type) Channels Contribute to Chronoselectivity of Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Actions in Spontaneously Beating Rat Atria

    PubMed Central

    Bragança, Bruno; Oliveira-Monteiro, Nádia; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Lima, Pedro A.; Faria, Miguel; Fontes-Sousa, Ana P.; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Impulse generation in supraventricular tissue is inhibited by adenosine and acetylcholine via the activation of A1 and M2 receptors coupled to inwardly rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels, respectively. Unlike M2 receptors, bradycardia produced by A1 receptors activation predominates over negative inotropy. Such difference suggests that other ion currents may contribute to adenosine chronoselectivity. In isolated spontaneously beating rat atria, blockade of KCa2/SK channels with apamin and Cav1 (L-type) channels with nifedipine or verapamil, sensitized atria to the negative inotropic action of the A1 agonist, R-PIA, without affecting the nucleoside negative chronotropy. Patch-clamp experiments in the whole-cell configuration mode demonstrate that adenosine, via A1 receptors, activates the inwardly-rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/KIR3.4 current resulting in hyperpolarization of atrial cardiomyocytes, which may slow down heart rate. Conversely, the nucleoside inactivates a small conductance Ca2+-activated KCa2/SK outward current, which eventually reduces the repolarizing force and thereby prolong action potentials duration and Ca2+ influx into cardiomyocytes. Immunolocalization studies showed that differences in A1 receptors distribution between the sinoatrial node and surrounding cardiomyocytes do not afford a rationale for adenosine chronoselectivity. Immunolabelling of KIR3.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3, and Cav1 was also observed throughout the right atrium. Functional data indicate that while both A1 and M2 receptors favor the opening of GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels modulating atrial chronotropy, A1 receptors may additionally restrain KCa2/SK activation thereby compensating atrial inotropic depression by increasing the time available for Ca2+ influx through Cav1 (L-type) channels. PMID:27014060

  11. Effect of the alkaloid (-)cathinone on the release of radioactivity from rabbit atria prelabelled with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine

    SciTech Connect

    Kalix, P.

    1983-02-14

    In certain countries of East Africa and the Arab Peninsula, fresh leaves of the khat shrub are used as a stimulant. The effect of the plant material can be explained by the presence of the phenylalklamine alkaloid (-)cathinone in the leaves, since this substance has been shown to have an amphetamine-like releasing effect on CNS tissue prelabelled with /sup 3/H-dopamine. Characteristically, the chewing of khat is accompanied by sympathomimetic effects, especially at the cardiovascular level. To test whether these might be due to release of neurotransmitter from adrenergic nerve endings, the effect of (-)cathinone on the efflux of radioactivity from isolated rabbit atrium tissue prelabelled with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine was investigated. It was found that, at concentrations below 1 ..mu..M, (-)cathinone caused an immediate increase of efflux. The effect was dose-dependent and was potentiated by pretreatment of the rabbits with reserpine. Preincubation of the tissue with desipramine and cocaine prevented the induction of release by (-)cathinone. The results indicate that the alkaloid (-)cathinone has an amphetamine-like releasing effect on noradrenergic nerve endings and they suggest that the cardiovascular symptoms observed during khat consumption are due to release of neurotransmitter from physiologicl storage sites.

  12. Effects of angiotensin II on intracellular Ca2+ and pH in isolated beating rabbit hearts and myocytes loaded with the indicator indo-1.

    PubMed Central

    Ikenouchi, H; Barry, W H; Bridge, J H; Weinberg, E O; Apstein, C S; Lorell, B H

    1994-01-01

    1. Angiotensin II increases myocardial contractility in several species, including the rabbit and man. However, it is controversial whether the predominant mechanism is an increase in free cytosolic [Ca2+]i or a change in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. To address this question, we infused angiotensin II in isolated perfused rabbit hearts loaded with the Ca2+ indicator indo-1 AM and measured changes in beat-to-beat surface transients of the Ca2+i-sensitive 400:500 nm ratio and left ventricular contractility. The effects of angiotensin II were compared with the response to a Ca(2+)-dependent increase in the inotropic state produced by a change in the perfusate [Ca2+] from 0.9 to 3.6 nM. 2. In the isolated beating heart, an increase in perfusate [Ca2+] caused an increase in left ventricular pressure +dP/dt in association with an increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. Angiotensin II perfusion caused a similar increase in left ventricular +dP/dt in the absence of any increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. 3. To exclude any contribution of non-myocyte sources of Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescence which may be present in the intact heart, we also compared the effects of angiotensin II and a change in superfusate [Ca2+] in collagenase-dissociated paced adult rabbit ventricular myocytes loaded with indo-1 AM. In the isolated rabbit myocytes a change in perfusate [Ca2+] from 0.9 to 3.6 mM caused an increase in peak systolic cell shortening coincident with an increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. In contrast, angiotensin II caused a similar increase in peak systolic cell shortening whereas there was no increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. There was also no change in inward Ca2+ current (ICa) in response to angiotensin II. 4. To investigate further the mechanism of the positive inotropic action of angiotensin II, its effects on intracellular pH were studied in isolated rabbit myocytes loaded with the fluorescent H+ probe SNARF 1. These experiments demonstrated that angiotensin II induced a 0.2 p

  13. Beating irregularity of single pacemaker cells isolated from the rabbit sinoatrial node.

    PubMed Central

    Wilders, R; Jongsma, H J

    1993-01-01

    Single pacemaker heart cells discharge irregularly. Data on fluctuations in interbeat interval of single pacemaker cells isolated from the rabbit sinoatrial node are presented. The coefficient of variation of the interbeat interval is quite small, approximately 2%, even though the coefficient of variation of diastolic depolarization rate is approximately 15%. It has been hypothesized that random fluctuations in interbeat interval arise from the stochastic behavior of the membrane ionic channels. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a single channel model of a single pacemaker cell isolated from the rabbit sinoatrial node, i.e., a model into which the stochastic open-close kinetics of the individual membrane ionic channels are incorporated. Single channel conductances as well as single channel open and closed lifetimes are based on experimental data from whole cell and single channel experiments that have been published in the past decade. Fluctuations in action potential parameters of the model cell are compared with those observed experimentally. It is concluded that fluctuations in interbeat interval of single sinoatrial node pacemaker cells indeed are due to the stochastic open-close kinetics of the membrane ionic channels. PMID:8312495

  14. Comparative effects of a new calcium channel antagonist, mepirodipine, on rabbit spontaneously beating sino-atrial node cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, H; Hashimoto, K

    1991-01-25

    The effects of mepirodipine, a new 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, on the membrane potentials were examined on spontaneously beating rabbit sino-atrial (SA) node cells and on the membrane currents under voltage-clamped conditions. Mepirodipine 3 x 10(-9) M significantly decreased the action potential amplitude and the maximum rate of depolarization. The action potential duration and the cycle length were prolonged. Sinus arrest occurred at 10(-8) M in all of five preparations. In voltage-clamped SA node cells, mepirodipine in concentrations higher than 3 x 10(-9) M decreased the slow inward current. It did not affect the steady state outward current and the hyperpolarization-activated inward current. Verapamil, diltiazem and nifedipine produced similar changes in the action potential parameters, but at a concentration of 10(-6) M. At concentrations higher than 10(-5) M, they elicited sinus arrest. These results suggest that mepirodipine is a more potent inhibitor of spontaneous calcium-dependent SA node impulse generation than the three other calcium antagonists tested.

  15. Comparative stereology of mouse atria.

    PubMed

    Bossen, E H; Sommer, J R; Waugh, R A

    1981-01-01

    The left and right atria of the mouse were compared to each other and to the mouse left ventricle using stereologic techniques. The volume fraction (Vv) and surface area per unit cell volume (Sv) of the interior junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (IJSR), total JSR and extended JSR were greater in the left atrium than in right. The Vv and Sv of the free SR, transverse tubules, and mitochondria were similar in the two atria. It is suggested that the differences in junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum between the atria can be accounted for by a difference in distribution of two types of cells whose anatomy is analogous to working and conducting fibers in the ventricle. The Sv and Vv of the transverse tubules, mitochondria, and all the components of the sarcoplasmic reticulum except for the free SR were greater in the left ventricle than in either atrium. The greater calcium content and sensitivity to extracellular calcium of the atria may explain the greater volume of free SR in the atria as compared to the left ventricle. The Sv of the plasmalemma of the atria and of the Sv of the plasmalemma of the transverse tubules of the left ventricles supports the suggestion of others that there is a constant ratio of surface area to cell volume in cardiac cells.

  16. A Low-Cost Method of Ciliary Beat Frequency Measurement Using iPhone and MATLAB: Rabbit Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jason J; Lemieux, Bryan T; Wong, Brian J F

    2016-08-01

    (1) To determine ciliary beat frequency (CBF) using a consumer-grade cellphone camera and MATLAB and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method. Prospective animal study. Academic otolaryngology department research laboratory. Five ex vivo tracheal samples were extracted from 3 freshly euthanized (<3 hours postmortem) New Zealand white rabbits and incubated for 30 minutes in buffer at 23°C, buffer at 37°C, or 10% formalin at 23°C. Samples were sectioned transversely and observed under a phase-contrast microscope. Cilia movement was recorded through the eyepiece using an iPhone 6 at 240 frames per second (fps). Through MATLAB programming, the video of the 23°C sample was downsampled to 120, 60, and 30 fps, and Fourier analysis was performed on videos of all frame rates and conditions to determine CBF. CBF of the 23°C sample was also calculated manually frame by frame for verification. Recorded at 240 fps, the CBF at 23°C was 5.03 ± 0.4 Hz, and the CBF at 37°C was 9.08 ± 0.49 Hz (P < .001). The sample with 10% formalin did not display any data beyond DC noise. Compared with 240 fps, the means of other frame rates/methods (120, 60, 30 fps; manual counting) at 23°C all showed no statistical difference (P > .05). There is no significant difference between CBF measured via visual inspection and that analyzed by the developed program. Furthermore, all tested acquisition rates are shown to be effective, providing a fast and inexpensive alternative to current CBF measurement protocols. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  17. Diastolic Calcium Release Controls the Beating Rate of Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells: Numerical Modeling of the Coupling Process

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Vinogradova, Tatiana M.; Bogdanov, Konstantin Y.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Stern, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies employing Ca2+ indicators and confocal microscopy demonstrate substantial local Ca2+ release beneath the cell plasma membrane (subspace) of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) occurring during diastolic depolarization. Pharmacological and biophysical experiments have suggested that the released Ca2+ interacts with the plasma membrane via the ion current (INaCa) produced by the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and constitutes an important determinant of the pacemaker rate. This study provides a numerical validation of the functional importance of diastolic Ca2+ release for rate control. The subspace Ca2+ signals in rabbit SANCs were measured by laser confocal microscopy, averaged, and calibrated. The time course of the subspace [Ca2+] displayed both diastolic and systolic components. The diastolic component was mainly due to the local Ca2+ releases; it was numerically approximated and incorporated into a SANC cellular electrophysiology model. The model predicts that the diastolic Ca2+ release strongly interacts with plasma membrane via INaCa and thus controls the phase of the action potential upstroke and ultimately the final action potential rate. PMID:15041695

  18. Effect of somatostatin on 45Ca fluxes in guinea-pig isolated atria.

    PubMed Central

    Díez, J.; Tamargo, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of somatostatin (SS, 10(-6) M and 5 X 10(-6) M) was studied on 45Ca fluxes in guinea-pig isolated atria. SS produced a dose-dependent decrease in 45Ca uptake, this effect being dependent on the stimulation rate and Ca concentration in the bathing media. The decrease in 45Ca uptake was more evident at faster (60 and 180 beats min-1) than at slower frequencies (15 beats min-1) and was less evident in high Ca (5.4 mM). SS had no effect on 45Ca efflux. These results suggest that SS inhibits the slow inward Ca current in guinea-pig atrial fibres. PMID:2435352

  19. Vagally induced block and delayed conduction as a mechanism for circus movement tachycardia in frog atria.

    PubMed

    Rosenshtraukh, L V; Zaitsev, A V; Fast, V G; Pertsov, A M; Krinsky, V I

    1989-02-01

    Episodes of tachycardia induced by strong vagal stimulation in spontaneously beating isolated atria of frog (Rana temporaria) were studied with multielectrode mapping technique. These episodes were inducible in 19 of 39 preparations. The arrhythmia started several seconds after cessation of vagal stimulation strong enough to cause sinus arrest, without electrical stimulation of the myocardium. The arrhythmia consisted of two to 20 beats (6 +/- 4, mean +/- SD, n = 42) with a cycle length of 100-500 msec. Recording from 32 sites with spatial resolution of 1-2 mm showed that the arrhythmia was due to intra-atrial circus movement. The estimated perimeter of the reentrant circuit ranged from 6 to 20 mm. In circuits of the minimal size, the average conduction velocity along the circuit was as low as 2-3 cm/sec. Paroxysms of the tachycardia were always preceded by vagally induced nonuniform depression of conduction, with some areas of atria being completely blocked. As the vagal influence decreased, the blocked areas recovered in an inhomogeneous manner, their unblocking being significantly (p less than 0.05) delayed after inhibition of tissue cholinesterase by proserine. The reentrant tachycardia was initiated when a sinus impulse arrived during certain phase of the unblocking. Unlike the well-known mechanism of reentrant excitation, which is based on inhomogeneous refractoriness and critically timed extrabeat(s), the circus movement in our model depended on vagally induced conduction block and could be launched by a single sinus impulse.

  20. Effect of phorbol ester and pertussis toxin on the enhancement of noradrenaline release by angiotensin II in mouse atria.

    PubMed Central

    Musgrave, I. F.; Majewski, H.

    1989-01-01

    1. Mouse atria were incubated with [3H]-noradrenaline, and the outflow of radioactivity due to electrical field stimulation (5 Hz, 60 s) was used as an index of noradrenaline release. Angiotensin II (0.01 and 0.1 microM) significantly enhanced the stimulation-induced (S-I) outflow of radioactivity. 2. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (0.001, 0.03, 0.1 and 1.0 microM), a protein kinase C activating phorbol ester, significantly enhanced the S-I outflow of radioactivity. When angiotensin II (0.1 microM) was present with the concentration of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate that was maximally effective in increasing the S-I outflow (0.1 microM), the enhancement of S-I outflow produced by angiotensin II was maintained. 3. Polymyxin B (70 microM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, significantly inhibited the S-I outflow. Polymyxin B also inhibited the enhancement of the S-I outflow produced by angiotensin II (0.1 microM). 4. In another series of experiments mice were injected with pertussis toxin (1.5 micrograms per mouse), 4 days before their atria were removed. The effectiveness of pertussis toxin pretreatment was determined indirectly using carbachol. Carbachol caused a concentration-dependent fall in both the rate and force of beating of isolated spontaneously beating atria from mice pretreated with vehicle. This effect of carbachol was not seen with atria from mice pretreated with pertussis toxin. 5. Pertussis toxin pretreatment did not alter the enhancement of the S-I outflow of radioactivity produced by angiotensin II (0.01 and 0.1 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2720295

  1. Free creatine available to the creatine phosphate energy shuttle in isolated rat atria

    SciTech Connect

    Savabi, F. )

    1988-10-01

    To measure the actual percentage of intracellular free creatine participating in the process of energy transport, the incorporation of (1-{sup 14}C)creatine into the free creatine and phosphocreatine (PCr) pools in spontaneously beating isolated rat atria, under various conditions, was examined. The atria were subjected to three consecutive periods, control, anoxia, and postanoxic recover, in medium containing tracers of (1-{sup 14}C)creatine. The tissue content and specific activity of creatine and PCr were determined at the end of each period. The higher specific activity found for tissue PCr (1.87 times) than creatine, independent of the percentage of total intracellular creatine that was present as free creatine, provides evidence for the existence of two separate pools of free creatine. Analysis of the data shows that in the normal oxygenated state {approx} 9% of the total intracellular creatine is actually free to participate in the process of energy transport (shuttle pool). About 36% of the total creatine is bound to unknown intracellular components and the rest exists as PCr. The creatine that was taken up and the creatine that was released from the breakdown of PCr have much greater access to the site of phosphorylation than the rest of the intracellular creatine. A sharp increase in the specific activity of residual PCr on prolongation of anoxic time was also observed. This provides evidence for a nonhomogeneous pool of PCr, for the most recently formed (radioactive) PCr appeared to be hydrolyzed last.

  2. Specific inhibition of HCN channels slows rhythm differently in atria, ventricle and outflow tract and stabilizes conduction in the anoxic-reoxygenated embryonic heart model.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Alexandre; Pedretti, Sarah; Gardier, Stephany; Raddatz, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed in pacemaker cells very early during cardiogenesis. This work aimed at determining to what extent these channels are implicated in the electromechanical disturbances induced by a transient oxygen lack which may occur in utero. Spontaneously beating hearts or isolated ventricles and outflow tracts dissected from 4-day-old chick embryos were exposed to a selective inhibitor of HCN channels (ivabradine 0.1-10microM) to establish a dose-response relationship. The effects of ivabradine on electrocardiogram, excitation-contraction coupling and contractility of hearts submitted to anoxia (30min) and reoxygenation (60min) were also determined. The distribution of the predominant channel isoform, HCN4, was established in atria, ventricle and outflow tract by immunoblotting. Intrinsic beating rate of atria, ventricle and outflow tract was 164+/-22 (n=10), 78+/-24 (n=8) and 40+/-12bpm (n=23, mean+/-SD), respectively. In the whole heart, ivabradine (0.3microM) slowed the firing rate of atria by 16% and stabilized PR interval. These effects persisted throughout anoxia-reoxygenation, whereas the variations of QT duration, excitation-contraction coupling and contractility, as well as the types and duration of arrhythmias were not altered. Ivabradine (10microM) reduced the intrinsic rate of atria and isolated ventricle by 27% and 52%, respectively, whereas it abolished activity of the isolated outflow tract. Protein expression of HCN4 channels was higher in atria and ventricle than in the outflow tract. Thus, HCN channels are specifically distributed and control finely atrial, ventricular and outflow tract pacemakers as well as conduction in the embryonic heart under normoxia and throughout anoxia-reoxygenation.

  3. Endogenous triacylglycerol utilization by the isolated rat atria.

    PubMed

    Varela, A; Savino, E A

    1988-03-01

    The isolated atria from 24 h fasted rats, either in the presence of glucose or in a substrate-free medium containing 2-deoxyglucose, mobilized the endogenous triacylglycerol (TG) to a greater extent than those from fed rats. The TG of the fasted atria had almost disappeared at the end of the 90 min incubation in the substrate-free plus 2-deoxyglucose medium, whereas in those from fed rats a mobilization-resistant portion of about 40% of the TG pool remained. This finding coincided with a lower decay of the contractile and pacemaker activities in the atria from fasted rats. Insulin abolished the TG mobilization in the atria from fed rats in the presence of glucose, but it was ineffective in the fasted atria. These data suggest that the endogenous-TG and glucose share in supporting the atrial functions, that insulin is involved in the control of TG consumption only in the fed state and that the greater TG mobilization in the fasted atria, at least partly, meets the energy requirements of the tissue.

  4. Effects of platelet activating factor on contractile force and 45Ca fluxes in guinea-pig isolated atria.

    PubMed Central

    Diez, J.; Delpón, E.; Tamargo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of platelet activating factor (PAF) were studied on the electromechanical properties and 45Ca2+ fluxes of guinea-pig isolated atria. 2 Both in spontaneously beating and electrically driven atria, PAF (10(-12)-10(-7) M) increased atrial rate but produced a biphasic effect on contractile force. At low concentrations (up to 10(-10) M) it produced a positive inotropic effect, while at higher concentrations PAF exerted a negative inotropic effect. A similar biphasic effect was observed in the slow contractions elicited by isoprenaline in K(+)-depolarized atrial fibres. 3. The positive inotropic effect of PAF was prevented by verapamil, whereas pretreatment of atria with propranolol, phentolamine, indomethacin or atropine did not modify its positive and negative inotropic actions. BN 52021, a specific PAF antagonist, abolished both the positive and negative inotropic effects. 4. PAF had no effect on the characteristics of the action potentials recorded in either normally polarized or K(+)-depolarized (slow action potential) atrial fibres. 5. At concentrations at which it increased contractile force, PAF potentiated the contractile responses to Ca2+ (0.9-9 mM), whereas at negative inotropic concentrations it inhibited them. The negative inotropic effect of PAF was partially reversed in 70% Na+ medium. 6. At 10(-11) M, PAF increased 45Ca2+ uptake and reduced the rate coefficient (kcm) for the 45Ca2+ efflux. This increase in 45Ca2+ uptake was abolished in atria pretreated with verapamil or BN 52021. However, 10(-7) M PAF modified neither 45Ca2+ uptake nor efflux in atrial muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2379035

  5. Beneficial effect of medicinal plants on the contractility of post-hypoxic isolated guinea pig atria - Potential implications for the treatment of ischemic-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Bipat, Robbert; Toelsie, Jerry R; Magali, Indira; Soekhoe, Rubaina; Stender, Karin; Wangsawirana, Angelique; Oedairadjsingh, Krishan; Pawirodihardjo, Jennifer; Mans, Dennis R A

    2016-08-01

    Context Ischemic-reperfusion injury is accompanied by a decreased contractility of the myocardium. Positive-inotropic agents have proven useful for treating this condition but may exert serious side-effects. Objective In this study, aqueous preparations from Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench (Malvaceae), Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae), Bixa orellana L. (Bixaceae), Cecropia peltata L. (Moraceae), Erythrina fusca Lour. (Fabaceae), Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) and Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae) were evaluated for their ability to improve the decreased contractility of isolated guinea pig atria after hypoxic stress. Materials and methods Guinea pig atria isolated in Ringer-Locke buffer gassed with 100% O2 at 30 °C were exposed for 5 min to hypoxia, then allowed to recover in oxygenated buffer alone or containing a single plant extract (0.001-1 mg/mL). The contractility (g/s) and beating frequency (beats/min), as well as troponin C contents of the bathing solution (ng/mL), were determined and expressed as means ± SDs. Results The extracts of A. muricata, B. orellana, C. peltata and T. catappa caused an increase in the contractility compared to untreated atria of 340 ± 102%, 151 ± 13%, 141 ± 14% and 238 ± 44%, respectively. However, the latter two preparations increased the troponin C contents of the bathing solution to 36 ± 11 and 69 ± 33, compared to the value of 11 ± 3 ng/mL found with untreated atria. Conclusions Preparations from A. muricata and B. orellana may possess positive-inotropic properties which may improve the contractility of the post-hypoxic myocardium. Studies to assess their usefulness in ischemic-reperfusion injury are warranted.

  6. PAC₁ receptors mediate positive chronotropic responses to PACAP-27 and VIP in isolated mouse atria.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Donald B; Girard, Beatrice M; Hoover, Jeffrey L; Parsons, Rodney L

    2013-08-05

    PACAP and VIP have prominent effects on cardiac function in several species, but little is known about their influence on the murine heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the expression of PACAP/VIP receptors in mouse heart and the response of isolated atria to peptide agonists. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that PAC₁, VPAC₁, and VPAC₂ receptor mRNAs are present throughout the mouse heart. Expression of all three receptor transcripts was low, PAC₁ being the lowest. No regional differences in expression were detected for individual receptor mRNAs after normalization to L32. Pharmacological effects of PACAP-27, VIP, and the selective PAC₁ agonist maxadilan were evaluated in isolated, spontaneously beating atria from C57BL/6 mice of either sex. Incremental additions of PACAP-27 at 1 min intervals caused a concentration-dependent tachycardia with a logEC₅₀=-9.08 ± 0.15 M (n=7) and a maximum of 96.3 ± 5.9% above baseline heart rate. VIP and maxadilan also caused tachycardia but their potencies were about two orders of magnitude less. Increasing the dosing interval to 5 min caused a leftward shift of the concentration-response curve to maxadilan but no changes in the curves for PACAP-27 or VIP. Under this condition, neither the potency nor the efficacy of maxadilan differed from those of PACAP-27. Neither PACAP-27 nor maxadilan caused tachyphylaxis, and maximal responses to maxadilan were maintained for at least 2 h. We conclude that all three VIP/PACAP family receptors are expressed by mouse cardiac tissue, but only PAC₁ receptors mediate positive chronotropic responses to PACAP-27 and VIP.

  7. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes. Photoplethysmography, which measures changes in arterial blood volume, is commonly used to obtain heart rate and blood oxygen saturation. The digitized PPG signals are used as inputs into the beat-to-beat blood

  8. Access to the native atria following conduit total cavopulmonary anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Robert L; Danon, Saar; Jureidini, Saadeh

    2017-08-01

    We describe the use of trans-thoracic and trans-conduit puncture to access the atria and perform interventional procedures in patients who have undergone conduit total cavopulmonary anastomosis. Catheter access to the atria following intra or extra-cardiac Fontan is desirable when there is a need for trans-atrial interventions. Between 2009 and 2014, 5 patients ages 7 to 28 years underwent this approach; three trans-thoracic and 2 trans-conduit punctures. Various therapeutic aims were achieved. Included are: placement of pacing wire in the left atrial appendage, access to re-canalized left superior vena cava via the coronary sinus for device occlusion eliminating cyanosis, access with subsequent device closure of a dormant pulmonary valve thought to be the nidus of an embolic event, and access to the atria for ablation of an atrial tachycardia. Entry to the atria was successful in all five patients with either trans-thoracic access or trans-conduit puncture with subsequent intended intervention performed successfully. Trans-conduit puncture and trans-thoracic access may allow therapeutic procedures which mitigate the need for further open heart surgery. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Increased Heart Rate in Shenxianshengmai-treated Bradycardia Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhou-Ying; Huang, Jian; Liu, Na-Na; Zheng, Min; Zhao, Tao; Zhao, Bu-Chang; Wang, Yi-Min; Pu, Jie-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background: The molecular mechanisms of Shenxianshengmai (SXSM), a traditional Chinese medicine, on bradycardia have been incompletely understood. The study tried to investigate the gene expression profile and proteomics of bradycardia rabbits’ hearts after SXSM treatment. Methods: Twenty-four adult rabbits were randomly assigned in four groups: sham, model, model plus SXSM treatment, and sham plus SXSM treatment groups. Heart rate was recorded in all rabbits. Then, total RNA of atria and proteins of ventricle were isolated and quantified, respectively. Gene expression profiling was conducted by gene expression chip, and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to confirm the results of gene expression chip. We used isobaric tags for elative and absolute quantitation and Western blotting to identify altered proteins after SXSM treatment. Results: There was a constant decrease in the mean heart rate (32%, from 238 ± 6 beats/min to 149 ± 12 beats/min) after six weeks in model compared with that in sham group. This effect was partially reversed by 4-week SXSM treatment. Complementary DNA microarray demonstrated that the increased acetylcholinesterase and reduced nicotinic receptor were take responsibility for the increased heart rate. In addition, proteins involved in calcium handling and signaling were affected by SXSM treatment. Real-time RT-PCR verified the results from gene chip. Results from proteomics demonstrated that SXSM enhanced oxidative phosphorylation and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in ventricular myocardium to improve ATP generation. Conclusions: Long-term SXSM stimulates sympathetic transmission by increasing the expression of acetylcholinesterase and reduces the expression of nicotinic receptor to increase heart rate. SXSM also restored the calcium handling genes and altered genes involved in signaling. In addition, SXSM improves the ATP supply of ventricular myocardium by increasing proteins

  11. Epicardial radiofrequency ablation on a beating heart: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Susumu; Oki, Shigeru; Muraoka, Masato; Oshima, Kiyohiro; Kashiwabara, Kenji; Morishita, Yasuo

    2005-02-01

    The effect of epicardial radiofrequency ablation (RFA) during normal heart beating was experimentally studied in order to establish safe and effective procedures for RFA. Seven pigs weighing approximately 30 to 50 kg were used in this study. Fifty-one epicardial RFA lesions were created on both atria using a Cobra Cooled probe with continuous internal irrigation of a saline solution. The ablation temperature was fixed at 80 degrees C and the duration of the RFA in each case was 20, 30, 60 and 120 seconds. There was significant positive correlation between the right and left atria in wall thickness. Transmural coagulation was obtained in 69% of the total specimens, which decreased according to the increase of wall thickness especially over 3 mm. Transmural coagulation was seen in 64% of the specimens after RFA of less than 30 seconds, and 86% after ablation of >or=60 seconds. Occurence of 90% or deeper coagulation was higher in the right atrium than in the left one (97% vs. 78%). Right atrial rupture occurred in a region of 1 mm in thickness after ablation of 60 seconds. Further technical improvements associated with new instruments are indispensable to complete epicardial RFA procedures on a beating heart.

  12. Role of polyamines and cAMP-dependent mechanisms on 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone-elicited functional effects in isolated right atria of rat.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Manuel; Secades, Lorena; Bordallo, Carmen; Meana, Clara; Rubín, José Manuel; Cantabrana, Begoña; Bordallo, Javier

    2009-10-01

    Androgens produce acute vasodilation of systemic, pulmonary, and coronary arteries in several mammal preparations and increase cardiomyocyte contractility. A decrease of the spontaneous beating of sinoatrial cells has also been described. The aim of this study was to characterize the direct effect of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone on the spontaneous chronotropism and inotropism in the same preparation as an approach to establish the effect on cardiac output and their mechanism of action. The effects were studied on isolated right atria of Wistar rats placed in an organ bath in Tyrode solution at 37 degrees C and bubbled with carbogen. In male rats, the acute administration of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, a nonaromatizable derivate of testosterone, elicited a positive inotropism, which was associated with a negative chronotropism. As reported in the left atria, polyamines and beta-adrenoceptors played a role in 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone-elicited positive inotropism because the effect was antagonized by alpha-difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis, and atenolol, a beta1-adrenoceptor blocker, but not on the negative effect on chronotropism. The androgen increased the sinoatrial node recovery time, suggesting an effect on the mechanisms of spontaneous diastolic depolarization involved in atria pacemaking. These effects of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone are not hormonally regulated because they are similarly produced in estrogenized females and gonadectomized male and female rats. These results suggest that the androgen could acutely improve cardiac performance.

  13. Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. I.; Hafizi, B.; Ting, A.; Burris, H. R.; Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Ganguly, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    The Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator (VBWA) is a particle acceleration scheme which uses the non-linear ponderomotive beating of two different frequency laser beams to accelerate electrons. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate the VBWA is underway at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). This experiment will use the beating of a 1054 nm and 527 nm laser pulse from the NRL T-cubed laser to generate the beat wave and a 4.5 MeV RF electron gun as the electron source. Simulation results and the experimental design will be presented. The suitability of using axicon or higher order Gaussian laser beams will also be discussed.

  14. Model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat time interval series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, Alberto; Diambra, Luis; Malta, C. P.

    2005-09-01

    In this study we present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a set of differential equations used to simulate the membrane potential of a single rabbit sinoatrial node cell, excited with a periodic input signal with added correlated noise. This signal, which simulates the input from the autonomous nervous system to the sinoatrial node, was included in the pacemaker equations as a modulation of the iNaK current pump and the potassium current iK. We focus at modeling the heart beat-to-beat time interval series from normal subjects during meditation of the Kundalini Yoga and Chi techniques. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that while the embedding of pre-meditation and control cases have a roughly circular shape, it acquires a polygonal shape during meditation, triangular for the Kundalini Yoga data and quadrangular in the case of Chi data. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce the trajectory of the experimental data in the phase space. The embedding of the Chi data could be reproduced using a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a square wave. In the case of Kundalini Yoga data, the embedding was reproduced with a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a triangular wave having a rising branch of longer duration than the decreasing branch. Our study provides an estimation of the respiratory signal using only the heart beat-to-beat time interval series.

  15. Observations of surf beat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guza, R. T.; Thornton, Edward B.

    1985-03-01

    The magnitudes of cross-shore velocity and elevation oscillations at surf beat frequencies observed on three ocean beaches are significantly correlated with the significant height of incident wind waves. Measured surf beat run-up spectra are coupled with numerical integrations of the long wave equations to predict the energy spectrum at offshore sensors, and the coherence and phase between offshore sensors and run-up meter. As in previous studies, valleys in the observed surf beat energy spectra at offshore sensors, and jumps in the relative phase between sensors, occur at the nodal frequencies of simple standing wave (either leaky or high mode edge wave) models. The variance observed in the surf beat cross-shore velocity field is between 10 and 100 times larger near the shoreline than in 5 m depth, and decays more rapidly with increasing offshore distance than the variance in the surf beat elevation field. The standing wave model is qualitatively consistent with this structure.

  16. Binaural beat salience

    PubMed Central

    Grose, John H.; Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of binaural beats have noted individual variability and response lability, but little attention has been paid to the salience of the binaural beat percept. The purpose of this study was to gauge the strength of the binaural beat percept by matching its salience to that of sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM), and to then compare rate discrimination for the two types of fluctuation. Rate discrimination was measured for standard rates of 4, 8, 16, and 32 Hz – all in the 500-Hz carrier region. Twelve normal-hearing adults participated in this study. The results indicated that discrimination acuity for binaural beats is similar to that for SAM tones whose depths of modulation have been adjusted to provide equivalent modulation salience. The matched-salience SAM tones had relatively shallow depths of modulation, suggesting that the perceptual strength of binaural beats is relatively weak, although all listeners perceived them. The Weber fraction for detection of an increase in binaural beat rate is roughly constant across beat rates, at least for rates above 4 Hz, as is rate discrimination for SAM tones. PMID:22326292

  17. Binaural beat salience.

    PubMed

    Grose, John H; Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies of binaural beats have noted individual variability and response lability, but little attention has been paid to the salience of the binaural beat percept. The purpose of this study was to gauge the strength of the binaural beat percept by matching its salience to that of sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM), and to then compare rate discrimination for the two types of fluctuation. Rate discrimination was measured for standard rates of 4, 8, 16, and 32 Hz - all in the 500-Hz carrier region. Twelve normal-hearing adults participated in this study. The results indicated that discrimination acuity for binaural beats is similar to that for SAM tones whose depths of modulation have been adjusted to provide equivalent modulation salience. The matched-salience SAM tones had relatively shallow depths of modulation, suggesting that the perceptual strength of binaural beats is relatively weak, although all listeners perceived them. The Weber fraction for detection of an increase in binaural beat rate is roughly constant across beat rates, at least for rates above 4 Hz, as is rate discrimination for SAM tones.

  18. On binaural beats.

    PubMed

    Fritze, W

    1985-01-01

    Binaural beats have been investigated in normal volunteers using high-stable synthesizers. There are considerable differences between the subjective rhythm heard and the difference of the two frequencies, indicating that this dissimilarity must be caused centrally.

  19. Thyroid hormones differentially affect sarcoplasmic reticulum function in rat atria and ventricles.

    PubMed

    Kaasik, A; Minajeva, A; Paju, K; Eimre, M; Seppet, E K

    1997-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-pump activity, together with assessment of the functional role of SR in providing activator Ca2+ under these altered thyroid states. In response to a shift from hypothyroid to hyperthyroid state, a 10 fold and 2 fold increase in SR Ca(2+)-pump activity in atria and ventricles, respectively, were observed. This was associated with the 8-9 fold increases in atrial contractility (+dT/dt) and relaxation (-dT/dt), but only with a 3-4 fold increase in their ventricular counterparts. Also, the recirculation fraction of activator Ca2+ (RFA) increased to a far greater extent in atria (4 fold) than in papillary muscles, and the relative increment in inhibition of developed tension by ryanodine became 3 times larger in atria than in papillary muscles. A positive force-frequency relationship (FFR) was observed in hypothyroid atria, whereas the hyperthyroid atria, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid papillary muscles showed a negative FFR. These results suggest the greater role of transsarcolemmal (SL) Ca2+ and smaller role of SR Ca2+ in activating contraction in hypothyroid atria compared to other preparations. Thyroid hormones decrease the contribution of SL and increase that of SR in providing activator Ca2+ to the greater extent in atria than in ventricles. This effect of thyroid hormones is based on larger stimulation of SR Ca(2+)-pump in atria compared to ventricles.

  20. Differential cholinoceptor subtype-dependent activation of signal transduction pathways in neonatal versus adult rat atria.

    PubMed

    Borda, E S; Perez Leiros, C; Camusso, J J; Bacman, S; Sterin-Borda, L

    1997-04-04

    In this study, we investigated the expression and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) and the different signaling pathways associated with mAChR activation in atria isolated from adult and neonatal rats. Carbachol stimulation of mAChRs in both neonatal and adult rat atria led to a negative inotropic response with activation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis, an increase in cyclic GMP levels, and a decrease in cyclic AMP production. However, compared with adult atria, neonatal atria showed hypersensitivity in the contractile effect induced by carbachol. Pharmacological analysis with mAChR antagonists indicated that M1 and M2 mAChR subtypes are important mediators of the response to carbachol in neonatal atria. In contrast, in adult atria the effect of the agonist was coupled only to the M2 mAChR subtype. Moreover, an increased number of total mAChRs was labeled in neonatal atrial membranes compared with those of adults. Although a predominant M2 mAChR population is expressed in atria at both stages of development studied, competition binding parameters calculated for carbachol indicated the presence of high-affinity binding sites, with higher affinity in neonates than in adults. These results suggest that the differences observed between neonatal and adult atria in their response to a cholinergic agonist may be related to differential expression of mAChR subtypes and/or changes in functional coupling of mAChR subtypes during development.

  1. Thermally-induced ventilation in atria: an atrium classification scheme and promising test sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    In establishing the atrium classification scheme, specific attention was given to: climate (hot-arid, warm-humid, and temperate), atrium configuration (open, closed, and adjustable tops), and thermal mechanism (natural convection, radiative cooling, shading, and others). Application of the resulting three-dimensional (three-coordinate) matrix was considered and tested. Although the testing was for purposes of checking scheme application, the procedure indicated that most of the atria examined were of the adjustable-top configuration with daylighting the principal functional mode. However, it was noted that thermally-induced air flow was present in many of the atria classified. In the identification of promising test sites it was noted that there appears to be a shortage of buildings which meet the atrium definition. Consequently, prospective test sites were categorized as follows based upon anticipated value to the study: commercial atria already constructed, commercial atria planned or under construction, and residential atria already constructed.

  2. Metal MEMS Tools for Beating-heart Tissue Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Evan J.; Folk, Chris; Cohen, Adam; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Chen, Rich; del Nido, Pedro J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2011-01-01

    Achieving superior outcomes through the use of robots in medical applications requires an integrated approach to the design of the robot, tooling and the procedure itself. In this paper, this approach is applied to develop a robotic technique for closing abnormal communication between the atria of the heart. The goal is to achieve the efficacy of surgical closure as performed on a stopped, open heart with the reduced risk and trauma of a beating-heart catheter-based procedure. In the proposed approach, a concentric tube robot is used to percutaneously access the right atrium and deploy a tissue approximation device. The device is constructed using a metal MEMS fabrication process and is designed to both fit the manipulation capabilities of the robot as well as to reproduce the beneficial features of surgical closure by suture. Experimental results demonstrate device efficacy through manual in-vivo deployment and bench-top robotic deployment. PMID:22229109

  3. Thermally-induced ventilation applications in atria: a state-of-the-art report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Atria dating back as far as the Roman Empire from fourteen countries were reviewed. Several tentative conclusions have emerged regarding optimal atria aspect ratios and mechanisms to control the atria microclimate. Three areas were considered in the review of atrium technical considerations: cooling design concepts, thermal functions and atrium operating principles. The cooling design concepts discussed include radiative cooling, shading, convective cooling (wind-driven and thermally-induced), and thermal mass. Assumed atrium thermal functions consist of the control of incoming solar radiation, ventilation, cooling and day-lighting. Primary atrium operating mechanisms are convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. The partitioning of these energy flows are highly dependent upon specific atrium system parameters. Existing natural convection heat transfer and ventilation algorithms as they pertain to atria are presented. The limitations and major assumptions used in developing these algorithms are discussed. The computer programs reviewed include: (1) BLAST, (2) CALPAS3, (3) DEROB, (4) DOE-2A, (5) FREHEAT, (6) PASOLE, (7) PEGFIX, (8) NBSLD, (9) TWOZONE, and (10) UWENSOL. Out of the many atria surveyed, forty-one from thirty-seven locations in the US have been identified and documented. Most of the sites identified are commercial buildings. Sites are categorized into those already constructed and those still in the planning or building stages. Annotated bibliographies for information about atria are presented. These are grouped into the following subject areas: (1) general passive cooling, (2) climate and human comfort, (3) thermal and ventilation equations, (4) atria, (5) courtyards, and (6) measurement techniques.

  4. Influence of resting tension on immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Schiebinger, R.J.; Linden, J.

    1986-07-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is a potent diuretic hormone secreted by the atria in response to volume expansion. We examined the effect of resting tension on atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro. Left atria were hooked between an electrode and force transducer and superfused with medium 199. The atria were studied at a pacing frequency of 0 or 3 Hz. Atrial natriuretic peptide content of the superfusate was measured by radioimmunoassay. In nonpaced and paced atria, increasing resting tension three- to five-fold caused immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion to increase by 35 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM, n = 6, p less than 0.01) and 30 +/- 3% (n = 4, p less than 0.01), respectively. Lowering resting tension by 50% in nonpaced and paced atria lowered immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by 30 +/- 3% (n = 7, p less than 0.01) and 24 +/- 3% (n = 6, p less than 0.01), respectively. To exclude the possibility that release of norepinephrine or acetylcholine from endogenous nerve endings was mediating this effect, the atria were superfused with the combination of propranolol 0.1 microM, phentolamine 1.0 microM, and atropine 10 microM. These concentrations of the antagonists were 125-fold or higher than their Kd for binding to their respective receptors. The antagonists did not block the rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion; neither did they inhibit an established rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion induced by increasing the resting tension.

  5. Beat-to-beat P-wave morphology as a predictor of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Filos, Dimitrios; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Tachmatzidis, Dimitris; Vassilikos, Vassilios; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2017-11-01

    based on a feature selection process which highlighted 7 features, while an SVM classifier resulted a balanced accuracy equal to 93.75%. The results show the virtue of beat-to-beat analysis for PAF prediction. The difference in the percentage of the main P-wave-morphology and in the P-wave time-frequency characteristics suggests a higher electrical instability of the atrial substrate in patients with PAF and different conduction patterns in the atria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Simulation of the contraction of the ventricles in a human heart model including atria and pericardium.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Thomas; Wieners, Christian; Seemann, Gunnar; Steen, Henning; Dössel, Olaf

    2014-06-01

    During the contraction of the ventricles, the ventricles interact with the atria as well as with the pericardium and the surrounding tissue in which the heart is embedded. The atria are stretched, and the atrioventricular plane moves toward the apex. The atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) is considered to be a major contributor to the ventricular function, and a reduced AVPD is strongly related to heart failure. At the same time, the epicardium slides almost frictionlessly on the pericardium with permanent contact. Although the interaction between the ventricles, the atria and the pericardium plays an important role for the deformation of the heart, this aspect is usually not considered in computational models. In this work, we present an electromechanical model of the heart, which takes into account the interaction between ventricles, pericardium and atria and allows to reproduce the AVPD. To solve the contact problem of epicardium and pericardium, a contact handling algorithm based on penalty formulation was developed, which ensures frictionless and permanent contact. Two simulations of the ventricular contraction were conducted, one with contact handling of pericardium and heart and one without. In the simulation with contact handling, the atria were stretched during the contraction of the ventricles, while, due to the permanent contact with the pericardium, their volume increased. In contrast to that, in the simulations without pericardium, the atria were also stretched, but the change in the atrial volume was much smaller. Furthermore, the pericardium reduced the radial contraction of the ventricles and at the same time increased the AVPD.

  7. The effects of 4-pentenoic and pentanoic acids on the isolated rat atria.

    PubMed

    Varela, A; Felip, M N; Montesi, A; Savino, E A

    1988-12-01

    The peak developed tension and the pacemaker frequency of the isolated atria from fed and fasted rats, declined progressively during the incubation in a glucose-free medium containing 2-deoxyglucose. The atria from fed rats exhibited a faster decline than those from fasted rats, which was associated to a slower triacylglycerol lipolysis. 4-Pentenoic acid inhibited the lipolysis of both groups of atria but did not alter the atrial contractile performance. However, it enhanced the decline of the pacemaker frequency in the atria from fasted rats whereas, in contrast, it alleviated the decline in the fed atria. n-Pentanoic acid ameliorated the impairment of the contractile and pacemaker activities in both groups of atria, without affecting the lipolysis. It was concluded that, since the inhibition of the intramyocardial lipolysis did not correlate with changes of the atrial functions, 4-pentenoic acid was not appropriate to assess about the contribution of endogenous triacylglycerol to the maintenance of the atrial contractile and pacemaker activities.

  8. Axial tubule junctions control rapid calcium signaling in atria

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Sören; Kohl, Tobias; Williams, George S.B.; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A.; Hebisch, Elke; Dura, Miroslav; Didié, Michael; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Kohl, Peter; Ward, Christopher W.; Lehnart, Stephan E.

    2016-01-01

    The canonical atrial myocyte (AM) is characterized by sparse transverse tubule (TT) invaginations and slow intracellular Ca2+ propagation but exhibits rapid contractile activation that is susceptible to loss of function during hypertrophic remodeling. Here, we have identified a membrane structure and Ca2+-signaling complex that may enhance the speed of atrial contraction independently of phospholamban regulation. This axial couplon was observed in human and mouse atria and is composed of voluminous axial tubules (ATs) with extensive junctions to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that include ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) clusters. In mouse AM, AT structures triggered Ca2+ release from the SR approximately 2 times faster at the AM center than at the surface. Rapid Ca2+ release correlated with colocalization of highly phosphorylated RyR2 clusters at AT-SR junctions and earlier, more rapid shortening of central sarcomeres. In contrast, mice expressing phosphorylation-incompetent RyR2 displayed depressed AM sarcomere shortening and reduced in vivo atrial contractile function. Moreover, left atrial hypertrophy led to AT proliferation, with a marked increase in the highly phosphorylated RyR2-pS2808 cluster fraction, thereby maintaining cytosolic Ca2+ signaling despite decreases in RyR2 cluster density and RyR2 protein expression. AT couplon “super-hubs” thus underlie faster excitation-contraction coupling in health as well as hypertrophic compensatory adaptation and represent a structural and metabolic mechanism that may contribute to contractile dysfunction and arrhythmias. PMID:27643434

  9. Optimal ciliary beating patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2011-11-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of single or collective biological cilia. We define the efficiency of a single cilium as Q2 / P , where Q is the volume flow rate of the pumped fluid and P is the dissipated power. For ciliary arrays, we define it as (ρQ) 2 / (ρP) , with ρ denoting the surface density of cilia. We then numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. For a single cilium optimization leads to curly, somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal waves lead to a significantly higher efficiency than synchronous beating. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible optimum.

  10. Whole Genome Expression Differences in Human Left and Right Atria Ascertained by RNA-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jeffrey; Hanna, Peter; Van Wagoner, David R.; Barnard, John; Serre, David; Chung, Mina K.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Background The left and right atria have different susceptibilities towards developing arrhythmias, with left atrial arrhythmias more commonly observed. To understand the molecular basis for such differences, we catalogued miRNA and mRNA expression differences by next generation sequencing. Methods and Results Four human left-right atrial pairs were subjected to whole-genome expression analyses via next generation sequencing of small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), and poly-A enriched mRNAs. Using a paired sample design, significant differences in the expression of 32 miRNAs were found in between the left and right atria at a p-value of <0.01. Hsa-miR-143 was the most highly expressed miRNA in the atria, as quantified by RNA-seq. There were 746 and 2292 differentially expressed mRNAs between the left and right atria at false discovery rates of <0.001 and <0.05, respectively. Transcription factor binding elements within 2 kb of RefSeq genes were determined and specific motifs were identified that were enriched in differentially expressed genes. Similarly, specific miRNA target sequences in 3' UTRs were also enriched in differentially expressed genes. In addition eleven novel non-coding RNAs of unknown function were found to be differentially expressed between the left and right atria. Conclusions There are significant differences in miRNA and mRNA expression profiles between the left and right atria, which may yield insight into increased the arrhythmogenesis of the left atria. PMID:22474228

  11. A beat frequency buncher

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, D.W.; Corcoran, D.T.; Harper, G.C.

    1995-09-01

    A superconducting high energy buncher operating at 13/12 times the linac frequency has been built and installed, to combine with the low energy buncher operating at 1/12 the linac frequency. The system is synchronized so the linac and high energy buncher beat frequency remains in phase with the low energy buncher. On linac cycles not corresponding to a primary bunch, the high energy buncher bunches residual beam away from the linac longitudinal acceptance rather than into it. The resonator for the new high energy buncher was constructed by shortening an existing low-{beta} resonator.

  12. Pet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, E V

    1994-01-01

    Pet rabbits are becoming more common, and rabbit owners are demanding quality veterinary care. This article provides a broad overview of pet rabbit medicine, which is a relatively new field compared to laboratory and farm rabbit medicine. The most common differential diagnoses for presenting complaints are summarized in table form. Disease conditions are reviewed individually in the text. Sources of further information on veterinary care of rabbits are listed throughout the text, in an appendix, and in the references.

  13. Cardiotachometer with linear beat-to-beat frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Pope, J. M.; Smith, D. B. D.

    1967-01-01

    Cardiotachometer detects and displays the human heart rate during physiological studies. It provides linear response to the heart rate, records heart rate during rest and under heavy stress, provides a beat-to-beat indication of changes in heart rate, and is relatively free of interfering signals from activities other than the heart rate.

  14. Demonstrations of beats as moving interference patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, T. S.; Dishman, L. G.

    1982-02-01

    A ripple tank demonstration is described that displays the dynamic interference patterns responsible for producing beats. Photographs are provided of a computer simulation of various beat interference patterns. Young's two-slit interference pattern is presented as a special case (the zero-beat case) of the more general beat interference pattern. Equations for the constructive interference paths of beat interference patterns are derived.

  15. Rabbit medicine.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Dinah G

    2007-01-01

    When filling prescriptions for a rabbit, it is important to know whether the rabbit is a pet or is being raised as a source of food for human consumption. Several drugs widely used for pet rabbits are prohibited from exralabel use in animals raised for food production. The list of banned drugs should always be perused prior to filling a prescription for a rabbit being raised for food production. Since no veterinary-approved products exist for rabbits and most medications must be compounded, pharmacists are likely to encounter prescriptions for rabbits in their practice. A basic understanding of rabbit anatomy, physiolgy and common diseases will assist pharmacists in distinguishing between safe and dangerous drugs for administration to rabbits.

  16. An analysis of the mechanism of the inotropic action of some milrinone analogues in guinea-pig isolated atria.

    PubMed Central

    Dorigo, P.; Gaion, R. M.; Belluco, P.; Mosti, L.; Borea, P. A.; Maragno, I.

    1991-01-01

    1. It has been reported previously that the milrinone analogues, ethyl 5-cyano-1,6-dihydro-2-methyl-6-oxo-3 pyridine carboxylate (I) and ethyl 5-cyano-1,6-dihydro-2-ethyl-6-oxo-3 pyridine carboxylate (II) exert a positive inotropic effect (EC50 = 15.6 +/- 0.2 microM and 40.3 +/- 0.1 microM) both on spontaneously beating and on electrically driven atria from reserpine-treated guinea-pigs. In the present study the mechanism of the inotropic action of these two agents was investigated. 2. In electrically driven left atrium from reserpine-treated guinea-pigs the EC50 values for inotropic activity for compounds (I) and (II) corresponded to that of milrinone (EC50 = 25 +/- 0.1 microM) but compound (I) induced a greater maximum effect. This corresponded to a percentage increase in developed tension over control of 63 +/- 0.3 whereas the maximum inotropic effect of milrinone was 48 +/- 0.3 and that of compound (II) was 47 +/- 0.2. 3. The inotropic activity of compounds (I) and (II) (10-100 microM) was resistant to propranolol (0.1 microM), thus excluding the involvement of beta-adrenoceptors. 4. Since the inotropism induced by compounds (I) and (II) was not reduced by carbachol (1 nM-0.5 microM), an action involving changes in adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) can be excluded. 5. The inotropic action of compounds (I) and (II) was blocked selectively by 8-phenyltheophyline (10 microM) or adenosine deaminase (2 u ml-1). 6. Both (I) and (II) inhibited, in an apparently competitive manner, the negative inotropic effect induced by N6-(L-phenylisopropyl) adenosine (L-PIA), a stable adenosine agonist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1810600

  17. Disposable rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.; Trammell, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  18. Disposal rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.C.; Trammell, D.R.

    1983-10-12

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  19. Beat to beat wavelet variability in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Filos, D; Chouvarda, I; Dakos, G; Vassilikos, V; Maglaveras, N

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex phenomenon, related with a multitude of factors, including the electrical properties of the atrial substrate. The purpose of this work is to present a method that highlights electrocardiographic differences between normal subjects and patients with paroxysmal AF episodes (PAF), potentially related with substrate differences. Vectorcardiography recordings are considered and, for each lead (X-Y-Z), on a beat by beat basis, a steady window before QRS, corresponding to the atrial activity, is analysed via continuous wavelet transform. Wavelet-based parameters are calculated and compared between the normal and AF group, with the beat to beat variation of wavelet energy as the most important feature showing a significantly higher variability in the AF group.

  20. Beat to beat variability in cardiovascular variables: noise or music?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, M. L.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Smith, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Cardiovascular variables such as heart rate, arterial blood pressure, stroke volume and the shape of electrocardiographic complexes all fluctuate on a beat to beat basis. These fluctuations have traditionally been ignored or, at best, treated as noise to be averaged out. The variability in cardiovascular signals reflects the homeodynamic interplay between perturbations to cardiovascular function and the dynamic response of the cardiovascular regulatory systems. Modern signal processing techniques provide a means of analyzing beat to beat fluctuations in cardiovascular signals, so as to permit a quantitative, noninvasive or minimally invasive method of assessing closed loop hemodynamic regulation and cardiac electrical stability. This method promises to provide a new approach to the clinical diagnosis and management of alterations in cardiovascular regulation and stability.

  1. Beat to beat variability in cardiovascular variables: noise or music?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, M. L.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Smith, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Cardiovascular variables such as heart rate, arterial blood pressure, stroke volume and the shape of electrocardiographic complexes all fluctuate on a beat to beat basis. These fluctuations have traditionally been ignored or, at best, treated as noise to be averaged out. The variability in cardiovascular signals reflects the homeodynamic interplay between perturbations to cardiovascular function and the dynamic response of the cardiovascular regulatory systems. Modern signal processing techniques provide a means of analyzing beat to beat fluctuations in cardiovascular signals, so as to permit a quantitative, noninvasive or minimally invasive method of assessing closed loop hemodynamic regulation and cardiac electrical stability. This method promises to provide a new approach to the clinical diagnosis and management of alterations in cardiovascular regulation and stability.

  2. [Comparison of distribution of cholinergic nerves and M2 receptors between rat atria and ventricles].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-li; Zang, Wei-jin; Kang, Xin-qin; Li, Ming; Yu, Xiao-jiang; Chen, Li-na; Luo, Hong-li

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the general pattern of cholinergic nerve distribution and M(2) receptors in adult rat heart. Karnovsky-Roots histochemical staining combining point counting method and immunochemical SABC method with image analysis were used to identify the cholinergic nerves and M(2) receptors, respectively, in adult rat heart. Positive staining of cholinergic nerves and M(2) receptors was found in all regions of the rat heart, and the point count of cholinergic nerves in the atria was 4.6 times as much as that in ventricles, and the area of immunoreactive substance for M(2) receptors two-fold higher in the atria than in the ventricles. The point counts of the cholinergic nerves in the medial-layer myocardium were fewer than that in subepicardial and endocardial tissues of the left ventricular free wall. However, M(2) receptors were comparable among the 3 layers of the left free ventricular wall. Cholinergic nerves and M(2) receptors are located in both rat atria and ventricles, but their density is much higher in the atria than in the ventricles. Transmural heterogeneity characterizes cholinergic nerve innervation in the left ventricular free wall without significant differences in M(2) receptor density.

  3. 3D virtual human atria: A computational platform for studying clinical atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidi, Oleg V; Colman, Michael A; Stott, Jonathan; Dobrzynski, Halina; Boyett, Mark R; Holden, Arun V; Zhang, Henggui

    2011-01-01

    Despite a vast amount of experimental and clinical data on the underlying ionic, cellular and tissue substrates, the mechanisms of common atrial arrhythmias (such as atrial fibrillation, AF) arising from the functional interactions at the whole atria level remain unclear. Computational modelling provides a quantitative framework for integrating such multi-scale data and understanding the arrhythmogenic behaviour that emerges from the collective spatio-temporal dynamics in all parts of the heart. In this study, we have developed a multi-scale hierarchy of biophysically detailed computational models for the human atria – 3D virtual human atria. Primarily, diffusion tensor MRI reconstruction of the tissue geometry and fibre orientation in the human sinoatrial node (SAN) and surrounding atrial muscle was integrated into the 3D model of the whole atria dissected from the Visible Human dataset. The anatomical models were combined with the heterogeneous atrial action potential (AP) models, and used to simulate the AP conduction in the human atria under various conditions: SAN pacemaking and atrial activation in the normal rhythm, break-down of regular AP wave-fronts during rapid atrial pacing, and the genesis of multiple re-entrant wavelets characteristic of AF. Contributions of different properties of the tissue to the mechanisms of the normal rhythm and AF arrhythmogenesis are investigated and discussed. The 3D model of the atria itself was incorporated into the torso model to simulate the body surface ECG patterns in the normal and arrhythmic conditions. Therefore, a state-of-the-art computational platform has been developed, which can be used for studying multi-scale electrical phenomena during atrial conduction and arrhythmogenesis. Results of such simulations can be directly compared with experimental electrophysiological and endocardial mapping data, as well as clinical ECG recordings. More importantly, the virtual human atria can provide validated means for

  4. 3D virtual human atria: A computational platform for studying clinical atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Aslanidi, Oleg V; Colman, Michael A; Stott, Jonathan; Dobrzynski, Halina; Boyett, Mark R; Holden, Arun V; Zhang, Henggui

    2011-10-01

    Despite a vast amount of experimental and clinical data on the underlying ionic, cellular and tissue substrates, the mechanisms of common atrial arrhythmias (such as atrial fibrillation, AF) arising from the functional interactions at the whole atria level remain unclear. Computational modelling provides a quantitative framework for integrating such multi-scale data and understanding the arrhythmogenic behaviour that emerges from the collective spatio-temporal dynamics in all parts of the heart. In this study, we have developed a multi-scale hierarchy of biophysically detailed computational models for the human atria--the 3D virtual human atria. Primarily, diffusion tensor MRI reconstruction of the tissue geometry and fibre orientation in the human sinoatrial node (SAN) and surrounding atrial muscle was integrated into the 3D model of the whole atria dissected from the Visible Human dataset. The anatomical models were combined with the heterogeneous atrial action potential (AP) models, and used to simulate the AP conduction in the human atria under various conditions: SAN pacemaking and atrial activation in the normal rhythm, break-down of regular AP wave-fronts during rapid atrial pacing, and the genesis of multiple re-entrant wavelets characteristic of AF. Contributions of different properties of the tissue to mechanisms of the normal rhythm and arrhythmogenesis were investigated. Primarily, the simulations showed that tissue heterogeneity caused the break-down of the normal AP wave-fronts at rapid pacing rates, which initiated a pair of re-entrant spiral waves; and tissue anisotropy resulted in a further break-down of the spiral waves into multiple meandering wavelets characteristic of AF. The 3D virtual atria model itself was incorporated into the torso model to simulate the body surface ECG patterns in the normal and arrhythmic conditions. Therefore, a state-of-the-art computational platform has been developed, which can be used for studying multi

  5. Detection of heart beats in multimodal data: a robust beat-to-beat interval estimation approach.

    PubMed

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    The heart rate and its variability play a vital role in the continuous monitoring of patients, especially in the critical care unit. They are commonly derived automatically from the electrocardiogram as the interval between consecutive heart beat. While their identification by QRS-complexes is straightforward under ideal conditions, the exact localization can be a challenging task if the signal is severely contaminated with noise and artifacts. At the same time, other signals directly related to cardiac activity are often available. In this multi-sensor scenario, methods of multimodal sensor-fusion allow the exploitation of redundancies to increase the accuracy and robustness of beat detection.In this paper, an algorithm for the robust detection of heart beats in multimodal data is presented. Classic peak-detection is augmented by robust multi-channel, multimodal interval estimation to eliminate false detections and insert missing beats. This approach yielded a score of 90.70 and was thus ranked third place in the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Muthmodal Data follow-up analysis.In the future, the robust beat-to-beat interval estimator may directly be used for the automated processing of multimodal patient data for applications such as diagnosis support and intelligent alarming.

  6. Project HeartBeat!

    PubMed Central

    Labarthe, Darwin R.; Dai, Shifan; Day, R. Sue; Fulton, Janet E.; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Shah, Syed M.; Wen, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors begin development in childhood and adolescence. Project HeartBeat! studied early development of these risk factors as growth processes. Growth, body composition, sexual maturation, major CVD risk factors, and cardiac structure and function were monitored every 4 months for up to 4 years among 678 children and adolescents (49.1% girls; 20.1% blacks) aged 8, 11, or 14 years at study entry. All resided in The Woodlands or Conroe TX. Interviews were conducted at entry and annually on diet, physical activity, and health history of participants and their families. Data were collected from 1991 to 1995, and study investigators continue data analysis and reporting. Overlap in ages at examination among three cohorts (aged 8–12, 11–15, and 14–18 years at baseline) and use of multilevel modeling methods permit analysis of some 5500 observations on each principal variable for the synthetic cohort from ages 8 to 18 years. The mixed-longitudinal design provides trajectories of change with age, for total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides; systolic, and fourth-phase and fifth-phase diastolic blood pressure, and left ventricular mass. These trajectories are then related to concurrent measures of multiple indices of body composition and sexual maturation and adjusted for energy intake and physical activity. The data provide valuable insights into risk factor development and suggest a fresh approach to understanding influences on blood lipids, blood pressure, and left ventricular mass during the period of childhood and adolescence, a period of dynamic change in these risk factors. PMID:19524162

  7. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa de Barros, Bruno; Weber dos Santos, Rodrigo; Lobosco, Marcelo; Alonso, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action potential propagation. Next, an equivalent discrete model is implemented, which permits a faster integration of the equations. This discrete model is a simplified version of the microscopic model that maintains the distribution of connections between cells. Both models produce similar results when describing action potential propagation in homogeneous tissue; however, they slightly differ in the generation of ectopic beats in heterogeneous tissue. Nevertheless, both models present the generation of reentry inside fibrotic tissues. This kind of reentry restricted to microfibrosis regions can result in the formation of ectopic pacemakers, that is, regions that will generate a series of ectopic stimulus at a fast pacing rate. In turn, such activity has been related to trigger fibrillation in the atria and in the ventricles in clinical and animal studies. PMID:26583127

  8. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions.

    PubMed

    Gouvêa de Barros, Bruno; Weber dos Santos, Rodrigo; Lobosco, Marcelo; Alonso, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action potential propagation. Next, an equivalent discrete model is implemented, which permits a faster integration of the equations. This discrete model is a simplified version of the microscopic model that maintains the distribution of connections between cells. Both models produce similar results when describing action potential propagation in homogeneous tissue; however, they slightly differ in the generation of ectopic beats in heterogeneous tissue. Nevertheless, both models present the generation of reentry inside fibrotic tissues. This kind of reentry restricted to microfibrosis regions can result in the formation of ectopic pacemakers, that is, regions that will generate a series of ectopic stimulus at a fast pacing rate. In turn, such activity has been related to trigger fibrillation in the atria and in the ventricles in clinical and animal studies.

  9. Pharmacological investigation on nigrescigenin-a cardenolide from Parquetina nigrescens (Afzel.) Bullock: comparative studies on cardiotonic effects of Parquetina nigrescens, g-strophanthin and noradrenaline in guinea-pig isolated atria.

    PubMed

    Datté, J Y; Ziegler, A

    2001-06-01

    The cardiotonic and catecholamine-like effects of Parquetina nigrescens extract-induced contractile force of guinea-pig left and right atria were investigated in-vitro. Isometric contractions were recorded. P. nigrescens extract, 5-150 microg mL(-1), increased the force of contraction dose dependently in electrically driven left atria. The concentration of P. nigrescens extract producing 50% of the maximal effect (EC50 value) was 7.5 microg mL(-1). The positive inotropic response differed from that of g-strophanthin by its high rate of onset and its complete reversibility upon removal of the extract from the incubation medium. In spontaneously beating right atrial muscle, P. nigrescens extract increased the rate of contractions. Its positive chronotropic and inotropic effects were partly antagonized by propranolol and atenolol indicating the presence of an adrenergic acting principle in P. nigrescens extract. In contrast, the inotropic response to P. nigrescens extract could not be completely suppressed by beta-blocking agents, suggesting that the force of contraction is not only increased by a sympathomimetic ingredient of P. nigrescens extract but also by the cardenolides known to be present in P. nigrescens.

  10. Percutaneous intracardiac beating-heart surgery using metal MEMS tissue approximation tools

    PubMed Central

    Gosline, Andrew H; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Butler, Evan J; Folk, Chris; Cohen, Adam; Chen, Rich; Lang, Nora; del Nido, Pedro J; Dupont, Pierre E

    2013-01-01

    Achieving superior outcomes through the use of robots in medical applications requires an integrated approach to the design of the robot, tooling and the procedure itself. In this paper, this approach is applied to develop a robotic technique for closing abnormal communication between the atria of the heart. The goal is to achieve the efficacy of surgical closure as performed on a stopped, open heart with the reduced risk and trauma of a beating-heart catheter-based procedure. In the proposed approach, a concentric tube robot is used to percutaneously access the right atrium and deploy a tissue approximation device. The device is constructed using a metal microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabrication process and is designed to both fit the manipulation capabilities of the robot as well as to reproduce the beneficial features of surgical closure by suture. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated through ex vivo and in vivo experiments. PMID:23750066

  11. Independent Review of Aviation Technology and Research Information Analysis System (ATRIAS) Database

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    capability to support the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/ Aviation Security Research and Development Service’s (ACA) Explosive Detection...Systems (EDS) programs and Aviation Security Human Factors Program (ASHFP). This review was conducted by an independent consultant selected by the FAA...sections 2 and 3 of the report. Overall, ATRIAS was found to address many technology application areas relevant to the FAA’s aviation security programs

  12. [Differences in atrial remodelling between right and left atria in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Tamargo Menéndez, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation starts in the left atrium and from there the activity invades the atrial tissues and causes an inhomogeneous shortening the duration of atrial action potential duration and refractoriness. The purpose of this study was to compare the voltage-dependent potassium currents in human cells isolated from the right and left atria and to determine whether electrical remodeling produced by chronic atrial fibrillation (CAF) differentially affects voltage-dependent potassium currents involved in atrial repolarization in each atrium as compared to sinus rhythm (SR). The currents were recorded using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. We found that in atrial cardiomyocytes of patients both in SR and in CAF there are three types of cells according to their main voltage-dependent repolarizing potassium current: the Ca(2+)-independent 4-aminopyridine sensitive component of the transient outward current (I(to1)) and the ultrarapid (I(Kur)), rapid (I(Kr)) and slow (I(Ks)) components of the delayed rectifier current. CAF differentially modified the proportion of these 3 types of cells on each atrium: CAF reduced the I(to1) more markedly in the left than in the right atria, while I(Kur) was more markedly reduced in the right than in the left atria. Interestingly, in both atria, CAF markedly increased the I(Ks). This increase was enhanced by isoproterenol and suppressed by atenolol. These changes produce a non-uniform shortening of atrial repolarization that facilitates the reentry of the cardiac impulse and the perpetuation of the arrhythmia.

  13. Binaural beats at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D; Pasanen, E G

    1975-10-24

    Binaural beats have long been believed to be audible only at low frequencies, but an interaction reminiscent of a binaural beat can sometimes be heard when different two-tone complexes of high frequency are presented to the two ears. The primary requirement is that the frequency separation in the complex at one ear be slightly different from that in the other--that is, that there be a small interaural difference in the envelope periodicities. This finding is in accord with other recent demonstrations that the auditory system is not deaf to interaural time differences at high frequencies.

  14. [Ischemic heart disease: structural changes of the atria in preinfarction and postinfarction stages].

    PubMed

    Pangonyte, Dalia; Morkūnaite, Kristina; Stalioraityte, Elena; Zaikauskiene, Jolanta

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine atrial structural remodeling during the development of ischemic heart disease. Quantitative histomorphometric parameters of interstitial collagen network (the percentage volume, perimeter, number of fibers per field and collagen-cardiomyocyte volume ratio) of the atria of 132 autopsied men (mean age 49.7+/-8.9 years) who had died suddenly (within 6 hours since the onset of terminal heart attack symptoms) due to the first (no postinfarction scars) and repeated (postinfarction scars present) acute "pure" ischemic heart disease were investigated. The main remodeling feature of the wall of the both atria among ischemic heart disease subjects is hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes and hyperplasia of interstitial fibrillar collagen network with the maintenance of the same proportion of contractile myocardium and fibrillar collagen network volume. This proportion in the case of the left atrium persists in both pre- and postinfarction ischemic heart disease groups, while myocardium of the right atrium in preinfarction group subjects is characterized by an excess increase of collagen network as compared to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which levels again with that of the control in postinfarction group. At preinfarction stage of ischemic heart disease, remodeling of both atria develops and progresses in the left atrium at postinfarction stage in the relationship with increase of left ventricular dysfunction.

  15. Functional β2-adrenoceptors in rat left atria: effect of foot-shock stress.

    PubMed

    Moura, André Luiz de; Hyslop, Stephen; Grassi-Kassisse, Dora M; Spadari, Regina C

    2017-09-01

    Altered sensitivity to the chronotropic effect of catecholamines and a reduction in the β1/β2-adrenoceptor ratio have previously been reported in right atria of stressed rats, human failing heart, and aging. In this report, we investigated whether left atrial inotropism was affected by foot-shock stress. Male rats were submitted to 3 foot-shock sessions and the left atrial inotropic response, adenylyl cyclase activity, and β-adrenoceptor expression were investigated. Left atria of stressed rats were supersensitive to isoprenaline when compared with control rats and this effect was abolished by ICI118,551, a selective β2-receptor antagonist. Schild plot slopes for the antagonism between CGP20712A (a selective β1-receptor antagonist) and isoprenaline differed from unity in atria of stressed but not control rats. Atrial sensitivity to norepinephrine, as well as basal and forskolin- or isoprenaline-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities were not altered by stress. The effect of isoprenaline on adenylyl cyclase stimulation was partially blocked by ICI118,551 in atrial membranes of stressed rats. These findings indicate that foot-shock stress equally affects inotropism and chronotropism and that β2-adrenoceptor upregulation contributes to the enhanced inotropic response to isoprenaline.

  16. And the Beat Goes On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Advocates setting up a "beat system" for high school newspapers to use to provide updates on established areas of coverage, such as administrators, department chairs, club and class sponsors, sports, the school board, the city council and even the custodians. Includes examples of ways to incorporate this information into brief updates in…

  17. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  18. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  19. And the Beat Goes On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Advocates setting up a "beat system" for high school newspapers to use to provide updates on established areas of coverage, such as administrators, department chairs, club and class sponsors, sports, the school board, the city council and even the custodians. Includes examples of ways to incorporate this information into brief updates in…

  20. Surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation: The efficacy of a novel bipolar pen device in the cardioplegically arrested and beating heart

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shun-ichiro; Voeller, Rochus K.; Melby, Spencer J.; Lall, Shelly C.; Chang, Nai-lun; Schuessler, Richard B.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The introduction of ablation technology has simplified surgical intervention for atrial fibrillation. However, most ablation devices cannot create focal transmural lesions on the beating heart and have difficulty ablating specific regions of the atria, such as the atrioventricular isthmus, coronary sinus, and ganglionated plexus. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of a pen-type bipolar radiofrequency ablation device on both arrested and beating hearts. Methods Endocardial and epicardial atrial tissues in the free wall, left atrial roof, atrioventricular annuli, and coronary sinus were ablated for varying time intervals (2.5–15 seconds) in porcine cardioplegically arrested (n = 6) and beating (n = 9) hearts. The hearts were stained with 1%2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride solution and sectioned to determine lesion depth and width. In 5 animals epicardial fat pads containing ganglionated plexus were stimulated and ablated. Results Lesion depth increased with ablation time similarly in both arrested and beating hearts. Transmurality was fully achieved in the thin atrial tissue (<4 mm) at 10 seconds in the beating and arrested hearts. The device had a maximal penetration depth of 6.1 mm. Epicardial ablation of the coronary sinus showed complete penetration through the left posterior atrium only in the arrested heart. Seven of 17 fat pads demonstrated a vagal response. All vagal responses were eliminated after ablation. Conclusion The bipolar pen effectively ablated atrial tissue in both arrested and beating hearts. This device might allow the surgeon to ablate tissue in regions not accessible to other devices during atrial fibrillation surgery. PMID:19026819

  1. Demonstrations of Beats as Moving Interference Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, T. S.; Dishman, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a ripple tank demonstration that displays interference patterns responsible for producing beats and provides photographs of computer simulations of various beat interference patterns. Includes programs for the computer simulation and equations of constructive interference paths in beat interference patterns. (Author/SK)

  2. Realtime Multichannel System for Beat to Beat QT Interval Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starc, Vito; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) shows clinical promise for identifying several types of cardiac pathology. However, until now, there has been no device capable of displaying, in real time on a beattobeat basis, changes in QTV in all 12 conventional leads in a continuously monitored patient. While several software programs have been designed to analyze QTV, heretofore, such programs have all involved only a few channels (at most) and/or have required laborious user interaction or offline calculations and postprocessing, limiting their clinical utility. This paper describes a PC-based ECG software program that in real time, acquires, analyzes and displays QTV and also PQ interval variability (PQV) in each of the eight independent channels that constitute the 12lead conventional ECG. The system also processes certain related signals that are derived from singular value decomposition and that help to reduce the overall effects of noise on the realtime QTV and PQV results.

  3. Rhythmicity, Recurrence, and Recovery of Flagellar Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty Y.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-12-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the alga C. reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating.

  4. A comparison of auditory evoked potentials to acoustic beats and to binaural beats.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Hillel; Starr, Arnold; Michalewski, Henry J; Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Nomi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cortical brain responses evoked by amplitude modulated acoustic beats of 3 and 6 Hz in tones of 250 and 1000 Hz with those evoked by their binaural beats counterparts in unmodulated tones to indicate whether the cortical processes involved differ. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to 3- and 6-Hz acoustic and binaural beats in 2000 ms duration 250 and 1000 Hz tones presented with approximately 1 s intervals. Latency, amplitude and source current density estimates of ERP components to beats-evoked oscillations were determined and compared across beat types, beat frequencies and base (carrier) frequencies. All stimuli evoked tone-onset components followed by oscillations corresponding to the beat frequency, and a subsequent tone-offset complex. Beats-evoked oscillations were higher in amplitude in response to acoustic than to binaural beats, to 250 than to 1000 Hz base frequency and to 3 Hz than to 6 Hz beat frequency. Sources of the beats-evoked oscillations across all stimulus conditions located mostly to left temporal lobe areas. Differences between estimated sources of potentials to acoustic and binaural beats were not significant. The perceptions of binaural beats involve cortical activity that is not different than acoustic beats in distribution and in the effects of beat- and base frequency, indicating similar cortical processing. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2002-04-01

    Among all the advanced accelerator concepts that use lasers as the power source, most of the effort to date has been with the idea of using a laser pulse to excite a accelerating mode in a plasma. Within this area, there are a variety of approaches for creating the accelerating mode, as indicated by the other talks in this session. What is common to these approaches is the physics of how a laser pulse pushes on plasma electrons to organize electron-density perturbations, the sources of the ultra-high (> GeV/M) accelerating gradients. It is the "ponderomotive force", proportional to the local gradient of the of the laser intensity, that pushes plasma electrons forward (on the leading edge of the pulse) and backwards (on the trailing edge) which leads to harmonic motion of the electrons. As the laser pulse moves through the plasma at group velocity Vg c, the oscillating electrons show up macroscopically as a plasma mode or wave with frequency w equal to the plasma frequency and k = w/Vg. For short laser pulses, this is the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) concept. Closely related is the Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration (PBWA) concept. Here, the laser pulse that perturbs the plasma is composed of two closely-spaced frequencies that "beat", i.e., periodically constructively and destructively interfere, forming an electromagnetic beat wave. One can visualize this as a train of short pulses. If this beating frequency is set to the plasma frequency, then each pulse in the train will reinforce the density perturbation caused by the previous pulse. The principal advantage of multiple pulses driving up the plasma wave as opposed to a single pulse is in efficiency, allowing for the production of relatively large diameter (more 1-D like) accelerating modes. In this talk I will discuss past, current and planned PBWA experiments which are taking place at UCLA, RAL in England, and LULI in France.

  6. Absolute beat-to-beat variability and instability parameters of ECG intervals: biomarkers for predicting ischaemia-induced ventricular fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sarusi, Annamária; Rárosi, Ferenc; Szűcs, Mónika; Csík, Norbert; Farkas, Attila S; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Forster, Tamás; Curtis, Michael J; Farkas, András

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Predicting lethal arrhythmia liability from beat-to-beat variability and instability (BVI) of the ECG intervals is a useful technique in drug assessment. Most investigators use only arrhythmia-free ECGs for this. Recently, it was shown that drug-induced torsades de pointes (TdP) liability can be predicted more accurately from BVI measured irrespective of rhythm, even during arrhythmias (absolute BVI). The present study tested the broader applicability of this assessment by examining whether absolute BVI parameters predict another potential lethal arrhythmia, ischaemia-induced ventricular fibrillation (VF). Experimental Approach Langendorff-perfused rat hearts were subjected to regional ischaemia for 15 min. Absolute BVI parameters were derived from ECG intervals measured in 40 consecutive ventricular complexes (irrespective of rhythm) immediately preceding VF onset and compared with time-matched values in hearts not expressing VF. Key Results Increased frequency of non-sinus beats and ‘R on T’ arrhythmic beats, shortened mean RR and electrical diastolic intervals, and increased BVI of cycle length and repolarization predicted VF occurrence. Absolute BVI parameters that quantify variability of repolarization (e.g. ‘short-term variability’ of QT interval) had the best predictive power with high sensitivity and specificity. In contrast, VF was not predicted by any BVI parameter derived from the last arrhythmia-free interlude before VF. Conclusions and Implications The novel absolute BVI parameters that predicted TdP in rabbit also predict ischaemia-induced VF in rat, indicating a diagnostic and mechanistic congruence. Repolarization inhomogeneity represents a pivotal biomarker of ischaemia-induced VF. The newly validated biomarkers could serve as surrogates for VF in pre-clinical drug investigations. PMID:24417376

  7. The chirality of ciliary beats.

    PubMed

    Hilfinger, A; Jülicher, F

    2008-03-19

    Many eukaryotic cells possess cilia which are motile, whip-like appendages that can oscillate and thereby induce motion and fluid flows. These organelles contain a highly conserved structure called the axoneme, whose characteristic architecture is based on a cylindrical arrangement of nine doublets of microtubules. Complex bending waves emerge from the interplay of active internal forces generated by dynein motor proteins within the structure. These bending waves are typically chiral and often exhibit a sense of rotation. In order to study how the shape of the beat emerges from the axonemal structure, we present a three-dimensional description of ciliary dynamics based on the self-organization of dynein motors and microtubules. Taking into account both bending and twisting of the cilium, we determine self-organized beating patterns and find that modes with both a clockwise and anticlockwise sense of rotation exist. Because of the axonemal chirality, only one of these modes is selected dynamically for given parameter values and properties of dynein motors. This physical mechanism, which underlies the selection of a beating pattern with specific sense of rotation, triggers the breaking of the left-right symmetry of developing embryos which is induced by asymmetric fluid flows that are generated by rotating cilia.

  8. Novel function of α1D L-type calcium channel in the atria.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ujala; Aromolaran, Ademuyiwa S; Fabris, Frank; Lazaro, Deana; Kassotis, John; Qu, Yongxia; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2017-01-22

    Ca entry through atrial L-type Calcium channels (α1C and α1D) play an important role in muscular contraction, regulation of gene expression, and release of hormones including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). α1D Ca channel is exclusively expressed in atria, and has been shown to play a key role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Recent data have shown that the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel, SK4 is also atrial specific and also contributes prominently to the secretion of ANP and BNP. However, its functional role in the heart is still poorly understood. Here we used α1D gene heterozygous (α1D(+/-)) mice and HL-1 cells to determine the functional contribution of SK4 channels to α1D-dependent regulation of ANP and BNP secretion in response to endothelin (ET), and/or mechanical stretch. Immunoprecipitation with α1D specific antibody and western blotting with SK4 specific antibody on the immuno-precipitated protein complex showed a band at 50 KDa confirming the presence of SK4 in the complex and provided evidence of interaction between SK4 and α1D channels. Using RT-PCR, we observed a 2.9 fold decrease in expression of Cacna1d (gene encoding α1D) mRNA in atria from α1D(+/-)mice. The decrease in α1D mRNA corresponded with a 4.2 fold decrease in Kcnn4 (gene encoding SK4) mRNA from α1D(+/-) mice. These changes were paralleled with a 77% decrease in BNP serum levels from α1D(+/-) mice. When α1D was knocked down in HL-1cardiomyocytes using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, a 97% decrease in secreted BNP was observed even in cells subjected to stretch and endothelin. In conclusion, our data are first to show that α1D Ca and SK4 channels are coupled in the atria, and that deletion of α1D leads to decreased SK4 mRNA and BNP secretion providing evidence for a novel role of α1D in atrial endocrine function. Elucidating the regulatory factors that underlie the secretory function of atria will identify

  9. Twin heart with a fused atria and separate ventricles in conjoined twins

    PubMed Central

    Ambar, Sameer Suresh; Halkati, Prabhu C; Patted, Suresh V; Yavagal, ST

    2010-01-01

    One of the most interesting congenital malformations is that of conjoined twins. We report echocardiographic features of twin heart in dicephalus, tribrachius, dispinous, thoracoomphalopagus twin. It showed two hearts fused at atrial level. Right-sided heart had single atrial chamber with a single ventricle. A single great vessel, aorta, originated from it. Left-sided heart was well developed with two atria and two ventricles. There was a small mid muscular ventricular septal defect and a small patent ductus arteriosus. Great arteries had normal origins. PMID:21234207

  10. Twin heart with a fused atria and separate ventricles in conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Ambar, Sameer Suresh; Halkati, Prabhu C; Patted, Suresh V; Yavagal, St

    2010-07-01

    One of the most interesting congenital malformations is that of conjoined twins. We report echocardiographic features of twin heart in dicephalus, tribrachius, dispinous, thoracoomphalopagus twin. It showed two hearts fused at atrial level. Right-sided heart had single atrial chamber with a single ventricle. A single great vessel, aorta, originated from it. Left-sided heart was well developed with two atria and two ventricles. There was a small mid muscular ventricular septal defect and a small patent ductus arteriosus. Great arteries had normal origins.

  11. Naloxone modifies the inotropic decrease induced by halothane on isolated left atria.

    PubMed

    Laorden, M L; Carceles, M D; Miralles, F S; Hernandez, J

    1991-01-01

    1. The present study evaluates the interaction between naloxone and halothane on the left atria. 2. Halothane produced significant decrease in auricular inotropism at concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 2.5 v/v%. 3. Naloxone modified the concentration response curve to halothane. The antagonism between both drugs is consistent with a competitive antagonism since the curve obtained had a slope which did not differ significantly from -1. 4. These results suggest that the negative inotropic effects induced by halothane could be mediated by opioid receptors.

  12. Criticality in the Relaxation Phase of a Spontaneously Contracting Atria Isolated from a Frog's Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contoyiannis, Y. F.; Diakonos, F. K.; Papaefthimiou, C.; Theophilidis, G.

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the spontaneous contraction generated by the atria of a frog’s heart isolated in a physiological solution. In the relaxation phase, the recorded time series for two different sampling rates possesses an intermittent component similar to the dynamics of the order parameter’s fluctuations of a thermal critical system belonging to the mean field universality class. This behavior is not visible through conventional analysis in the frequency space due to the presence of Brownian noise dominating the corresponding power spectrum.

  13. Preparation and characterization of muscarinic-acetylcholine-receptor-enriched membranes from pig atria.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, G L; Schimerlik, M I

    1982-01-01

    A procedure was developed for the large scale preparation of membranes from pig atria which are enriched 10-13 fold in the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. The procedure involved differential centrifugation and sucrose-gradient centrifugation in solutions containing 150 mM-NaClO4 and 5 mM-EDTA to minimize membrane aggregation. The final membrane preparation bound about 1.1 pmol of L-quinuclidinyl benzilate/mg of protein. Comparable results were obtained with either fresh or frozen tissue. About the same yield (120 pmol of L-quinuclidinyl benzilate sites/100 g of tissue) and specific activity of membranes were obtained from different regions of the atria. The final preparation was stable at -80 degrees C in buffered sucrose solutions. The membranes appeared mostly as sheets or fragments and partly as closed vesicles in the electron microscope and were heterogeneous in isopycnic Percoll gradients. Marker enzyme studies showed that the receptor was enriched in parallel with the plasma membrane markers guanylate cyclase (particulate form) and (Na+ + K+)-activated ATPase. Some contamination by mitochondrial outer and endoplasmic reticulum membranes was evident from the distribution of monoamine oxidase and glucose-6-phosphatase activity, but the preparation was largely free of sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial inner, and lysosomal membranes. PMID:7092826

  14. Presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors in rat atria: evidence for the presence of stereoselective beta 1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Heimburger, M.; Montero, M. J.; Fougeres, V.; Beslot, F.; Davy, M.; Midol-Monnet, M.; Cohen, Y.

    1989-01-01

    1. Presynaptic beta-adrenoceptor activity was studied in rat isolated atria, previously loaded with [3H]-noradrenaline. The stimulation-induced release of 3H transmitter was measured in the presence of cocaine, and adrenaline was used as a facilitatory beta-adrenoceptor agonist. 2. Adrenaline (0.1 and 2 nM) increased, by about 50%, the evoked efflux of tritium. With phenoxybenzamine present, the same activity was shown with 10 nM adrenaline. 3. The beta 2-selective adrenoceptor blocking drugs: IPS 339 and ICI 118 551 caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the activity of adrenaline. Cardioselective beta-blocking drugs: acebutolol, beta-xolol, nebivolol and its isomers (R 67 138 and R 67 145) also reduced dose-dependently the agonistic action of adrenaline. The order of potency for nebivolol and its isomers was R 67 138 greater than nebivolol greater than R 67 145. The activity of pindolol was not concentration-dependent. The inhibitory effect of acebutolol was also observed in the presence of blockade of alpha-adrenoceptors. 4. The postsynaptic beta-adrenoceptor blocking activity of nebivolol and its isomers was studied in pithed rats. They reduced isoprenaline-induced tachycardia without altering hypotensive responses. The order of potency was: R 67 138 greater than nebivolol greater than R 67 145. 5. It is concluded that in rat isolated atria, presynaptic beta 2- and beta 1-adrenoceptors coexist and that facilitatory beta 1-adrenoceptors are stereospecific. PMID:2572291

  15. Plasma beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1983-06-01

    We perform an analytic study of some quantities relevant to the plasma beat-wave accelerator (PBWA) concept. We obtain analytic expressions for the plasma frequency, longitudinal electron velocity, plasma density and longitudinal plasma electric field of a nonlinear longitudinal electron plasma oscillation with amplitude less than the wave-breaking limit and phase velocity approaching the speed of light. We also estimate the luminosity of a single-pass e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear PBWA collider assuming the energy and collision beamstrahlung are fixed parameters.

  16. Effect of chronic treatment with deoxycorticosterone acetate on content of a natriuretic substance in atria of rats.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, S J; Fregly, M J; Wilson, K M; Papanek, P E; Henley, W N

    1986-10-01

    Chronic (72 days) administration of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA), with or without saline as the sole drinking fluid, depleted atria of rats of their diuretic and natriuretic activities. Chronic ingestion of saline as the sole drinking fluid did not affect the diuretic, natriuretic, and kaliuretic activities of atria compared with those of rats receiving water to drink. Since systolic blood pressure of the DOCA-treated group did not differ significantly from that of the untreated control group, the decrease in potency of atrial extract from DOCA-treated rats most likely occurred in response to increases in extracellular and vascular volumes. The ability of DOCA to decrease diuretic and natriuretic activities of atria was dose dependent. The decreased activities of the atria of DOCA-treated rats could reflect an increased production and turnover of atrial natriuretic factor. Additional studies revealed an increased diuretic and natriuretic responsiveness of DOCA-treated recipients to atrial extract from untreated rats. Thus, the results of these studies suggest that chronic treatment with DOCA reduced the natriuretic and diuretic potencies of atrial extract and increased renal responsiveness to it.

  17. The Simplest Demonstration on Acoustic Beats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Alessio; Ganci, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The classical demonstration experiment on acoustic beats using two signal generators and a dual trace oscilloscope is an important ingredient in teaching the subject. This short laboratory note aims to point out what may be the simplest demonstrative experiment on acoustic beats to carry out in a classroom without employing any lab apparatus.

  18. The Simplest Demonstration on Acoustic Beats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Alessio; Ganci, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The classical demonstration experiment on acoustic beats using two signal generators and a dual trace oscilloscope is an important ingredient in teaching the subject. This short laboratory note aims to point out what may be the simplest demonstrative experiment on acoustic beats to carry out in a classroom without employing any lab apparatus.

  19. Notes on the beating fantasy.

    PubMed

    Sirois, François J

    2010-06-01

    This theoretical paper revisits the beating fantasy, which constitutes a crossroads of the psychic economy in that it condenses three primal phantasies, namely the primal scene, castration and seduction. Two forms of the phantasy have been distinguished: a 'fixed' form, apparently associated with the masochistic perversion, and a 'transitory' form, probably bound up with libidinal development. In Freud 's (1919) paper these two aspects are intertwined. The present contribution confines itself to the transitory form of the phantasy and its significance in the libidinal development of the girl, notably in the organization of passivity. With this in mind, particular attention is paid to the phantasy's third phase in this context, and an attempt made to show how this phase epitomizes the transformation of the instinctual pressure and might therefore be looked upon in this connection as the intermediate phase of the phantasy.

  20. Non Heart-Beating Donors in England

    PubMed Central

    Chaib, Eleazar

    2008-01-01

    When transplantation started all organs were retrieved from patients immediately after cardio-respiratory arrest, i.e. from non-heart-beating donors. After the recognition that death resulted from irreversible damage to the brainstem, organ retrieval rapidly switched to patients certified dead after brainstem testing. These heart-beating-donors have become the principal source of organs for transplantation for the last 30 years. The number of heart-beating-donors are declining and this is likely to continue, therefore cadaveric organs from non-heart-beating donor offers a large potential of resources for organ transplantation. The aim of this study is to examine clinical outcomes of non-heart-beating donors in the past 10 years in the UK as an way of decreasing pressure in the huge waiting list for organs transplantation. PMID:18297216

  1. Rhythmicity, recurrence, and recovery of flagellar beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating. Financial support is acknowledged from the EPSRC, ERC Advanced Investigator Grant No. 247333, and a Senior Investigator Award from the Wellcome Trust.

  2. Elastic interactions synchronize beating in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ohad; Safran, Samuel A

    2016-07-13

    Motivated by recent experimental results, we study theoretically the synchronization of the beating phase and frequency of two nearby cardiomyocyte cells. Each cell is represented as an oscillating force dipole in an infinite, viscoelastic medium and the propagation of the elastic signal within the medium is predicted. We examine the steady-state beating of two nearby cells, and show that elastic interactions result in forces that synchronize the phase and frequency of beating in a manner that depends on their mutual orientation. The theory predicts both in-phase and anti-phase steady-state beating depending on the relative cell orientations, as well as how synchronized beating varies with substrate elasticity and the inter-cell distance. These results suggest how mechanics plays a role in cardiac efficiency, and may be relevant for the design of cardiomyocyte based micro devices and other biomedical applications.

  3. Dichotic beats of mistuned consonances.

    PubMed

    Feeney, M P

    1997-10-01

    The beats of mistuned consonances (BMCs) result from the presentation of two sinusoids at frequencies slightly mistuned from a ratio of small integers. Several studies have suggested that the source of dichotic BMCs is an interaction within a binaural critical band. In one case the mechanism has been explained as an aural harmonic of the low-frequency tone (f1) creating binaural beats with the high-frequency tone (f2). The other explanation involves a binaural cross correlation between the excitation pattern of f1 and the contralateral f2--occurring within the binaural critical band centered at f2. This study examined the detection of dichotic BMCs for the octave and fifth. In one experiment with the octave, narrow-band noise centered at f2 was presented to one ear along with f1. The other ear was presented with f2. The noise was used to prevent interactions in the binaural critical band centered at f2. Dichotic BMCs were still detected under these conditions, suggesting that binaural interaction within a critical band does not explain the effect. Localization effects were also observed under this masking condition for phase reversals of tuned dichotic octave stimuli. These findings suggest a new theory of dichotic BMCs as a between-channel phase effect. The modified weighted-image model of localization [Stern and Trahiotis, in Auditory Physiology and Perception, edited by Y. Cazals, L. Demany, and K. Horner (Pergamon, Oxford, 1992), pp. 547-554] was used to provide an explanation of the between-channel mechanism.

  4. Feeling the beat: premotor and striatal interactions in musicians and non-musicians during beat perception

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, Jessica A.; Rowe, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the underlying neurobiology of rhythm and beat perception, despite its universal cultural importance. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study rhythm perception in musicians and non-musicians. Three conditions varied in the degree to which external reinforcement versus internal generation of the beat was required. The ‘Volume’ condition strongly externally marked the beat with volume changes, the ‘Duration’ condition marked the beat with weaker accents arising from duration changes, and the ‘Unaccented’ condition required the beat to be entirely internally generated. In all conditions, beat rhythms compared to nonbeat control rhythms revealed putamen activity. The presence of a beat was also associated with greater connectivity between the putamen and the supplementary motor area (SMA), the premotor cortex (PMC) and auditory cortex. In contrast, the type of accent within the beat conditions modulated the coupling between premotor and auditory cortex, with greater modulation for musicians than non-musicians. Importantly, the putamen's response to beat conditions was not due to differences in temporal complexity between the three rhythm conditions. We propose that a cortico-subcortical network including the putamen, SMA, and PMC is engaged for the analysis of temporal sequences and prediction or generation of putative beats, especially under conditions that may require internal generation of the beat. The importance of this system for auditory-motor interaction and development of precisely timed movement is suggested here by its facilitation in musicians. PMID:19515922

  5. Rabbit hematology.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kemba L

    2008-09-01

    Using laboratory animal medicine as an established resource, companion animal veterinarians have access to many physiologic and basic science studies that we can now merge with our clinical impressions. By working with reference laboratories, companion animal veterinarians are poised to accelerate our knowledge of the normal rabbit rapidly. The aim of this article is to discuss normal hematopoiesis and infectious and metabolic diseases that specifically target the hemolymphatic system. Additionally, photographic representation of cell types is provided.

  6. Analyzing the acoustic beat with mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-04-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency Δf. The resulting auditory sensation is a tone with a volume that varies periodically. Acoustic beats can be perceived repeatedly in day-to-day life and have some interesting applications. For example, string instruments are still tuned with the help of an acoustic beat, even with modern technology. If a reference tone (e.g., 440 Hz) and, for example, a slightly out-of-tune violin string produce a tone simultaneously, a beat can be perceived. The more similar the frequencies, the longer the duration of the beat. In the extreme case, when the frequencies are identical, a beat no longer arises. The string is therefore correctly tuned. Using the Oscilloscope app,4 it is possible to capture and save acoustic signals of this kind and determine the beat frequency fS of the signal, which represents the difference in frequency Δf of the two overlapping tones (for Android smartphones, the app OsciPrime Oscilloscope can be used).

  7. ECG Beats Classification Using Mixture of Features

    PubMed Central

    Ari, Samit

    2014-01-01

    Classification of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals plays an important role in clinical diagnosis of heart disease. This paper proposes the design of an efficient system for classification of the normal beat (N), ventricular ectopic beat (V), supraventricular ectopic beat (S), fusion beat (F), and unknown beat (Q) using a mixture of features. In this paper, two different feature extraction methods are proposed for classification of ECG beats: (i) S-transform based features along with temporal features and (ii) mixture of ST and WT based features along with temporal features. The extracted feature set is independently classified using multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN). The performances are evaluated on several normal and abnormal ECG signals from 44 recordings of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. In this work, the performances of three feature extraction techniques with MLP-NN classifier are compared using five classes of ECG beat recommended by AAMI (Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation) standards. The average sensitivity performances of the proposed feature extraction technique for N, S, F, V, and Q are 95.70%, 78.05%, 49.60%, 89.68%, and 33.89%, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed feature extraction techniques show better performances compared to other existing features extraction techniques. PMID:27350985

  8. Ventricular beat detection in single channel electrocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Dotsinsky, Ivan A; Stoyanov, Todor V

    2004-01-01

    Background Detection of QRS complexes and other types of ventricular beats is a basic component of ECG analysis. Many algorithms have been proposed and used because of the waves' shape diversity. Detection in a single channel ECG is important for several applications, such as in defibrillators and specialized monitors. Methods The developed heuristic algorithm for ventricular beat detection includes two main criteria. The first of them is based on steep edges and sharp peaks evaluation and classifies normal QRS complexes in real time. The second criterion identifies ectopic beats by occurrence of biphasic wave. It is modified to work with a delay of one RR interval in case of long RR intervals. Other algorithm branches classify already detected QRS complexes as ectopic beats if a set of wave parameters is encountered or the ratio of latest two RR intervals RRi-1/RRi is less than 1:2.5. Results The algorithm was tested with the AHA and MIT-BIH databases. A sensitivity of 99.04% and a specificity of 99.62% were obtained in detection of 542014 beats. Conclusion The algorithm copes successfully with different complicated cases of single channel ventricular beat detection. It is aimed to simulate to some extent the experience of the cardiologist, rather than to rely on mathematical approaches adopted from the theory of signal analysis. The algorithm is open to improvement, especially in the part concerning the discrimination between normal QRS complexes and ectopic beats. PMID:14750981

  9. Accidental degeneracy beats: A distinct type of beat phenomenon in nonlinear optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, K. A.; Thompson, David E.; Fayer, M. D.

    2002-02-01

    A type of beat in nonlinear optical spectroscopy that is distinct from quantum beats (QB's) and polarization beats, is described. Like a quantum beat, this beat, which we refer to as an accidental degeneracy beat (ADB), can only be seen in multilevel systems. However, unlike quantum beats, which are the result of intramolecular interferences, ADB's are interferences between different subensembles of molecules in the sample. They require multilevel systems with spectral overlap. ADB's can appear as separate frequencies or as phase and amplitude contributions with the same frequency as that of quantum beats. A procedure for distinguishing between quantum beats and ADB's is outlined, and criteria under which ADB's are expected to be observed are delineated. Calculations of the spectrally resolved stimulated vibrational echo signal from an inhomogeneously broadened coupled anharmonic oscillator system are presented to illustrate the differences between the two types of beats. ADB's carry information about the anharmonicity of a system, while QB's carry information about intramolecular correspondence of transition frequencies in a multilevel system.

  10. Electrical Brain Responses to Beat Irregularities in Two Cases of Beat Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Brian; Lidji, Pascale; Honing, Henkjan; Palmer, Caroline; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Beat deafness, a recently documented form of congenital amusia, provides a unique window into functional specialization of neural circuitry for the processing of musical stimuli: Beat-deaf individuals exhibit deficits that are specific to the detection of a regular beat in music and the ability to move along with a beat. Studies on the neural underpinnings of beat processing in the general population suggest that the auditory system is capable of pre-attentively generating a predictive model of upcoming sounds in a rhythmic pattern, subserved largely within auditory cortex and reflected in mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3 event-related potential (ERP) components. The current study examined these neural correlates of beat perception in two beat-deaf individuals, Mathieu and Marjorie, and a group of control participants under conditions in which auditory stimuli were either attended or ignored. Compared to control participants, Mathieu demonstrated reduced behavioral sensitivity to beat omissions in metrical patterns, and Marjorie showed a bias to identify irregular patterns as regular. ERP responses to beat omissions reveal an intact pre-attentive system for processing beat irregularities in cases of beat deafness, reflected in the MMN component, and provide partial support for abnormalities in later cognitive stages of beat processing, reflected in an unreliable P3b component exhibited by Mathieu—but not Marjorie—compared to control participants. P3 abnormalities observed in the current study resemble P3 abnormalities exhibited by individuals with pitch-based amusia, and are consistent with attention or auditory-motor coupling accounts of deficits in beat perception. PMID:26941591

  11. Mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation in the atria of heart failure patients due to mitral and tricuspid regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jen-Ping; Chen, Mien-Cheng; Liu, Wen-Hao; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Pan, Kuo-Li; Ho, Wan-Chun; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Huang-Chung

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis occurs in atrial cardiomyocytes in mitral and tricuspid valve disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the respective roles of the mitochondrial and tumor necrosis factor-α receptor associated death domain (TRADD)-mediated death receptor pathways for apoptosis in the atrial cardiomyocytes of heart failure patients due to severe mitral and moderate-to-severe tricuspid regurgitation. This study comprised eighteen patients (7 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation and 11 in sinus rhythm). Atrial appendage tissues were obtained during surgery. Three purchased normal human left atrial tissues served as normal controls. Moderately-to-severely myolytic cardiomyocytes comprised 59.7±22.1% of the cardiomyocytes in the right atria and 52.4±12.9% of the cardiomyocytes in the left atria of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients with atrial fibrillation group and comprised 58.4±24.8% of the cardiomyocytes in the right atria of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients with sinus rhythm. In contrast, no myolysis was observed in the normal human adult left atrial tissue samples. Immunohistochemical analysis showed expression of cleaved caspase-9, an effector of the mitochondrial pathways, in the majority of right atrial cardiomyocytes (87.3±10.0%) of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients with sinus rhythm, and right atrial cardiomyocytes (90.6±31.4%) and left atrial cardiomyocytes (70.7±22.0%) of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients with atrial fibrillation. In contrast, only 5.7% of cardiomyocytes of the normal left atrial tissues showed strongly positive expression of cleaved caspase-9. Of note, none of the atrial cardiomyocytes in right atrial tissue in sinus rhythm and in the fibrillating right and left atria of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients, and in the normal human adult left atrial tissue samples showed cleaved caspase-8 expression, which is a downstream effector of TRADD of the death receptor pathway

  12. Dynamic focusing in the zebrafish beating heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Delgado, L.; Peralta, M.; Mercader, N.; Ripoll, J.

    2016-03-01

    Of the large amount of the animal models available for cardiac research, the zebrafish is extremely valuable due to its transparency during early stages of development. In this work a dual illumination laser sheet microscope with simultaneous dual camera imaging is used to image the beating heart at 200 fps, dynamically and selectively focusing inside the beating heart through the use of a tunable lens. This dual color dynamic focusing enables imaging with cellular resolution at unprecedented high frame rates, allowing 3D imaging of the whole beating heart of embryonic zebrafish.

  13. Do nonlinearities play a significant role in short term, beat-to-beat variability?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, H. G.; Mukkamala, R.; Moody, G. B.; Mark, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies of short-term beat-to-beat variability in cardiovascular signals have not resolved the debate about the completeness of linear analysis techniques. This aim of this paper is to evaluate further the role of nonlinearities in short-term, beat-to-beat variability. We compared linear autoregressive moving average (ARMA) and nonlinear neural network (NN) models for predicting instantaneous heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (BP) from past HR and BP. To evaluate these models, we used HR and BP time series from the MIMIC database. Experimental results indicate that NN-based nonlinearities do not play a significant role and suggest that ARMA linear analysis techniques provide adequate characterization of the system dynamics responsible for generating short-term, beat-to-beat variability.

  14. Do nonlinearities play a significant role in short term, beat-to-beat variability?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, H. G.; Mukkamala, R.; Moody, G. B.; Mark, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies of short-term beat-to-beat variability in cardiovascular signals have not resolved the debate about the completeness of linear analysis techniques. This aim of this paper is to evaluate further the role of nonlinearities in short-term, beat-to-beat variability. We compared linear autoregressive moving average (ARMA) and nonlinear neural network (NN) models for predicting instantaneous heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (BP) from past HR and BP. To evaluate these models, we used HR and BP time series from the MIMIC database. Experimental results indicate that NN-based nonlinearities do not play a significant role and suggest that ARMA linear analysis techniques provide adequate characterization of the system dynamics responsible for generating short-term, beat-to-beat variability.

  15. Binaural beats and frequency-coding.

    PubMed

    Fritze, W; Köhler, W

    1986-01-01

    Binaural beats were studied before and during a situation of temporary threshold shift, and no frequency shift could be found. In contrast, subjective binaural frequency comparison revealed a distinct shift. These findings demonstrate the two known modes of perception.

  16. Healthy Dietary Fats Help Beat High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166625.html Healthy Dietary Fats Help Beat High Cholesterol Eating them can reduce ... and Human Services. More Health News on Cholesterol Dietary Fats Heart Diseases--Prevention Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus ...

  17. RABBIT POX

    PubMed Central

    Rosahn, Paul D.; Hu, Ch'uan-K'uei

    1935-01-01

    Observations on an epidemic of rabbit pox occurring in an isolated animal room during the winter of 1933–34 are reported. The clinical manifestations, consisting of a generalized papular eruption involving the skin and mucous membranes, together with blepharitis, ophthalmia, nasal discharge and lymphadenopathy were essentially similar to those noted in a pox epidemic of the previous year. This was true in general also of the pathological findings except that vacuolization, local necrosis and vesicle formation were seen in the epidermis, while in the previous year the microscopic pathology in the skin was confined to the corium. Evidence was presented indicating that the infection can be transmitted through the medium of a personal carrier, and that transmission in this manner can occur during the incubation period or before a definite diagnosis is possible. The findings also demonstrated that the etiological agents responsible for the disease reported here and that of the previous year were immunologically related, and that the immunity in recovered animals effectively persisted during the entire period for which data are available, 9 to 12 months. It appeared also that young animals suckling an immune doe were more refractory to the development of the lesions of rabbit pox than were the young of susceptible does. PMID:19870418

  18. How molecular motors shape the flagellar beat

    PubMed Central

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Hilfinger, Andreas; Howard, Jonathon; Jülicher, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are slender cellular appendages whose regular beating propels cells and microorganisms through aqueous media. The beat is an oscillating pattern of propagating bends generated by dynein motor proteins. A key open question is how the activity of the motors is coordinated in space and time. To elucidate the nature of this coordination we inferred the mechanical properties of the motors by analyzing the shape of beating sperm: Steadily beating bull sperm were imaged and their shapes were measured with high precision using a Fourier averaging technique. Comparing our experimental data with wave forms calculated for different scenarios of motor coordination we found that only the scenario of interdoublet sliding regulating motor activity gives rise to satisfactory fits. We propose that the microscopic origin of such “sliding control” is the load dependent detachment rate of motors. Agreement between observed and calculated wave forms was obtained only if significant sliding between microtubules occurred at the base. This suggests a novel mechanism by which changes in basal compliance could reverse the direction of beat propagation. We conclude that the flagellar beat patterns are determined by an interplay of the basal properties of the axoneme and the mechanical feedback of dynein motors. PMID:19404446

  19. Beliefs of Sri Lankan Medical Students about Wife Beating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; de Zoysa, Piyanjali

    2007-01-01

    The article presents the results of a study on beliefs about wife beating conducted among 476 Sri Lankan medical students. Participants fill out a self-administered questionnaire, which examines six beliefs about wife beating. Most students tend to justify wife beating, to believe women benefit from wife beating, and to believe the wife bears more…

  20. Beliefs of Sri Lankan Medical Students about Wife Beating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; de Zoysa, Piyanjali

    2007-01-01

    The article presents the results of a study on beliefs about wife beating conducted among 476 Sri Lankan medical students. Participants fill out a self-administered questionnaire, which examines six beliefs about wife beating. Most students tend to justify wife beating, to believe women benefit from wife beating, and to believe the wife bears more…

  1. Influence of the estrous cycle on the sensitivity to catecholamines in right atria from rats submitted to foot-shock stress.

    PubMed

    Vanderlei, L C; Marcondes, F K; Lanza, L L; Spadari-Bratfisch, R C

    1996-06-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of the alterations in sensitivity to catecholamines in right atria from female rats exhibiting regular 4-day estrous cycles after three foot-shock sessions at estrus, metestrus, and diestrus or at diestrus, proestrus, and estrus. Right atria from stressed rats sacrificed at diestrus showed subsensitivity to noradrenaline and adrenaline. After in vitro sympathetic denervation (38 microM 6-hydroxydopamine) plus inhibition of neuronal reuptake (0.1 microM desipramine) subsensitivity to noradrenaline was abolished, but it was again evident when extraneuronal uptake was also inhibited (10 microM phenoxybenzamine and 30 microM corticosterone). The same pretreatment abolished the subsensitivity to adrenaline. After addition of 1 microM butoxamine, a beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, the tissues from stressed rats were subsensitive to adrenaline. Right atria from stressed rats sacrificed at estrus did not show any alteration in sensitivity to catecholamines. We conclude that after foot-shock stress, right atria from female rats sacrificed at diestrus showed subsensitivity of the chronotropic response to catecholamines as a result of a conformational alteration of beta 1-adrenoceptors, simultaneously with an increase in beta 2-adrenoceptor-mediated response. The mechanisms seem to be similar to those which underlie stress-induced alterations in catecholamine sensitivity in right atria from male rats. However, during estrus there are some protective factors that prevent the effects of stress on right atria.

  2. Diamide: positive inotropic effect in isolated atria and inhibition of Na+/Ca2+ exchange in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Antolini, M; Debetto, P; Trevisi, L; Luciani, S

    1991-02-01

    The influence of frequency of stimulation and external calcium on the positive inotropic response of guinea-pig left atria to diamide and the inhibitory action on Na+/Ca2+ exchange activity of rat cardiomyocytes by this oxidant of sulphhydryl groups have been investigated. Diamide (50-500 microM) induces a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which is more pronounced when atria are driven at 1.0 Hz rather than at 0.5 and 0.1 Hz, and are bathed in 2.72 mM rather than in 1.36 mM external calcium. A decrease in the positive inotropic effect at 35 degrees C with respect to 29 degrees C is also observed. In addition, diamide in positive inotropic concentrations (100-300 microM) significantly reduces Na+/Ca2+ exchange activity and cytoplasmic glutathione levels in adult rat cardiomyocytes. The thiol reducing agent dithiothreitol either reverses or prevents diamide effects both in isolated atria and cardiomyocytes, suggesting that the actions of diamide are correlated to its property to oxidize sulphhydryl groups to disulphides. In view of the functional importance of Na+/Ca2+ exchange in myocardial contractility, it is proposed that diamide may increase the heart force of contraction by an inhibition of the sarcolemmal Na+/Ca2+ exchange activity.

  3. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL BASES OF CARDIAC FIBRILLATION. DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES BETWEEN ATRIA AND VENTRICLES

    PubMed Central

    Filgueiras-Rama, David; Jalife, José

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over the last 25 years suggests that, whether in the atria or ventricles, fibrillation may be explained by the self-organization of the cardiac electrical activity into rapidly spinning rotors giving way to spiral waves that break intermittently and result in fibrillatory conduction. The dynamics and frequency of such rotors depend on the ion channel composition, excitability and refractory properties of the tissues involved, as well as on the thickness and respective three-dimensional fiber structure of the atrial and ventricular chambers. Therefore, improving the understanding of fibrillation has required the use of multidisciplinary research approaches, including optical mapping, patch clamping and molecular biology, and the application of concepts derived from the theory of wave propagation in excitable media. Moreover, translation of such concepts to the clinic has recently opened new opportunities to apply novel mechanistic approaches to therapy, particularly during atrial fibrillation ablation. Here we review the current understanding of the manner in which the underlying myocardial structure and function influence rotor initiation and maintenance during cardiac fibrillation. We also examine relevant underlying differences and similarities between atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation and evaluate the latest clinical mapping technologies used to identify rotors in either arrhythmia. Altogether, the data being discussed have significantly improved our understanding of the cellular and structural bases of cardiac fibrillation and pointed toward potentially exciting new avenues for more efficient and effective identification and therapy of the most complex cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:27042693

  4. Study of atrial arrhythmias in a computer model based on magnetic resonance images of human atria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virag, N.; Jacquemet, V.; Henriquez, C. S.; Zozor, S.; Blanc, O.; Vesin, J.-M.; Pruvot, E.; Kappenberger, L.

    2002-09-01

    The maintenance of multiple wavelets appears to be a consistent feature of atrial fibrillation (AF). In this paper, we investigate possible mechanisms of initiation and perpetuation of multiple wavelets in a computer model of AF. We developed a simplified model of human atria that uses an ionic-based membrane model and whose geometry is derived from a segmented magnetic resonance imaging data set. The three-dimensional surface has a realistic size and includes obstacles corresponding to the location of major vessels and valves, but it does not take into account anisotropy. The main advantage of this approach is its ability to simulate long duration arrhythmias (up to 40 s). Clinically relevant initiation protocols, such as single-site burst pacing, were used. The dynamics of simulated AF were investigated in models with different action potential durations and restitution properties, controlled by the conductance of the slow inward current in a modified Luo-Rudy model. The simulation studies show that (1) single-site burst pacing protocol can be used to induce wave breaks even in tissue with uniform membrane properties, (2) the restitution-based wave breaks in an atrial model with realistic size and conduction velocities are transient, and (3) a significant reduction in action potential duration (even with apparently flat restitution) increases the duration of AF.

  5. Detailed Anatomical and Electrophysiological Models of Human Atria and Torso for the Simulation of Atrial Activation.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Ana; Sebastián, Rafael; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Rodríguez, José F; Godoy, Eduardo J; Martínez, Laura; Saiz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias, and specifically atrial fibrillation (AF), induce rapid and irregular activation patterns that appear on the torso surface as abnormal P-waves in electrocardiograms and body surface potential maps (BSPM). In recent years both P-waves and the BSPM have been used to identify the mechanisms underlying AF, such as localizing ectopic foci or high-frequency rotors. However, the relationship between the activation of the different areas of the atria and the characteristics of the BSPM and P-wave signals are still far from being completely understood. In this work we developed a multi-scale framework, which combines a highly-detailed 3D atrial model and a torso model to study the relationship between atrial activation and surface signals in sinus rhythm. Using this multi scale model, it was revealed that the best places for recording P-waves are the frontal upper right and the frontal and rear left quadrants of the torso. Our results also suggest that only nine regions (of the twenty-one structures in which the atrial surface was divided) make a significant contribution to the BSPM and determine the main P-wave characteristics.

  6. Analysis of agonist dissociation constants as assessed by functional antagonism in guinea pig left atria

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, P.; Malta, E.

    1986-04-01

    In electrically driven guinea pig left atria, positive inotropic responses to (-)-isoprenaline and the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist RO363 were obtained in the absence and in the presence of the functional antagonists adenosine, carbachol, gallopamil, nifedipine, and Ro 03-7894. Each of the functional antagonists reduced the maximum response to both agonists and produced nonparallel rightward shifts in the cumulative concentration effect curves. For both agonists, dissociation constants (KA) were calculated using the equation described by Furchgott (1966) for irreversible antagonism. For RO363, which is a partial agonist with high agonist activity, the equations outlined for functional interaction by Mackay (1981) were also employed to calculate KA values. The KA values obtained by each method were compared with the dissociation constants (KD) for the two agonists determined from their ability to displace the radioligand (-)-(/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol from beta 1-adrenoceptors in guinea pig left atrial membrane preparations. The estimates of KA varied substantially from KD values. The KD values were taken as more accurate estimates of the true values for the dissociation constants because a high degree of correlation exists between pKD and pD2 values for a number of other beta-adrenoceptor agonists that behave as partial agonists and between pKD and pKB values for a number of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. Thus, it appears that there are serious limitations in the current theory for using functional antagonism as a means of obtaining agonist dissociation constants.

  7. Detailed Anatomical and Electrophysiological Models of Human Atria and Torso for the Simulation of Atrial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Ana; Sebastián, Rafael; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Rodríguez, José F.; Godoy, Eduardo J.; Martínez, Laura; Saiz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias, and specifically atrial fibrillation (AF), induce rapid and irregular activation patterns that appear on the torso surface as abnormal P-waves in electrocardiograms and body surface potential maps (BSPM). In recent years both P-waves and the BSPM have been used to identify the mechanisms underlying AF, such as localizing ectopic foci or high-frequency rotors. However, the relationship between the activation of the different areas of the atria and the characteristics of the BSPM and P-wave signals are still far from being completely understood. In this work we developed a multi-scale framework, which combines a highly-detailed 3D atrial model and a torso model to study the relationship between atrial activation and surface signals in sinus rhythm. Using this multi scale model, it was revealed that the best places for recording P-waves are the frontal upper right and the frontal and rear left quadrants of the torso. Our results also suggest that only nine regions (of the twenty-one structures in which the atrial surface was divided) make a significant contribution to the BSPM and determine the main P-wave characteristics. PMID:26523732

  8. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL BASES OF CARDIAC FIBRILLATION. DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES BETWEEN ATRIA AND VENTRICLES.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras-Rama, David; Jalife, José

    2016-02-01

    Evidence accumulated over the last 25 years suggests that, whether in the atria or ventricles, fibrillation may be explained by the self-organization of the cardiac electrical activity into rapidly spinning rotors giving way to spiral waves that break intermittently and result in fibrillatory conduction. The dynamics and frequency of such rotors depend on the ion channel composition, excitability and refractory properties of the tissues involved, as well as on the thickness and respective three-dimensional fiber structure of the atrial and ventricular chambers. Therefore, improving the understanding of fibrillation has required the use of multidisciplinary research approaches, including optical mapping, patch clamping and molecular biology, and the application of concepts derived from the theory of wave propagation in excitable media. Moreover, translation of such concepts to the clinic has recently opened new opportunities to apply novel mechanistic approaches to therapy, particularly during atrial fibrillation ablation. Here we review the current understanding of the manner in which the underlying myocardial structure and function influence rotor initiation and maintenance during cardiac fibrillation. We also examine relevant underlying differences and similarities between atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation and evaluate the latest clinical mapping technologies used to identify rotors in either arrhythmia. Altogether, the data being discussed have significantly improved our understanding of the cellular and structural bases of cardiac fibrillation and pointed toward potentially exciting new avenues for more efficient and effective identification and therapy of the most complex cardiac arrhythmias.

  9. The impact of binaural beats on creativity

    PubMed Central

    Reedijk, Susan A.; Bolders, Anne; Hommel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Human creativity relies on a multitude of cognitive processes, some of which are influenced by the neurotransmitter dopamine. This suggests that creativity could be enhanced by interventions that either modulate the production or transmission of dopamine directly, or affect dopamine-driven processes. In the current study we hypothesized that creativity can be influenced by means of binaural beats, an auditory illusion that is considered a form of cognitive entrainment that operates through stimulating neuronal phase locking. We aimed to investigate whether binaural beats affect creative performance at all, whether they affect divergent thinking, convergent thinking, or both, and whether possible effects may be mediated by the individual striatal dopamine level. Binaural beats were presented at alpha and gamma frequency. Participants completed a divergent and a convergent thinking task to assess two important functions of creativity, and filled out the Positive And Negative Affect Scale—mood State questionnaire (PANAS-S) and an affect grid to measure current mood. Dopamine levels in the striatum were estimated using spontaneous eye blink rates (EBRs). Results showed that binaural beats, regardless of the presented frequency, can affect divergent but not convergent thinking. Individuals with low EBRs mostly benefitted from alpha binaural beat stimulation, while individuals with high EBRs were unaffected or even impaired by both alpha and gamma binaural beats. This suggests that binaural beats, and possibly other forms of cognitive entrainment, are not suited for a one-size-fits-all approach, and that individual cognitive-control systems need to be taken into account when studying cognitive enhancement methods. PMID:24294202

  10. The impact of binaural beats on creativity.

    PubMed

    Reedijk, Susan A; Bolders, Anne; Hommel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Human creativity relies on a multitude of cognitive processes, some of which are influenced by the neurotransmitter dopamine. This suggests that creativity could be enhanced by interventions that either modulate the production or transmission of dopamine directly, or affect dopamine-driven processes. In the current study we hypothesized that creativity can be influenced by means of binaural beats, an auditory illusion that is considered a form of cognitive entrainment that operates through stimulating neuronal phase locking. We aimed to investigate whether binaural beats affect creative performance at all, whether they affect divergent thinking, convergent thinking, or both, and whether possible effects may be mediated by the individual striatal dopamine level. Binaural beats were presented at alpha and gamma frequency. Participants completed a divergent and a convergent thinking task to assess two important functions of creativity, and filled out the Positive And Negative Affect Scale-mood State questionnaire (PANAS-S) and an affect grid to measure current mood. Dopamine levels in the striatum were estimated using spontaneous eye blink rates (EBRs). Results showed that binaural beats, regardless of the presented frequency, can affect divergent but not convergent thinking. Individuals with low EBRs mostly benefitted from alpha binaural beat stimulation, while individuals with high EBRs were unaffected or even impaired by both alpha and gamma binaural beats. This suggests that binaural beats, and possibly other forms of cognitive entrainment, are not suited for a one-size-fits-all approach, and that individual cognitive-control systems need to be taken into account when studying cognitive enhancement methods.

  11. Nonlinear evolution of the plasma beat wave: Compressing the laser beat notes via electromagnetic cascading.

    PubMed

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-04-01

    The near-resonant beat wave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating the trains of few-femtosecond electromagnetic (EM) pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a comoving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the difference frequency. As a result, the cascade of sidebands red and blue shifted by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. The bandwidth of the phase-modulated laser is proportional to the product of the plasma length, laser wavelength, and amplitude of the electron density perturbation. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the redshifted spectral components are advanced in time with respect to the blueshifted ones near the center of each laser beat note. The group velocity dispersion of plasma compresses so chirped beat notes to a few-laser-cycle duration thus creating a train of sharp EM spikes with the beat periodicity. Depending on the plasma and laser parameters, chirping and compression can be implemented either concurrently in the same, or sequentially in different plasmas. Evolution of the laser beat wave and electron density perturbations is described in time and one spatial dimension in a weakly relativistic approximation. Using the compression effect, we demonstrate that the relativistic bistability regime of the EPW excitation [G. Shvets, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 195004 (2004)] can be achieved with the initially subthreshold beat wave pulse.

  12. Coexistence of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in the rabbit heart: quantitative analysis of the regional distribution by (-)-/sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol binding

    SciTech Connect

    Brodde, O.E.; Leifert, F.J.; Krehl, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    We determined the amount of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in right and left atria and ventricles of rabbits. For this purpose inhibition of specific (-)-/sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol ((-)-/sup 3/H-DHA) binding (5 nM) by beta 1-selective (practolol, metoprolol) and beta 2-selective (zinterol, IPS 339) adrenergic drugs was determined and analyzed by pseudo-Scatchard (Hofstee) plots. For both atria, inhibition of binding by the four selective beta-adrenergic drugs resulted in non-linear Hofstee plots, suggesting the coexistence of both beta-adrenoceptor subtypes. From these plots we calculated a beta 1:beta 2-adrenoceptor ratio of 72:28 for the right atrium and of 82:18 for the left. In contrast, only a very small amount of beta 2-adrenoceptors (approximately 5-7% of the total beta-adrenoceptor population) could be detected in the ventricles. For comparison we analyzed the inhibition of specific (-)-/sup 3/H-DHA binding in tissues with homogeneous population of beta-adrenoceptors (beta 1:guinea pig left ventricle; beta 2: cerebellum of mature rats). For both tissues the four selective beta-adrenergic drugs showed linear Hofstee plots, demonstrating that in tissues with homogeneous beta-receptor population interaction of each drug with the receptor followed simple mass-action kinetics. We conclude that beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors coexist in rabbit atria while the ventricles are predominantly endowed the beta 1-adrenoceptors.

  13. GABAA receptor-mediated positive inotropism in guinea-pig isolated left atria: evidence for the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive nerves.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Giuliani, S; Manzini, S; Meli, A

    1989-05-01

    1. Isolated left atria from reserpine-pretreated guinea-pigs, electrically driven (3 Hz) in the presence of atropine (1 microM), phentolamine (0.3 microM) and propranolol (1 microM), responded to a train of stimuli (10 Hz for 2.5s) with a delayed neurogenic positive inotropic response which was insensitive to hexamethonium (10 microM) but abolished by either tetrodotoxin (1 microM), omega-conotoxin (0.1 microM), in vitro capsaicin desensitization or desensitization to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). 2. In these experimental conditions, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) produced a concentration-related (10 microM-1 mM) positive inotropic response similar to that produced by electrical field stimulation. The effect of GABA was competitively antagonized by bicuculline methiodide (10 microM), a GABAA receptor antagonist. 3. The selective GABAA receptor agonists, muscimol and homotaurine mimicked the positive inotropic effect of GABA while baclofen, the selective GABAB receptor agonist, did not. 4. The action of GABA (1 mM) was abolished by either tetrodotoxin (1 microM), omega-conotoxin (0.1 microM), in vitro capsaicin desensitization or desensitization to CGRP, while it was unaffected by hexamethonium. In contrast, the inotropic response to CGRP was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, omega-conotoxin, bicuculline methiodide, hexamethonium or in vitro capsaicin desensitization, but was abolished by CGRP desensitization. 5. In the spontaneously beating guinea-pig right atrium, GABA (1 microM) produced a small and transient positive chronotropic effect that was no longer observed after in vitro desensitization with capsaicin (1 microM). 6. In the guinea-pig isolated perfused heart from reserpine-pretreated animals (with atropine, phentolamine and propranolol in the perfusion medium), GABA (1 microM) produced a transient tachycardia and a small increase in coronary flow. Both capsaicin (1 microM) and CGRP (1 microM) produced marked tachycardias and increases in coronary flow

  14. Fuzzy beat labeling for intelligent arrhythmia monitoring.

    PubMed

    Barro, S; Ruiz, R; Mira, J

    1990-06-01

    The performance in automatic diagnosis of cardiac rhythm based on the analysis of the electrocardiographic signal (ECG) is strongly conditioned by the correct classification of each beat detected. In this work we present a fuzzy classifier of beats that applies empiric criteria and that permits it to ignore the frequent lack of clarity in the information coming from previous stages within ECG processing. The classification of each beat is performed applying diffuse conditional statements which represent the knowledge of the cardiologist expert and that use a set of descriptions of the temporal and morphological attributes of the analyzed beat. The process of classification is completed with information derived from the consideration of "families," which group beats that have QRSs of similar morphology, and with information brought in by the user himself in the monitoring process. The modularity of the classifier that has been developed facilitates the incorporation of new descriptions and classification criteria in order to increase its reliability. The design process proposed has a structure that is transferable to other analysis and event classification processes.

  15. Quantum Beats from Entangled Localized Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, David

    Recent experiments report observations of quantum interference between plasmon resonances, inviting descriptions of plasmon-photon interaction using methods from quantum optics. Here we demonstrate, using a Heisenberg-Langevin approach, that the radiation emitted from the localized surface plasmon resonances of a mixed-metal heterodimer may exhibit observable, beat frequency interferences at a far-field detector, known as quantum beats. This prediction represents a correspondence between V-type atoms of quantum optics and the familiar heterodimer system of plasmonics. We explore this analogy in depth and find that although both systems support quantum beats, the heterodimer emits photons in bunches due to the bosonic nature of the plasmon. This highlights a significant difference between the properties of atomic and plasmonic systems. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's CAREER program under Award Number CHE-1253775 and NSF XSEDE resources under Award Number PHY-130045.

  16. Energy Consumption of Actively Beating Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia and flagella are important for propelling cells or driving fluid over tissues. The microtubule-based core in these organelles, the axoneme, has a nearly universal ``9+2'' arrangement of 9 outer doublet microtubules assembled around two singlet microtubules in the center. Thousands of molecular motor proteins are attached to the doublets and walk on neighboring outer doublets. The motors convert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into sliding motion between adjacent doublet microtubules, resulting in precisely regulated oscillatory beating. Using demembranated sea urchin sperm flagella as an experimental platform, we simultaneously monitor the axoneme's consumption of ATP and its beating dynamics while key parameters, such as solution viscosity and ATP concentration, are varied. Insights into motor cooperativity during beating and energetic consequences of hydrodynamic interactions will be presented.

  17. False beats in coupled piano string unisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capleton, Brian

    2004-02-01

    The behavior of a unison pair of piano strings coupled by the soundboard bridge, when one string has localized anisotropy in the reactive part of the bridge admittance for a given partial frequency, can be investigated using a theoretical matrix description. The anisotropy can cause what in piano tuning terminology is referred to as ``false beating'' in a partial of the single string. A mathematical model can be used to illustrate how ``mistunings'' between the strings of the unison (measured when the strings are sounding in isolation from each other) may theoretically arise as a consequence of the normal practice in piano tuning, of eliminating or reducing audible beating in the unison when both strings are sounding. ``False beats'' in a single string partial can be ``inherited'' by a partial of the coupled unison's spectrum, and mistunings between the strings can eliminate or reduce the appearance of this inheritance.

  18. Evidence for leukotriene D4 receptors in guinea pig left atria

    SciTech Connect

    Falcone, R.C.; Aharony, D.; Orzechowski, R.F. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of peptidoleukotrienes (LTs) on electrically driven guinea pig left atria (GPLA) were investigated. LTD4 produced a positive inotropic response; however, rapid desensitization required the construction of noncumulative dose-response curves to naive tissues. The maximal inotropic response to LTD4 was 24 {plus minus} 3% of isoproterenol and the EC50 = 267 {plus minus} 77 nM. The functional response was corroborated by the demonstration of specific and rapid (3H)LTD4 binding to GPLA membranes with low affinity (Kd = 212 {plus minus} 80.2 nM), in a saturable (Bmax = 20 {plus minus} 1.1 pmol/mg protein) manner. In tissues pretreated with acivicin, which inhibits conversion of LTC4 to LTD4, the response to LTC4, but not LTD4, was abolished. Selectivity towards LTD4 was demonstrated by the inability of propranolol, prazosin, atropine, pyrilamine, capsaicin or indomethacin (all tested at 1 microM) to alter the functional response to LTD4. Similarly, none of the tested compounds (100 microMs) was inhibitory in the binding assay. Structurally diverse LTD4 antagonists SKF102922 (pKb = 6.42) and ICI 198.615 (pKb = 8.74) were able to inhibit the functional response as well as (3H)LTD4 binding to GPLA membranes. The calcium channel antagonist, verapamil, inhibited the functional response but did not alter (3H)LTD4 binding. These data support the existence of specific LTD4 receptors in GPLA which evoke a modest, rapidly desensitized, increase in the force of myocardial contraction.

  19. Protective effect of bepridil against veratrine-induced contracture in rat atria.

    PubMed

    Leboeuf, J; Baissat, J; Massingham, R

    1992-06-05

    In isolated stimulated rat atria, superfusion with veratrine caused a marked contracture (VIC) which was absent in calcium-free medium and which was inhibited by tetrodotoxin (IC50VIC of 1.38 microM). Lowering the extracellular calcium concentration from 2.5 to 0.5 or 0.1 mM reduced the veratrine-induced contracture and delayed its onset. Superfusion of bepridil (1-10 microM) for 60 min before and during veratrine exposure markedly slowed the onset of contracture, reduced the maximum response (IC50VIC = 2.11 microM) and facilitated recovery upon washout of the alkaloid. The direct negative inotropic effect (NIE) of bepridil (IC50NIE = 10.96 microM) resulted in an VIC/NIE ratio of 5.19 for this drug. The protective effects of bepridil were rate-independent and were not modified by the presence of atropine (1.4 microM) and propranolol (0.3 microM) in the medium. Diltiazem, verapamil and nifedipine only reduced veratrine-induced contracture at concentrations much higher than those producing a negative inotropic effect, giving them negative NIE/VIC ratios of 0.31, 0.08 and 0.08 respectively. Like bepridil, flunarizine had a positive NIE/VIC ratio (15.87, IC50VIC = 3.71 microM). The lack of effect of the quaternary derivative of bepridil CERM 11888 indicated that intracellular sites of action may be involved in the activity of bepridil on veratrine-induced contracture. Given that veratrine-induced changes may mimic some of the pathological changes occurring in ischaemia, the results suggest that bepridil and flunarizine may be more effective than L-type, slow calcium ion-channel blockers in protecting against calcium overload during ischaemia and reperfusion injury.

  20. Digoxin and Risk of Death in Adults with Atrial Fibrillation: The ATRIA-CVRN Study

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, James V.; Reynolds, Kristi; Fang, Margaret; Udaltsova, Natalia; Steimle, Anthony; Pomernacki, Niela K.; Borowsky, Leila H.; Harrison, Teresa N.; Singer, Daniel E.; Go, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Digoxin remains commonly used for rate control in atrial fibrillation, but very limited data exist supporting this practice and some studies have shown an association with adverse outcomes. We examined the independent association between digoxin and risks of death and hospitalization in adults with incident atrial fibrillation and no heart failure. Methods and Results We performed a retrospective cohort study of 14,787 age, gender and high-dimensional propensity score-matched adults with incident atrial fibrillation and no prior heart failure or digoxin use in the AnTicoagulation and Risk factors In Atrial fibrillation-Cardiovascular Research Network (ATRIA-CVRN) Study within Kaiser Permanente Northern and Southern California. We examined the independent association between newly initiated digoxin and the risks of death and hospitalization using extended Cox regression. During a median 1.17 (interquartile range 0.49–1.97) years of follow-up among matched patients with atrial fibrillation, incident digoxin use was associated with higher rates of death (8.3 vs. 4.9 per 100 person-years, P<0.001) and hospitalization (60.1 vs. 37.2 per 100 person-years, P<0.001). Incident digoxin use was independently associated with a 71% higher risk of death (hazard ratio [HR] 1.71, 95%CI:1.52–1.93) and a 63% higher risk of hospitalization (HR 1.63, 95%CI:1.56–1.71). Results were consistent in subgroups of age and gender and when using “intent-to-treat” or “on-treatment” analytic approaches. Conclusions In adults with atrial fibrillation, digoxin use was independently associated with higher risks of death and hospitalization. Given other available rate control options, digoxin should be used with caution in the management of atrial fibrillation. PMID:25414270

  1. Digoxin and risk of death in adults with atrial fibrillation: the ATRIA-CVRN study.

    PubMed

    Freeman, James V; Reynolds, Kristi; Fang, Margaret; Udaltsova, Natalia; Steimle, Anthony; Pomernacki, Niela K; Borowsky, Leila H; Harrison, Teresa N; Singer, Daniel E; Go, Alan S

    2015-02-01

    Digoxin remains commonly used for rate control in atrial fibrillation, but limited data exist supporting this practice and some studies have shown an association with adverse outcomes. We examined the independent association between digoxin and risks of death and hospitalization in adults with incident atrial fibrillation and no heart failure. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 14,787 age, sex, and high-dimensional propensity score-matched adults with incident atrial fibrillation and no previous heart failure or digoxin use in the AnTicoagulation and Risk factors In Atrial fibrillation-Cardiovascular Research Network (ATRIA-CVRN) study within Kaiser Permanente Northern and Southern California. We examined the independent association between newly initiated digoxin and the risks of death and hospitalization using extended Cox regression. During a median 1.17 (interquartile range, 0.49-1.97) years of follow-up among matched patients with atrial fibrillation, incident digoxin use was associated with higher rates of death (8.3 versus 4.9 per 100 person-years; P<0.001) and hospitalization (60.1 versus 37.2 per 100 person-years; P<0.001). Incident digoxin use was independently associated with a 71% higher risk of death (hazard ratio, 1.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-1.93) and a 63% higher risk of hospitalization (hazard ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.56-1.71). Results were consistent in subgroups of age and sex and when using intent-to-treat or on-treatment analytic approaches. In adults with atrial fibrillation, digoxin use was independently associated with higher risks of death and hospitalization. Given other available rate control options, digoxin should be used with caution in the management of atrial fibrillation. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Role of N-type calcium channels in autonomic neurotransmission in guineapig isolated left atria

    PubMed Central

    Serone, Adrian P; Angus, James A

    1999-01-01

    Calcium entry via neuronal calcium channels is essential for the process of neurotransmission. We investigated the calcium channel subtypes involved in the operation of cardiac autonomic neurotransmission by examining the effects of selective calcium channel blockers on the inotropic responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) of driven (4 Hz) guineapig isolated left atria. In this tissue, a previous report (Hong & Chang, 1995) found no evidence for N-type channels involved in the vagal negative inotropic response and only weak involvement in sympathetic responses. The effects of cumulative concentrations of the selective N-type calcium channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA (GVIA; 0.1–10 nM) and the nonselective N-, P/Q-type calcium channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC (MVIIC; 0.01–10 nM) were examined on the positive (with atropine, 1 μM present) and negative (with propranolol, 1 μM and clonidine, 1 μM present) inotropic responses to EFS (eight trains, each train four pulses per punctate stimulus). GVIA caused complete inhibition of both cardiac vagal and sympathetic inotropic responses to EFS. GVIA was equipotent at inhibiting positive (pIC50 9.29±0.08) and negative (pIC50 9.13±0.17) inotropic responses. MVIIC also mediated complete inhibition of inotropic responses to EFS and was 160 and 85 fold less potent than GVIA at inhibiting positive (pIC50 7.08±0.10) and negative (pIC50 7.20±0.14) inotropic responses, respectively. MVIIC was also equipotent at inhibiting both sympathetic and vagal responses. Our data demonstrates that N-type calcium channels account for all the calcium current required for cardiac autonomic neurotransmission in the guinea-pig isolated left atrium. PMID:10433500

  3. Viral infections of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Donnelly, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Viral diseases of rabbits have been used historically to study oncogenesis (e.g. rabbit fibroma virus, cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) and biologically to control feral rabbit populations (e.g. myxoma virus). However, clinicians seeing pet rabbits in North America infrequently encounter viral diseases although myxomatosis may be seen occasionally. The situation is different in Europe and Australia, where myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease are endemic. Advances in epidemiology and virology have led to detection of other lapine viruses that are now recognized as agents of emerging infectious diseases. Rabbit caliciviruses, related to rabbit hemorrhagic disease, are generally avirulent, but lethal variants are being identified in Europe and North America. Enteric viruses including lapine rotavirus, rabbit enteric coronavirus and rabbit astrovirus are being acknowledged as contributors to the multifactorial enteritis complex of juvenile rabbits. Three avirulent leporid herpesviruses are found in domestic rabbits. A fourth highly pathogenic virus designated leporid herpesvirus 4 has been described in Canada and Alaska. This review considers viruses affecting rabbits by their clinical significance. Viruses of major and minor clinical significance are described, and viruses of laboratory significance are mentioned. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acoustical sensing of cardiomyocyte cluster beating

    SciTech Connect

    Tymchenko, Nina; Kunze, Angelika; Dahlenborg, Kerstin; Svedhem, Sofia; Steel, Daniella

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •An example of the application of QCM-D to live cell studies. •Detection of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte cluster beating. •Clusters were studied in a thin liquid film and in a large liquid volume. •The QCM-D beating profile provides an individual fingerprint of the hPS-CMCs. -- Abstract: Spontaneously beating human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes clusters (CMCs) represent an excellent in vitro tool for studies of human cardiomyocyte function and for pharmacological cardiac safety assessment. Such testing typically requires highly trained operators, precision plating, or large cell quantities, and there is a demand for real-time, label-free monitoring of small cell quantities, especially rare cells and tissue-like structures. Array formats based on sensing of electrical or optical properties of cells are being developed and in use by the pharmaceutical industry. A potential alternative to these techniques is represented by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique, which is an acoustic surface sensitive technique that measures changes in mass and viscoelastic properties close to the sensor surface (from nm to μm). There is an increasing number of studies where QCM-D has successfully been applied to monitor properties of cells and cellular processes. In the present study, we show that spontaneous beating of CMCs on QCM-D sensors can be clearly detected, both in the frequency and the dissipation signals. Beating rates in the range of 66–168 bpm for CMCs were detected and confirmed by simultaneous light microscopy. The QCM-D beating profile was found to provide individual fingerprints of the hPS-CMCs. The presented results point towards acoustical assays for evaluation cardiotoxicity.

  5. A binaural beat constructed from a noise

    PubMed Central

    Akeroyd, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The binaural beat has been used for over one hundred years as a stimulus for generating the percept of motion. Classically the beat consists of a pure tone at one ear (e.g. 500 Hz) and the same pure tone at the other ear but shifted upwards or downwards in frequency (e.g., 501 Hz). An experiment and binaural computational analysis are reported which demonstrate that a more powerful motion percept can be obtained by applying the concept of the frequency shift to a noise, via an upwards or downwards shift in the frequency of the Fourier components of its spectrum. PMID:21218863

  6. Beating-heart Mitral Valve Chordal Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Genevieve; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2011-01-01

    Replacing open-heart surgical procedures with beating-heart interventions substantially decreases the trauma and risk of a procedure. One of the most challenging procedures to perform on the beating heart is valve repair. To address this need, this paper proposes a tool for replacing mitral valve chordae to correct regurgitation. The chordae is secured to the papillary muscle and leaflet using NiTi tissue anchors that also incorporate an internal adjustment mechanism to enable initial adjustment as well as subsequent readjustment of chordae length. Efficacy of the proposed tool for chordae replacement and reduction of regurgitation was demonstrated in an ex-vivo heart simulator. PMID:22254843

  7. Load Response of the Flagellar Beat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klindt, Gary S.; Ruloff, Christian; Wagner, Christian; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2016-12-01

    Cilia and flagella exhibit regular bending waves that perform mechanical work on the surrounding fluid, to propel cellular swimmers and pump fluids inside organisms. Here, we quantify a force-velocity relationship of the beating flagellum, by exposing flagellated Chlamydomonas cells to controlled microfluidic flows. A simple theory of flagellar limit-cycle oscillations, calibrated by measurements in the absence of flow, reproduces this relationship quantitatively. We derive a link between the energy efficiency of the flagellar beat and its ability to synchronize to oscillatory flows.

  8. Beat that Word: How Listeners Integrate Beat Gesture and Focus in Multimodal Speech Discourse.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Diana; Chu, Mingyuan; Wang, Lin; Özyürek, Asli; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Communication is facilitated when listeners allocate their attention to important information (focus) in the message, a process called "information structure." Linguistic cues like the preceding context and pitch accent help listeners to identify focused information. In multimodal communication, relevant information can be emphasized by nonverbal cues like beat gestures, which represent rhythmic nonmeaningful hand movements. Recent studies have found that linguistic and nonverbal attention cues are integrated independently in single sentences. However, it is possible that these two cues interact when information is embedded in context, because context allows listeners to predict what information is important. In an ERP study, we tested this hypothesis and asked listeners to view videos capturing a dialogue. In the critical sentence, focused and nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures, grooming hand movements, or no gestures. ERP results showed that focused words are processed more attentively than nonfocused words as reflected in an N1 and P300 component. Hand movements also captured attention and elicited a P300 component. Importantly, beat gesture and focus interacted in a late time window of 600-900 msec relative to target word onset, giving rise to a late positivity when nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures. Our results show that listeners integrate beat gesture with the focus of the message and that integration costs arise when beat gesture falls on nonfocused information. This suggests that beat gestures fulfill a unique focusing function in multimodal discourse processing and that they have to be integrated with the information structure of the message.

  9. Pro-arrhythmogenic effects of atrial fibrillation-induced electrical remodelling: insights from the three-dimensional virtual human atria.

    PubMed

    Colman, Michael A; Aslanidi, Oleg V; Kharche, Sanjay; Boyett, Mark R; Garratt, Clifford; Hancox, Jules C; Zhang, Henggui

    2013-09-01

    Chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with structural and electrical remodelling in the atria, which are associated with a high recurrence of AF. Through biophysically detailed computer modelling, this study investigated mechanisms by which AF-induced electrical remodelling promotes and perpetuates AF. A family of Courtemanche-Ramirez-Nattel variant models of human atrial cell action potentials (APs), taking into account of intrinsic atrial electrophysiological properties, was modified to incorporate various experimental data sets on AF-induced changes of major ionic channel currents (ICaL, IKur, Ito, IK1, IKs, INaCa) and on intracellular Ca(2+) handling. The single cell models for control and AF-remodelled conditions were incorporated into multicellular three-dimensional (3D) atrial tissue models. Effects of the AF-induced electrical remodelling were quantified as the changes of AP profile, AP duration (APD) and its dispersion across the atria, and the vulnerability of atrial tissue to the initiation of re-entry. The dynamic behaviour of re-entrant excitation waves in the 3D models was characterised. In our simulations, AF-induced electrical remodelling abbreviated atrial APD non-uniformly across the atria; this resulted in relatively short APDs co-existing with marked regional differences in the APD at junctions of the crista terminalis/pectinate muscle, pulmonary veins/left atrium. As a result, the measured tissue vulnerability to re-entry initiation at these tissue junctions was increased. The AF-induced electrical remodelling also stabilized and accelerated re-entrant excitation waves, leading to rapid and sustained re-entry. Under the AF-remodelled condition, re-entrant scroll waves in the 3D model degenerated into persistent and erratic wavelets, leading to fibrillation. In conclusion, realistic 3D atrial tissue models indicate that AF-induced electrical remodelling produces regionally heterogeneous and shortened APD; these respectively facilitate

  10. [Morphological and electrophysiological changes of the heart atria in necropsy patients with atrial fibrillation - a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Matějková, Adéla; Steiner, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common supraventricular tachycardia, has a morphological base, so called remodelation of atrial myocardium, with its abnormal conduction pattern as a consequence. The remodelation regards electrical, contractile, and structural properties. In this pilot study we attempted to find relations between the myocardial morphological (scarring, amyloidosis, left atrial enlargement) and electrophysiological (ECG characteristics of the P-wave) changes in patients with AF. We examined 40 hearts of necropsy patients - 20 with a history of AF and 20 with no history of AF. Grossly, the heart weight and the size of the left atrium (LA) were evaluated. Histologically, 7 standard sites from the atria were examined. In each specimen, the degree of myocardial scarring and of deposition of isolated atrial amyloid (IAA) were assessed. We failed to show any significant difference in the P-wave pattern between patients with and without AF. Morphologically, however, there were several differences - the patients with AF had significantly heavier hearts, larger left atria, more severely scarred myocardium of the LA and the atrial septum, and more severe deposition of IAA in both atria in comparison to the control group of patients with sinus rhythm. The left atrial distribution of both fibrosis and amyloidosis was irregular. In patients with AF the former was most pronounced in the LA ceiling while the latter in the LA anterior wall. The entire series showed more marked amyloidosis in the left than in the right atrium. An interesting finding was the universal absence of IAA in the sinoatrial node. The knowledge of distribution of atrial myocardial structural changes could be utilized by pathologists in taking specimens for histology and also by cardiologists in targeting the radiofrequency ablation therapy.

  11. Expression and function of Kv1.1 potassium channels in human atria from patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Glasscock, Edward; Voigt, Niels; McCauley, Mark D; Sun, Qiang; Li, Na; Chiang, David Y; Zhou, Xiao-Bo; Molina, Cristina E; Thomas, Dierk; Schmidt, Constanze; Skapura, Darlene G; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated Kv1.1 channels encoded by the Kcna1 gene are traditionally regarded as being neural-specific with no known expression or intrinsic functional role in the heart. However, recent studies in mice reveal low-level Kv1.1 expression in heart and cardiac abnormalities associated with Kv1.1-deficiency suggesting that the channel may have a previously unrecognized cardiac role. Therefore, this study tests the hypothesis that Kv1.1 channels are associated with arrhythmogenesis and contribute to intrinsic cardiac function. In intra-atrial burst pacing experiments, Kcna1-null mice exhibited increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation (AF). The atria of Kcna1-null mice showed minimal Kv1 family ion channel remodeling and fibrosis as measured by qRT-PCR and Masson's trichrome histology, respectively. Using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblotting, KCNA1 mRNA and protein were detected in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes and human atria for the first time. Patients with chronic AF (cAF) showed no changes in KCNA1 mRNA levels relative to controls; however, they exhibited increases in atrial Kv1.1 protein levels, not seen in paroxysmal AF patients. Patch-clamp recordings of isolated human atrial myocytes revealed significant dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K)-sensitive outward current components that were significantly increased in cAF patients, reflecting a contribution by Kv1.1 channels. The concomitant increases in Kv1.1 protein and DTX-K-sensitive currents in atria of cAF patients suggest that the channel contributes to the pathological mechanisms of persistent AF. These findings provide evidence of an intrinsic cardiac role of Kv1.1 channels and indicate that they may contribute to atrial repolarization and AF susceptibility.

  12. Apparent affinity of some 8-phenyl-substituted xanthines at adenosine receptors in guinea-pig aorta and atria.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, M. G.; Jacobson, K. A.; Tomkins, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    1 Some 8-phenyl-substituted, 1,3 dipropyl xanthines have previously been demonstrated to have a 20-400 fold greater affinity for A1 binding sites in rat CNS membranes than for A2 adenosine receptors in intact CNS cells from guinea-pigs. In the present study these compounds (1,3, dipropyl-8-phenylxanthine: DPPX; 1,3 dipropyl-8-(2 amino-4-chlorophenyl) xanthine: PACPX; 8-(4-(2-amino-ethyl)amino) carbonyl methyl oxyphenyl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine: XAC; and D-Lys-XAC) together with two that have not been reported to exhibit A1-receptor selectively (8-(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline: 8-PST; 8-(4-carboxy methyl oxyphenyl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine: XCC) have been evaluated as antagonists of the effects of 2-chloroadenosine in two isolated cardiovascular tissues. 2 The isolated tissues used were guinea-pig atria (bradycardic response) and aorta (relaxation), which are thought to possess A1 and A2 adenosine receptors, respectively. 3 All the xanthines antagonized responses evoked by 2-chloroadenosine in both tissues but did not affect responses evoked by acetylcholine (atria) or sodium nitrite (aorta). 4 The xanthines, 8-PST, XAC, D-Lys XAC, XCC and DPPX appeared to be competitive antagonists of the effects of 2-chloroadenosine, as Schild plot slopes did not differ significantly from unity. The 1,3-dipropyl substituted compounds had pA2 values from 6.5 to 7.4 and were more potent than the 1,3 dimethyl substituted 8-PST (pA2 4.9 to 5). 5 For individual xanthines, there was no difference between pA2 values obtained in the atria and in the aorta.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3664093

  13. Expression and function of Kv1.1 potassium channels in human atria from patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Glasscock, Edward; Voigt, Niels; McCauley, Mark D.; Sun, Qiang; Li, Na; Chiang, David Y.; Zhou, Xiao-Bo; Molina, Cristina E.; Thomas, Dierk; Schmidt, Constanze; Skapura, Darlene G.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv1.1 channels encoded by the Kcna1 gene are traditionally regarded as being neural-specific with no known expression or intrinsic functional role in the heart. However, recent studies in mice reveal low-level Kv1.1 expression in heart and cardiac abnormalities associated with Kv1.1-deficiency suggesting that the channel may have a previously unrecognized cardiac role. Therefore, this study tests the hypothesis that Kv1.1 channels are associated with arrhythmogenesis and contribute to intrinsic cardiac function. In intra-atrial burst pacing experiments, Kcna1-null mice exhibited increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation (AF). The atria of Kcna1-null mice showed minimal Kv1 family ion channel remodeling and fibrosis as measured by qRT-PCR and Masson’s trichrome histology, respectively. Using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblotting, KCNA1 mRNA and protein were detected in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes and human atria for the first time. Patients with chronic AF (cAF) showed no changes in KCNA1 mRNA levels relative to controls; however, they exhibited increases in atrial Kv1.1 protein levels, not seen in paroxysmal AF patients. Patch-clamp recordings of isolated human atrial myocytes revealed significant dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K)-sensitive outward current components that were significantly increased in cAF patients, reflecting a contribution by Kv1.1 channels. The concomitant increases in Kv1.1 protein and DTX-K-sensitive currents in atria of cAF patients suggest that the channel contributes to the pathological mechanisms of persistent AF. These findings provide evidence of an intrinsic cardiac role of Kv1.1 channels and indicate that they may contribute to atrial repolarization and AF susceptibility. PMID:26162324

  14. Analyzing the Acoustic Beat with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency ?f. The…

  15. Analyzing the Acoustic Beat with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency ?f. The…

  16. Beat the Instructor: An Introductory Forecasting Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Brent R.; Eliasson, Janice B.

    2013-01-01

    This teaching brief describes a 30-minute game where student groups compete in-class in an introductory time-series forecasting exercise. The students are challenged to "beat the instructor" who competes using forecasting techniques that will be subsequently taught. All forecasts are graphed prior to revealing the randomly generated…

  17. Beat the Instructor: An Introductory Forecasting Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Brent R.; Eliasson, Janice B.

    2013-01-01

    This teaching brief describes a 30-minute game where student groups compete in-class in an introductory time-series forecasting exercise. The students are challenged to "beat the instructor" who competes using forecasting techniques that will be subsequently taught. All forecasts are graphed prior to revealing the randomly generated…

  18. Mechanical communication in cardiac cell synchronized beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsan, Ido; Drori, Stavit; Lewis, Yair E.; Cohen, Shlomi; Tzlil, Shelly

    2016-05-01

    Cell-cell communication, which enables cells to coordinate their activity and is essential for growth, development and function, is usually ascribed a chemical or electrical origin. However, cells can exert forces and respond to environment elasticity and to mechanical deformations created by their neighbours. The extent to which this mechanosensing ability facilitates intercellular communication remains unclear. Here we demonstrate mechanical communication between cells directly for the first time, providing evidence for a long-range interaction that induces long-lasting alterations in interacting cells. We show that an isolated cardiac cell can be trained to beat at a given frequency by mechanically stimulating the underlying substrate. Deformations are induced using an oscillatory mechanical probe that mimics the deformations generated by a beating neighbouring cardiac cell. Unlike electrical field stimulation, the probe-induced beating rate is maintained by the cell for an hour after the stimulation stops, implying that long-term modifications occur within the cell. These long-term alterations provide a mechanism for cells that communicate mechanically to be less variable in their electromechanical delay. Mechanical coupling between cells therefore ensures that the final outcome of action potential pacing is synchronized beating. We further show that the contractile machinery is essential for mechanical communication.

  19. Tagging the neuronal entrainment to beat and meter.

    PubMed

    Nozaradan, Sylvie; Peretz, Isabelle; Missal, Marcus; Mouraux, André

    2011-07-13

    Feeling the beat and meter is fundamental to the experience of music. However, how these periodicities are represented in the brain remains largely unknown. Here, we test whether this function emerges from the entrainment of neurons resonating to the beat and meter. We recorded the electroencephalogram while participants listened to a musical beat and imagined a binary or a ternary meter on this beat (i.e., a march or a waltz). We found that the beat elicits a sustained periodic EEG response tuned to the beat frequency. Most importantly, we found that meter imagery elicits an additional frequency tuned to the corresponding metric interpretation of this beat. These results provide compelling evidence that neural entrainment to beat and meter can be captured directly in the electroencephalogram. More generally, our results suggest that music constitutes a unique context to explore entrainment phenomena in dynamic cognitive processing at the level of neural networks.

  20. 5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance Nerves

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness 5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance Nerves KidsHealth > For Teens > 5 Ways to ... afrontar los nervios anticipatorios 5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance Nerves Lots of people stress out about ...

  1. Model for the heart beat-to-beat time series during meditation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, A.; Diambra, L.; Malta, C. P.

    2003-09-01

    We present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a pacemaker, that simulates the membrane potential of the sinoatrial node, modulated by a periodic input signal plus correlated noise that simulates the respiratory input. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce in the phase space the trajectory of experimental heart beat-to-beat interval data. The data sets were recorded during meditation practices of the Chi and Kundalini Yoga techniques. Our study indicates that in the first case the respiratory signal has the shape of a smoothed square wave, and in the second case it has the shape of a smoothed triangular wave.

  2. An automated system using spatial oversampling for optical mapping in murine atria. Development and validation with monophasic and transmembrane action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ting Yue; Syeda, Fahima; Holmes, Andrew P.; Osborne, Benjamin; Dehghani, Hamid; Brain, Keith L.; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fabritz, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    We developed and validated a new optical mapping system for quantification of electrical activation and repolarisation in murine atria. The system makes use of a novel 2nd generation complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera with deliberate oversampling to allow both assessment of electrical activation with high spatial and temporal resolution (128 × 2048 pixels) and reliable assessment of atrial murine repolarisation using post-processing of signals. Optical recordings were taken from isolated, superfused and electrically stimulated murine left atria. The system reliably describes activation sequences, identifies areas of functional block, and allows quantification of conduction velocities and vectors. Furthermore, the system records murine atrial action potentials with comparable duration to both monophasic and transmembrane action potentials in murine atria. PMID:25130572

  3. Application of Nexfin noninvasive beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure monitoring in autonomic function testing.

    PubMed

    Sipkens, Laura M; Treskes, Kaij; Ariese-Beldman, Karin; Veerman, Derk P; Boer, Christa

    2011-10-01

    Evaluation of autonomic function responses is increasingly important for risk prediction and hemodynamic evaluation in the ambulant and perioperative setting, but requires a noninvasive arterial blood pressure measurement device. This study describes whether a novel noninvasive beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure measurement device (Nexfin HD) is able to reproducibly reflect autonomic function responses in healthy volunteers. Noninvasive beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure measurements (Nexfin HD) were performed in 20 healthy men of 22 ± 3 years. Measurements were performed during supine steady state, controlled breathing (0.125 Hz), passive leg raising, a controlled Valsalva maneuver, and a quick stand test. Finally, relative changes in pulse pressure during autonomic function testing and the test-retest reproducibility were determined. Autonomic function tests induced beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure changes that were accurately monitored by the Nexfin device. The intraclass correlation coefficients for systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure measurements during supine steady state were agreeable [0.91 (0.82-0.96) and 0.84 (0.69-0.93), respectively]. The reproducibility of blood pressure changes during controlled breathing, passive leg raising, and Valsalva maneuver averaged 0.92 (0.82-0.96), 0.76 (0.50-0.90), and 0.94 (0.89-0.97), respectively. The reproducibility of the pulse pressure variation (PPV) as calculated from controlled breathing-induced changes in the arterial blood pressure (13 ± 5%) was high [0.96 (0.93-0.98)]. This study shows that noninvasive beat-to-beat Nexfin HD arterial blood pressure measurements reproducibly reflect autonomic function responses in healthy volunteers.

  4. Beat-to-beat T-wave amplitude variability in the long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Extramiana, Fabrice; Tatar, Charif; Maison-Blanche, Pierre; Denjoy, Isabelle; Messali, Anne; Dejode, Patrick; Iserin, Frank; Leenhardt, Antoine

    2010-09-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a primary electrical disease characterized by QT prolongation and increased repolarization dispersion leading to T-wave amplitude beat-to-beat changes. We aimed to quantify beat-to-beat T-wave amplitude variability from ambulatory Holter recordings in genotyped LQTS patients. Seventy genotyped LQTS patients (mean age 23 +/- 15 years, 42 males, 50% LQT1, 39% LQT2, and 11% LQT3) and 70 normal matched control subjects underwent a 24-h digital Holter recording. Using the Tvar software (Ela Medical, Sorin group), the beat-to-beat variance of the T-wave amplitude (TAV in microV) [corrected] was assessed on 50-ms consecutive clusters during three 1-h periods: one with around average diurnal heart rate (Day Fast), one nocturnal period (Night), and one diurnal period with around average nocturnal heart rate (Day Slow). TAV was increased in LQTS patients during the two diurnal periods but not at night (during the Day Fast period, mean TAV was 34 +/- 20 microV [corrected] in LQTS patients vs. 27 +/- 10 microV [corrected] in controls, P < 0.05). This effect depended on the genotype. In LQT1, TAV was larger when compared with controls for both Day Fast and Slow periods, but in LQT2 only Day Fast shows higher TAV. Oppositely, in LQT3 the TAV was higher than in the control group during the Day slow period (mean TAV = 34 +/- 20 vs. 25 +/- 8 microV [corrected] in controls, P < 0.05). In genotyped LQTS patients beat-to-beat T-wave amplitude variability was increased when compared with control subjects. That pattern was modulated by circadian influences in a gene-dependent manner.

  5. Detrended fluctuation analysis of non-stationary cardiac beat-to-beat interval of sick infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Massaro, An N.; Al-Shargabi, Tareq; Niforatos Andescavage, Nickie; Chang, Taeun; Glass, Penny; du Plessis, Adre J.

    2014-11-01

    We performed detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of cardiac beat-to-beat intervals (RRis) collected from sick newborn infants over 1-4 day periods. We calculated four different metrics from the DFA fluctuation function: the DFA exponents αL (>40 beats up to one-fourth of the record length), αs (15-30 beats), root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuation on a short-time scale (20-50 beats), and RMS fluctuation on a long-time scale (110-150 beats). Except αL , all metrics clearly distinguished two groups of newborn infants (favourable vs. adverse) with well-characterized outcomes. However, the RMS fluctuations distinguished the two groups more consistently over time compared to αS . Furthermore, RMS distinguished the RRi of the two groups earlier compared to the DFA exponent. In all the three measures, the favourable outcome group displayed higher values, indicating a higher magnitude of (auto-)correlation and variability, thus normal physiology, compared to the adverse outcome group.

  6. Beat Gestures Modulate Auditory Integration in Speech Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous beat gestures are an integral part of the paralinguistic context during face-to-face conversations. Here we investigated the time course of beat-speech integration in speech perception by measuring ERPs evoked by words pronounced with or without an accompanying beat gesture, while participants watched a spoken discourse. Words…

  7. Beat Gestures Modulate Auditory Integration in Speech Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous beat gestures are an integral part of the paralinguistic context during face-to-face conversations. Here we investigated the time course of beat-speech integration in speech perception by measuring ERPs evoked by words pronounced with or without an accompanying beat gesture, while participants watched a spoken discourse. Words…

  8. Effects of KATP channel openers diazoxide and pinacidil in coronary-perfused atria and ventricles from failing and non-failing human hearts

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Vadim V.; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Kostecki, Geran; Chang, Roger; Janks, Deborah; Schuessler, Richard B.; Moazami, Nader; Nichols, Colin G.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study compared the effects of ATP-regulated potassium channel (KATP) openers, diazoxide and pinacidil, on diseased and normal human atria and ventricles. METHODS We optically mapped the endocardium of coronary-perfused right (n=11) or left (n=2) posterior atrial-ventricular free wall preparations from human hearts with congestive heart failure (CHF, n=8) and non-failing human hearts without (NF, n=3) or with (INF, n=2) infarction. We also analyzed the mRNA expression of the KATP targets Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1, and SUR2 in the left atria and ventricles of NF (n=8) and CHF (n=4) hearts. RESULTS In both CHF and INF hearts, diazoxide significantly decreased action potential durations (APDs) in atria (by −21±3% and −27±13%, p<0.01) and ventricles (by −28±7% and −28±4%, p<0.01). Diazoxide did not change APD (0±5%) in NF atria. Pinacidil significantly decreased APDs in both atria (−46 to - 80%, p<0.01) and ventricles (−65 to −93%, p<0.01) in all hearts studied. The effect of pinacidil on APD was significantly higher than that of diazoxide in both atria and ventricles of all groups (p<0.05). During pinacidil perfusion, burst pacing induced flutter/fibrillation in all atrial and ventricular preparations with dominant frequencies of 14.4±6.1 Hz and 17.5 ±5.1 Hz, respectively. Glibenclamide (10 μM) terminated these arrhythmias and restored APDs to control values. Relative mRNA expression levels of KATP targets were correlated to functional observations. CONCLUSION Remodeling in response to CHF and/or previous infarct potentiated diazoxide-induced APD shortening. The activation of atrial and ventricular KATP channels enhances arrhythmogenicity, suggesting that such activation may contribute to reentrant arrhythmias in ischemic hearts. PMID:21586291

  9. Variant rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus in young rabbits, Spain.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Kevin P; Nicieza, Inés; Balseiro, Ana; Muguerza, María A; Rosell, Joan M; Casais, Rosa; Álvarez, Ángel L; Parra, Francisco

    2012-12-01

    Outbreaks of rabbit hemorrhagic disease have occurred recently in young rabbits on farms on the Iberian Peninsula where rabbits were previously vaccinated. Investigation identified a rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus variant genetically related to apathogenic rabbit caliciviruses. Improved antivirus strategies are needed to slow the spread of this pathogen.

  10. Beat-to-beat electrocardiographic analysis of ventricular repolarization variability in patients after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Arini, Pedro D; Valverde, Esteban R

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the beat-to-beat variability of ventricular repolarization, which can be computed by T-wave spectral variance (TSV) index, constitutes a marker of cardiac risk. Moreover, the fact that properties of action potential duration are altered during the healing (days, weeks) and healed (months) infarct stages, have been reported. However, no data exist regarding the influence of the time elapsed after myocardial infarction (MI) on modulation of the beat-to-beat ventricular repolarization variability. In the present work we have evaluated TSV index during healing and healed stages of MI using 12 standard ECG leads. The ECG of control or healthy subjects (n = 49) and the ECGs in patients after MI (n = 38), one within the first seven days (MI7) and the other after 60 days (MI60) of cardiac infarction, have been analyzed. We have considered the preferential ECG leads as those leads in which TSV index have presented a relative change greater than 10 in MI7 respect to control. Results indicate that TSV index have shown a significant increase (p < 0.0005) in I, II, aVR, aVF, V3, V4, V5 and V6 leads in healing phase of MI (MI7) with respect to control. Further, in the healed phase of MI (MI60), the TSV index tends to decrease their values towards the control. Also, we have computed a multilead TSV index based on the preferential ECG leads. In that sense, the multilead criteria have shown better perfomance quantifying beat-to-beat repolarization variability than any single ECG lead considered. The sensitivity, specificity and AUC of TSV index were: 92%, 90% and 0.96 for MI7; and 76%, 84% and 0.81 for MI60, respectively. Moreover, the beat-to-beat ventricular repolarization variability has been quantified by the QT variability index (QTVI). Even though the results that we have obtained with TSV index have been comparable to those obtained with the QTVI, this latter has not reflected the modulation effect associated to time elapsed after MI. Also

  11. "Lost in time" but still moving to the beat.

    PubMed

    Bégel, Valentin; Benoit, Charles-Etienne; Correa, Angel; Cutanda, Diana; Kotz, Sonja A; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2017-01-08

    Motor synchronization to the beat of an auditory sequence (e.g., a metronome or music) is widespread in humans. However, some individuals show poor synchronization and impoverished beat perception. This condition, termed "beat deafness", has been linked to a perceptual deficit in beat tracking. Here we present single-case evidence (L.A. and L.C.) that poor beat tracking does not have to entail poor synchronization. In a first Experiment, L.A., L.C., and a third case (L.V.) were submitted to the Battery for The Assessment of Auditory Sensorimotor and Timing Abilities (BAASTA), which includes both perceptual and sensorimotor tasks. Compared to a control group, L.A. and L.C. performed poorly on rhythm perception tasks, such as detecting time shifts in a regular sequence, or estimating whether a metronome is aligned to the beat of the music or not. Yet, they could tap to the beat of the same stimuli. L.V. showed impairments in both beat perception and tapping. In a second Experiment, we tested whether L.A., L.C., and L.V.'s perceptual deficits extend to an implicit timing task, in which they had to respond as fast as possible to a different target pitch after a sequence of standard tones. The three beat-deaf participants benefited similarly to controls from a regular temporal pattern in detecting the pitch target. The fact that synchronization to a beat can occur in the presence of poor perception shows that perception and action can dissociate in explicit timing tasks. Beat tracking afforded by implicit timing mechanisms is likely to support spared synchronization to the beat in some beat-deaf participants. This finding suggests that separate pathways may subserve beat perception depending on the explicit/implicit nature of a task in a sample of beat-deaf participants.

  12. Mechanism of reentry induction by a 9-V battery in rabbit ventricles.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Martin J; Burton, Rebecca A B; Kalla, Manish; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Plank, Gernot; Bub, Gil; Vigmond, Edward J

    2014-04-01

    Although the application of a 9-V battery to the epicardial surface is a simple method of ventricular fibrillation induction, the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process remain unstudied. We used a combined experimental and modelling approach to understand how the interaction of direct current (DC) from a battery may induce reentrant activity within rabbit ventricles and its dependence on battery application timing and duration. A rabbit ventricular computational model was used to simulate 9-V battery stimulation for different durations at varying onset times during sinus rhythm. Corresponding high-resolution optical mapping measurements were conducted on rabbit hearts with DC stimuli applied via a relay system. DC application to diastolic tissue induced anodal and cathodal make excitations in both simulations and experiments. Subsequently, similar static epicardial virtual electrode patterns were formed that interacted with sinus beats but did not induce reentry. Upon battery release during diastole, break excitations caused single ectopics, similar to application, before sinus rhythm resumed. Reentry induction was possible for short battery applications when break excitations were slowed and forced to take convoluted pathways upon interaction with refractory tissue from prior make excitations or sinus beats. Short-lived reentrant activity could be induced for battery release shortly after a sinus beat for longer battery applications. In conclusion, the application of a 9-V battery to the epicardial surface induces reentry through a complex interaction of break excitations after battery release with prior induced make excitations or sinus beats.

  13. Mechanism of reentry induction by a 9-V battery in rabbit ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Rebecca A. B.; Kalla, Manish; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Plank, Gernot; Bub, Gil; Vigmond, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the application of a 9-V battery to the epicardial surface is a simple method of ventricular fibrillation induction, the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process remain unstudied. We used a combined experimental and modelling approach to understand how the interaction of direct current (DC) from a battery may induce reentrant activity within rabbit ventricles and its dependence on battery application timing and duration. A rabbit ventricular computational model was used to simulate 9-V battery stimulation for different durations at varying onset times during sinus rhythm. Corresponding high-resolution optical mapping measurements were conducted on rabbit hearts with DC stimuli applied via a relay system. DC application to diastolic tissue induced anodal and cathodal make excitations in both simulations and experiments. Subsequently, similar static epicardial virtual electrode patterns were formed that interacted with sinus beats but did not induce reentry. Upon battery release during diastole, break excitations caused single ectopics, similar to application, before sinus rhythm resumed. Reentry induction was possible for short battery applications when break excitations were slowed and forced to take convoluted pathways upon interaction with refractory tissue from prior make excitations or sinus beats. Short-lived reentrant activity could be induced for battery release shortly after a sinus beat for longer battery applications. In conclusion, the application of a 9-V battery to the epicardial surface induces reentry through a complex interaction of break excitations after battery release with prior induced make excitations or sinus beats. PMID:24464758

  14. Beat Cepheids as Galactic Metallicity Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchler, J. R.; Szabó, R.

    We give a brief overview of Cepheids and of their modeling, with particular emphasis on F/O1 Beat Cepheids. Then we revisit the use of Period Ratio vs. Period diagram (Petersen diagram) for fundamental/first overtone Beat Cepheids, because they allow one to put very tight constraints on their metallicity Z. The Petersen diagram is shown to be largely independent of the helium content Y, of the mass-luminosity relation that is used in their construction, and of stellar rotation rates. However, it shows sensitivity to the chemical makeup of the elements that are lumped into the metallicity parameter Z. The Petersen diagram for the new Asplund, M., Grevesse, N., & Sauval, A.J. (2005, ASP Conf. Ser., 336, 25) solar mix is compared to that for for the older, “standard” solar mix of Grevesse & Noels(1993).

  15. Newborn infants detect the beat in music

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, István; Háden, Gábor P.; Ladinig, Olivia; Sziller, István; Honing, Henkjan

    2009-01-01

    To shed light on how humans can learn to understand music, we need to discover what the perceptual capabilities with which infants are born. Beat induction, the detection of a regular pulse in an auditory signal, is considered a fundamental human trait that, arguably, played a decisive role in the origin of music. Theorists are divided on the issue whether this ability is innate or learned. We show that newborn infants develop expectation for the onset of rhythmic cycles (the downbeat), even when it is not marked by stress or other distinguishing spectral features. Omitting the downbeat elicits brain activity associated with violating sensory expectations. Thus, our results strongly support the view that beat perception is innate. PMID:19171894

  16. Optically gated beating-heart imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    The constant motion of the beating heart presents an obstacle to clear optical imaging, especially 3D imaging, in small animals where direct optical imaging would otherwise be possible. Gating techniques exploit the periodic motion of the heart to computationally “freeze” this movement and overcome motion artifacts. Optically gated imaging represents a recent development of this, where image analysis is used to synchronize acquisition with the heartbeat in a completely non-invasive manner. This article will explain the concept of optical gating, discuss a range of different implementation strategies and their strengths and weaknesses. Finally we will illustrate the usefulness of the technique by discussing applications where optical gating has facilitated novel biological findings by allowing 3D in vivo imaging of cardiac myocytes in their natural environment of the beating heart. PMID:25566083

  17. Stochastic ion acceleration by beating electrostatic waves.

    PubMed

    Jorns, B; Choueiri, E Y

    2013-01-01

    A study is presented of the stochasticity in the orbit of a single, magnetized ion produced by the particle's interaction with two beating electrostatic waves whose frequencies differ by the ion cyclotron frequency. A second-order Lie transform perturbation theory is employed in conjunction with a numerical analysis of the maximum Lyapunov exponent to determine the velocity conditions under which stochasticity occurs in this dynamical system. Upper and lower bounds in ion velocity are found for stochastic orbits with the lower bound approximately equal to the phase velocity of the slower wave. A threshold condition for the onset of stochasticity that is linear with respect to the wave amplitudes is also derived. It is shown that the onset of stochasticity occurs for beating electrostatic waves at lower total wave energy densities than for the case of a single electrostatic wave or two nonbeating electrostatic waves.

  18. The Impact of Monaural Beat Stimulation on Anxiety and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Wilpert, Elke C.; Hoppe, Christian; Axmacher, Nikolai; Fell, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    Application of auditory beat stimulation has been speculated to provide a promising new tool with which to alleviate symptoms of anxiety and to enhance cognition. In spite of reportedly similar EEG effects of binaural and monaural beats, data on behavioral effects of monaural beats are still lacking. Therefore, we examined the impact of monaural beat stimulation on anxiety, mood and memory performance. We aimed to target states related to anxiety levels and general well-being, in addition to long-term and working memory processes, using monaural beats within the range of main cortical rhythms. Theta (6 Hz), alpha (10 Hz) and gamma (40 Hz) beat frequencies, as well as a control stimulus were applied to healthy participants for 5 min. After each stimulation period, participants were asked to evaluate their current mood state and to perform cognitive tasks examining long-term and working memory processes, in addition to a vigilance task. Monaural beat stimulation was found to reduce state anxiety. When evaluating responses for the individual beat frequencies, positive effects on state anxiety were observed for all monaural beat conditions compared to control stimulation. Our results indicate a role for monaural beat stimulation in modulating state anxiety and are in line with previous studies reporting anxiety-reducing effects of auditory beat stimulation. PMID:28555100

  19. The Impact of Monaural Beat Stimulation on Anxiety and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Chaieb, Leila; Wilpert, Elke C; Hoppe, Christian; Axmacher, Nikolai; Fell, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    Application of auditory beat stimulation has been speculated to provide a promising new tool with which to alleviate symptoms of anxiety and to enhance cognition. In spite of reportedly similar EEG effects of binaural and monaural beats, data on behavioral effects of monaural beats are still lacking. Therefore, we examined the impact of monaural beat stimulation on anxiety, mood and memory performance. We aimed to target states related to anxiety levels and general well-being, in addition to long-term and working memory processes, using monaural beats within the range of main cortical rhythms. Theta (6 Hz), alpha (10 Hz) and gamma (40 Hz) beat frequencies, as well as a control stimulus were applied to healthy participants for 5 min. After each stimulation period, participants were asked to evaluate their current mood state and to perform cognitive tasks examining long-term and working memory processes, in addition to a vigilance task. Monaural beat stimulation was found to reduce state anxiety. When evaluating responses for the individual beat frequencies, positive effects on state anxiety were observed for all monaural beat conditions compared to control stimulation. Our results indicate a role for monaural beat stimulation in modulating state anxiety and are in line with previous studies reporting anxiety-reducing effects of auditory beat stimulation.

  20. Nonlinear quantum beats of propagating polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantke, K.-H.; Schillak, P.; Razbirin, B. S.; Lyssenko, V. G.; Hvam, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    We observe nonequidistant oscillations in the correlation trace of the nonlinear signal in a four-wave mixing experiment when exciting the upper polariton branch between the An=1 and the An=2 excitons in CdSe. The quantum beats are described qualitatively and quantitatively taking into account propagation interference effects on the third-order nonlinear polarization, and the homogeneous dampings of the exciton polaritons are determined.

  1. Tracking local motion on the beating heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeger, Martin; Ortmaier, Tobias; Sepp, Wolfgang; Hirzinger, Gerd

    2002-05-01

    Local motion on the beating heart is investigated in the context of minimally invasive robotic surgery. The focus lies on the motion remaining in the mechanically stabilised field of surgery of the heart. Motion is detected by tracking natural landmarks on the heart surface in 2D video images. An appropriate motion model is presented with a discussion of its degrees of freedom and a trajectory analysis of its parameters.

  2. Beat frequency interference pattern characteristics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency spectra and corresponding beat frequencies created by the relative motions between multiple Solar Power Satellites due to solar wind, lunar gravity, etc. were analyzed. The results were derived mathematically and verified through computer simulation. Frequency spectra plots were computer generated. Detailed computations were made for the seven following locations in the continental US: Houston, Tx.; Seattle, Wa.; Miami, Fl.; Chicago, Il.; New York, NY; Los Angeles, Ca.; and Barberton, Oh.

  3. Cortical evoked potentials to an auditory illusion: binaural beats.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Hillel; Starr, Arnold; Michalewski, Henry J; Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Nomi

    2009-08-01

    To define brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of 3 and 6Hz binaural beats in 250Hz or 1000Hz base frequencies, and compare it to the sound onset response. Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded in response to unmodulated tones of 250 or 1000Hz to one ear and 3 or 6Hz higher to the other, creating an illusion of amplitude modulations (beats) of 3Hz and 6Hz, in base frequencies of 250Hz and 1000Hz. Tones were 2000ms in duration and presented with approximately 1s intervals. Latency, amplitude and source current density estimates of ERP components to tone onset and subsequent beats-evoked oscillations were determined and compared across beat frequencies with both base frequencies. All stimuli evoked tone-onset P(50), N(100) and P(200) components followed by oscillations corresponding to the beat frequency, and a subsequent tone-offset complex. Beats-evoked oscillations were higher in amplitude with the low base frequency and to the low beat frequency. Sources of the beats-evoked oscillations across all stimulus conditions located mostly to left lateral and inferior temporal lobe areas in all stimulus conditions. Onset-evoked components were not different across stimulus conditions; P(50) had significantly different sources than the beats-evoked oscillations; and N(100) and P(200) sources located to the same temporal lobe regions as beats-evoked oscillations, but were bilateral and also included frontal and parietal contributions. Neural activity with slightly different volley frequencies from left and right ear converges and interacts in the central auditory brainstem pathways to generate beats of neural activity to modulate activities in the left temporal lobe, giving rise to the illusion of binaural beats. Cortical potentials recorded to binaural beats are distinct from onset responses. Brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of low frequency beats can be recorded from the scalp.

  4. Cortical Evoked Potentials to an Auditory Illusion: Binaural Beats

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Hillel; Starr, Arnold; Michalewski, Henry J.; Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Nomi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To define brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of 3 and 6 Hz binaural beats in 250 Hz or 1,000 Hz base frequencies, and compare it to the sound onset response. Methods: Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded in response to unmodulated tones of 250 or 1000 Hz to one ear and 3 or 6 Hz higher to the other, creating an illusion of amplitude modulations (beats) of 3 Hz and 6 Hz, in base frequencies of 250 Hz and 1000 Hz. Tones were 2,000 ms in duration and presented with approximately 1 s intervals. Latency, amplitude and source current density estimates of ERP components to tone onset and subsequent beats-evoked oscillations were determined and compared across beat frequencies with both base frequencies. Results: All stimuli evoked tone-onset P50, N100 and P200 components followed by oscillations corresponding to the beat frequency, and a subsequent tone-offset complex. Beats-evoked oscillations were higher in amplitude with the low base frequency and to the low beat frequency. Sources of the beats-evoked oscillations across all stimulus conditions located mostly to left lateral and inferior temporal lobe areas in all stimulus conditions. Onset-evoked components were not different across stimulus conditions; P50 had significantly different sources than the beats-evoked oscillations; and N100 and P200 sources located to the same temporal lobe regions as beats-evoked oscillations, but were bilateral and also included frontal and parietal contributions. Conclusions: Neural activity with slightly different volley frequencies from left and right ear converges and interacts in the central auditory brainstem pathways to generate beats of neural activity to modulate activities in the left temporal lobe, giving rise to the illusion of binaural beats. Cortical potentials recorded to binaural beats are distinct from onset responses. Significance: Brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of low frequency beats can be recorded from the

  5. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits. PMID:26538235

  6. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits.

  7. Common procedures in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jennifer

    2006-05-01

    Rabbits are popular companion animals that present to veterinary clinics for routine and emergency care. Clinics equipped for treat-ing dogs and cats may be easily adapted to accommodate rabbits. This article reviews common procedures performed by the clinician specific to rabbits. Topics include handling and restraint, triage and patient assessment, sample collection, and supportive care techniques. Miscellaneous procedures, including anesthetic delivery, nasolacrimal duct flushing, and ear cleaning, are also discussed.

  8. Beat-to-beat left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation: radionuclide assessment with the computerized nuclear probe

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.; Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Lachman, A.B.; Zaret, B.L.

    1983-04-01

    There is wide beat-to-beat variability in cycle length and left ventricular performance in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, left ventricular ejection fraction and relative left ventricular volumes were evaluated on a beat-to-beat basis with the computerized nuclear probe, an instrument with sufficiently high sensitivity to allow continuous evaluation of the radionuclide time-activity curve. Of 18 patients with atrial fibrillation, 5 had mitral stenosis, 6 had mitral regurgitation, and 7 had coronary artery disease. Fifty consecutive beats were analyzed in each patient. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction ranged from 17 to 51%. There was substantial beat-to-beat variation in cycle length and left ventricular ejection fraction in all patients, including those with marked left ventricular dysfunction. In 14 patients who also underwent multiple gated cardiac blood pool imaging, there was an excellent correlation between mean ejection fraction derived from the nuclear probe and gated ejection fraction obtained by gamma camera imaging (r . 0.90). Based on beat-to-beat analysis, left ventricular function was dependent on relative end-diastolic volume and multiple preceding cycle lengths, but not preceding end-systolic volumes. This study demonstrates that a single value for left ventricular ejection fraction does not adequately characterize left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, both the mean beat-to-beat and the gated ejection fraction may underestimate left ventricular performance at rest in such patients.

  9. INFECTIOUS PAPILLOMATOSIS OF RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.; Hurst, E. Weston

    1933-01-01

    A papilloma has been observed in wild cottontail rabbits and has been found to be transmissible to both wild and domestic rabbits. The clinical and pathological pictures of the condition have been described. It has been found that the causative agent is readily filtrable through Berkefeld but not regularly through Seitz filters, that it stores well in glycerol, that it is still active after heating to 67°C. for 30 minutes, but not after heating to 70°C., and that it exhibits a marked tropism for cutaneous epithelium. The activities and properties of the papilloma-producing agent warrant its classification as a filtrable virus. Rabbits carrying experimentally produced papillomata are partially or completely immune to reinfection and, furthermore, their sera partially or completely neutralize the causative virus. The disease is transmissible in series through wild rabbits and virus of wild rabbit origin is readily transmissible to domestic rabbits, producing in this species papillomata identical in appearance with those found in wild rabbits. However, the condition is not transmissible in series through domestic rabbits. The possible significance of this observation has been discussed. The virus of infectious papillomatosis is not related immunologically to either the virus of infectious fibroma or to that of infectious myxoma of rabbits. PMID:19870219

  10. The subunit proportions and kinetic properties of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase isozymes from rat heart atria and ventricle progressively change during aging.

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, Y; Dunaway, G A

    1991-09-18

    Relative to 2-3 month rats, total 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK) activity in heart atria from 12 month rats declined 31%; but, by 24 months it was decreased by only 13%. PFK activities from 12 and 24 month ventricles relative to the 2-3 month rats were decreased by 40% and 30%, respectively. This change in PFK activity in each heart region was associated with alterations of subunit composition. In heart atria from 12 and 24 month rats when compared to 3 month rats, the levels of L-type subunit were not significantly different; but the levels of the M-type subunit were decreased by 43% and 38%, respectively. With respect to levels in 2-3 month atria, the C-type subunit in 12 month atria decreased by 27%; and at 24 months it increased by 31%. Making the same comparison for the heart ventricle at 12 and 24 months, L-type subunit decreased by 30% and 24% respectively; M-type subunit decreased by approximately 47%; and the C-type subunit increased 1.9 and 4.7 fold, respectively. These age-related changes of subunit composition in atrial and ventricular PFK isozyme pools led to changes in their kinetic and regulatory properties suggesting that the aged rat could exhibit a diminished capacity to produce ATP from glucose.

  11. 3D absolute shape measurement of live rabbit hearts with a superfast two-frequency phase-shifting technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajun; Laughner, Jacob I.; Efimov, Igor R.; Zhang, Song

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a two-frequency binary phase-shifting technique to measure three-dimensional (3D) absolute shape of beating rabbit hearts. Due to the low contrast of the cardiac surface, the projector and the camera must remain focused, which poses challenges for any existing binary method where the measurement accuracy is low. To conquer this challenge, this paper proposes to utilize the optimal pulse width modulation (OPWM) technique to generate high-frequency fringe patterns, and the error-diffusion dithering technique to produce low-frequency fringe patterns. Furthermore, this paper will show that fringe patterns produced with blue light provide the best quality measurements compared to fringe patterns generated with red or green light; and the minimum data acquisition speed for high quality measurements is around 800 Hz for a rabbit heart beating at 180 beats per minute. PMID:23482151

  12. Induction of Atrial Ectopic Beats with Calcium Release Inhibition: Local Hierarchy of Automaticity in the Right Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Tetsuji; Joung, Boyoung; Kim, Daehyeok; Maruyama, Mitsunori; Luk, Hsiang-Ning; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicates that spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release underlies the mechanism of sinoatrial node (SAN) acceleration during β-stimulation, indicating the importance of Ca clock in SAN automaticity. Whether or not the same mechanism applies to atrial ectopic pacemakers (AEP) remains unclear. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the mechanism of AEP. Methods We simultaneously mapped intracellular calcium (Cai) and membrane potential in 12 isolated canine right atria. The late diastolic Cai elevation (LDCAE) was used to detect the Ca clock activity. Pharmacological interventions with isoproterenol (ISO), ryanodine, and ZD7288, a blocker of the If membrane current, were performed. Results Ryanodine, which inhibits SR Ca release, reduced LDCAE in SAN, resulting in an inferior shift of the pacemaking site. Cycle length increased significantly in a dose-dependent way. In the presence of 3-10 μmol/L of ryanodine, ISO infusion consistently induces AEPs from the lower crista terminalis. All ectopic beats continuing over 30 seconds were located at the lower crista terminalis. These AEPs were resistant to ryanodine treatment even at high doses. Subsequent blockade of If inhibited the AEP and resulted in profound bradycardia. Conclusion Spontaneous SR Ca release underlies ISO-induced increase of superior SAN activity. As compared with SAN, the AEP is less dependent on the Ca clock and more dependent on the membrane clock for its automaticity. AEPs outside the SAN can effectively serve as backup pacemakers when the Ca clock functionality is reduced. PMID:20129292

  13. Day-to-day reproducibility of Holter beat-by-beat analysis of repolarisation.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Rafał; Popławska, Wanda; Buchner, Teodor; Chojnowska, Lidia; Rydlewska-Sadowska, Wanda

    2003-06-01

    Reproducibility of Holter QT analysis is not well established and has been assessed only in one study. We evaluated the day-to-day reproducibility of different QT parameters--mean and max (four beats basis) 24h QT and QTc (Bazett formula), QT for heart rate 55-60 [QT60], 75-80 [QT80] and 95-100 [QT100] beats/min and QT/RR slope (calculated in moving window of 3000 beats in 50 beat steps). QT intervals were measured from 48h digital ECG (sampled at 256 Hz) recordings using Del Mar Medical's QT software in beat-to-beat fashion. The analysed group consisted of 6 women and 24 men--13 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 5 healthy family members of the patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 7 patients with CAD and 5 with other diseases (hypertension, arrhythmia, aborted sudden death without organic heart disease). Reproducibility was analysed with the methods proposed by Bland and Altman. The overall reproducibility of repolarisation parameters was acceptable. Coefficient of reproducibility for mean 24h QT was 24ms, mean QTc 12ms, max QT 22ms, max QTc 24ms. The best reproducibility was observed for QT60, QT80 and QT100 - 12ms, respectively. The poorest day-to-day reproducibility was recorded for the QT/RR slope parameters, which was related to lower heart rate reproducibility. We can conclude that day-to-day reproducibility of Holter repolarisation analysis is acceptable. QT measurement in narrow heart rate windows has the best reproducibility. Accurate QT analysis requires good quality recording, T wave amplitude above 0.2mV and an interactive QT measurement tool which includes verification, editing abilities.

  14. Beat-to-beat heart rate estimation fusing multimodal video and sensor data

    PubMed Central

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Gao, Hanno; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Coverage and accuracy of unobtrusively measured biosignals are generally relatively low compared to clinical modalities. This can be improved by exploiting redundancies in multiple channels with methods of sensor fusion. In this paper, we demonstrate that two modalities, skin color variation and head motion, can be extracted from the video stream recorded with a webcam. Using a Bayesian approach, these signals are fused with a ballistocardiographic signal obtained from the seat of a chair with a mean absolute beat-to-beat estimation error below 25 milliseconds and an average coverage above 90% compared to an ECG reference. PMID:26309754

  15. Beat-to-beat variation in echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular dimensions and function.

    PubMed

    Bett, J H; Dryburgh, L G

    1981-03-01

    M-mode echocardiography was used to explore the extent of spontaneous variation in left ventricular dimensions and indices of systolic and diastolic function. Extended records made in 26 subjects at rest were digitized and analyzed by computer. We found considerable beat-to-beat variation, in that measurements of five or more consecutive cycles were necessary to provide representative values for minor axis dimensions, while the degree of scatter for derived indices of function was greater. This has to be recognized when serial echocardiography is used to study the progress of disease or the effects of treatment.

  16. Deciphering the gene expression profile of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway in the left atria of patients with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mien-Cheng; Chang, Jen-Ping; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Pan, Kuo-Li; Ho, Wan-Chun; Liu, Wen-Hao; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-06-02

    Differentially expressed genes in the left atria of mitral regurgitation (MR) pigs have been linked to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway in the KEGG pathway. However, specific genes of the PPAR signaling pathway in the left atria of MR patients have never been explored. This study enrolled 15 MR patients with heart failure, 7 patients with aortic valve disease and heart failure, and 6 normal controls. We used PCR assay (84 genes) for PPAR pathway and quantitative RT-PCR to study specific genes of the PPAR pathway in the left atria. Gene expression profiling analysis through PCR assay identified 23 genes to be differentially expressed in the left atria of MR patients compared to normal controls. The expressions of APOA1, ACADM, FABP3, ETFDH, ECH1, CPT1B, CPT2, SLC27A6, ACAA2, SMARCD3, SORBS1, EHHADH, SLC27A1, PPARGC1B, PPARA and CPT1A were significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of PLTP was significantly down-regulated in the MR patients compared to normal controls. The expressions of HMGCS2, ACADM, FABP3, MLYCD, ECH1, ACAA2, EHHADH, CPT1A and PLTP were significantly up-regulated in the MR patients compared to patients with aortic valve disease. Notably, only ACADM, FABP3, ECH1, ACAA2, EHHADH, CPT1A and PLTP of the PPAR pathway were significantly differentially expressed in the MR patients compared to patients with aortic valve disease and normal controls. Differentially expressed genes of the PPAR pathway have been identified in the left atria of MR patients compared with patients with aortic valve disease and normal controls.

  17. Distribution and morphology of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunoreactive axons in the whole-mount atria of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Hatcher, Jeffrey T; Hoover, Donald B; Gu, He; Wurster, Robert D; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2014-04-01

    The murine model has been used to investigate the role of cardiac sensory axons in various disease states. However, the distribution and morphological structures of cardiac nociceptive axons in normal murine tissues have not yet been well characterized. In this study, whole-mount atria from FVB mice were processed with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) primary antibodies followed by secondary antibodies, and then examined using confocal microscopy. We found: 1) Large CGRP-IR axon bundles entered the atria with the major veins, and these large bundles bifurcated into small bundles and single axons that formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the epicardium. Varicose CGRP-IR axons had close contacts with muscle fibers, and some CGRP-IR axons formed varicosities around principle neurons (PNs) within intrinsic cardiac ganglia (ICGs). 2) SP-IR axons also were found in the same regions of the atria, attached to veins, and within cardiac ganglia. Similar to CGRP-IR axons, these SP-IR axons formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the atrial epicardium and myocardium. Within ICGs, SP-IR axons formed varicose endings around PNs. However, SP-IR nerve fibers were less abundant than CGRP-IR fibers in the atria. 3) None of the PNs were CGRP-IR or SP-IR. 4) CGRP-IR and SP-IR often colocalized in terminal varicosities around PNs. Collectively, our data document the distribution pattern and morphology of CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons and terminals in different regions of the atria. This knowledge provides useful information for CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons that can be referred to in future studies of pathological remodeling.

  18. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria*

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Higgins, John D.; Hund, Thomas J.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca2+ current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca2+ channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction. PMID:25825486

  19. Effects of fasting, hypoxia, methylpalmoxirate and oxfenicine on the tissue-levels of long-chain acyl CoA and acylcarnitine in the rat atria.

    PubMed

    Varela, A; Carregal, M; Testoni, G; Dalamon, V; Savino, E A

    1997-10-01

    During hypoxia the atria from fasted rats exhibit a faster decline in the pacemaker and contractile activities than those from fed rats. Oxfenicine and methylpalmoxirate, inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT 1), ameliorate these disturbances. Since the fasted rat atria have greater triacylglycerol stores and a faster lipolysis, and CPT 1 funnels fatty acid into beta-oxidation, the effects of fasting could be ascribed to the accumulation of amphipathic metabolites such as long-chain acyl CoA (LCCoA) and long-chain acylcarnitine (LCCa). Hence, this investigation aimed to assess whether the levels of these metabolites correlate with the effects of fasting and CPT 1 inhibitors. At the end of the prehypoxic equilibration period the fasted rat atria had a 6.5-fold greater content of LCCa than those of the fed rats and methylpalmoxirate impeded the increase. During hypoxia the LCCoA content increased 9-fold in the fasted rat atria, LCCa levels were 3.6-fold greater in the fasted than in the fed group, and free-CoA and free-carnitine showed a significant fall. The increases of LCCoA and LCCa as well as the fall in free-CoA were abolished by both inhibitors. The decrease of free-carnitine was impeded by methylpalmoxirate, but oxfenicine unexpectedly decreased its concentration in both nutritional groups. These data suggest that: (1) the atrial CPT 1 activity is enhanced during fasting, (2) in the hypoxic atria levels of LCCoA and LCCa were closely correlated with the noxious effects of fasting and the amelioration effected by CPT 1 inhibitors, and (3) the effects of amphipathic metabolites during oxygen deprivation can be attenuated by pharmacological interventions.

  20. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria.

    PubMed

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F; Makara, Michael A; Little, Sean C; Higgins, John D; Hund, Thomas J; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-05-08

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca(2+) current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca(2+) channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction.

  1. Muscarinic cholinergic and alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors in murine atria: phosphatidylinositol breakdown and receptor interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Upon stimulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors, there is a decrease in the force of contraction rate of firing in heart, while stimulation of ..cap alpha.. adrenergic receptors causes an increase in the force of contraction with no change in the heart rate. Yet both receptors stimulate the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol (PI). Therefore, the breakdown of PI was examined to determine how the process differed between the two receptor systems. Murine atria, prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, were stimulated with the muscarinic cholinergic agonists, carbamylcholine (CARB), and oxotremorine (OXO); and with the ..cap alpha.. adrenergic agonists, norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine (PE); either singly or in combination. Breakdown of PI was assessed by measurement of individual inositol phosphates by anion exchange chromatography. Binding of CARB to atrial muscarinic receptors was measured by competition with (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate.

  2. Beta-adrenergic effect of antibodies from chagasic patients and normal human lymphocytes on isolated rat atria

    PubMed Central

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Fink, Susana; Diez, C.; Cossio, Patricio; De E. De Bracco, María M.

    1982-01-01

    It was previously shown that fresh sera from chagasic patients that contained antibodies reacting with the plasma membrane of striated muscle and endothelial cells (EVI(+) serum) could act in co-operation with complement as a partial beta-agonist increasing the frequency of contraction of isolated rat atria. This activity was absent in EVI(-) chagasic serum or normal human serum and was lost upon heat-inactivation of EVI(+) serum. Also, IgG purified from EVI(+) serum was virtually devoid of activity. In this report we demonstrate that normal human lymphocytes can collaborate with EVI(+) IgG or heat-inactivated EVI(+) sera and induce both positive ino- and chronotropic effects on isolated rat atria. Depletion of phagocytic mononuclear cells from the effector cell population did not alter its activity, whereas blockade of the receptors for the Fc fragment of IgG with heat-aggregated IgG abrogated the effect. After fractionation of the T and non-T cell populations by sedimentation of E rosette forming cells the activity was present in the non-T cell fraction. The mechanism triggered involved a beta-adrenergic reaction that could be blocked by 10-7 M (-)-propanolol and not by inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis (10-6 M indomethacin and 1·8 × 10-4 M acetyl salicylic acid) or an anti-histamine drug (10-6 M pyrilamine). Since positive EVI reactivity and myocardial lympho-mononuclear cell infiltrates are frequent in patients with chronic Chagas' cardiomyo-pathy, the possibility that they could interact influencing the rhythm and contractile activity of the heart should be taken into account. PMID:6819907

  3. Studies on the mechanism of the positive inotropic effect of ATX II (Anemonia sulcata) on isolated guinea pig atria.

    PubMed

    Alsen, C; Peters, T; Scheufler, E

    1982-01-01

    The basic polypeptide ATX II (MW 4,770) isolated from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata evokes a pronounced and dose-dependent positive inotropic effect in different mammalian heart preparations. The mechanism of this effect is so far unknown. (a) Investigations on isolated guinea pig atria indicate that changes of the steady state cellular Na, K and Ca concentrations cannot account for the positive inotropic effect. (b) An increase of the surface pressure of phospholipid monolayers was observed only at cardiotoxic ATX II concentrations. However, the 45Ca binding to phosphatidylserine, as the essential Ca-binding phospholipid, was not changed even at cardiotoxic ATX II concentrations. (c) Neither the enzymatic activity nor the ouabain inhibition kinetic of an isolated Na/K-ATPase preparation was affected by ATX II. (d) In intact electrically stimulated (1 Hz) guinea pig atria the binding of [3H]ouabain increases by about 50% at a positive inotropic ATX II concentration. The results suggest that the positive inotropic effect of ATX II is not caused by an unspecific membrane damaging action or by a direct interaction with the Na/K-ATPase. The increased binding of [3H]ouabain to intact heart muscles indirectly reflects an increased pump activity of the Na/K-ATPase, which is caused by an elevated Na transient due to the electrophysiologically well-established mechanism of the ATX II action on fast Na channel, i.e., delayed inactivation of the fast Na flux. However, the exact mechanism of the ATX II induced positive inotropic effect remains unknown.

  4. Morphological pattern of intrinsic nerve plexus distributed on the rabbit heart and interatrial septum

    PubMed Central

    Saburkina, Inga; Gukauskiene, Ligita; Rysevaite, Kristina; Brack, Kieran E; Pauza, Audrys G; Pauziene, Neringa; Pauza, Dainius H

    2014-01-01

    Although the rabbit is routinely used as the animal model of choice to investigate cardiac electrophysiology, the neuroanatomy of the rabbit heart is not well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the topography of the intrinsic nerve plexus located on the rabbit heart surface and interatrial septum stained histochemically for acetylcholinesterase using pressure-distended whole hearts and whole-mount preparations from 33 Californian rabbits. Mediastinal cardiac nerves entered the venous part of the heart along the root of the right cranial vein (superior caval vein) and at the bifurcation of the pulmonary trunk. The accessing nerves of the venous part of the heart passed into the nerve plexus of heart hilum at the heart base. Nerves approaching the heart extended epicardially and innervated the atria, interatrial septum and ventricles by five nerve subplexuses, i.e. left and middle dorsal, dorsal right atrial, ventral right and left atrial subplexuses. Numerous nerves accessed the arterial part of the arterial part of the heart hilum between the aorta and pulmonary trunk, and distributed onto ventricles by the left and right coronary subplexuses. Clusters of intrinsic cardiac neurons were concentrated at the heart base at the roots of pulmonary veins with some positioned on the infundibulum. The mean number of intrinsic neurons in the rabbit heart is not significantly affected by aging: 2200 ± 262 (range 1517–2788; aged) vs. 2118 ± 108 (range 1513–2822; juvenile). In conclusion, despite anatomic differences in the distribution of intrinsic cardiac neurons and the presence of well-developed nerve plexus within the heart hilum, the topography of all seven subplexuses of the intrinsic nerve plexus in rabbit heart corresponds rather well to other mammalian species, including humans. PMID:24527844

  5. The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT): a battery for assessing beat perception and production and their dissociation.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shinya; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT), a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: (1) music tapping test (MTT), (2) beat saliency test (BST), (3) beat interval test (BIT), and (4) beat finding and interval test (BFIT). MTT measures the degree of tapping synchronization with the beat of music, whereas BST, BIT, and BFIT measure perception and production thresholds via psychophysical adaptive stair-case methods. We administered the H-BAT on thirty individuals and investigated the performance distribution across these individuals in each subtest. There was a wide distribution in individual abilities to tap in synchrony with the beat of music during the MTT. The degree of synchronization consistency was negatively correlated with thresholds in the BST, BIT, and BFIT: a lower degree of synchronization was associated with higher perception and production thresholds. H-BAT can be a useful tool in determining an individual's ability to perceive and produce a beat within a single session.

  6. The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT): a battery for assessing beat perception and production and their dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Shinya; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT), a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: (1) music tapping test (MTT), (2) beat saliency test (BST), (3) beat interval test (BIT), and (4) beat finding and interval test (BFIT). MTT measures the degree of tapping synchronization with the beat of music, whereas BST, BIT, and BFIT measure perception and production thresholds via psychophysical adaptive stair-case methods. We administered the H-BAT on thirty individuals and investigated the performance distribution across these individuals in each subtest. There was a wide distribution in individual abilities to tap in synchrony with the beat of music during the MTT. The degree of synchronization consistency was negatively correlated with thresholds in the BST, BIT, and BFIT: a lower degree of synchronization was associated with higher perception and production thresholds. H-BAT can be a useful tool in determining an individual's ability to perceive and produce a beat within a single session. PMID:24324421

  7. Elastohydrodynamic synchronization of adjacent beating flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Lauga, Eric; Pesci, Adriana I.; Proctor, Michael R. E.

    2016-11-01

    It is now well established that nearby beating pairs of eukaryotic flagella or cilia typically synchronize in phase. A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis that hydrodynamic coupling between the active filaments, combined with waveform compliance, provides a robust mechanism for synchrony. This elastohydrodynamic mechanism has been incorporated into bead-spring models in which the beating flagella are represented by microspheres tethered by radial springs as they are driven about orbits by internal forces. While these low-dimensional models reproduce the phenomenon of synchrony, their parameters are not readily relatable to those of the filaments they represent. More realistic models, which reflect the underlying elasticity of the axonemes and the active force generation, take the form of fourth-order nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). While computational studies have shown the occurrence of synchrony, the effects of hydrodynamic coupling between nearby filaments governed by such continuum models have been examined theoretically only in the regime of interflagellar distances d large compared to flagellar length L . Yet in many biological situations d /L ≪1 . Here we present an asymptotic analysis of the hydrodynamic coupling between two extended filaments in the regime d /L ≪1 and find that the form of the coupling is independent of the microscopic details of the internal forces that govern the motion of the individual filaments. The analysis is analogous to that yielding the localized induction approximation for vortex filament motion, extended to the case of mutual induction. In order to understand how the elastohydrodynamic coupling mechanism leads to synchrony of extended objects, we introduce a heuristic model of flagellar beating. The model takes the form of a single fourth-order nonlinear PDE whose form is derived from symmetry considerations, the physics of elasticity, and the overdamped nature of the dynamics. Analytical

  8. [Investigation and treatment of premature beats].

    PubMed

    Swan, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    If a patient has premature beats, it is essential to clarify whether they are associated with a heart disorder or some other disease. The basis for an examination for all patients is the rest-ECG. Ultrasound examination is indicated, if the symptoms are severe or findings indicating a heart disorder are present. The occurrence of severe symptoms, such as episodes of tachycardia and attacks of unconsciousness, is mapped in an interview and they are an indication for further investigations within specialized care. Atrial extrasystoles as such do not require any treatment unless they are accompanied by atrial fibrillation.

  9. A new Bayesian Earthquake Analysis Tool (BEAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyura-Bathke, Hannes; Dutta, Rishabh; Jónsson, Sigurjón; Mai, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Modern earthquake source estimation studies increasingly use non-linear optimization strategies to estimate kinematic rupture parameters, often considering geodetic and seismic data jointly. However, the optimization process is complex and consists of several steps that need to be followed in the earthquake parameter estimation procedure. These include pre-describing or modeling the fault geometry, calculating the Green's Functions (often assuming a layered elastic half-space), and estimating the distributed final slip and possibly other kinematic source parameters. Recently, Bayesian inference has become popular for estimating posterior distributions of earthquake source model parameters given measured/estimated/assumed data and model uncertainties. For instance, some research groups consider uncertainties of the layered medium and propagate these to the source parameter uncertainties. Other groups make use of informative priors to reduce the model parameter space. In addition, innovative sampling algorithms have been developed that efficiently explore the often high-dimensional parameter spaces. Compared to earlier studies, these improvements have resulted in overall more robust source model parameter estimates that include uncertainties. However, the computational demands of these methods are high and estimation codes are rarely distributed along with the published results. Even if codes are made available, it is often difficult to assemble them into a single optimization framework as they are typically coded in different programing languages. Therefore, further progress and future applications of these methods/codes are hampered, while reproducibility and validation of results has become essentially impossible. In the spirit of providing open-access and modular codes to facilitate progress and reproducible research in earthquake source estimations, we undertook the effort of producing BEAT, a python package that comprises all the above-mentioned features in one

  10. Attosecond quantum-beat spectroscopy in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaram, Niranjan; Tong, Xiao-Min; Timmers, Henry; Sandhu, Arvinder

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of electron wavepackets determines the course of many physical and chemical phenomena, and attosecond spectroscopy aims to measure and control such dynamics in real time. Here, we investigate radial electron wavepacket motion in helium by using an XUV attosecond pulse train to prepare a coherent superposition of excited states and a delayed femtosecond IR pulse to ionize them. Quantum-beat signals observed in the high resolution photoelectron spectrogram allow us to follow the field-free evolution of the bound electron wavepacket and determine the time-dependent ionization dynamics of the low-lying 2{{p}} state.

  11. Beating the forger: authenticating ceramic antiquities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneham, Doreen; Stoneham, Marshall

    2010-09-01

    Today's forger may have skills to match the artists and craftsmen of the past. But can they be exposed by scientific methods? Ceramic antiquities - including pottery, porcelains, and bronzes with a casting core - have long been valued, and demonstrable antiquity is crucial. Thermoluminescence provides key evidence as to when the object was fired. We describe the basic ideas, the methods themselves, and some of the potential limitations. Examples illustrate the remarkable ingenuity of forgers, who are making determined efforts to beat the physics-based tests of authenticity.

  12. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation does not reduce vulnerability to atrial fibrillation in remodeling atria.

    PubMed

    Ramadeen, Andrew; Connelly, Kim A; Leong-Poi, Howard; Hu, Xudong; Fujii, Hiroko; Van Krieken, Richard; Laurent, Gabriel; Holub, Bruce J; Bazinet, Richard P; Dorian, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Prophylactic supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) reduce vulnerability to atrial fibrillation (AF). The effect of PUFAs given after cardiac injury has occurred is unknown. To investigate using a model of pacing-induced cardiac injury, the time course of development of injury and whether it was altered by postinjury PUFAs. Sixty-five dogs were randomized to undergo simultaneous atrial and ventricular pacing (SAVP, 220 beats/min) for 0, 2, 7, or 14 days. Twenty-two dogs received PUFAs (850 mg/d) either prophylactically or after some pacing had occurred (postinjury). Electrophysiologic and echocardiographic measurements were taken at baseline and sacrifice. Atrial tissue samples were collected at sacrifice for histologic and molecular analyses. With no PUFAs, the inducibility of AF increased with pacing duration (P < .001). Postinjury PUFAs (started after 7 days of pacing) did not reduce the inducibility of AF after 14 days of pacing (9.3% ± 8.8% no PUFAs vs 9.7% ± 9.9% postinjury PUFAs; P = .91). Atrial myocyte size and fibrosis increased with pacing duration (P < .05). Postinjury PUFAs did not significantly attenuate the cell size increase after 14 days of pacing (no PUFAs 38% ± 30% vs postinjury PUFAs 19% ± 28%; P = .11). Similarly, postinjury PUFAs did not attenuate the increase in fibrosis after 14 days of pacing (no PUFAs 66% ± 51% vs postinjury PUFAs 63% ± 76%; P = .90). PUFA supplementation begun after cardiac injury has already occurred does not reduce atrial structural remodeling or vulnerability to AF. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Autoantibody Production in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Asherson, G. L.; Rose, M. Elaine

    1963-01-01

    The finding that the serum of apparently healthy rabbits fixed complement with rabbit liver and kidney has been confirmed. Experimental infection of rabbits with Eimeria stiedae, the cause of hepatic coccidiosis, led to a rise in the titre of serum complement-fixing factors. The rise was statistically significant 14, 21 and 28 days after infection. The factors were regarded as antibodies because they behaved as macroglobulins on diethylaminoethyl—cellulose chromatography and sucrose gradient centrifugation, and as autoantibodies because they fixed complement with the kidney of the rabbits in which they occurred. The antibody reacted with widely distributed antigen(s) with high activity in brain and low activity in skeletal muscle. The possibility that coccidial infection may be responsible for the natural autoantibody of rabbits is discussed. PMID:13965167

  14. Non-heart beating organ donation. A case study.

    PubMed

    Stirling, John

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this case study is to discuss the clinical management of a non-heart beating organ donor. This case study will concentrate in particular on the clinical assessment of the potential donor patient undertaken by the donor transplant coordinator (DTC) and the donation process up to the time of transplantation. The author will also describe the differences between heart beating and non-heart beating donors and discuss how transplantation can benefit renal recipient patients.

  15. Oxidative shift in tissue redox potential increases beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration.

    PubMed

    Kistamás, Kornél; Hegyi, Bence; Váczi, Krisztina; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-07-01

    Profound changes in tissue redox potential occur in the heart under conditions of oxidative stress frequently associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Since beat-to-beat variability (short term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) is a good indicator of arrhythmia incidence, the aim of this work was to study the influence of redox changes on SV in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using a conventional microelectrode technique. The redox potential was shifted toward a reduced state using a reductive cocktail (containing dithiothreitol, glutathione, and ascorbic acid) while oxidative changes were initiated by superfusion with H2O2. Redox effects were evaluated as changes in "relative SV" determined by comparing SV changes with the concomitant APD changes. Exposure of myocytes to the reductive cocktail decreased SV significantly without any detectable effect on APD. Application of H2O2 increased both SV and APD, but the enhancement of SV was the greater, so relative SV increased. Longer exposure to H2O2 resulted in the development of early afterdepolarizations accompanied by tremendously increased SV. Pretreatment with the reductive cocktail prevented both elevation in relative SV and the development of afterdepolarizations. The results suggest that the increased beat-to-beat variability during an oxidative stress contributes to the generation of cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. Spoken Word Recognition Enhancement Due to Preceding Synchronized Beats Compared to Unsynchronized or Unrhythmic Beats

    PubMed Central

    Sidiras, Christos; Iliadou, Vasiliki; Nimatoudis, Ioannis; Reichenbach, Tobias; Bamiou, Doris-Eva

    2017-01-01

    The relation between rhythm and language has been investigated over the last decades, with evidence that these share overlapping perceptual mechanisms emerging from several different strands of research. The dynamic Attention Theory posits that neural entrainment to musical rhythm results in synchronized oscillations in attention, enhancing perception of other events occurring at the same rate. In this study, this prediction was tested in 10 year-old children by means of a psychoacoustic speech recognition in babble paradigm. It was hypothesized that rhythm effects evoked via a short isochronous sequence of beats would provide optimal word recognition in babble when beats and word are in sync. We compared speech recognition in babble performance in the presence of isochronous and in sync vs. non-isochronous or out of sync sequence of beats. Results showed that (a) word recognition was the best when rhythm and word were in sync, and (b) the effect was not uniform across syllables and gender of subjects. Our results suggest that pure tone beats affect speech recognition at early levels of sensory or phonemic processing. PMID:28769752

  17. Beat-to-beat QT interval variability associated with acute myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Murabayashi, Taizo; Fetics, Barry; Kass, David; Nevo, Erez; Gramatikov, Boris; Berger, Ronald D

    2002-01-01

    Beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) quantifies lability in ventricular repolarization. We hypothesized that myocardial ischemia destabilizes ventricular repolarization and increases QTV. We analyzed 2-hour 2-lead digitized electrocardiogram records of 68 patients in the European ST-T Database. All patients had ischemic episodes during the 2-hour record, annotated by the developers of the database. We determined the normalized QTV (QTVnorm), QT variability index (QTVI), and normalized heart rate variability (HRVnorm) for each 5-minute epoch by automated analysis. QTVnorm was greater during ischemic episodes than during nonischemic episodes (1.41 +/- 0.77 vs. 0.88 +/- 0.23, P <.0001). There was no significant difference in HRVnorm between ischemic and nonischemic episodes (1.22 +/- 0.63 vs. 0.94 +/- 0.18, not significant). The QTVI was higher during ischemic episodes than during nonischemic episodes (0.14 +/- 0.31 vs. -0.051 +/- 0.12, P <.0001). Acute ischemia is associated with labile ventricular repolarization, which manifests as enhanced beat-to-beat QT interval variability. The association between ischemic repolarization liability and arrhythmic risk deserves further study.

  18. Spoken Word Recognition Enhancement Due to Preceding Synchronized Beats Compared to Unsynchronized or Unrhythmic Beats.

    PubMed

    Sidiras, Christos; Iliadou, Vasiliki; Nimatoudis, Ioannis; Reichenbach, Tobias; Bamiou, Doris-Eva

    2017-01-01

    The relation between rhythm and language has been investigated over the last decades, with evidence that these share overlapping perceptual mechanisms emerging from several different strands of research. The dynamic Attention Theory posits that neural entrainment to musical rhythm results in synchronized oscillations in attention, enhancing perception of other events occurring at the same rate. In this study, this prediction was tested in 10 year-old children by means of a psychoacoustic speech recognition in babble paradigm. It was hypothesized that rhythm effects evoked via a short isochronous sequence of beats would provide optimal word recognition in babble when beats and word are in sync. We compared speech recognition in babble performance in the presence of isochronous and in sync vs. non-isochronous or out of sync sequence of beats. Results showed that (a) word recognition was the best when rhythm and word were in sync, and (b) the effect was not uniform across syllables and gender of subjects. Our results suggest that pure tone beats affect speech recognition at early levels of sensory or phonemic processing.

  19. Binaural auditory beats affect vigilance performance and mood.

    PubMed

    Lane, J D; Kasian, S J; Owens, J E; Marsh, G R

    1998-01-01

    When two tones of slightly different frequency are presented separately to the left and right ears the listener perceives a single tone that varies in amplitude at a frequency equal to the frequency difference between the two tones, a perceptual phenomenon known as the binaural auditory beat. Anecdotal reports suggest that binaural auditory beats within the electroencephalograph frequency range can entrain EEG activity and may affect states of consciousness, although few scientific studies have been published. This study compared the effects of binaural auditory beats in the EEG beta and EEG theta/delta frequency ranges on mood and on performance of a vigilance task to investigate their effects on subjective and objective measures of arousal. Participants (n = 29) performed a 30-min visual vigilance task on three different days while listening to pink noise containing simple tones or binaural beats either in the beta range (16 and 24 Hz) or the theta/delta range (1.5 and 4 Hz). However, participants were kept blind to the presence of binaural beats to control expectation effects. Presentation of beta-frequency binaural beats yielded more correct target detections and fewer false alarms than presentation of theta/delta frequency binaural beats. In addition, the beta-frequency beats were associated with less negative mood. Results suggest that the presentation of binaural auditory beats can affect psychomotor performance and mood. This technology may have applications for the control of attention and arousal and the enhancement of human performance.

  20. Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriola, David; Gadêlha, Hermes; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-03-01

    The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive cross-linkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been made to assess the role of dyneins on the nonlinear nature of the axoneme. Here, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of flagella by considering an axonemal sliding control mechanism for dynein activity. This approach unveils the nonlinear selection of the oscillation amplitudes, which are typically either missed or prescribed in mathematical models. The explicit set of nonlinear equations are derived and solved numerically. Our analysis reveals the spatio-temporal dynamics of dynein populations and flagellum shape for different regimes of motor activity, medium viscosity and flagellum elasticity. Unstable modes saturate via the coupling of dynein kinetics and flagellum shape without the need of invoking a nonlinear axonemal response. Hence, our work reveals a novel mechanism for the saturation of unstable modes in axonemal beating.

  1. Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

    PubMed Central

    Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive cross-linkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been made to assess the role of dyneins on the nonlinear nature of the axoneme. Here, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of flagella by considering an axonemal sliding control mechanism for dynein activity. This approach unveils the nonlinear selection of the oscillation amplitudes, which are typically either missed or prescribed in mathematical models. The explicit set of nonlinear equations are derived and solved numerically. Our analysis reveals the spatio-temporal dynamics of dynein populations and flagellum shape for different regimes of motor activity, medium viscosity and flagellum elasticity. Unstable modes saturate via the coupling of dynein kinetics and flagellum shape without the need of invoking a nonlinear axonemal response. Hence, our work reveals a novel mechanism for the saturation of unstable modes in axonemal beating. PMID:28405357

  2. Motion estimation in beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Ortmaier, Tobias; Gröger, Martin; Boehm, Dieter H; Falk, Volkmar; Hirzinger, Gerd

    2005-10-01

    Minimally invasive beating-heart surgery offers substantial benefits for the patient, compared to conventional open surgery. Nevertheless, the motion of the heart poses increased requirements to the surgeon. To support the surgeon, algorithms for an advanced robotic surgery system are proposed, which offer motion compensation of the beating heart. This implies the measurement of heart motion, which can be achieved by tracking natural landmarks. In most cases, the investigated affine tracking scheme can be reduced to an efficient block matching algorithm allowing for realtime tracking of multiple landmarks. Fourier analysis of the motion parameters shows two dominant peaks, which correspond to the heart and respiration rates of the patient. The robustness in case of disturbance or occlusion can be improved by specially developed prediction schemes. Local prediction is well suited for the detection of single tracking outliers. A global prediction scheme takes several landmarks into account simultaneously and is able to bridge longer disturbances. As the heart motion is strongly correlated with the patient's electrocardiogram and respiration pressure signal, this information is included in a novel robust multisensor prediction scheme. Prediction results are compared to those of an artificial neural network and of a linear prediction approach, which shows the superior performance of the proposed algorithms.

  3. Findings from Project HeartBeat!

    PubMed Central

    Labarthe, Darwin R.; Dai, Shifan; Day, R. Sue; Fulton, Janet E.; Grunbaum, Jo Anne

    2015-01-01

    Project HeartBeat! was a longitudinal “growth” study of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and body composition in childhood and adolescence. Its findings demonstrate patterns of change from ages 8 to 18 years in anthropometric indicators of adiposity, blood lipid components, and blood pressure measurements, as well as the varying inter-relations among these patterns. Especially noteworthy are differences among associations between the two components of BMI (kg/m2)—the lean or fat-free mass index, and the fat mass index—and each of several CVD risk factors. Policy development and public health recommendations for CVD prevention beginning in childhood have evolved over 30 years or more. A new impetus to action is the recognized increase in the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity. Intervention to prevent obesity can have a major impact in preventing CVD risk factors more broadly. Opportunities to strengthen interventions for CVD prevention in childhood and adolescence include updated algorithms for monitoring body composition, blood lipids, and blood pressure throughout childhood and adolescence through use of the Project HeartBeat! study results. PMID:19524150

  4. Heritability of ambulatory and beat-to-beat office blood pressure in large multigenerational Arab pedigrees: the 'Oman Family study'.

    PubMed

    Albarwani, Sulayma; Muñoz, M Loretto; Voruganti, V Saroja; Jaju, Deepali; Al-Yahyaee, V Saeed; Rizvi, Syed G; Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan C; Al-Anqoudi, Zahir M; Bayoumi, Riad A; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Snieder, Harold; Hassan, Mohammed O

    2012-12-01

    To estimate the heritability of ambulatory blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and beat-to-beat office BP and HR in an isolated, environmentally and genetically homogeneous Omani Arab population. Ambulatory BP measurements were recorded in 1,124 subjects with a mean age of 33.8 ± 16.2 years, using the auscultatory mode of the validated Schiller ambulatory BP Monitor. Beat-to-beat BP and HR were recorded by the Task Force Monitor. Heritability was estimated using quantitative genetic analysis. This was achieved by applying the maximum-likelihood-based variance decomposition method implemented in SOLAR software. We detected statistically significant heritability estimates for office beat-to-beat, 24-hour, daytime, and sleep HR of 0.31, 0.21, 0.20, and 0.07, respectively. Heritability estimates in the above mentioned conditions for systolic BP (SBP)/diastolic BP (DBP)/mean BP (MBP)were all significant and estimated at 0.19/0.19/0.19, 0.30/0.44/0.41, 0.28/0.38/0.39, and 0.21/0.18/0.20,respectively. Heritability estimates for 24-hour and daytime ambulatory SBP, DBP, and MBP ranged from 0.28 to 0.44, and were higher than the heritability estimates for beat-to-beat recordings and sleep periods,which were estimated within a narrow range of 0.18-0.21. In this cohort, because shared environments are common to all, the environmental influence that occurs is primarily due to the variation in non-shared environment that is unique to the individual. We demonstrated significant heritability estimates for both beat-to-beat office and ambulatory BP and HR recordings, but 24-hour and daytime ambulatory heritabilities are higher than those from beat-to-beat resting levels and ambulatory night-time recordings.

  5. Performance of a Novel Bipolar/Monopolar Radiofrequency Ablation Device on the Beating Heart in an Acute Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Saint, Lindsey L.; Lawrance, Christopher P.; Okada, Shoichi; Kazui, Toshinobu; Robertson, Jason O.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Although the advent of ablation technology has simplified and shortened surgery for atrial fibrillation, only bipolar clamps have reliably been able to create transmural lesions on the beating heart. Currently there are no devices capable of reproducibly creating the long linear lesions in the right and left atria needed to perform a Cox-Maze procedure. This study evaluated the performance of a novel suction-assisted radiofrequency device that uses both bipolar and monopolar energy to create lesions from an epicardial approach on the beating heart. Methods Six domestic pigs underwent median sternotomy. A dual bipolar/monopolar radiofrequency ablation device was used to create epicardial linear lesions on the superior and inferior vena cavae, right and left atrial free walls, and right and left atrial appendages. The heart was stained with 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride and each lesion was cross-sectioned at 5mm intervals. Lesion depth and transmurality were determined. Results Transmurality was documented in 94% of all cross-sections, and 68% of all ablation lines were transmural along their entire length. Tissue thickness was not different between transmural and non-transmural cross-sections (3.1 ± 1.3 and 3.4 ± 2.1, p=0.57, respectively), nor was the anatomic location on the heart (p=0.45 for the distribution). Of the cross-sections located at the end of the ablation line, 11% (8/75) were found to be non-transmural, whereas only 4% (8/195) of cross-sections located within the line of ablation were found to be non-transmural (p=0.04). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that failure of the device to create transmural lesions was associated with low body temperature (p=0.006), but not with cardiac output (p=0.54). Conclusions This novel device was able to consistently create transmural epicardial lesions on the beating heart, regardless of anatomic location, cardiac output or tissue thickness. The performance of this device was

  6. Hepatitis E Virus in Farmed Rabbits, Wild Rabbits and Petting Farm Rabbits in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Burt, Sara A; Veltman, Jorg; Hakze-van der Honing, Renate; Schmitt, Heike; van der Poel, Wim H M

    2016-09-01

    Rabbits have been suggested as a zoonotic source of Hepatitis E virus. Phylogenetic analysis of HEV isolates from farmed, wild and pet rabbits in the Netherlands (23, 0, and 60 % respectively) showed them to be grouped amongst published rabbit HEV sequences and distinct from most human isolates. Dutch rabbits are unlikely to be a zoonotic source.

  7. SERUM SICKNESS IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Mover S.; Jones, Lloyd

    1931-01-01

    1. The injection of a single large dose of normal horse serum into rabbits results in the appearance 3 to 8 days later of erythematous and edematous reactions on the ears in 68.9 per cent of the animals. 2. The injections may be given by any of several routes and reactions appear when the site of injection is definitely distant from the ears. 3. Injections of various antisera into rabbits cause the appearance of similar reactions. 4. These reactions can be considered as manifestations of serum sickness in rabbits. PMID:19869943

  8. Rabbit orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rich, Gregory A

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery in rabbits poses several unique parameters for the veterinary surgeon. It is imperative for the veterinarian to be knowledgeable about the anatomic features of the surgical repair site and to become familiar with a rabbit's pain and discomfort often associated with orthopedic injuries. Handling the perioperative and postoperative pain and potential GI disturbances are crucial for a successful outcome of the surgical case. This article is designed to help the veterinary surgeon prepare for the orthopedic surgical procedure and the peripheral physiologic needs of the rabbit from presentation through recovery.

  9. Increased Short-Term Beat-To-Beat Variability of QT Interval in Patients with Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Orosz, Andrea; Csajbók, Éva; Czékus, Csilla; Gavallér, Henriette; Magony, Sándor; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Várkonyi, Tamás T.; Nemes, Attila; Baczkó, István; Forster, Tamás; Wittmann, Tibor; Papp, Julius Gy.; Varró, András; Lengyel, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, including ventricular arrhythmias are responsible for increased mortality in patients with acromegaly. Acromegaly may cause repolarization abnormalities such as QT prolongation and impairment of repolarization reserve enhancing liability to arrhythmia. The aim of this study was to determine the short-term beat-to-beat QT variability in patients with acromegaly. Thirty acromegalic patients (23 women and 7 men, mean age±SD: 55.7±10.4 years) were compared with age- and sex-matched volunteers (mean age 51.3±7.6 years). Cardiac repolarization parameters including frequency corrected QT interval, PQ and QRS intervals, duration of terminal part of T waves (Tpeak-Tend) and short-term variability of QT interval were evaluated. All acromegalic patients and controls underwent transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Autonomic function was assessed by means of five standard cardiovascular reflex tests. Comparison of the two groups revealed no significant differences in the conventional ECG parameters of repolarization (QT: 401.1±30.6 ms vs 389.3±16.5 ms, corrected QT interval: 430.1±18.6 ms vs 425.6±17.3 ms, QT dispersion: 38.2±13.2 ms vs 36.6±10.2 ms; acromegaly vs control, respectively). However, short-term beat-to-beat QT variability was significantly increased in acromegalic patients (4.23±1.03 ms vs 3.02±0.80, P<0.0001). There were significant differences between the two groups in the echocardiographic dimensions (left ventricular end diastolic diameter: 52.6±5.4 mm vs 48.0±3.9 mm, left ventricular end systolic diameter: 32.3±5.2 mm vs 29.1±4.4 mm, interventricular septum: 11.1±2.2 mm vs 8.8±0.7 mm, posterior wall of left ventricle: 10.8±1.4 mm vs 8.9±0.7 mm, P<0.05, respectively). Short-term beat-to-beat QT variability was elevated in patients with acromegaly in spite of unchanged conventional parameters of ventricular repolarization. This enhanced temporal QT variability may be an early indicator of increased liability to

  10. Movement Instruction to Facilitate Beat Competency in Instrumental Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Colleen; Marshall, Herbert; Hartz, Barry

    2014-01-01

    This article offers instrumental directors at all levels some suggestions for the use of movement to facilitate "beat competency". We use the term beat competency to refer to a musician's ability to play with a consistent sense of pulse and balanced subdivision, as well as the eventual ability to bring that sense of pulse to reading…

  11. Visual enhancement of auditory beat perception across auditory interference levels.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi-Huang

    2014-10-01

    This study dealt with audiovisual rhythm perception involving an observed movement. Two experiments investigated whether a visual beat conveyed by a bouncing human point-light figure facilitated beat perception of concurrent auditory rhythms, and whether this enhancement followed a profile of multisensory integration. In Experiment 1, participants listened to three repetitions of a metrically simple rhythm and detected a perturbation in the third repetition. The rhythm was presented alone or with a visual beat in phase to it. Both conditions were presented with or without an auditory interference sequence at four increasing tempi, which served to progressively weaken the beat of the auditory rhythm. In Experiment 2, participants tapped to a regular auditory beat in the same combinations of visual beat and auditory interference. Results showed that the visual beat improved the perception of (Experiment 1) and the synchronization to (Experiment 2) the auditory rhythms. Moreover, in both experiments, visual enhancement was greater when the performance in the unisensory (auditory) conditions was poorer, consistent with the principle of inverse effectiveness. The relative multisensory gain increased as auditory performance deteriorated, except in one intermediate level. Together these results demonstrate that rhythmic visual movement aids auditory rhythm perception, which may be subserved by a perceptually integrated audiovisual beat that couples the internal motor system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Beat-wave generation of plasmons in semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, V.I.; Mahajan, S.M. |

    1995-08-01

    It is shown that in semiconductor plasmas, it is possible to generate large amplitude plasma waves by the beating of two laser beams with frequency difference close to the plasma frequency. For narrow gap seimconductors (for example n-type InSb), the system can simulate the physics underlying beat wave generation in relativistic gaseous plasmas.

  13. Effect of frequency difference on sensitivity of beats perception.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo-Chul; Kyung, Ki-Uk; Kwon, Dong-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Two vibrations with slightly different frequencies induce the beats phenomenon. In tactile perception, when two pins of different frequencies stimulate the fingertips, an individual perceives a beats caused by a summation stimulus of the two vibrations. The present study demonstrates experimentally that humans can perceive another vibration based on the beats phenomenon when two tactile stimuli with slightly different frequencies are stimulated on the finger pad with a small contactor in different locations at the same time. Moreover, we examined the amplitude of the detection threshold to be able to perceive beats phenomenon on the index finger with 5 carrier frequency (63.1, 100, 158.5, 251.2, and 398.1 Hz) and 4 beats frequency (2.5, 3.98, 6.31, and 10 Hz) when two stimuli 1 mm distance apart are vibrated at a slightly different frequency. From the experiments, it is concluded that the amplitude threshold to be able to perceive beats decreases as the standard frequency increases under 398 Hz. Furthermore, from comparing the absolute detection threshold and beats detection threshold, as the carrier frequency increases, the required amplitude at two pins for the detection of beats decreases compared to absolute vibration.

  14. Movement Instruction to Facilitate Beat Competency in Instrumental Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Colleen; Marshall, Herbert; Hartz, Barry

    2014-01-01

    This article offers instrumental directors at all levels some suggestions for the use of movement to facilitate "beat competency". We use the term beat competency to refer to a musician's ability to play with a consistent sense of pulse and balanced subdivision, as well as the eventual ability to bring that sense of pulse to reading…

  15. Appropriate threshold levels of cardiac beat-to-beat variation in semi-automatic analysis of equine ECG recordings.

    PubMed

    Flethøj, Mette; Kanters, Jørgen K; Pedersen, Philip J; Haugaard, Maria M; Carstensen, Helena; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Buhl, Rikke

    2016-11-28

    Although premature beats are a matter of concern in horses, the interpretation of equine ECG recordings is complicated by a lack of standardized analysis criteria and a limited knowledge of the normal beat-to-beat variation of equine cardiac rhythm. The purpose of this study was to determine the appropriate threshold levels of maximum acceptable deviation of RR intervals in equine ECG analysis, and to evaluate a novel two-step timing algorithm by quantifying the frequency of arrhythmias in a cohort of healthy adult endurance horses. Beat-to-beat variation differed considerably with heart rate (HR), and an adaptable model consisting of three different HR ranges with separate threshold levels of maximum acceptable RR deviation was consequently defined. For resting HRs <60 beats/min (bpm) the threshold level of RR deviation was set at 20%, for HRs in the intermediate range between 60 and 100 bpm the threshold was 10%, and for exercising HRs >100 bpm, the threshold level was 4%. Supraventricular premature beats represented the most prevalent arrhythmia category with varying frequencies in seven horses at rest (median 7, range 2-86) and six horses during exercise (median 2, range 1-24). Beat-to-beat variation of equine cardiac rhythm varies according to HR, and threshold levels in equine ECG analysis should be adjusted accordingly. Standardization of the analysis criteria will enable comparisons of studies and follow-up examinations of patients. A small number of supraventricular premature beats appears to be a normal finding in endurance horses. Further studies are required to validate the findings and determine the clinical significance of premature beats in horses.

  16. Oil well rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Yerian, H.W.

    1983-10-18

    A well rabbit is described which has a high gas seal capacity as well as resistance to wear and structural failure. The rabbit comprises a one-piece elongated generally cylindrical body having external circumferential gas-sealing grooves spaced along its length and a set of helically oriented slots at its lower end. The circumferential grooves, which work collectively in the manner of a labyrinth seal, are undercut in a way to deflect escaping gas streams and promote turbulence to enhance their gas-sealing capability. The undercut profile and relative spacing of the grooves leaves a large surface area between the grooves for distributing radial forces and thereby decreasing the wear rate of the rabbit. The helically oriented slots convert energy of upward escaping gas into rotational energy in the rabbit. (3 claims.

  17. Planetary beat and solar-terrestrial responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, N.-A.

    2013-11-01

    Solar activity changes with time in a cyclic pattern. The origin of those changes may be caused by planetary motion around the Sun, affecting the position of the Sun's motion with respect to the centre of mass and subjecting the Sun to changes in angular momentum and gravitational tidal forces. With modern achievements, this multi-body problem can now be addressed in a constructive way. Indeed, there are multiple criteria suggesting that the solar variability is driven by a planetary beat also affecting a number of terrestrial variables: 14C and 10Be production, Earth's rotation, ocean circulation, paleoclimate, geomagnetism, etc. The centennial changes between grand solar maxima and minima imply that we will soon be in a new solar minimum and, in analogy with past events, probably also in Little Ice Age climatic conditions.

  18. Ion heating with beating electrostatic waves.

    PubMed

    Jorns, B; Choueiri, E Y

    2011-02-25

    The nonlinear interaction of a magnetized ion with two beating electrostatic waves (BEW) whose frequencies differ by a cyclotron harmonic can lead, under some conditions [Phys. Rev. E 69, 046402 (2004)], to vigorous acceleration for an ion with arbitrarily low initial velocity. When applied to an ensemble of ions, this mechanism promises enhanced heating over single electrostatic wave (SEW) heating for comparable wave energy densities. The extension of single ion acceleration to heating (SEWH and BEWH) of an ensemble of initially thermalized ions was carried out to compare the processes. Using a numerical solution of the Vlasov equation as a guideline, an analytical expression for the heating level was derived with Lie transforms and was used to show BEWH's superiority over all parameter space. © 2011 American Physical Society

  19. Computer Simulation of the Beating Human Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskin, Charles S.; McQueen, David M.

    2001-06-01

    The mechanical function of the human heart couples together the fluid mechanics of blood and the soft tissue mechanics of the muscular heart walls and flexible heart valve leaflets. We discuss a unified mathematical formulation of this problem in which the soft tissue looks like a specialized part of the fluid in which additional forces are applied. This leads to a computational scheme known as the Immersed Boundary (IB) method for solving the coupled equations of motion of the whole system. The IB method is used to construct a three-dimensional Virtual Heart, including representations of all four chambers of the heart and all four valves, in addition to the large arteries and veins that connect the heart to the rest of the circulation. The chambers, valves, and vessels are all modeled as collections of elastic (and where appropriate, actively contractile) fibers immersed in viscous incompressible fluid. Results are shown as a computer-generated video animation of the beating heart.

  20. Correlation between P-wave morphology and origin of atrial focal tachycardia--insights from realistic models of the human atria and torso.

    PubMed

    Colman, Michael A; Aslanidi, Oleg V; Stott, Jonathan; Holden, Arun V; Zhang, Henggui

    2011-10-01

    Atrial arrhythmias resulting from abnormally rapid focal activity in the atria may be reflected in an altered P-wave morphology (PWM) in the ECG. Although clinically important, detailed relationships between PWM and origins of atrial focal excitations have not been established. To study such relationships, we developed computational models of the human atria and torso. The model simulation results were used to evaluate an extant clinical algorithm for locating the origin of atrial focal points from the ECG. The simulations showed that the algorithm was practical and could predict the atrial focal locations with 85% accuracy. We proposed a further refinement of the algorithm to distinguish between focal locations within the large atrial bundles.

  1. Neuropeptide Y is a prejunctional inhibitor of vagal but not sympathetic inotropic responses in guinea-pig isolated left atria

    PubMed Central

    Serone, Adrian P; Angus, James A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of NPY and related peptides were examined on basal contractile force and nerve-mediated inotropic responses to electrical field stimulation of the guinea-pig isolated left atrium.Electrical field stimulus (EFS)-inotropic response curves were constructed by applying 1-64 trains of four field pulses (200 Hz, 0.1 ms duration, 100 V) across isolated left atria (paced at 4 Hz, 2 ms, 1–4 V) within the atrial refractory period. Curves were constructed in presence of vehicle, propranolol (1 μM) or atropine (1 μM) to determine appropriate stimulus conditions.The effects of PYY (1–10,000 nM), NPY (0.01–10 μM), N-Ac-[Leu28,31]NPY(24–36) (N-A[L]NPY(24–36); 0.01–10 μM) and clonidine (0.1–1000 nM) were examined on the positive and negative inotropic responses to EFS (eight trains, four pulses per refractory period).NPY-related peptides had no effect on basal force of contraction nor on the inotropic concentration-response curves to bethanechol or isoprenaline. All three peptides inhibited vagally-mediated negative inotropic responses; rank order of potency PYY>NPY⩾N-A[L]NPY(24–36) was consistent with an action at prejunctional Y2-receptors. Clonidine concentration-dependently inhibited sympathetic inotropic responses. However, PYY, NPY and N-A[L]NPY(24–36) failed to mediate any significant inhibition of the positive inotropic response to EFS.These data demonstrate that NPY is an effective inhibitor of vagal but not sympathetically-mediated inotropic responses in the guinea-pig isolated left atria. This may suggest that endogenously co-released NPY is important in mediating cross talk between efferent components of the autonomic nervous system modulating cardiac contractility, acting overall to sustain positive inotropic responses. PMID:10385237

  2. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lense, Miriam D; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS.

  3. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  4. Beat-to-beat variability of cardiac action potential duration: underlying mechanism and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Nánási, Péter P; Magyar, János; Varró, András; Ördög, Balázs

    2017-07-26

    Beat-to-beat variability of cardiac action potential duration (short-term variability, SV) is a common feature of various cardiac preparations, including the human heart. Although it is believed to be one of the best arrhythmia predictors, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood at present. The magnitude of SV is basically determined by the intensity of cell-to-cell coupling in multicellular preparations and by the duration of the action potential (APD). To compensate for the APD-dependent nature of SV, the concept of relative SV (RSV) has been introduced by normalizing the changes of SV to the concomitant changes in APD. RSV is reduced by ICa, IKr, and IKs while increased by INa, suggesting that ion currents involved in the negative feedback regulation of APD tend to keep RSV at a low level. RSV is also influenced by intracellular calcium concentration and tissue redox potential. The clinical implications of APD variability is discussed in detail.

  5. Wearable seismocardiography: towards a beat-by-beat assessment of cardiac mechanics in ambulant subjects.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, M; Vaini, E; Castiglioni, P; Merati, G; Meriggi, P; Parati, G; Faini, A; Rizzo, F

    2013-11-01

    Seismocardiogram (SCG) is the measure of the micro-vibrations produced by the heart contraction and blood ejection into the vascular tree. Over time, a large body of evidence has been collected on the ability of SCG to reflect cardiac mechanical events such as opening and closure of mitral and aortic valves, atrial filling and point of maximal aortic blood ejection. We recently developed a smart garment, named MagIC-SCG, that allows the monitoring of SCG, electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration out of the laboratory setting in ambulant subjects. The present pilot study illustrates the results of two different experiments performed to obtain a first evaluation on whether a dynamical assessment of indexes of cardiac mechanics can be obtained from SCG recordings obtained by MagIC-SCG. In the first experiment, we evaluated the consistency of the estimates of two indexes of cardiac contractility, the pre-ejection period, PEP, and the left ventricular ejection time, LVET. This was done in the lab, by reproducing an experimental protocol well known in literature, so that our measures derived from SCG could have been compared with PEP and LVET reference values obtained by traditional techniques. Six healthy subjects worn MagIC-SCG while assuming two different postures (supine and standing); PEP was estimated as the time interval between the Q wave in ECG and the SCG wave corresponding to the opening of aortic valve; LVET was the time interval between the SCG waves corresponding to the opening and closure of the aortic valve. The shift from supine to standing posture produced a significant increase in PEP and PEP/LVET ratio, a reduction in LVET and a concomitant rise in the LF/HF ratio in the RR interval (RRI) power spectrum. These results are in line with data available in literature thus providing a first support to the validity of our estimates. In the second experiment, we evaluated in one subject the feasibility of the beat-by-beat assessment of LVET during spontaneous

  6. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation and beat to beat blood pressure control are impaired in acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Eames, P; Blake, M; Dawson, S; Panerai, R; Potter, J

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Hypertension and chronic cerebrovascular disease are known to alter static cerebral autoregulation (CA) but the effects of acute stroke on dynamic CA (dCA) have not been studied in detail. Those studies to date measuring dCA have used sympathetically induced blood pressure (BP) changes, which may themselves directly affect dCA. This study assessed whether dCA is compromised after acute stroke using spontaneous blood pressure (BP) changes as the stimulus for the dCA response. Methods: 56 patients with ischaemic stroke (aged 70 (SD 9) years), studied within 72 hours of ictus were compared with 56 age, sex, and BP matched normal controls. Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) with non-invasive beat to beat arterial BP levels, surface ECG, and transcutaneous CO2 levels and a dynamic autoregulatory index (dARI) calculated. Results: Beat to beat BP, but not pulse interval variability was significantly increased and cardiac baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS) decreased in the patients with stroke. Dynamic CA was significantly reduced in patients with stroke compared with controls (strokes: ARI 3.8 (SD 2.2) and 3.2 (SD 2.0) for pressor and depressor stimuli respectively v controls: ARI 4.7 (SD 2.2) and 4.5 (SD 2.0) respectively (p<0.05 in all cases)). There was no difference between stroke and non-stroke hemispheres in ARI, which was also independent of severity of stroke, BP, BP variability, BRS, sex, and age. Conclusion: Dynamic cerebral autoregulation, as assessed using spontaneous transient pressor and depressor BP stimuli, is globally impaired after acute ischaemic stroke and may prove to be an important factor in predicting outcome. PMID:11909905

  7. Cardiac autonomic function and vascular profile in subclinical hypothyroidism: Increased beat-to-beat QT variability

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Pramila; Yeragani, Vikram K.; Prasanna Kumar, K. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) may have higher incidence of coronary heart disease and autonomic dysfunction. Design of the Study: Prospective case control study. Aim and Objectives: To evaluate beat-to-beat QT variability and vascular stiffness in patients with SH compared to normal controls. Materials and Methods: We compared linear and nonlinear measures of cardiac repolarization liability using beat-to-beat QT intervals derived from the surface electrocardiogram during supine posture and vascular indices including pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial index (ABI) during supine posture between female patients with SH and age- and sex-matched normal controls. Spectral analysis was done at very low frequency (LF) (0.003–0.04 Hz), Low frequency (LF) (0.04–0.15 Hz), and high frequency (HF) (0.15–0.4 Hz). The HF represents vagal regulation (parasympathetic) and LF represents both parasympathetic and sympathetic regulation. Results: We recruited 58 women with a mean age of 31.83 ± 8.9 years and 49 controls with mean age of 32.4 ± 9.9 years (P = NS). QT variability index (QTvi) was higher in cases compared to controls (P = 0.01). The ratio of LF/HF of R-R interval which is an index of sympathovagal tone was significantly more in cases compared to controls (P = 0.02). The difference in the left minus the right ABI was significant between cases and controls (P = 0.03). Conclusions: The cases had lower parasympathetic activity as compared to controls, and there was a predominance of sympathetic activity in cases. QTvi may be an important noninvasive tool in this group of patients to study the risk of cardiovascular mortality. PMID:27730068

  8. Biatrial reduction plasty with reef imbricate technique as an adjunct to maze procedure for permanent atrial fibrillation associated with giant left atria.

    PubMed

    Wang, William; Guo, L Ray; Martland, Anne Marie; Feng, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Jie; Feng, Xi Qing

    2010-04-01

    Success of the modified maze procedure after valvular operation with giant atria and permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) remains suboptimal. We report an aggressive approach for these patients utilizing biatrial reduction plasty with a reef imbricate suture technique concomitantly with valvular and maze procedure for AF. From January 1999 to December 2006, 122 consecutive Chinese patients with permanent AF and biatrial enlargement who required mitral valve+/-tricuspid valve (TV) surgery underwent aggressive left atrial reduction combined with radiofrequency bipolar full maze procedure. Left atrial dimensions were measured by TTE or TEE. There were 71 women (58.1%) and 51 men (41.9%) and their mean age was 45+/-9.5 years. Mean duration of AF was 48.4+/-21.4 months. All patients underwent left atrial reduction plasty with reef imbricate suture technique and full maze procedure. Their preoperative left atria measured 64+/-12 mm in the enlarged left atria (ELA) group and 86+/-17 mm in the giant left atria (GLA). Mitral valve replacement (MVR) combined with TV repair was performed in 102 patients (83%) while 21 patients underwent MVRs combined with aortic valve replacements (17%). Sixty-six (54%) patients required additional procedures and 61 (50%) of the patients also underwent left atrial appendage clot evacuation. Postoperative left atrial size was reduced to 49+/-8 mm (ELA) and 51+/-11 mm (GLA), respectively (P<0.05). Ninety-three of 122 (76%) patients were restored in normal sinus rhythm after one year clinical follow-up. Aggressive biatrial reduction plasty combined with full maze procedure is an effective treatment for patients with permanent AF undergoing concomitant valvular surgery. Further studies utilizing the reef imbricate suture technique for atrial reduction need to subsequently be evaluated.

  9. Fetal cerebral ventricular atria width of 8-10mm: A possible prenatal risk factor for adolescent treated Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Kivilevitch, Zvi; Gabis, Lidia V; Katorza, Eldad; Achiron, Reuven

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to study the in-utero and long term post-natal outcome of fetal isolated cerebral ventricular atria width between 8 and 10mm. We conducted a retrospective, observational, case-control study, of low risk pregnant women, between 1993 and 2001. One hundred and forty one fetuses with isolated cerebral ventricular atria width between 8 and 10mm, corresponding to 2-4 standard deviations above the mean, and 309 controls, with atrial width below this level, were included for the analysis. Clinical data concerning pre and post-natal outcome was retrieved from computerized medical records. Matching of cases with controls was based on age, with a ratio of 2-3 controls per case. Statistical analysis included: T-test, Chi-Square, and Multiple Logistic Regression analysis. The study group was characterized by a predominance of male gender, left side involvement, and higher birth weight, compared to the control group. Long term post-natal follow-up at a mean age of 12.7 years (±1.9) demonstrated an adjusted odds ratio of 2.589 (95% CI 1.415-4.737, p=0.001), being diagnosed as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and treated by Methylphenidate (Ritalin(®)), during childhood, compared to the control group (23.6% and 10.0% respectively) (p=0.001). Cerebral atria width was an independent factor, controlled for the only two significant variants between groups, gender and weight over 90th centile. In conclusions, our preliminary results show that fetuses with prenatal finding of isolated cerebral ventricular atria width between 8 and 10mm are more likely of being diagnosed and treated as ADHD during childhood.

  10. Viral diseases of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Krogstad, Aric P; Simpson, Janet E; Korte, Scott W

    2005-01-01

    Viral disease in the rabbit is encountered infrequently by the clinical practitioner; however, several viral diseases were reported to occur in this species. Viral diseases that are described in the rabbit primarily may affect the integument, gastrointestinal tract or, central nervous system or maybe multi-systemic in nature. Rabbit viral diseases range from oral papillomatosis, with benign clinical signs, to rabbit hemorrhagic disease and myxomatosis, which may result in significant clinical disease and mortality. The wild rabbit may serve as a reservoir for disease transmission for many of these viral agents. In general, treatment of viral disease in the rabbit is supportive in nature.

  11. Noninvasive continuous beat-to-beat radial artery pressure via TL-200 applanation tonometry.

    PubMed

    Dueck, Ron; Goedje, Oliver; Clopton, Paul

    2012-04-01

    The Tensys TL-200(®) noninvasive beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) monitor displays continuous radial artery waveform as well as systolic, mean and diastolic BP from a pressure sensor directly over the radial artery at the wrist. It locates the site of maximal radial pulse signal, determines mean BP from maximal pulse waveform amplitude at optimal artery compression and then derives systolic and diastolic BP. We performed a cross-sectional study of TL-200 BP comparisons with contralateral invasive radial artery (A-Line) BP values in 19 subjects during an average 2.5 h of general anesthesia for a wide range of surgical procedures. Two hundred and fifty random sample pairs/patient resulted in 4,747 systolic, mean and diastolic BP pairs for analysis. A-Line BP ranged from 29 mm Hg diastolic to 211 mm Hg systolic, and heart rate varied between 38 and 210 beats/min. Bland-Altman analysis showed an average 2.3 mm Hg TL-200 versus A-Line systolic BP bias and limits of agreement (1.96 SD) were ± 15.3 mm Hg. Mean BP showed a 2.3 mm Hg TL-200 bias and ± 11.7 mm Hg limits of agreement, while diastolic BP showed a 1.7 mm Hg bias and ± 12.3 mm Hg limits of agreement. Coefficients of determination for TL-200 and A-Line BP regression were r² = 0.86 for systolic, r² = 0.86 for mean, and r² = 80 for diastolic BP, respectively, with no apparent change in correlation at low or high BP. Bland-Altman analysis suggested satisfactory agreement between TL-200 noninvasive beat-to-beat BP and invasive A-Line BP. Paired TL-200/A-Line BP comparisons showed a high coefficient of determination.

  12. Pharmacological properties of novel bicyclic isoquinoline analogs in isolated guinea pig atria, trachea and in human platelets: relationship to trimetoquinol.

    PubMed

    Shams, G; Fedyna, J; Romstedt, K J; Adejare, A; Miller, D D; Roche, V F; Feller, D R

    1991-01-01

    1. Antiplatelet and beta-adrenoceptor activities of a set of secondary and tertiary N-methyl substituted amine analogs of trimetoquinol (TMQ, I and II, respectively) and 5,8-ethano-l-(p-methoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydroisoquin oline (bicyclic isoquinoline compounds III and IV, respectively) were examined. 2. Compounds III and IV induced relaxations of guinea pig trachea which were blocked by propranolol whereas neither compound acted as an agonist nor antagonist of beta-adrenoceptors (chronotropy) in guinea pig atria. TMQ analogs (I and II) were agonists in both beta-adrenoceptor systems. 3. When tested in human platelets, compounds III and IV, like the TMQ analogs, blocked several inducers of the prostaglandin-dependent and -independent pathways, and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated pathway of platelet activation. 4. The bicyclic isoquinoline analogs (III and IV) possessed more selective beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulatory activity and equal or greater inhibitory activity against inducers of the prostaglandin-independent pathways of platelet function than the corresponding TMQ analogs (I and II). 5. These chemically novel lipophilic bicyclic compounds provide a new lead to the development of agents useful for the treatment of asthma and thrombotic disorders.

  13. Robust inter-beat interval estimation in cardiac vibration signals.

    PubMed

    Brüser, C; Winter, S; Leonhardt, S

    2013-02-01

    Reliable and accurate estimation of instantaneous frequencies of physiological rhythms, such as heart rate, is critical for many healthcare applications. Robust estimation is especially challenging when novel unobtrusive sensors are used for continuous health monitoring in uncontrolled environments, because these sensors can create significant amounts of potentially unreliable data. We propose a new flexible algorithm for the robust estimation of local (beat-to-beat) intervals from cardiac vibration signals, specifically ballistocardiograms (BCGs), recorded by an unobtrusive bed-mounted sensor. This sensor allows the measurement of motions of the body which are caused by cardiac activity. Our method requires neither a training phase nor any prior knowledge about the morphology of the heart beats in the analyzed waveforms. Instead, three short-time estimators are combined using a Bayesian approach to continuously estimate the inter-beat intervals. We have validated our method on over-night BCG recordings from 33 subjects (8 normal, 25 insomniacs). On this dataset, containing approximately one million heart beats, our method achieved a mean beat-to-beat interval error of 0.78% with a coverage of 72.69%.

  14. Understanding women's attitudes towards wife beating in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed Central

    Hindin, Michelle J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with attitudes towards wife beating among women in partnerships in Zimbabwe in order to assist public health practitioners in preventing intimate partner violence (IPV). METHODS: A nationally representative survey of 5907 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) was conducted in Zimbabwe. Women were asked about their attitudes towards wife beating in five situations. The survey included sociodemographic characteristics, partnership characteristics, and household decision-making. FINDINGS: Over half of all women in Zimbabwe (53%) believed that wife beating was justified in at least one of the five situations. Respondents were most likely to find wife beating justified if a wife argued with her spouse (36%), neglected her children (33%), or went out without telling her spouse (30%). Among women in partnerships (n=3077), younger age, living in rural areas, lower household wealth, schooling at a lower level than secondary, and lower occupational status were associated with women reporting that wife beating is justified. Women who reported that they make household decisions jointly with their partners were less likely to say that wife beating is justified. CONCLUSIONS: Zimbabwe has a long way to go in preventing IPV, particularly because the younger generation of women is significantly more likely to believe that wife beating is justified compared with older women. Given the current social and political climate in Zimbabwe, finding means to negotiate rather than settle conflict through violence is essential from the household level to the national level. PMID:12973642

  15. Energetics of synchronized states in three-dimensional beating flagella.

    PubMed

    Mettot, Clément; Lauga, Eric

    2011-12-01

    During collective locomotion, beating flagella of spermatozoa interact hydrodynamically and are observed experimentally to synchronize. G. I. Taylor used a small-amplitude two-dimensional sheet model to show that the rate at which swimmers do work against the fluid is minimal for in-phase beating. We use a semianalytical approach based on hydrodynamic reflections to extend these results to the small-amplitude three-dimensional beating of infinite flagellar filaments. We first consider a configuration of two parallel filaments. In the case where the beating of both flagella occurs in the same plane as that defined by their axis, in-phase beating is found to lead to an overall minimum of energy dissipation, while opposite-phase leads to a maximum. If we allow the orientation of the beating planes to vary, we find that the minimum of energy dissipation is obtained for either the in-phase or opposite-phase conformation, in a manner that depends on the flagella orientation and their relative distance. We further characterize numerically the set of optimal relative orientations. Quantitatively analogous results are obtained using a simple model based on the beating of two spheres interacting hydrodynamically in the far field. Exploiting the linearity of Stokes equation, we then extend our results to the case of three beating flagella in an aligned and triangular conformation. Consistent with Taylor's two-dimensional work, our results suggest that, from a hydrodynamic standpoint, it is more energetically favorable for spermatozoa with three-dimensional flagella to swim close to each other and with synchronized, parallel, in-phase beating.

  16. Psychoacoustic Factors in Musical Intonation: Beats, Interval Tuning, and Inharmonicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keislar, Douglas Fleming

    Three psychoacoustic experiments were conducted using musically experienced subjects. In the first two experiments, the interval tested was the perfect fifth F4-C5; in the final one it was the major third F4-A4. The beat rate was controlled by two different methods: (1) simply retuning the interval, and (2) frequency-shifting one partial of each pair of beating partials without changing the overall interval tuning. The second method introduces inharmonicity. In addition, two levels of beat amplitude were introduced by using either a complete spectrum of 16 equal-amplitude partials per note, or by deleting one partial from each pair of beating partials. The results of all three experiments indicate that, for these stimuli, beating does not contribute significantly to the percept of "out-of-tuneness," because it made no difference statistically whether the beat amplitude was maximal or minimal. By contrast, mistuning the interval was highly significant. For the fifths, frequency-shifting the appropriate partials had about as much effect on the perceived intonation as mistuning the interval. For thirds, this effect was weaker, presumably since there were fewer inharmonic partials and they were higher in the harmonic series. Subjects were less consistent in their judgments of thirds than of fifths, perhaps because the equal-tempered and just thirds differ noticeably, unlike fifths. Since it is unlikely that beats would be more audible in real musical situations than under these laboratory conditions, these results suggest that the perception of intonation in music is dependent on the actual interval tuning rather than the concomitant beat rate. If beating partials are unimportant vis-a-vis interval tuning, this strengthens the argument for a cultural basis for musical intonation and scales, as opposed to the acoustical basis set forth by Helmholtz and others.

  17. The beat-to-beat decay of cardiac contractility from highly potentiated levels is bi-exponential.

    PubMed

    Noble, Mark I M; Arlock, Per; Wohlfart, Bjorn; Drake-Holland, Angela J

    2006-01-01

    In order to determine the mode of beat-to-beat decay of contractility from very high levels, we studied the beat-by-beat decay of cardiac contractility following potentiation. Such decay curves are normally analysed using a mono-exponential decay function, which assumes that a fixed fraction of activator calcium ions is recirculated from one beat to the next. We postulated that there might be deviations from such a mono-exponential expression at high levels of contractility. In single sucrose-gap voltage clamp experiments of isolated ferret papillary muscle, we obtained very high contractility by potentiation due to prolonged depolarisations. We found a bi-exponential decay in 9 of 11 muscles studied, in which the initial decay is much faster than the subsequent slower decay, as judged by residual variance of least-squares exponential fitting and by analysis of covariance using a linear equation (force of beat versus force of previous beat), p = 0.0089. In the slower decay period (physiological range), the decay was identical to that following post-extrasystolic potentiation in the same muscles studied with conventional stimulation.

  18. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  19. Synchronization in autonomous mercury beating heart systems.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Singh, Harpartap; Contractor, A Q; Parmananda, P

    2014-07-03

    The ability of the mercury beating heart (MBH) system to exhibit sustained mechanical and electrochemical activities simultaneously without any external agent (fluctuating or constant), has attracted researchers for decades. The interplay of these activities could mimic the biological phenomena such as a pulsating heart that occurs due to the coupled tissues exhibiting mechanical as well as electrical dynamics. In the present work, we have studied experimentally the dynamics of electrically coupled two and three autonomous MBH systems. A dynamical triangular (heart) shape, in the traditional watch glass geometry, has been chosen for the experiments. It is found that the redox potentials (electrical behavior) of the quasi-identical (due to the inherent heterogeneities in the setup) MBH systems get synchronized at the intermediate coupling strengths whereas coherence in their mechanical activities occur only at large coupling strengths. To the best of our knowledge, this synchronization phenomenon involving two distinct activities (electrical and mechanical) and different coupling thresholds has not been reported, so far. The coherent mechanical activities means the simultaneous occurrence of compressions and expansions in the coupled Hg drops, which are shown using snapshots. In addition to this, the redox time series have also been provided to demonstrate the synchronization in the electrical behavior of MBH systems. Moreover, a mathematical framework considering only electrical and mechanical components of the MBH systems is presented to validate the experimental findings that the strong synchrony in the redox potentials of the MBH systems is a prerequisite for the synchrony in their mechanical activities.

  20. Increasing sleep duration to lower beat-to-beat blood pressure: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Haack, Monika; Serrador, Jorge; Cohen, Daniel; Simpson, Norah; Meier-Ewert, Hans; Mullington, Janet M

    2013-06-01

    Strong evidence has accumulated over the last several years, showing that low sleep quantity and/or quality plays an important role in the elevation of blood pressure. We hypothesized that increasing sleep duration serves as an effective behavioral strategy to reduce blood pressure in prehypertension or type 1 hypertension. Twenty-two participants with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension, and habitual sleep durations of 7 h or less, participated in a 6-week intervention study. Subjects were randomized to a sleep extension group (48 ± 12 years, N = 13) aiming to increase bedtime by 1 h daily over a 6-week intervention period, or to a sleep maintenance group (47 ± 12 years, N = 9) aiming to maintain habitual bedtimes. Both groups received sleep hygiene instructions. Beat-to-beat blood pressure was monitored over 24 h, and 24-h urine and a fasting blood sample were collected pre- and post-intervention. Subjects in the sleep extension group increased their actigraphy-assessed daily sleep duration by 35 ± 9 min, while subjects in the sleep maintenance condition increased slightly by 4 ± 9 min (P = 0.03 for group effect). Systolic and diastolic beat-to-beat blood pressure averaged across the 24-h recording period significantly decreased from pre- to post-intervention visit in the sleep extension group by 14 ± 3 and 8 ± 3 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.05). Though the reduction of 7 ± 5 and 3 ± 4 mmHg in the sleep maintenance group was not significant, it did not differ from the blood pressure reduction in the sleep extension group (P = 0.15 for interaction effect). These changes were not paralleled by pre- to post-intervention changes in inflammatory or sympatho-adrenal markers, nor by changes in caloric intake. While these preliminary findings have to be interpreted with caution due to the small sample size, they encourage future investigations to test whether behavioral interventions designed to increase sleep duration serve as

  1. Best Way to Beat Back Zika a Matter of Debate

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162423.html Best Way to Beat Back Zika a Matter of Debate Analysis found conflicting evidence ... methods for controlling the mosquitoes that can transmit Zika and other diseases. The researchers, from the University ...

  2. Mercury Beating Heart: Modifications to the Classical Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najdoski, Metodija; Mirceski, Valentin; Petrusevski, Vladimir M.; Demiri, Sani

    2007-01-01

    The mercury beating heart (MBH) is a commonly performed experiment, which is based on varying oxidizing agents and substituting other metals for iron. Various modified versions of the classical demonstration of the experiment are presented.

  3. Intertrial auditory neural stability supports beat synchronization in preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Kali Woodruff; Tierney, Adam; White-Schwoch, Travis; Kraus, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The ability to synchronize motor movements along with an auditory beat places stringent demands on the temporal processing and sensorimotor integration capabilities of the nervous system. Links between millisecond-level precision of auditory processing and the consistency of sensorimotor beat synchronization implicate fine auditory neural timing as a mechanism for forming stable internal representations of, and behavioral reactions to, sound. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate a systematic relationship between consistency of beat synchronization and trial-by-trial stability of subcortical speech processing in preschoolers (ages 3 and 4 years old). We conclude that beat synchronization might provide a useful window into millisecond-level neural precision for encoding sound in early childhood, when speech processing is especially important for language acquisition and development. PMID:26760457

  4. After Stroke, 'Blue' Light May Help Beat the Blues

    MedlinePlus

    ... Light May Help Beat the Blues Akin to sunlight, it could ward off depression during rehab, study ... facility used "blue" light in its lighting system. Sunlight is humans' largest source of blue-spectrum light, ...

  5. Home Beats Rehab for Knee, Hip Replacement Recovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Home Beats Rehab for Knee, Hip Replacement Recovery Research shows patients fare well, sometimes better, if ... involved with the studies, but agrees that home recovery is the best option for most patients. "The ...

  6. Mercury Beating Heart: Modifications to the Classical Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najdoski, Metodija; Mirceski, Valentin; Petrusevski, Vladimir M.; Demiri, Sani

    2007-01-01

    The mercury beating heart (MBH) is a commonly performed experiment, which is based on varying oxidizing agents and substituting other metals for iron. Various modified versions of the classical demonstration of the experiment are presented.

  7. Exercise Beats Weight Loss At Helping Seniors' Hearts

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163858.html Exercise Beats Weight Loss at Helping Seniors' Hearts Both ... a healthy boost may want to focus on exercise first, a new study suggests. The research found ...

  8. Beat frequency ultrasonic microsphere contrast agent detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A system for and method of detecting and measuring concentrations of an ultrasonically-reflective microsphere contrast agent involving detecting non-linear sum and difference beat frequencies produced by the microspheres when two impinging signals with non-identical frequencies are combined by mixing. These beat frequencies can be used for a variety of applications such as detecting the presence of and measuring the flow rates of biological fluids and industrial liquids, including determining the concentration level of microspheres in the myocardium.

  9. A quantitative electroencephalographic study of meditation and binaural beat entrainment.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Christina F; Koren, Stanley A; Persinger, Michael A

    2011-04-01

    The study objective was to determine the quantitative electroencephalographic correlates of meditation, as well as the effects of hindering (15 Hz) and facilitative (7 Hz) binaural beats on the meditative process. The study was a mixed design, with experience of the subject as the primary between-subject measure and power of the six classic frequency bands (δ, θ, low α, high α, β, γ), neocortical lobe (frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital), hemisphere (left, right), and condition (meditation only, meditation with 7-Hz beats, meditation with 15-Hz beats) as the within-subject measures. The study was conducted at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The subjects comprised novice (mean of 8 months experience) and experienced (mean of 18 years experience) meditators recruited from local meditation groups. Experimental manipulation included application of hindering and facilitative binaural beats to the meditative process. Experienced meditators displayed increased left temporal lobe δ power when the facilitative binaural beats were applied, whereas the effect was not observed for the novice subjects in this condition. When the hindering binaural beats were introduced, the novice subjects consistently displayed more γ power than the experienced subjects over the course of their meditation, relative to baseline. Based on the results of this study, novice meditators were not able to maintain certain levels of θ power in the occipital regions when hindering binaural beats were presented, whereas when the facilitative binaural beats were presented, the experienced meditators displayed increased θ power in the left temporal lobe. These results suggest that the experienced meditators have developed techniques over the course of their meditation practice to counter hindering environmental stimuli, whereas the novice meditators have not yet developed those techniques.

  10. Human auditory steady state responses to binaural and monaural beats.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, D W F; Taylor, P

    2005-03-01

    Binaural beat sensations depend upon a central combination of two different temporally encoded tones, separately presented to the two ears. We tested the feasibility to record an auditory steady state evoked response (ASSR) at the binaural beat frequency in order to find a measure for temporal coding of sound in the human EEG. We stimulated each ear with a distinct tone, both differing in frequency by 40Hz, to record a binaural beat ASSR. As control, we evoked a beat ASSR in response to both tones in the same ear. We band-pass filtered the EEG at 40Hz, averaged with respect to stimulus onset and compared ASSR amplitudes and phases, extracted from a sinusoidal non-linear regression fit to a 40Hz period average. A 40Hz binaural beat ASSR was evoked at a low mean stimulus frequency (400Hz) but became undetectable beyond 3kHz. Its amplitude was smaller than that of the acoustic beat ASSR, which was evoked at low and high frequencies. Both ASSR types had maxima at fronto-central leads and displayed a fronto-occipital phase delay of several ms. The dependence of the 40Hz binaural beat ASSR on stimuli at low, temporally coded tone frequencies suggests that it may objectively assess temporal sound coding ability. The phase shift across the electrode array is evidence for more than one origin of the 40Hz oscillations. The binaural beat ASSR is an evoked response, with novel diagnostic potential, to a signal that is not present in the stimulus, but generated within the brain.

  11. Beat frequency ultrasonic microsphere contrast agent detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A system for and method of detecting and measuring concentrations of an ultrasonically-reflective microsphere contrast agent involving detecting non-linear sum and difference beat frequencies produced by the microspheres when two impinging signals with non-identical frequencies are combined by mixing. These beat frequencies can be used for a variety of applications such as detecting the presence of and measuring the flow rates of biological fluids and industrial liquids, including determining the concentration level of microspheres in the myocardium.

  12. Beat relationships between orbital periodicities in insolation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1987-01-01

    Variations in insolation are examined in terms of beat relationships. The relations between eccentricity periods, precessional parameters, and obliquity periods are analyzed. Beat periods are calculated and compared with orbital periodicities from Berger's (1978) series expansions. It is noted that the data, which correlate eccentricity, obliquity, and precessional-parameter periods, are applicable to the study of orbital periodicities in time-series analyses of long-term climatic records.

  13. VLDL from Metabolic Syndrome Individuals Enhanced Lipid Accumulation in Atria with Association of Susceptibility to Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Ke, Liang-Yin; Wei, Chi; Hsiao, Yi-Lin; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lai, Wen-Ter; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Chen, Chu-Huang; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Wu, Bin-Nan

    2016-01-20

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of metabolic derangements. Dyslipidemia is an important factor in MetS and is related to atrial fibrillation (AF). We hypothesized that very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in MetS (MetS-VLDL) may induce atrial dilatation and vulnerability to AF. VLDL was therefore separated from normal (normal-VLDL) and MetS individuals. Wild type C57BL/6 male mice were divided into control, normal-VLDL (nVLDL), and MetS-VLDL (msVLDL) groups. VLDL (15 µg/g) and equivalent volumes of saline were injected via tail vein three times a week for six consecutive weeks. Cardiac chamber size and function were measured by echocardiography. MetS-VLDL significantly caused left atrial dilation (control, n = 10, 1.64 ± 0.23 mm; nVLDL, n = 7, 1.84 ± 0.13 mm; msVLDL, n = 10, 2.18 ± 0.24 mm; p < 0.0001) at week 6, associated with decreased ejection fraction (control, n = 10, 62.5% ± 7.7%, vs. msVLDL, n = 10, 52.9% ± 9.6%; p < 0.05). Isoproterenol-challenge experiment resulted in AF in young msVLDL mice. Unprovoked AF occurred only in elderly msVLDL mice. Immunohistochemistry showed excess lipid accumulation and apoptosis in msVLDL mice atria. These findings suggest a pivotal role of VLDL in AF pathogenesis for MetS individuals.

  14. Atria selective prolongation by NIP-142, an antiarrhythmic agent, of refractory period and action potential duration in guinea pig myocardium.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Takeda, Kentaro; Ito, Mie; Yamagishi, Reiko; Tamura, Miku; Nakamura, Hideki; Tsuruoka, Noriko; Saito, Tomoaki; Masumiya, Haruko; Suzuki, Takeshi; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Itokawa-Matsuda, Maho; Yamashita, Toru; Tsuruzoe, Nobutomo; Tanaka, Hikaru; Shigenobu, Koki

    2005-05-01

    NIP-142 is a novel benzopyran compound that was shown to prolong the atrial effective refractory period and terminate experimental atrial fibrillation in the dog. In the present study, we examined the effects of NIP-142 on isolated guinea pig myocardium and on the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel current (acetylcholine-activated potassium current; I(KACh)) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. NIP-142 (10 and 100 microM) concentration-dependently prolonged the refractory period and action potential duration in the atrium but not in the ventricle. E-4031 and 4-aminopyridine prolonged action potential duration in both left atrium and right ventricle. Prolongation by NIP-142 of the atrial action potential duration was observed at stimulation frequencies between 0.5 and 5 Hz. In contrast, the prolongation by E-4031 was not observed at higher frequencies. Tertiapin, a blocker of I(KACh), prolonged action potential duration in the atrium but not in the ventricle. NIP-142 completely reversed the carbachol-induced shortening of atrial action potential duration. NIP-142 (1 to 100 microM), as well as tertiapin (0.1 to 100 nM), concentration-dependently blocked I(KACh) expressed in Xenopus oocytes; the blockade by NIP-142 was not affected by membrane voltage. In conclusion, NIP-142 was shown to prolong atrial refractory period and action potential duration through blockade of I(KACh) which may possibly explain its previously described antiarrhythmic activity. NIP-142 has pharmacological properties that are different from classical class III antiarrhythmic agents such as atria specificity and lack of reverse frequency dependence, and thus appears promising for the treatment of supraventricular arrhythmia.

  15. Functional Remodeling of Both Atria is Associated with Occurrence of Stroke in Patients with Paroxysmal and Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Hu, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Ping-Huang; Lee, Chao-Lin; Wang, Hsueh-Han; Chang, Shih-Lin; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Background It is critical to recognize high risk patients who are prone to develop stroke in the management of atrial fibrillation (AF). The purpose of this study was to identify the determinants of AF related stroke by assessing the anatomical and functional remodeling of cardiac chambers. Methods We compared the cardiac structure and function of 28 consecutive patients with paroxysmal and persistent AF-related stroke with 69 patients with AF and 21 controls without stroke using contrast-enhanced 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography during sinus rhythm. Results The volume of left atrium (LA), LA appendage (LAA) and right atrium (RA) were significantly increased across the groups with sinus rhythm (SR), AF and AF-related stroke (p < 0.001 for each, respectively). The emptying fraction and booster-pump function of LA, LAA and RA were decreased across the groups (p < 0.001 for each). In addition, the left ventricular mass index was increased in AF related stroke (p = 0.003). Using multivariate analysis, increased age (p = 0.003), reduced booster-pump function of LA (p = 0.01), LAA (p < 0.001) and RA (p < 0.001) were shown to be independently associated with the occurrence of stroke. Conclusions The dilatation and contractile dysfunction of both atria are related to the development of stroke in patients with paroxysmal and persistent AF. Our results suggested that the use of substrate-based assessment may help improve risk stratification of stroke in patients with AF. PMID:28115807

  16. Histamine H2-receptor antagonism of T-593: studies on positive chronotropic responses in guinea pig atria.

    PubMed

    Arai, H; Nakagawa, M; Tanada, K; Yamaguchi, H; Hirai, S

    1994-04-01

    Histamine H2-antagonistic properties of the novel H2-antagonist T-593, (+-)-N-[2-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]-N'-[2- [[[5-(methylamino)methyl-2-furyl]methyl]thio]ethyl]-N"- (methylsulfonyl) guanidine were investigated on the histamine-induced positive chronotropic responses in isolated guinea pig right atria. T-593 at 3 x 10(-7)-3 x 10(-6) M suppressed the maximal responses of the histamine concentration-response curves in a concentration-dependent fashion, indicating that T-593 is an unsurmountable antagonist. The pD'2 values were 5.50 for T-593 and 5.61 for famotidine; and the IC50 values at 1 x 10(-5) M histamine were 1.05 x 10(-6) M for T-593, 1.59 x 10(-6) M for ranitidine and 1.67 x 10(-7) M for famotidine. T-593 is a racemic compound composed of two enantiomers, (-)-T-593 and (+)-T-593. The histamine H2-antagonistic activity of (-)-T-593 was 1.5-fold more potent than that of racemic T-593, but (+)-T-593 scarcely inhibited the histamine-induced positive chronotropic response. Histamine H2-antagonism by racemic T-593 was mainly attributed to (-)-T-593. Isoproterenol-induced positive chronotropic responses were not affected by T-593 even at 3 x 10(-5) M. Pretreatment of ranitidine for 10 min prior to application of T-593 protected H2-receptors from unsurmountable antagonism by T-593. Reversibility of H2-antagonism was determined every 1 hr after a 30-min treatment of H2-antagonists. T-593 inhibited the positive chronotropic responses for over 6 hr in contrast to fast recovery from inhibition by ranitidine or famotidine. This result showed that T-593 is a slowly dissociable, long-acting histamine H2-antagonist.

  17. Visual three-dimensional representation of beat-to-beat electrocardiogram traces during hemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Rodrigo; Infante, Oscar; Perez-Grovas, Héctor; Hernandez, Erika; Ruiz-Palacios, Patricia; Franco, Martha; Lerma, Claudia

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of the three-dimensional representation of electrocardiogram traces (3DECG) to reveal acute and gradual changes during a full session of hemodiafiltration (HDF) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Fifteen ESRD patients were included (six men, nine women, age 46 ± 19 years old). Serum electrolytes, blood pressure, heart rate, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were measured before and after HDF. Continuous electrocardiograms (ECGs) obtained by Holter monitoring during HDF were used to produce the 3DECG. Several major disturbances were identified by 3DECG images: increase in QRS amplitude (47%), decrease in T-wave amplitude (33%), increase in heart rate (33%), and occurrence of arrhythmia (53%). Different arrhythmia types were often concurrent and included isolated supraventricular premature beats (N = 5), atrial fibrillation or atrial bigeminy (N = 2), and isolated premature ventricular beats (N = 6). Patients with decrease in T-wave amplitude had higher potassium and BUN (both before HDF and total removal) than those without decrease in T-wave amplitude (P < 0.05). Concurrent acute and gradual ECG changes during HDF are identified by the 3DECG, which could be useful as a preventive and prognostic method. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Positive airway pressure improves nocturnal beat-to-beat blood pressure surges in obesity hypoventilation syndrome with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jason R; Fonkoue, Ida T; Grimaldi, Daniela; Emami, Leila; Gozal, David; Sullivan, Colin E; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment has been shown to have a modest effect on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, there is a paucity of data on the effect of PAP therapy on rapid, yet significant, BP swings during sleep, particularly in obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). The present study hypothesizes that PAP therapy will improve nocturnal BP on the first treatment night (titration PAP) in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and that these improvements will become more significant with 6 wk of PAP therapy. Seventeen adults (7 men, 10 women; age 50.4 ± 10.7 years, BMI 49.3 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)) with OHS and clinically diagnosed OSA participated in three overnight laboratory visits that included polysomnography and beat-to-beat BP monitoring via finger plethysmography. Six weeks of PAP therapy, but not titration PAP, lowered mean nocturnal BP. In contrast, when nocturnal beat-to-beat BPs were aggregated into bins consisting of at least three consecutive cardiac cycles with a >10 mmHg BP surge (i.e., Δ10-20, Δ20-30, Δ30-40, and Δ>40 mmHg), titration, and 6-wk PAP reduced the number of BP surges per hour (time × bin, P < 0.05). PAP adherence over the 6-wk period was significantly correlated to reductions in nocturnal systolic (r = 0.713, P = 0.001) and diastolic (r = 0.497, P = 0.043) BP surges. Despite these PAP-induced improvements in nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges, 6 wk of PAP therapy did not alter daytime BP. In conclusion, PAP treatment reduces nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and this improvement in nocturnal BP regulation was greater in patients with higher PAP adherence.

  19. Positive airway pressure improves nocturnal beat-to-beat blood pressure surges in obesity hypoventilation syndrome with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jason R.; Fonkoue, Ida T.; Grimaldi, Daniela; Emami, Leila; Gozal, David; Sullivan, Colin E.

    2016-01-01

    Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment has been shown to have a modest effect on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, there is a paucity of data on the effect of PAP therapy on rapid, yet significant, BP swings during sleep, particularly in obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). The present study hypothesizes that PAP therapy will improve nocturnal BP on the first treatment night (titration PAP) in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and that these improvements will become more significant with 6 wk of PAP therapy. Seventeen adults (7 men, 10 women; age 50.4 ± 10.7 years, BMI 49.3 ± 2.4 kg/m2) with OHS and clinically diagnosed OSA participated in three overnight laboratory visits that included polysomnography and beat-to-beat BP monitoring via finger plethysmography. Six weeks of PAP therapy, but not titration PAP, lowered mean nocturnal BP. In contrast, when nocturnal beat-to-beat BPs were aggregated into bins consisting of at least three consecutive cardiac cycles with a >10 mmHg BP surge (i.e., Δ10–20, Δ20–30, Δ30–40, and Δ>40 mmHg), titration, and 6-wk PAP reduced the number of BP surges per hour (time × bin, P < 0.05). PAP adherence over the 6-wk period was significantly correlated to reductions in nocturnal systolic (r = 0.713, P = 0.001) and diastolic (r = 0.497, P = 0.043) BP surges. Despite these PAP-induced improvements in nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges, 6 wk of PAP therapy did not alter daytime BP. In conclusion, PAP treatment reduces nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and this improvement in nocturnal BP regulation was greater in patients with higher PAP adherence. PMID:26818059

  20. The Cutaneous Rabbit Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Rudiger; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In the cutaneous rabbit effect (CRE), a tactile event (so-called attractee tap) is mislocalized toward an adjacent attractor tap. The effect depends on the time interval between the taps. The authors delivered sequences of taps to the forearm and asked participants to report the location of one of the taps. The authors replicated the original CRE…

  1. The Cutaneous Rabbit Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Rudiger; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In the cutaneous rabbit effect (CRE), a tactile event (so-called attractee tap) is mislocalized toward an adjacent attractor tap. The effect depends on the time interval between the taps. The authors delivered sequences of taps to the forearm and asked participants to report the location of one of the taps. The authors replicated the original CRE…

  2. Autoantibody Production in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Asherson, G. L.; Dumonde, D. C.

    1963-01-01

    The sera of rabbits injected with rat liver, kidney, heart, muscle, spleen and brain in Freund's complete adjuvant fixed complement with rabbit tissue. This complement-fixing activity was attributed to autoantibodies which were able to fix complement in vitro with the tissue of the rabbit in which they occurred. Absorption, gel diffusion and antibody and antigen titrations indicated that some of the anti-liver, anti-kidney, anti-heart, anti-muscle and anti-brain sera contained organ-specific autoantibody. The sera also contained autoantibody reacting with widely distributed antigen(s), which was relatively labile at 65°. The anti-kidney and anti-brain sera reacted with distinct antigens which were extracted from rabbit kidney and brain with a mixture of chloroform and methanol. The natural autoantibody of Kidd and Friedewald was usually labile at 65° and behaved like a macroglobulin on sucrose gradient centrifugation. Sera taken 1 week after immunization with rat tissue contained heat-labile macroglobulin antibody. However, sera taken 1 month after immunization also contained small molecular weight antibody which was stable at 65°. PMID:13965166

  3. Adaptive control with self-tuning for non-invasive beat-by-beat blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Nogawa, Masamichi; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamakoshi, Takehiro; Tanaka, Shinobu; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Up to now, we have successfully carried out the non-invasive beat-by-beat measurement of blood pressure (BP) in the root of finger, superficial temporal and radial artery based on the volume-compensation technique with reasonable accuracy. The present study concerns with improvement of control method for this beat-by-beat BP measurement. The measurement system mainly consists of a partial pressurization cuff with a pair of LED and photo-diode for the detection of arterial blood volume, and a digital self-tuning control method. Using healthy subjects, the performance and accuracy of this system were evaluated through comparison experiments with the system using a conventional empirically tuned PID controller. The significant differences of BP measured in finger artery were not showed in systolic (SBP), p=0.52, and diastolic BP (DBP), p=0.35. With the advantage of the adaptive control with self-tuning method, which can tune the control parameters without disturbing the control system, the application area of the non-invasive beat-by-beat measurement method will be broadened.

  4. Autoantibody production in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Asherson, G. L.; Holborow, E. J.

    1966-01-01

    Rabbits received two injections of dead bacteria in Freund's complete adjuvant. One month later the sera of the rabbits were examined for autoantibodies against gut by indirect immunofluorescence using the rabbit's own stomach, ileum and colon taken at post mortem. Autoantibodies against colon were found in three out of seven rabbits injected with one particular strain of Escherichia coli O64 and in a few animals injected with other E. coli, Salmonella arizona, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus faecalis. The antigen, with which the autoantibodies reacted, behaved like mucus and was detected in the colon and sometimes in the ileum and the stomach. Three patterns of staining were observed: (a) staining of the superficial mucosa of the colon with sparing of the deep glands; (b) staining of scattered groups of glands in the deepest part of the colon with sparing of the superficial glands (this pattern of staining was associated with staining of the superficial mucosa of the body of the stomach); and (c) staining of both the superficial and deep glands of the colon. None of the sera tested reacted with the bronchial or salivary glands. Polysaccharide preparations of the colon, but not the stomach, inhibited the reaction of the autoantibodies with colon in the sera tested. The amount of antigen needed to inhibit the basal staining was much greater than that needed to inhibit the superficial staining. It was concluded that rabbits may produce autoantibodies to colon and in some cases to ileum and stomach following the injection of certain dead bacteria in Freund's complete adjuvant. ImagesFIGS. 1-2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4956607

  5. Mechanisms involved in the regulation of mRNA for M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and endothelial and neuronal NO synthases in rat atria

    PubMed Central

    Ganzinelli, S; Joensen, L; Borda, E; Bernabeo, G; Sterin-Borda, L

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Agonists of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) increase mRNA for this receptor and mRNA for endothelial and neuronal isoforms of NO synthase (eNOS or nNOS). Here we examine the different signalling pathways involved in such events in rat cardiac atria. Experimental approach: In isolated atria, the effects of carbachol on mRNA for M2 receptors, eNOS and nNOS were measured along with changes in phosphoinositide (PI) turnover, translocation of protein kinase C (PKC), NOS activity and atrial contractility. Key Results: Carbachol increased mRNA for M2 receptors, activation of PI turnover, translocation of PKC and NOS activity and decreased atrial contractility. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), calcium/calmodulin (CaM), NOS and PKC prevented the carbachol-dependent increase in mRNA for M2 receptors. These inhibitors also attenuated the carbachol induced increase in nNOS- and eNOS-mRNA levels. Inhibition of nNOS shifted the dose response curve of carbachol on contractility to the right, whereas inhibition of eNOS shifted it to the left. Conclusions and implications: From our results, activation of M2 receptors induced nNOS and eNOS expression and activation of NOS up-regulated M2 receptor gene expression. The signalling pathways involved included stimulation of PI turnover via PLC activation, CaM and PKC. nNOS and eNOS mediated opposing effects on the negative inotropic effect in atria, induced by stimulation of M2 receptors. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the effects and side effects of cholinomimetic treatment in patients with cardiac neuromyopathy. PMID:17384670

  6. Early repolarization as a predictor of premature ventricular beats.

    PubMed

    Matoshvili, Z T; Petriashvili, Sh G; Archadze, A T; Azaladze, I G

    2015-02-01

    Early repolarization pattern (ERP) is a common ECG variant, characterized by J point elevation manifested either as terminal QRS slurring (the transition from the QRS segment to the ST segment) or notching (a positive deflection inscribed on terminal QRS complex) associated with concave upward ST-segment elevation and prominent T waves in at least two contiguous leads. Aim of this observational study was to compare number of premature ventricular beats in the different groups of patients with early repolarization. The result of this observational study shows that there are: 1,74 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in 41-74 year subgroup VS 19-40 year subgroup; 1,31 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in male subgroup VS female subgroup (But this difference is not statistically significant, because t=1,49, p=0,141); 2,85 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in CAD+ERP subgroup VS ERP without CAD subgroup; 1,74 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in HF+ERP subgroup VS ERP without HF subgroup; 1,81 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in CAD+ERP subgroup VS CAD without ERP subgroup; 1,58 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in HF+ERP subgroup VS HF without ERP subgroup; So, CAD+ERP is very arrhythmogenic condition, after this is HF+ERP, Then Age. This study shows that ERP independently increase number of PVB in different groups (CAD, HF). This is principally new and very important result. Also the number of patients is enough to make this conclusion.

  7. From rabbit antibody repertoires to rabbit monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Justus; Peng, Haiyong; Rader, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we explain why and how rabbit monoclonal antibodies have become outstanding reagents for laboratory research and increasingly for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Starting with the unique ontogeny of rabbit B cells that affords highly distinctive antibody repertoires rich in in vivo pruned binders of high diversity, affinity and specificity, we describe the generation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology, phage display and alternative methods, along with an account of successful humanization strategies. PMID:28336958

  8. Rabbits killing birds revisited.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimin; Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang

    2006-09-01

    We formulate and study a three-species population model consisting of an endemic prey (bird), an alien prey (rabbit) and an alien predator (cat). Our model overcomes several model construction problems in existing models. Moreover, our model generates richer, more reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rabbit or the cat when the bird is endangered. We confirm the existence of the hyperpredation phenomenon, which is a big potential threat to most endemic prey. Specifically, we show that, in an endemic prey-alien prey-alien predator system, eradication of introduced predators such as the cat alone is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey since predator control may fail to protect the indigenous prey when the control of the introduced prey is not carried out simultaneously.

  9. Rabbit renotropic system

    SciTech Connect

    Areas, J.; Yun, G.C.; Rahmat, J.; Gersten, D.; Goel, R.; Preuss, H.G.

    1988-04-01

    Elevated levels of a specific renal growth factor, renotropin, have been associated with spontaneous hypertension. To examine this association more closely, we have undertaken the development of a better assay system to characterize and purify renotropin. Sera from rabbits prior to operation (control) and at a specified time after unilateral nephrectomy (uni) were examined for renotropic activity. Comparing the effects of uni to control sera in the same rabbit, significant stimulation of 3H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of primary rabbit kidney cultures incubated in D-valine medium to eliminate fibroblast growth was noted: at 3 days postoperatively 73% (n = 13), at 7 days 103% (n = 39), at 10 days 130% (n = 31), at 21 days 101% (n = 24), at 42 days 89% (n = 13). All values were at least P less than 0.01. The stimulatory properties were dose-dependent but reached a plateau at high serum concentrations. Comparing CPM/mg protein in uni/control in different concentrations of sera 7 days postoperatively, uni versus control were 67/44 at 5% v/v, 139/72 at 10% v/v, 261/161 at 20% v/v, and 243/136 at 40% v/v. The renotropic effect of uni sera remained after dialysis in incubation medium and after sera were heated in boiling water for 5 minutes. Renal extracts obtained from growing kidneys 7 days postnephrectomy augmented renotropic activity. Atrial natriuretic factor, ouabain, PGF2 alpha, PGE1, and cAMP did not possess renotropic activity. We conclude that the primary rabbit kidney culture assay for renotropin is highly sensitive and will be an important tool to comprehend the role of renotropin in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  10. Stimulation and inhibition of the sodium pump by cardioactive steroids in relation to their binding sites and their inotropic effect on guinea-pig isolated atria.

    PubMed Central

    Ghysel-Burton, J.; Godfraind, T.

    1979-01-01

    1 The actions of ouabain, ouabagenin and dihydroouabain on the contractility and on the ionic content have been investigated in left guinea-pig atria stimulated at 3.3 Hz. The specific binding of ouabain and its displacement by the other cardenolides have been determined. 2 The action of either ouabain or ouabagenin on Na and K content was qualitatively different according to the concentration employed. Low doses evoked a reduction of Nai whereas high doses produced an increase. Dihydroouabain evoked only a Nai gain. 3 The increase of KCl concentration from 2.7 to 12 mM decreased Nai in untreated atria and displaced ouabain dose-effect curves to the right. 4 ED50 values for the positive inotropic effect were lower than ED50 values for the inhibition of the pump and were not similarly affected by an increase in KCl concentration. 5 The specific binding of ouabain occurred at high and low affinity sites, related to Na pump stimulation and inhibition respectively. 6 The increase in KCl reduced the affinity of the two groups of sites for ouabain and increased the capacity of the high-affinity sites whereas the capacity of the other sites remained unchanged. 7 The results confirm the existence of two specific binding sites for ouabain in guinea-pig heart and suggest that the inhibition of the Na pump is not the only mechanism responsible for the positive inotropic effect of cardiac glycosides. PMID:465868

  11. Stimulation and inhibition of the sodium pump by cardioactive steroids in relation to their binding sites and their inotropic effect on guinea-pig isolated atria.

    PubMed

    Ghysel-Burton, J; Godfraind, T

    1979-06-01

    1 The actions of ouabain, ouabagenin and dihydroouabain on the contractility and on the ionic content have been investigated in left guinea-pig atria stimulated at 3.3 Hz. The specific binding of ouabain and its displacement by the other cardenolides have been determined. 2 The action of either ouabain or ouabagenin on Na and K content was qualitatively different according to the concentration employed. Low doses evoked a reduction of Nai whereas high doses produced an increase. Dihydroouabain evoked only a Nai gain. 3 The increase of KCl concentration from 2.7 to 12 mM decreased Nai in untreated atria and displaced ouabain dose-effect curves to the right. 4 ED50 values for the positive inotropic effect were lower than ED50 values for the inhibition of the pump and were not similarly affected by an increase in KCl concentration. 5 The specific binding of ouabain occurred at high and low affinity sites, related to Na pump stimulation and inhibition respectively. 6 The increase in KCl reduced the affinity of the two groups of sites for ouabain and increased the capacity of the high-affinity sites whereas the capacity of the other sites remained unchanged. 7 The results confirm the existence of two specific binding sites for ouabain in guinea-pig heart and suggest that the inhibition of the Na pump is not the only mechanism responsible for the positive inotropic effect of cardiac glycosides.

  12. Modulation of attosecond beating in resonant two-photon ionization.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Galán, Álvaro; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2014-12-31

    We present a theoretical study of the photoelectron attosecond beating due to interference of two-photon transitions in the presence of autoionizing states. We show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, both the phase shift and frequency of the sideband beating significantly vary with photon energy. Furthermore, the beating between two resonant paths persists even when the pump and the probe pulses do not overlap, thus providing a nonholographic interferometric means to reconstruct coherent metastable wave packets. We characterize these phenomena by means of a general analytical model that accounts for the effect of both intermediate and final resonances on two-photon processes. The model predictions are in excellent agreement with those of accurate ab initio calculations for the helium atom in the region of the N=2 doubly excited states.

  13. Modulation of Attosecond Beating in Resonant Two-Photon Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Galán, Álvaro; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    We present a theoretical study of the photoelectron attosecond beating due to interference of two-photon transitions in the presence of autoionizing states. We show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, both the phase shift and frequency of the sideband beating significantly vary with photon energy. Furthermore, the beating between two resonant paths persists even when the pump and the probe pulses do not overlap, thus providing a nonholographic interferometric means to reconstruct coherent metastable wave packets. We characterize these phenomena by means of a general analytical model that accounts for the effect of both intermediate and final resonances on two-photon processes. The model predictions are in excellent agreement with those of accurate ab initio calculations for the helium atom in the region of the N =2 doubly excited states.

  14. A Structural Basis for How Motile Cilia Beat

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Peter; Heuser, Thomas; Sale, Winfield S.

    2014-01-01

    The motile cilium is a mechanical wonder, a cellular nanomachine that produces a high-speed beat based on a cycle of bends that move along an axoneme made of 9+2 microtubules. The molecular motors, dyneins, power the ciliary beat. The dyneins are compacted into inner and outer dynein arms, whose activity is highly regulated to produce microtubule sliding and axonemal bending. The switch point hypothesis was developed long ago to account for how sliding in the presence of axonemal radial spoke–central pair interactions causes the ciliary beat. Since then, a new genetic, biochemical, and structural complexity has been discovered, in part, with Chlamydomonas mutants, with high-speed, high-resolution analysis of movement and with cryoelectron tomography. We stand poised on the brink of new discoveries relating to the molecular control of motility that extend and refine our understanding of the basic events underlying the switching of arm activity and of bend formation and propagation. PMID:26955066

  15. A Structural Basis for How Motile Cilia Beat.

    PubMed

    Satir, Peter; Heuser, Thomas; Sale, Winfield S

    2014-12-01

    The motile cilium is a mechanical wonder, a cellular nanomachine that produces a high-speed beat based on a cycle of bends that move along an axoneme made of 9+2 microtubules. The molecular motors, dyneins, power the ciliary beat. The dyneins are compacted into inner and outer dynein arms, whose activity is highly regulated to produce microtubule sliding and axonemal bending. The switch point hypothesis was developed long ago to account for how sliding in the presence of axonemal radial spoke-central pair interactions causes the ciliary beat. Since then, a new genetic, biochemical, and structural complexity has been discovered, in part, with Chlamydomonas mutants, with high-speed, high-resolution analysis of movement and with cryoelectron tomography. We stand poised on the brink of new discoveries relating to the molecular control of motility that extend and refine our understanding of the basic events underlying the switching of arm activity and of bend formation and propagation.

  16. Superresolution measurement of nanofiber diameter by modes beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, E. F.; Solano, P.; Hoffman, J. E.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Fatemi, F. K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanofibers are becoming an important tool in quantum information technologies for coupling photonics systems to atomic systems. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing these nanofibers prior to integration into an apparatus are desirable. In this work, we probe the light propagating in a fused silica optical nanofiber (750-nm-diameter) by coupling it evanescently to a 6- μm-diameter microfiber that is scanned along the nanofiber length. This technique is capable of observing all possible beat lengths among different propagating modes. The beat lengths are strongly dependent on the nanofiber diameter and refractive index of the fiber. The steep dependence has enabled measurements of the fiber diameter with sub-Angstrom sensitivity. The diameter extracted from the beat length measurements agrees with a measurement made using scanning electron microscopy. Work supported by NSF.

  17. On readout of vibrational qubits using quantum beats

    SciTech Connect

    Shyshlov, Dmytro; Babikov, Dmitri; Berrios, Eduardo; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-12-14

    Readout of the final states of qubits is a crucial step towards implementing quantum computation in experiment. Although not scalable to large numbers of qubits per molecule, computational studies show that molecular vibrations could provide a significant (factor 2–5 in the literature) increase in the number of qubits compared to two-level systems. In this theoretical work, we explore the process of readout from vibrational qubits in thiophosgene molecule, SCCl{sub 2}, using quantum beat oscillations. The quantum beats are measured by first exciting the superposition of the qubit-encoding vibrational states to the electronically excited readout state with variable time-delay pulses. The resulting oscillation of population of the readout state is then detected as a function of time delay. In principle, fitting the quantum beat signal by an analytical expression should allow extracting the values of probability amplitudes and the relative phases of the vibrational qubit states. However, we found that if this procedure is implemented using the standard analytic expression for quantum beats, a non-negligible phase error is obtained. We discuss the origin and properties of this phase error, and propose a new analytical expression to correct the phase error. The corrected expression fits the quantum beat signal very accurately, which may permit reading out the final state of vibrational qubits in experiments by combining the analytic fitting expression with numerical modelling of the readout process. The new expression is also useful as a simple model for fitting any quantum beat experiments where more accurate phase information is desired.

  18. On readout of vibrational qubits using quantum beats.

    PubMed

    Shyshlov, Dmytro; Berrios, Eduardo; Gruebele, Martin; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-12-14

    Readout of the final states of qubits is a crucial step towards implementing quantum computation in experiment. Although not scalable to large numbers of qubits per molecule, computational studies show that molecular vibrations could provide a significant (factor 2-5 in the literature) increase in the number of qubits compared to two-level systems. In this theoretical work, we explore the process of readout from vibrational qubits in thiophosgene molecule, SCCl2, using quantum beat oscillations. The quantum beats are measured by first exciting the superposition of the qubit-encoding vibrational states to the electronically excited readout state with variable time-delay pulses. The resulting oscillation of population of the readout state is then detected as a function of time delay. In principle, fitting the quantum beat signal by an analytical expression should allow extracting the values of probability amplitudes and the relative phases of the vibrational qubit states. However, we found that if this procedure is implemented using the standard analytic expression for quantum beats, a non-negligible phase error is obtained. We discuss the origin and properties of this phase error, and propose a new analytical expression to correct the phase error. The corrected expression fits the quantum beat signal very accurately, which may permit reading out the final state of vibrational qubits in experiments by combining the analytic fitting expression with numerical modelling of the readout process. The new expression is also useful as a simple model for fitting any quantum beat experiments where more accurate phase information is desired.

  19. Frequency beating between monolithically integrated semiconductor ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hongjun; Liu, Chiyu; Ling, Hai; Deng, Hui; Benavidez, Marcita; Smagley, Vladimir A.; Caldwell, Robert B.; Peake, Gregory M.; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Eliseev, Petr G.; Osiński, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Optoelectronic integrated circuits incorporating a pair of optically independent large-cavity semiconductor ring lasers (SRLs), directional couplers, waveguides, Y-junction mixer, and photodetectors are demonstrated. Counterclockwise and clockwise output beams from the two SRLs are collected separately and mixed prior to detection. Frequency beating between modes of two SRLs is measured. The beat frequency is fine-tuned by an integrated Joule heater, designed for thermal control of the lasing wavelength. No signs of frequency lock-in in the vicinity of zero detuning are observed, which makes this structure a promising candidate for applications in ring laser gyros and optical rotation sensors.

  20. Characterization of fluid transport due to multiciliary beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukens, Sarah; Yang, Xingzhou; Fauci, Lisa

    2008-11-01

    Understanding fluid transport caused by beating cilia can give insight on biological systems such as transport of respiratory mucus, ovum transport in the oviduct, and feeding currents around unicellular organisms. Here we investigate fluid transport due to coordinated beating of motile cilia based upon a computational model that couples their internal force generating mechanisms with external fluid dynamics. Velocity field data is used to identify Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) within the domain. These coherent structures give spatial information on fluid mixing and nutrient transport within this dynamic environment.

  1. Rabbit models of cardiac mechano-electric and mechano-mechanical coupling.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac auto-regulation involves integrated regulatory loops linking electrics and mechanics in the heart. Whereas mechanical activity is usually seen as 'the endpoint' of cardiac auto-regulation, it is important to appreciate that the heart would not function without feed-back from the mechanical environment to cardiac electrical (mechano-electric coupling, MEC) and mechanical (mechano-mechanical coupling, MMC) activity. MEC and MMC contribute to beat-by-beat adaption of cardiac output to physiological demand, and they are involved in various pathological settings, potentially aggravating cardiac dysfunction. Experimental and computational studies using rabbit as a model species have been integral to the development of our current understanding of MEC and MMC. In this paper we review this work, focusing on physiological and pathological implications for cardiac function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on pulmonary circulation in isolated rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Comellas, A; Tristano, S; Pesce, L; Friedman, E; Marcano, H; Sánchez de León, R

    1999-03-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of acute lung injury. The aim of this work is to study the effect of PAF on isolated and perfused rabbit lungs with blood and with a blood-free solution. 24 isolated and perfused rabbit lungs have been used: 8 control preparations (CP), 4 vehicles preparations (VP), 8 PAF preparations (PP) to which we administered PAF (1 microg/Kg of rabbit weight) and 4 acellular preparations (AP) with the same dose of PAF as in PP but dissolved in BSA-Krebs buffer solution. In the preparations pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa), airway pressure (Paw), left atria pressure (Pla) and fluid filtration rate (FFR) were registered. Ppa resulted in a significant difference in AP vs PP, with a value of 21 cm of water (CI 95%: 12-26) vs 205.1 cm of water (CI 95%: 141.3 - 271) respectively. A increase in FFR was observed in PP but it did not occur in AP, the difference being statistically significant: 5.515 g/min (CI 95 %: 2.425 - 8.865) vs 0.049 g/min (CI 95%: 0.008 - 0.32) respectively. Paw was statistically different in PP vs AP, with a value of 14.3 cm of water (CI 95%: 11.57 - 16.7) vs 8.5 cm of water (CI 95%: 8-9) respectively. These results suggest that PAF does not have a direct effect on the endothelium or smooth muscle in the production of lung edema.

  3. The brain responses to different frequencies of binaural beat sounds on QEEG at cortical level.

    PubMed

    Jirakittayakorn, Nantawachara; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2015-01-01

    Beat phenomenon is occurred when two slightly different frequency waves interfere each other. The beat can also occur in the brain by providing two slightly different frequency waves separately each ear. This is called binaural beat. The brain responses to binaural beat are in discussion process whether the brain side and the brain area. Therefore, this study aims to figure out the brain responses to binaural beat by providing different binaural beat frequencies on 250 carrier tone continuously for 30 minutes to participants and using quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) to interpret the data. The result shows that different responses appear in different beat frequency. Left hemisphere dominance occur in 3 Hz beat within 15 minutes and 15 Hz beat within 5 minutes. Right hemisphere dominance occurs in 10 Hz beat within 25 minute. 6 Hz beat enhances all area of the brain within 10 minutes. 8 Hz and 25 Hz beats have no clearly responses while 40 Hz beat enhances the responses in frontal lobe. These brain responses can be used for brain modulation application to induce the brain activity in further studies.

  4. Toe photoplethysmographic monitor, a promising noninvasive technique for tracking systolic blood pressure trends beat-to-beat.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhi Qing; Fan, Jin; Wang, Yu Tang

    2014-08-01

    The call for early detection of hypotension creates a heavy demand for new methods that can monitor trends in blood pressure (BP) levels continuously and noninvasively. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is widely used in hemodynamic analysis. We assessed the feasibility of toe PPG in tracing BP trends using BP readings obtained by standard intermittent noninvasive BP measurements from the arm of a patient with severe hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. We demonstrated that an attenuated or inversed dicrotic wave of toe PPG is predictive of BP trends, and this method could be applicable for the continuous noninvasive monitoring of systolic BP at a beat-by-beat basis.

  5. Analysis of ependymal ciliary beat pattern and beat frequency using high speed imaging: comparison with the photomultiplier and photodiode methods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare beat frequency measurements of ependymal cilia made by digital high speed imaging to those obtained using the photomultiplier and modified photodiode techniques. Using high speed video analysis the relationship of the power and recover strokes was also determined. Methods Ciliated strips of ependyma attached to slices from the brain of Wistar rats were incubated at 30°C and observed using a ×50 water immersion lens. Ciliary beat frequency was measured using each of the three techniques: the high speed video, photodiode and photomultiplier. Readings were repeated after 30 minutes incubation at 37°C. Ependymal cilia were observed in slow motion and the precise movement of cilia during the recovery stroke relative to the path travelled during the power stroke was measured. Results The mean (95% confidence intervals) beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 30°C were 27.7 (26.6 to 28.8), 25.5 (24.4 to 26.6) and 20.8 (20.4 to 21.3) Hz, respectively. The mean (95% confidence intervals) beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 37°C were 36.4 (34 to 39.5), 38.4 (36.8 to 39.9) and 18.8 (16.9 to 20.5) Hz. The inter and intra observer reliability for measurement of ciliary beat frequency was 3.8% and 1%, respectively. Ependymal cilia were observed to move in a planar fashion during the power and recovery strokes with a maximum deviation to the right of the midline of 12.1(11.8 to 13.0)° during the power stroke and 12.6(11.6 to 13.6)° to the left of the midline during the recovery stroke. Conclusion The photodiode technique greatly underestimates ciliary beat frequency and should not be used to measure ependymal ciliary beat frequency at the temperatures studied. Ciliary beat frequency from the high speed video and photomultiplier techniques cannot be used interchangeably. Ependymal cilia had minimal deviation to the right side

  6. Two dimensional wavelet energy analysis on a beat to beat basis: application to Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Filos, D; Chouvarda, I; Dakos, G; Vassilikos, V; Maglaveras, N

    2013-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is a condition in which heart rhythm is not associated with normal sinoatrial (SA) node pacemaker but it derives from different areas on the atrium, often from the area of Pulmonary veins (PVs) A way to eliminate the influence of PVs in the inducement of AF is the PVs isolation surgery. In this study, an effort is made towards investigating the morphology and dynamics of P-waves, when the potentially arrhythmogenic tissue in PVs is involved or isolated via ablation. For this reason, 20 patients who were subjected to PVs isolation were studied, via vectrorcardiography recordings obtained before and after the ablation. Wavelet energies for five frequency bands were analyzed, using a two dimensional representation. The proposed technique was applied for the analysis of wavelet energies in consecutive beats, and their correlation with the RR interval. Features for the evaluation of those plots were extracted, such as the axes of a fitted to the plot ellipse and the center of the mass. The statistical analysis demonstrated significant differences between the groups, which imply the modification of the atrial substrate concerning electrical conduction toward to a more stable condition.

  7. Beating Breast Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Beating Breast Cancer Winter 2017 Table of Contents Melanie Nix with ... Her mother had died at age 49 of breast cancer after three battles with the disease. Ovarian cancer ...

  8. Resonance of beats for states with equal angular momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Khvostenko, G.I.

    1995-01-01

    Induced beats for states with all equal angular momenta are considered. It is shown that an observable resonance signal is present in emission (in particular, in an integrated emission), whereas it is absent in integrated absorption of light from the initial intensity. 9 refs.

  9. Are African American Fraternities Beating Themselves to Death?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Beating of pledges, frequently leading to lawsuits and sometimes to death, has become a serious problem in black fraternities. Although black fraternities officially cracked down on hazing in 1990 in response to a student's death, many fear underground hazing has become even more dangerous. Incidents occur both on black and on white campuses.…

  10. Using Science and Much More to Beat the Flood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The Beat the Flood challenge involves designing and building a model flood-proof home, which is then tested in "flood" conditions. It is set on the fictitious Watu Island. The children form teams, with each team member being assigned a responsibility for the duration of the task--team leader, chief recorder, and resource manager. This…

  11. Phase Shifting and the Beating of Complex Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2011-01-01

    At the introductory level, the demonstration and analysis of sound beating is usually limited to the superposition of two purely sinusoidal waves with equal amplitudes and very similar frequencies. Under such conditions, an observer hears the periodic variation of the loudness of a sound with an unchanging timbre. On the other hand, when complex…

  12. Robust electrocardiogram (ECG) beat classification using discrete wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Fayyaz-ul-Amir Afsar; Arif, Muhammad

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a robust technique for the classification of six types of heartbeats through an electrocardiogram (ECG). Features extracted from the QRS complex of the ECG using a wavelet transform along with the instantaneous RR-interval are used for beat classification. The wavelet transform utilized for feature extraction in this paper can also be employed for QRS delineation, leading to reduction in overall system complexity as no separate feature extraction stage would be required in the practical implementation of the system. Only 11 features are used for beat classification with the classification accuracy of approximately 99.5% through a KNN classifier. Another main advantage of this method is its robustness to noise, which is illustrated in this paper through experimental results. Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) has been used for feature reduction, which reduces the number of features from 11 to 6 while retaining the high beat classification accuracy. Due to reduction in computational complexity (using six features, the time required is approximately 4 ms per beat), a simple classifier and noise robustness (at 10 dB signal-to-noise ratio, accuracy is 95%), this method offers substantial advantages over previous techniques for implementation in a practical ECG analyzer.

  13. Phase Shifting and the Beating of Complex Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2011-01-01

    At the introductory level, the demonstration and analysis of sound beating is usually limited to the superposition of two purely sinusoidal waves with equal amplitudes and very similar frequencies. Under such conditions, an observer hears the periodic variation of the loudness of a sound with an unchanging timbre. On the other hand, when complex…

  14. Are African American Fraternities Beating Themselves to Death?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Beating of pledges, frequently leading to lawsuits and sometimes to death, has become a serious problem in black fraternities. Although black fraternities officially cracked down on hazing in 1990 in response to a student's death, many fear underground hazing has become even more dangerous. Incidents occur both on black and on white campuses.…

  15. Using Science and Much More to Beat the Flood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The Beat the Flood challenge involves designing and building a model flood-proof home, which is then tested in "flood" conditions. It is set on the fictitious Watu Island. The children form teams, with each team member being assigned a responsibility for the duration of the task--team leader, chief recorder, and resource manager. This…

  16. More Booze Won't Beat Back That Hangover

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163781.html More Booze Won't Beat Back That Hangover Drinking coffee doesn't ease the agony either, substance abuse expert adds ... to believe, a hair of the dog isn't the best remedy after a night of heavy ...

  17. Robust detection of heart beats in multimodal data.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Behar, Joachim; Johnson, Alistair; Oster, Julien; Clifford, Gari D; Moody, George B

    2015-08-01

    This editorial reviews the background issues, the design, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology (CinC) Challenge 2014, published in the concurrent focus issue of Physiological Measurement. Our major focus was to accelerate the development and facilitate the comparison of robust methods for locating heart beats in long-term multi-channel recordings. A public (training) database consisting of 151 032 annotated beats was compiled from records that contained ECGs as well as pulsatile signals that directly reflect cardiac activity, and other signals that may have few or no observable markers of heart beats. A separate hidden test data set (consisting of 152 478 beats) is permanently stored at PhysioNet, and a public framework has been developed to provide researchers with the ability to continue to automatically score and compare the performance of their algorithms. A scoring criteria based on the averaging of gross sensitivity, gross positive predictivity, average sensitivity, and average positive predictivity is proposed. The top three scores (as of March 2015) on the hidden test data set were 93.64%, 91.50%, and 90.70%.

  18. Quantum beats in transitions from levels subject to optical cascades.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. J.; Druetta, M.; Church, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the g values of weakly aligned O II and O III multiplet levels subject to strong optical cascades, obtained by means of a beam-foil quantum beat method. Within the measurement precision limits of nearly plus or minus 1%, the effects of the optical cascades on the measured g values are shown to be negligible.

  19. Editorial: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Behar, Joachim; Johnson, Alistair; Oster, Julien; Clifford, Gari D.; Moody, George B.

    2015-01-01

    This editorial reviews the background issues, the design, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology (CinC) 2014 Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Our major focus was to accelerate the development and facilitate the comparison of robust methods for locating heart beats in long-term multi-channel recordings. A public (training) database consisting of 151,032 annotated beats was compiled from records that contained ECGs as well as pulsatile signals that directly reflect cardiac activity, and other signals that may have few or no observable markers of heart beats. A separate hidden test data set (consisting of 152,478 beats) is permanently stored at PhysioNet, and a public framework has been developed to provide researchers the ability to continue to automatically score and compare the performance of their algorithms. A scoring criteria based on the averaging of gross sensitivity, gross positive predictivity, average sensitivity, and average positive predictivity is proposed. The top three scores (as of March 2015) on the hidden test data set were 93.64%, 91.50%, and 90.70%. PMID:26217894

  20. INFECTIOUS MYXOMATOSIS OF RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, T. M.

    1930-01-01

    The virus of infectious myxomatosis of rabbits (Sanarelli) induces multiple lesions in the skin, lymph glands, tunica vaginalis,epididymis, testicle, spleen, and lungs. Growth and destruction of cells in the epidermis overlying the myxomatous masses leads to the formation of vesicles. Cytoplasmic inclusions are found in affected epidermal cells. Occasionally, similar inclusions are seen in other involved epithelial cells. The nature of the inclusions is an open question. In the myxomatous masses situated in the subcutaneous and other tissues, evidences of alteration and growth of certain cells are observed. PMID:19869741

  1. INFECTIOUS MYXOMATOSIS OF RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Smadel, Joseph E.; Ward, S. M.; Rivers, Thomas M.

    1940-01-01

    A second soluble antigen, separable from the virus, occurs in extracts of infected skin and in the serum of rabbits acutely ill with infectious myxomatosis. Like the first antigen (A), the second (B) is heat labile and has certain characteristics of a globulin. The two antigens precipitate in different concentrations of ammonium sulfate and can be separated by this method. Neither of the antigens after being heated at 56°C. precipitates in the presence of specific antibody but each is capable of inhibiting the activity of its antibody. PMID:19871012

  2. J point elevation as a predictor of premature ventricular beats.

    PubMed

    Matoshvili, Z; Petriashvili, Sh; Archvadze, A; Azaladze, I

    2014-01-01

    Early repolarization pattern (ERP) is a common ECG variant, characterized by J point elevation manifested either as terminal QRS slurring (the transition from the QRS segment to the ST segment) or notching (a positive deflection inscribed on terminal QRS complex) associated with concave upward ST-segment elevation and prominent T waves in at least two contiguous leads. 36 patients were included in this observation. There are 36 patients (19-68 years old) with early repolarization ECG patterns. All this 36 patients were divided into two groups according to their level of J point elevation. First group consisted of 12 patients with J point elevation ≥0,15 mV; second group - of 24 patients with J point elevation <0,15 mV. We make 24 h ECG holter monitoring all this patients to evaluate absolute number of premature ventricular beat during 24 h. Before and during this monitoring patients don't take any antyarrhythmic drugs. In the first group (J point elevation ≥0,15 mV) sum of premature ventricular beats were 27432, in the second group (J point elevation <0,15 mV) sum of premature ventricular beats were 31 896. The results of this observational study shows that there is 1,72 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in first group. So, J point elevation equal or more then 0,15 mV, is more arrhythmogenic and induces premature ventricular beats. This is principally new and very important result.

  3. Role of gap junction channel in the development of beat-to-beat action potential repolarization variability and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Janos; Banyasz, Tamas; Szentandrassy, Norbert; Kistamas, Kornel; Nanasi, Peter P; Satin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The short-term beat-to-beat variability of cardiac action potential duration (SBVR) occurs as a random alteration of the ventricular repolarization duration. SBVR has been suggested to be more predictive of the development of lethal arrhythmias than the action potential prolongation or QT prolongation of ECG alone. The mechanism underlying SBVR is not completely understood but it is known that SBVR depends on stochastic ion channel gating, intracellular calcium handling and intercellular coupling. Coupling of single cardiomyocytes significantly decreases the beat-to-beat changes in action potential duration (APD) due to the electrotonic current flow between neighboring cells. The magnitude of this electrotonic current depends on the intercellular gap junction resistance. Reduced gap junction resistance causes greater electrotonic current flow between cells, and reduces SBVR. Myocardial ischaemia (MI) is known to affect gap junction channel protein expression and function. MI increases gap junction resistance that leads to slow conduction, APD and refractory period dispersion, and an increase in SBVR. Ultimately, development of reentry arrhythmias and fibrillation are associated post-MI. Antiarrhythmic drugs have proarrhythmic side effects requiring alternative approaches. A novel idea is to target gap junction channels. Specifically, the use of gap junction channel enhancers and inhibitors may help to reveal the precise role of gap junctions in the development of arrhythmias. Since cell-to-cell coupling is represented in SBVR, this parameter can be used to monitor the degree of coupling of myocardium.

  4. Beat-to-beat measurement and analysis of the R-T interval in 24 h ECG Holter recordings.

    PubMed

    Speranza, G; Nollo, G; Ravelli, F; Antolini, R

    1993-09-01

    This study assesses the feasibility of beat-to-beat measurement of the R-T interval in Holter ECG recordings. The low sampling rate of the Holter system was increased by a specific interpolating filter, and the precision and accuracy of two T-wave fiducial point (T-wave maximum: Tm, T-wave end: Te) detection algorithms were compared. The results of the validation tests show better performance of the Tm measurement procedure in the presence of high noise levels. The overall process for the beat-to-beat R-T interval measurement was then tested on ECG Holter recordings collected during free and controlled respiration. Finally, the R-Tm and the corresponding R-R intervals were measured on 24 h ECG recordings of healthy subjects and the spectral analysis was applied to the constructed series. Both R-R and R-Tm spectra show two main frequency components (low-frequency approximately 0.1 Hz, high-frequency approximately 0.25 Hz) changing in their power ratios continuously throughout the 24 h period. The method described seems to provide a dynamic index of the sympatho-vagal balance at the ventricle that can be useful for a deeper understanding of ventricular repolarisation duration variability.

  5. Performance of Perceived Beat in Relation to Age and Music Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents results of study of perception of beat across range of stimulus speeds. Finds that college music majors and graduate students perceived faster rates of presentation as subdivisions of slower beat tempi. Concludes that nonmusic subjects perceived stimulus tones as beats regardless of rate of presentation. Urges further research using…

  6. Correlations in heart beat data as quantitative characterization of heart pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbikas, J.; Cenys, A.; Zemaityte, D.; Varoneckas, G.

    1996-06-01

    Correlation between heart pathology and statistical properties of heart beat data has been studied. It is shown that heart beat data has different scaling behavior for healthy and disease cases. Possibilities to develop new monitoring technique based on the permanent control of the correlations in heart beat data are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Left ventricular diastolic filling with an implantable ventricular assist device: beat to beat variability with overall improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Zhou, J.; Greenberg, N. L.; Savage, R. M.; McCarthy, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied the effects of left ventricular (LV) unloading by an implantable ventricular assist device on LV diastolic filling. BACKGROUND: Although many investigators have reported reliable systemic and peripheral circulatory support with implantable LV assist devices, little is known about their effect on cardiac performance. METHODS: Peak velocities of early diastolic filling, late diastolic filling, late to early filling ratio, deceleration time of early filling, diastolic filling period and atrial filling fraction were measured by intraoperative transesophageal Doppler echocardiography before and after insertion of an LV assist device in eight patients. A numerical model was developed to simulate this situation. RESULTS: Before device insertion, all patients showed either a restrictive or a monophasic transmitral flow pattern. After device insertion, transmitral flow showed rapid beat to beat variation in each patient, from abnormal relaxation to restrictive patterns. However, when the average values obtained from 10 consecutive beats were considered, overall filling was significantly normalized from baseline, with early filling velocity falling from 87 +/- 31 to 64 +/- 26 cm/s (p < 0.01) and late filling velocity rising from 8 +/- 11 to 32 +/- 23 cm/s (p < 0.05), resulting in an increase in the late to early filling ratio from 0.13 +/- 0.18 to 0.59 +/- 0.38 (p < 0.01) and a rise in the atrial filling fraction from 8 +/- 10% to 26 +/- 17% (p < 0.01). The deceleration time (from 112 +/- 40 to 160 +/- 44 ms, p < 0.05) and the filling period corrected by the RR interval (from 39 +/- 8% to 54 +/- 10%, p < 0.005) were also significantly prolonged. In the computer model, asynchronous LV assistance produced significant beat to beat variation in filling indexes, but overall a normalization of deceleration time as well as other variables. CONCLUSIONS: With LV assistance, transmitral flow showed rapidly varying patterns beat by beat in each patient, but

  8. Left ventricular diastolic filling with an implantable ventricular assist device: beat to beat variability with overall improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Zhou, J.; Greenberg, N. L.; Savage, R. M.; McCarthy, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied the effects of left ventricular (LV) unloading by an implantable ventricular assist device on LV diastolic filling. BACKGROUND: Although many investigators have reported reliable systemic and peripheral circulatory support with implantable LV assist devices, little is known about their effect on cardiac performance. METHODS: Peak velocities of early diastolic filling, late diastolic filling, late to early filling ratio, deceleration time of early filling, diastolic filling period and atrial filling fraction were measured by intraoperative transesophageal Doppler echocardiography before and after insertion of an LV assist device in eight patients. A numerical model was developed to simulate this situation. RESULTS: Before device insertion, all patients showed either a restrictive or a monophasic transmitral flow pattern. After device insertion, transmitral flow showed rapid beat to beat variation in each patient, from abnormal relaxation to restrictive patterns. However, when the average values obtained from 10 consecutive beats were considered, overall filling was significantly normalized from baseline, with early filling velocity falling from 87 +/- 31 to 64 +/- 26 cm/s (p < 0.01) and late filling velocity rising from 8 +/- 11 to 32 +/- 23 cm/s (p < 0.05), resulting in an increase in the late to early filling ratio from 0.13 +/- 0.18 to 0.59 +/- 0.38 (p < 0.01) and a rise in the atrial filling fraction from 8 +/- 10% to 26 +/- 17% (p < 0.01). The deceleration time (from 112 +/- 40 to 160 +/- 44 ms, p < 0.05) and the filling period corrected by the RR interval (from 39 +/- 8% to 54 +/- 10%, p < 0.005) were also significantly prolonged. In the computer model, asynchronous LV assistance produced significant beat to beat variation in filling indexes, but overall a normalization of deceleration time as well as other variables. CONCLUSIONS: With LV assistance, transmitral flow showed rapidly varying patterns beat by beat in each patient, but

  9. Correlation between P-wave Morphology and Origin of Atrial Focal Tachycardia – Insights from Realistic Models of the Human Atria and Torso

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Michael A.; Aslanidi, Oleg V.; Stott, Jonathan; Holden, Arun V.; Zhang, Henggui

    2011-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias resulting from abnormally rapid focal activity in the artia may be reflected in an altered P-wave morphology (PWM) in the ECG. Although clinically important, detailed relationships between PWM and origins of atrial focal excitations has not been established. To study such relationships, we developed computational models of the human atria and torso. The model simulation results were used to evaluate an extant clinical algorithm for locating the origin of atrial focal points from the ECG. The simulations showed that the algorithm was practical, and could predict the atrial focal locations with 85% accuracy. We proposed a further refinement of the algorithm to distinguish between focal locations within large atrial bundles. PMID:21742568

  10. Correlative anatomy for the electrophysiologist: ablation for atrial fibrillation. Part II: regional anatomy of the atria and relevance to damage of adjacent structures during AF ablation.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Paula G; Kapa, Suraj; Mears, Jennifer A; Fratianni, Amy; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2010-07-01

    Ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation have become an established and increasingly used option for managing patients with symptomatic arrhythmia. The anatomic structures relevant to the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation and ablation procedures are varied and include the pulmonary veins, other thoracic veins, the left atrial myocardium, and autonomic ganglia. Exact regional anatomic knowledge of these structures is essential to allow correlation with fluoroscopy and electrograms and, importantly, to avoid complications from damage of adjacent structures within the chest. We present this information as a series of 2 articles. In a prior issue, we have discussed the thoracic vein anatomy relevant to paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the present article, we focus on the atria themselves, the autonomic ganglia, and anatomic issues relevant for minimizing complications during atrial fibrillation ablation.

  11. KCNE2 protein is more abundant in ventricles than in atria and can accelerate hERG protein degradation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Wang, Yuhong; Jiang, Min; Zankov, Dimitar P.; Chowdhury, Sabeeha; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2012-01-01

    KCNE2 functions as an auxiliary subunit in voltage-gated K and HCN channels in the heart. Genetic variations in KCNE2 have been linked to long QT syndrome. The underlying mechanisms are not entirely clear. One of the issues is whether KCNE2 protein is expressed in ventricles. We use adenovirus-mediated genetic manipulations of adult cardiac myocytes to validate two antibodies (termed Ab1 and Ab2) for their ability to detect native KCNE2 in the heart. Ab1 faithfully detects native KCNE2 proteins in spontaneously hypertensive rat and guinea pig hearts. In both cases, KCNE2 protein is more abundant in ventricles than in atria. In both ventricular and atrial myocytes, KCNE2 protein is preferentially distributed on the cell surface. Ab1 can detect a prominent KCNE2 band in human ventricular muscle from nonfailing hearts. The band intensity is much fainter in atria and in failing ventricles. Ab2 specifically detects S98 phosphorylated KCNE2. Through exploring the functional significance of S98 phosphorylation, we uncover a novel mechanism by which KCNE2 modulates the human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) current amplitude: by accelerating hERG protein degradation and thus reducing the hERG protein level on the cell surface. S98 phosphorylation appears to be required for this modulation, so that S98 dephosphorylation leads to an increase in hERG/rapid delayed rectifier current amplitude. Our data confirm that KCNE2 protein is expressed in the ventricles of human and animal models. Furthermore, KCNE2 can modulate its partner channel function not only by altering channel conductance and/or gating kinetics, but also by affecting protein stability. PMID:22180649

  12. The role of calcium in the effects of noradrenaline and phenoxybenzamine on adrenergic transmitter release from atria: no support for negative feedback of release

    PubMed Central

    Kalsner, Stanley

    1981-01-01

    1 The relation of calcium ion influx into nerve terminals to presynaptic adrenoceptor function and the possible masking, by desensitization due to intraneuronal calcium accumulation, of the effects of adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on presynaptic α-adrenoceptors was investigated in guinea-pig atria previously incubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. 2 Atria were stimulated with 100 pulses at various frequencies (1 to 15 Hz) in standard (2.3 mm), low (0.26 mm) and high (6.9 mm) calcium-Krebs solution in the absence and then the presence first of noradrenaline and subsequently phenoxybenzamine. 3 The per pulse overflow of tritium was directly related to the calcium concentration of the Krebs solution, being much reduced and substantially increased in 0.26 and 6.9 mm calcium-Krebs solutions respectively. 4 Noradrenaline inhibited the overflow of tritium in low calcium-Krebs solution, to a relatively constant extent, independently of frequency. In addition, the agonist had a greater maximal inhibitory effect in standard than in reduced calcium-Krebs. The catecholamine was as effective an inhibitor of overflow at the lowest and highest frequencies in high as it was in standard calcium-Krebs solution. Phenoxybenzamine invariably increased the tritium overflow but was generally less effective both in low and in high calcium-Krebs solution. The patterns of inhibition and enhancement of stimulation-induced tritium overflow by these two agents do not indicate an intimate relationship between calcium influx and adrenoceptor activation; nor does desensitization appear to be an adequate explanation of the relationship between frequency of stimulation and the intensity of agonist and antagonist effect in the three different calcium concentrations. 5 It is concluded that the perineuronal levels of adrenergic transmitter do not establish the magnitudes of effect of exogenous adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on tritium overflow and that a negative feedback regulation of

  13. Novel non-invasive algorithm to identify the origins of re-entry and ectopic foci in the atria from 64-lead ECGs: A computational study

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Atrial tachy-arrhytmias, such as atrial fibrillation (AF), are characterised by irregular electrical activity in the atria, generally associated with erratic excitation underlain by re-entrant scroll waves, fibrillatory conduction of multiple wavelets or rapid focal activity. Epidemiological studies have shown an increase in AF prevalence in the developed world associated with an ageing society, highlighting the need for effective treatment options. Catheter ablation therapy, commonly used in the treatment of AF, requires spatial information on atrial electrical excitation. The standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) provides a method for non-invasive identification of the presence of arrhythmia, due to irregularity in the ECG signal associated with atrial activation compared to sinus rhythm, but has limitations in providing specific spatial information. There is therefore a pressing need to develop novel methods to identify and locate the origin of arrhythmic excitation. Invasive methods provide direct information on atrial activity, but may induce clinical complications. Non-invasive methods avoid such complications, but their development presents a greater challenge due to the non-direct nature of monitoring. Algorithms based on the ECG signals in multiple leads (e.g. a 64-lead vest) may provide a viable approach. In this study, we used a biophysically detailed model of the human atria and torso to investigate the correlation between the morphology of the ECG signals from a 64-lead vest and the location of the origin of rapid atrial excitation arising from rapid focal activity and/or re-entrant scroll waves. A focus-location algorithm was then constructed from this correlation. The algorithm had success rates of 93% and 76% for correctly identifying the origin of focal and re-entrant excitation with a spatial resolution of 40 mm, respectively. The general approach allows its application to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant extension to

  14. Association between beat-to-beat blood pressure variability and vascular elasticity in normal young adults during the cold pressor test

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yufa; Wu, Dan; Gao, Zhifan; Liu, Xin; Chen, Qian; Ren, Lijie; Wu, Wanqing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) monitoring parameters, such as average beat-to-beat BP, BP variability (BPV), could have an influence on the vascular elasticity. This study hypothesized that the elevated beat-to-beat BPV could evoke the reduction of the vascular elasticity independent of BP levels. We measured the beat-to-beat BP recordings and total arterial compliance (TAC), which was used to assess the vascular elasticity, in 80 young healthy adults during the cold pressor test (CPT). The CPT included 3 phases: baseline phase, cold stimulus phase, recovery phase. Six parameters were used to estimate BPV. In bivariate correlation analysis, TAC showed a significant correlation with systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) in the cold stimulus phase; and 4 indices of SBP variability (SBPV) were associated with TAC (r = 0.271∼0.331, P ≤ 0.015) in the recovery phase; similarly, 2 indices of DBP variability (DBPV) were also correlated with TAC (r = 0.221∼0.285, P ≤ 0.048) in the recovery phase. In multivariate regression analysis, DBPV (β = 0.229, P = 0.001) was a determinant of TAC independent of average DBP, sex, and weight. In addition, both beat-to-beat BP and BPV values increased in the cold stimulus phase (P < 0.01); whereas, the TAC decreased in the cold stimulus phase (P < 0.01). In conclusion, these data suggest that the beat-to-beat DBPV shows an independent association with the vascular elasticity in young normal adults during the CPT. PMID:28225488

  15. Incomplete Relaxation between Beats after Myocardial Hypoxia and Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Weisfeldt, Myron L.; Armstrong, Paul; Scully, Hugh E.; Sanders, Charles A.; Daggett, Willard M.

    1974-01-01

    Recovery from hypoxia has been shown to prolong cardiac muscle contraction, particularly the relaxation phase. The present studies were designed to examine whether incomplete relaxation between beats can result from this prolongation of contraction and relaxation in isolated muscle after hypoxia and in the canine heart after both hypoxia and acute ischemia. The relationship between heart rate and the extent of incomplete relaxation is emphasized in view of the known enhancement of the velocity of contraction caused by increasing heart rate. The extent of incomplete relaxation during 10-s periods of pacing at increasing rates was examined before and after hypoxia in isometric cat right ventricular papillary muscle (12-120 beats/min) and in the canine isovolumic left ventricle (120-180 beats/min). Incomplete relaxation was quantified by measuring the difference between the lowest diastolic tension or pressure during pacing and the true resting tension or pressure determined by interruption of pacing at each rate. In eight cat papillary muscles (29°C), there was significantly greater incomplete relaxation 5 min after hypoxia at rates of 96 and 120 beats/min (P < 0.02 vs. before hypoxia). In seven canine isovolumic left ventricles, recovery from hypoxia and higher heart rates also resulted in incomplete relaxation. Incomplete relaxation before hypoxia at a rate of 180 beats/min was 0.8±0.5 cm H2O and at 5 min of recovery from hypoxia was 12.6±3.5 cm H2O (P < 0.01). 12 hearts were subjected to a 1.5-3-min period of acute ischemia and fibrillation. There was significant incomplete relaxation at a rate of 140 beats/min for 5 min after defibrillation and reperfusion. These data indicate that incomplete relaxation is an important determinant of diastolic hemodynamics during recovery from ischemia or hypoxia. The extent of incomplete relaxation appears to be a function of the rate of normalization of the velocity of relaxation and tension development after ischemia or

  16. Oculoscopy in Rabbits and Rodents.

    PubMed

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2015-09-01

    Ophthalmic diseases are common in rabbits and rodents. Fast and definitive diagnosis is imperative for successful treatment of ocular diseases. Ophthalmic examination in rabbits and rodents can be challenging. Oculoscopy offers great magnification for the examination of the ocular structures in such animals, including the evaluation of cornea, anterior eye chamber, limbus, iris, lens, and retina. To date, oculoscopy has been described only sporadically and/or under experimental conditions. This article describes the oculoscopy technique, normal and abnormal ocular findings, and the most common eye disorders diagnosed with the aid of endoscopy in rabbits and rodents.

  17. Identification of the impact direction using the beat signals detected by piezoceramic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Linsheng; Li, Xu; Chen, Dongdong; Li, Hongnan; Song, Gangbing

    2017-08-01

    The beat phenomenon may be observed in a free vibration test with piezoceramic sensors. In contrast to exponential decay vibration, the beat signal is characterized as decreasing or increasing periodically. The beat phenomenon in the piezoelectric sensors is caused by the combination of signals of an oblique impact coming from two orthogonal directions of structures. An impact direction determination method based on the beat signal is proposed in this paper. The proposed method was verified through an impact test on a steel column specimen. The results showed that the proposed method can effectively identify the impact direction by using the envelope of the beat signal of the piezoelectric sensor.

  18. Urethral healing in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Scherz, H C; Kaplan, G W; Boychuk, D I; Landa, H M; Haghighi, P

    1992-08-01

    We studied urethral healing in New Zealand white rabbits by histological examination after insult (urethral catheter) or injury (urethrotomy) specifically for acute and chronic inflammation, fibrosis, fistulas, squamous metaplasia, foreign body giant cells and urethral dilatation. Urethral catheterization resulted in increased inflammation and fibrosis compared to noncatheterized animals. Skin closure techniques and materials resulted in an inflammatory response that may extend to and involve the urethra. Minor differences in suture size were not an important variable but the persistence of suture material may have a role in the degree of inflammation and the formation of foreign body giant cells. Transepithelial closure techniques drag epithelial cells into subcutaneous tissues and may predispose to fistula formation.

  19. Exogenous midkine administration prevents cardiac remodeling in pacing-induced congestive heart failure of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Harada, Masahide; Hojo, Mayumi; Kamiya, Kaichiro; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Murohara, Toyoaki; Kodama, Itsuo; Horiba, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Midkine (MK), a heparin-binding growth factor, has been shown to prevent cardiac remodeling after ischemic injury through its anti-apoptotic effect. Cell apoptosis is central to the pathophysiology of cardiac remodeling in congestive heart failure (CHF) of ischemic as well as non-ischemic origin. We hypothesized that MK exerts the anti-apoptotic cardioprotective effect in CHF of non-ischemic etiology. MK protein or vehicle (normal saline) was subcutaneously administered in tachycardia-induced CHF rabbits (right ventricular pacing, 350 beats/min, 4 weeks). The vehicle-treated rabbits (n = 19, control) demonstrated severe CHF and high mortality rate, whereas MK (n = 16) demonstrated a well-compensated state and a lower mortality rate. In echocardiography, left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic dimension decreased in MK versus control, whereas LV systolic function increased. In histological analysis (picrosirius red staining), MK decreased collagen deposition area compared with control. TUNEL staining showed that MK prevented cell apoptosis and minimized myocyte loss in the CHF rabbit ventricle, associated with activation of PI3-K/Akt signaling, producing a parallel decrease of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. MK prevented progression of cardiac remodeling in the CHF rabbit, likely by activation of anti-apoptotic signaling. Exogenous MK application might be a novel therapeutic strategy for CHF due to non-ischemic origin.

  20. Recovery of spray paint traces from clothing by beating.

    PubMed

    Olderiks, Maurice; Baiker, Martin; van Velzen, Jill; van der Weerd, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    Manual recovery of spray paints from textiles using a microscope, the routine method in many laboratories, is often laborious. Beating the clothing with a plastic rod, the routine method used for recovery of glass traces within the authors' laboratory, is proposed as an alternative. The efficiency of the method was evaluated by spray tests with fluorescent paint. In these tests, paint particles in the acquired debris samples, as well as those remaining on the textiles, were investigated. The results show that beating is an efficient way to recover and concentrate paint particles. A good efficiency for jeans fabric and rough knitwear is reported. The results appeared to be less satisfactory for smooth woven fabric. Application of the method in casework was effective for graffiti paints as well as for flaked car paint. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Multiple beats of weakly confined excitons with inverted selection rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Hideki; Ishihara, Hajime

    2009-05-01

    The phenomenon of multiple beats (MBs) arising from nondipole-type excitons weakly confined in a thin film is theoretically elucidated using a nonlocal transient-response theory. Kojima previously demonstrated for a GaAs thin film that the degenerate four-wave mixing signals from the quantized levels of the center-of-mass motion of excitons exhibit complex interference between beats under femtosecond-order pulse incidence [Kojima , J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 77, 044701 (2008)]. This leads to an ultrafast optical response on the order of femtoseconds. This effect occurs in a size region beyond the long-wavelength approximation regime due to the resonant enhancement of the internal field, wherein the usual dipole selection rule is violated. Our analysis of MBs employs a model of the nonlocal multilevel system that considers the spatial interplay between excitonic waves and the radiation field to elucidate the mechanism behind the observed ultrafast response.

  2. Active Phase and Amplitude Fluctuations of Flagellar Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Klindt, Gary S.; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Jülicher, Frank; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2014-07-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats periodically, driven by the oscillatory dynamics of molecular motors, to propel cells and pump fluids. Small but perceivable fluctuations in the beat of individual flagella have physiological implications for synchronization in collections of flagella as well as for hydrodynamic interactions between flagellated swimmers. Here, we characterize phase and amplitude fluctuations of flagellar bending waves using shape mode analysis and limit-cycle reconstruction. We report a quality factor of flagellar oscillations Q =38.0±16.7 (mean±s.e.). Our analysis shows that flagellar fluctuations are dominantly of active origin. Using a minimal model of collective motor oscillations, we demonstrate how the stochastic dynamics of individual motors can give rise to active small-number fluctuations in motor-cytoskeleton systems.

  3. Control of conditional quantum beats in cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimmarusti, Andres; Pimenta, Wanderson; Patterson, Burkley; Orozco, Luis; Barberis-Blostein, Pablo; Carmichael, Howard

    2013-05-01

    We present a feedback mechanism to preserve the Zeeman coherence of a conditional ground state superposition. We monitor the state by looking at quantum beats generated on the second order correlation function of the output of a driven two-mode cavity QED system. The decoherence is produced by phase diffusion due to Rayleigh scattering. We show how to prevent a shift in the Larmor frequency associated with this scattering. The protocol consists of turning off the drive of the system after the detection of a first photon and letting it evolve in the dark. Restoring the drive after a set time shows phase accumulation only from Larmor precession, and the amplitude of the quantum beat can increase by more than a factor of two with respect to continuous drive. We are exploring other protocols that rely on postselection. Work supported by NSF, USA; CONACYT, Mexico; FAPEMIG, Brazil; and the Marsden Fund of RSNZ.

  4. The Effect of Binaural Beats on Visuospatial Working Memory and Cortical Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A.; Leonessa, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Binaural beats utilize a phenomenon that occurs within the cortex when two different frequencies are presented separately to each ear. This procedure produces a third phantom binaural beat, whose frequency is equal to the difference of the two presented tones and which can be manipulated for non-invasive brain stimulation. The effects of binaural beats on working memory, the system in control of temporary retention and online organization of thoughts for successful goal directed behavior, have not been well studied. Furthermore, no studies have evaluated the effects of binaural beats on brain connectivity during working memory tasks. In this study, we determined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions on participant response accuracy and cortical network topology, as measured by EEG recordings, during a visuospatial working memory task. Three acoustic stimulation control conditions and three binaural beat stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5Hz binaural beats, 10Hz binaural beats, and 15Hz binaural beats. We found that listening to 15Hz binaural beats during a visuospatial working memory task not only increased the response accuracy, but also modified the strengths of the cortical networks during the task. The three auditory control conditions and the 5Hz and 10Hz binaural beats all decreased accuracy. Based on graphical network analyses, the cortical activity during 15Hz binaural beats produced networks characteristic of high information transfer with consistent connection strengths throughout the visuospatial working memory task. PMID:27893766

  5. The Effect of Binaural Beats on Visuospatial Working Memory and Cortical Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A; Leonessa, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Binaural beats utilize a phenomenon that occurs within the cortex when two different frequencies are presented separately to each ear. This procedure produces a third phantom binaural beat, whose frequency is equal to the difference of the two presented tones and which can be manipulated for non-invasive brain stimulation. The effects of binaural beats on working memory, the system in control of temporary retention and online organization of thoughts for successful goal directed behavior, have not been well studied. Furthermore, no studies have evaluated the effects of binaural beats on brain connectivity during working memory tasks. In this study, we determined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions on participant response accuracy and cortical network topology, as measured by EEG recordings, during a visuospatial working memory task. Three acoustic stimulation control conditions and three binaural beat stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5Hz binaural beats, 10Hz binaural beats, and 15Hz binaural beats. We found that listening to 15Hz binaural beats during a visuospatial working memory task not only increased the response accuracy, but also modified the strengths of the cortical networks during the task. The three auditory control conditions and the 5Hz and 10Hz binaural beats all decreased accuracy. Based on graphical network analyses, the cortical activity during 15Hz binaural beats produced networks characteristic of high information transfer with consistent connection strengths throughout the visuospatial working memory task.

  6. The role of the basal ganglia in beat perception: neuroimaging and neuropsychological investigations.

    PubMed

    Grahn, Jessica A

    2009-07-01

    Perception of musical rhythms is culturally universal. Despite this special status, relatively little is known about the neurobiology of rhythm perception, particularly with respect to beat processing. Findings are presented here from a series of studies that have specifically examined the neural basis of beat perception, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and studying patients with Parkinson's disease. fMRI data indicate that novel beat-based sequences robustly activate the basal ganglia when compared to irregular, nonbeat sequences. Furthermore, although most healthy participants find it much easier to discriminate changes in beat-based sequences compared to irregular sequences, Parkinson's disease patients fail to show the same degree of benefit. Taken together, these data suggest that the basal ganglia are performing a crucial function in beat processing. The results of an additional fMRI study indicate that the role of the basal ganglia is strongly linked to internal generation of the beat. Basal ganglia activity is greater when participants listen to rhythms in which internal generation of the beat is required, as opposed to rhythms with strongly externally cued beats. Functional connectivity between part of the basal ganglia (the putamen) and cortical motor areas (premotor and supplementary motor areas) is also higher during perception of beat rhythms compared to nonbeat rhythms. Increased connectivity between cortical motor and auditory areas is found in those with musical training. The findings from these converging methods strongly implicate the basal ganglia in processing a regular beat, particularly when internal generation of the beat is required.

  7. An efficient method for ectopic beats cancellation based on radial basis function.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Jorge; Torres, Ana; Rieta, José J

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the surface Electrocardiogram (ECG) is the most extended noninvasive technique in cardiological diagnosis. In order to properly use the ECG, we need to cancel out ectopic beats. These beats may occur in both normal subjects and patients with heart disease, and their presence represents an important source of error which must be handled before any other analysis. This paper presents a method for electrocardiogram ectopic beat cancellation based on Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN). A train-able neural network ensemble approach to develop customized electrocardiogram beat classifier in an effort to further improve the performance of ECG processing and to offer individualized health care is presented. Six types of beats including: Normal Beats (NB); Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVC); Left Bundle Branch Blocks (LBBB); Right Bundle Branch Blocks (RBBB); Paced Beats (PB) and Ectopic Beats (EB) are obtained from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Four morphological features are extracted from each beat after the preprocessing of the selected records. Average Results for the RBFNN based method provided an ectopic beat reduction (EBR) of (mean ± std) EBR = 7, 23 ± 2.18 in contrast to traditional compared methods that, for the best case, yielded EBR = 4.05 ± 2.13. The results prove that RBFNN based methods are able to obtain a very accurate reduction of ectopic beats together with low distortion of the QRST complex.

  8. Binaural Beat Technology: A Complementary Path to Post Deployment Wellness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-16

    brainwave frequency (4-7 Hz) in music using Binaural Beat Technology (BBT) compared to using music alone on the cardiovascular stress response in military...service members with chronic stress following deployment. Design: Double-blinded, randomized, pre and post-intervention trial Methods...for at least three consecutive nights per week, for four weeks. A 20-minute pre and post-intervention heartrate variability (HRV) stress test and

  9. Quantum Beats of Resonant Tunneling between Fractional Quantum Hall Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, Ilari J.; Goldman, V. J.

    1997-03-01

    We report measurements of resonant tunneling between two fractional quantum Hall edges in a quantum antidot geometry (I. J. Maasilta and V. J. Goldman, to appear in Phys. Rev. B 55),(1997).. We observe beats in the conductance oscillations, whose evolution as a function of experimental parameters is discussed. Possible explanations in terms of different models (G. Kirczenow Phys. Rev. B 53), 15767 (1996), M. Geller et. al, preprint. are presented.

  10. Visualization of calcium transients controlling orientation of ciliary beat.

    PubMed

    Tamm, S L; Terasaki, M

    1994-06-01

    To image changes in intraciliary Ca controlling ciliary motility, we microinjected Ca Green dextran, a visible wavelength fluorescent Ca indicator, into eggs or two cell stages of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi. The embryos developed normally into free-swimming, approximately 0.5 mm cydippid larvae with cells and ciliary comb plates (approximately 100 microns long) loaded with the dye. Comb plates of larvae, like those of adult ctenophores, undergo spontaneous or electrically stimulated reversal of beat direction, triggered by Ca influx through voltage-sensitive Ca channels. Comb plates of larvae loaded with Ca Green dextran emit spontaneous or electrically stimulated fluorescent flashes along the entire length of their cilia, correlated with ciliary reversal. Fluorescence intensity peaks rapidly (34-50 ms), then slowly falls to resting level in approximately 1 s. Electrically stimulated Ca Green emissions often increase in steps to a maximum value near the end of the stimulus pulse train, and slowly decline in 1-2 s. In both spontaneous and electrically stimulated flashes, measurements at multiple sites along a single comb plate show that Ca Green fluorescence rises within 17 ms (1 video field) and to a similar relative extent above resting level from base to tip of the cilia. The decline of fluorescence intensity also begins simultaneously and proceeds at similar rates along the ciliary length. Ca-free sea water reversibly abolishes spontaneous and electrically stimulated Ca Green ciliary emissions as well as reversed beating. Calculations of Ca diffusion from the ciliary base show that Ca must enter the comb plate along the entire length of the ciliary membranes. The voltage-dependent Ca channels mediating changes in beat direction are therefore distributed over the length of the comb plate cilia. The observed rapid and virtually instantaneous Ca signal throughout the intraciliary space may be necessary for reprogramming the pattern of dynein activity

  11. Ca2+ flux and beating in leaky heart cells.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S

    1980-01-01

    Previous work has shown that beating heart muscle cells with leaky sarcolemmae take up Ca2+ from the medium at a rate of 5.4 nmol/min/mg of protein while beating at a rate of 44 b.p.m. In the present work, we have used fragments of myocardium (MF), composed of such cells, to measure Ca2+ effux velocity and to compare influx and efflux rates to contraction frequency. The MF were estimated to be three cells thick, five cells wide, and three cells long, on the average. With MF suspended in fresh Pi-buffered medium containing 8.7 mumol/liter total Ca2+, the initial velocity of Ca2+ uptake (Vi) was much greater than the initial velocity of efflux (Vo). Vi, but not Vo, covaried with beating as a function of temperature and also showed ATP dependence. Thus, uptake, but not efflux, is a controlled process coupled to beating under these conditions. When cells were preloaded with Ca2+ and resuspended in Ca2+-depleted medium (total Ca2+ about 1 mumol/liter), approximating the steady state condition, Vi was reduced while Vo increased proportionally. These data suggest that contraction-activating Ca2+ is derived from extracellular sources during the pre-steady state conditions used here. Derivation from intracellular sites could occur in the steady state. The pre-steady state results conflict with mechanical behavior studies by us and others and, with Ca2+ flux in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The steady state results suggest that this conflict may be due to differences in Ca2+ loading and [Ca2+]i/[Ca2+]o.

  12. Wave and particle dynamics of the beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, P. )

    1989-10-15

    We present two-dimensional wave-envelope studies of the interaction between a plasma beat-wave and the laser pumps which drive it. A new method of focusing is demonstrated which requires the plasma wave to be driven slightly below its resonant frequency. Test particles are employed to investigate possible means of extending the accelerator stage length. {copyright} 1989 American Institute of Physics

  13. Exposure to hog barn dust alters airway epithelial ciliary beating.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, T A; Sisson, J H; Von Essen, S G; Poole, J A; Romberger, D J

    2008-06-01

    Swine confinement workers are at increased risk of airway diseases, including mucus membrane irritation syndrome, chronic rhinosinusitis and chronic bronchitis. Dust extracts from swine confinement facilities stimulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchial epithelial cells, including interleukin (IL)-8. As IL-8 is capable of blocking beta-agonist-stimulated increases in cilia beating, which impacts on mucociliary clearance, it was hypothesised that hog barn-dust exposure might alter cilia responses to stimulation. To test this hypothesis, ciliated bovine bronchial epithelial cell cultures were exposed to hog barn-dust extract (HDE) and ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was assayed. An elevation in baseline CBF was observed. This effect appeared to be independent of endotoxin but dependent upon nitric oxide. HDE also stimulated nitric oxide production in bronchial epithelial cells; however, stimulation of cilia beating by a beta-agonist did not occur in cells pre-exposed to HDE. These data demonstrate that hog barn dust can alter normal stimulation of cilia, suggesting a mechanism for the abrogation of stimulated increases in mucociliary clearance in response to inhaled dust exposure.

  14. Set-Based Discriminative Measure for Electrocardiogram Beat Classification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Li, Jianqing; Qin, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Computer aided diagnosis systems can help to reduce the high mortality rate among cardiac patients. Automatical classification of electrocardiogram (ECG) beats plays an important role in such systems, but this issue is challenging because of the complexities of ECG signals. In literature, feature designing has been broadly-studied. However, such methodology is inevitably limited by the heuristics of hand-crafting process and the challenge of signals themselves. To address it, we treat the problem of ECG beat classification from the metric and measurement perspective. We propose a novel approach, named “Set-Based Discriminative Measure”, which first learns a discriminative metric space to ensure that intra-class distances are smaller than inter-class distances for ECG features in a global way, and then measures a new set-based dissimilarity in such learned space to cope with the local variation of samples. Experimental results have demonstrated the advantage of this approach in terms of effectiveness, robustness, and flexibility based on ECG beats from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database. PMID:28125072

  15. Moving to the Beat and Singing are Linked in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Bella, Simone; Berkowska, Magdalena; Sowiński, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    The abilities to sing and to move to the beat of a rhythmic auditory stimulus emerge early during development, and both engage perceptual, motor, and sensorimotor processes. These similarities between singing and synchronization to a beat may be rooted in biology. Patel (2008) has suggested that motor synchronization to auditory rhythms may have emerged during evolution as a byproduct of selection for vocal learning (“vocal learning and synchronization hypothesis”). This view predicts a strong link between vocal performance and synchronization skills in humans. Here, we tested this prediction by asking occasional singers to tap along with auditory pulse trains and to imitate familiar melodies. Both vocal imitation and synchronization skills were measured in terms of accuracy and precision or consistency. Accurate and precise singers tapped more in the vicinity of the pacing stimuli (i.e., they were more accurate) than less accurate and less precise singers. Moreover, accurate singers were more consistent when tapping to the beat. These differences cannot be ascribed to basic motor skills or to motivational factors. Individual differences in terms of singing proficiency and synchronization skills may reflect the variability of a shared sensorimotor translation mechanism. PMID:26733370

  16. Effectiveness of binaural beats in reducing preoperative dental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Isik, B K; Esen, A; Büyükerkmen, B; Kilinç, A; Menziletoglu, D

    2017-07-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory illusion perceived when two different pure-tone sine waves are presented one to each ear at a steady intensity and frequency. We evaluated their effectiveness in reducing preoperative anxiety in dentistry. Sixty patients (30 in each group) who were to have impacted third molars removed were studied (experimental group: 20 women and 10 men, mean (range) age 24 (18-35) years, and control group: 22 women and 8 men, mean (range) age 28 (15-47) years). All patients were fully informed about the operation preoperatively, and their anxiety recorded on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The local anaesthetic was given and the patients waited for 10minutes, during which those in the experimental group were asked to listen to binaural beats through stereo earphones (200Hz for the left ear and 209.3Hz for the right ear). No special treatment was given to the control group. In both groups anxiety was then recorded again, and the tooth removed in the usual way. The paired t test and t test were used to assess the significance of differences between groups. The degree of anxiety in the control group was unchanged after the second measurement (p=0.625), while that in the experimental group showed a significant reduction in anxiety (p=0.001). We conclude that binaural beats may be useful in reducing preoperative anxiety in dentistry. Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Beliefs About Wife Beating Among Social Work Students in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M; Shen, April Chiung-Tao

    2017-07-01

    Based on an integrative framework, this study addresses the beliefs that a group of social work students from Taiwan had about wife beating. A self-administered questionnaire was filled out by 790 students (76.5% female, 23.5% male) spanning all 4 years of undergraduate studies. The results show that male students exhibited a greater tendency than their female counterparts to justify wife beating and to hold battered women responsible for violence against them. This tendency was also found among students who held traditional attitudes toward women, students who held patriarchal expectations of marriage, and students who had witnessed interparental violence in childhood. In addition, male students and students with traditional attitudes toward women exhibited the strongest tendency to believe that wives benefit from beating. Conversely, female students expressed more willingness than their male counterparts to help battered women, as did students who held liberal attitudes toward women and students who held egalitarian expectations of marriage. Furthermore, female students and those with liberal attitudes toward women tended to hold violent husbands responsible for their behavior, and to express support for punishing violent husbands. This article concludes with a discussion of the study's limitations and the results' implications for future research on the topic.

  18. Image stabilisation of the beating heart by local linear interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, Martin; Hirzinger, Gerd

    2006-03-01

    The stabilisation of motion on the beating heart is investigated in the context of minimally invasive robotic surgery. Although reduced by mechanical stabilisers, residual tissue motion makes safe surgery still difficult and time consuming. Compensation for this movement is therefore highly desirable. Motion can be captured by tracking natural landmarks on the heart surface recorded by a video endoscope. Stabilisation is achieved by transforming the images using a motion field calculated from captured local motion. Since the surface of the beating heart is distorted nonlinearly, compensating the occurring motion with a constant image correction factor is not sufficient. Therefore, heart motion is captured by several landmarks, the motion between which is interpolated such that locally appropriate motion correction values are obtained. To estimate the motion between the landmark positions, a triangulation is built and motion information in each triangle is approximated by linear interpolation. Motion compensation is evaluated by calculating the optical flow remaining in the stabilised images. The proposed linear interpolation model is able to reduce motion significantly and can also be implemented efficiently to stabilise images of the beating heart in realtime.

  19. Laser precision ranger based on beat-wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wu, Yanhua; Weia, Huang

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a laser precision ranger based on beat wave interferometry. A frequency-stabilized double longitudinal modes He-Ne laser with thermoregulation is used as the light source. The two beams of double longitudinal modes generated in the same resonator of the laser are naturally coaxial. They have a frequency difference of about 790MHz and a beat wavelength of 380mm. Their stability is the same as the laser, which is better than 10-7 in open air. The node of the beat wave is used as the sampling flag. An adaptive filter and a wavelet transform program are used to eliminate the noise and to improve the accuracy of node detection. The distance between the node and the measur ed point is measured with a double frequency interferometer, which is incorporated in the same optical system and has a resolution of 0.08μm. Experimental results indicate that the measuring range is 20m and the uncertainty 30μm /10m.

  20. The cottontail rabbits of Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Llewellyn, L.M.; Handley, C.O.

    1945-01-01

    Five races of cottontail rabbits belonging to three species occur in Virginia. One of them, the Mearns cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus mearnsi), is reported here for the first time. It occurs in six southwestern counties of the state, while the eastern cottontail (S. f. mallurus) occurs in the remainder of the state with the exception of Smith and Fishermans islands off the eastern coast of Cape Charles, where it is replaced by Hitchens cottontail (S. f. hitchensi). The New England cottontail (S. transitionalis) is found on the higher mountain peaks, above 3000 feet, and the swamp rabbit (S. palustris) occurs in the Dismal Swamp region of southeastern Virginia.....The height of the breeding season for the eastern cottontail in Virginia is March and April, but breeding continues through the entire year except in December and January. The average litter size based on embryo counts was 4.7. The sex ratio of 234 specimens from all parts of the state, taken mostly in the December to February period, was 53 males to 47 females. That of a group of 145 rabbits live-trapped at Blacksburg during February and Marchwas 58 males to 42 females. The figures show that males are more active than females during the winter months, and therefore are more easily taken then....In transplanting cottontails from one section of the state to another, it is recommended that only cottontails of the same race as those originally present in the region being restocked be released there....Tularemia is not a common disease among rabbits in Virginia, but the rabbit ticks are often carriers of the disease and may transmit it to rabbits. Rabbit ticks are also found to be carriers of Rocky Mountain fever and American Q. fever. After the ticks drop off the rabbits to hibernate in the ground, which is likely to occur during mid-winter in Virginia, there is relatively little danger of humans contracting tularemia by contact with rabbits. Present laws in Virginia which prohibit rabbit hunting until the

  1. Phospholamban Overexpression in Transgenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, J. Scott; Waggoner, Jason R.; James, Jeanne; Martin, Lisa; Gulick, James; Osinska, Hanna; Klevitsky, Raisa; Kranias, Evangelia G.; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in pursuing phospholamban as a putative therapeutic target for overcoming depressed calcium handling in human heart failure. Studies predominantly done in mice have shown that phospholamban is a key regulator of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium cycling and cardiac function. However, mice differ significantly from humans in how they regulate calcium, whereas rabbits better recapitulate human cardiac function and calcium handling. To investigate phospholamban’s role in the rabbit heart, transgenic rabbits that overexpressed wild-type phospholamban in the ventricular cardiomyocytes and slow-twitch skeletal muscles were generated. Rabbits expressing high levels of phospholamban were not viable due to severe skeletal muscle wasting, the onset of cardiac pathology and early death. A viable transgenic line exhibited a 30% increase in PLN protein levels in the heart. These animals showed isolated foci of cardiac pathology, but cardiac function as well as the response to β-adrenergic stimulation were normal. SR-calcium uptake measurements showed that the transgenic hearts had the expected reduced affinity for calcium. The data show that phospholamban-overexpressing transgenic rabbits differ markedly in phenotype from analogous transgenic mice in that rabbits are quite sensitive to alterations in phospholamban levels. Exceeding a relatively narrow window of phospholamban expression results in significant morbidity and early death. PMID:17882530

  2. Population-based beat-to-beat QT analysis from Holter recordings in the long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Page, Alex; McNitt, Scott; Xia, Xiaojuan; Zareba, Wojciech; Couderc, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-10

    The increasing dissemination of wearable ECG recorders (e.g. Holter, patches, and strap sensors) enables the acquisition of large amounts of data during long periods of time. However, the clinical value of these long-term continuous recordings is hindered by the lack of automatic tools to extract clinically relevant information (other than non-sinus and life-threatening rhythms) from such long-term data, particularly when targeting population-based research. In this work, we propose and test a new tool for analyzing beat-to-beat interval measurements and extracting features from Holter ECGs. Specifically, we assess the adaptation of the QT interval following sudden changes in heart rate in the primary long QT types (1 & 2). We find that in long QT syndrome type 2, certain QT adaptation patterns can indicate a higher risk for cardiac events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neural Entrainment to the Beat: The "Missing-Pulse" Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Tal, Idan; Large, Edward W; Rabinovitch, Eshed; Wei, Yi; Schroeder, Charles E; Poeppel, David; Zion Golumbic, Elana

    2017-06-28

    Most humans have a near-automatic inclination to tap, clap, or move to the beat of music. The capacity to extract a periodic beat from a complex musical segment is remarkable, as it requires abstraction from the temporal structure of the stimulus. It has been suggested that nonlinear interactions in neural networks result in cortical oscillations at the beat frequency, and that such entrained oscillations give rise to the percept of a beat or a pulse. Here we tested this neural resonance theory using MEG recordings as female and male individuals listened to 30 s sequences of complex syncopated drumbeats designed so that they contain no net energy at the pulse frequency when measured using linear analysis. We analyzed the spectrum of the neural activity while listening and compared it to the modulation spectrum of the stimuli. We found enhanced neural response in the auditory cortex at the pulse frequency. We also showed phase locking at the times of the missing pulse, even though the pulse was absent from the stimulus itself. Moreover, the strength of this pulse response correlated with individuals' speed in finding the pulse of these stimuli, as tested in a follow-up session. These findings demonstrate that neural activity at the pulse frequency in the auditory cortex is internally generated rather than stimulus-driven. The current results are both consistent with neural resonance theory and with models based on nonlinear response of the brain to rhythmic stimuli. The results thus help narrow the search for valid models of beat perception.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Humans perceive music as having a regular pulse marking equally spaced points in time, within which musical notes are temporally organized. Neural resonance theory (NRT) provides a theoretical model explaining how an internal periodic representation of a pulse may emerge through nonlinear coupling between oscillating neural systems. After testing key falsifiable predictions of NRT using MEG recordings, we

  4. The role of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, INa and ICaL in the genesis of dofetilide-induced torsades de pointes in isolated, AV-blocked rabbit hearts

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Attila S; Makra, Péter; Csík, Norbert; Orosz, Szabolcs; Shattock, Michael J; Fülöp, Ferenc; Forster, Tamás; Csanády, Miklós; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Farkas, András

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) may contribute to triggered activity and transmural dispersion of repolarization, which are substrates of torsades de pointes (TdP) type arrhythmias. This study examined the effects of selective inhibition of the NCX by SEA0400 on the occurrence of dofetilide-induced TdP. Experimental approach: Effects of SEA0400 (1 µmol·L−1) on dofetilide-induced TdP was studied in isolated, Langendorff-perfused, atrioventricular (AV)-blocked rabbit hearts. To verify the relevance of the model, lidocaine (30 µmol·L−1) and verapamil (750 nmol·L−1) were also tested against dofetilide-induced TdP. Key results: Acute AV block caused a chaotic idioventricular rhythm and strikingly increased beat-to-beat variability of the RR and QT intervals. SEA0400 exaggerated the dofetilide-induced increase in the heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc) and did not reduce the incidence of dofetilide-induced TdP [100% in the SEA0400 + dofetilide group vs. 75% in the dofetilide (100 nmol·L−1) control]. In the second set of experiments, verapamil further increased the dofetilide-induced QTc prolongation and neither verapamil nor lidocaine reduced the dofetilide-induced increase in the beat-to-beat variability of the QT interval. However, lidocaine decreased and verapamil prevented the development of dofetilide-induced TdP as compared with the dofetilide control (TdP incidence: 13%, 0% and 88% respectively). Conclusions and implications: Na+/Ca2+ exchanger does not contribute to dofetilide-induced TdP, whereas Na+ and Ca2+ channel activity is involved in TdP genesis in isolated, AV-blocked rabbit hearts. Neither QTc prolongation nor an increase in the beat-to-beat variability of the QT interval is a sufficient prerequisite of TdP genesis in rabbit hearts. PMID:19222480

  5. The mechanism of self-organized beating of cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyadharan, Jyothish Sulochana

    The internal structure and physical properties of cilia are well known. The relevant hydrodynamics is also well known. But the mechanism behind the coordinated activity of the dynein molecular motors is not known. Based on experimental observations, it has been concluded that this mechanism cannot be due to control from the cell body. The possible mechanism has to be self-organized and the trigger for motor activation/deactivation has to be something related to the geometry of the ciliary axoneme. This thesis critically evaluates the most widely currently cited models and suggests an alternative model for how cilia beat. From the literature we obtained wave forms of ciliary beating at different instants in the beat cycle. These instants were digitized and interpolated. From this data, we were able to calculate the hydrodynamic force distribution (external force distribution) on the cilia and the translational and rotational velocities of the cell body. Once the hydrodynamic force distribution was obtained, we calculated the internal force distribution in the cilium using an equation we derived. Once this was known, we were able to calculate parameters of the ciliary axoneme such as the dynamic stiffness. The stiffness is the ratio of the first Fourier modes of the internal force distribution and the relative sliding between the doublet microtubules that form the axoneme. We found that the first mode was the dominant one and is the one we used for calculations. We were also able to calculate the energy involved in formation and propagation of the wave that produces the ciliary beating. We discovered that the dynamic stiffness varies along the length of a cilium. We determined that in the central region of the cilium, the stiffness is almost purely imaginary which means that the sliding velocity follows the internal force generation in that region rather than sliding. We also found that in Fourier space, the flexural rigidity (kappa=EI where E is Young's modulus and

  6. Beat-to-beat agreement of noninvasive tonometric and intra-radial arterial blood pressure during microgravity and hypergravity generated by parabolic flights.

    PubMed

    Normand, Hervé; Lemarchand, Erick; Arbeille, Philippe; Quarck, Gaëlle; Vaïda, Pierre; Duretete, Arnaud; Denise, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    Accurate measurement of beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure is essential for understanding the cardiovascular adaptation to weightlessness; however, the intra-arterial standard of beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement has never been used during space flight because of its invasive nature. The aim of the present study was to compare noninvasive radial artery tonometry blood pressure measurement with intra-radial pressure measurement during microgravity and hypergravity generated by parabolic flights. Two study participants, equipped with an intra-radial pressure line on the left arm and a Colin CBM-7000 (Colin Corp., Komaki City, Japan) beat-to-beat pressure measurement apparatus on the right arm, were studied in a supine position, during parabolic flights on board of the Airbus A300 OG of the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales. The mean and standard deviations of the beat-to-beat difference between tonometric and intra-radial blood pressure were calculated for systolic and diastolic arterial pressure in the three gravity conditions (1g, 0 g and 1.8 g) experienced during parabolic flight. The Colin CBM-7000 met the specifications required by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation in the 0 g environment. Gravity, however, significantly affected the difference between tonometric and intra-arterial blood pressure, possibly owing to the effect of gravity on the apparent weight of the device and the corresponding calibration factor. We conclude that the Colin CBM-7000 can be used with confidence during space flight.

  7. Characterizing Spatial Dynamics of Bifurcation to Alternans in Isolated Whole Rabbit Hearts Based on Alternate Pacing.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Kanchan; Visweswaran, Ramjay; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Tolkacheva, Elena G

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death instigated by ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the largest cause of natural death in the USA. Alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the action potential duration, has been implicated as being proarrhythmic. The onset of alternans is mediated via a bifurcation, which may occur through either a smooth or a border-collision mechanism. The objective of this study was to characterize the mechanism of bifurcation to alternans based on experiments in isolated whole rabbit hearts. High resolution optical mapping was performed and the electrical activity was recorded from the left ventricle (LV) epicardial surface of the heart. Each heart was paced using an "alternate pacing protocol," where the basic cycle length (BCL) was alternatively perturbed by ±δ. Local onset of alternans in the heart, BCL(start), was measured in the absence of perturbations (δ = 0) and was defined as the BCL at which 10% of LV exhibited alternans. The influences of perturbation size were investigated at two BCLs: one prior to BCL(start) (BCL(prior) = BCL(start) + 20 ms) and one preceding BCL(prior) (BCL(far) = BCL(start) + 40 ms). Our results demonstrate significant spatial correlation of the region exhibiting alternans with smooth bifurcation characteristics, indicating that transition to alternans in isolated rabbit hearts occurs predominantly through smooth bifurcation.

  8. Influences of rapid pacing-induced electrical remodeling on pharmacological manipulation of the atrial refractoriness in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Toshiki; Kondo, Naoto; Takahara, Akira

    2016-03-01

    Electrical remodeling plays a pivotal role in maintaining the reentry during atrial fibrillation. In this study, we assessed influence of electrical remodeling on pharmacological manipulation of the atrial refractoriness in rabbits. We used an atrial electrical remodeling model of the rabbit, subjected to rapid atrial pacing (RAP; 600 beats/min) for 2-4 weeks, leading to shortening of atrial effective refractory period (AERP). Intravenous administration of dl-sotalol (6 mg/kg), bepridil (1 mg/kg), amiodarone (10 mg/kg) or vernakalant (3 mg/kg) significantly prolonged the AERP both in the control and RAP rabbits. The extents in the RAP rabbits were similar to those in the control animals. On the other hand, prolonging effects of intravenously administered ranolazine (10 mg/kg) or tertiapin-Q (0.03 mg/kg) on the AERP in the RAP rabbits were more potent than those in the control animals. These results suggest that rapid pacing-induced electrical remodeling effectively modified the prolonging effects of ranolazine and tertiapin-Q on the AERP in contrast to those of clinically available antiarrhythmic drugs, dl-sotalol, bepridil amiodarone and vernakalant.

  9. Neural Entrainment and Sensorimotor Synchronization to the Beat in Children with Developmental Dyslexia: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Colling, Lincoln J.; Noble, Hannah L.; Goswami, Usha

    2017-01-01

    Tapping in time to a metronome beat (hereafter beat synchronization) shows considerable variability in child populations, and individual differences in beat synchronization are reliably related to reading development. Children with developmental dyslexia show impairments in beat synchronization. These impairments may reflect deficiencies in auditory perception of the beat which in turn affect auditory-motor mapping, or may reflect an independent motor deficit. Here, we used a new methodology in EEG based on measuring beat-related steady-state evoked potentials (SS-EPs, Nozaradan et al., 2015) in an attempt to disentangle neural sensory and motor contributions to behavioral beat synchronization in children with dyslexia. Children tapped with both their left and right hands to every second beat of a metronome pulse delivered at 2.4 Hz, or listened passively to the beat. Analyses of preferred phase in EEG showed that the children with dyslexia had a significantly different preferred phase compared to control children in all conditions. Regarding SS-EPs, the groups differed significantly for the passive Auditory listening condition at 2.4 Hz, and showed a trend toward a difference in the Right hand tapping condition at 3.6 Hz (sensorimotor integration measure). The data suggest that neural rhythmic entrainment is atypical in children with dyslexia for both an auditory beat and during sensorimotor coupling (tapping). The data are relevant to a growing literature suggesting that rhythm-based interventions may help language processing in children with developmental disorders of language learning. PMID:28747870

  10. Prostanoid receptors involved in regulation of the beating rate of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mechiche, Hakima; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Robinet, Arnaud; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Devillier, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Although prostanoids are known to be involved in regulation of the spontaneous beating rate of cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, the various subtypes of prostanoid receptors have not been investigated in detail. In our experiments, prostaglandin (PG)F(2α) and prostanoid FP receptor agonists (fluprostenol, latanoprost and cloprostenol) produced a decrease in the beating rate. Two prostanoid IP receptor agonists (iloprost and beraprost) induced first a marked drop in the beating rate and then definitive abrogation of beating. In contrast, the prostanoid DP receptor agonists (PGD(2) and BW245C) and TP receptor agonists (U-46619) produced increases in the beating rate. Sulprostone (a prostanoid EP(1) and EP(3) receptor agonist) induced marked increases in the beating rate, which were suppressed by SC-19220 (a selective prostanoid EP(1) antagonist). Butaprost (a selective prostanoid EP(2) receptor agonist), misoprostol (a prostanoid EP(2) and EP(3) receptor agonist), 11-deoxy-PGE(1) (a prostanoid EP(2), EP(3) and EP(4) receptor agonist) did not alter the beating rate. Our results strongly suggest that prostanoid EP(1) receptors are involved in positive regulation of the beating rate. Prostanoid EP(1) receptor expression was confirmed by western blotting with a selective antibody. Hence, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes express both prostanoid IP and FP receptors (which negatively regulate the spontaneous beating rate) and prostanoid TP, DP(1) and EP(1) receptors (which positively regulate the spontaneous beating rate).

  11. Healthcare performance and the effects of the binaural beats on human blood pressure and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Carter, Calvin

    2008-01-01

    Binaural beats are the differences in two different frequencies (in the range of 30-1000 Hz). Binaural beats are played through headphones and are perceived by the superior olivary nucleus of each hemisphere of the brain. The brain perceives the binaural beat and resonates to its frequency (frequency following response). Once the brain is in tune with the binaural beat it produces brainwaves of that frequency altering the listener's state of mind. In this experiment, the effects of the beta and theta binaural beat on human blood pressure and pulse were studied. Using headphones, three sounds were played for 7 minutes each to 12 participants: the control,- the sound of a babbling brook (the background sound to the two binaural beats), the beta binaural beat (20 Hz), and the theta binaural beat (7 Hz). Blood pressure and pulse were recorded before and after each sound was played. Each participant was given 2 minutes in-between each sound. The results showed that the control and the two binaural beats did not affect the 12 participant's blood pressure or pulse (p > 0.05). One reason for this may be that the sounds were not played long enough for the brain to either perceive and/or resonate to the frequency. Another reason why the sounds did not affect blood pressure and pulse may be due to the participant's age since older brains may not perceive the binaural beats as well as younger brains.

  12. Neural Entrainment and Sensorimotor Synchronization to the Beat in Children with Developmental Dyslexia: An EEG Study.

    PubMed

    Colling, Lincoln J; Noble, Hannah L; Goswami, Usha

    2017-01-01

    Tapping in time to a metronome beat (hereafter beat synchronization) shows considerable variability in child populations, and individual differences in beat synchronization are reliably related to reading development. Children with developmental dyslexia show impairments in beat synchronization. These impairments may reflect deficiencies in auditory perception of the beat which in turn affect auditory-motor mapping, or may reflect an independent motor deficit. Here, we used a new methodology in EEG based on measuring beat-related steady-state evoked potentials (SS-EPs, Nozaradan et al., 2015) in an attempt to disentangle neural sensory and motor contributions to behavioral beat synchronization in children with dyslexia. Children tapped with both their left and right hands to every second beat of a metronome pulse delivered at 2.4 Hz, or listened passively to the beat. Analyses of preferred phase in EEG showed that the children with dyslexia had a significantly different preferred phase compared to control children in all conditions. Regarding SS-EPs, the groups differed significantly for the passive Auditory listening condition at 2.4 Hz, and showed a trend toward a difference in the Right hand tapping condition at 3.6 Hz (sensorimotor integration measure). The data suggest that neural rhythmic entrainment is atypical in children with dyslexia for both an auditory beat and during sensorimotor coupling (tapping). The data are relevant to a growing literature suggesting that rhythm-based interventions may help language processing in children with developmental disorders of language learning.

  13. Analysis of heart rate variability in the presence of ectopic beats using the heart timing signal.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Javier; Laguna, Pablo

    2003-03-01

    The time-domain signals representing the heart rate variability (HRV) in the presence of an ectopic beat exhibit a sharp transient at the position of the ectopic beat, which corrupts the signal, particularly the power spectral density (PSD) of the HRV. Consequently, there is a need for correction of this type of beat prior to any HRV analysis. This paper deals with the PSD estimation of the HRV by means of the heart timing (HT) signal when ectopic beats are present. These beat occurrence times are modeled from a generalized, continuous time integral pulse frequency modulation model and, from this point of view, a specific method for minimizing the effect of the presence of ectopic beats is presented to work together with the HT signal. By using both, a white noise driven autoregressive model of the HRV signal with artificially introduced ectopic beats and actual heart rate series including ectopic beats, the more usual methods of HRV spectral estimation are compared. Results of the PSD estimation error function of the number of ectopic beats are presented. These results demonstrate that the proposed method has one order of magnitude lower error than usual ectopic beats removal strategies in preserving PSD, thus, this strategy better recovers the original clinical indexes of interest.

  14. INFECTIOUS MYXOMATOSIS OF RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Thomas M.; Ward, S. M.

    1937-01-01

    From the results of the experiments described in this paper it is obvious that large amounts of elementary bodies of myxoma can be obtained in a relatively pure state by means of the methods used. Furthermore, it is evident that infectious myxomatosis is a viral disease in which elementary bodies of the same order of magnitude as vaccinal elementary bodies play a conspicuous rô1e in that they either represent the etiological agent or are intimately associated with it. The bodies are specifically agglutinated by antimyxoma serum and are agglutinated to a less extent by serum from rabbits convalescing from fibroma, a disease closely related to myxoma. In virus-free filtrates of emulsions prepared from infected skin there is a soluble precipitinogen or precipitinogens specific for the malady. Moreover, a specific precipitinogen or precipitinogens are demonstrable in virus-free serum of animals acutely ill as a result of extensive infection with myxoma virus. It is believed that this is the second viral disease, yellow fever (14) being the first, in which a specific soluble antigen free from virus has been found in the serum of ill animals. PMID:19870643

  15. The Inhibitory Effects of Ketamine on Human Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels and Action Potential in Rabbit Sinoatrial Node.

    PubMed

    Xing, Junlian; Zhang, Chi; Jiang, Wanzhen; Hao, Jie; Liu, Zhipei; Luo, Antao; Zhang, Peihua; Fan, Xinrong; Ma, Jihua

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of ketamine on human hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (hHCN) 1, 2, 4 channel currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes and spontaneous action potentials (APs) of rabbit sinoatrial node (SAN). The 2-electrode voltage clamp and standard microelectrode techniques were respectively applied to record hHCN channels currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes and APs of SAN separated from rabbit heart. Ketamine (1-625 µmol/L) blocked hHCN1, 2, and 4 currents with IC50 of 67.0, 89.1, and 84.0 µmol/L, respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner. The currents were rapidly blocked by ketamine and partially recovered after washout. The steady-state activation curves of hHCN1, 2, and 4 currents demonstrated a concentration-dependent shift to the left and the rates of activation were significantly decelerated. But ketamine blocked hHCN channels in a voltage-independence and non-use-dependent manner, and did not modify the voltage dependence of activation and reversal potentials. Furthermore, ketamine suppressed phase-4 spontaneous depolarization rate in isolated rabbit SAN and decreased the beat rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Ketamine could inhibit hHCN channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes in a concentration-dependent manner as a close-state blocker and decrease beat rates of isolated rabbit SAN. This study may provide novel insights into other unexplained actions of ketamine. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. RABBIT ANTIBODIES TO STREPTOCOCCAL CARBOHYDRATES

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Dietmar G.; Eichmann, Klaus; Krause, Richard M.

    1969-01-01

    In a search for possible genetic factors which may influence the immune response to the streptococcal carbohydrates, over 100 rabbits have been immunized with streptococcal vaccines, and representative examples of high and low response pairs mated. The concentration of precipitins to the group—specific carbohydrates has been measured in the antisera following primary intravenous immunization with heat-killed streptococcal vaccines, Group A, Group A-variant, and Group C. For the majority of rabbits, the concentration of precipitins varied between 1 and 10 mg/ml of antiserum; while in the minority, it was between 11 and 32 mg/ml. The offspring of rabbits with high antibody levels had a significantly higher concentration of antibody than was seen in the offspring of rabbits of low response parents. Such data suggest that the magnitude of the immune response to these carbohydrate antigens is under some form of genetic control. Not uncommonly in rabbits with hyper-γ-globulinemia following primary immunization, the group-specific precipitins are the predominant component of the γ-globulin. An unusual feature of such components is that they are electrophoretically monodisperse, and possess individual antigenic specificity. In this respect they resemble the myeloma proteins. When a response of this sort is not seen after primary immunization, it may occur after secondary immunization. Therefore, prior exposure to the same or closely related antigen may also have an influence on the occurrence of high concentrations of such uniform antibodies. PMID:5766948

  17. Modulation of Attosecond Beating by Resonant Two-Photon Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Galán, Álvaro; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    We present an analytical model that characterizes two-photon transitions in the presence of autoionising states. We applied this model to interpret resonant RABITT spectra, and show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, the phase of the sideband beating significantly varies with photon energy. This phase variation is generally very different from the π jump observed in previous works, in which the direct path contribution was negligible. We illustrate the possible phase profiles arising in resonant two-photon transitions with an intuitive geometrical representation.

  18. Photoacoustic tomography: Ultrasonically beating optical diffusion and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong

    2014-03-01

    A decade of research has pushed photoacoustic computed tomography to the forefront of molecular-level imaging, notes SPIE Fellow Lihong Wang (Washington University, St. Louis) in his plenary talk, "Photoacoustic Tomography: Ultrasonically Beating Optical Diffusion and Diffraction." Modern optical microscopy has resolution and diffraction limitations. But noninvasive functional photoacoustic computed tomography has overcome this limit, offering deep penetration with optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution of 1 cm depth or more -- up to 7 cm of penetration in some cases, such as evaluating sentinel lymph nodes for breast cancer staging. This opens up applications in whole body imaging, brain function, oxygen saturation, label-free cell analysis, and noninvasive cancer biopsies.

  19. Cascade focusing in the beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, P.; Bell, A.R.

    1988-10-03

    The 2D wave-envelope equationf for the beat-wave--cascade system are studied analytically and numerically. An expression for the mean square width of the cascade envelope is obtained, and is used to predict the long-term behavior of the waves. The amplitude or a resonantly driven plasma wave falls significantly over a stage length due to enhanced diffraction of the cascade envelope. Conversely, detuning the pumps from the plasma frequency can lead to focusing of the envelope and a corresponding increase in plasmon amplitude of up to 200% over the same distance.

  20. Non-Heart-Beating Donor Heart Transplantation: Breaking the Taboo

    PubMed Central

    Fatullayev, Javid; Samak, Mostafa; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Mohite, Prashant N.; García-Sáez, Diana; Patil, Nikhil P.; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Simon, André R.; Zeriouh, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 60% of hearts offered for transplantation are rejected because of organ dysfunction. Moreover, hearts from circulatory-dead patients have long been thought to be non-amenable for transplantation, unlike other organs. However, tentative surgical attempts inspired by the knowledge obtained from preclinical research to recover those hearts have been performed, finally culminating in clinically successful transplants. In this review we sought to address the major concerns in non-heart-beating donor heart transplantation and highlight recently introduced developments to overcome them. PMID:26174972

  1. The beat frequency model for QPOs. [Quasi-Periodic-Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    The quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) phenomenon has come to pose increasingly complex problems as sources have been discovered; these currently number 12, of which at least seven are X-ray binaries. The beat-frequency model (BFM), originally devised to characterize the first and simplest of the QPOs, GX5-1, is presently discussed with a view to its assumptions and applicability to other QPOs. The most important problem with the BFM is identified as the assumption that the neutron star involved rotates at an angular frequency of the order, in the case of GX5-1, of 10 msec.

  2. Inclusion of Incidental Radiation Dose to the Cardiac Atria and Ventricles Does Not Improve the Prediction of Radiation Pneumonitis in Advanced-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wijsman, Robin; Dankers, Frank J W M; Troost, Esther G C; Hoffmann, Aswin L; van der Heijden, Erik H F M; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Bussink, Johan

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate whether inclusion of incidental radiation dose to the cardiac atria and ventricles improves the prediction of grade ≥3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) in advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (AS-NSCLC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Using a bootstrap modeling approach, clinical parameters and dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of lungs and heart (assessing atria and ventricles separately and combined) were evaluated for RP prediction in 188 AS-NSCLC patients. After a median follow-up of 18.4 months, 26 patients (13.8%) developed RP. Only the median mean lung dose (MLD) differed between groups (15.3 Gy vs 13.7 Gy for the RP and non-RP group, respectively; P=.004). The MLD showed the highest Spearman correlation coefficient (Rs) for RP (Rs = 0.21; P<.01). Most Rs of the lung DVH parameters exceeded those of the heart DVH parameters. After predictive modeling using a bootstrap procedure, the MLD was always included in the predictive model for grade ≥3 RP, whereas the heart DVH parameters were seldom included in the model. Incidental dose to the cardiac atria and ventricles did not improve RP risk prediction in our cohort of 188 AS-NSCLC patients treated with IMRT or VMAT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Individual differences in beat perception affect gait responses to low- and high-groove music.

    PubMed

    Leow, Li-Ann; Parrott, Taylor; Grahn, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    Slowed gait in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the "beat," which might be difficult for patients with PD who tend to show weak beat perception. One solution may be to use high-groove music, which has high beat salience that may facilitate synchronization, and affective properties, which may improve motivation to move. As a first step to understanding how beat perception affects gait in complex neurological disorders, we examined how beat perception ability affected gait in neurotypical adults. Synchronization performance and gait parameters were assessed as healthy young adults with strong or weak beat perception synchronized to low-groove music, high-groove music, and metronome cues. High-groove music was predicted to elicit better synchronization than low-groove music, due to its higher beat salience. Two musical tempi, or rates, were used: (1) preferred tempo: beat rate matched to preferred step rate and (2) faster tempo: beat rate adjusted to 22.5% faster than preferred step rate. For both strong and weak beat-perceivers, synchronization performance was best with metronome cues, followed by high-groove music, and worst with low-groove music. In addition, high-groove music elicited longer and faster steps than low-groove music, both at preferred tempo and at faster tempo. Low-groove music was particularly detrimental to gait in weak beat-perceivers, who showed slower and shorter steps compared to uncued walking. The findings show that individual differences in beat perception affect gait when synchronizing footsteps to music, and have implications for using music in gait rehabilitation.

  4. Gain enhancement plasma-loaded FEL in the presence of beat waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shamamian, A.H.; Gevorgian, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    An expression for the dielectric permittivity of underdense plasma interacting with laser beat waves is derived. It is shown that the presence of beat waves in plasma results in an effective growth of the plasma frequency. The FEL Gain is investigated in the case when the frequency of soft photons weakly depending on the electron beam energy and the synchronism condition is maintained. It is shown that the plasma beat waves lead to the essential increase in FEL gain.

  5. Quantum beat experiments and their applications using cold neutron spin interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai; Ebisawa, Toru; Kawai, Takeshi; Tasaki, Seiji; Hino, Masahiro; Akiyoshi, Tsunekazu; Achiwa, Norio

    We have carried out quantum beat experiments using cold neutron spin interferometers installed at KURRI and JAERI. Quantum beat profiles (time-dependent interference fringe) with frequencies from 20 μHz to 34 kHz were observed, which correspond to energy difference 8.271 × 10 -20and 1.406 × 10 -10eV. Delayed choice experiment using quantum beat are proposed as an application.

  6. Factors associated with wife beating in Egypt: Analysis of two surveys (1995 and 2005)

    PubMed Central

    Akmatov, Manas K; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T; Labeeb, Shokria; Dhaher, Enas; Khan, Md Mobarak

    2008-01-01

    Background Wife beating is an important public health problem in many developing countries. We assessed the rates of wife beating and examined factors associated with wife beating in 1995 and 2005 in Egypt. Methods We used data from two Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in Egypt in 1995 and 2005 using multistage household sampling. Data related to wife beating included information from 7122 women in 1995 and 5612 women in 2005. Logistic regression was used to analyze factors independently associated with wife beating. Special weights were used to obtain nationally representative estimates. Results In 1995 17.5% of married women in Egypt experienced wife beating in the last 12 months, in 2005 – 18.9% or 16.0%, using different measures. The association between socio-demographic differentials and wife beating was weaker in the newer survey. The 12-month prevalence of wife beating was lower only when both partners were educated, but the differences across education levels were less pronounced in 2005. Based on the information available in the 2005 survey, more educated women experienced less severe forms of wife beating than less educated women. Conclusion Different measures used in both surveys make a direct comparison difficult. The observed patterns indicate that the changes in prevalence may be masked by two opposite processes occurring in the society: a decrease in (severe forms of) wife beating and an increase in reporting of wife beating. Improving the access to education for women and raising education levels in the whole society may help reducing wife beating. PMID:18801155

  7. Response of cat inferior colliculus neurons to binaural beat stimuli: possible mechanisms for sound localization.

    PubMed

    Kuwada, S; Yin, T C; Wickesberg, R E

    1979-11-02

    The interaural phase sensitivity of neurons was studied through the use of binaural beat stimuli. The response of most cells was phase-locked to the beat frequency, which provides a possible neural correlate to the human sensation of binaural beats. In addition, this stimulus allowed the direction and rate of interaural phase change to be varied. Some neurons in our sample responded selectively to manipulations of these two variables, which suggests a sensitivity to direction or speed of movement.

  8. Double beat-wave mechanism to keep particle in phase with accelerating plasma wave

    SciTech Connect

    Csonka, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two mechanisms are described by which the phase matching between accelerated particle and accelerating plasma wave in a plasma beat-wave accelerator can be maintained indefinitely. (1) Interference between two beat-waves to cancel (a) the fields in the interfering electromagnetic waves, and (b) electron oscillations which would otherwise be set up by those waves. (2) Alternating plasma density used in conjunction with one or two beat-waves.

  9. Predictors of non-pulmonary vein ectopic beats initiating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: implication for catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Huang; Tai, Ching-Tai; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiung; Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Huang, Jin-Long; Lee, Kun-Tai; Chen, Yi-Jen; Cheng, Jun-Jack; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2005-09-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictor of non-pulmonary vein (PV) ectopic beats initiating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Non-PV ectopic beats can initiate PAF in some patients and play an important role in the recurrence of PAF after PV isolation. Information on the predictors of non-PV ectopic beats initiating PAF is unknown. This study included 293 patients (215 men and 78 women, age 60 +/- 14 years) with clinically documented drug-refractory PAF. Of the 94 patients with non-PV ectopic beats initiating PAF, 38 (40%) patients had superior vena cava (SVC) ectopic beats and 32 (34%) had left atrial posterior free wall (LAPFW) ectopic beats. In a univariate analysis, only female gender was related to the presence of non-PV (p = 0.016) and SVC ectopic beats (p = 0.012). Right atrial enlargement (p = 0.005) and left atrial enlargement (p < 0.001) were related to the presence of LAPFW ectopic beats. In a multivariate analysis, female gender (p = 0.043; odds ratio 2.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02 to 3.92) and left atrial enlargement (p = 0.007; odds ratio 2.34, 95% CI 1.27 to 4.32) could predict the presence of non-PV ectopic beats. Subgroup analysis showed that female gender could predict the presence of SVC ectopic beats (p = 0.039; odds ratio 2.14, 95% CI 1.04 to 4.43). In contrast, left atrial enlargement could predict the presence of LAPFW ectopic beats (p = 0.002; odds ratio 3.89, 95% CI 1.62 to 9.38). The location of non-PV ectopic beats initiating PAF can be predicted by both gender and left atrial enlargement.

  10. European Rabbits as Reservoir for Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    González-Barrio, David; Maio, Elisa; Vieira-Pinto, Madalena

    2015-01-01

    We studied the role of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as a reservoir for Coxiella burnetii in the Iberian region. High individual and population seroprevalences observed in wild and farmed rabbits, evidence of systemic infections, and vaginal shedding support the reservoir role of the European rabbit for C. burnetii. PMID:25988670

  11. HEREDITARY OSTEOPETROSIS OF THE RABBIT

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Louise; Brown, Wade H.

    1948-01-01

    The manifestations and course of an hereditary disease of the rabbit are reported. The condition is present at birth and is invariably fatal, generally in the 4th and 5th weeks of age. Retardation and eventual cessation of growth with marked reduction in size are conspicuous characteristic symptoms. The condition, which first occurred in the backcross progeny of a pure bred Dutch male rabbit, is inherited. It is determined by the expression of a simple recessive unit factor, affected individuals being homozygous for the factor. Rabbits heterozygous for the factor are identified only by appropriate breeding tests. The condition is not sex-linked. The disease has a remarkable resemblance to osteopetrosis or marble bone disease of infants and children with respect to signs and general course and also, as may be stated in anticipation of later discussions (5, 6), to the characteristic abnormal condition of the skeleton. PMID:18103397

  12. See what I hear? Beat perception in auditory and visual rhythms.

    PubMed

    Grahn, Jessica A

    2012-07-01

    Our perception of time is affected by the modality in which it is conveyed. Moreover, certain temporal phenomena appear to exist in only one modality. The perception of temporal regularity or structure (e.g., the 'beat') in rhythmic patterns is one such phenomenon: visual beat perception is rare. The modality-specificity for beat perception is puzzling, as the durations that comprise rhythmic patterns are much longer than the limits of visual temporal resolution. Moreover, the optimization that beat perception provides for memory of auditory sequences should be equally relevant to visual sequences. Why does beat perception appear to be modality specific? One possibility is that the nature of the visual stimulus plays a role. Previous studies have usually used brief stimuli (e.g., light flashes) to present visual rhythms. In the current study, a rotating line that appeared sequentially in different spatial orientations was used to present a visual rhythm. Discrimination accuracy for visual rhythms and auditory rhythms was compared for different types of rhythms. The rhythms either had a regular temporal structure that previously has been shown to induce beat perception in the auditory modality, or they had an irregular temporal structure without beat-inducing qualities. Overall, the visual rhythms were discriminated more poorly than the auditory rhythms. The beat-based structure, however, increased accuracy for visual as well as auditory rhythms. These results indicate that beat perception can occur in the visual modality and improve performance on a temporal discrimination task, when certain types of stimuli are used.

  13. Beat gestures and postural control in youth at ultrahigh risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Osborne, K Juston; Bernard, Jessica A; Gupta, Tina; Dean, Derek J; Millman, Zachary; Vargas, Teresa; Ristanovic, Ivanka; Schiffman, Jason; Mittal, Vijay A

    2016-11-30

    Beat gestures, rhythmic hand movements that co-occur with speech, appear to be uniquely associated with the cerebellum in healthy individuals. This behavior may also have relevance for psychosis-risk youth, a group characterized by cerebellar dysfunction. This study examined beat gesture frequency and postural sway (a sensitive index of cerebellar functioning) in youth at ultrahigh risk (UHR) for psychosis. Results indicated that decreased beat gesture frequency, but not self-regulatory movement, is associated with elevated postural sway, suggesting that beat gestures may be an important biomarker in this critical population.

  14. Distinguishing between overdrive excited and suppressed ventricular beats in guinea pig ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Greer-Short, Amara; Poelzing, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Rapid ventricular pacing rates induces two types of beats following pacing cessation: recovery cycle length (RCL) prolongation (overdrive suppression) and RCL shortening (overdrive excitation). The goals of this study were to compare common experimental protocols for studying triggered activity in whole-heart preparations and differentiate between recovery beats using a new methodology. Post-pacing recovery beat cycle length (RCL) and QRS were normalized to pre-paced R-R and QRS intervals and analyzed using a K-means clustering algorithm. Control hearts only produced suppressed beats: RCL ratio increased with rapid pacing (25 ± 4.0%, n = 10) without changing QRS duration. Rapid pacing during hypercalcemia + hypothermia (5.5 mM and 34°C) produced significantly earlier excited beats (53 ± 14%, n = 5) with wider QRS durations (58 ± 6.3%, n = 5) than suppressed beats. Digoxin + hypothermia (0.75 μM) produced the most excited beats with significantly earlier RCL (44 ± 3.2%, n = 6) and wider QRS (60 ± 3.1%, n = 6) ratios relative to suppressed beats. Increasing pacing further shortened RCL (30 ± 7.8%, n = 6). In a prospective study, TTX (100 nM) increased RCL ratio (15 ± 6.0%, n = 10) without changing the QRS duration of excited beats. The algorithm was compared to a cross-correlation analysis with 93% sensitivity and 94% specificity. This ECG based algorithm distinguishes between triggered and automatic activity.

  15. Distinguishing between overdrive excited and suppressed ventricular beats in guinea pig ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Greer-Short, Amara; Poelzing, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Rapid ventricular pacing rates induces two types of beats following pacing cessation: recovery cycle length (RCL) prolongation (overdrive suppression) and RCL shortening (overdrive excitation). The goals of this study were to compare common experimental protocols for studying triggered activity in whole-heart preparations and differentiate between recovery beats using a new methodology. Post-pacing recovery beat cycle length (RCL) and QRS were normalized to pre-paced R-R and QRS intervals and analyzed using a K-means clustering algorithm. Control hearts only produced suppressed beats: RCL ratio increased with rapid pacing (25 ± 4.0%, n = 10) without changing QRS duration. Rapid pacing during hypercalcemia + hypothermia (5.5 mM and 34°C) produced significantly earlier excited beats (53 ± 14%, n = 5) with wider QRS durations (58 ± 6.3%, n = 5) than suppressed beats. Digoxin + hypothermia (0.75 μM) produced the most excited beats with significantly earlier RCL (44 ± 3.2%, n = 6) and wider QRS (60 ± 3.1%, n = 6) ratios relative to suppressed beats. Increasing pacing further shortened RCL (30 ± 7.8%, n = 6). In a prospective study, TTX (100 nM) increased RCL ratio (15 ± 6.0%, n = 10) without changing the QRS duration of excited beats. The algorithm was compared to a cross-correlation analysis with 93% sensitivity and 94% specificity. This ECG based algorithm distinguishes between triggered and automatic activity. PMID:25741282

  16. Analysis of the forces acting on beating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, Ashok S.; Vidyadharan, Jyothish; Foster, Kenneth W.

    2016-06-01

    Detailed analysis of the forces acting on a uniform-diameter beating cilium is carried out to determine the moment generated by the inter-doublet forces acting along the length of a cilium and the results are compared with the sliding-control theory according to which the moment is a function of the interdoublet sliding. In the central part of the cilium the inter-doublet forces are found to be proportional to the inter-doublet sliding. However, in spite of the uniformity of the diameter of the cilium, the proportionality constant, known as the dynamic stiffness, is not constant along its entire length. Significant variations are observed in the regions both near the tip of the cilium and proximal to the cell body. In the tip region the magnitude of the dynamic stiffness is found to decrease. This decrease is probably due to decrease in the number density of the molecular motors in that region and in the number of doublet microtubules. The behavior in the proximal region, on the other hand, does not appear to be well described by the sliding control theory. Our analysis therefore suggests that the dynamics of ciliary beating cannot be adequately described by a simple sliding-control theory with constant dynamic stiffness. Our analysis suggests that the cilium is differentiated into a basal region optimized for the creation of a wave and a central region optimized to support a traveling wave that provides the thrust for the cell.

  17. Efficient heart beat detection using embedded system electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Oh, Sechang; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    The present day bio-technical field concentrates on developing various types of innovative ambulatory and wearable devices to monitor several bio-physical, physio-pathological, bio-electrical and bio-potential factors to assess a human body's health condition without intruding quotidian activities. One of the most important aspects of this evolving technology is monitoring heart beat rate and electrocardiogram (ECG) from which many other subsidiary results can be derived. Conventionally, the devices and systems consumes a lot of power since the acquired signals are always processed on the receiver end. Because of this back end processing, the unprocessed raw data is transmitted resulting in usage of more power, memory and processing time. This paper proposes an innovative technique where the acquired signals are processed by a microcontroller in the front end of the module and just the processed signal is then transmitted wirelessly to the display unit. Therefore, power consumption is considerably reduced and clearer data analysis is performed within the module. This also avoids the need for the user to be educated about usage of the device and signal/system analysis, since only the number of heart beats will displayed at the user end. Additionally, the proposed concept also eradicates the other disadvantages like obtrusiveness, high power consumption and size. To demonstrate the above said factors, a commercial controller board was used to extend the monitoring method by using the saved ECG data from a computer.

  18. Unraveling the nature of coherent beatings in chlorosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dostál, Jakub; Mančal, Tomáš; Pšenčík, Jakub; Vácha, František; Zigmantas, Donatas

    2014-03-21

    Coherent two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy at 80 K was used to study chlorosomes isolated from green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. Two distinct processes in the evolution of the 2D spectrum are observed. The first being exciton diffusion, seen in the change of the spectral shape occurring on a 100-fs timescale, and the second being vibrational coherences, realized through coherent beatings with frequencies of 91 and 145 cm{sup −1} that are dephased during the first 1.2 ps. The distribution of the oscillation amplitude in the 2D spectra is independent of the evolution of the 2D spectral shape. This implies that the diffusion energy transfer process does not transfer coherences within the chlorosome. Remarkably, the oscillatory pattern observed in the negative regions of the 2D spectrum (dominated by the excited state absorption) is a mirror image of the oscillations found in the positive part (originating from the stimulated emission and ground state bleach). This observation is surprising since it is expected that coherences in the electronic ground and excited states are generated with the same probability and the latter dephase faster in the presence of fast diffusion. Moreover, the relative amplitude of coherent beatings is rather high compared to non-oscillatory signal despite the reported low values of the Huang-Rhys factors. The origin of these effects is discussed in terms of the vibronic and Herzberg-Teller couplings.

  19. Ion acceleration by beating electrostatic waves: domain of allowed acceleration.

    PubMed

    Spektor, R; Choueiri, E Y

    2004-04-01

    The conditions under which a magnetized ion can be accelerated through a nonlinear interaction with a pair of beating electrostatic waves are explored. It has been shown [Benisti et al., Phys. Plasma 5, 3224 (1998)] that the electric field of the beating waves can, under some conditions, accelerate ions from arbitrarily low initial velocity in stark contrast with the well-known nonlinear threshold criteria for ion acceleration by a single wave. It is shown here that the previously found condition is necessary but not sufficient for acceleration to occur. The sufficient and necessary conditions are identified in terms of the location of the critical points of the motion on the Poincaré section. A second-order perturbation analysis was carried out to approximate the location of these critical points and define the domains of allowed and forbidden acceleration. It is shown that for an ion to be significantly energized, the Hamiltonian must be outside the energy barrier defined by the location of the elliptic and hyperbolic critical points. Despite the restriction on the Hamiltonian, an ion with arbitrarily low initial velocity may benefit from this acceleration mechanism.

  20. Cardioscopically Guided Beating Heart Surgery: Paravalvular Leak Repair.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Benoit; Machaidze, Zurab; Mencattelli, Margherita; Manjila, Sunil; Shin, Borami; Price, Karl; Borger, Michael A; Thourani, Vinod; Del Nido, Pedro; Brown, David W; Baird, Christopher W; Mayer, John E; Dupont, Pierre E

    2017-09-01

    There remains a paucity of direct visualization techniques for beating-heart intracardiac procedures. To address this need, we evaluated a novel cardioscope in the context of aortic paravalvular leaks (PVLs) localization and closure. A porcine aortic PVL model was created using a custom-made bioprosthetic valve, and PVL presence was verified by epicardial echocardiography. Transapical delivery of occlusion devices guided solely by cardioscopy was attempted 13 times in a total of three pigs. Device retrieval after release was attempted six times. Echocardiography, morphologic evaluation, and delivery time were used to assess results. Cardioscopic imaging enabled localization of PVLs via visualization of regurgitant jet flow in a paravalvular channel at the base of the prosthetic aortic valve. Occluders were successfully placed in 11 of 13 attempts (84.6%), taking on average 3:03 ± 1:34 min. Devices were cardioscopically removed successfully in three of six attempts (50%), taking 3:41 ± 1:46 min. No damage to the ventricle or annulus was observed at necropsy. Cardioscopy can facilitate intracardiac interventions by providing direct visualization of anatomic structures inside the blood-filled, beating-heart model. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A sensorimotor theory of temporal tracking and beat induction.

    PubMed

    Todd, N P McAngus; Lee, C S; O'Boyle, D J

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a theory of the neurobiological basis of temporal tracking and beat induction as a form of sensory-guided action. We propose three principal components for the neurological architecture of temporal tracking: (1) the central auditory system, which represents the temporal information in the input signal in the form of a modulation power spectrum; (2) the musculoskeletal system, which carries out the action and (3) a controller, in the form of a parieto-cerebellar-frontal loop, which carries out the synchronisation between input and output by means of an internal model of the musculoskeletal dynamics. The theory is implemented in the form of a computational algorithm which takes sound samples as input and synchronises a simple linear mass-spring-damper system to simulate audio-motor synchronisation. The model may be applied to both the tracking of isochronous click sequences and beat induction in rhythmic music or speech, and also accounts for the approximate Weberian property of timing.

  2. Unraveling the nature of coherent beatings in chlorosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostál, Jakub; Mančal, Tomáš; Vácha, František; Pšenčík, Jakub; Zigmantas, Donatas

    2014-03-01

    Coherent two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy at 80 K was used to study chlorosomes isolated from green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. Two distinct processes in the evolution of the 2D spectrum are observed. The first being exciton diffusion, seen in the change of the spectral shape occurring on a 100-fs timescale, and the second being vibrational coherences, realized through coherent beatings with frequencies of 91 and 145 cm-1 that are dephased during the first 1.2 ps. The distribution of the oscillation amplitude in the 2D spectra is independent of the evolution of the 2D spectral shape. This implies that the diffusion energy transfer process does not transfer coherences within the chlorosome. Remarkably, the oscillatory pattern observed in the negative regions of the 2D spectrum (dominated by the excited state absorption) is a mirror image of the oscillations found in the positive part (originating from the stimulated emission and ground state bleach). This observation is surprising since it is expected that coherences in the electronic ground and excited states are generated with the same probability and the latter dephase faster in the presence of fast diffusion. Moreover, the relative amplitude of coherent beatings is rather high compared to non-oscillatory signal despite the reported low values of the Huang-Rhys factors. The origin of these effects is discussed in terms of the vibronic and Herzberg-Teller couplings.

  3. Nitroxide stable radicals protect beating cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Samuni, A.; Winkelsberg, D.; Pinson, A.; Hahn, S.M.; Mitchell, J.B.; Russo, A. )

    1991-05-01

    The protective effect of stable nitroxide radicals against oxidative damage was studied using cardiomyocyte cultures obtained from newborn rats. Monolayered cardiomyocytes were exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the effect on spontaneous beating and leakage of LDH was determined. Hydrogen peroxide irreversibly blocked rhythmic beating and resulted in a significant membrane injury as shown by release of LDH. The injury was prevented by catalase which removes H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and by cell-permeable, metal-chelating agents such as desferrioxamine or bipyridine. In contrast, reagents which are excluded from the cell such as superoxide dismutase or DTPA did not protect the cells against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Five- and six-membered ring, stable nitroxide radicals which have previously been shown to chemically act as low-molecular weight, membrane-permeable, SOD-mimetic compounds provided full protection. The nitroxides prevented leakage of LDH and preserved normal cardiomyocyte contractility, presumably by intercepting intracellular O{sub 2}-radicals. Alternatively, protection may result through nitroxides reacting with reduced transition metal ions or by detoxifying secondary organic radicals.

  4. Disorders of the Reproductive Tract of Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Harcourt-Brown, Frances Margaret

    2017-05-01

    Disorders of the reproductive tract are common in rabbits. Conditions are different in rabbits that are farmed for their meat or fur and those that are kept as pets. Farmed rabbits suffer from infections and diseases associated with pregnancy. Congenital abnormalities are more likely to be recognized and treated in pet rabbits. Pet rabbits suffer from age-related changes to their genital tract (hyperplasia, neoplasia, or hernias). Neutering is an important part of prevention and treatment of reproductive disorders. Knowledge of normal male and female reproductive anatomy is essential to prevent complications. These are described and illustrated. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rabbit Oncology: Diseases, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    van Zeeland, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Neoplasia has long been reported as a rare finding in rabbits, but over the past decades the number of reports on neoplastic disease in rabbits has risen considerably. Similar to other animals, neoplastic changes may occur in any organ system, but the rate in which the organ systems are affected differs considerably. In rabbits, tumors have predominantly been found in the urogenital, hemolymphatic, and integumentary systems. This article discusses current insights on the etiopathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, and treatment of the commonest neoplastic diseases in rabbits and offer guidelines for the correct diagnosis and treatment of the rabbit oncologic patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence-Based Advances in Rabbit Medicine.

    PubMed

    Summa, Noémie M; Brandão, João

    2017-09-01

    Rabbit medicine has been continuously evolving over time with increasing popularity and demand. Tremendous advances have been made in rabbit medicine over the past 5 years, including the use of imaging tools for otitis and dental disease management, the development of laboratory testing for encephalitozoonosis, or determination of prognosis in rabbits. Recent pharmacokinetic studies have been published, providing additional information on commonly used antibiotics and motility-enhancer drugs, as well as benzimidazole toxicosis. This article presents a review of evidence-based advances for liver lobe torsions, thymoma, and dental disease in rabbits and controversial and new future promising areas in rabbit medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Steady Beat Sound Facilitates both Coordinated Group Walking and Inter-Subject Neural Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Nozawa, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Miyazaki, Atsuko; Sasaki, Yukako; Sakaki, Kohei; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2017-01-01

    Group walking is a collective social interaction task as pedestrians are required to determine their own pace of walking on the basis of surrounding others’ states. The steady beat sound is known to be a controllable factor that contributes to relative success/failure of coordinated group walking since the beat improves pedestrian flow in congested situation. According to some reports, inter-personal interaction synchronizes inter-personal brain activity in the prefrontal region, which supports social cognitive processes required for successful inter-individual coordination, such as predicting each other’s state; success/failure of a coordinated task is associated with increase/decrease in inter-subject neural synchrony (INS). Combining these previous findings, we hypothesized that INS during group walking in congested situations would also differ depending on the existence of the steady beat, corresponding to the modulated coordination-related cognitive processes. Subjects’ frontopolar activities were measured using ultra-small near infrared spectroscopy, which can simultaneously measure the brain activities of multiple subjects without constraints on their motions. To exclude the possibility that increased INS may be spuriously induced by the shared stimuli (i.e., steady beat) or by the resultant behavioral synchronization, as control we used stepping on a same spot, which is similar in movement to walking but does not require the subjects to consider others’ states, either with or without the steady beat. In a two by two repeated measures factorial experimental design, the subjects were instructed to walk or keep stepping on a same spot with or without a steady beat sound of 70 beats per minute. As previously reported, the walking flow during group walking with the beat significantly increased compared with that without the beat. Synchronization of stepping between the subjects was also significantly increased by the steady beat sound. For INS, we

  8. Intracranial electroencephalography power and phase synchronization changes during monaural and binaural beat stimulation.

    PubMed

    Becher, Ann-Katrin; Höhne, Marlene; Axmacher, Nikolai; Chaieb, Leila; Elger, Christian E; Fell, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Auditory stimulation with monaural or binaural auditory beats (i.e. sine waves with nearby frequencies presented either to both ears or to each ear separately) represents a non-invasive approach to influence electrical brain activity. It is still unclear exactly which brain sites are affected by beat stimulation. In particular, an impact of beat stimulation on mediotemporal brain areas could possibly provide new options for memory enhancement or seizure control. Therefore, we examined how electroencephalography (EEG) power and phase synchronization are modulated by auditory stimulation with beat frequencies corresponding to dominant EEG rhythms based on intracranial recordings in presurgical epilepsy patients. Monaural and binaural beat stimuli with beat frequencies of 5, 10, 40 and 80 Hz and non-superposed control signals were administered with low amplitudes (60 dB SPL) and for short durations (5 s). EEG power was intracranially recorded from mediotemporal, temporo-basal and temporo-lateral and surface sites. Evoked and total EEG power and phase synchronization during beat vs. control stimulation were compared by the use of Bonferroni-corrected non-parametric label-permutation tests. We found that power and phase synchronization were significantly modulated by beat stimulation not only at temporo-basal, temporo-lateral and surface sites, but also at mediotemporal sites. Generally, more significant decreases than increases were observed. The most prominent power increases were seen after stimulation with monaural 40-Hz beats. The most pronounced power and synchronization decreases resulted from stimulation with monaural 5-Hz and binaural 80-Hz beats. Our results suggest that beat stimulation offers a non-invasive approach for the modulation of intracranial EEG characteristics. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Effect of Dopaminergic Medication on Beat-Based Auditory Timing in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Daniel J; Pickett, Kristen A; Earhart, Gammon M; Grahn, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) adversely affects timing abilities. Beat-based timing is a mechanism that times events relative to a regular interval, such as the "beat" in musical rhythm, and is impaired in PD. It is unknown if dopaminergic medication influences beat-based timing in PD. Here, we tested beat-based timing over two sessions in participants with PD (OFF then ON dopaminergic medication) and in unmedicated control participants. People with PD and control participants completed two tasks. The first was a discrimination task in which participants compared two rhythms and determined whether they were the same or different. Rhythms either had a beat structure (metric simple rhythms) or did not (metric complex rhythms), as in previous studies. Discrimination accuracy was analyzed to test for the effects of beat structure, as well as differences between participants with PD and controls, and effects of medication (PD group only). The second task was the Beat Alignment Test (BAT), in which participants listened to music with regular tones superimposed, and responded as to whether the tones were "ON" or "OFF" the beat of the music. Accuracy was analyzed to test for differences between participants with PD and controls, and for an effect of medication in patients. Both patients and controls discriminated metric simple rhythms better than metric complex rhythms. Controls also improved at the discrimination task in the second vs. first session, whereas people with PD did not. For participants with PD, the difference in performance between metric simple and metric complex rhythms was greater (sensitivity to changes in simple rhythms increased and sensitivity to changes in complex rhythms decreased) when ON vs. OFF medication. Performance also worsened with disease severity. For the BAT, no group differences or effects of medication were found. Overall, these findings suggest that timing is impaired in PD, and that dopaminergic medication influences beat-based and non-beat

  10. Single-beat determination of right ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shing-Hsien; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Hsu, Lung-An; Ho, Wan-Jing; Wang, Chun-Li

    2010-11-01

    In atrial fibrillation (AF), left ventricular (LV) systolic function positively correlates with the ratio of the preceding to prepreceding RR intervals (RRp/RRpp) and single-beat determination of LV function at a beat with equal RRp and RRpp closely estimates the average value over all cardiac cycles. The study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of single-beat determination that was based on the ratio of RRp/RRpp to accurately assess RV function in AF. In 60 patients with AF, RV fractional area change (RVFAC), RRp and RRpp were measured during 20 beats for each patient. The relationship between RVFAC and RRp/RRpp was evaluated by linear regression analysis. The measured values of RVFAC at the beats with equal RRp and RRpp were compared with the average values over 20 beats. The influence of RRp cycle lengths on the values of RVFAC at the beats with equal RRp and RRpp was examined from the plot of normalized value against RR intervals. There were a positive linear relationship between RVFAC and RRp/RRpp in all patients (P < 0.001 in all). The RVFAC measured by single-beat method and cycle lengths < 500 ms were usually far below the average values. After excluding beats with cycle lengths < 500 ms, RVFAC determined by single-beat method was very close to the average values (y = 0.96x + 1.91%, r = 0.961; P < 0.001; bias 0.26%). RV FAC correlates positively with RRp/RRpp and single-beat determination of RV function is feasible and accurate in patients with chronic AF. © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Interacting cortical and basal ganglia networks underlying finding and tapping to the musical beat.

    PubMed

    Kung, Shu-Jen; Chen, Joyce L; Zatorre, Robert J; Penhune, Virginia B

    2013-03-01

    Humans are able to find and tap to the beat of musical rhythms varying in complexity from children's songs to modern jazz. Musical beat has no one-to-one relationship with auditory features-it is an abstract perceptual representation that emerges from the interaction between sensory cues and higher-level cognitive organization. Previous investigations have examined the neural basis of beat processing but have not tested the core phenomenon of finding and tapping to the musical beat. To test this, we used fMRI and had musicians find and tap to the beat of rhythms that varied from metrically simple to metrically complex-thus from a strong to a weak beat. Unlike most previous studies, we measured beat tapping performance during scanning and controlled for possible effects of scanner noise on beat perception. Results showed that beat finding and tapping recruited largely overlapping brain regions, including the superior temporal gyrus (STG), premotor cortex, and ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC). Beat tapping activity in STG and VLPFC was correlated with both perception and performance, suggesting that they are important for retrieving, selecting, and maintaining the musical beat. In contrast BG activity was similar in all conditions and was not correlated with either perception or production, suggesting that it may be involved in detecting auditory temporal regularity or in associating auditory stimuli with a motor response. Importantly, functional connectivity analyses showed that these systems interact, indicating that more basic sensorimotor mechanisms instantiated in the BG work in tandem with higher-order cognitive mechanisms in PFC.

  12. Biplane assessment of left ventricular function during atrial fibrillation at beats with equal subsequent cycles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Li; Ho, Wan-Jing; Luqman, Nazar; Hsu, Lung-An; Kuo, Chi-Tai

    2006-10-26

    Prior study has demonstrated that the biplane single-beat method could be used to assess left ventricular function during atrial fibrillation at a beat with equal subsequent cycles. The study was to test whether we could improve the method by measuring a few beats with equal subsequent cycles and cycle-length limits. In 75 patients with atrial fibrillation, stroke volume and ejection fraction were determined from simultaneous biplane views of left ventricle for 20 beats using a matrix-array transducer and a biplane Simpson's rule. The influence of cycle lengths on the values of systolic parameters at beats with equal subsequent cycles was examined from the plot of normalized parameters (measured values/average values) against cycle lengths. The values of 1 to 3 beats with equal subsequent cycles and cycle-length limits were averaged and compared with the average values over 20 beats by Bland-Altman and mean percentage difference analysis. The variability of repeat measurements was evaluated in 10 patients. The systolic parameters measured at beats with cycle lengths shorter than 500 ms were usually far below the average values. Agreement and mean percentage difference analysis revealed improved accuracy when 2 or 3 beats with cycle-length limits (>500 ms) were used for assessment. As the variability of averaging 2 or 3 beats is no greater than that of repeat measurements, both methods are equally good. Accurate assessment of left ventricular systolic function in atrial fibrillation can be obtained by averaging 2 beats with equal subsequent cycles and cycle-length limits (>500 ms).

  13. Towards active tracking of beating heart motion in the presence of arrhythmia for robotic assisted beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuna, E Erdem; Karimov, Jamshid H; Liu, Taoming; Bebek, Özkan; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Çavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-01-01

    In robotic assisted beating heart surgery, the control architecture for heart motion tracking has stringent requirements in terms of bandwidth of the motion that needs to be tracked. In order to achieve sufficient tracking accuracy, feed-forward control algorithms, which rely on estimations of upcoming heart motion, have been proposed in the literature. However, performance of these feed-forward motion control algorithms under heart rhythm variations is an important concern. In their past work, the authors have demonstrated the effectiveness of a receding horizon model predictive control-based algorithm, which used generalized adaptive predictors, under constant and slowly varying heart rate conditions. This paper extends these studies to the case when the heart motion statistics change abruptly and significantly, such as during arrhythmias. A feasibility study is carried out to assess the motion tracking capabilities of the adaptive algorithms in the occurrence of arrhythmia during beating heart surgery. Specifically, the tracking performance of the algorithms is evaluated on prerecorded motion data, which is collected in vivo and includes heart rhythm irregularities. The algorithms are tested using both simulations and bench experiments on a three degree-of-freedom robotic test bed. They are also compared with a position-plus-derivative controller as well as a receding horizon model predictive controller that employs an extended Kalman filter algorithm for predicting future heart motion.

  14. Changes in intracellular calcium concentration influence beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kistamas, K; Szentandrassy, N; Hegyi, B; Vaczi, K; Ruzsnavszky, F; Horvath, B; Banyasz, T; Nanasi, P P; Magyar, J

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the influence of changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) on beat-to-beat variability (short term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes. Series of action potentials were recorded from enzymatically isolated canine ventricular cells using conventional microelectrode technique. Drug effects on SV were evaluated as relative SV changes determined by plotting the drug-induced changes in SV against corresponding changes in APD and comparing these data to the exponential SV-APD function obtained with inward and outward current injections. Exposure of myocytes to the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM (5 μM) decreased, while Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 (1 μM) increased the magnitude of relative SV. Both effects were primarily due to the concomitant changes in APD. Relative SV was reduced by BAPTA-AM under various experimental conditions including pretreatment with veratridine, BAY K8644, dofetilide or E-4031. Contribution of transient changes of [Ca(2+)]i due to Ca(2+) released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied using 10 μM ryanodine and 1 μM cyclopiazonic acid: relative SV was reduced by both agents. Inhibition of the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger by 1 μM SEA0400 increased relative SV. It is concluded that elevation of [Ca(2+)]i increases relative SV significantly. More importantly, Ca(2+) released from the SR is an important component of this effect.

  15. Application of stochastic phenomenological modelling to cell-to-cell and beat-to-beat electrophysiological variability in cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, John; Mirams, Gary R.; Pitt-Francis, Joe; Rodriguez, Blanca; Burrage, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Variability in the action potential of isolated myocytes and tissue samples is observed in experimental studies. Variability is manifested as both differences in the action potential (AP) morphology between cells (extrinsic variability), and also ‘intrinsic’ or beat-to-beat variability of repolarization (BVR) in the AP duration of each cell. We studied the relative contributions of experimentally recorded intrinsic and extrinsic variability to dispersion of repolarization in tissue. We developed four cell-specific parameterizations of a phenomenological stochastic differential equation AP model exhibiting intrinsic variability using APs recorded from isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes exhibiting BVR. We performed simulations in tissue using the four different model parameterizations in the presence and the absence of both intrinsic and extrinsic variability. We altered the coupling of the tissue to determine how inter-cellular coupling affected the dispersion of the AP duration in tissue. Both intrinsic and extrinsic variability were gradually revealed by reduction of tissue coupling. However, the recorded extrinsic variability between individual myocytes produced a greater degree of dispersion in repolarization in tissue than the intrinsic variability of each myocyte. PMID:25451525

  16. Towards Active Tracking of Beating Heart Motion in the Presence of Arrhythmia for Robotic Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, E. Erdem; Karimov, Jamshid H.; Liu, Taoming; Bebek, Özkan; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    In robotic assisted beating heart surgery, the control architecture for heart motion tracking has stringent requirements in terms of bandwidth of the motion that needs to be tracked. In order to achieve sufficient tracking accuracy, feed-forward control algorithms, which rely on estimations of upcoming heart motion, have been proposed in the literature. However, performance of these feed-forward motion control algorithms under heart rhythm variations is an important concern. In their past work, the authors have demonstrated the effectiveness of a receding horizon model predictive control-based algorithm, which used generalized adaptive predictors, under constant and slowly varying heart rate conditions. This paper extends these studies to the case when the heart motion statistics change abruptly and significantly, such as during arrhythmias. A feasibility study is carried out to assess the motion tracking capabilities of the adaptive algorithms in the occurrence of arrhythmia during beating heart surgery. Specifically, the tracking performance of the algorithms is evaluated on prerecorded motion data, which is collected in vivo and includes heart rhythm irregularities. The algorithms are tested using both simulations and bench experiments on a three degree-of-freedom robotic test bed. They are also compared with a position-plus-derivative controller as well as a receding horizon model predictive controller that employs an extended Kalman filter algorithm for predicting future heart motion. PMID:25048462

  17. Coprophagy in rabbits: autoingestion of hard feces.

    PubMed

    Ebino, K Y; Shutoh, Y; Takahashi, K W

    1993-10-01

    The rabbit is a representative animal species that conducts coprophagy, i. e. the production and reingestion of soft feces. We, however, encountered a maternal rabbit eating its own hard feces. A detailed investigation was performed on coprophagy in the rabbit to elucidate whether rabbits actually reingest their own hard feces. It was found that young adult Japanese White rabbits reingested their hard, as well as soft, feces directly from the anus. It has been reported that rabbits reingest only soft feces because of their high nutritive content, but the present study demonstrates that rabbits also reingest their hard feces despite their low nutritive content. It seems possible that coprophagy may be initiated by the colonic or rectal wall expanding effects of the fecal material itself.

  18. Use of beat-to-beat cardiovascular variability data to determine the validity of sham therapy as the placebo control in osteopathic manipulative medicine research.

    PubMed

    Henley, Charles E; Wilson, Thad E

    2014-11-01

    Osteopathic manipulative medicine researchers often use sham therapy as the placebo control during clinical trials. Optimally, the sham therapy should be a hands-on procedure that is perceptually indistinguishable from osteopathic manipulative treatment, does not create an effect on its own, and is not a treatment intervention. However, the sham therapy itself may often influence the outcome. The use of cardiovascular variability (eg, beat-to-beat heart rate variability) as a surrogate for the autonomic nervous system is one objective method by which to identify such an effect. By monitoring cardiovascular variability, investigators can assess autonomic nervous system activity as a response to the sham therapy and quickly determine whether or not the selected sham therapy is a true placebo control. The authors provide evidence for assessment of beat-to-beat heart rate variability as one method for assuring objectivity of sham therapy as a placebo control in osteopathic manipulative medicine research.

  19. Detection and evaluation of ventricular repolarization alternans: an approach to combined ECG, thoracic impedance, and beat-to-beat heart rate variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Kriščiukaitis, Algimantas; Šimoliūnienė, Renata; Macas, Andrius; Petrolis, Robertas; Drėgūnas, Kęstutis; Bakšytė, Giedrė; Pieteris, Linas; Bertašienė, Zita; Žaliūnas, Remigijus

    2014-01-01

    Beat-to-beat alteration in ventricles repolarization reflected by alternans of amplitude and/or shape of ECG S-T,T segment (TWA) is known as phenomena related with risk of severe arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death. Technical difficulties have caused limited its usage in clinical diagnostics. Possibilities to register and analyze multimodal signals reflecting heart activity inspired search for new technical solutions. First objective of this study was to test whether thoracic impedance signal and beat-to-beat heart rate reflect repolarization alternans detected as TWA. The second objective was revelation of multimodal signal features more comprehensively representing the phenomena and increasing its prognostic usefulness. ECG, and thoracic impedance signal recordings made during 24h follow-up of the patients hospitalized in acute phase of myocardial infarction were used for investigation. Signal morphology variations reflecting estimates were obtained by the principal component analysis-based method. Clinical outcomes of patients (survival and/or rehospitalization in 6 and 12 months) were compared to repolarization alternans and heart rate variability estimates. Repolarization alternans detected as TWA was also reflected in estimates of thoracic impedance signal shape and variation in beat-to-beat heart rate. All these parameters showed correlation with clinical outcomes of patients. The strongest significant correlation showed magnitude of alternans in estimates of thoracic impedance signal shape. The features of ECG, thoracic impedance signal and beat-to-beat variability of heart rate, give comprehensive estimates of repolarization alternans, which correlate, with clinical outcomes of the patients and we recommend using them to improve diagnostic reliability. Copyright © 2014 Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Microbiological quality of rabbit meat.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Calleja, Jose M; Santos, Jesús A; Otero, Andrés; García-López, María-Luisa

    2004-05-01

    World rabbit meat production is estimated to be over 1 million tons, and Spain is the third largest producer. Although rabbit meat is marketed and consumed worldwide, information on microbiological quality is very scarce. Here, we report indicator organisms, spoilage flora, sensory quality, and some physicochemical traits of 24 h postmortem chilled rabbit carcasses and prepackaged rabbit meat stored chilled in air for 0 to 3 days at the retail level. The mean total bacterial count (4.01 +/- 0.48 log CFU/g) for carcasses dressed at a small abattoir by a manual process was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that (4.96 +/- 0.90 log CFU/g) for carcasses dressed at a large abattoir in automated slaughter lines. Both groups of carcasses had mean pH values of 5.98. The dominant contaminants on carcasses from the small abattoir were Pseudomonas, lactic acid bacteria, and yeasts. These microorganisms and Brochothrix thermosphacta were dominant on carcasses from the large abattoir. On prepacked hind legs (pH 6.26 +/- 0.18) stored at -1 to +1 degree C (supermarket 1), mean aerobic mesophilic count was 5.87 +/- 1.03 log CFU/g, and the major microbial groups were Pseudomonas, yeasts, lactic acid bacteria, and B. thermosphacta. On prepacked whole carcasses (pH 6.37 +/- 0.18) displayed at -1 to +5 degrees C (supermarket 2), mean aerobic mesophilic count was 6.60 +/- 1.18 and the same microbial groups were dominant. Relative Escherichia coli incidence was supermarket 2 > large abattoir > supermarket 1 > small abattoir. Overall, low numbers of coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, psychrotrophic clostridia, coagulase-positive staphylococci, and molds were found. Sensory scores, pH values, and L-lactic acid content differentiated fresh carcasses from retail samples. Data obtained suggest that the microflora of chilled rabbit meat are different from those found on the meat of other animals.

  1. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, Robert A., III (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate is presented. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  2. 77 FR 17060 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge... years, announces the launch of the Beat Down Blood Pressure Video Challenge. This challenge is an open... consumer e-health tools to manage high blood pressure. Health care providers are also encouraged to...

  3. Attitudes toward Wife Beating among Palestinian Women of Reproductive Age from Three Cities in West Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhaher, Enas A.; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T.; Maxwell, Annette E.; Kramer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    A total of 450 women were interviewed in Mother and Child Health Care Centers in three cities in West Bank, Palestine, to assess attitudes toward wife beating. Overall, women perceived wife beating to be justified if a wife insults her husband (59%), if she disobeys her husband (49%), if she neglects her children (37%), if she goes out without…

  4. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  5. Direct Visualization of Mechanical Beats by Means of an Oscillating Smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez, Marcos H.; Salinas, Isabel; Monsoriu, Juan A.; Castro-Palacio, Juan C.

    2017-10-01

    The resonance phenomenon is widely known in physics courses. Qualitatively speaking, resonance takes place in a driven oscillating system whenever the frequency approaches the natural frequency, resulting in maximal oscillatory amplitude. Very closely related to resonance is the phenomenon of mechanical beating, which occurs when the driving and natural frequencies of the system are slightly different. The frequency of the beat is just the difference of the natural and driving frequencies. Beats are very familiar in acoustic systems. There are several works in this journal on visualizing the beats in acoustic systems. For instance, the microphone and the speaker of two mobile devices were used in previous work to analyze the acoustic beats produced by two signals of close frequencies. The formation of beats can also be visualized in mechanical systems, such as a mass-spring system or a double-driven string. Here, the mechanical beats in a smartphone-spring system are directly visualized in a simple way. The frequency of the beats is measured by means of the acceleration sensor of a smartphone, which hangs from a spring attached to a mechanical driver. This laboratory experiment is suitable for both high school and first-year university physics courses.

  6. The evolutionary neuroscience of musical beat perception: the Action Simulation for Auditory Prediction (ASAP) hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aniruddh D; Iversen, John R

    2014-01-01

    a perceived periodic pulse that structures the perception of musical rhythm and which serves as a framework for synchronized movement to music. What are the neural mechanisms of musical beat perception, and how did they evolve? One view, which dates back to Darwin and implicitly informs some current models of beat perception, is that the relevant neural mechanisms are relatively general and are widespread among animal species. On the basis of recent neural and cross-species data on musical beat processing, this paper argues for a different view. Here we argue that beat perception is a complex brain function involving temporally-precise communication between auditory regions and motor planning regions of the cortex (even in the absence of overt movement). More specifically, we propose that simulation of periodic movement in motor planning regions provides a neural signal that helps the auditory system predict the timing of upcoming beats. This "action simulation for auditory prediction" (ASAP) hypothesis leads to testable predictions. We further suggest that ASAP relies on dorsal auditory pathway connections between auditory regions and motor planning regions via the parietal cortex, and suggest that these connections may be stronger in humans than in non-human primates due to the evolution of vocal learning in our lineage. This suggestion motivates cross-species research to determine which species are capable of human-like beat perception, i.e., beat perception that involves accurate temporal prediction of beat times across a fairly broad range of tempi.

  7. Beat-wave Photoinjector for Generating Periodic Electron Bunches at THz Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-H.; Lau, W.-K.

    2009-01-22

    A laser beat wave is proposed to induce density modulated electron emission from a photocathode and is thereby used to generate a periodically bunched electron beam from a photocathode electron accelerator. This technique does not introduce additional energy spread or emittance to the electron beam. We also present a laser system for this purpose with a tunable beat frequency up to 40 THz.

  8. Keeping the Beat: A Large Sample Study of Bouncing and Clapping to Music

    PubMed Central

    Tranchant, Pauline; Vuvan, Dominique T.; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of humans move in time with a musical beat. This behaviour has been mostly studied through finger-tapping synchronization. Here, we evaluate naturalistic synchronization responses to music–bouncing and clapping–in 100 university students. Their ability to match the period of their bounces and claps to those of a metronome and musical clips varying in beat saliency was assessed. In general, clapping was better synchronized with the beat than bouncing, suggesting that the choice of a specific movement type is an important factor to consider in the study of sensorimotor synchronization processes. Performance improved as a function of beat saliency, indicating that beat abstraction plays a significant role in synchronization. Fourteen percent of the population exhibited marked difficulties with matching the beat. Yet, at a group level, poor synchronizers showed similar sensitivity to movement type and beat saliency as normal synchronizers. These results suggest the presence of quantitative rather than qualitative variations when losing the beat. PMID:27471854

  9. Effect of Ca2+ on the ciliary beat frequency of skinned dog tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Y; Kanno, T; Sasaki, H; Takishima, T

    1985-04-01

    Beat frequency of dog tracheal ciliated epithelium was measured using a profile projector and a photomultiplier. The preparation, treated with 50 micrograms/ml of saponin for 15 min, lost osmotic behavior and the ciliary beat came to depend on externally applied MgATP2- indicating that ciliated epithelium is skinned with saponin. Beat frequency of skinned cilia did not increase with Ca2+ in 0.1 mM MgATP2- with no ATP-regenerating system. Under 4 mM Mg ATP2- the beat frequency increased with an increase in Ca2+ from 0.3 to 10 microM, although a marked beat continued in the virtual absence of Ca2+ sensitivity and maximum beat frequency increased with the addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin. The effect of calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) on skinned preparations was somewhat weaker than that on intact ones. We concluded that Ca2+, within the physiological range of concentrations, directly activated the ciliary proteins and increased the ciliary beat frequency. The addition of calmodulin augments the effect of Ca2+ but the basal beat frequency is not Ca2+ dependent.

  10. Beat Processing Is Pre-Attentive for Metrically Simple Rhythms with Clear Accents: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    Bouwer, Fleur L.; Van Zuijen, Titia L.; Honing, Henkjan

    2014-01-01

    The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN), an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespective of whether subjects are attending to the stimuli. Both musicians and non-musicians were presented with a varying rhythm with a clear accent structure in which occasionally a sound was omitted. We compared the MMN response to the omission of identical sounds in different metrical positions. Most importantly, we found that omissions in strong metrical positions, on the beat, elicited higher amplitude MMN responses than omissions in weak metrical positions, not on the beat. This suggests that the detection of a beat is pre-attentive when highly beat inducing stimuli are used. No effects of musical expertise were found. Our results suggest that for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents beat processing does not require attention or musical expertise. In addition, we discuss how the use of acoustically varying stimuli may influence ERP results when studying beat processing. PMID:24870123

  11. Beat processing is pre-attentive for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Fleur L; Van Zuijen, Titia L; Honing, Henkjan

    2014-01-01

    The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN), an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespective of whether subjects are attending to the stimuli. Both musicians and non-musicians were presented with a varying rhythm with a clear accent structure in which occasionally a sound was omitted. We compared the MMN response to the omission of identical sounds in different metrical positions. Most importantly, we found that omissions in strong metrical positions, on the beat, elicited higher amplitude MMN responses than omissions in weak metrical positions, not on the beat. This suggests that the detection of a beat is pre-attentive when highly beat inducing stimuli are used. No effects of musical expertise were found. Our results suggest that for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents beat processing does not require attention or musical expertise. In addition, we discuss how the use of acoustically varying stimuli may influence ERP results when studying beat processing.

  12. Plasma heating and current drive by an obliquely propagating upper-hybrid cyclotron beat wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. R.; Cairns, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Excitation of an obliquely propagating upper-hybrid cyclotron beat wave is considered for plasma heating and current drive in tokamaks. The beat wave is excited by the interaction of two intense free-electron laser (FEL) pulses at their difference frequency. The three-wave nonlinear interaction equations in a magnetized plasma are solved numerically in a steady-state two-dimensional (2-D) geometry for this purpose. The 2-D toroidal inhomogeneity effect and the effect of finite spatial width of the pump microwave pulses are taken into account for the beat wave excitation. To illustrate the principle, the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX) [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 57 (1988)] is considered. It has been found that the fraction of total input power of the pump microwaves deposited in the cyclotron beat wave is lower than the case of a Langmuir type beat wave considered by Amin and Cairns [Nucl. Fusion 30, 327 (1990)]. However, increasing the input powers of the pump microwaves, a substantial amount of input power can be deposited in the excited beat wave. The beat wave eventually transfers this power to the electrons by cyclotron damping. It has also been found that for the same input parameters, right-hand polarized pumps are more efficient than left-hand polarized pump microwaves for beat wave excitation.

  13. Attitudes toward Wife Beating among Palestinian Women of Reproductive Age from Three Cities in West Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhaher, Enas A.; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T.; Maxwell, Annette E.; Kramer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    A total of 450 women were interviewed in Mother and Child Health Care Centers in three cities in West Bank, Palestine, to assess attitudes toward wife beating. Overall, women perceived wife beating to be justified if a wife insults her husband (59%), if she disobeys her husband (49%), if she neglects her children (37%), if she goes out without…

  14. Automatic computerized analysis of heart rate variability with digital filtering of ectopic beats.

    PubMed

    Storck, N; Ericson, M; Lindblad, L; Jensen-Urstad, M

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has been used in studies of autonomic function and risk assessment in different patient groups such as in patients with diabetes mellitus, after myocardial infarction (MI) and other cardiovascular disease. Ectopic beats can, however, interfere with HRV analysis and give erroneous results. We have therefore studied the impact of ectopic beats on HRV analysis and the ability of a filter algorithm to correct this. Power spectral analysis of synthetic data with an increasing proportion of ectopic beats and 24-h Holter recordings from 98 healthy subjects and 93 post MI patients was done with and without digital filtering and interpolation of errors in the data stream. The analysis of HRV was seriously hampered by less than 1% of ectopic beats. A filter algorithm based on detection and linear interpolation of ectopic beats and other noise in the data stream corrected effectively for this in the synthetic data employed. In the healthy subjects and the post MI patients, filtering markedly reduced the extra variability related to non-normal beats. The software could automatically analyse over one hundred 24-h files in one batch. HRV analysis should include filtering for ectopic beats even with a small number of such beats. It is possible to make a fast analysis automatically even in huge clinical series, which makes it possible to use the method both clinically and in epidemiological studies.

  15. The Short Supply of Saints: Limits on Replication of Models that "Beat the Odds"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Tamara; Jacobsen, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have identified effective practices that allow schools to "beat the odds" and close the reading achievement gap. Although identifying these practices is important, researchers have paid little attention to the work it takes to implement them. Through interviews with teachers who work at schools identified as beating the odds, this…

  16. Training with Rhythmic Beat Gestures Benefits L2 Pronunciation in Discourse-Demanding Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluhareva, Daria; Prieto, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has shown that beat gestures (hand gestures that co-occur with speech in spontaneous discourse) are temporally integrated with prosodic prominence and that they help word memorization and discourse comprehension. However, little is known about the potential beneficial effects of beat gestures in second language (L2) pronunciation…

  17. Metal MEMS Tools for Beating-heart Tissue Removal

    PubMed Central

    Gosline, Andrew H.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Veeramani, Arun; Wu, MingTing; Schmitz, Greg; Chen, Rich; Arabagi, Veaceslav; del Nido, Pedro J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel robotic tool is proposed to enable the surgical removal of tissue from inside the beating heart. The tool is manufactured using a unique metal MEMS process that provides the means to fabricate fully assembled devices that incorporate micron-scale features in a millimeter scale tool. The tool is integrated with a steerable curved concentric tube robot that can enter the heart through the vasculature. Incorporating both irrigation and aspiration, the tissue removal system is capable of extracting substantial amounts of tissue under teleoperated control by first morselizing it and then transporting the debris out of the heart through the lumen of the robot. Tool design and robotic integration are described and ex vivo experimental results are presented. PMID:24232076

  18. Nonlinear pattern analysis of ventricular premature beats by mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yokoshima, T.; Kishida, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of ventricular premature beats (VPBs) has been related to the risk of mortality. However, little is known about the temporal pattern of occurrence of VPBs and its relationship to autonomic activity. Hence, we applied a general correlation measure, mutual information, to quantify how VPBs are generated over time. We also used mutual information to determine the correlation between VPB production and heart rate in order to evaluate effects of autonomic activity on VPB production. We examined twenty subjects with more than 3000 VPBs/day and simulated random time series of VPB occurrence. We found that mutual information values could be used to characterize quantitatively the temporal patterns of VPB generation. Our data suggest that VPB production is not random and VPBs generated with a higher value of mutual information may be more greatly affected by autonomic activity.

  19. Scaling dependence and synchronization of forced mercury beating heart systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Animesh; Das, Dibyendu; Parmananda, P.

    2017-04-01

    We perform experiments on a nonautonomous Mercury beating heart system, which is forced to pulsate using an external square wave potential. At suitable frequencies and volumes, the drop exhibits pulsation with polygonal shapes having n corners. We find the scaling dependence of the forcing frequency νn on the volume V of the drop and establish the relationship νn∝n/√{V } . It is shown that the geometrical shape of substrate is important for obtaining closer match to these scaling relationships. Furthermore, we study synchronization of two nonidentical drops driven by the same frequency and establish that synchrony happens when the relationship n2/n1=√{V2/V1 } is satisfied.

  20. Cardioscopic Tool-delivery Instrument for Beating-heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ataollahi, Asghar; Berra, Ignacio; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Machaidze, Zurab; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an instrument that provides solutions to two open challenges in beating-heart intracardiac surgery - providing high-fidelity imaging of tool-tissue contact and controlling tool penetration into tissue over the cardiac cycle. Tool delivery is illustrated in the context of tissue removal for which these challenges equate to visualization of the tissue as it is being removed and to control of cutting depth. Cardioscopic imaging is provided by a camera and illumination system encased in an optical window. When the optical window is pressed against tissue, it displaces the blood between the camera and tissue allowing clear visualization. Control of cutting depth is achieved via precise extension of the cutting tool from a port in the optical window. Successful tool use is demonstrated in ex vivo and in vivo experiments. PMID:26951754

  1. Biofilms suck: how bacteria beat the diffusion limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Thomas; Zhang, Wenbo; Zehnder, Steven; Breaux, Jolie

    2013-03-01

    Multicellular behavior in bacterial biofilms is intimately tied to the production of an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) matrix that encases the cells and provides physical integrity to the colony as a whole. Recent work in Bacillus subtilis biofilms shows that a sudden increase in EPS production generates osmotic stresses that cause the biofilm to expand. Moreover, EPS production is triggered by a nutrient depletion gradient that develops in the biofilm due to diffusive mass transport limitations. These polymer physics based biofilm behaviors suggest that EPS production may have evolved in biofilms to beat the diffusion limit of nutrient transport into the colony, though no direct observation of nutrient transport has been observed previously. Here we measure the rate of nutrient transport into b. subtilis biofilms and find that when EPS production is up-regulated, the polymer sucks fluid into the colony with a characteristic time dependence like that of pressure driven flow. Preliminary data and analysis will be presented.

  2. Beating Rayleigh's Curse by Imaging Using Phase Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tham, Weng-Kian; Ferretti, Hugo; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2017-02-01

    Every imaging system has a resolution limit, typically defined by Rayleigh's criterion. Given a fixed number of photons, the amount of information one can gain from an image about the separation between two sources falls to zero as the separation drops below this limit, an effect dubbed "Rayleigh's curse." Recently, in a quantum-information-inspired proposal, Tsang and co-workers found that there is, in principle, infinitely more information present in the full electromagnetic field in the image plane than in the intensity alone, and suggested methods for extracting this information and beating the Rayleigh limit. In this Letter, we experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme that captures most of this information, and show that it has a greatly improved ability to estimate the distance between a pair of closely separated sources, achieving near-quantum-limited performance and immunity to Rayleigh's curse.

  3. Acceleration of injected electrons by the plasma beat wave accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.; Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Dyson, A.; Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Leemans, W. P.; Williams, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W. B.

    1992-07-01

    In this paper we describe the recent work at UCLA on the acceleration of externally injected electrons by a relativistic plasma wave. A two frequency laser was used to excite a plasma wave over a narrow range of static gas pressures close to resonance. Electrons with energies up to our detection limit of 9.1 MeV were observed when 2.1 MeV electrons were injected in the plasma wave. No accelerated electrons above the detection threshold were observed when the laser was operated on a single frequency or when no electrons were injected. Experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions, and future prospects for the plasma beat wave accelerator are discussed.

  4. Beating Rayleigh's Curse by Imaging Using Phase Information.

    PubMed

    Tham, Weng-Kian; Ferretti, Hugo; Steinberg, Aephraim M

    2017-02-17

    Every imaging system has a resolution limit, typically defined by Rayleigh's criterion. Given a fixed number of photons, the amount of information one can gain from an image about the separation between two sources falls to zero as the separation drops below this limit, an effect dubbed "Rayleigh's curse." Recently, in a quantum-information-inspired proposal, Tsang and co-workers found that there is, in principle, infinitely more information present in the full electromagnetic field in the image plane than in the intensity alone, and suggested methods for extracting this information and beating the Rayleigh limit. In this Letter, we experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme that captures most of this information, and show that it has a greatly improved ability to estimate the distance between a pair of closely separated sources, achieving near-quantum-limited performance and immunity to Rayleigh's curse.

  5. Synchronization using environmental coupling in mercury beating heart oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Tanu; Montoya, Fernando; Rivera, M.; Tajima, Shunsuke; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Parmananda, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report synchronization of Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) oscillators using the environmental coupling mechanism. This mechanism involves interaction of the oscillators with a common medium/environment such that the oscillators do not interact among themselves. In the present work, we chose a modified MBH system as the common environment. In the absence of coupling, this modified system does not exhibit self sustained oscillations. It was observed that, as a result of the coupling of the MBH oscillators with this common environment, the electrical and the mechanical activities of both the oscillators synchronized simultaneously. Experimental results indicate the emergence of both lag and the complete synchronization in the MBH oscillators. Simulations of the phase oscillators were carried out in order to better understand the experimental observations.

  6. Beating heart mitral valve repair with integrated ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John T.; Peters, Terry M.

    2015-03-01

    Beating heart valve therapies rely extensively on image guidance to treat patients who would be considered inoperable with conventional surgery. Mitral valve repair techniques including the MitrClip, NeoChord, and emerging transcatheter mitral valve replacement techniques rely on transesophageal echocardiography for guidance. These images are often difficult to interpret as the tool will cause shadowing artifacts that occlude tissue near the target site. Here, we integrate ultrasound imaging directly into the NeoChord device. This provides an unobstructed imaging plane that can visualize the valve lea ets as they are engaged by the device and can aid in achieving both a proper bite and spacing between the neochordae implants. A proof of concept user study in a phantom environment is performed to provide a proof of concept for this device.

  7. Nonlinear pattern analysis of ventricular premature beats by mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yokoshima, T.; Kishida, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of ventricular premature beats (VPBs) has been related to the risk of mortality. However, little is known about the temporal pattern of occurrence of VPBs and its relationship to autonomic activity. Hence, we applied a general correlation measure, mutual information, to quantify how VPBs are generated over time. We also used mutual information to determine the correlation between VPB production and heart rate in order to evaluate effects of autonomic activity on VPB production. We examined twenty subjects with more than 3000 VPBs/day and simulated random time series of VPB occurrence. We found that mutual information values could be used to characterize quantitatively the temporal patterns of VPB generation. Our data suggest that VPB production is not random and VPBs generated with a higher value of mutual information may be more greatly affected by autonomic activity.

  8. Luminal fluid tonicity regulates airway ciliary beating by altering membrane stretch and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Horváth, György; Sorscher, Eric J

    2008-06-01

    The coordinated, directional beating of airway cilia drives airway mucociliary clearance. Here we explore the hypothesis that airway surface liquid osmolarity is a key regulator of ciliary beating. Cilia in freshly isolated human and murine airways visualized with streaming video-microscopy exhibited a reciprocal dependence on a physiological range of luminal fluid osmolarities, across the entire range of ciliary activity (0-20 beats per sec). Increasing osmolarity slowed or completely abrogated, while lower osmolarity dramatically stimulated ciliary beating. In parallel, epithelial cell height and importantly, intracellular calcium levels (as judged by fluorescence imaging) also changed. Moreover, ciliary beating was stimulated by isosmotic solutions containing membrane permeant osmolytes, suggesting that cell size and membrane stretch (governed by apical fluid tonicity), rather than osmolarity itself, contribute to the activation. These findings shed light on the pathophysiology of diseases of mucociliary clearance such as cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Born to dance but beat deaf: a new form of congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Toiviainen, Petri; Gosselin, Nathalie; Piché, Olivier; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Palmer, Caroline; Peretz, Isabelle

    2011-04-01

    Humans move to the beat of music. Despite the ubiquity and early emergence of this response, some individuals report being unable to feel the beat in music. We report a sample of people without special training, all of whom were proficient at perceiving and producing the musical beat with the exception of one case ("Mathieu"). Motion capture and psychophysical tests revealed that people synchronized full-body motion to music and detected when a model dancer was not in time with the music. In contrast, Mathieu failed to period- and phase-lock his movement to the beat of most music pieces, and failed to detect most asynchronies of the model dancer. Mathieu's near-normal synchronization with a metronome suggests that the deficit concerns beat finding in the context of music. These results point to time as having a distinct neurobiological origin from pitch in music processing.

  10. Auditory Beat Stimulation and its Effects on Cognition and Mood States

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Wilpert, Elke Caroline; Reber, Thomas P.; Fell, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Auditory beat stimulation may be a promising new tool for the manipulation of cognitive processes and the modulation of mood states. Here, we aim to review the literature examining the most current applications of auditory beat stimulation and its targets. We give a brief overview of research on auditory steady-state responses and its relationship to auditory beat stimulation (ABS). We have summarized relevant studies investigating the neurophysiological changes related to ABS and how they impact upon the design of appropriate stimulation protocols. Focusing on binaural-beat stimulation, we then discuss the role of monaural- and binaural-beat frequencies in cognition and mood states, in addition to their efficacy in targeting disease symptoms. We aim to highlight important points concerning stimulation parameters and try to address why there are often contradictory findings with regard to the outcomes of ABS. PMID:26029120

  11. Auditory beat stimulation and its effects on cognition and mood States.

    PubMed

    Chaieb, Leila; Wilpert, Elke Caroline; Reber, Thomas P; Fell, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Auditory beat stimulation may be a promising new tool for the manipulation of cognitive processes and the modulation of mood states. Here, we aim to review the literature examining the most current applications of auditory beat stimulation and its targets. We give a brief overview of research on auditory steady-state responses and its relationship to auditory beat stimulation (ABS). We have summarized relevant studies investigating the neurophysiological changes related to ABS and how they impact upon the design of appropriate stimulation protocols. Focusing on binaural-beat stimulation, we then discuss the role of monaural- and binaural-beat frequencies in cognition and mood states, in addition to their efficacy in targeting disease symptoms. We aim to highlight important points concerning stimulation parameters and try to address why there are often contradictory findings with regard to the outcomes of ABS.

  12. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  13. More attentional focusing through binaural beats: evidence from the global-local task.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Barone, Hayley; Sellaro, Roberta; Hommel, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    A recent study showed that binaural beats have an impact on the efficiency of allocating attention over time. We were interested to see whether this impact affects attentional focusing or, even further, the top-down control over irrelevant information. Healthy adults listened to gamma-frequency (40 Hz) binaural beats, which are assumed to increase attentional concentration, or a constant tone of 340 Hz (control condition) for 3 min before and during a global-local task. While the size of the congruency effect (indicating the failure to suppress task-irrelevant information) was unaffected by the binaural beats, the global-precedence effect (reflecting attentional focusing) was considerably smaller after gamma-frequency binaural beats than after the control condition. Our findings suggest that high-frequency binaural beats bias the individual attentional processing style towards a reduced spotlight of attention.

  14. Comparison of blood pressure and sympathetic activity of rabbits in their home cage and the laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyungjoon; Burke, Sandra L; Armitage, James A; Head, Geoffrey A

    2012-12-01

    Methodological improvements in measuring cardiovascular parameters have meant that data can be collected from freely moving animals in their home cage. However, experiments in rabbits still often require them to be restrained in a laboratory setting. The aim of this study was to determine whether measurements collected when rabbits were placed in a holding box in the laboratory are representative of values obtained in freely moving conscious rabbits. Nine New Zealand White rabbits received two radiotelemetry implants to monitor mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). The MAP measured in the laboratory (71 ± 1 mmHg) was similar to that in the home cage (69 ± 1 mmHg), but there was less MAP variability. The RSNA was also similar in both environments. In contrast, laboratory heart rate (HR) was 7% lower than home cage HR (181 ± 4 beats min(-1), P < 0.001), but HR variability was similar. Baroreflex gain, assessed by spectral analysis, was 19% higher in the laboratory than in the home cage due to lower MAP mid-frequency variability in the laboratory. Home cage circadian patterns of MAP and HR were strongly influenced by feeding and activity. Nevertheless, MAP and RSNA laboratory measurements were the same as average 24 h values and remained similar over several weeks. We conclude that while HR is generally lower in the laboratory, a valid representation of MAP and RSNA can be given by laboratory measurements.

  15. Spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes derived from white mature adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jumabay, Medet; Zhang, Rui; Yao, Yucheng; Goldhaber, Joshua I.; Boström, Kristina I.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Adipose stromal cells and dissociated brown adipose tissue have been shown to generate cardiomyocyte-like cells. However, it is not clear whether white mature adipocytes have the same potential, even though a close relationship has been found between adipocytes and vascular endothelial cells, another cardiovascular cell type. The objective of this study was to examine if white adipocytes would be able to supply cardiomyocytes. Methods and results We prepared a highly purified population of lipid-filled adipocytes from mice, 6–7 weeks of age. When allowed to lose lipids, the adipocytes assumed a fibroblast-like morphology, so-called dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. Subsequently, 10–15% of the DFAT cells spontaneously differentiated into cardiomyocyte-like cells, in which the cardiomyocyte phenotype was identified by morphological observations, expression of cardiomyocyte-specific markers, and immunocytochemical staining. In addition, electrophysiological studies revealed pacemaker activity in these cells, and functional studies showed that a β-adrenergic agonist stimulated the beating rate, whereas a β-antagonist reduced it. In vitro treatment of newly isolated adipocytes or DFAT cells with inhibitors of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) and Wnt signalling promoted the development of the cardiomyocyte phenotype as determined by the number or beating colonies of cardiomyocyte-like cells and expression of troponin I, a cardiomyocyte-specific marker. Inhibition of BMP was most effective in promoting the cardiomyocyte phenotype in adipocytes, whereas Wnt-inhibition was most effective in DFAT cells. Conclusion White mature adipocytes can differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, suggesting a link between adipocyte and cardiomyocyte differentiation. PMID:19643806

  16. Effect of Cilia Beat Frequency on Muco-ciliary Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Sedaghat, M.H.; Shahmardan, M.M.; Norouzi, M.; Heydari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The airway surface liquid (ASL), which is a fluid layer coating the interior epithelial surface of the bronchi and bronchiolesis, plays an important defensive role against foreign particles and chemicals entering lungs. Objective: Numerical investigation has been employed to solve two-layer model consisting of mucus layer as a viscoelastic fluid and periciliary liquid layer as a Newtonian fluid to study the effects of cilia beat frequency (CBF) at various amounts of mucus properties on muco-ciliary transport problem. Methods: Hybrid finite difference-lattice Boltzmann-method (FB-LBM) has been used to solve the momentum equations and to simulate cilia forces, and also the PCL-mucus interface more accurately, immersed boundary method (IBM) has been employed. The main contribution of the current study is to use an Oldroyd-B model as the constitutive equation of mucus. Results: Our results show that increasing CBF and decreasing mucus viscosity ratio have great effects on mucus flow, but the effect of viscosity ratio is more significant. The results also illustrate that the relation between cilia beat frequency and mean mucus velocity is almost linear and it has similar behavior at different values of viscosity ratio. Conclusion: Numerical investigation based on hybrid IB-FD-LBM has been used to study the effect of CBF at various mounts of mucus viscosity ratio on the muco-ciliary clearance. The results showed that the effect of viscosity ratio on the muco-ciliary transport process is more significant compared with CBF. PMID:28144596

  17. The NPL Doppler fetal heart beat detector test facility.

    PubMed

    Bond, A D; Preston, R C

    1998-03-01

    There are many thousands of Doppler fetal heart beat detectors in medical use and many different detector manufacturers but, until recently, there has been no well-defined quantitative method for measuring the sensitivity of these detectors and, therefore, no way of directly comparing their technical performance under standardised test conditions. At NPL, we have developed a reference test facility for measuring detector sensitivity to meet the needs of manufacturers, and to comply with the requirements of an international standard (IEC 1995) that defines methods of measurement of the sensitivity of fetal heart beat detectors. The test facility has primarily been developed for detectors operating at a transmitted frequency of 2 MHz and with Doppler shifts of up to 1 kHz. The detectors are tested by directing the ultrasound beam at a small moving target being driven at a constant velocity, and then monitoring the output signal from the detector, which will be at the Doppler shift frequency. To determine the sensitivity, attenuators are inserted into the beam until the output signal is reduced to 6 dB above the noise level. The sensitivity is calculated by adding the final signal level above the noise to the total insertion loss of the attenuators in the ultrasound path and the reflection loss of the target. A crucial aspect of this calculation is the knowledge of the target strengths and characteristics. This has already been extensively studied (Preston and Bond 1997) over the frequency range of interest. The NPL test facility developed for undertaking the sensitivity measurements is described, including an assessment of the uncertainties in such a measurement and solutions to problems encountered along the way.

  18. A New Algorithm to Diagnose Atrial Ectopic Origin from Multi Lead ECG Systems - Insights from 3D Virtual Human Atria and Torso

    PubMed Central

    Alday, Erick A. Perez; Colman, Michael A.; Langley, Philip; Butters, Timothy D.; Higham, Jonathan; Workman, Antony J.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Rapid atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) predispose to ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Identifying the origin of atrial ectopic activity from the electrocardiogram (ECG) can help to diagnose the early onset of AF in a cost-effective manner. The complex and rapid atrial electrical activity during AF makes it difficult to obtain detailed information on atrial activation using the standard 12-lead ECG alone. Compared to conventional 12-lead ECG, more detailed ECG lead configurations may provide further information about spatio-temporal dynamics of the body surface potential (BSP) during atrial excitation. We apply a recently developed 3D human atrial model to simulate electrical activity during normal sinus rhythm and ectopic pacing. The atrial model is placed into a newly developed torso model which considers the presence of the lungs, liver and spinal cord. A boundary element method is used to compute the BSP resulting from atrial excitation. Elements of the torso mesh corresponding to the locations of the placement of the electrodes in the standard 12-lead and a more detailed 64-lead ECG configuration were selected. The ectopic focal activity was simulated at various origins across all the different regions of the atria. Simulated BSP maps during normal atrial excitation (i.e. sinoatrial node excitation) were compared to those observed experimentally (obtained from the 64-lead ECG system), showing a strong agreement between the evolution in time of the simulated and experimental data in the P-wave morphology of the ECG and dipole evolution. An algorithm to obtain the location of the stimulus from a 64-lead ECG system was developed. The algorithm presented had a success rate of 93%, meaning that it correctly identified the origin of atrial focus in 75/80 simulations, and involved a general approach relevant to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant improvement over previously developed algorithms. PMID

  19. Endocytosis and uptake of lucifer yellow by cultured atrial myocytes and isolated intact atria from adult rats. Regulation and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Page, E; Goings, G E; Upshaw-Earley, J; Hanck, D A

    1994-08-01

    The time course of endocytic uptake of Lucifer yellow (LY) was followed by fluorescence and electron microscopy after exposure of primary cultures of atrial myocytes from adult rats to LY under conditions that prevented transplasmalemmal LY entry via channels or carriers. After a 2-minute exposure to LY at 37 degrees C, electron microscopy revealed classic clathrin-coated vesicles fused to endosomes, which were absent in LY-free medium or at 2 degrees C, suggesting that LY turns on endocytosis or accelerates a slow constitutive endocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy, which detected no LY entry at 2 minutes in LY, showed punctate cytoplasmic fluorescent densities after 10 minutes, which were readily distinguishable from intrinsic perinuclear fluorescence. Fluorescence microscopy after immunostaining with antibodies against clathrin, vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, atrial peptide, or a marker for acidified compartments suggested LY sorting into an acidified prelysosomal pathway. Using absence of punctate fluorescence after 10 minutes in LY as a criterion for inhibition of endocytosis, we showed that endocytosis was inhibited by inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A or inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinases 1 and 2, by effects of caffeine on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release, and by temperatures below 18 degrees C, but not by staurosporine, phorbol esters, pertussis toxin, thapsigargin, preventing contractions with nifedipine, ryanodine and low [Ca2+]o, or raising cytosolic cAMP concentrations. Both phosphatase inhibitors and caffeine also inhibited a fraction of LY uptake by intact rat atria. We conclude that endocytic uptake of LY is an energy-dependent, specifically regulated process, whose understanding and control are potentially important for the medically relevant problem of introducing drugs and macromolecules into atrial heart muscle cells.

  20. A new algorithm to diagnose atrial ectopic origin from multi lead ECG systems--insights from 3D virtual human atria and torso.

    PubMed

    Alday, Erick A Perez; Colman, Michael A; Langley, Philip; Butters, Timothy D; Higham, Jonathan; Workman, Antony J; Hancox, Jules C; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Rapid atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) predispose to ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Identifying the origin of atrial ectopic activity from the electrocardiogram (ECG) can help to diagnose the early onset of AF in a cost-effective manner. The complex and rapid atrial electrical activity during AF makes it difficult to obtain detailed information on atrial activation using the standard 12-lead ECG alone. Compared to conventional 12-lead ECG, more detailed ECG lead configurations may provide further information about spatio-temporal dynamics of the body surface potential (BSP) during atrial excitation. We apply a recently developed 3D human atrial model to simulate electrical activity during normal sinus rhythm and ectopic pacing. The atrial model is placed into a newly developed torso model which considers the presence of the lungs, liver and spinal cord. A boundary element method is used to compute the BSP resulting from atrial excitation. Elements of the torso mesh corresponding to the locations of the placement of the electrodes in the standard 12-lead and a more detailed 64-lead ECG configuration were selected. The ectopic focal activity was simulated at various origins across all the different regions of the atria. Simulated BSP maps during normal atrial excitation (i.e. sinoatrial node excitation) were compared to those observed experimentally (obtained from the 64-lead ECG system), showing a strong agreement between the evolution in time of the simulated and experimental data in the P-wave morphology of the ECG and dipole evolution. An algorithm to obtain the location of the stimulus from a 64-lead ECG system was developed. The algorithm presented had a success rate of 93%, meaning that it correctly identified the origin of atrial focus in 75/80 simulations, and involved a general approach relevant to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant improvement over previously developed algorithms.

  1. Risk Factors for Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Normal versus Dilated Left Atria (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities [ARIC] Study)

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Waqas; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Solomon, Scott D.; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E.; Shah, Amil; Gupta, Deepak K.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Herrington, David

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data are limited regarding risk factors of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with normal-sized left atria (LA). We evaluated whether traditional risk factors of AF differ between patients with normal-sized and dilated LA. This is a cross sectional study of community-dwelling participants of Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. LA volume index (LAVI) was measured by 2-dimensional echocardiography. LAVI ≥29mm3/m2 defined dilated LA. Prevalent AF was defined by electrocardiogram and hospital discharge international classification of diseases - 9 codes. Multivariable adjusted logistic regression analysis was used to examine whether magnitude of association of risk factors with AF differ by LA cavity size. Interaction of risk factors by LA cavity size was evaluated to determine significance of these differential associations. Of 5496 participants (mean age 75±5 years, women 58%), 1230 (22%) had dilated LA. The prevalence of AF was 11% in individuals with normal-sized LA and 15% in individuals with dilated LA. Age >75 years [Odds Ratio (OR) 1.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.49 – 2.35, interaction p=0.12] and heart failure (OR 5.43; 95% CI 3.77 – 7.87, interaction p=0.10) were stronger risk factors for AF in normal-sized LA than dilated-LA. Female sex (OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.01 – 2.77, interaction p=0.09), weight (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.02 – 1.71, interaction p=0.19) and alcohol-use (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.08 – 2.41, interaction p=0.004) were stronger risk factors for AF in individuals with dilated LA than normal-sized LA. In conclusion, risk factors of AF may differ by left ventricular cavity size. PMID:25245413

  2. Would calcium or potassium channels be responsible for cardiac arrest produced by adenosine and ATP in the right atria of Wistar rats?

    PubMed

    Camara, Henrique; Rodrigues, Juliano Quintella Dantas; Alves, Gabriel Andrade; da Silva Junior, Edilson Dantas; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Garcia, Antônio G; Jurkiewicz, Aron

    2015-12-05

    Autonomic nerves release ATP, which is processed into adenosine in the synaptic cleft. Adenosine and ATP exert a negative chronotropic effect in the heart. This study aims to evaluate adenosine and P2 receptors and cellular signalling in cardiac arrest produced by purines in the heart. Right atria of adult Wistar rats were used to evaluate the effects of adenosine, ATP and CPA (an adenosine A1 receptor agonist), in the presence and absence of DPCPX, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. Effects of adenosine A2 and A3 receptors agonists and antagonists were also investigated. Finally, involvement of calcium and potassium channels in these responses was assessed using BayK 8644 and 4-Aminopyridine. Cumulative concentration-effect curves of adenosine and CPA resulted in a negative chronotropic effect culminating in cardiac arrest at 1000μM (adenosine) and 1µM (CPA). Furthermore, ATP produced a negative chronotropic effect at 1-300µM and cardiac arrest at 1000μM in the right atrium. ATPγS (a non-hydrolysable analogue of ATP) reduced chronotropism only. The effects of adenosine, CPA and ATP were inhibited by DPCPX, a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. The selective adenosine A2 and A3 receptors antagonists did not alter the chronotropic response of adenosine. 4-Aminopyridine, a blocker of potassium channels at 10mM, prevented the cardiac arrest produced by adenosine and ATP, while BayK 8644, activator of calcium channels, did not prevent cardiac arrest. Adenosine A1 receptor activation by adenosine and ATP produces cardiac arrest in the right atrium of Wistar rats predominantly through activation of potassium channels.

  3. Effects of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation-Induced Electrical Remodeling on Atrial Electro-Mechanics – Insights from a 3D Model of the Human Atria

    PubMed Central

    Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, David H.; Garratt, Clifford J.; Ye, Jianqiao; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Aims Atrial stunning, a loss of atrial mechanical contraction, can occur following a successful cardioversion. It is hypothesized that persistent atrial fibrillation-induced electrical remodeling (AFER) on atrial electrophysiology may be responsible for such impaired atrial mechanics. This simulation study aimed to investigate the effects of AFER on atrial electro-mechanics. Methods and Results A 3D electromechanical model of the human atria was developed to investigate the effects of AFER on atrial electro-mechanics. Simulations were carried out in 3 conditions for 4 states: (i) the control condition, representing the normal tissue (state 1) and the tissue 2–3 months after cardioversion (state 2) when the atrial tissue recovers its electrophysiological properties after completion of reverse electrophysiological remodelling; (ii) AFER-SR condition for AF-remodeled tissue with normal sinus rhythm (SR) (state 3); and (iii) AFER-AF condition for AF-remodeled tissue with re-entrant excitation waves (state 4). Our results indicate that at the cellular level, AFER (states 3 & 4) abbreviated action potentials and reduced the Ca2+ content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, resulting in a reduced amplitude of the intracellular Ca2+ transient leading to decreased cell active force and cell shortening as compared to the control condition (states 1 & 2). Consequently at the whole organ level, atrial contraction in AFER-SR condition (state 3) was dramatically reduced. In the AFER-AF condition (state 4) atrial contraction was almost abolished. Conclusions This study provides novel insights into understanding atrial electro-mechanics illustrating that AFER impairs atrial contraction due to reduced intracellular Ca2+ transients. PMID:26606047

  4. Increased Short-Term Beat-to-Beat QT Interval Variability in Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Andrea; Baczkó, István; Nyiraty, Szabolcs; Körei, Anna E; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Takács, Róbert; Nemes, Attila; Várkonyi, Tamás T; Balogh, László; Ábrahám, György; Kempler, Péter; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Lengyel, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Prediabetic states and diabetes are important risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Determination of short-term QT interval variability (STVQT) is a non-invasive method for assessment of proarrhythmic risk. The aim of the study was to evaluate the STVQT in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). 18 IGT patients [age: 63 ± 11 years, body mass index (BMI): 31 ± 6 kg/m(2), fasting glucose: 6.0 ± 0.4 mmol/l, 120 min postload glucose: 9.0 ± 1.0 mmol/l, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): 5.9 ± 0.4%; mean ± SD] and 18 healthy controls (age: 56 ± 9 years, BMI: 27 ± 5 kg/m(2), fasting glucose: 5.2 ± 0.4 mmol/l, 120 min postload glucose: 5.5 ± 1.3 mmol/l, HbA1c: 5.4 ± 0.3%) were enrolled into the study. ECGs were recorded, processed, and analyzed off-line. The RR and QT intervals were expressed as the average of 30 consecutive beats, the temporal instability of beat-to-beat repolarization was characterized by calculating STVQT as follows: STVQT = Σ|QTn + 1 - QTn| (30x√2)(-1). Autonomic function was assessed by means of standard cardiovascular reflex tests. There were no differences between IGT and control groups in QT (411 ± 43 vs 402 ± 39 ms) and QTc (431 ± 25 vs 424 ± 19 ms) intervals or QT dispersion (44 ± 13 vs 42 ± 17 ms). However, STVQT was significantly higher in IGT patients (5.0 ± 0.7 vs 3.7 ± 0.7, P < 0.0001). The elevated temporal STVQT in patients with IGT may be an early indicator of increased instability of cardiac repolarization during prediabetic conditions.

  5. Rabbits are not resistant to prion infection

    PubMed Central

    Chianini, Francesca; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Vidal, Enric; Gibbard, Louise; Pintado, Belén; de Castro, Jorge; Priola, Suzette A.; Hamilton, Scott; Eaton, Samantha L.; Finlayson, Jeanie; Pang, Yvonne; Steele, Philip; Reid, Hugh W.; Dagleish, Mark P.; Castilla, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    The ability of prions to infect some species and not others is determined by the transmission barrier. This unexplained phenomenon has led to the belief that certain species were not susceptible to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and therefore represented negligible risk to human health if consumed. Using the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique, we were able to overcome the species barrier in rabbits, which have been classified as TSE resistant for four decades. Rabbit brain homogenate, either unseeded or seeded in vitro with disease-related prions obtained from different species, was subjected to serial rounds of PMCA. De novo rabbit prions produced in vitro from unseeded material were tested for infectivity in rabbits, with one of three intracerebrally challenged animals succumbing to disease at 766 d and displaying all of the characteristics of a TSE, thereby demonstrating that leporids are not resistant to prion infection. Material from the brain of the clinically affected rabbit containing abnormal prion protein resulted in a 100% attack rate after its inoculation in transgenic mice overexpressing rabbit PrP. Transmissibility to rabbits (>470 d) has been confirmed in 2 of 10 rabbits after intracerebral challenge. Despite rabbits no longer being able to be classified as resistant to TSEs, an outbreak of “mad rabbit disease” is unlikely. PMID:22416127

  6. What can we learn about beat perception by comparing brain signals and stimulus envelopes?

    PubMed

    Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Grahn, Jessica A

    2017-01-01

    Entrainment of neural oscillations on multiple time scales is important for the perception of speech. Musical rhythms, and in particular the perception of a regular beat in musical rhythms, is also likely to rely on entrainment of neural oscillations. One recently proposed approach to studying beat perception in the context of neural entrainment and resonance (the "frequency-tagging" approach) has received an enthusiastic response from the scientific community. A specific version of the approach involves comparing frequency-domain representations of acoustic rhythm stimuli to the frequency-domain representations of neural responses to those rhythms (measured by electroencephalography, EEG). The relative amplitudes at specific EEG frequencies are compared to the relative amplitudes at the same stimulus frequencies, and enhancements at beat-related frequencies in the EEG signal are interpreted as reflecting an internal representation of the beat. Here, we show that frequency-domain representations of rhythms are sensitive to the acoustic features of the tones making up the rhythms (tone duration, onset/offset ramp duration); in fact, relative amplitudes at beat-related frequencies can be completely reversed by manipulating tone acoustics. Crucially, we show that changes to these acoustic tone features, and in turn changes to the frequency-domain representations of rhythms, do not affect beat perception. Instead, beat perception depends on the pattern of onsets (i.e., whether a rhythm has a simple or complex metrical structure). Moreover, we show that beat perception can differ for rhythms that have numerically identical frequency-domain representations. Thus, frequency-domain representations of rhythms are dissociable from beat perception. For this reason, we suggest caution in interpreting direct comparisons of rhythms and brain signals in the frequency domain. Instead, we suggest that combining EEG measurements of neural signals with creative behavioral paradigms

  7. The effect of binaural beats on verbal working memory and cortical connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A.; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Synchronization in activated regions of cortical networks affect the brain’s frequency response, which has been associated with a wide range of states and abilities, including memory. A non-invasive method for manipulating cortical synchronization is binaural beats. Binaural beats take advantage of the brain’s response to two pure tones, delivered independently to each ear, when those tones have a small frequency mismatch. The mismatch between the tones is interpreted as a beat frequency, which may act to synchronize cortical oscillations. Neural synchrony is particularly important for working memory processes, the system controlling online organization and retention of information for successful goal-directed behavior. Therefore, manipulation of synchrony via binaural beats provides a unique window into working memory and associated connectivity of cortical networks. Approach. In this study, we examined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions during an N-back working memory task, and we measured participant response accuracy and cortical network topology via EEG recordings. Six acoustic stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5 Hz binaural beats, 10 Hz binaural beats, and 15 Hz binaural beats. Main results. We determined that listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during an N-Back working memory task increased the individual participant’s accuracy, modulated the cortical frequency response, and changed the cortical network connection strengths during the task. Only the 15 Hz binaural beats produced significant change in relative accuracy compared to the None condition. Significance. Listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during the N-back task activated salient frequency bands and produced networks characterized by higher information transfer as compared to other auditory stimulation conditions.

  8. Oxidized Cellulose with Different Carboxyl Content: Structure and Properties before and after Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendula, Hejlová; Miloslav, Milichovský

    Our recent studies concentrated in investigating influence of beating oxidized cellulose, with different carboxyl content, on changing their basic properties (degree of polymerization, WRV - water resistant value and X-ray diffraction). Cellulose samples of oxidized cellulose were beated by toroidal beating machine. Cellulose consists of both amorphous and crystalline regions. Cellulose consists of linear chains of poly[ß-1,4-D- anhydroglucopyranose] (C6nH10n + 2O5n + 1 (n = degree of polymerization of glucose)), which crystallize through hydrogen bonding between the chains and has cellobiose as repeat unit. Oxidized cellulose is preparing by oxidation of cellulose in the C6 position of the glucopyranose units to carboxylic group (-COOH) and polyanhydroglukuronic acid (PAGA) is arised. An other option is oxidation with sodium hypochlorite with catalytic amounts of sodium bromide and 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) under various conditions. Beating and refining or mechanical treatment of fibers in water is an important step in using pulps for papermaking. It is an energy intensive process. The purpose of the treatment is to modify fiber properties to obtain the most desirable paper machine runnability and product properties. End of beating pulps was characterized by position, when all beated pulps under mixture passed through of riddle (about sizes mesh of 50). During beating of samples about different ratio of oxidation it was found, that samples with higher contents of COOH groups in starting pulp are characterized by a significantly lower specific beating energy consumption needed to achieving the same sizes of particles. X-ray analyse shows that for non-beated oxidized cellulose was perceptible high share amorphous contents compared with beated oxidized cellulose.

  9. The effect of binaural beats on verbal working memory and cortical connectivity.

    PubMed

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Synchronization in activated regions of cortical networks affect the brain's frequency response, which has been associated with a wide range of states and abilities, including memory. A non-invasive method for manipulating cortical synchronization is binaural beats. Binaural beats take advantage of the brain's response to two pure tones, delivered independently to each ear, when those tones have a small frequency mismatch. The mismatch between the tones is interpreted as a beat frequency, which may act to synchronize cortical oscillations. Neural synchrony is particularly important for working memory processes, the system controlling online organization and retention of information for successful goal-directed behavior. Therefore, manipulation of synchrony via binaural beats provides a unique window into working memory and associated connectivity of cortical networks. In this study, we examined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions during an N-back working memory task, and we measured participant response accuracy and cortical network topology via EEG recordings. Six acoustic stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5 Hz binaural beats, 10 Hz binaural beats, and 15 Hz binaural beats. We determined that listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during an N-Back working memory task increased the individual participant's accuracy, modulated the cortical frequency response, and changed the cortical network connection strengths during the task. Only the 15 Hz binaural beats produced significant change in relative accuracy compared to the None condition. Listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during the N-back task activated salient frequency bands and produced networks characterized by higher information transfer as compared to other auditory stimulation conditions.

  10. What can we learn about beat perception by comparing brain signals and stimulus envelopes?

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Molly J.; Herrmann, Björn; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2017-01-01

    Entrainment of neural oscillations on multiple time scales is important for the perception of speech. Musical rhythms, and in particular the perception of a regular beat in musical rhythms, is also likely to rely on entrainment of neural oscillations. One recently proposed approach to studying beat perception in the context of neural entrainment and resonance (the “frequency-tagging” approach) has received an enthusiastic response from the scientific community. A specific version of the approach involves comparing frequency-domain representations of acoustic rhythm stimuli to the frequency-domain representations of neural responses to those rhythms (measured by electroencephalography, EEG). The relative amplitudes at specific EEG frequencies are compared to the relative amplitudes at the same stimulus frequencies, and enhancements at beat-related frequencies in the EEG signal are interpreted as reflecting an internal representation of the beat. Here, we show that frequency-domain representations of rhythms are sensitive to the acoustic features of the tones making up the rhythms (tone duration, onset/offset ramp duration); in fact, relative amplitudes at beat-related frequencies can be completely reversed by manipulating tone acoustics. Crucially, we show that changes to these acoustic tone features, and in turn changes to the frequency-domain representations of rhythms, do not affect beat perception. Instead, beat perception depends on the pattern of onsets (i.e., whether a rhythm has a simple or complex metrical structure). Moreover, we show that beat perception can differ for rhythms that have numerically identical frequency-domain representations. Thus, frequency-domain representations of rhythms are dissociable from beat perception. For this reason, we suggest caution in interpreting direct comparisons of rhythms and brain signals in the frequency domain. Instead, we suggest that combining EEG measurements of neural signals with creative behavioral

  11. Electrotonic Interaction between Muscle Fibers in the Rabbit Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Tille, J.

    1966-01-01

    Transmembrane potentials were recorded simultaneously from pairs of ventricular fibers in an isolated, regularly beating preparation. A double-barrelled microelectrode was used to record the potentials from, and to polarize, one fiber. A single microelectrode was used to record from a distant fiber. The existence of two systems of fibers, termed P and V, was confirmed. Histological evidence for the existence of two types of fibers is also presented. Electrotonic current spread was observed within both systems, electrotonic interaction between the two systems was rare and always weak. In the case of those pairs of fibers showing electrotonic interaction, the distance for an e-fold decrease in magnitude of the electrotonic potentials was found to be from 300 to 600 µ in P fibers and from 100 to 300 µ in V fibers. However, no electrotonic interaction could be observed in the majority of V fiber pairs. Moreover, the magnitude of the electrotonic potential did not decay monotonically with distance in any one direction. It is concluded that the rabbit ventricle cannot be regarded as a single freely interconnected syncytium. PMID:5971027

  12. [Impacts of early metoprolol intervention on connexin 43 and phosphorylated connexin 43 expression in rabbits with experimental myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Lu, Q; Jiang, J Q; Chen, Z N; Gong, Z G; Li, Z G; Fu, W W; Ding, S F

    2017-04-24

    Objective: To investigate the early intervention effects of metoprolol on connexin 43(Cx43) and phosphorylated Cx43 (p-Cx43) expression in rabbits with post myocardial infarction. Methods: A total of 24 adult male New Zealand white rabbits were divided into sham group (n=6), early treatment group(n=6), routine treatment group(n=6), and myocardial infarction group(n=6) with a randomized block design blocked by weight. Myocardial infarction was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) ligation. Rabbits in sham group received similar surgical procedure without LAD ligation. Metoprolol (12.5 mg/kg dissolved in 2 ml distilled water) was applied to rabbits in early treatment group and routine treatment group per gavage immediately after recovery from anesthesia and at 24 hours after myocardial infarction, respectively, then treated daily for 40 days. Rabbits in sham group and myocardial infarction group received 2 ml distilled water per gavage daily for 40 days. Plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) level were detected by automatic biochemistry analyzer after 6 hours in all rabbits. Ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) was measured in vivo by bipolar pacing electrodes at 40 days. Cx43 and p-Cx43 distribution in ventricular tissue was detected by immunofluorescence analyses. Cx43 and p-Cx43 protein level in ventricular tissue was determined by Western blot. Results: (1) Plasma LDH ((851.7±85.9)U/L vs. (332.3±39.6)U/L, P<0.01) and CK ((1 192.7±105.3)U/L vs. (462.3±65.6)U/L, P<0.01) were significantly higher in myocardial infarction group than in sham group (both P<0.01). (2) VFT was significantly lower in myocardial infarction group than that in sham group ((470.0±91.0) beats per minute vs. (683.3±60.9) beats per minute, P<0.05), and VFT was significantly higher in early treatment group ((633.3±43.2) beats per minute) and routine treatment group ((645.0±30.8) beats per minute) than in the myocardial infarction group (both

  13. A beat-by-beat analysis of cardiovascular responses to dry resting and exercise apnoeas in elite divers.

    PubMed

    Sivieri, Andrea; Fagoni, Nazzareno; Bringard, Aurélien; Capogrosso, Michela; Perini, Renza; Ferretti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses during resting apnoea include three phases: (1) a dynamic phase of rapid changes, lasting at most 30 s; (2) a subsequent steady phase; and (3) a further dynamic phase, with a continuous decrease in heart rate (HR) and an increase in blood pressure. The interpretation was that the end of the steady phase corresponds to the physiological apnoea breaking point. This being so, during exercise apnoeas, the steady phase would be shorter, and the rate of cardiovascular changes in the subsequent unsteady phase would be faster than at rest. To test these hypotheses, we measured beat-by-beat systolic (SBP), diastolic, and mean blood pressures (MBP), HR, and stroke volume (SV) in six divers during dry resting (duration 239.4 ± 51.6 s) and exercise (30 W on cycle ergometer, duration 88.2 ± 20.9 s) maximal apnoeas, and we computed cardiac output ([Formula: see text]) and total peripheral resistance (TPR). Compared to control, at the beginning of resting (R1) and exercising (E1) apnoeas, SBP and MBP decreased and HR increased. SV and [Formula: see text] fell, so that TPR remained unchanged. At rest, HR, SV, [Formula: see text], and SBP were stable during the subsequent phase; this steady phase was missing in exercise apnoeas. Subsequently, at rest (R3) and at exercise (E2), HR decreased and SBP increased continuously. SV returned to control values. Since [Formula: see text] remained unchanged, TPR grew. The lack of steady phase during exercise apnoeas suggests that the conditions determining R3 were already attained at the end of E1. This being so, E2 would correspond to R3.

  14. Contribution of ion currents to beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Szentandrássy, Norbert; Kistamás, Kornél; Hegyi, Bence; Horváth, Balázs; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Váczi, Krisztina; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Varró, András; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-07-01

    Although beat-to-beat variability (short-term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) is considered as a predictor of imminent cardiac arrhythmias, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In the present study, therefore, we aimed to determine the role of the major cardiac ion currents, APD, stimulation frequency, and changes in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) on the magnitude of SV. Action potentials were recorded from isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using conventional microelectrode techniques. SV was an exponential function of APD, when APD was modified by current injections. Drug effects were characterized as relative SV changes by comparing the drug-induced changes in SV to those in APD according to the exponential function obtained with current pulses. Relative SV was increased by dofetilide, HMR 1556, nisoldipine, and veratridine, while it was reduced by BAY K8644, tetrodotoxin, lidocaine, and isoproterenol. Relative SV was also increased by increasing the stimulation frequency and [Ca(2+)]i. In summary, relative SV is decreased by ion currents involved in the negative feedback regulation of APD (I Ca, I Ks, and I Kr), while it is increased by I Na and I to. We conclude that drug-induced effects on SV should be evaluated in relation with the concomitant changes in APD. Since relative SV was decreased by ion currents playing critical role in the negative feedback regulation of APD, blockade of these currents, or the beta-adrenergic pathway, may carry also some additional proarrhythmic risk in addition to their well-known antiarrhythmic action.

  15. Immunosuppression abrogates resistance of young rabbits to Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) is caused by a calicivirus (RHDV) that kills 90% of infected adult European rabbits within 3 days. Remarkably, young rabbits are resistant to RHD. We induced immunosuppression in young rabbits by treatment with methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and challenged the animals with RHDV by intramuscular injection. All of these young rabbits died within 3 days of infection due to fulminant hepatitis, presenting a large number of RHDV-positive dead or apoptotic hepatocytes, and a significant seric increase in cytokines, features that are similar to those of naïve adult rabbits infected by RHDV. We conclude that MPA-induced immunosuppression abrogates the resistance of young rabbits to RHD, indicating that there are differences in the innate immune system between young and adult rabbits that contribute to their distinct resistance/susceptibility to RHDV infection. PMID:24490832

  16. Immunosuppression abrogates resistance of young rabbits to Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD).

    PubMed

    Marques, Raquel M; Teixeira, Luzia; Aguas, Artur P; Ribeiro, Joana C; Costa-e-Silva, António; Ferreira, Paula G

    2014-02-04

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) is caused by a calicivirus (RHDV) that kills 90% of infected adult European rabbits within 3 days. Remarkably, young rabbits are resistant to RHD. We induced immunosuppression in young rabbits by treatment with methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and challenged the animals with RHDV by intramuscular injection. All of these young rabbits died within 3 days of infection due to fulminant hepatitis, presenting a large number of RHDV-positive dead or apoptotic hepatocytes, and a significant seric increase in cytokines, features that are similar to those of naïve adult rabbits infected by RHDV. We conclude that MPA-induced immunosuppression abrogates the resistance of young rabbits to RHD, indicating that there are differences in the innate immune system between young and adult rabbits that contribute to their distinct resistance/susceptibility to RHDV infection.

  17. Pulmonary interstitial pressure in premature rabbits.

    PubMed

    Miserocchi, G; Poskurica, B H; del Fabbro, M; Crisafulli, B

    1995-12-01

    By micropuncture technique we measured pulmonary interstitial pressure (Pip) from birth up to 6 h postnatal age in anesthetized and paralyzed cesarian delivered term (31 days gestation) and premature (27 to 30 days gestation) rabbits. In term cesarian delivered rabbits Pip followed the time course of vaginally delivered rabbits, namely, it increased from about zero at birth up to about 5 cmH2O at 2 h, as a result of alveolar fluid reabsorption, subsequently it decreased becoming subatmospheric due to progressive interstitial fluid drainage. In ventilated lung regions of premature rabbits, Pip also peaked to about 5 cmH2O at 2 h but its subsequent decrease was markedly slowed down while in atelectatic regions of premature rabbits Pip remained slightly subatmospheric. Up to 6 h, the wet/dry weight ratio of the lung was higher in premature relative to vaginally and cesarian delivered term rabbits (at birth 8.4 +/- 0.9 vs. 7.5 +/- 0.8). In 29-31 days rabbits, plasma protein concentration at birth was 3.6 +/- 0.5 g/dl (within 95% confidence limits for vaginally delivered rabbits, considered as control) while in 27-28 days rabbit it was 3.1 +/- 0.4 g/dl (at the lower edge of control confidence limits). In the first postnatal hours, the increase in Pip favoured fluid reabsorption into pulmonary microcirculation in term cesarian delivered rabbits and in ventilated regions of premature rabbits. Conversely, in the atelectatic regions of premature rabbits the unchanged Pip value in the postnatal hours favours fluid filtration from microcirculation into lung interstitium.

  18. The Rabbit Corneal Pocket Assay.

    PubMed

    Morbidelli, Lucia; Ziche, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The rabbit corneal micropocket angiogenesis assay uses the avascular cornea as a substrate canvas to study angiogenesis in vivo. Through the use of standardized slow-release pellets, a predictable angiogenic response is generated over the course of 1-2 weeks and then quantified. Uniform slow-release pellets are prepared by mixing purified angiogenic growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor and a synthetic polymer to allow slow release. A micropocket is surgically created in the rabbit cornea under anesthesia and a pellet implanted. On the days later, the angiogenic response is measured and qualified using a slit lamp, as well as the concomitant vascular phenotype or inflammatory features. The results of the assay are used to assess the ability of potential therapeutic molecules to modulate angiogenesis in vivo, both when released locally or given by ocular formulations or through systemic treatment. In this chapter, the experimental details of the rabbit cornea assay and technical implementations to the original protocol are described.

  19. Rabbits' eye globe sonographic biometry.

    PubMed

    Toni, Maria Carolina; Meirelles, Adriana Érica Wilkes Burton; Gava, Fábio Nelson; Camacho, Aparecido Antônio; Laus, José Luiz; Canola, Júlio Carlos

    2010-11-01

    To measure intraocular structures in New Zealand White breed rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus Linnaeus, 1758) using A-mode and B-mode ultrasound with a 20 MHz transducer. In this study, the eyes of 15 rabbits were evaluated for determination of intraocular measurements using an ophthalmic ultrasound unit able to operate in both A and B-modes. The distances from the cornea to the anterior capsule of the lens (D1), from the anterior capsule of the lens to the posterior capsule of the lens (D2), from the posterior capsule of the lens to the retina (D3) and the complete length of the eye, which corresponds to the distance from the cornea to the retina (D4) were taken. The mean values obtained were 2.70 mm (± 0.22 mm) for D1, 7.32 mm (± 0.40 mm) for D2, 7.10 mm (± 0.45 mm) for D3 and 17.12 mm (± 0.41 mm) for D4. Statistical analyses using the Student's t-test showed that there were no differences between the eyes. The study was feasible without the need of pharmacological restraint and yielded normal mean values for ocular sonographic biometry in rabbits. © 2010 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  20. Exploring crystalline structural variations of cellulose during pulp beating of tobacco stems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Deqing; Yang, Fei; Dai, Ya; Tao, Feiyan; Shen, Yi; Duan, Wangjun; Zhou, Xuezheng; Ma, Hongyan; Tang, Lvqiao; Li, Jun

    2017-10-15

    In this work, crystalline structural variations of cellulose during pulp beating of tobacco stems were characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectroscopy. The results showed that the correlation between the cellulose crystallinity index and the degree of beating was not a linear but an initially upward and then downward trend followed by a repeating fluctuation as a result of the beating action on amorphous regions first and then on crystalline cellulose. It was proposed that the whole beating process might be presumably divided into two phases in the case of the evolution of the crystallinity index. The crystallite sizes of 101 and 101¯ lattice planes showed an obvious fluctuation during the beating while the crystallite sizes and d-spacings from representative 002 lattice planes exhibited little change. Complementally, FT-IR characterization of cellulose structural properties further proved that the crystallinity index was highly affected by mechanical beating and the intact beating process might be divided into two stages characteristic of a first ascending and then descending tendency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of single cycle binaural beat duration on auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Mihajloski, Todor; Bohorquez, Jorge; Özdamar, Özcan

    2014-01-01

    Binaural beat (BB) illusions are experienced as continuous central pulsations when two sounds with slightly different frequencies are delivered to each ear. It has been shown that steady-state auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) to BBs can be captured and investigated. The authors recently developed a new method of evoking transient AEPs to binaural beats using frequency modulated stimuli. This methodology was able to create single BBs in predetermined intervals with varying carrier frequencies. This study examines the effects of the BB duration and the frequency modulating component of the stimulus on the binaural beats and their evoked potentials. Normal hearing subjects were tested with a set of four durations (25, 50, 100, and 200 ms) with two stimulation configurations, binaural dichotic (binaural beats) and diotic (frequency modulation). The results obtained from the study showed that out of the given durations, the 100 ms beat, was capable of evoking the largest amplitude responses. The frequency modulation effect showed a decrease in peak amplitudes with increasing beat duration until their complete disappearance at 200 ms. Even though, at 200 ms, the frequency modulation effects were not present, the binaural beats were still perceived and captured as evoked potentials.

  2. Digital image analysis of flagellar beating and microtubule sliding of activated and hyperactivated sperm flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2007-01-01

    Flagellar beatings of Suncus, golden hamster, and monkey spermatozoa before and after hyperactivation were analysed using high-speed video microscopy and digital image processing in order to examine the sliding mechanism of the flagellar beating and the function of accessory fibres of the mammalian spermatozoa. Although these spermatozoa have different morphology and movement characteristics, the flagellar beatings of hyperactivated spermatozoa had a few common features; i.e., sharp bends at the base of the flagellum and a low beat frequency. While nonhyperactivated (activated) spermatozoa exhibited nearly constant-curvature beating, the hyperactivated spermatozoa displayed a constant-frequency beating. A detailed analysis of the microtubule sliding of the activated and hyperactivated sperm flagella revealed that the sharp bends at the base of the flagella were induced by an increase in the total length of the microtubule sliding at the base of the flagella and that the sliding velocity of the activated and hyperactivated sperm flagella was consistent within each species. A comparison of the sliding velocity of the flagellar beating of Suncus, golden hamster, and monkey spermatozoa with the moment of inertia of the cross section of the flagellar base suggests that the sliding velocity is involved in the hardness of a sperm flagellum.

  3. Ventricular activity morphological characterization: ectopic beats removal in long term atrial fibrillation recordings.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Arturo; Alcaraz, Raúl; Rieta, José J

    2013-03-01

    Ectopic beats are early heart beats remarkably different to the normal beat morphology that provoke serious disturbances in electrocardiographic analysis. These beats are very common in atrial fibrillation (AF), causing important residua when ventricular activity has to be removed for atrial activity (AA) analysis. In this work, a method is proposed to cancel out ectopics by discriminating between normal and abnormal beats, with an accuracy higher than 99%, through QRS morphological delineation and characterization. The most similar ectopics to the one under cancellation are clustered to provide a very precise cancellation template. Simulated and real AF recordings were used to validate the method. A new index, able to estimate the presence of ventricular residue after ectopics cancellation, was defined. Results by using the 2, 4, 6, …, 30 most similar ectopics to the one under study yielded optimal cancellation for templates composed of 10 beats. Furthermore, these beats were very likely located close to the ectopic under cancellation, which could facilitate the algorithm implementation. As conclusion, the proposed method is an effective way to remove ectopics from long term AF recordings and get them ready for the application of any QRST cancellation technique able to extract the AA in optimal conditions. Moreover, it could also detect, characterize and remove ectopics in any other type of non-AF recordings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ectopic beats in approximate entropy and sample entropy-based HRV assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Butta; Singh, Dilbag; Jaryal, A. K.; Deepak, K. K.

    2012-05-01

    Approximate entropy (ApEn) and sample entropy (SampEn) are the promising techniques for extracting complex characteristics of cardiovascular variability. Ectopic beats, originating from other than the normal site, are the artefacts contributing a serious limitation to heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. The approaches like deletion and interpolation are currently in use to eliminate the bias produced by ectopic beats. In this study, normal R-R interval time series of 10 healthy and 10 acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients were analysed by inserting artificial ectopic beats. Then the effects of ectopic beats editing by deletion, degree-zero and degree-one interpolation on ApEn and SampEn have been assessed. Ectopic beats addition (even 2%) led to reduced complexity, resulting in decreased ApEn and SampEn of both healthy and AMI patient data. This reduction has been found to be dependent on level of ectopic beats. Editing of ectopic beats by interpolation degree-one method is found to be superior to other methods.

  5. Mycobacteriosis in the rabbit and rodent.

    PubMed

    McClure, Diane E

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous mycobacteriosis is rare in rabbits and rodents with the exception of the pygmy rabbit, and there are only a handful of reported cases involving other rodents. Mycobacterium avium complex was the most commonly identified organism in reports of spontaneous mycobacteriosis involving rabbits and rodents. The resistance of rabbits and rodents to mycobacterial disease has been useful in understanding the disease in humans and other animals. Preventing or controlling Mycobacterium sp transmission from wildlife to domestic animals will require collaboration between agriculture, wildlife, environmental, and political entities. Understanding the ecology and epidemiology of mycobacteria is needed for better worldwide management of tuberculosis.

  6. Selective neuronal entrainment to the beat and meter embedded in a musical rhythm.

    PubMed

    Nozaradan, Sylvie; Peretz, Isabelle; Mouraux, André

    2012-12-05

    Fundamental to the experience of music, beat and meter perception refers to the perception of periodicities while listening to music occurring within the frequency range of musical tempo. Here, we explored the spontaneous building of beat and meter hypothesized to emerge from the selective entrainment of neuronal populations at beat and meter frequencies. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded while human participants listened to rhythms consisting of short sounds alternating with silences to induce a spontaneous perception of beat and meter. We found that the rhythmic stimuli elicited multiple steady state-evoked potentials (SS-EPs) observed in the EEG spectrum at frequencies corresponding to the rhythmic pattern envelope. Most importantly, the amplitude of the SS-EPs obtained at beat and meter frequencies were selectively enhanced even though the acoustic energy was not necessarily predominant at these frequencies. Furthermore, accelerating the tempo of the rhythmic stimuli so as to move away from the range of frequencies at which beats are usually perceived impaired the selective enhancement of SS-EPs at these frequencies. The observation that beat- and meter-related SS-EPs are selectively enhanced at frequencies compatible with beat and meter perception indicates that these responses do not merely reflect the physical structure of the sound envelope but, instead, reflect the spontaneous emergence of an internal representation of beat, possibly through a mechanism of selective neuronal entrainment within a resonance frequency range. Taken together, these results suggest that musical rhythms constitute a unique context to gain insight on general mechanisms of entrainment, from the neuronal level to individual level.

  7. The evolutionary neuroscience of musical beat perception: the Action Simulation for Auditory Prediction (ASAP) hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Aniruddh D.; Iversen, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Every human culture has some form of music with a beat: a perceived periodic pulse that structures the perception of musical rhythm and which serves as a framework for synchronized movement to music. What are the neural mechanisms of musical beat perception, and how did they evolve? One view, which dates back to Darwin and implicitly informs some current models of beat perception, is that the relevant neural mechanisms are relatively general and are widespread among animal species. On the basis of recent neural and cross-species data on musical beat processing, this paper argues for a different view. Here we argue that beat perception is a complex brain function involving temporally-precise communication between auditory regions and motor planning regions of the cortex (even in the absence of overt movement). More specifically, we propose that simulation of periodic movement in motor planning regions provides a neural signal that helps the auditory system predict the timing of upcoming beats. This “action simulation for auditory prediction” (ASAP) hypothesis leads to testable predictions. We further suggest that ASAP relies on dorsal auditory pathway connections between auditory regions and motor planning regions via the parietal cortex, and suggest that these connections may be stronger in humans than in non-human primates due to the evolution of vocal learning in our lineage. This suggestion motivates cross-species research to determine which species are capable of human-like beat perception, i.e., beat perception that involves accurate temporal prediction of beat times across a fairly broad range of tempi. PMID:24860439

  8. Cardiovascular and autonomic effects of omega-conotoxins MVIIA and CVID in conscious rabbits and isolated tissue assays.

    PubMed

    Wright, C E; Robertson, A D; Whorlow, S L; Angus, J A

    2000-12-01

    1. The effects of a novel N-type voltage-operated calcium channel antagonist, omega-conotoxin CVID, were compared with omega-conotoxin MVIIA on sympathetic-evoked activation of right atria (RA), small mesenteric arteries (MA) and vasa deferentia (VD) isolated from the rat. Their effects were also compared on blood pressure and cardiovascular reflexes in conscious rabbits. 2. The pIC(50) values for MVIIA and CVID, respectively, for inhibiting sympathetic-evoked responses were equivalent in RA (8.7 and 8.7) and VD (9.0 and 8.7); however, in MA the values were 8.4 and 7.7. The cardiac to vascular (RA/MA) potency ratios, antilog (plog RA - plog MA), for MVIIA and CVID were 2 and 10. The offset rates for CVID and MVIIA were rapid, and peptide reapplication caused rapid onset of blockade, suggesting limited desensitization. 3. In the conscious rabbit, CVID and MVIIA (100 microg kg(-1) i.v.) caused a similar fall in blood pressure and a tachycardia that rapidly reached maximum. Both peptides decreased the vagal- and sympathetic-mediated components of the baroreflex, but had no effect on the vagal nasopharyngeal reflex. The orthostatic reflex to 90 degrees tilt was blocked by MVIIA with sustained postural hypotension for > or = 90 min after administration. In contrast, CVID caused postural hypotension at 30 min which recovered rapidly. 4. Neither CVID nor MVIIA (3 microg kg(-1) i.t.) significantly altered cardiovascular variables or autonomic reflexes. 5. In conclusion, CVID appears to be relatively weak at inhibiting the reflex response to tilt consistent with its weaker inhibition of rat mesenteric artery constriction to perivascular nerve stimulation. This may point to subtype N-type calcium channel selectivity.

  9. Mitochondrial calcium transients in adult rabbit cardiac myocytes: inhibition by ruthenium red and artifacts caused by lysosomal loading of Ca(2+)-indicating fluorophores.

    PubMed Central

    Trollinger, D R; Cascio, W E; Lemasters, J J

    2000-01-01

    A cold/warm loading protocol was used to ester-load Rhod 2 into mitochondria and other organelles and Fluo 3 into the cytosol of adult rabbit cardiac myocytes for confocal fluorescence imaging. Transient increases in both cytosolic Fluo 3 and mitochondrial Rhod 2 fluorescence occurred after electrical stimulation. Ruthenium red, a blocker of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, inhibited mitochondrial Rhod 2 fluorescence transients but not cytosolic Fluo 3 transients. Thus the ruthenium red-sensitive mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter catalyzes Ca(2+) uptake during beat-to-beat transients of mitochondrial free Ca(2+), which in turn may help match mitochondrial ATP production to myocardial ATP demand. After ester loading, substantial amounts of Ca(2+)-indicating fluorophores localized into an acidic lysosomal/endosomal compartment. This lysosomal fluorescence did not respond to electrical stimulation. Because fluorescence arose predominantly from lysosomes after the cold loading/warm incubation procedure, total cellular fluorescence failed to track beat-to-beat changes of mitochondrial fluorescence. Only three-dimensionally resolved confocal imaging distinguished the relatively weak mitochondrial signal from the bright lysosomal fluorescence. PMID:10866936

  10. Polarization mode beating techniques for high-sensitivity intracavity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Garcia, Andrea

    Several industries, including semiconductor, space, defense, medical, chemical and homeland security, demand precise and accurate measurements in the nanometer and sub-nanometer scale. Optical interferometers have been widely investigated due to its dynamic-range, non-contact and high-precision features. Although commercially available interferometers can have sub-nanometer resolution, the practical accuracy exceeds the nanometer range. The fast development of nanotechnology requires more sensitive, reliable, compact and lower cost alternatives than those in existence. This work demonstrates a compact, versatile, accurate and cost-effective fiber laser sensor based on intracavity polarization mode beating (PMB) techniques for monitoring intracavity phase changes with very high sensitivity. Fiber resonators support two orthogonal polarization modes that can behave as two independent lasing channels within the cavity. The fiber laser incorporates an intracavity polarizing beamsplitter that allows for adjusting independently the polarization modes. The heterodyne detection of the laser output produces a beating (PMB) signal, whose frequency is a function of the phase difference between the polarization modes. The optical phase difference is transferred from the optical frequency to a much lower frequency and thus electronic methods can be used to obtain very precise measurements. Upon changing the pathlength of one mode, changes iu the PMB frequency can be effectively measured. Furthermore, since the polarization nodes share the same cavity, the PMB technique provides a simple means to achieve suppression of common mode noise and laser source instabilities. Frequency changes of the PMB signal are evaluated as a function of displacement, intracavity pressure and air density. Refractive index changes of 10 -9 and sub-nanometer displacement measurements are readily attained. Increased refractive index sensitivity and sub-picometer displacement can be reached owing to the

  11. Disentangling beat perception from sequential learning and examining the influence of attention and musical abilities on ERP responses to rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Fleur L; Werner, Carola M; Knetemann, Myrthe; Honing, Henkjan

    2016-05-01

    Beat perception is the ability to perceive temporal regularity in musical rhythm. When a beat is perceived, predictions about upcoming events can be generated. These predictions can influence processing of subsequent rhythmic events. However, statistical learning of the order of sounds in a sequence can also affect processing of rhythmic events and must be differentiated from beat perception. In the current study, using EEG, we examined the effects of attention and musical abilities on beat perception. To ensure we measured beat perception and not absolute perception of temporal intervals, we used alternating loud and soft tones to create a rhythm with two hierarchical metrical levels. To control for sequential learning of the order of the different sounds, we used temporally regular (isochronous) and jittered rhythmic sequences. The order of sounds was identical in both conditions, but only the regular condition allowed for the perception of a beat. Unexpected intensity decrements were introduced on the beat and offbeat. In the regular condition, both beat perception and sequential learning were expected to enhance detection of these deviants on the beat. In the jittered condition, only sequential learning was expected to affect processing of the deviants. ERP responses to deviants were larger on the beat than offbeat in both conditions. Importantly, this difference was larger in the regular condition than in the jittered condition, suggesting that beat perception influenced responses to rhythmic events in addition to sequential learning. The influence of beat perception was present both with and without attention directed at the rhythm. Moreover, beat perception as measured with ERPs correlated with musical abilities, but only when attention was directed at the stimuli. Our study shows that beat perception is possible when attention is not directed at a rhythm. In addition, our results suggest that attention may mediate the influence of musical abilities on beat

  12. Beta-Band Oscillations Represent Auditory Beat and Its Metrical Hierarchy in Perception and Imagery.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Takako; Ross, Bernhard; Trainor, Laurel J

    2015-11-11

    Dancing to music involves synchronized movements, which can be at the basic beat level or higher hierarchical metrical levels, as in a march (groups of two basic beats, one-two-one-two …) or waltz (groups of three basic beats, one-two-three-one-two-three …). Our previous human magnetoencephalography studies revealed that the subjective sense of meter influences auditory evoked responses phase locked to the stimulus. Moreover, the timing of metronome clicks was represented in periodic modulation of induced (non-phase locked) β-band (13-30 Hz) oscillation in bilateral auditory and sensorimotor cortices. Here, we further examine whether acoustically accented and subjectively imagined metric processing in march and waltz contexts during listening to isochronous beats were reflected in neuromagnetic β-band activity recorded from young adult musicians. First, we replicated previous findings of beat-related β-power decrease at 200 ms after the beat followed by a predictive increase toward the onset of the next beat. Second, we showed that the β decrease was significantly influenced by the metrical structure, as reflected by differences across beat type for both perception and imagery conditions. Specifically, the β-power decrease associated with imagined downbeats (the count "one") was larger than that for both the upbeat (preceding the count "one") in the march, and for the middle beat in the waltz. Moreover, beamformer source analysis for the whole brain volume revealed that the metric contrasts involved auditory and sensorimotor cortices; frontal, parietal, and inferior temporal lobes; and cerebellum. We suggest that the observed β-band activities reflect a translation of timing information to auditory-motor coordination. With magnetoencephalography, we examined β-band oscillatory activities around 20 Hz while participants listened to metronome beats and imagined musical meters such as a march and waltz. We demonstrated that β-band event

  13. An anthropomorphic beating heart phantom for cardiac x-ray CT imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Thomas; Pavlicek, William; Paden, Robert; Renno, Markus; Jensen, Angela; Akay, Metin

    2010-01-28

    The current work describes an anthropomorphic beating heart phantom constructed as a tool for the assessment of technological advances in cardiac x-ray computed tomography (CT). The phantom is comprised of a thorax, a compressor system, an ECG system, a beating heart with tortuous coronary arteries, and the option to add or remove pathologies such as aberrant beats, stents, and plaques. Initial trials with the phantom have shown its utility to assess temporal resolution, spatial resolution, radiation dose, iodine contrast, stents, and plaques.

  14. Experimental Infection of Rabbits with Rabbit and Genotypes 1 and 4 Hepatitis E Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongxia; Zheng, Lin; Liu, Yunbo; Zhao, Chenyan; Harrison, Tim J.; Ma, Yuyuan; Sun, Shuhua; Zhang, Jingang; Wang, Youchun

    2010-01-01

    Background A recent study provided evidence that farmed rabbits in China harbor a novel hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype. Although the rabbit HEV isolate had 77–79% nucleotide identity to the mammalian HEV genotypes 1 to 4, their genomic organization is very similar. Since rabbits are used widely experimentally, including as models of infection, we investigated whether they constitute an appropriate animal model for human HEV infection. Methods Forty-two SPF rabbits were divided randomly into eleven groups and inoculated with six different isolates of rabbit HEV, two different doses of a second-passage rabbit HEV, and with genotype 1 and 4 HEV. Sera and feces were collected weekly after inoculation. HEV antigen, RNA, antibody and alanine aminotransferase in sera and HEV RNA in feces were detected. The liver samples were collected during necropsy subject to histopathological examination. Findings Rabbits inoculated with rabbit HEV became infected with HEV, with viremia, fecal virus shedding and high serum levels of viral antigens, and developed hepatitis, with elevation of the liver enzyme, ALT. The severity of disease corresponded to the infectious dose (genome equivalents), with the most severe hepatic disease caused by strain GDC54-18. However, only two of nine rabbits infected with HEV genotype 4, and none infected with genotype 1, developed hepatitis although six of nine rabbits inoculated with the genotype 1 HEV and in all rabbits inoculated with the genotype 4 HEV seroconverted to be positive for anti-HEV IgG antibody by 14 weeks post-inoculation. Conclusions These data indicate that rabbits are an appropriate model for rabbit HEV infection but are not likely to be useful for the study of human HEV. The rabbit HEV infection of rabbits may provide an appropriate parallel animal model to study HEV pathogenesis. PMID:20161794

  15. Force Control of Flexible Catheter Robots for Beating Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, Samuel B.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in cardiac catheter technology promise to allow physicians to perform most cardiac interventions without stopping the heart or opening the chest. However, current cardiac devices, including newly developed catheter robots, are unable to accurately track and interact with the fast moving cardiac tissue without applying potentially damaging forces. This paper examines the challenges of implementing force control on a flexible robotic catheter. In particular, catheter friction and backlash must be compensated when controlling tissue interaction forces. Force controller designs are introduced and evaluated experimentally in a number of configurations. The controllers are based on the inner position loop force control approach where the position trajectory is adjusted to achieve a desired force on the target. Friction and backlash compensation improved force tracking up to 86% with residual RMS errors of 0.11 N while following a prerecorded cardiac tissue trajectory with accelerations of up to 3800 mm/s2. This performance provides sufficient accuracy to enable a wide range of beating heart surgical procedures. PMID:21874164

  16. Force Control of Flexible Catheter Robots for Beating Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Samuel B; Howe, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in cardiac catheter technology promise to allow physicians to perform most cardiac interventions without stopping the heart or opening the chest. However, current cardiac devices, including newly developed catheter robots, are unable to accurately track and interact with the fast moving cardiac tissue without applying potentially damaging forces. This paper examines the challenges of implementing force control on a flexible robotic catheter. In particular, catheter friction and backlash must be compensated when controlling tissue interaction forces. Force controller designs are introduced and evaluated experimentally in a number of configurations. The controllers are based on the inner position loop force control approach where the position trajectory is adjusted to achieve a desired force on the target. Friction and backlash compensation improved force tracking up to 86% with residual RMS errors of 0.11 N while following a prerecorded cardiac tissue trajectory with accelerations of up to 3800 mm/s(2). This performance provides sufficient accuracy to enable a wide range of beating heart surgical procedures.

  17. Coordinated Beating of Algal Flagella is Mediated by Basal Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    Cilia or flagella often exhibit synchronized behavior. This includes phase-locking, as seen in Chlamydomonas, and metachronal wave formation in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating filaments. Recent work on the dynamics of physically separated pairs of flagella isolated from the multicellular alga Volvox has shown that hydrodynamic coupling alone is sufficient for synchrony. However, the situation is more complex when considering multiple flagella on a single cell. We suggest that a mechanism, internal to the cell, provides an additional flagellar coupling. For instance, flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants deficient in filamentary connections between basal bodies are found to display markedly different synchronization from the wildtype. Diverse flagellar coordination strategies found in quadri-, octo- and hexadecaflagellates reveal further evidence that intracellular couplings between flagellar basal bodies compete with hydrodynamic interactions to determine the precise form of flagellar synchronization in unicellular algae.

  18. Coordinated beating of algal flagella is mediated by basal coupling.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kirsty Y; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2016-05-17

    Cilia and flagella often exhibit synchronized behavior; this includes phase locking, as seen in Chlamydomonas, and metachronal wave formation in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating filaments. Recent work on the dynamics of physically separated pairs of flagella isolated from the multicellular alga Volvox has shown that hydrodynamic coupling alone is sufficient to produce synchrony. However, the situation is more complex in unicellular organisms bearing few flagella. We show that flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants deficient in filamentary connections between basal bodies display markedly different synchronization from the wild type. We perform micromanipulation on configurations of flagella and conclude that a mechanism, internal to the cell, must provide an additional flagellar coupling. In naturally occurring species with 4, 8, or even 16 flagella, we find diverse symmetries of basal body positioning and of the flagellar apparatus that are coincident with specific gaits of flagellar actuation, suggesting that it is a competition between intracellular coupling and hydrodynamic interactions that ultimately determines the precise form of flagellar coordination in unicellular algae.

  19. Digitally synthesized beat frequency-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jacky C. K.; Diebold, Eric D.; Buckley, Brandon W.; Mao, Sien; Akbari, Najva; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging is a powerful technique that enables the observation of subtle changes in the molecular environment of a fluorescent probe. This technique works by measuring the phase delay between the optical emission and excitation of fluorophores as a function of modulation frequency. However, high-resolution measurements are time consuming, as the excitation modulation frequency must be swept, and faster low-resolution measurements at a single frequency are prone to large errors. Here, we present a low cost optical system for applications in real-time confocal lifetime imaging, which measures the phase vs. frequency spectrum without sweeping. Deemed Lifetime Imaging using Frequency-multiplexed Excitation (LIFE), this technique uses a digitally-synthesized radio frequency comb to drive an acousto-optic deflector, operated in a cat’s-eye configuration, to produce a single laser excitation beam modulated at multiple beat frequencies. We demonstrate simultaneous fluorescence lifetime measurements at 10 frequencies over a bandwidth of 48 MHz, enabling high speed frequency domain lifetime analysis of single- and multi-component sample mixtures. PMID:25574449

  20. Curvature regulation of the ciliary beat through axonemal twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Geyer, Veikko F.; Howard, Jonathon; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Cilia and flagella are hairlike organelles that propel cells through fluid. The active motion of the axoneme, the motile structure inside cilia and flagella, is powered by molecular motors of the axonemal dynein family. These motors generate forces and torques that slide and bend the microtubule doublets within the axoneme. To create regular waveforms, the activities of the dyneins must be coordinated. It is thought that coordination is mediated by stresses due to radial, transverse, or sliding deformations, and which build up within the moving axoneme and feed back on dynein activity. However, which particular components of the stress regulate the motors to produce the observed waveforms of the many different types of flagella remains an open question. To address this question, we describe the axoneme as a three-dimensional bundle of filaments and characterize its mechanics. We show that regulation of the motors by radial and transverse stresses can lead to a coordinated flagellar motion only in the presence of twist. We show that twist, which could arise from torque produced by the dyneins, couples curvature to transverse and radial stresses. We calculate emergent beating patterns in twisted axonemes resulting from regulation by transverse stresses. The resulting waveforms are similar to those observed in flagella of Chlamydomonas and sperm. Due to the twist, the waveform has nonplanar components, which result in swimming trajectories such as twisted ribbons and helices, which agree with observations.