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Sample records for beating rabbit atria

  1. Interactions between acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, nicotine and morphine on isolated rabbit atria

    PubMed Central

    Chittal, S. M.; Dadkar, N. K.; Gaitondé, B. B.

    1968-01-01

    1. The effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and morphine on the responses to acetylcholine and nicotine of isolated rabbit atria were studied. 2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (10 μg/ml.) and morphine (20 μg/ml.) blocked the negative chronotropic and inotropic actions of acetylcholine. 3. Nicotine (20 μg/ml.) produced stimulation of the atria, which was blocked by dichlorisoprenaline, morphine, 5-HT, bretylium and hemicholinium. Hemicholinium block was reversed by choline. 4. In reserpinized preparations, nicotine produced inhibition of atria and this action was also blocked by atropine, 5-HT and morphine. Inhibition induced by nicotine was potentiated by physostigmine. 5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (20 μg/ml.) produced stimulation of atria. This was blocked by bretylium and reduced by hemicholinium. Hemicholinium block was reversed by choline. 6. It is concluded that 5-HT in low concentrations acts as a weak agonist at the cholinoceptive receptors and therefore blocks the action of acetylcholine. Furthermore, nicotine and larger doses of 5-HT have actions on ganglionic structures and liberate acetylcholine, which in turn releases catecholamines. PMID:4386371

  2. Interactions between acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, nicotine and morphine on isolated rabbit atria.

    PubMed

    Chittal, S M; Dadkar, N K; Gaitondé, B B

    1968-09-01

    1. The effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and morphine on the responses to acetylcholine and nicotine of isolated rabbit atria were studied.2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (10 mug/ml.) and morphine (20 mug/ml.) blocked the negative chronotropic and inotropic actions of acetylcholine.3. Nicotine (20 mug/ml.) produced stimulation of the atria, which was blocked by dichlorisoprenaline, morphine, 5-HT, bretylium and hemicholinium. Hemicholinium block was reversed by choline.4. In reserpinized preparations, nicotine produced inhibition of atria and this action was also blocked by atropine, 5-HT and morphine. Inhibition induced by nicotine was potentiated by physostigmine.5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (20 mug/ml.) produced stimulation of atria. This was blocked by bretylium and reduced by hemicholinium. Hemicholinium block was reversed by choline.6. It is concluded that 5-HT in low concentrations acts as a weak agonist at the cholinoceptive receptors and therefore blocks the action of acetylcholine. Furthermore, nicotine and larger doses of 5-HT have actions on ganglionic structures and liberate acetylcholine, which in turn releases catecholamines.

  3. The mode of action of quinidine on isolated rabbit atria interpreted from intracellular potential records.

    PubMed

    VAUGHAN WILLIAMS, E M

    1958-09-01

    An attempt has been made to show why quinidine, which has long been known not to lengthen the duration of the cardiac action potential, measured with external electrodes, and also not to lengthen, and sometimes to shorten, the absolute refractory period, nevertheless reduces the maximum frequency at which atria can respond to a stimulus. Simultaneous measurements have been made in electrically driven isolated rabbit atria of contractions, conduction velocity and intracellular potentials before and during exposure to a wide range of concentrations of quinidine sulphate. The resting potential remained undiminished, in contrast to the effect of quinidine on Purkinje fibres. In the therapeutic range of doses, up to 10 mg./l., the half-time for repolarization was either shortened or unchanged, thus providing an explanation for the failure of quinidine to prolong the absolute refractory period. In contrast, even at low concentrations of quinidine, conduction velocity and the rate of rise of the action potential were greatly slowed, and the height of the overshoot was reduced. The terminal phase of the action potential was prolonged. It is known that the rate of rise of the action potential is a function of the level of repolarization at which an impulse takes off (the more negative the take-off point, the faster the rate of rise). Normally, a stimulus introduced when repolarization has proceeded to 2/3 of the resting potential evokes a response with a rate of rise fast enough for propagation, so that the duration of the terminal 1/3 of the phase of repolarization has no influence upon the length of the effective refractory period. In the presence of quinidine, however, the rate of rise itself was directly reduced, thus repolarization had to proceed further before the critical take-off point was reached at which the rate of rise was fast enough for propagation, and the duration of the terminal phase of repolarization thus became significant. It has been concluded that

  4. Microwave radiation and heart-beat rate of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chou, C K; Han, L F; Guy, A W

    1980-06-01

    Each of three adult New Zealand rabbits, 2 male and 1 female albinos, was exposed dorsally or ventrally, to 2450-MHz plane waves for 20 min under each of several field conditions: 1) to continuous waves (CW) at 5 mW/cm2; 2) to pulsed waves (PW) of 1-microsecond width that recurred 700 pps at an average of 5 mW/cm2 and at a peak of 7.1 W/cm2; 3) to PW of 10-microseconds width at a peak of 13.7 W/cm2 that were synchronized with and triggered by the R wave of the electrocardiogram (EKG) at various delay times (0, 100, and 200 ms; and 4) to CW at 80 mW/cm2. Carbon-loaded Teflon electrodes were used to record the EKG from forelimbs of an animal before, during, and after irradiation whilst it was maintained in a constant exposure geometry in a wooden squeeze box. Field induced changes in the heart-beat rate were observed at 80 mW/cm2 but not a lower average power densities, although a peak positive chronotropic effect might have been occasioned by PM introduced at 100 and 200 ms after the R wave peak. No cumulative effect was observed over a period of four months. Thermographic analysis revealed relatively little absorption of microwave energy by the myocardium irrespective of anatomical aspect of exposure.

  5. Effects of adrenoceptor antagonists and neuronal uptake inhibitors on dimethylphenylpiperazinium-induced release of catecholamines from the rabbit isolated adrenal gland and guinea-pig atria

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, A.R.; Story, D.F.

    1984-11-01

    Isolated rabbit adrenal glands were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution at 37 degrees C and the catecholamine storage sites were labeled with (/sup 3/H)epinephrine. Release of radioactivity was evoked by 2-min periods of perfusion with dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP, 100 microM). DMPP-induced efflux of radioactivity was decreased by desipramine (1 microM), cocaine (30 microM), phenoxybenzamine (1 and 10 microM), phentolamine (1, 3 and 10 microM) and propranolol (1 microM). The reduction in DMPP-induced efflux cannot be accounted for by interactions with alpha adrenoceptors, as prazosin (1 microM) and yohimbine (1 microM) were without effect. There also was no correlation between inhibition of DMPP-induced efflux and ability of the drugs to inhibit catecholamine uptake as phentolamine (1 microM) and propranolol (1 microM) did not affect the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)epinephrine by the gland. In guinea-pig atria, in which the catecholamine storage sites had been labeled with (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine, efflux of radioactivity was elicited by 1-min periods of contact with DMPP. DMPP-induced efflux of radioactivity from atria was decreased by desipramine (1 microM), cocaine (30 microM), phenoxybenzamine (1 and 10 microM), phentolamine (1 and 10 microM) and propranolol (1 microM) but not by prazosin (1 microM) or yohimbine (1 microM). The inhibition of DMPP-induced efflux in guinea-pig atria could not be correlated with alpha adrenoceptor antagonism or blockade of neuronal uptake. There were differences between the two preparations in the degree of inhibition of DMPP-induced release produced by the above drugs.

  6. Is phosphodiesterase inhibition arrhythmogenic? Electrophysiologic effects in pithed rats and in normoxic and hypoxic rabbit atria of enoximone, a new cardiotonic agent.

    PubMed

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1987-02-01

    The positive inotropic and chronotropic actions of enoximone were confirmed. At concentrations within the clinical range, enoximone prolonged the chronotropic and hypotensive action of isoproterenol in pithed rats. Very high doses of both enoximone and isoproterenol caused ventricular fibrillation in only one of six rats. In isolated rabbit atria, the maximum frequency at which pacing stimuli were followed 1:1 was increased by enoximone, and atrial flutter was consistently induced, then terminated by greatly suprathreshold stimulation. Enoximone significantly shortened action potential duration (APD), but did not exacerbate the APD-shortening induced by hypoxia. Since such hypoxia-induced shortening occurred in the presence of glucose 11 mmol/L and oxygen 20%, it was concluded that it was unlikely to have been caused by the opening of ATP-regulated potassium channels. These animal experiments suggest that enoximone, at concentrations encountered clinically in humans, does not have any electrophysiologic actions that would be likely to increase the probability of arrhythmias.

  7. Ciliary activity of cultured rabbit tracheal epithelium: beat pattern and metachrony.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, M J; Sleigh, M A

    1981-02-01

    The beat pattern of rabbit tracheal cilia has been investigated using high-speed cine photography and scanning electron microscopy, on cultured epithelia of known orientation. The cilia normally rest in the position reached at the end of the effective stroke, the ciliary tips pointing towards the oropharynx. Each beat begins with a recovery (or preparative) stroke in which a bend is propagated up the cilium causing the cilium to rotate backwards in a clockwise sweep, as viewed from above. At the end of its recovery stroke the cilium progresses immediately into the effective (or power) stroke, which is almost planar and in a cephalad direction. The active cilium describes an arc of almost 110 degrees before reaching the rest stage. This beat pattern is not significantly altered over an increase in frequency from 13-29 Hz; the relative duration of the 2 active phases of the beat remain similar over this range. Metachronal waves exist in the form of short erratic areas of coordinated beating which travel only short distances. Within each area, the non-planar recovery strokes initiate an antilaeoplectic wave of activity which recruits inactive cilia to extent the wave. As cilia perform their effective strokes, adjacent cilia in the plane of beating move in an antiplectic sequence. This pattern of coordination is related to the pattern of beat of the cilia and their distribution on the epithelium.

  8. Ion Fluxes through KCa2 (SK) and Cav1 (L-type) Channels Contribute to Chronoselectivity of Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Actions in Spontaneously Beating Rat Atria

    PubMed Central

    Bragança, Bruno; Oliveira-Monteiro, Nádia; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Lima, Pedro A.; Faria, Miguel; Fontes-Sousa, Ana P.; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Impulse generation in supraventricular tissue is inhibited by adenosine and acetylcholine via the activation of A1 and M2 receptors coupled to inwardly rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels, respectively. Unlike M2 receptors, bradycardia produced by A1 receptors activation predominates over negative inotropy. Such difference suggests that other ion currents may contribute to adenosine chronoselectivity. In isolated spontaneously beating rat atria, blockade of KCa2/SK channels with apamin and Cav1 (L-type) channels with nifedipine or verapamil, sensitized atria to the negative inotropic action of the A1 agonist, R-PIA, without affecting the nucleoside negative chronotropy. Patch-clamp experiments in the whole-cell configuration mode demonstrate that adenosine, via A1 receptors, activates the inwardly-rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/KIR3.4 current resulting in hyperpolarization of atrial cardiomyocytes, which may slow down heart rate. Conversely, the nucleoside inactivates a small conductance Ca2+-activated KCa2/SK outward current, which eventually reduces the repolarizing force and thereby prolong action potentials duration and Ca2+ influx into cardiomyocytes. Immunolocalization studies showed that differences in A1 receptors distribution between the sinoatrial node and surrounding cardiomyocytes do not afford a rationale for adenosine chronoselectivity. Immunolabelling of KIR3.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3, and Cav1 was also observed throughout the right atrium. Functional data indicate that while both A1 and M2 receptors favor the opening of GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels modulating atrial chronotropy, A1 receptors may additionally restrain KCa2/SK activation thereby compensating atrial inotropic depression by increasing the time available for Ca2+ influx through Cav1 (L-type) channels. PMID:27014060

  9. Diastolic Calcium Release Controls the Beating Rate of Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells: Numerical Modeling of the Coupling Process

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Vinogradova, Tatiana M.; Bogdanov, Konstantin Y.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Stern, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies employing Ca2+ indicators and confocal microscopy demonstrate substantial local Ca2+ release beneath the cell plasma membrane (subspace) of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) occurring during diastolic depolarization. Pharmacological and biophysical experiments have suggested that the released Ca2+ interacts with the plasma membrane via the ion current (INaCa) produced by the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and constitutes an important determinant of the pacemaker rate. This study provides a numerical validation of the functional importance of diastolic Ca2+ release for rate control. The subspace Ca2+ signals in rabbit SANCs were measured by laser confocal microscopy, averaged, and calibrated. The time course of the subspace [Ca2+] displayed both diastolic and systolic components. The diastolic component was mainly due to the local Ca2+ releases; it was numerically approximated and incorporated into a SANC cellular electrophysiology model. The model predicts that the diastolic Ca2+ release strongly interacts with plasma membrane via INaCa and thus controls the phase of the action potential upstroke and ultimately the final action potential rate. PMID:15041695

  10. Safety of dietary supplements: chronotropic and inotropic effects on isolated rat atria.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoko; Umegaki, Keizo; Tanaka, Naoko; Mizuno, Hideya; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kunitomo, Masaru; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2002-02-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary supplements on atria isolated from male Wistar rats. The examined supplements, which are increasingly used in Japan, those were Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE), catechins, isoflavones, sodium iron chlorophyllin and sodium copper chlorophyllin. GBE at 100-1000 microg/ml significantly increased the beat rate and the contractile force. Catechins at 1-100 microg/ml significantly potentiated the contractile force but did not effect the beat rates. However, isoflavones, sodium iron and sodium copper chlorophyllins did not change the contractile force or the beat rates. To identify the active ingredient of GBE, ginkgolide B, quercetin and amentoflavone on the atria were tested. Ginkgolide B weakened the contractile force. Quercetin potentiated the contractile force at only 30 microg/ml. Amentoflavone significantly increased the beat rate. From these findings, amentoflavone and quercetin were considered to be the principal ingredients of GBE producing the positive chronotropic and inotropic actions, respectively. In the case of catechins, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), one of the principal ingredients, produced inotropic actions. These findings suggest that there are some dietary supplements which affect cardiac function, such GBE and catechins.

  11. Effects of hyperbaric pressure and temperature on atria from ectotherm animals (Rana pipiens and Anguilla anguilla).

    PubMed

    Gennser, M; Karpe, F; Ornhagen, H C

    1990-01-01

    1. Spontaneously beating atria from frogs (R. pipiens) and eels (A. anguilla) were compressed hydraulically to 10 MPa. Effects on beating frequency and twitch tension were studied. 2. At low temperatures (8-10 degrees C) compression to 10 MPa caused a slowing of the beat frequency. No effects were noted at higher temperatures (16-24 degrees C). Twitch tension was decreased by pressure at low temperatures and increased at high temperatures. 3. Differences were noted between preparations from cold and warm acclimatized frogs, and from silver and yellow eels, respectively. 4. The effect of temperature acclimatization on pressure and temperature sensitivity is discussed in relation to data on cardiac phospholipid fatty acid composition.

  12. [Restrictive ventricular septal defect in a dwarf rabbit].

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, N; Leuser, C; Miltz, D; Henrich, E; Schneider, M

    2016-01-01

    A 9-week-old intact female dwarf rabbit was presented for evaluation of a heart murmur. Physical examination revealed a grade IV/VI systolic heart murmur with the maximal intensity over the right heart base. Evidence for a left-sided cardiomegaly was present on lateral and dorsoventral radiographs. An electrocardiogram was recorded in right lateral recumbency, which revealed a sinus tachycardia with a heart rate of 360 beats/minute. Echocardiography showed normal dimensions for the atria and ventricles. Two-dimensional echocardiography confirmed the presence of a perimembranous ventricular septal defect (VSD) with a diameter of 0.8 mm. Identification of the VSD was possible from a right (long and short axes) and a left parasternal window. Peak flow velocity of the systolic left to right shunt was 5.2 m/s. Additionally, a relative pulmonic stenosis (peak flow in the pulmonary artery of 1.02 m/s, pulsed-wave Doppler) was present. According to these findings, the VSD was classified as restrictive. At this time point, medical treatment was unnecessary. The re-examination after 7 weeks revealed unchanged morphological and haemodynamic findings. The VSD in this dwarf rabbit displayed both in the physical and echocardiographic examinations typical features as seen in dogs and cats as well as in one New Zealand white rabbit. PMID:26763583

  13. Vagally induced block and delayed conduction as a mechanism for circus movement tachycardia in frog atria.

    PubMed

    Rosenshtraukh, L V; Zaitsev, A V; Fast, V G; Pertsov, A M; Krinsky, V I

    1989-02-01

    Episodes of tachycardia induced by strong vagal stimulation in spontaneously beating isolated atria of frog (Rana temporaria) were studied with multielectrode mapping technique. These episodes were inducible in 19 of 39 preparations. The arrhythmia started several seconds after cessation of vagal stimulation strong enough to cause sinus arrest, without electrical stimulation of the myocardium. The arrhythmia consisted of two to 20 beats (6 +/- 4, mean +/- SD, n = 42) with a cycle length of 100-500 msec. Recording from 32 sites with spatial resolution of 1-2 mm showed that the arrhythmia was due to intra-atrial circus movement. The estimated perimeter of the reentrant circuit ranged from 6 to 20 mm. In circuits of the minimal size, the average conduction velocity along the circuit was as low as 2-3 cm/sec. Paroxysms of the tachycardia were always preceded by vagally induced nonuniform depression of conduction, with some areas of atria being completely blocked. As the vagal influence decreased, the blocked areas recovered in an inhomogeneous manner, their unblocking being significantly (p less than 0.05) delayed after inhibition of tissue cholinesterase by proserine. The reentrant tachycardia was initiated when a sinus impulse arrived during certain phase of the unblocking. Unlike the well-known mechanism of reentrant excitation, which is based on inhomogeneous refractoriness and critically timed extrabeat(s), the circus movement in our model depended on vagally induced conduction block and could be launched by a single sinus impulse.

  14. The mechanism of supraventricular tachycardia induced by a single premature beat in the isolated left atrium of the rabbit. I. Circus movement as a consequence of unidirectional block of the premature impulse.

    PubMed

    Allessie, M A; Bonke, F I; Schopman, F J

    1975-01-01

    In the isolated left atrium of the rabbit tachycardia could be elicited by a single stimulus shortly after the refractory period. The activation pattern of the preparation was mapped by means of multiple extracellular recordings. It could be demonstrated that a circus movement of the activation in a relatively small part of the atrial myocardium was responsible for the tachycardia. This phenomenon was studied on a cellular level with multiple microelectrode recordings. The impulse of the premature beat, when followed by a tachycardia, was one way only, while in the other directions the conduction failed completely or occurred with such decrement that the impulse died out. These differences in conductivity were connected with spatial differences in the refractory period. Therefore the excitability of the fibers surrounding the stimulating electrod was not restored to the same level at the moment the premature beat was elicited. Spatial dispersion in the refractory period was important for the occurrence of unidirectional block and thus for the initiation of circus movement and tachycardia. PMID:1188162

  15. The mechanism of supraventricular tachycardia induced by a single premature beat in the isolated left atrium of the rabbit. I. Circus movement as a consequence of unidirectional block of the premature impulse.

    PubMed

    Allessie, M A; Bonke, F I; Schopman, F J

    1975-01-01

    In the isolated left atrium of the rabbit tachycardia could be elicited by a single stimulus shortly after the refractory period. The activation pattern of the preparation was mapped by means of multiple extracellular recordings. It could be demonstrated that a circus movement of the activation in a relatively small part of the atrial myocardium was responsible for the tachycardia. This phenomenon was studied on a cellular level with multiple microelectrode recordings. The impulse of the premature beat, when followed by a tachycardia, was one way only, while in the other directions the conduction failed completely or occurred with such decrement that the impulse died out. These differences in conductivity were connected with spatial differences in the refractory period. Therefore the excitability of the fibers surrounding the stimulating electrod was not restored to the same level at the moment the premature beat was elicited. Spatial dispersion in the refractory period was important for the occurrence of unidirectional block and thus for the initiation of circus movement and tachycardia.

  16. Free creatine available to the creatine phosphate energy shuttle in isolated rat atria

    SciTech Connect

    Savabi, F. )

    1988-10-01

    To measure the actual percentage of intracellular free creatine participating in the process of energy transport, the incorporation of (1-{sup 14}C)creatine into the free creatine and phosphocreatine (PCr) pools in spontaneously beating isolated rat atria, under various conditions, was examined. The atria were subjected to three consecutive periods, control, anoxia, and postanoxic recover, in medium containing tracers of (1-{sup 14}C)creatine. The tissue content and specific activity of creatine and PCr were determined at the end of each period. The higher specific activity found for tissue PCr (1.87 times) than creatine, independent of the percentage of total intracellular creatine that was present as free creatine, provides evidence for the existence of two separate pools of free creatine. Analysis of the data shows that in the normal oxygenated state {approx} 9% of the total intracellular creatine is actually free to participate in the process of energy transport (shuttle pool). About 36% of the total creatine is bound to unknown intracellular components and the rest exists as PCr. The creatine that was taken up and the creatine that was released from the breakdown of PCr have much greater access to the site of phosphorylation than the rest of the intracellular creatine. A sharp increase in the specific activity of residual PCr on prolongation of anoxic time was also observed. This provides evidence for a nonhomogeneous pool of PCr, for the most recently formed (radioactive) PCr appeared to be hydrolyzed last.

  17. [Effects of creatinol O-phosphate on the isolated rabbit's atrium and on the rat's phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation].

    PubMed

    Ferrini, R; Miragoli, G

    1975-11-01

    Creatinol O-phosphate (COP) enhanced the semiisometric contraction of isolated rabbit's atria and those of rat's phrenic - diaphragm preparations immersed in hypocalcic Ringer or Krebs solution. Creatine-phosphate elicited a similar effect.

  18. Endogenous triacylglycerol utilization by the isolated rat atria.

    PubMed

    Varela, A; Savino, E A

    1988-03-01

    The isolated atria from 24 h fasted rats, either in the presence of glucose or in a substrate-free medium containing 2-deoxyglucose, mobilized the endogenous triacylglycerol (TG) to a greater extent than those from fed rats. The TG of the fasted atria had almost disappeared at the end of the 90 min incubation in the substrate-free plus 2-deoxyglucose medium, whereas in those from fed rats a mobilization-resistant portion of about 40% of the TG pool remained. This finding coincided with a lower decay of the contractile and pacemaker activities in the atria from fasted rats. Insulin abolished the TG mobilization in the atria from fed rats in the presence of glucose, but it was ineffective in the fasted atria. These data suggest that the endogenous-TG and glucose share in supporting the atrial functions, that insulin is involved in the control of TG consumption only in the fed state and that the greater TG mobilization in the fasted atria, at least partly, meets the energy requirements of the tissue.

  19. Beneficial effect of medicinal plants on the contractility of post-hypoxic isolated guinea pig atria - Potential implications for the treatment of ischemic-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Bipat, Robbert; Toelsie, Jerry R; Magali, Indira; Soekhoe, Rubaina; Stender, Karin; Wangsawirana, Angelique; Oedairadjsingh, Krishan; Pawirodihardjo, Jennifer; Mans, Dennis R A

    2016-08-01

    Context Ischemic-reperfusion injury is accompanied by a decreased contractility of the myocardium. Positive-inotropic agents have proven useful for treating this condition but may exert serious side-effects. Objective In this study, aqueous preparations from Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench (Malvaceae), Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae), Bixa orellana L. (Bixaceae), Cecropia peltata L. (Moraceae), Erythrina fusca Lour. (Fabaceae), Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) and Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae) were evaluated for their ability to improve the decreased contractility of isolated guinea pig atria after hypoxic stress. Materials and methods Guinea pig atria isolated in Ringer-Locke buffer gassed with 100% O2 at 30 °C were exposed for 5 min to hypoxia, then allowed to recover in oxygenated buffer alone or containing a single plant extract (0.001-1 mg/mL). The contractility (g/s) and beating frequency (beats/min), as well as troponin C contents of the bathing solution (ng/mL), were determined and expressed as means ± SDs. Results The extracts of A. muricata, B. orellana, C. peltata and T. catappa caused an increase in the contractility compared to untreated atria of 340 ± 102%, 151 ± 13%, 141 ± 14% and 238 ± 44%, respectively. However, the latter two preparations increased the troponin C contents of the bathing solution to 36 ± 11 and 69 ± 33, compared to the value of 11 ± 3 ng/mL found with untreated atria. Conclusions Preparations from A. muricata and B. orellana may possess positive-inotropic properties which may improve the contractility of the post-hypoxic myocardium. Studies to assess their usefulness in ischemic-reperfusion injury are warranted.

  20. Beneficial effect of medicinal plants on the contractility of post-hypoxic isolated guinea pig atria - Potential implications for the treatment of ischemic-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Bipat, Robbert; Toelsie, Jerry R; Magali, Indira; Soekhoe, Rubaina; Stender, Karin; Wangsawirana, Angelique; Oedairadjsingh, Krishan; Pawirodihardjo, Jennifer; Mans, Dennis R A

    2016-08-01

    Context Ischemic-reperfusion injury is accompanied by a decreased contractility of the myocardium. Positive-inotropic agents have proven useful for treating this condition but may exert serious side-effects. Objective In this study, aqueous preparations from Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench (Malvaceae), Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae), Bixa orellana L. (Bixaceae), Cecropia peltata L. (Moraceae), Erythrina fusca Lour. (Fabaceae), Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) and Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae) were evaluated for their ability to improve the decreased contractility of isolated guinea pig atria after hypoxic stress. Materials and methods Guinea pig atria isolated in Ringer-Locke buffer gassed with 100% O2 at 30 °C were exposed for 5 min to hypoxia, then allowed to recover in oxygenated buffer alone or containing a single plant extract (0.001-1 mg/mL). The contractility (g/s) and beating frequency (beats/min), as well as troponin C contents of the bathing solution (ng/mL), were determined and expressed as means ± SDs. Results The extracts of A. muricata, B. orellana, C. peltata and T. catappa caused an increase in the contractility compared to untreated atria of 340 ± 102%, 151 ± 13%, 141 ± 14% and 238 ± 44%, respectively. However, the latter two preparations increased the troponin C contents of the bathing solution to 36 ± 11 and 69 ± 33, compared to the value of 11 ± 3 ng/mL found with untreated atria. Conclusions Preparations from A. muricata and B. orellana may possess positive-inotropic properties which may improve the contractility of the post-hypoxic myocardium. Studies to assess their usefulness in ischemic-reperfusion injury are warranted. PMID:26730936

  1. Rotigaptide (ZP123) improves atrial conduction slowing in chronic volume overload-induced dilated atria.

    PubMed

    Haugan, Ketil; Miyamoto, Takuya; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao; Nakayama, Jun; Shimojo, Hisashi; Hirose, Masamichi

    2006-07-01

    Chronic atrial dilation is associated with atrial conduction velocity slowing and an increased risk of developing atrial tachyarrhythmias. Rotigaptide (ZP123) is a selective gap junction modifier that increases cardiac gap junctional intercellular communication. We hypothesised that rotigaptide treatment would increase atrial conduction velocity and reduce the inducibility to atrial tachyarrhythmias in a model of chronic volume overload induced chronic atrial dilatation characterized by atrial conduction velocity slowing. Chronic volume overload was created in Japanese white rabbits by arterio-venous shunt formation. Atrial conduction velocity and atrial tachyarrhythmias inducibility were examined in Langendorff-perfused chronic volume overload hearts (n=12) using high-resolution optical mapping before and after treatment with rotigaptide. Moreover, expression levels of atrial gap junction proteins (connexin40 and connexin43) were examined in chronic volume overload hearts (n=6) and compared to sham-operated controls (n=6). Rotigaptide treatment significantly increased atrial conduction velocity in chronic volume overload hearts, however, rotigaptide did not decrease susceptibility to the induction of atrial tachyarrhythmias. Protein expressions of Cx40 and Cx43 were decreased by 32% and 72% (P<0.01), respectively, in chromic volume overload atria compared to control. To conclude, rotigaptide increased atrial conduction velocity in a rabbit model of chromic volume overload induced atrial conduction velocity slowing. The demonstrated effect of rotigaptide on atrial conduction velocity did not prevent atrial tachyarrhythmias inducibility. Whether rotigaptide may possess antiarrhythmic efficacy in other models of atrial fibrillation remains to be determined.

  2. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes. Photoplethysmography, which measures changes in arterial blood volume, is commonly used to obtain heart rate and blood oxygen saturation. The digitized PPG signals are used as inputs into the beat-to-beat blood

  3. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  4. Model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat time interval series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, Alberto; Diambra, Luis; Malta, C. P.

    2005-09-01

    In this study we present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a set of differential equations used to simulate the membrane potential of a single rabbit sinoatrial node cell, excited with a periodic input signal with added correlated noise. This signal, which simulates the input from the autonomous nervous system to the sinoatrial node, was included in the pacemaker equations as a modulation of the iNaK current pump and the potassium current iK. We focus at modeling the heart beat-to-beat time interval series from normal subjects during meditation of the Kundalini Yoga and Chi techniques. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that while the embedding of pre-meditation and control cases have a roughly circular shape, it acquires a polygonal shape during meditation, triangular for the Kundalini Yoga data and quadrangular in the case of Chi data. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce the trajectory of the experimental data in the phase space. The embedding of the Chi data could be reproduced using a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a square wave. In the case of Kundalini Yoga data, the embedding was reproduced with a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a triangular wave having a rising branch of longer duration than the decreasing branch. Our study provides an estimation of the respiratory signal using only the heart beat-to-beat time interval series.

  5. A mechanical characterization of the porcine atria at the healthy stage and after ventricular tachypacing.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Chiara; Di Martino, Elena S

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a cardiac arrhythmia that highly increases the risk of stroke and is associated with significant but still unexplored changes in the mechanical behavior of the tissue. Planar biaxial tests were performed on tissue specimens from pigs at the healthy stage and after ventricular tachypacing (VTP), a procedure applied to reproduce the relevant features of AF. The local arrangement of the fiber bundles in the tissue was investigated on specimens from rabbit atria by means of circularly polarized light. Based on this, mechanical data were fitted to two anisotropic constitutive relationships, including a four-parameter Fung-type model and a microstructurally-motivated model. Accounting for the fiber-induced anisotropy brought average R(2) = 0.807 for the microstructurally-motivated model and average R(2) = 0.949 for the Fung model. Validation of the fitted constitutive relationships was performed by means of FEM simulations coupled to FORTRAN routines. The performances of the two material models in predicting the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress were comparable, with average errors <3.1%. However, the Fung model outperformed the other in the prediction of the Green-Lagrange strain, with 9.2% maximum average error. To increase model generality, a proper averaging procedure accounting for nonlinearities was used to obtain average material parameters. In general, a stiffer behavior after VTP was noted. PMID:22482675

  6. Heterogeneous three-dimensional anatomical and electrophysiological model of human atria.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Gunnar; Höper, Christine; Sachse, Frank B; Dössel, Olaf; Holden, Arun V; Zhang, Henggui

    2006-06-15

    Investigating the mechanisms underlying the genesis and conduction of electrical excitation in the atria at physiological and pathological states is of great importance. To provide knowledge concerning the mechanisms of excitation, we constructed a biophysical detailed and anatomically accurate computer model of human atria that incorporates both structural and electrophysiological heterogeneities. The three-dimensional geometry was extracted from the visible female dataset. The sinoatrial node (SAN) and atrium, including crista terminalis (CT), pectinate muscles (PM), appendages (APG) and Bachmann's bundle (BB) were segmented in this work. Fibre orientation in CT, PM and BB was set to local longitudinal direction. Descriptions for all used cell types were based on modifications of the Courtemanche et al. model of a human atrial cell. Maximum conductances of Ito, IKr and ICa,L were modified for PM, CT, APG and atrioventricular ring to reproduce measured action potentials (AP). Pacemaker activity in the human SAN was reproduced by removing IK1, but including If, ICa,T, and gradients of channel conductances as described in previous studies for heterogeneous rabbit SAN. Anisotropic conduction was computed with a monodomain model using the finite element method. The transversal to longitudinal ratio of conductivity for PM, CT and BB was 1:9. Atrial working myocardium (AWM) was set to be isotropic. Simulation of atrial electrophysiology showed initiation of APs in the SAN centre. The excitation spread afterwards to the periphery near to the region of the CT and preferentially towards the atrioventricular region. The excitation extends over the right atrium along PM. Both CT and PM activated the right AWM. Earliest activation of the left atrium was through BB and excitation spread over to the APG. The conduction velocities were 0.6ms-1 for AWM, 1.2ms-1 for CT, 1.6ms-1 for PM and 1.1ms-1 for BB at a rate of 63bpm. The simulations revealed that bundles form dominant

  7. Simultaneous measurement of ciliary beating and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1994-01-01

    A novel system for measuring, simultaneously, ciliary beating and intracellular free calcium is presented. The advantages and dynamic nature of the system are demonstrated by measuring the effects of the calcium ionophore lonomycin and of extracellular ATP on ciliated rabbit trachea. The results are discussed with regard to the ciliary and calcium stimulation. PMID:7919010

  8. Gene Expression and Genetic Variation in Human Atria

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Honghuang; Dolmatova, Elena V.; Morley, Michael P.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; McManus, David D.; Magnani, Jared W.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Hakonarson, Hakon; del Monte, Federica; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The human left and right atria have different susceptibilities to develop atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the molecular events related to structural and functional changes that enhance AF susceptibility are still poorly understood. Objective To characterize gene expression and genetic variation in human atria. Methods We studied the gene expression profiles and genetic variations in 53 left atrial and 52 right atrial tissue samples collected from the Myocardial Applied Genomics Network (MAGNet) repository. The tissues were collected from heart failure patients undergoing transplantation and from unused organ donor hearts with normal ventricular function. Gene expression was profiled using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133A Array. Genetic variation was profiled using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results We found that 109 genes were differentially expressed between left and right atrial tissues. A total of 187 and 259 significant cis-associations between transcript levels and genetic variants were identified in left and right atrial tissues, respectively. We also found that a SNP at a known AF locus, rs3740293, was associated with the expression of MYOZ1 in both left and right atrial tissues. Conclusion We found a distinct transcriptional profile between the right and left atrium, and extensive cis-associations between atrial transcripts and common genetic variants. Our results implicate MYOZ1 as the causative gene at the chromosome 10q22 locus for AF. PMID:24177373

  9. Adaptive beat-to-beat heart rate estimation in ballistocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Brüser, Christoph; Stadlthanner, Kurt; de Waele, Stijn; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2011-09-01

    A ballistocardiograph records the mechanical activity of the heart. We present a novel algorithm for the detection of individual heart beats and beat-to-beat interval lengths in ballistocardiograms (BCGs) from healthy subjects. An automatic training step based on unsupervised learning techniques is used to extract the shape of a single heart beat from the BCG. Using the learned parameters, the occurrence of individual heart beats in the signal is detected. A final refinement step improves the accuracy of the estimated beat-to-beat interval lengths. Compared to many existing algorithms, the new approach offers heart rate estimates on a beat-to-beat basis. The agreement of the proposed algorithm with an ECG reference has been evaluated. A relative beat-to-beat interval error of 1.79% with a coverage of 95.94% was achieved on recordings from 16 subjects.

  10. Thermally-induced ventilation in atria: an atrium classification scheme and promising test sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    In establishing the atrium classification scheme, specific attention was given to: climate (hot-arid, warm-humid, and temperate), atrium configuration (open, closed, and adjustable tops), and thermal mechanism (natural convection, radiative cooling, shading, and others). Application of the resulting three-dimensional (three-coordinate) matrix was considered and tested. Although the testing was for purposes of checking scheme application, the procedure indicated that most of the atria examined were of the adjustable-top configuration with daylighting the principal functional mode. However, it was noted that thermally-induced air flow was present in many of the atria classified. In the identification of promising test sites it was noted that there appears to be a shortage of buildings which meet the atrium definition. Consequently, prospective test sites were categorized as follows based upon anticipated value to the study: commercial atria already constructed, commercial atria planned or under construction, and residential atria already constructed.

  11. Comparison of relaxin receptors in rat isolated atria and uterus by use of synthetic and native relaxin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Y Y; Wade, J D; Tregear, G W; Summers, R J

    1998-01-01

    The receptors for relaxin in the rat atria and uterus were investigated and compared by use of a series of synthetic and native relaxin analogues. The assays used were the positive chronotropic and inotropic effects in rat spontaneously beating, isolated right atrium and electrically driven left atrium and the relaxation of K+ precontracted uterine smooth muscle. Relaxin analogues with an intact A- and B-chain were active in producing powerful chronotropic and inotropic effects in the rat isolated atria at nanomolar concentrations. Single-chain analogues and structural homologues of relaxin such as human insulin and sheep insulin-like growth factor I had no agonist action and did not antagonize the effect of the B29 form of human gene 2 relaxin. Shortening the B-chain carboxyl terminal of human gene 1 (B2–29) relaxin to B2–26 reduced the activity of the peptide and removal of another 2 amino acid residues (B2–24) abolished the activity. This suggests that the B-chain length may be important for determination of the activity of relaxin. More detailed studies are needed to determine the effect of progressive amino acid removal on the structure and the bioactivity of relaxin. Porcine prorelaxin was as active as porcine relaxin on a molar basis, suggesting that the presence of the intact C-peptide did not affect the binding of the prorelaxin to the receptor to produce functional responses. Relaxin caused relaxation of uterine longitudinal and circular smooth muscle precontracted with 40 mM K+. The pEC50 values for human gene 2 and porcine relaxins were lower than those in the atrial assay, but rat relaxin had similar pEC50 values in both atrial and uterine assays. Rat relaxin was significantly less potent than either human gene 2 or porcine relaxin in the atrial assay, but in the uterine assay they were equipotent. The results suggest that the relaxin receptor or the signalling pathway in rat atria may differ from that in the uterus. PMID:9517397

  12. Prevention of adenosine A2A receptor activation diminishes beat-to-beat alternation in human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Molina, Cristina E; Llach, Anna; Herraiz-Martínez, Adela; Tarifa, Carmen; Barriga, Montserrat; Wiegerinck, Rob F; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Cabello, Nuria; Vallmitjana, Alex; Benitéz, Raúl; Montiel, José; Cinca, Juan; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with increased spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and linked to increased adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expression and activation. Here we tested whether this may favor atrial arrhythmogenesis by promoting beat-to-beat alternation and irregularity. Patch-clamp and confocal calcium imaging was used to measure the beat-to-beat response of the calcium current and transient in human atrial myocytes. Responses were classified as uniform, alternating or irregular and stimulation of Gs-protein coupled receptors decreased the frequency where a uniform response could be maintained from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 0.6 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.01 for beta-adrenergic receptors and from 1.4 ± 0.1 to 0.5 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.05 for A2ARs. The latter was linked to increased spontaneous calcium release and after-depolarizations. Moreover, A2AR activation increased the fraction of non-uniformly responding cells in HL-1 myocyte cultures from 19 ± 3 to 51 ± 9 %; p < 0.02, and electrical mapping in perfused porcine atria revealed that adenosine induced electrical alternans at longer cycle lengths, doubled the fraction of electrodes showing alternation, and increased the amplitude of alternations. Importantly, protein kinase A inhibition increased the highest frequency where uniform responses could be maintained from 0.84 ± 0.12 to 1.86 ± 0.11 Hz; p < 0.001 and prevention of A2AR-activation with exogenous adenosine deaminase selectively increased the threshold from 0.8 ± 0.1 to 1.2 ± 0.1 Hz; p = 0.001 in myocytes from patients with AF. In conclusion, A2AR-activation promotes beat-to-beat irregularities in the calcium transient in human atrial myocytes, and prevention of A2AR activation may be a novel means to maintain uniform beat-to-beat responses at higher beating frequencies in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  13. Measuring heart beats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Frank

    2014-03-01

    A simple instrument has been constructed to measure heart beats via an earlobe sensor. The pulse rate is determined from a Picoscope trace and pupils may wish to see how this rate changes after modest exertion.

  14. Influence of resting tension on immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Schiebinger, R.J.; Linden, J.

    1986-07-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is a potent diuretic hormone secreted by the atria in response to volume expansion. We examined the effect of resting tension on atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro. Left atria were hooked between an electrode and force transducer and superfused with medium 199. The atria were studied at a pacing frequency of 0 or 3 Hz. Atrial natriuretic peptide content of the superfusate was measured by radioimmunoassay. In nonpaced and paced atria, increasing resting tension three- to five-fold caused immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion to increase by 35 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM, n = 6, p less than 0.01) and 30 +/- 3% (n = 4, p less than 0.01), respectively. Lowering resting tension by 50% in nonpaced and paced atria lowered immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by 30 +/- 3% (n = 7, p less than 0.01) and 24 +/- 3% (n = 6, p less than 0.01), respectively. To exclude the possibility that release of norepinephrine or acetylcholine from endogenous nerve endings was mediating this effect, the atria were superfused with the combination of propranolol 0.1 microM, phentolamine 1.0 microM, and atropine 10 microM. These concentrations of the antagonists were 125-fold or higher than their Kd for binding to their respective receptors. The antagonists did not block the rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion; neither did they inhibit an established rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion induced by increasing the resting tension.

  15. Thermally-induced ventilation applications in atria: a state-of-the-art report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Atria dating back as far as the Roman Empire from fourteen countries were reviewed. Several tentative conclusions have emerged regarding optimal atria aspect ratios and mechanisms to control the atria microclimate. Three areas were considered in the review of atrium technical considerations: cooling design concepts, thermal functions and atrium operating principles. The cooling design concepts discussed include radiative cooling, shading, convective cooling (wind-driven and thermally-induced), and thermal mass. Assumed atrium thermal functions consist of the control of incoming solar radiation, ventilation, cooling and day-lighting. Primary atrium operating mechanisms are convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. The partitioning of these energy flows are highly dependent upon specific atrium system parameters. Existing natural convection heat transfer and ventilation algorithms as they pertain to atria are presented. The limitations and major assumptions used in developing these algorithms are discussed. The computer programs reviewed include: (1) BLAST, (2) CALPAS3, (3) DEROB, (4) DOE-2A, (5) FREHEAT, (6) PASOLE, (7) PEGFIX, (8) NBSLD, (9) TWOZONE, and (10) UWENSOL. Out of the many atria surveyed, forty-one from thirty-seven locations in the US have been identified and documented. Most of the sites identified are commercial buildings. Sites are categorized into those already constructed and those still in the planning or building stages. Annotated bibliographies for information about atria are presented. These are grouped into the following subject areas: (1) general passive cooling, (2) climate and human comfort, (3) thermal and ventilation equations, (4) atria, (5) courtyards, and (6) measurement techniques.

  16. Metal MEMS Tools for Beating-heart Tissue Approximation.

    PubMed

    Butler, Evan J; Folk, Chris; Cohen, Adam; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Chen, Rich; Del Nido, Pedro J; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-05-01

    Achieving superior outcomes through the use of robots in medical applications requires an integrated approach to the design of the robot, tooling and the procedure itself. In this paper, this approach is applied to develop a robotic technique for closing abnormal communication between the atria of the heart. The goal is to achieve the efficacy of surgical closure as performed on a stopped, open heart with the reduced risk and trauma of a beating-heart catheter-based procedure. In the proposed approach, a concentric tube robot is used to percutaneously access the right atrium and deploy a tissue approximation device. The device is constructed using a metal MEMS fabrication process and is designed to both fit the manipulation capabilities of the robot as well as to reproduce the beneficial features of surgical closure by suture. Experimental results demonstrate device efficacy through manual in-vivo deployment and bench-top robotic deployment.

  17. Effects of extracts of ginkgo, onion, and celery on the contractility of isolated rat atria.

    PubMed

    Radenković, Mirjana; Kitić, Dušanka; Kostić, Milica; Mrkaić, Ana; Pavlović, Dragana; Miladinović, Bojana; Branković, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    The acute negative inotropic and chronotropic effects of the commercial extract of ginkgo leaf (Gingium(®)) and ethanolic extracts of onion bulbs and celery root on spontaneous and noradrenalin-stimulated contractions of the Wistar rat atria were investigated. All analyzed extracts exerted negative inotropic effects on the isolated rat atria. Among the tested extracts, the extract of ginkgo showed the strongest negative inotropic effects on rat atria, either in spontaneous or noradrenalin-induced contractions, being more potent than the onion and celery extracts, respectively.

  18. Thermally-induced ventilation applications in atria: a state-of-the-art report

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, S.K.; Kazama, D.B.; Pierson, R.E.; Sobin, H.; Tam, T.M.; Trenschel, D.; Young, M.F.

    1981-10-15

    This state-of-the-art report of an overall passive cooling project consists of selecting atrium sites for investigating thermally-induced heat transfer and ventilative cooling and collecting experimental data from which to develop design guidelines and to establish heat transfer and ventilation algorithms. The principal area of interest is for passive cooling of commercial buildings but passive cooling of residential structures is also considered. Passive heating functions are also addressed. The information is organized into five parts: (1) the review of historical and world-wide atria; (2) technical considerations of atria; (3) presentation of existing heat transfer and ventilation algorithms and computer programs for analyzing the energy functions of an atrium; (4) identification of existing atria in the US; and (5) bibliographical abstracts on information pertinent to atria.

  19. Simulation of the contraction of the ventricles in a human heart model including atria and pericardium.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Thomas; Wieners, Christian; Seemann, Gunnar; Steen, Henning; Dössel, Olaf

    2014-06-01

    During the contraction of the ventricles, the ventricles interact with the atria as well as with the pericardium and the surrounding tissue in which the heart is embedded. The atria are stretched, and the atrioventricular plane moves toward the apex. The atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) is considered to be a major contributor to the ventricular function, and a reduced AVPD is strongly related to heart failure. At the same time, the epicardium slides almost frictionlessly on the pericardium with permanent contact. Although the interaction between the ventricles, the atria and the pericardium plays an important role for the deformation of the heart, this aspect is usually not considered in computational models. In this work, we present an electromechanical model of the heart, which takes into account the interaction between ventricles, pericardium and atria and allows to reproduce the AVPD. To solve the contact problem of epicardium and pericardium, a contact handling algorithm based on penalty formulation was developed, which ensures frictionless and permanent contact. Two simulations of the ventricular contraction were conducted, one with contact handling of pericardium and heart and one without. In the simulation with contact handling, the atria were stretched during the contraction of the ventricles, while, due to the permanent contact with the pericardium, their volume increased. In contrast to that, in the simulations without pericardium, the atria were also stretched, but the change in the atrial volume was much smaller. Furthermore, the pericardium reduced the radial contraction of the ventricles and at the same time increased the AVPD.

  20. Cellular potentials, electrogenic sodium pumping and sensitivity in guinea-pig atria.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J C; Fleming, W W; Westfall, D P; Millecchia, R

    1984-10-01

    Intracellular recording techniques in guinea-pig atrial pacemaker and nonpacemaker cells were used to investigate 1) the role of membrane potential changes in postjunctional supersensitivity, 2) the electrogenicity of the Na+,K+ pump and 3) the role of electrogenic pumping in sensitivity of the atria to agonists. In nonpacemaker cells, ouabain (10(-6) M) had no effect on resting membrane potential (left atria) or maximum diastolic potential (right atria). However, ouabain effectively suppressed the transient hyperpolarization that followed cessation of electrical stimulation. In pacemaker cells, ouabain and chronic treatment with reserpine (0.1 mg/kg/day) produced quite different patterns of changes in intracellular potentials. Chronic treatment with reserpine induced chronotropic supersensitivity to isoproterenol but not to histamine. Ouabain did not alter the chronotropic sensitivity to either agonist. The effects of isoproterenol and histamine on intracellular potentials in pacemaker cells were investigated in the presence and absence of ouabain and in control atria vs. atria from guinea pigs chronically pretreated with reserpine. Analysis of the data indicated that 1) electrophysiological measurements do not provide a discernible explanation for chronotropic supersensitivity, 2) the Na+ pump has the capacity for electrogenic pumping under conditions of Na+ loading, but demonstrates little indication of electrogenicity under basal conditions and 3) chronic treatment with reserpine does suppress the Na+,K+ pump in some areas of the right atrium, but this activity probably does not contribute to chronotropic supersensitivity. Other possible mechanisms of postjunctional supersensitivity in atria are discussed. PMID:6491974

  1. The effects of 4-pentenoic and pentanoic acids on the isolated rat atria.

    PubMed

    Varela, A; Felip, M N; Montesi, A; Savino, E A

    1988-12-01

    The peak developed tension and the pacemaker frequency of the isolated atria from fed and fasted rats, declined progressively during the incubation in a glucose-free medium containing 2-deoxyglucose. The atria from fed rats exhibited a faster decline than those from fasted rats, which was associated to a slower triacylglycerol lipolysis. 4-Pentenoic acid inhibited the lipolysis of both groups of atria but did not alter the atrial contractile performance. However, it enhanced the decline of the pacemaker frequency in the atria from fasted rats whereas, in contrast, it alleviated the decline in the fed atria. n-Pentanoic acid ameliorated the impairment of the contractile and pacemaker activities in both groups of atria, without affecting the lipolysis. It was concluded that, since the inhibition of the intramyocardial lipolysis did not correlate with changes of the atrial functions, 4-pentenoic acid was not appropriate to assess about the contribution of endogenous triacylglycerol to the maintenance of the atrial contractile and pacemaker activities.

  2. Purification of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor from porcine atria.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, G L; Herron, G S; Yamaki, M; Fullerton, D S; Schimerlik, M I

    1984-01-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor from porcine atria has been purified 100,000-fold to homogeneity by solubilization in digitonin/cholate and sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose, diethylaminoethylagarose, hydroxylapatite, and 3-(2'-aminobenzhydryloxy)tropane-agarose. The yield of purified receptor was 4.3% of that found in the membrane fraction, and the purified receptor bound 11.1-12.8 nmol of L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate per mg of protein, corresponding to a binding component Mr of 78,400-90,000. The purified receptor preparation consisted of two polypeptides in approximately equimolar amounts when examined on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. The larger polypeptide (Mr 78,000 on 8% polyacrylamide gels) was specifically alkylated with [3H]propylbenzilylcholine mustard, whereas the smaller polypeptide (Mr 14,800) was not labeled. The possibility that the small polypeptide is a contaminant fortuitously appearing in equimolar amounts with the large polypeptide cannot be ruled out at this time. The purified preparation was highly stable, with no measurable change in the number of ligand binding sites or the gel pattern after 1 month's storage on ice. Scatchard analysis showed a single class of binding sites for the antagonist L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate with a dissociation constant of 61 +/- 4 pM. Equilibrium titration experiments demonstrated that the antagonist L-hyoscyamine displaced L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate from a single class of sites (Kd = 475 +/- 30 pM), whereas the agonist carbamoylcholine interacted at two populations of sites (53% +/- 3% high affinity, Kd = 1.1 +/- 0.3 microM; 47% +/- 3% low affinity, Kd = 67 +/- 14 microM). The ligand binding data were very similar to that for the membrane-bound receptor, suggesting that the receptor has not been altered radically during purification. Images PMID:6589642

  3. What makes cilia beat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, Ashok; Foster, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    There have been numerous attempts at understanding the mechanism responsible for producing steady beat in cilia that propel eukaryotic cells. The core structure of a cilium, known as the axoneme, consists of nine microtubules doublet surrounding a central pair of microtubules. The dynein motors on the doublets generate active shear forces that are responsible for relative sliding and bending of the cilium. Several theories have been put forward over the last sixty years but none are supported through a careful analysis of the ciliary beating. We have combined the methods of slender body theory and multipole expansions - both developed by Professor Acrivos and his students - to analyze in detail the hydrodynamics of ciliary beating in ten different cases. The analysis is used to infer the internal dynamics of cilia and, in particular, the active forces generated by the dynein motors along the length of cilia. We find that the properties of the axoneme vary along the length of a cilium. In the central region, the active forces generated are primarily dependent on the rate of sliding of the microtubules. This region therefore appears to be optimized to propagate a wave down the length of the cilium. The proximal region near the cell body appears more complex and may be suitable for creating waves. These conclusions from the hydrodynamic analysis are consistent with a recent study that reports different structures of the axoneme in these two regions. The detailed comparison with various theories of axoneme dynamics/collective behavior of molecular motors show that none of the existing theories are adequate for predicting the correct active moments generated so that the mechanism for ciliary beating still remains unresolved.

  4. [Electrocardiograph beat pattern recognition].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qunyi; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huiling

    2005-02-01

    It is very important to recognize arrhythmia in clinical electrocardiography (ECG) analysis. The fundamental of beat pattern recognition is presented in this paper. Various prevalent methods for arrhythmia recognitiion are categorized and summarized, based on which the advantages and disadvantages among the methods are compared, and the main problems are discussed in depth. At last, the development trend of arrhythmia recognition technology is pointed out.

  5. Optimal ciliary beating patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2011-11-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of single or collective biological cilia. We define the efficiency of a single cilium as Q2 / P , where Q is the volume flow rate of the pumped fluid and P is the dissipated power. For ciliary arrays, we define it as (ρQ) 2 / (ρP) , with ρ denoting the surface density of cilia. We then numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. For a single cilium optimization leads to curly, somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal waves lead to a significantly higher efficiency than synchronous beating. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible optimum.

  6. Species differences in the negative inotropic effect of acetylcholine and soman in rat, guinea pig, and rabbit hearts. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.M.; Thomsen, R.H.; Baskin, S.I.

    1991-12-31

    Acetylcholine reduced atrial contractions by 82.5% in guinea pig, 50.8% in rat, and 41.5% in rabbit. 2. The EC50, values for the negative inotropic effect of acetylcholine were 3.3 x 10(-7) M in rat and guinea pig atria and 4.1 x 10(-6) M in rabbit atria. 3. There was no correlation between the species differences in the negative inotropic effect of acetylcholine in atria and the density or affinity of acetylcholinesterase or muscarinic receptors. 4. Inhibition of atrial acetylcholinesterase with soman reduced the EC50 of acetylcholine three-fold in all species, but did not change the maximal inotropic effect of acetylcholine. 5. Species differences in the negative inotropic effect of acetylcholine may be caused by differences in the coupling between myocardial muscarinic receptors and the ion channels that mediate negative inotropy. Acetylcholine, cardiovascular response, species variation negative inotropic response.

  7. Disposal rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.C.; Trammell, D.R.

    1983-10-12

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  8. Disposable rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.; Trammell, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  9. Resonant Bloch-wave beatings.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Torner, Lluis

    2014-07-01

    We introduce Bloch-wave beatings in arrays of multimode periodically bent waveguides with a transverse refractive index gradient. The new phenomenon manifests itself in the periodic drastic increase of the amplitude of the Bloch oscillations that accompanies resonant conversion of modes guided by the individual waveguides. The Bloch-wave beatings are found to be most pronounced when the length of the resonant mode conversion substantially exceeds the longitudinal period of the Bloch oscillations. The beating frequency decreases when the amplitude of waveguide bending decreases, while the beating amplitude is restricted by the amplitude of the Bloch oscillations that emerge from the second allowed band of the Floquet-Bloch lattice spectrum.

  10. Mechanisms of Beat-to-Beat Regulation of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell Function by Ca2+ Cycling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Maltsev, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    Whether intracellular Ca2+ cycling dynamics regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function on a beat-to-beat basis remains unknown. Here we show that under physiological conditions, application of low concentrations of caffeine (2–4 mM) to isolated single rabbit sinoatrial node cells acutely reduces their spontaneous action potential cycle length (CL) and increases Ca2+ transient amplitude for several cycles. Numerical simulations, using a modified Maltsev-Lakatta coupled-clock model, faithfully reproduced these effects, and also the effects of CL prolongation and dysrhythmic spontaneous beating (produced by cytosolic Ca2+ buffering) and an acute CL reduction (produced by flash-induced Ca2+ release from a caged Ca2+ buffer), which we had reported previously. Three contemporary numerical models (including the original Maltsev-Lakatta model) failed to reproduce the experimental results. In our proposed new model, Ca2+ releases acutely change the CL via activation of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current. Time-dependent CL reductions after flash-induced Ca2+ releases (the memory effect) are linked to changes in Ca2+ available for pumping into sarcoplasmic reticulum which, in turn, changes the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, diastolic Ca2+ releases, and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current. These results support the idea that Ca2+ regulates CL in cardiac pacemaker cells on a beat-to-beat basis, and suggest a more realistic numerical mechanism of this regulation. PMID:24094396

  11. Down-regulation of the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in diabetic mouse atria.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fu; Ling, Tian-You; Lu, Tong; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jingchao; Claycomb, William C; Shen, Win-Kuang; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2015-03-13

    The small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels have recently been found to be expressed in the heart, and genome-wide association studies have shown that they are implicated in atrial fibrillation. Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor of atrial fibrillation, but the ionic mechanism underlying this relationship remains unclear. We hypothesized that SK channel function is abnormal in diabetes mellitus, leading to altered cardiac electrophysiology. We found that in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, the expression of SK2 and SK3 isoforms was down-regulated by 85 and 92%, respectively, whereas that of SK1 was not changed. SK currents from isolated diabetic mouse atrial myocytes were significantly reduced compared with controls. The resting potentials of isolated atrial preparations were similar between control and diabetic mice, but action potential durations were significantly prolonged in the diabetic atria. Exposure to apamin significantly prolonged action potential durations in control but not in diabetic atria. Production of reactive oxygen species was significantly increased in diabetic atria and in high glucose-cultured HL-1 cells, whereas exposure of HL-1 cells in normal glucose culture to H2O2 reduced the expression of SK2 and SK3. Tyrosine nitration in SK2 and SK3 was significantly increased by high glucose culture, leading to accelerated channel turnover. Treatment with Tiron prevented these changes. Our results suggest that increased oxidative stress in diabetes results in SK channel-associated electrical remodeling in diabetic atria and may promote arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25605734

  12. Masses for Galactic Beat Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.; Morgan, Siobahn M.; Böhm-Vitense, Erika

    2000-08-01

    Accurate mass determinations for Cepheids may be used to determine the degree of excess mixing in the interiors of their main-sequence progenitors: the larger the excess mixing, the larger the luminosity of the Cepheid of a given mass, or the smaller the mass of a Cepheid with given luminosity. Dynamical masses determined recently for a few Cepheid binaries indicate excess mixing somewhat stronger than that corresponding to the convective overshoot models by Schaller et al. Beat Cepheids can be used similarly to test main-sequence mixing in stellar interiors. The period ratios for beat Cepheids depend on luminosity, Teff, heavy element abundance, and mass. By comparing pulsational models and the observationally derived luminosity, Teff, metallicities, and period ratios it is possible to obtain masses for these stars, the so-called beat masses. With the old opacities masses much smaller than the evolutionary masses were obtained. With the new OPAL opacities a beat mass close to the dynamical mass was obtained for the binary beat Cepheid Y Carinae, showing that it is now possible to obtain reliable beat masses. In this paper, we determine beat masses for seven Galactic beat Cepheids for which photometric and spectroscopic data are available. We find an average mass around 4.2+/-0.3 Msolar for these stars, though the actual error limits for each star may be larger mainly because of uncertainties in E(B-V) and the heavy element abundances. (As derived spectroscopically, beat Cepheids are in general metal-poor, with -0.4<~[Fe/H]<~0.0). The relation between the derived beat masses and the luminosities again indicates excess mixing that is somewhat larger than that corresponding to the models by Schaller et al.

  13. Beat to beat variability in cardiovascular variables: noise or music?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, M. L.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Smith, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Cardiovascular variables such as heart rate, arterial blood pressure, stroke volume and the shape of electrocardiographic complexes all fluctuate on a beat to beat basis. These fluctuations have traditionally been ignored or, at best, treated as noise to be averaged out. The variability in cardiovascular signals reflects the homeodynamic interplay between perturbations to cardiovascular function and the dynamic response of the cardiovascular regulatory systems. Modern signal processing techniques provide a means of analyzing beat to beat fluctuations in cardiovascular signals, so as to permit a quantitative, noninvasive or minimally invasive method of assessing closed loop hemodynamic regulation and cardiac electrical stability. This method promises to provide a new approach to the clinical diagnosis and management of alterations in cardiovascular regulation and stability.

  14. Detection of heart beats in multimodal data: a robust beat-to-beat interval estimation approach.

    PubMed

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    The heart rate and its variability play a vital role in the continuous monitoring of patients, especially in the critical care unit. They are commonly derived automatically from the electrocardiogram as the interval between consecutive heart beat. While their identification by QRS-complexes is straightforward under ideal conditions, the exact localization can be a challenging task if the signal is severely contaminated with noise and artifacts. At the same time, other signals directly related to cardiac activity are often available. In this multi-sensor scenario, methods of multimodal sensor-fusion allow the exploitation of redundancies to increase the accuracy and robustness of beat detection.In this paper, an algorithm for the robust detection of heart beats in multimodal data is presented. Classic peak-detection is augmented by robust multi-channel, multimodal interval estimation to eliminate false detections and insert missing beats. This approach yielded a score of 90.70 and was thus ranked third place in the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Muthmodal Data follow-up analysis.In the future, the robust beat-to-beat interval estimator may directly be used for the automated processing of multimodal patient data for applications such as diagnosis support and intelligent alarming.

  15. Using music structure to improve beat tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    2005-09-01

    Beats are an important feature of most music. Beats are used in music information retrieval systems for genre classification, similarity search, and segmentation. However, beats can be difficult to identify, especially in music audio. Traditional beat trackers attempt to (1) match predicted beats to observations of likely beats, and (2) maintain a fairly steady tempo. A third criterion can be added: when repetitions of musical passages occur, the beats in the first repetition should align with the beats in all other repetitions. This third criterion improves beat tracking performance significantly. Repetitions of musical passages are discovered in audio data by searching for similar sequences of chroma vectors. Beats are ``tracked'' by first locating a sequence of likely beats in the music audio using high frequency energy as an indicator of beat likelihood. This beat sequence is then extended by searching forward and backward for more matching beats, allowing slight variations in tempo, and using a relaxation algorithm to optimize the proposed beat locations with respect to the three criteria. Other high-level music features may offer further improvements in beat identification.

  16. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa de Barros, Bruno; Weber dos Santos, Rodrigo; Lobosco, Marcelo; Alonso, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action potential propagation. Next, an equivalent discrete model is implemented, which permits a faster integration of the equations. This discrete model is a simplified version of the microscopic model that maintains the distribution of connections between cells. Both models produce similar results when describing action potential propagation in homogeneous tissue; however, they slightly differ in the generation of ectopic beats in heterogeneous tissue. Nevertheless, both models present the generation of reentry inside fibrotic tissues. This kind of reentry restricted to microfibrosis regions can result in the formation of ectopic pacemakers, that is, regions that will generate a series of ectopic stimulus at a fast pacing rate. In turn, such activity has been related to trigger fibrillation in the atria and in the ventricles in clinical and animal studies. PMID:26583127

  17. Diabetes Alters the Expression and Translocation of the Insulin-Sensitive Glucose Transporters 4 and 8 in the Atria.

    PubMed

    Maria, Zahra; Campolo, Allison R; Lacombe, Veronique A

    2015-01-01

    Although diabetes has been identified as a major risk factor for atrial fibrillation, little is known about glucose metabolism in the healthy and diabetic atria. Glucose transport into the cell, the rate-limiting step of glucose utilization, is regulated by the Glucose Transporters (GLUTs). Although GLUT4 is the major isoform in the heart, GLUT8 has recently emerged as a novel cardiac isoform. We hypothesized that GLUT-4 and -8 translocation to the atrial cell surface will be regulated by insulin and impaired during insulin-dependent diabetes. GLUT protein content was measured by Western blotting in healthy cardiac myocytes and type 1 (streptozotocin-induced, T1Dx) diabetic rodents. Active cell surface GLUT content was measured using a biotinylated photolabeled assay in the perfused heart. In the healthy atria, insulin stimulation increased both GLUT-4 and -8 translocation to the cell surface (by 100% and 240%, respectively, P<0.05). Upon insulin stimulation, we reported an increase in Akt (Th308 and s473 sites) and AS160 phosphorylation, which was positively (P<0.05) correlated with GLUT4 protein content in the healthy atria. During diabetes, active cell surface GLUT-4 and -8 content was downregulated in the atria (by 70% and 90%, respectively, P<0.05). Akt and AS160 phosphorylation was not impaired in the diabetic atria, suggesting the presence of an intact insulin signaling pathway. This was confirmed by the rescued translocation of GLUT-4 and -8 to the atrial cell surface upon insulin stimulation in the atria of type 1 diabetic subjects. In conclusion, our data suggest that: 1) both GLUT-4 and -8 are insulin-sensitive in the healthy atria through an Akt/AS160 dependent pathway; 2) GLUT-4 and -8 trafficking is impaired in the diabetic atria and rescued by insulin treatment. Alterations in atrial glucose transport may induce perturbations in energy production, which may provide a metabolic substrate for atrial fibrillation during diabetes.

  18. Effects of endothelin-1 chronic stimulation on electrical restitution, beat-to-beat variability of repolarization, and ventricular arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Qin, Mu; Shi, Shao Bo; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Teng; Huang, Cong-Xin

    2013-12-01

    Chronically elevated levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1) have been detected in several cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the chronic effects of ET-1 on the electrophysiological characteristics expected to influence the genesis and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmia (VA). Rabbits were randomized to ET-1 (ET-1 group) or 0.9% saline (control group) for 2 weeks. The S1-S2 protocol and S1-S1 dynamic pacing were performed to assess the action potential duration restitution (APDR) and to induce APD alternans or VA in 4 sites of Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. The beat-to-beat variability of repolarization was quantified as short-term variability and long-term variability. Compared with the control group, chronic ET-1 administration significantly prolonged QT intervals, APD at 90% repolarization (APD₉₀), and effective refractory period (ERP), steepened the maximum slopes of the APDR curve, decreased the ERP/APD₉₀ ratio, and increased the spatial dispersions of APD₉₀, ERP, and maximum slopes (P < 0.05 for all). Moreover, chronic ET-1 administration markedly increased the short-term variability and long-term variability (P < 0.01 for all). APD alternans occurred in both groups, but the threshold of APD alternans was decreased at all sites in the ET-1 group (P < 0.01 for all). We also observed that chronic ET-1 stimulation significantly increased the incidence and duration of the VA episodes. These results suggest that chronic stimulation with ET-1 facilitated VA by steepening the APDR curve and increasing the spatial dispersion of APDR and beat-to-beat variability of repolarization.

  19. Thermally-induced ventilation in atria: an atrium classification scheme and promising test sites

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, S.K.; Kazama, D.B.; Pierson, R.E.; Trenschel, D.A.; Young, M.F.

    1981-10-15

    This report is an element of an overall investigation into thermally-induced ventilation in atria. The principal area of interest is thermally-induced cooling in commercial use buildings. However, heating and heat transfer plus non-commercial applications will be considered as well. The specific topics of this report are: (1) the development and presentation of an atrium classification scheme; and (2) the identification of promising test sites. In establishing the atrium classification scheme, specific attention was given to: climate - hot-arid, warm-humid, and temperate; atrium configuration - open, closed, and adjustable tops; and thermal mechanism - natural convection, radiative cooling, shading, and others. Application of the resulting three-dimensional (three-coordinate) matrix was considered and tested. Although the testing was for purposes of checking scheme application, the procedure indicated that most of the atria examined were of the adjustable-top configuration with daynical considerations: cooling design concepts, thermal alternatives are assessed.

  20. Percutaneous intracardiac beating-heart surgery using metal MEMS tissue approximation tools.

    PubMed

    Gosline, Andrew H; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Butler, Evan J; Folk, Chris; Cohen, Adam; Chen, Rich; Lang, Nora; Del Nido, Pedro J; Dupont, Pierre E

    2012-08-01

    Achieving superior outcomes through the use of robots in medical applications requires an integrated approach to the design of the robot, tooling and the procedure itself. In this paper, this approach is applied to develop a robotic technique for closing abnormal communication between the atria of the heart. The goal is to achieve the efficacy of surgical closure as performed on a stopped, open heart with the reduced risk and trauma of a beating-heart catheter-based procedure. In the proposed approach, a concentric tube robot is used to percutaneously access the right atrium and deploy a tissue approximation device. The device is constructed using a metal microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabrication process and is designed to both fit the manipulation capabilities of the robot as well as to reproduce the beneficial features of surgical closure by suture. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated through ex vivo and in vivo experiments.

  1. Percutaneous intracardiac beating-heart surgery using metal MEMS tissue approximation tools

    PubMed Central

    Gosline, Andrew H; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Butler, Evan J; Folk, Chris; Cohen, Adam; Chen, Rich; Lang, Nora; del Nido, Pedro J; Dupont, Pierre E

    2013-01-01

    Achieving superior outcomes through the use of robots in medical applications requires an integrated approach to the design of the robot, tooling and the procedure itself. In this paper, this approach is applied to develop a robotic technique for closing abnormal communication between the atria of the heart. The goal is to achieve the efficacy of surgical closure as performed on a stopped, open heart with the reduced risk and trauma of a beating-heart catheter-based procedure. In the proposed approach, a concentric tube robot is used to percutaneously access the right atrium and deploy a tissue approximation device. The device is constructed using a metal microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabrication process and is designed to both fit the manipulation capabilities of the robot as well as to reproduce the beneficial features of surgical closure by suture. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated through ex vivo and in vivo experiments. PMID:23750066

  2. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  3. Aging-associated changes in L-type calcium channels in the left atria of dogs

    PubMed Central

    GAN, TIAN-YI; QIAO, WEIWEI; XU, GUO-JUN; ZHOU, XIAN-HUI; TANG, BAO-PENG; SONG, JIAN-GUO; LI, YAO-DONG; ZHANG, JIAN; LI, FA-PENG; MAO, TING; JIANG, TAO

    2013-01-01

    Action potential (AP) contours vary considerably between the fibers of normal adult and aged left atria. The underlying ionic and molecular mechanisms that mediate these differences remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the L-type calcium current (ICa.L) and the L-type Ca2+ channel of the left atria may be altered with age to contribute to atrial fibrillation (AF). Two groups of mongrel dogs (normal adults, 2–2.5 years old and older dogs, >8 years old) were used in this study. The inducibility of AF was quantitated using the cumulative window of vulnerability (WOV). A whole-cell patch-clamp was used to record APs and ICa.L in left atrial (LA) cells obtained from the two groups of dogs. Protein and mRNA expression levels of the a1C (Cav1.2) subunit of the L-type calcium channel were assessed using western blotting and quantitative PCR (qPCR), respectively. Although the resting potential, AP amplitude and did not differ with age, the plateau potential was more negative and the APD90 was longer in the aged cells compared with that in normal adult cells. Aged LA cells exhibited lower peak ICa.L current densities than normal adult LA cells (P<0.05). In addition, the Cav1.2 mRNA and protein expression levels in LA cells were decreased in the aged group compared with those in the normal adult group. The lower AP plateau potential and the decreased ICa.L of LA cells in aged dogs may contribute to the slow and discontinuous conduction of the left atria. Furthermore, the reduction of the expression levels of Cav1.2 with age may be the molecular mechanism that mediates the decline in ICa.L with increasing age. PMID:24137290

  4. A framework for personalization of computational models of the human atria.

    PubMed

    Dössel, Olaf; Krueger, Martin W; Weber, Frank M; Schilling, Christopher; Schulze, Walther H W; Seemann, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    A framework for step-by-step personalization of a computational model of human atria is presented. Beginning with anatomical modeling based on CT or MRI data, next fiber structure is superimposed using a rule-based method. If available, late-enhancement-MRI images can be considered in order to mark fibrotic tissue. A first estimate of individual electrophysiology is gained from BSPM data solving the inverse problem of ECG. A final adjustment of electrophysiology is realized using intracardiac measurements. The framework is applied using several patient data. First clinical application will be computer assisted planning of RF-ablation for treatment of atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation. PMID:22255296

  5. Realtime Multichannel System for Beat to Beat QT Interval Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starc, Vito; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) shows clinical promise for identifying several types of cardiac pathology. However, until now, there has been no device capable of displaying, in real time on a beattobeat basis, changes in QTV in all 12 conventional leads in a continuously monitored patient. While several software programs have been designed to analyze QTV, heretofore, such programs have all involved only a few channels (at most) and/or have required laborious user interaction or offline calculations and postprocessing, limiting their clinical utility. This paper describes a PC-based ECG software program that in real time, acquires, analyzes and displays QTV and also PQ interval variability (PQV) in each of the eight independent channels that constitute the 12lead conventional ECG. The system also processes certain related signals that are derived from singular value decomposition and that help to reduce the overall effects of noise on the realtime QTV and PQV results.

  6. Rhythmicity, Recurrence, and Recovery of Flagellar Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty Y.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-12-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the alga C. reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating.

  7. Rhythmicity, recurrence, and recovery of flagellar beating.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kirsty Y; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-12-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the alga C. reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating.

  8. Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2002-04-01

    Among all the advanced accelerator concepts that use lasers as the power source, most of the effort to date has been with the idea of using a laser pulse to excite a accelerating mode in a plasma. Within this area, there are a variety of approaches for creating the accelerating mode, as indicated by the other talks in this session. What is common to these approaches is the physics of how a laser pulse pushes on plasma electrons to organize electron-density perturbations, the sources of the ultra-high (> GeV/M) accelerating gradients. It is the "ponderomotive force", proportional to the local gradient of the of the laser intensity, that pushes plasma electrons forward (on the leading edge of the pulse) and backwards (on the trailing edge) which leads to harmonic motion of the electrons. As the laser pulse moves through the plasma at group velocity Vg c, the oscillating electrons show up macroscopically as a plasma mode or wave with frequency w equal to the plasma frequency and k = w/Vg. For short laser pulses, this is the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) concept. Closely related is the Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration (PBWA) concept. Here, the laser pulse that perturbs the plasma is composed of two closely-spaced frequencies that "beat", i.e., periodically constructively and destructively interfere, forming an electromagnetic beat wave. One can visualize this as a train of short pulses. If this beating frequency is set to the plasma frequency, then each pulse in the train will reinforce the density perturbation caused by the previous pulse. The principal advantage of multiple pulses driving up the plasma wave as opposed to a single pulse is in efficiency, allowing for the production of relatively large diameter (more 1-D like) accelerating modes. In this talk I will discuss past, current and planned PBWA experiments which are taking place at UCLA, RAL in England, and LULI in France.

  9. Beating phantasies: Mourned and unmourned.

    PubMed

    Antinucci, Giuseppina

    2016-06-01

    This paper intends to explore the organizing function and fate of sado-masochistic phantasies in their fixed form, in the psychic life of patients who have suffered early traumas, due to environmental vicissitudes and maternal psychopathology. The theoretical starting point is provided by the Novicks' research into transitory and permanent beating phantasies in adult and child patients, their onset and their psychic function, based on an examination of Freud's paper 'A child is being beaten'. In this text Freud achieves an unprecedented syncretism, locating the phantasy at the intersection between the oedipal complex, which is a vertical structure organizing sexual and generational differences, and the fraternal dimension, which is horizontal and organizes the lateral relationship with that similar but different other who is the sibling. Reporting in some detail material from the analyses of two young women, whose clinical presentation and early traumas show some similarities, the author puts in the context of the analytic work the emerging of the sado-masochistic phantasies, emphasizing their use and function in the transference-countertransference interplay. The beating phantasies shore up a precarious sense of self, threatened with psychic depletion and death, in identification with the absent mother of early infancy. An overly close relationship with a sibling, experienced as a narcissistic double, compounds the clinical picture, to establish the triangle formed by the parent(s) and two children which features in the beating phantasy. Finally, the author explores the contribution of ameliorating factors, such as alternative identificatory figures, constitutional endowment and capacity for sublimation, to account for the different fate of the fixed beating phantasies. PMID:26602362

  10. Losing the beat: deficits in temporal coordination

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Caroline; Lidji, Pascale; Peretz, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Tapping or clapping to an auditory beat, an easy task for most individuals, reveals precise temporal synchronization with auditory patterns such as music, even in the presence of temporal fluctuations. Most models of beat-tracking rely on the theoretical concept of pulse: a perceived regular beat generated by an internal oscillation that forms the foundation of entrainment abilities. Although tapping to the beat is a natural sensorimotor activity for most individuals, not everyone can track an auditory beat. Recently, the case of Mathieu was documented (Phillips-Silver et al. 2011 Neuropsychologia 49, 961–969. (doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2011.02.002)). Mathieu presented himself as having difficulty following a beat and exhibited synchronization failures. We examined beat-tracking in normal control participants, Mathieu, and a second beat-deaf individual, who tapped with an auditory metronome in which unpredictable perturbations were introduced to disrupt entrainment. Both beat-deaf cases exhibited failures in error correction in response to the perturbation task while exhibiting normal spontaneous motor tempi (in the absence of an auditory stimulus), supporting a deficit specific to perception–action coupling. A damped harmonic oscillator model was applied to the temporal adaptation responses; the model's parameters of relaxation time and endogenous frequency accounted for differences between the beat-deaf cases as well as the control group individuals. PMID:25385783

  11. Losing the beat: deficits in temporal coordination.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Caroline; Lidji, Pascale; Peretz, Isabelle

    2014-12-19

    Tapping or clapping to an auditory beat, an easy task for most individuals, reveals precise temporal synchronization with auditory patterns such as music, even in the presence of temporal fluctuations. Most models of beat-tracking rely on the theoretical concept of pulse: a perceived regular beat generated by an internal oscillation that forms the foundation of entrainment abilities. Although tapping to the beat is a natural sensorimotor activity for most individuals, not everyone can track an auditory beat. Recently, the case of Mathieu was documented (Phillips-Silver et al. 2011 Neuropsychologia 49, 961-969. (doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2011.02.002)). Mathieu presented himself as having difficulty following a beat and exhibited synchronization failures. We examined beat-tracking in normal control participants, Mathieu, and a second beat-deaf individual, who tapped with an auditory metronome in which unpredictable perturbations were introduced to disrupt entrainment. Both beat-deaf cases exhibited failures in error correction in response to the perturbation task while exhibiting normal spontaneous motor tempi (in the absence of an auditory stimulus), supporting a deficit specific to perception-action coupling. A damped harmonic oscillator model was applied to the temporal adaptation responses; the model's parameters of relaxation time and endogenous frequency accounted for differences between the beat-deaf cases as well as the control group individuals. PMID:25385783

  12. Bondage fantasies and beating fantasies.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J

    1998-10-01

    Two male patients had masochistic sexual fantasies: one had bondage fantasies, the other beating fantasies. Each patient had been traumatized in childhood by his experiences with a martyr mother. Each had developed the belief that in an intimate sexual relationship with a woman he would hurt her. As a consequence, each tended to suppress his sexuality. Each used masochistic fantasies to reassure himself that he was not hurting his fantasied or real partner. The reassurance made it safe to experience his sexual feelings. The two patients' use of their masochistic fantasies is compared to the fetishist's use of his fetish, as described by Freud. PMID:9820894

  13. Adaptive Heartbeat Modeling for Beat-to-Beat Heart Rate Measurement in Ballistocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Paalasmaa, Joonas; Toivonen, Hannu; Partinen, Markku

    2015-11-01

    We present a method for measuring beat-to-beat heart rate from ballistocardiograms acquired with force sensors. First, a model for the heartbeat shape is adaptively inferred from the signal using hierarchical clustering. Then, beat-to-beat intervals are detected by finding positions where the heartbeat shape best fits the signal. The method was validated with overnight recordings from 46 subjects in varying setups (sleep clinic, home, single bed, double bed, two sensor types). The mean beat-to-beat interval error was 13 ms and on an average 54% of the beat-to-beat intervals were detected. The method is part of a home-use e-health system for an unobtrusive sleep measurement.

  14. Experimental plan for the investigation of thermally-induced ventilation in atria

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, S.K.; Young, M.F.; Pierson, R.E.

    1981-09-09

    A detailed and logical work plan is outlined for determining if current atrium designs are capable, and to what extent, of thermally inducing ventilation in atria. This passive cooling technique could displace costly refrigerated cooling, ventilation fan energy, and auxiliary space heating. The principal area of interest is for thermally-induced ventilation cooling in commercial and multi-residential buildings. The present work proposes ten test sites for detailed experimental investigation. Six test sites are recommended for detailed quantitative measurements while four are recommended for qualitative examination. These test sites include several atrium designs and span several US climate zones. Measurements planned include: (1) ambient conditions of wind, temperature, humidity and solar radiation; (2) atrium conditions of air flow rates, heat transfer rates, temperature, humidity, internal heat generation, infiltration and HVAC status. A detailed cost plan and test schedule are presented in this work. An optional costing procedure is presented which lists anticipated cost per site rather than a total project cost.

  15. The influence of epidural anesthesia on the electrical activity of heart atria

    PubMed Central

    Owczuk, Radoslaw; Wujtewicz, Magdalena A.; Wojciechowski, Jacek; Marjanski, Tomasz; Marciniak, Andrzej; Wujtewicz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction High thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) causes blockade of sympathetic fibers involved in innervation of the heart (segments T1-T4), which results in changes of cardiac electrophysiology. The anti-arrhythmic effects of TEA on supraventricular arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation, are controversial. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to assess the influence of epidural anesthesia on the electrical function of heart atria, including proven markers of increased risk of perioperative atrial fibrillation, such as P wave dispersion and P wave maximum duration. Material and methods The study involved 50 male patients, without a history of previous heart diseases, scheduled for elective surgical procedures. Patients received thoracic epidural anesthesia (group T, n = 25) or lumbar epidural anesthesia (group L, n = 25). The measurements were obtained from a continuous recording of ECG before epidural anesthesia and after the detection of blockade (T1 or T8 segment sensory block in groups T and L, respectively). Results The statistical analysis of electrocardiographic parameters, including the maximum, minimum and mean P wave duration; P wave dispersion; the maximum, minimum and mean PR interval duration; and PR interval dispersion, did not show any inter- or intragroup differences at selected time points. Conclusions Regardless of its location, epidural anesthesia and sympathetic blockade associated with this procedure do not significantly affect the electrical functions of the cardiac atria reflected in superficial ECG, including the electrocardiographic parameters that are considered to be markers of increased risk of perioperative atrial fibrillation, such as P wave dispersion and its maximum duration. PMID:26336414

  16. The Simplest Demonstration on Acoustic Beats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Alessio; Ganci, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The classical demonstration experiment on acoustic beats using two signal generators and a dual trace oscilloscope is an important ingredient in teaching the subject. This short laboratory note aims to point out what may be the simplest demonstrative experiment on acoustic beats to carry out in a classroom without employing any lab apparatus.

  17. Rhythmicity, recurrence, and recovery of flagellar beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating. Financial support is acknowledged from the EPSRC, ERC Advanced Investigator Grant No. 247333, and a Senior Investigator Award from the Wellcome Trust.

  18. Elastic interactions synchronize beating in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ohad; Safran, Samuel A

    2016-07-13

    Motivated by recent experimental results, we study theoretically the synchronization of the beating phase and frequency of two nearby cardiomyocyte cells. Each cell is represented as an oscillating force dipole in an infinite, viscoelastic medium and the propagation of the elastic signal within the medium is predicted. We examine the steady-state beating of two nearby cells, and show that elastic interactions result in forces that synchronize the phase and frequency of beating in a manner that depends on their mutual orientation. The theory predicts both in-phase and anti-phase steady-state beating depending on the relative cell orientations, as well as how synchronized beating varies with substrate elasticity and the inter-cell distance. These results suggest how mechanics plays a role in cardiac efficiency, and may be relevant for the design of cardiomyocyte based micro devices and other biomedical applications.

  19. Elastic interactions synchronize beating in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ohad; Safran, Samuel A

    2016-07-13

    Motivated by recent experimental results, we study theoretically the synchronization of the beating phase and frequency of two nearby cardiomyocyte cells. Each cell is represented as an oscillating force dipole in an infinite, viscoelastic medium and the propagation of the elastic signal within the medium is predicted. We examine the steady-state beating of two nearby cells, and show that elastic interactions result in forces that synchronize the phase and frequency of beating in a manner that depends on their mutual orientation. The theory predicts both in-phase and anti-phase steady-state beating depending on the relative cell orientations, as well as how synchronized beating varies with substrate elasticity and the inter-cell distance. These results suggest how mechanics plays a role in cardiac efficiency, and may be relevant for the design of cardiomyocyte based micro devices and other biomedical applications. PMID:27352146

  20. Position of the apex beat in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Antia, A U; Maxwell, S R; Gough, A; Ayeni, O

    1978-01-01

    The position of the apex beat in relation to the midclavicular and nipples lines and the intercostal spaces was studied in 353 healthy Jamaican children from birth to 10 years. The traditional use of the midclavicular line as a reference point in relation to the apex beat is not an accurate index of normal heart size at all ages. For this purpose actual measurement of the apex beat, which ranges between 2.8 and and 5.4 cm from the midline, should be made. However, for a rough estimate of normal cardiac size the midclavicular line may be used. In contrast, the nipple line lies outside the apex beat at all ages; it should not be used in the clinical evaluation of normal cardiac size. From birth to age 3 years the apex beat is located in the 4th intercostal space and with increasing age gradually moves into the 5th space in most children. PMID:686796

  1. Collective beating of artificial microcilia.

    PubMed

    Coq, Naïs; Bricard, Antoine; Delapierre, Francois-Damien; Malaquin, Laurent; du Roure, Olivia; Fermigier, Marc; Bartolo, Denis

    2011-07-01

    We combine technical, experimental, and theoretical efforts to investigate the collective dynamics of artificial microcilia in a viscous fluid. We take advantage of soft lithography and colloidal self-assembly to devise microcarpets made of hundreds of slender magnetic rods. This novel experimental setup is used to investigate the dynamics of extended cilia arrays driven by a precessing magnetic field. Whereas the dynamics of an isolated cilium is a rigid body rotation, collective beating results in a symmetry breaking of the precession patterns. The trajectories of the cilia are anisotropic and experience a significant structural evolution as the actuation frequency increases. We present a minimal model to account for our experimental findings and demonstrate how the global geometry of the array imposes the shape of the trajectories via long-range hydrodynamic interactions. PMID:21797546

  2. The action of creatinol 0-phosphate on the inotropic effect of isoprenaline in isolated rat atria and in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Godfraind, T; Ghysel-Burton, J; Merlo, L

    1979-01-01

    The action of N-methyl-N-(beta-hydroxyethyl) guanidine O-phosphate (creatinol O-phosphate) was studied on the contractility of the heart, in vitro on isolated rat atria and in vivo in anesthetized dogs. Creatinol O-phosphate was without action on the contractility of isolated rat atria stimulated by isoprenaline 10(-8) mol/l which produced the maximum inotropic effect. Creatinol O-phosphate increased the contractility evoked by isoprenaline 10(-5) mol/l and impaired the development of the negative inotropic effect evoked by prolonged treatment with this large dose. In dogs, creatinol O-phosphate pretreatment increased the positive inotropic effect of large but not low isoprenaline dosages. It is concluded that creatinol O-phosphate increased the contractile efficiency of the heart submitted to the action of an excess of catecholamines.

  3. Effects of Anatomical Structure on Initiation and Maintenance of Atrial Fibrillation in a Computer Model of Human Atria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Fenton, Flavio H.; Hastings, Harold M.; Evans, Steven J.

    2002-03-01

    We analyze the behavior of atrial fibrillation in a simulated model of human atria in order to better understand the role of the intricate atrial structure in arrhythmia initiation and maintenance. A cellular ionic model based on human atrial action potentials is used, with parameter values that reproduce the electrophysiology of both healthy and diseased atrial cells. We illustrate how the interatrial (right-left) connections and other anatomical structures function during sinus rhythm and during arrhythmias. In particular, we show the effects of wavelength and atrial size on the dynamics and stability of reentrant waves using healthy and diseased electrophysiological parameters. Our findings indicate that structural remodeling characteristic of diseased atria is an important destabilizing factor for reentrant waves in this complex geometry, as observed clinically.

  4. Positional Relationship Between the Pulmonary Venous Confluence-Vertical Vein and Atria in Infracardiac Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yongxuan; Ge, Yang; Zhang, Haibo; Liu, Jinfen; Hong, Haifa; Lu, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    To explore the positional relationship between the pulmonary venous confluence-venous vein (PVC-VV) and both the atria in infracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (iTAPVC), using two-dimensional (2D) computerized tomography (CT) reconstruction. Through the 2D reconstruction of enhanced cardiac CT images of patients with iTAPVC, the projection of PVC-VV on coronal axial images was acquired and its location on the bilateral atrial splice was analyzed. Sagittal axial reconstruction was used to identify which atrium had a precise anterior-posterior positional relationship with PVC-VV. The type of iTAPVC, where the projection of PVC-VV was lying on the left atrium, and the left atrium had a precise anterior-posterior positional relationship with PVC-VV, was classified as the left atrial type. If the projection of PVC-VV was lying on the right atrium and the right atrium had a precise anterior-posterior positional relationship with PVC-VV, it was classified as the right atrial type. Finally, if the projection of PVC-VV was lying in the middle of the bilateral atria, and both the atria had precise anterior-posterior positional relationship with PVC-VV, it was referred to as the bilateral atrial type. Upon analysis of the 22 enhanced cardiac CT images, 6 were the left atrial type (27.27 %), 9 were right atrial type (40.91 %), while 7 were of the bilateral atrial type (31.82 %). The positional relationship between PVC-VV and the bilateral atria are variable, and iTAPVC classification using 2D CT reconstruction is an invaluable tool in designing the surgical approaches in iTAPVC.

  5. Analyzing the acoustic beat with mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-04-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency Δf. The resulting auditory sensation is a tone with a volume that varies periodically. Acoustic beats can be perceived repeatedly in day-to-day life and have some interesting applications. For example, string instruments are still tuned with the help of an acoustic beat, even with modern technology. If a reference tone (e.g., 440 Hz) and, for example, a slightly out-of-tune violin string produce a tone simultaneously, a beat can be perceived. The more similar the frequencies, the longer the duration of the beat. In the extreme case, when the frequencies are identical, a beat no longer arises. The string is therefore correctly tuned. Using the Oscilloscope app,4 it is possible to capture and save acoustic signals of this kind and determine the beat frequency fS of the signal, which represents the difference in frequency Δf of the two overlapping tones (for Android smartphones, the app OsciPrime Oscilloscope can be used).

  6. Beat-by-beat validation of ECG gating

    SciTech Connect

    Bacharach, S.L.; Green, M.V.; Borer, J.S.; Ostrow, H.G.; Bonow, R.O.; Farkas, S.P.; Johnston, G.S.

    1980-04-01

    Ejection fraction, normalized peak ejection and filling rates, and the time of occurrence of these events relative to the R-wave were determined in each of 512 consecutive individual cardiac cycles in each of 30 patients using an ultra-high-efficiency nonimaging detector system. For a given patient the 512 measurements of each quantity were averaged and compared with the value of this same quantity as determined from an R-wave-gated left-ventricular (LV) time-activity curve (TAC) derived from the same 512 cycles. We conclude (a) that a small but detectable systematic underestimate occurs in some LV function parameters when they are derived from gated LV TACs; (b) that the magnitude of this underestimate is smaller and less variable for systolic than for diastolic measurements; (c) that the magnitude of the underestimate is not greater than 20% in any single patient for diastolic parameters, nor greater than 8% in any individual patient for systolic parameters, and is substantially less for most patients; and (d) that a small subset of patients may require beat-length windowing if the gated values of diastolic parameters are to fall within these limits. Thus LV function measurements obtained from gated TACs adequately reflect the true average of such values during the measurement interval.

  7. Influence of calcitonin gene-related peptide release on pH-induced mechanical depression in rat atria.

    PubMed

    Alvis, A G; Milesi, V; Rebolledo, A; Raingo, J; Grassi de Gende, A O

    2001-07-01

    Rat atria is richly innervated by sensory nerve fibers that release CGRP when stimulated either by capsaicin or acid pH. We studied the physiological relevance of acid pH-induced CGRP release on changes in atrial contractility and relaxation produced by lowering the pH. Isolated atria electrically paced at 2.77 Hz were exposed to a 10-minute period of metabolic acidosis (pH=6.73+/-0.01, n=28) after: 1) CGRP release induced by capsaicin 0.5 microM; 2) blockage of CGRP release with ruthenium red (RR) 5 microM; 3) no pretreatment; and 4) CGRP receptor blockage with CGRP(8-37) 1 microM. Contractility and relaxation were significantly less depressed by acid pH when CGRP release was prevented by RR or CGRP receptor activation was blocked by CGRP(8-37). The results suggest that CGRP release and the activation of CGRP receptors may be physiologically involved in contributing to the depression of contractility and relaxation induced by acid pH in rat atria. PMID:11693286

  8. Electrical Brain Responses to Beat Irregularities in Two Cases of Beat Deafness.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Brian; Lidji, Pascale; Honing, Henkjan; Palmer, Caroline; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Beat deafness, a recently documented form of congenital amusia, provides a unique window into functional specialization of neural circuitry for the processing of musical stimuli: Beat-deaf individuals exhibit deficits that are specific to the detection of a regular beat in music and the ability to move along with a beat. Studies on the neural underpinnings of beat processing in the general population suggest that the auditory system is capable of pre-attentively generating a predictive model of upcoming sounds in a rhythmic pattern, subserved largely within auditory cortex and reflected in mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3 event-related potential (ERP) components. The current study examined these neural correlates of beat perception in two beat-deaf individuals, Mathieu and Marjorie, and a group of control participants under conditions in which auditory stimuli were either attended or ignored. Compared to control participants, Mathieu demonstrated reduced behavioral sensitivity to beat omissions in metrical patterns, and Marjorie showed a bias to identify irregular patterns as regular. ERP responses to beat omissions reveal an intact pre-attentive system for processing beat irregularities in cases of beat deafness, reflected in the MMN component, and provide partial support for abnormalities in later cognitive stages of beat processing, reflected in an unreliable P3b component exhibited by Mathieu-but not Marjorie-compared to control participants. P3 abnormalities observed in the current study resemble P3 abnormalities exhibited by individuals with pitch-based amusia, and are consistent with attention or auditory-motor coupling accounts of deficits in beat perception.

  9. Electrical Brain Responses to Beat Irregularities in Two Cases of Beat Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Brian; Lidji, Pascale; Honing, Henkjan; Palmer, Caroline; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Beat deafness, a recently documented form of congenital amusia, provides a unique window into functional specialization of neural circuitry for the processing of musical stimuli: Beat-deaf individuals exhibit deficits that are specific to the detection of a regular beat in music and the ability to move along with a beat. Studies on the neural underpinnings of beat processing in the general population suggest that the auditory system is capable of pre-attentively generating a predictive model of upcoming sounds in a rhythmic pattern, subserved largely within auditory cortex and reflected in mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3 event-related potential (ERP) components. The current study examined these neural correlates of beat perception in two beat-deaf individuals, Mathieu and Marjorie, and a group of control participants under conditions in which auditory stimuli were either attended or ignored. Compared to control participants, Mathieu demonstrated reduced behavioral sensitivity to beat omissions in metrical patterns, and Marjorie showed a bias to identify irregular patterns as regular. ERP responses to beat omissions reveal an intact pre-attentive system for processing beat irregularities in cases of beat deafness, reflected in the MMN component, and provide partial support for abnormalities in later cognitive stages of beat processing, reflected in an unreliable P3b component exhibited by Mathieu—but not Marjorie—compared to control participants. P3 abnormalities observed in the current study resemble P3 abnormalities exhibited by individuals with pitch-based amusia, and are consistent with attention or auditory-motor coupling accounts of deficits in beat perception. PMID:26941591

  10. Dynamic focusing in the zebrafish beating heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Delgado, L.; Peralta, M.; Mercader, N.; Ripoll, J.

    2016-03-01

    Of the large amount of the animal models available for cardiac research, the zebrafish is extremely valuable due to its transparency during early stages of development. In this work a dual illumination laser sheet microscope with simultaneous dual camera imaging is used to image the beating heart at 200 fps, dynamically and selectively focusing inside the beating heart through the use of a tunable lens. This dual color dynamic focusing enables imaging with cellular resolution at unprecedented high frame rates, allowing 3D imaging of the whole beating heart of embryonic zebrafish.

  11. Myocardial steatosis and necrosis in atria and ventricles of rats given pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw Bowen; Reens, Jaimini; Johnson, Elizabeth; Brocklehurst, Simon; Slater, Ian

    2014-12-01

    Pharmaceutical therapies for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) include plasma glucose lowering by enhancing glucose utilization. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex is important in controlling the balance between glucose and fatty acid substrate oxidation. Administration of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors (PDHKIs) to rats effectively lowers plasma glucose but results in myocardial steatosis that in some instances is associated primarily with atrial and to a lesser degree with ventricular pathology. Induction of myocardial steatosis is not dose-dependent, varies from minimal to moderate severity, and is either of multifocal or diffuse distribution. Ventricular histopathology was restricted to few myocardial degenerative fibers, while that in the atrium/atria was of either acute or chronic appearance with the former showing myocardial degeneration/necrosis, acute myocarditis, edema, endothelial activation (rounding up), endocarditis, and thrombosis associated with moderate myocardial steatosis and the latter with myocardial loss, replacement fibrosis, and no apparent or minimal association with steatosis. The evidence from these evaluations indicate that excessive intramyocardial accumulation of lipid may be either primarily adverse or represents an indicator of other adversely affected cellular processes.

  12. Detailed Anatomical and Electrophysiological Models of Human Atria and Torso for the Simulation of Atrial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Ana; Sebastián, Rafael; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Rodríguez, José F.; Godoy, Eduardo J.; Martínez, Laura; Saiz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias, and specifically atrial fibrillation (AF), induce rapid and irregular activation patterns that appear on the torso surface as abnormal P-waves in electrocardiograms and body surface potential maps (BSPM). In recent years both P-waves and the BSPM have been used to identify the mechanisms underlying AF, such as localizing ectopic foci or high-frequency rotors. However, the relationship between the activation of the different areas of the atria and the characteristics of the BSPM and P-wave signals are still far from being completely understood. In this work we developed a multi-scale framework, which combines a highly-detailed 3D atrial model and a torso model to study the relationship between atrial activation and surface signals in sinus rhythm. Using this multi scale model, it was revealed that the best places for recording P-waves are the frontal upper right and the frontal and rear left quadrants of the torso. Our results also suggest that only nine regions (of the twenty-one structures in which the atrial surface was divided) make a significant contribution to the BSPM and determine the main P-wave characteristics. PMID:26523732

  13. Detailed Anatomical and Electrophysiological Models of Human Atria and Torso for the Simulation of Atrial Activation.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Ana; Sebastián, Rafael; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Rodríguez, José F; Godoy, Eduardo J; Martínez, Laura; Saiz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias, and specifically atrial fibrillation (AF), induce rapid and irregular activation patterns that appear on the torso surface as abnormal P-waves in electrocardiograms and body surface potential maps (BSPM). In recent years both P-waves and the BSPM have been used to identify the mechanisms underlying AF, such as localizing ectopic foci or high-frequency rotors. However, the relationship between the activation of the different areas of the atria and the characteristics of the BSPM and P-wave signals are still far from being completely understood. In this work we developed a multi-scale framework, which combines a highly-detailed 3D atrial model and a torso model to study the relationship between atrial activation and surface signals in sinus rhythm. Using this multi scale model, it was revealed that the best places for recording P-waves are the frontal upper right and the frontal and rear left quadrants of the torso. Our results also suggest that only nine regions (of the twenty-one structures in which the atrial surface was divided) make a significant contribution to the BSPM and determine the main P-wave characteristics.

  14. Influence of age on inducibility and cholinergic modulation of arrhythmia in isolated rat right atria.

    PubMed

    Faria, D M; Viviane, A G; Galvão, K M; Caricati-Neto, A; Godoy, C M G

    2009-03-01

    The effects of carbachol and atropine on the number of trains (NT) and on the train stimulus strength (SS) necessary to induce arrhythmia were studied in isolated right atria of infant, young, adult and mature rats submitted to electric field stimulation (66.7 Hz, 5 ms pulse-duration, 250 pulses). Carbachol (1 microM) decreased NT from four (control) to two in all ages tested. Atropine (1 microM) prevented tachyarrhythmia induction in tissue of all ages, even with NT equal to 12, except for mature rats (typically four trains). The SS decreases from infant to adult age [5- to 2-fold atrial threshold (AT)] and increases in mature animals (5-fold AT). Carbachol changes this result only for mature rats (5- to 2-fold AT). The SS was decreased by carbachol (1 microM) from 5- to 3-fold AT in mature rats, but atropine did not modify SS in this age. These results indicate that inducibility and cholinergic modulation of atrial tachyarrhythmia is influenced by age. PMID:19234768

  15. Analysis of agonist dissociation constants as assessed by functional antagonism in guinea pig left atria

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, P.; Malta, E.

    1986-04-01

    In electrically driven guinea pig left atria, positive inotropic responses to (-)-isoprenaline and the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist RO363 were obtained in the absence and in the presence of the functional antagonists adenosine, carbachol, gallopamil, nifedipine, and Ro 03-7894. Each of the functional antagonists reduced the maximum response to both agonists and produced nonparallel rightward shifts in the cumulative concentration effect curves. For both agonists, dissociation constants (KA) were calculated using the equation described by Furchgott (1966) for irreversible antagonism. For RO363, which is a partial agonist with high agonist activity, the equations outlined for functional interaction by Mackay (1981) were also employed to calculate KA values. The KA values obtained by each method were compared with the dissociation constants (KD) for the two agonists determined from their ability to displace the radioligand (-)-(/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol from beta 1-adrenoceptors in guinea pig left atrial membrane preparations. The estimates of KA varied substantially from KD values. The KD values were taken as more accurate estimates of the true values for the dissociation constants because a high degree of correlation exists between pKD and pD2 values for a number of other beta-adrenoceptor agonists that behave as partial agonists and between pKD and pKB values for a number of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. Thus, it appears that there are serious limitations in the current theory for using functional antagonism as a means of obtaining agonist dissociation constants.

  16. Why does the heart beat? The discovery of the electrical system of the heart.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Mark E; Grove, Daniel; Upshaw, Charles B

    2006-06-13

    Why does the heart beat? This question--known as the myogenic versus neurogenic theory--dominated cardiac research in the 19th century. In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered gelatinous fibers in the ventricular subendocardium that he thought were muscular. Walter Gaskell, in 1886, demonstrated specialized muscle fibers joining the atria and ventricles that caused "block" when cut and found that the sinus venosus was the area of first excitation of the heart. By examining serial embryologic sections, Wilhelm His, Jr, showed that a connective tissue sheet became a bundle connecting the upper and lower cardiac chambers, the bundle of His. Sunao Tawara traced the atrioventricular (AV) bundle of His backward to find a compact node of fibers at the base of the atrial septum and forward where it connected with the bundles of cells discovered by Purkinje in 1839. Tawara concluded that this "AV connecting system" originated in the AV node, penetrated the septum as the His bundle, and then divided into left and right bundle branches that terminated in the Purkinje fibers. Martin Flack and Arthur Keith studied the conduction system of a mole and found a structure in the sinoauricular junction that histologically resembled the AV node. They felt that this was where "the dominating rhythm of the heart normally begins" and named it the sinoauricular node in 1907. The ECG of Einthoven soon brought a new understanding to the complex electrical system that makes the heart beat. In 2006 and 2007, we celebrate the 100th anniversaries of the publication of the exciting discovery of the AV and sinus nodes, truly landmarks in our understanding of cardiac structure and physiology. PMID:16769927

  17. Why does the heart beat? The discovery of the electrical system of the heart.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Mark E; Grove, Daniel; Upshaw, Charles B

    2006-06-13

    Why does the heart beat? This question--known as the myogenic versus neurogenic theory--dominated cardiac research in the 19th century. In 1839, Jan Evangelista Purkinje discovered gelatinous fibers in the ventricular subendocardium that he thought were muscular. Walter Gaskell, in 1886, demonstrated specialized muscle fibers joining the atria and ventricles that caused "block" when cut and found that the sinus venosus was the area of first excitation of the heart. By examining serial embryologic sections, Wilhelm His, Jr, showed that a connective tissue sheet became a bundle connecting the upper and lower cardiac chambers, the bundle of His. Sunao Tawara traced the atrioventricular (AV) bundle of His backward to find a compact node of fibers at the base of the atrial septum and forward where it connected with the bundles of cells discovered by Purkinje in 1839. Tawara concluded that this "AV connecting system" originated in the AV node, penetrated the septum as the His bundle, and then divided into left and right bundle branches that terminated in the Purkinje fibers. Martin Flack and Arthur Keith studied the conduction system of a mole and found a structure in the sinoauricular junction that histologically resembled the AV node. They felt that this was where "the dominating rhythm of the heart normally begins" and named it the sinoauricular node in 1907. The ECG of Einthoven soon brought a new understanding to the complex electrical system that makes the heart beat. In 2006 and 2007, we celebrate the 100th anniversaries of the publication of the exciting discovery of the AV and sinus nodes, truly landmarks in our understanding of cardiac structure and physiology.

  18. Do nonlinearities play a significant role in short term, beat-to-beat variability?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, H. G.; Mukkamala, R.; Moody, G. B.; Mark, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies of short-term beat-to-beat variability in cardiovascular signals have not resolved the debate about the completeness of linear analysis techniques. This aim of this paper is to evaluate further the role of nonlinearities in short-term, beat-to-beat variability. We compared linear autoregressive moving average (ARMA) and nonlinear neural network (NN) models for predicting instantaneous heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (BP) from past HR and BP. To evaluate these models, we used HR and BP time series from the MIMIC database. Experimental results indicate that NN-based nonlinearities do not play a significant role and suggest that ARMA linear analysis techniques provide adequate characterization of the system dynamics responsible for generating short-term, beat-to-beat variability.

  19. People Interview: Engineering beats Pisa's problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    INTERVIEW Engineering beats Pisa's problem John Burland has been professor of soil mechanics at Imperial College London for 20 years and is recognized as a distinguished figure in geotechnical engineering. David Smith talks to him about his work.

  20. Beating Depression …Help Is Available

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Beating Depression …Help Is Available Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... treatments are available from your physician. Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  1. Beliefs of Sri Lankan Medical Students about Wife Beating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; de Zoysa, Piyanjali

    2007-01-01

    The article presents the results of a study on beliefs about wife beating conducted among 476 Sri Lankan medical students. Participants fill out a self-administered questionnaire, which examines six beliefs about wife beating. Most students tend to justify wife beating, to believe women benefit from wife beating, and to believe the wife bears more…

  2. How molecular motors shape the flagellar beat

    PubMed Central

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Hilfinger, Andreas; Howard, Jonathon; Jülicher, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are slender cellular appendages whose regular beating propels cells and microorganisms through aqueous media. The beat is an oscillating pattern of propagating bends generated by dynein motor proteins. A key open question is how the activity of the motors is coordinated in space and time. To elucidate the nature of this coordination we inferred the mechanical properties of the motors by analyzing the shape of beating sperm: Steadily beating bull sperm were imaged and their shapes were measured with high precision using a Fourier averaging technique. Comparing our experimental data with wave forms calculated for different scenarios of motor coordination we found that only the scenario of interdoublet sliding regulating motor activity gives rise to satisfactory fits. We propose that the microscopic origin of such “sliding control” is the load dependent detachment rate of motors. Agreement between observed and calculated wave forms was obtained only if significant sliding between microtubules occurred at the base. This suggests a novel mechanism by which changes in basal compliance could reverse the direction of beat propagation. We conclude that the flagellar beat patterns are determined by an interplay of the basal properties of the axoneme and the mechanical feedback of dynein motors. PMID:19404446

  3. An integrative computational model of multiciliary beating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingzhou; Dillon, Robert H; Fauci, Lisa J

    2008-05-01

    The coordinated beating of motile cilia is responsible for ovum transport in the oviduct, transport of mucus in the respiratory tract, and is the basis of motility in many single-celled organisms. The beating of a single motile cilium is achieved by the ATP-driven activation cycles of thousands of dynein molecular motors that cause neighboring microtubule doublets within the ciliary axoneme to slide relative to each other. The precise nature of the spatial and temporal coordination of these individual motors is still not completely understood. The emergent geometry and dynamics of ciliary beating is a consequence of the coupling of these internal force-generating motors, the passive elastic properties of the axonemal structure, and the external viscous, incompressible fluid. Here, we extend our integrative model of a single cilium that couples internal force generation with the surrounding fluid to the investigation of multiciliary interaction. This computational model allows us to predict the geometry of beating, along with the detailed description of the time-dependent flow field both near and away from the cilia. We show that synchrony and metachrony can, indeed, arise from hydrodynamic coupling. We also investigate the effects of viscosity and neighboring cilia on ciliary beat frequency. Moreover, since we have precise flow information, we also measure the dependence of the total flow pumped per cilium per beat upon parameters such as viscosity and ciliary spacing.

  4. Evidence for leukotriene D4 receptors in guinea pig left atria

    SciTech Connect

    Falcone, R.C.; Aharony, D.; Orzechowski, R.F. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of peptidoleukotrienes (LTs) on electrically driven guinea pig left atria (GPLA) were investigated. LTD4 produced a positive inotropic response; however, rapid desensitization required the construction of noncumulative dose-response curves to naive tissues. The maximal inotropic response to LTD4 was 24 {plus minus} 3% of isoproterenol and the EC50 = 267 {plus minus} 77 nM. The functional response was corroborated by the demonstration of specific and rapid (3H)LTD4 binding to GPLA membranes with low affinity (Kd = 212 {plus minus} 80.2 nM), in a saturable (Bmax = 20 {plus minus} 1.1 pmol/mg protein) manner. In tissues pretreated with acivicin, which inhibits conversion of LTC4 to LTD4, the response to LTC4, but not LTD4, was abolished. Selectivity towards LTD4 was demonstrated by the inability of propranolol, prazosin, atropine, pyrilamine, capsaicin or indomethacin (all tested at 1 microM) to alter the functional response to LTD4. Similarly, none of the tested compounds (100 microMs) was inhibitory in the binding assay. Structurally diverse LTD4 antagonists SKF102922 (pKb = 6.42) and ICI 198.615 (pKb = 8.74) were able to inhibit the functional response as well as (3H)LTD4 binding to GPLA membranes. The calcium channel antagonist, verapamil, inhibited the functional response but did not alter (3H)LTD4 binding. These data support the existence of specific LTD4 receptors in GPLA which evoke a modest, rapidly desensitized, increase in the force of myocardial contraction.

  5. Assessing QT prolongation and electrocardiography restitution using a beat-to-beat method.

    PubMed

    Fossa, Anthony A; Zhou, Meijian

    2010-01-01

    Historically, the heart rate corrected QT (QTc) interval has been the standard method to assess for impaired ventricular repolarization, particularly for drug development. However, QTc does not reflect changes in autonomic state or QT-RR hysteresis which can also affect the interpretation of arrhythmogenic risk. With the advent of more accurate algorithms to automatically measure the QT interval from continuously collected digital ECG data, usage of heart rate corrected functions is no longer necessary. The dynamic beat-to-beat QT interval method compares the QT interval to individual cardiac cycles from all normal autonomic states at similar RR intervals, thus eliminating the need for correction functions. The upper 97.5% reference boundary of these beat-to-beat QT interval values is defined across the entire 24-hour RR interval range. Beats with QT intervals exceeding this limit are flagged as outlier beats for further arrhythmia vulnerability assessment. The same beat-to-beat technique can also be used to assess the QT-TQ interval relationship known as ECG restitution. This analysis potentially provides an additional means to quantify cardiac stress or arrhythmia vulnerability as the heart works more in relationship to each rest cycle.

  6. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Bryan T.; Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2015-01-01

    1. Introduction Measuring ciliary beat frequency (CBF) is a technical challenge and difficult to perform in vivo. Doppler optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) is a mesoscopic non-contact imaging modality that provides high-resolution tomographic images and detects micromotion simultaneously in living tissues. Here we use D-OCT to measure CBF in ex vivo tissue as the first step toward translating this technology to clinical use. 2. Methods Fresh ex vivo samples of rabbit tracheal mucosa were imaged using both D-OCT and phase-contrast microscopy (n = 5). The D-OCT system was designed and built to specification in our lab (1310 nm swept source vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), 6 μm axial resolution). The samples were placed in culture and incubated at 37°C. A fast Fourier transform was performed on the D-OCT signal recorded on the surface of the samples to gauge CBF. High-speed digital video of the epithelium recorded via phase-contrast microscopy was analyzed to confirm the CBF measurements. 3. Results The D-OCT system detected Doppler signal at the epithelial layer of ex vivo rabbit tracheal samples suggestive of ciliary motion. CBF was measured at 9.36 ± 1.22 Hz using D-OCT and 9.08 ± 0.48 Hz using phase-contrast microscopy. No significant differences were found between the two methods (p ≫ 0.05). 4. Conclusions D-OCT allows for the quantitative measurement of CBF without the need to resolve individual cilia. Furthermore, D-OCT technology can be incorporated into endoscopic platforms that allow clinicians to readily measure CBF in the office and provide a direct measurement of mucosal health. PMID:26136399

  7. The initiation of the heart beat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng-Sheng; Joung, Boyoung; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Das, Mithilesh; Chen, Zhenhui; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2010-02-01

    During a normal lifetime, the heart may beat over 2 billion times, but the mechanisms by which the heart beats are initiated remain a subject of intense investigation. Since the discovery of a pacemaker current (I(f)) in 1978, multiple studies have shown that rhythmic changes in membrane voltage (the "membrane voltage clock") underlie the mechanisms of automaticity. The I(f) is a depolarization current activated during hyperpolarization. Therefore, when the cardiac cells recover, the I(f) is activated and slowly depolarizes the cell membrane, leading to the onset of action potential. Recent studies, however, suggest that increased intracellular Ca (Ca(i)) induced by spontaneous rhythmic sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca release (the "calcium clock") is also jointly responsible for the initiation of the heart beat. Elevated Ca(i) activates another ionic current (the sodium-calcium exchanger current or I(NCX)), leading to spontaneous phase 4 depolarization. Under normal conditions, both clocks are needed to initiate the heart beat. Malfunction of the clocks is associated with sinus node dysfunction in heart failure and atrial fibrillation. More studies are needed to determine how both clocks work together to initiate heart beat under normal and disease conditions.

  8. Intermode beat stabilized laser with frequency pulling.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S; Araki, T; Suzuki, N

    1994-01-20

    A frequency-stabilized two-mode He-Ne laser has been developed. The intermode beat frequency of the experimental laser was approximately 600 MHz for a 25-cm cavity. The laser frequency in which the mode stands is pulled to the center of the gain curve (frequency pulling). The degree of pulling depends on where the longitudinal modes stand in the broadened gain curve. Beat frequency is thereby changed periodically of the order of hundreds of kilohertz with respect to cavity expansion. The frequency pulling was effectively used for frequency stabilization of the laser. The standing position of the longitudinal mode lights was locked in the gain curve by controlling the change of intermode beat frequency. A microwave mixer was applied to extract the frequency change of the intermode beat. Excellent frequency stability (10(10) for the laser oscillation and 10(6) for the beat frequency) was attained. The polarization orthogonality of the proposed laser was superior to that of Zeeman lasers.

  9. Quantum Beats from Entangled Localized Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, David

    Recent experiments report observations of quantum interference between plasmon resonances, inviting descriptions of plasmon-photon interaction using methods from quantum optics. Here we demonstrate, using a Heisenberg-Langevin approach, that the radiation emitted from the localized surface plasmon resonances of a mixed-metal heterodimer may exhibit observable, beat frequency interferences at a far-field detector, known as quantum beats. This prediction represents a correspondence between V-type atoms of quantum optics and the familiar heterodimer system of plasmonics. We explore this analogy in depth and find that although both systems support quantum beats, the heterodimer emits photons in bunches due to the bosonic nature of the plasmon. This highlights a significant difference between the properties of atomic and plasmonic systems. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's CAREER program under Award Number CHE-1253775 and NSF XSEDE resources under Award Number PHY-130045.

  10. False beats in coupled piano string unisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capleton, Brian

    2004-02-01

    The behavior of a unison pair of piano strings coupled by the soundboard bridge, when one string has localized anisotropy in the reactive part of the bridge admittance for a given partial frequency, can be investigated using a theoretical matrix description. The anisotropy can cause what in piano tuning terminology is referred to as ``false beating'' in a partial of the single string. A mathematical model can be used to illustrate how ``mistunings'' between the strings of the unison (measured when the strings are sounding in isolation from each other) may theoretically arise as a consequence of the normal practice in piano tuning, of eliminating or reducing audible beating in the unison when both strings are sounding. ``False beats'' in a single string partial can be ``inherited'' by a partial of the coupled unison's spectrum, and mistunings between the strings can eliminate or reduce the appearance of this inheritance.

  11. False beats in coupled piano string unisons.

    PubMed

    Capleton, Brian

    2004-02-01

    The behavior of a unison pair of piano strings coupled by the soundboard bridge, when one string has localized anisotropy in the reactive part of the bridge admittance for a given partial frequency, can be investigated using a theoretical matrix description. The anisotropy can cause what in piano tuning terminology is referred to as "false beating" in a partial of the single string. A mathematical model can be used to illustrate how "mistunings" between the strings of the unison (measured when the strings are sounding in isolation from each other) may theoretically arise as a consequence of the normal practice in piano tuning, of eliminating or reducing audible beating in the unison when both strings are sounding. "False beats" in a single string partial can be "inherited" by a partial of the coupled unison's spectrum, and mistunings between the strings can eliminate or reduce the appearance of this inheritance. PMID:15000199

  12. Energy Consumption of Actively Beating Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia and flagella are important for propelling cells or driving fluid over tissues. The microtubule-based core in these organelles, the axoneme, has a nearly universal ``9+2'' arrangement of 9 outer doublet microtubules assembled around two singlet microtubules in the center. Thousands of molecular motor proteins are attached to the doublets and walk on neighboring outer doublets. The motors convert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into sliding motion between adjacent doublet microtubules, resulting in precisely regulated oscillatory beating. Using demembranated sea urchin sperm flagella as an experimental platform, we simultaneously monitor the axoneme's consumption of ATP and its beating dynamics while key parameters, such as solution viscosity and ATP concentration, are varied. Insights into motor cooperativity during beating and energetic consequences of hydrodynamic interactions will be presented.

  13. Acoustical sensing of cardiomyocyte cluster beating

    SciTech Connect

    Tymchenko, Nina; Kunze, Angelika; Dahlenborg, Kerstin; Svedhem, Sofia; Steel, Daniella

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •An example of the application of QCM-D to live cell studies. •Detection of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte cluster beating. •Clusters were studied in a thin liquid film and in a large liquid volume. •The QCM-D beating profile provides an individual fingerprint of the hPS-CMCs. -- Abstract: Spontaneously beating human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes clusters (CMCs) represent an excellent in vitro tool for studies of human cardiomyocyte function and for pharmacological cardiac safety assessment. Such testing typically requires highly trained operators, precision plating, or large cell quantities, and there is a demand for real-time, label-free monitoring of small cell quantities, especially rare cells and tissue-like structures. Array formats based on sensing of electrical or optical properties of cells are being developed and in use by the pharmaceutical industry. A potential alternative to these techniques is represented by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique, which is an acoustic surface sensitive technique that measures changes in mass and viscoelastic properties close to the sensor surface (from nm to μm). There is an increasing number of studies where QCM-D has successfully been applied to monitor properties of cells and cellular processes. In the present study, we show that spontaneous beating of CMCs on QCM-D sensors can be clearly detected, both in the frequency and the dissipation signals. Beating rates in the range of 66–168 bpm for CMCs were detected and confirmed by simultaneous light microscopy. The QCM-D beating profile was found to provide individual fingerprints of the hPS-CMCs. The presented results point towards acoustical assays for evaluation cardiotoxicity.

  14. Beat that Word: How Listeners Integrate Beat Gesture and Focus in Multimodal Speech Discourse.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Diana; Chu, Mingyuan; Wang, Lin; Özyürek, Asli; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Communication is facilitated when listeners allocate their attention to important information (focus) in the message, a process called "information structure." Linguistic cues like the preceding context and pitch accent help listeners to identify focused information. In multimodal communication, relevant information can be emphasized by nonverbal cues like beat gestures, which represent rhythmic nonmeaningful hand movements. Recent studies have found that linguistic and nonverbal attention cues are integrated independently in single sentences. However, it is possible that these two cues interact when information is embedded in context, because context allows listeners to predict what information is important. In an ERP study, we tested this hypothesis and asked listeners to view videos capturing a dialogue. In the critical sentence, focused and nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures, grooming hand movements, or no gestures. ERP results showed that focused words are processed more attentively than nonfocused words as reflected in an N1 and P300 component. Hand movements also captured attention and elicited a P300 component. Importantly, beat gesture and focus interacted in a late time window of 600-900 msec relative to target word onset, giving rise to a late positivity when nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures. Our results show that listeners integrate beat gesture with the focus of the message and that integration costs arise when beat gesture falls on nonfocused information. This suggests that beat gestures fulfill a unique focusing function in multimodal discourse processing and that they have to be integrated with the information structure of the message.

  15. Beta-adrenergic modulation of the release of atrial natriuretic factor from rat cardiac atria in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.; Imada, T.; Takayanagi, B.; Inagami, T.

    1986-03-01

    Several stimulatory factors for the release of atrial natriuretic factor, such as atrial stretch, atrial pacing and vasopressin, have been reported. We studied the effects of the adrenergic nervous system on the release of ANF using an in vitro perfusion system. Right and left atria from Sprague-Dawley rats were quartered and perfused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution gassed with 95% CO/sub 2//5% O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C. Perfusate factions were collected every 2 minutes. Fractions were collected 20 minutes before and for 2 hours during the administration of test agents. ANF was measured by radioimmunoassay. Within 10 minutes of exposure to 10/sup -6/M isoproterenol, ANF secretion fell to less than 50% of its baseline level. However, beta agonists showed a stimulatory effect of 4-5 fold. Carbachol, in a concentration of 10/sup -2/M was used to demonstrate the viability of the atria exposed to isoproterenol, and produced a stimulation of ANF release of 4-6 times the basal level. The adrenergic nervous system can modulate ANF release in vitro. Further studies are being performed with selective beta agonists and antagonists to elucidate these results.

  16. Evidence for a unidirectional retrograde communication between distal His bundle and atria.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, J W

    1980-01-01

    Intracardiac electrogram recordings are presented suggesting the existence in one patient with recurrent supraventricular tachycardia of a functionally unidirectional retrograde connection between the distal His bundle and the low right atrium. Recordings obtained during junctional rhythm showed a short ventriculoatrial conduction time which did not lengthen during rapid or premature ventricular pacing. During an episode of supraventricular tachycardia induced by a single atrial premature stimulus, an infra-His Wenckebach period occurred during which retrograde ventriculoatrial conduction remained constant until ventricular capture was blocked, but atrial activation persisted with the same retrograde atrial activation sequence seen in the previous beats of supraventricular tachycardia. The findings appear to document participation in supraventricular tachycardia of a type of atrio-His fibre originally described by Brechenmacher. PMID:7378222

  17. Prescription diets for rabbits.

    PubMed

    Proença, Laila Maftoum; Mayer, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    Dietary management can be used with drug therapy for the successful treatment of many diseases. Therapeutic nutrition is well-recognized in dogs and cats and is beginning to increase among other pet species, including rabbits. The nutritional component of some rabbit diseases (eg, urolithiasis) is not completely understood, and the clinician should evaluate the use of prescription diets based on the scientific literature and individual needs. Long-term feeding trials are needed to further evaluate the efficacy of prescription diets in rabbits. Prescription diets are available for selected diseases in rabbits, including diets for immediate-term, short-term, and long-term management. PMID:25155667

  18. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits. PMID:26538235

  19. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits.

  20. Electrocardiogram beat detection enhancement using independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuzilek, Jakub; Lhotska, Lenka

    2013-06-01

    Beat detection is a basic and fundamental step in electrocardiogram (ECG) processing. In many ECG applications strong artifacts from biological or technical sources could appear and cause distortion of ECG signals. Beat detection algorithm desired property is to avoid these distortions and detect beats in any situation. Our developed method is an extension of Christov's beat detection algorithm, which detects beat using combined adaptive threshold on transformed ECG signal (complex lead). Our offline extension adds estimation of independent components of measured signal into the transformation of ECG creating a signal called complex component, which enhances ECG activity and enables beat detection in presence of strong noises. This makes the beat detection algorithm much more robust in cases of unpredictable noise appearances, typical for holter ECGs and telemedicine applications of ECG. We compared our algorithm with the performance of our implementation of the Christov's and Hamilton's beat detection algorithm.

  1. Beating Boredom, Creating Interest. Fastback 419.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, M. Thomas

    This "Fastback" focuses on avoiding boredom in schools. Following an introduction that explains the importance of teachers breathing life into subject matter, the booklet includes five sections. Section one, "The Nature of Boredom," defines boredom and explains that both teachers and students are responsible for beating boredom. Section two,…

  2. Hydrodynamic analysis and mechanisms of ciliary beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, Ashok; Foster, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The scaffold of a cilium or eukaryotic flagellum, known as the axoneme, consists of nine microtubule doublets surrounding a pair of singlet microtubules. Attached to each doublet are periodically-spaced dynein motors that use energy from ATP hydrolysis to exert force on the neighboring doublet causing it to slide away from the cell body. In spite of the several theories that have been put forward over the last several decades to explain how these motors work collectively to produce steady beating this question remains unresolved: we shall show that the forces generated during the beating as determined from the detailed hydrodynamic analysis are inconsistent with the predictions of the existing theories. We shall also use the experimental data available in the literature to present empirical results for the beat properties, i.e. the frequency, amplitude, wavelength, and energy dissipation, as functions of ATP concentration and fluid viscosity. The power dissipated and the energy per wavelength are approximately the same independent of the viscosity of the fluid and the ATP concentration. We use these observations to suggest a new hypothesis regarding how the cilia beat. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation.

  3. Beat the Instructor: An Introductory Forecasting Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Brent R.; Eliasson, Janice B.

    2013-01-01

    This teaching brief describes a 30-minute game where student groups compete in-class in an introductory time-series forecasting exercise. The students are challenged to "beat the instructor" who competes using forecasting techniques that will be subsequently taught. All forecasts are graphed prior to revealing the randomly generated…

  4. Analyzing the Acoustic Beat with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency ?f. The…

  5. Mechanical communication in cardiac cell synchronized beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsan, Ido; Drori, Stavit; Lewis, Yair E.; Cohen, Shlomi; Tzlil, Shelly

    2016-05-01

    Cell-cell communication, which enables cells to coordinate their activity and is essential for growth, development and function, is usually ascribed a chemical or electrical origin. However, cells can exert forces and respond to environment elasticity and to mechanical deformations created by their neighbours. The extent to which this mechanosensing ability facilitates intercellular communication remains unclear. Here we demonstrate mechanical communication between cells directly for the first time, providing evidence for a long-range interaction that induces long-lasting alterations in interacting cells. We show that an isolated cardiac cell can be trained to beat at a given frequency by mechanically stimulating the underlying substrate. Deformations are induced using an oscillatory mechanical probe that mimics the deformations generated by a beating neighbouring cardiac cell. Unlike electrical field stimulation, the probe-induced beating rate is maintained by the cell for an hour after the stimulation stops, implying that long-term modifications occur within the cell. These long-term alterations provide a mechanism for cells that communicate mechanically to be less variable in their electromechanical delay. Mechanical coupling between cells therefore ensures that the final outcome of action potential pacing is synchronized beating. We further show that the contractile machinery is essential for mechanical communication.

  6. Heart rate estimation on a beat-to-beat basis via ballistocardiography - a hybrid approach.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, David; Aubert, Xavier L; Fuhr, Hartmut; Brauers, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for obtaining the heart rate from the signal of a single, contact-less sensor recording the mechanical activity of the heart. This vital parameter is required on a beat-to-beat basis for applications in sleep analysis and heart failure disease management. Our approach bundles information from various sources for first robust estimates. These estimates are further refined in a second step. An unambiguous comparison with the ECG RR-intervals taken as reference is possible for 98.5% of the heart beats. In these cases, a mean absolute error of 17 ms for the inter-beat interval lengths has been achieved, over a test corpus of 20 whole nights.

  7. Model for the heart beat-to-beat time series during meditation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, A.; Diambra, L.; Malta, C. P.

    2003-09-01

    We present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a pacemaker, that simulates the membrane potential of the sinoatrial node, modulated by a periodic input signal plus correlated noise that simulates the respiratory input. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce in the phase space the trajectory of experimental heart beat-to-beat interval data. The data sets were recorded during meditation practices of the Chi and Kundalini Yoga techniques. Our study indicates that in the first case the respiratory signal has the shape of a smoothed square wave, and in the second case it has the shape of a smoothed triangular wave.

  8. Beat Gestures Modulate Auditory Integration in Speech Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous beat gestures are an integral part of the paralinguistic context during face-to-face conversations. Here we investigated the time course of beat-speech integration in speech perception by measuring ERPs evoked by words pronounced with or without an accompanying beat gesture, while participants watched a spoken discourse. Words…

  9. Detrended fluctuation analysis of non-stationary cardiac beat-to-beat interval of sick infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Massaro, An N.; Al-Shargabi, Tareq; Niforatos Andescavage, Nickie; Chang, Taeun; Glass, Penny; du Plessis, Adre J.

    2014-11-01

    We performed detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of cardiac beat-to-beat intervals (RRis) collected from sick newborn infants over 1-4 day periods. We calculated four different metrics from the DFA fluctuation function: the DFA exponents αL (>40 beats up to one-fourth of the record length), αs (15-30 beats), root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuation on a short-time scale (20-50 beats), and RMS fluctuation on a long-time scale (110-150 beats). Except αL , all metrics clearly distinguished two groups of newborn infants (favourable vs. adverse) with well-characterized outcomes. However, the RMS fluctuations distinguished the two groups more consistently over time compared to αS . Furthermore, RMS distinguished the RRi of the two groups earlier compared to the DFA exponent. In all the three measures, the favourable outcome group displayed higher values, indicating a higher magnitude of (auto-)correlation and variability, thus normal physiology, compared to the adverse outcome group.

  10. 3D absolute shape measurement of live rabbit hearts with a superfast two-frequency phase-shifting technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajun; Laughner, Jacob I.; Efimov, Igor R.; Zhang, Song

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a two-frequency binary phase-shifting technique to measure three-dimensional (3D) absolute shape of beating rabbit hearts. Due to the low contrast of the cardiac surface, the projector and the camera must remain focused, which poses challenges for any existing binary method where the measurement accuracy is low. To conquer this challenge, this paper proposes to utilize the optimal pulse width modulation (OPWM) technique to generate high-frequency fringe patterns, and the error-diffusion dithering technique to produce low-frequency fringe patterns. Furthermore, this paper will show that fringe patterns produced with blue light provide the best quality measurements compared to fringe patterns generated with red or green light; and the minimum data acquisition speed for high quality measurements is around 800 Hz for a rabbit heart beating at 180 beats per minute. PMID:23482151

  11. Beat-to-beat cycle length variability of spontaneously beating guinea pig sinoatrial cells: relative contributions of the membrane and calcium clocks.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Massimiliano; Cacciani, Francesca; Lux, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    The heartbeat arises rhythmically in the sino-atrial node (SAN) and then spreads regularly throughout the heart. The molecular mechanism underlying SAN rhythm has been attributed by recent studies to the interplay between two clocks, one involving the hyperpolarization activated cation current If (the membrane clock), and the second attributable to activation of the electrogenic NaCa exchanger by spontaneous sarcoplasmic releases of calcium (the calcium clock). Both mechanisms contain, in principle, sources of beat-to-beat cycle length variability, which can determine the intrinsic variability of SAN firing and, in turn, contribute to the heart rate variability. In this work we have recorded long sequences of action potentials from patch clamped guinea pig SAN cells (SANCs) perfused, in turn, with normal Tyrode solution, with the If inhibitor ivabradine (3 µM), then back to normal Tyrode, and again with the ryanodine channels inhibitor ryanodine (3 µM). We have found that, together with the expected increase in beating cycle length (+25%), the application of ivabradine brought about a significant and dramatic increase in beat-to-beat cycle length variability (+50%). Despite the similar effect on firing rate, ryanodine did not modify significantly beat-to-beat cycle length variability. Acetylcholine was also applied and led to a 131% increase of beating cycle length, with only a 70% increase in beat-to-beat cycle length variability. We conclude that the main source of inter-beat variability of SANCs firing rate is related to the mechanism of the calcium clock, whereas the membrane clock seems to act in stabilizing rate. Accordingly, when the membrane clock is silenced by application of ivabradine, stochastic variations of the calcium clock are free to make SANCs beating rhythm more variable.

  12. Distribution and morphology of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunoreactive axons in the whole-mount atria of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Hatcher, Jeffrey T; Hoover, Donald B; Gu, He; Wurster, Robert D; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2014-04-01

    The murine model has been used to investigate the role of cardiac sensory axons in various disease states. However, the distribution and morphological structures of cardiac nociceptive axons in normal murine tissues have not yet been well characterized. In this study, whole-mount atria from FVB mice were processed with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) primary antibodies followed by secondary antibodies, and then examined using confocal microscopy. We found: 1) Large CGRP-IR axon bundles entered the atria with the major veins, and these large bundles bifurcated into small bundles and single axons that formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the epicardium. Varicose CGRP-IR axons had close contacts with muscle fibers, and some CGRP-IR axons formed varicosities around principle neurons (PNs) within intrinsic cardiac ganglia (ICGs). 2) SP-IR axons also were found in the same regions of the atria, attached to veins, and within cardiac ganglia. Similar to CGRP-IR axons, these SP-IR axons formed terminal end-nets and free endings in the atrial epicardium and myocardium. Within ICGs, SP-IR axons formed varicose endings around PNs. However, SP-IR nerve fibers were less abundant than CGRP-IR fibers in the atria. 3) None of the PNs were CGRP-IR or SP-IR. 4) CGRP-IR and SP-IR often colocalized in terminal varicosities around PNs. Collectively, our data document the distribution pattern and morphology of CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons and terminals in different regions of the atria. This knowledge provides useful information for CGRP-IR and SP-IR axons that can be referred to in future studies of pathological remodeling.

  13. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria*

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Higgins, John D.; Hund, Thomas J.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca2+ current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca2+ channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction. PMID:25825486

  14. Beat that Word: How Listeners Integrate Beat Gesture and Focus in Multimodal Speech Discourse.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Diana; Chu, Mingyuan; Wang, Lin; Özyürek, Asli; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Communication is facilitated when listeners allocate their attention to important information (focus) in the message, a process called "information structure." Linguistic cues like the preceding context and pitch accent help listeners to identify focused information. In multimodal communication, relevant information can be emphasized by nonverbal cues like beat gestures, which represent rhythmic nonmeaningful hand movements. Recent studies have found that linguistic and nonverbal attention cues are integrated independently in single sentences. However, it is possible that these two cues interact when information is embedded in context, because context allows listeners to predict what information is important. In an ERP study, we tested this hypothesis and asked listeners to view videos capturing a dialogue. In the critical sentence, focused and nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures, grooming hand movements, or no gestures. ERP results showed that focused words are processed more attentively than nonfocused words as reflected in an N1 and P300 component. Hand movements also captured attention and elicited a P300 component. Importantly, beat gesture and focus interacted in a late time window of 600-900 msec relative to target word onset, giving rise to a late positivity when nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures. Our results show that listeners integrate beat gesture with the focus of the message and that integration costs arise when beat gesture falls on nonfocused information. This suggests that beat gestures fulfill a unique focusing function in multimodal discourse processing and that they have to be integrated with the information structure of the message. PMID:27027421

  15. Muscarinic cholinergic and alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors in murine atria: phosphatidylinositol breakdown and receptor interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Upon stimulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors, there is a decrease in the force of contraction rate of firing in heart, while stimulation of ..cap alpha.. adrenergic receptors causes an increase in the force of contraction with no change in the heart rate. Yet both receptors stimulate the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol (PI). Therefore, the breakdown of PI was examined to determine how the process differed between the two receptor systems. Murine atria, prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, were stimulated with the muscarinic cholinergic agonists, carbamylcholine (CARB), and oxotremorine (OXO); and with the ..cap alpha.. adrenergic agonists, norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine (PE); either singly or in combination. Breakdown of PI was assessed by measurement of individual inositol phosphates by anion exchange chromatography. Binding of CARB to atrial muscarinic receptors was measured by competition with (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate.

  16. Newborn infants detect the beat in music.

    PubMed

    Winkler, István; Háden, Gábor P; Ladinig, Olivia; Sziller, István; Honing, Henkjan

    2009-02-17

    To shed light on how humans can learn to understand music, we need to discover what the perceptual capabilities with which infants are born. Beat induction, the detection of a regular pulse in an auditory signal, is considered a fundamental human trait that, arguably, played a decisive role in the origin of music. Theorists are divided on the issue whether this ability is innate or learned. We show that newborn infants develop expectation for the onset of rhythmic cycles (the downbeat), even when it is not marked by stress or other distinguishing spectral features. Omitting the downbeat elicits brain activity associated with violating sensory expectations. Thus, our results strongly support the view that beat perception is innate.

  17. Stochastic ion acceleration by beating electrostatic waves.

    PubMed

    Jorns, B; Choueiri, E Y

    2013-01-01

    A study is presented of the stochasticity in the orbit of a single, magnetized ion produced by the particle's interaction with two beating electrostatic waves whose frequencies differ by the ion cyclotron frequency. A second-order Lie transform perturbation theory is employed in conjunction with a numerical analysis of the maximum Lyapunov exponent to determine the velocity conditions under which stochasticity occurs in this dynamical system. Upper and lower bounds in ion velocity are found for stochastic orbits with the lower bound approximately equal to the phase velocity of the slower wave. A threshold condition for the onset of stochasticity that is linear with respect to the wave amplitudes is also derived. It is shown that the onset of stochasticity occurs for beating electrostatic waves at lower total wave energy densities than for the case of a single electrostatic wave or two nonbeating electrostatic waves. PMID:23410446

  18. Modeling of Nonlinear Beat Signals of TAE's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Berk, Herbert; Breizman, Boris; Zheng, Linjin

    2012-03-01

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod reveal Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) together with signals at various beat frequencies, including those at twice the mode frequency. The beat frequencies are sidebands driven by quadratic nonlinear terms in the MHD equations. These nonlinear sidebands have not yet been quantified by any existing codes. We extend the AEGIS code to capture nonlinear effects by treating the nonlinear terms as a driving source in the linear MHD solver. Our goal is to compute the spatial structure of the sidebands for realistic geometry and q-profile, which can be directly compared with experiment in order to interpret the phase contrast imaging diagnostic measurements and to enable the quantitative determination of the Alfven wave amplitude in the plasma core

  19. Patient-specific ECG beat classification technique.

    PubMed

    Das, Manab K; Ari, Samit

    2014-09-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) beat classification plays an important role in the timely diagnosis of the critical heart condition. An automated diagnostic system is proposed to classify five types of ECG classes, namely normal (N), ventricular ectopic beat (V), supra ventricular ectopic beat (S), fusion (F) and unknown (Q) as recommended by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI). The proposed method integrates the Stockwell transform (ST), a bacteria foraging optimisation (BFO) algorithm and a least mean square (LMS)-based multiclass support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The ST is utilised to extract the important morphological features which are concatenated with four timing features. The resultant combined feature vector is optimised by removing the redundant and irrelevant features using the BFO algorithm. The optimised feature vector is applied to the LMS-based multiclass SVM classifier for automated diagnosis. In the proposed technique, the LMS algorithm is used to modify the Lagrange multiplier, which in turn modifies the weight vector to minimise the classification error. The updated weights are used during the testing phase to classify ECG beats. The classification performances are evaluated using the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Average accuracy and sensitivity performances of the proposed system for V detection are 98.6% and 91.7%, respectively, and for S detections, 98.2% and 74.7%, respectively over the entire database. To generalise the capability, the classification performance is also evaluated using the St. Petersburg Institute of Cardiological Technics (INCART) database. The proposed technique performs better than other reported heartbeat techniques, with results suggesting better generalisation capability.

  20. Beat frequency interference pattern characteristics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency spectra and corresponding beat frequencies created by the relative motions between multiple Solar Power Satellites due to solar wind, lunar gravity, etc. were analyzed. The results were derived mathematically and verified through computer simulation. Frequency spectra plots were computer generated. Detailed computations were made for the seven following locations in the continental US: Houston, Tx.; Seattle, Wa.; Miami, Fl.; Chicago, Il.; New York, NY; Los Angeles, Ca.; and Barberton, Oh.

  1. Dispersion of refractoriness in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Evaluation with simultaneous endocardial recordings from both atria.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Hertervig, Eva; Carlson, Jonas; Johansson, Camilla; Olsson, S Bertil; Yuan, Shiwen

    2002-07-01

    This article studies the role of dispersion of atrial refractoriness (DAR) in the genesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). A 20-polar Halo catheter or a 40-polar basket catheter was placed in the right atrium and a 10-polar catheter in the coronary sinus in 21 patients with paroxysmal AF. Bipolar electrograms during AF were recorded from 7 to 16 sites in both atria. As control, electrograms during AF induced by extra-stimulation or burst pacing were also recorded from 4 to 14 sites in both atria in 12 patients with supraventricular tachycardias but without history of AF. The local atrial fibrillation intervals (AFI) during a period of 10 s or 20 s were measured and the mean, median and the 5th, 10th and 15th percentile AFIs at each site were calculated as estimates of the local effective refractory period (AERP). The maximum dispersion and variance of the estimated AERP among the 7-16/4-14 sites were used as measures of the DAR. The maximum dispersion and variance of the 5th and 10th percentile AFIs were significantly greater in the AF group than those in the control group, which were mainly due to the shortening of the minimum 5th and 10th percentile AFIs. No significant differences in dispersion and variance of the mean and median AFIs were shown between the 2 groups. The dispersion and variance of atrial refractoriness during AF estimated from the measurement of short AFIs were significantly greater in patients with paroxysmal AF than in those without clinical AF. The increased dispersion of refractoriness in patients with AF was mainly due to the shortening of the minimum AFIs. These findings suggest the involvement of an increased dispersion of atrial refractoriness in the genesis of paroxysmal AF. PMID:12122613

  2. Beat-to-beat left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation: radionuclide assessment with the computerized nuclear probe

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.; Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Lachman, A.B.; Zaret, B.L.

    1983-04-01

    There is wide beat-to-beat variability in cycle length and left ventricular performance in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, left ventricular ejection fraction and relative left ventricular volumes were evaluated on a beat-to-beat basis with the computerized nuclear probe, an instrument with sufficiently high sensitivity to allow continuous evaluation of the radionuclide time-activity curve. Of 18 patients with atrial fibrillation, 5 had mitral stenosis, 6 had mitral regurgitation, and 7 had coronary artery disease. Fifty consecutive beats were analyzed in each patient. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction ranged from 17 to 51%. There was substantial beat-to-beat variation in cycle length and left ventricular ejection fraction in all patients, including those with marked left ventricular dysfunction. In 14 patients who also underwent multiple gated cardiac blood pool imaging, there was an excellent correlation between mean ejection fraction derived from the nuclear probe and gated ejection fraction obtained by gamma camera imaging (r . 0.90). Based on beat-to-beat analysis, left ventricular function was dependent on relative end-diastolic volume and multiple preceding cycle lengths, but not preceding end-systolic volumes. This study demonstrates that a single value for left ventricular ejection fraction does not adequately characterize left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, both the mean beat-to-beat and the gated ejection fraction may underestimate left ventricular performance at rest in such patients.

  3. Beat-to-beat heart rate estimation fusing multimodal video and sensor data

    PubMed Central

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Gao, Hanno; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Coverage and accuracy of unobtrusively measured biosignals are generally relatively low compared to clinical modalities. This can be improved by exploiting redundancies in multiple channels with methods of sensor fusion. In this paper, we demonstrate that two modalities, skin color variation and head motion, can be extracted from the video stream recorded with a webcam. Using a Bayesian approach, these signals are fused with a ballistocardiographic signal obtained from the seat of a chair with a mean absolute beat-to-beat estimation error below 25 milliseconds and an average coverage above 90% compared to an ECG reference. PMID:26309754

  4. Beat-to-beat heart rate estimation fusing multimodal video and sensor data.

    PubMed

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Gao, Hanno; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    Coverage and accuracy of unobtrusively measured biosignals are generally relatively low compared to clinical modalities. This can be improved by exploiting redundancies in multiple channels with methods of sensor fusion. In this paper, we demonstrate that two modalities, skin color variation and head motion, can be extracted from the video stream recorded with a webcam. Using a Bayesian approach, these signals are fused with a ballistocardiographic signal obtained from the seat of a chair with a mean absolute beat-to-beat estimation error below 25 milliseconds and an average coverage above 90% compared to an ECG reference.

  5. Beat-to-beat heart rate estimation fusing multimodal video and sensor data.

    PubMed

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Gao, Hanno; Brüser, Christoph; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    Coverage and accuracy of unobtrusively measured biosignals are generally relatively low compared to clinical modalities. This can be improved by exploiting redundancies in multiple channels with methods of sensor fusion. In this paper, we demonstrate that two modalities, skin color variation and head motion, can be extracted from the video stream recorded with a webcam. Using a Bayesian approach, these signals are fused with a ballistocardiographic signal obtained from the seat of a chair with a mean absolute beat-to-beat estimation error below 25 milliseconds and an average coverage above 90% compared to an ECG reference. PMID:26309754

  6. The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT): a battery for assessing beat perception and production and their dissociation.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shinya; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT), a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: (1) music tapping test (MTT), (2) beat saliency test (BST), (3) beat interval test (BIT), and (4) beat finding and interval test (BFIT). MTT measures the degree of tapping synchronization with the beat of music, whereas BST, BIT, and BFIT measure perception and production thresholds via psychophysical adaptive stair-case methods. We administered the H-BAT on thirty individuals and investigated the performance distribution across these individuals in each subtest. There was a wide distribution in individual abilities to tap in synchrony with the beat of music during the MTT. The degree of synchronization consistency was negatively correlated with thresholds in the BST, BIT, and BFIT: a lower degree of synchronization was associated with higher perception and production thresholds. H-BAT can be a useful tool in determining an individual's ability to perceive and produce a beat within a single session.

  7. Beat gestures modulate auditory integration in speech perception.

    PubMed

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2013-02-01

    Spontaneous beat gestures are an integral part of the paralinguistic context during face-to-face conversations. Here we investigated the time course of beat-speech integration in speech perception by measuring ERPs evoked by words pronounced with or without an accompanying beat gesture, while participants watched a spoken discourse. Words accompanied by beats elicited a positive shift in ERPs at an early sensory stage (before 100 ms) and at a later time window coinciding with the auditory component P2. The same word tokens produced no ERP differences when participants listened to the discourse without view of the speaker. We conclude that beat gestures are integrated with speech early on in time and modulate sensory/phonological levels of processing. The present results support the possible role of beats as a highlighter, helping the listener to direct the focus of attention to important information and modulate the parsing of the speech stream.

  8. Outward sodium current in beating heart cells.

    PubMed

    Wellis, D P; DeFelice, L J; Mazzanti, M

    1990-01-01

    This article is a study of the fast Na current during action potentials. We have investigated the outward Na current (Mazzanti, M., and L.J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 52:95-100) in more detail, and we have asked whether it goes through the same channels associated with the rapid depolarization phase of action potentials. We address the question by patch clamping single, spontaneously beating, embryonic chick ventricle cells, using two electrodes to record the action potential and the patch current simultaneously. The chief limitation is the capacitive current, and in this article we describe a new method to subtract it. Varying the potential and the Na concentration in the patch pipette, and fitting the corrected currents to a standard model (Ebihara, L., and E.A. Johnson. 1980. Biophys. J. 32:779-790), provides evidence that the outward current is carried by the same channels that conduct the inward current. We compare the currents in beating cells to currents in nonbeating cells using whole-cell and cell-attached patch clamp recordings. The latter tend to show more positive Na reversal potentials, with the implication that internal Na is higher in beating cells. We propose that the plateau of the action potential, which is partly due to an inward Ca current, exceeds Na action current reversal potentials, and that this driving force gives rise to an outward movement of Na ions. The existence of such a current would imply that the fast repolarization phase after the upstroke of cardiac action potentials is partly due to the Na action current.

  9. Non-heart beating organ donation. A case study.

    PubMed

    Stirling, John

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this case study is to discuss the clinical management of a non-heart beating organ donor. This case study will concentrate in particular on the clinical assessment of the potential donor patient undertaken by the donor transplant coordinator (DTC) and the donation process up to the time of transplantation. The author will also describe the differences between heart beating and non-heart beating donors and discuss how transplantation can benefit renal recipient patients.

  10. Beating the forger: authenticating ceramic antiquities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneham, Doreen; Stoneham, Marshall

    2010-09-01

    Today's forger may have skills to match the artists and craftsmen of the past. But can they be exposed by scientific methods? Ceramic antiquities - including pottery, porcelains, and bronzes with a casting core - have long been valued, and demonstrable antiquity is crucial. Thermoluminescence provides key evidence as to when the object was fired. We describe the basic ideas, the methods themselves, and some of the potential limitations. Examples illustrate the remarkable ingenuity of forgers, who are making determined efforts to beat the physics-based tests of authenticity.

  11. Beat-to-beat heart rate detection in multi-lead abdominal fetal ECG recordings.

    PubMed

    Peters, C H L; van Laar, J O E H; Vullings, R; Oei, S G; Wijn, P F F

    2012-04-01

    Reliable monitoring of fetal condition often requires more information than is provided by cardiotocography, the standard technique for fetal monitoring. Abdominal recording of the fetal electrocardiogram may offer valuable additional information, but unfortunately is troubled by poor signal-to-noise ratios during certain parts of pregnancy. To increase the usability of abdominal fetal ECG recordings, an algorithm was developed that enhances fetal QRS complexes in these recordings and thereby provides a promising method for detecting the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate in recordings with poor signal-to-noise ratios. The method was evaluated on generated recordings with controlled signal-to-noise ratios and on actual recordings that were performed in clinical practice and were annotated by two independent experts. The evaluation on the generated signals demonstrated excellent results (sensitivity of 0.98 for SNR≥1.5). Only for SNR<2, the inaccuracy of the fetal heart rate detection exceeded 2 ms, which may still suffice for cardiotocography but is unacceptable for analysis of the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate variability. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of the method in actual recordings were reduced to approximately 90% for SNR≤2.4, but were excellent for higher signal-to-noise ratios.

  12. Oxidative shift in tissue redox potential increases beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration.

    PubMed

    Kistamás, Kornél; Hegyi, Bence; Váczi, Krisztina; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-07-01

    Profound changes in tissue redox potential occur in the heart under conditions of oxidative stress frequently associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Since beat-to-beat variability (short term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) is a good indicator of arrhythmia incidence, the aim of this work was to study the influence of redox changes on SV in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using a conventional microelectrode technique. The redox potential was shifted toward a reduced state using a reductive cocktail (containing dithiothreitol, glutathione, and ascorbic acid) while oxidative changes were initiated by superfusion with H2O2. Redox effects were evaluated as changes in "relative SV" determined by comparing SV changes with the concomitant APD changes. Exposure of myocytes to the reductive cocktail decreased SV significantly without any detectable effect on APD. Application of H2O2 increased both SV and APD, but the enhancement of SV was the greater, so relative SV increased. Longer exposure to H2O2 resulted in the development of early afterdepolarizations accompanied by tremendously increased SV. Pretreatment with the reductive cocktail prevented both elevation in relative SV and the development of afterdepolarizations. The results suggest that the increased beat-to-beat variability during an oxidative stress contributes to the generation of cardiac arrhythmias.

  13. Beat-to-beat interplay of heart rate, ventricular depolarization, and repolarization.

    PubMed

    Kozmann, György; Haraszti, Kristóf; Préda, István

    2010-01-01

    To improve malignant arrhythmia risk stratification, the causal and random components of spatiotemporal dynamics of heart rate (RR distances), ventricular depolarization sequence, and repolarization disparity were studied based on body surface potential map records taken for 5 minutes, in resting, supine position on 14 healthy subjects (age range, 20-65 years) and on 6 arrhythmia patients (age range, 59-70 years). Beat-to-beat QRS and QRST integral maps, Karhunen-Loève (KL) coefficients, RR, and nondipolarity index time series were computed. Tight relationship was found between RR and QRS integrals in healthy subjects with less association in arrhythmia patients. Tight KL-domain multiple linear association (r(2) > 0.72) was found between the QRS and QRST integral dynamics (ie, depolarization sequence and repolarization disparity). Beat-to-beat probability of the generation of significant nondipolarity index spikes was proportional to the QRST KL-component standard deviations (SD(i)) and inversely proportional with the mean dipolar KL components (M(i)) of the average QRST integral map.

  14. Myogenic responses occur on a beat-to-beat basis in the resting human limb.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Seth T; Padilla, Jaume; Vianna, Lauro C; Holwerda, Seth W; Davis, Michael J; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of human myogenic responses typically use maneuvers that evoke robust changes in transmural pressure. Although this strategy has demonstrated peripheral myogenic responsiveness in the limbs, particularly in glabrous skin of the hand or foot, it has not considered the potential influence of the myogenic mechanism in beat-to-beat blood flow (BF) control during unprovoked rest. In the present study, we examined the interactions of spontaneous beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finapres) with BF (Doppler ultrasound) supplying the forearm (brachial artery), lower leg (popliteal artery), and hand (ulnar artery) during 10 min of supine rest in healthy young men. Cross-correlation analyses revealed a negative association between MAP and BF, which was more prominent in the forearm than lower leg. The strongest correlation resulted when a -2-heart beat offset of MAP was applied (R=-0.53±0.04 in the forearm and -0.23±0.05 in the leg, P<0.05), suggesting an ∼2-s delay from instances of high/low MAP to low/high BF. Negatively associated episodes (high MAP/low BF and low MAP/high BF) outnumbered positively associated data (P<0.05). BF during low MAP values was greater than the steady-state average BF and vice versa. Wrist and ankle occlusion blunted the strength of correlations, homogenized the incidence of MAP and BF pairings, and reduced the magnitude of deviation from steady-state values. In contrast, these relationships were matched or accentuated for hand BF. Overall, these results suggest that myogenic responses are present and occur rapidly in human limbs during rest, overwhelm perfusion pressure gradient influences, and are primarily mediated by the distal limb circulation.

  15. Myogenic responses occur on a beat-to-beat basis in the resting human limb

    PubMed Central

    Fairfax, Seth T.; Padilla, Jaume; Vianna, Lauro C.; Holwerda, Seth W.; Davis, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of human myogenic responses typically use maneuvers that evoke robust changes in transmural pressure. Although this strategy has demonstrated peripheral myogenic responsiveness in the limbs, particularly in glabrous skin of the hand or foot, it has not considered the potential influence of the myogenic mechanism in beat-to-beat blood flow (BF) control during unprovoked rest. In the present study, we examined the interactions of spontaneous beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finapres) with BF (Doppler ultrasound) supplying the forearm (brachial artery), lower leg (popliteal artery), and hand (ulnar artery) during 10 min of supine rest in healthy young men. Cross-correlation analyses revealed a negative association between MAP and BF, which was more prominent in the forearm than lower leg. The strongest correlation resulted when a −2-heart beat offset of MAP was applied (R = −0.53 ± 0.04 in the forearm and −0.23 ± 0.05 in the leg, P < 0.05), suggesting an ∼2-s delay from instances of high/low MAP to low/high BF. Negatively associated episodes (high MAP/low BF and low MAP/high BF) outnumbered positively associated data (P < 0.05). BF during low MAP values was greater than the steady-state average BF and vice versa. Wrist and ankle occlusion blunted the strength of correlations, homogenized the incidence of MAP and BF pairings, and reduced the magnitude of deviation from steady-state values. In contrast, these relationships were matched or accentuated for hand BF. Overall, these results suggest that myogenic responses are present and occur rapidly in human limbs during rest, overwhelm perfusion pressure gradient influences, and are primarily mediated by the distal limb circulation. PMID:25362138

  16. Motor responses to a steady beat.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Rebecca S; Overy, Katie

    2015-03-01

    It is increasingly well established that music containing an isochronous pulse elicits motor responses at the levels of both brain and behavior. Such motor responses are often used in pedagogical and clinical practice to induce movement, particularly where motor functions are impaired. However, the complex nature of such apparently universal human responses has, arguably, not received adequate research attention to date. In particular, it should be noted that many adults, including those with disabilities, find it somewhat difficult to synchronize their movements with a beat with perfect accuracy; indeed, perfecting the skill of being musically "in time" can take years of training during childhood. Further research is needed on the nature of both the specificity and range of motor responses that can arise from the perception of a steady auditory pulse, with different populations, musical stimuli, conditions, and required levels of accuracy in order to better understand and capture the potential value of the musical beat as a pedagogical and therapeutic tool. PMID:25773615

  17. The chemical composition of Galactic beat Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtyukh, V.; Lemasle, B.; Chekhonadskikh, F.; Bono, G.; Matsunaga, N.; Yushchenko, A.; Anderson, R. I.; Belik, S.; da Silva, R.; Inno, L.

    2016-08-01

    We determine the metallicity and detailed chemical abundances (α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements) for the almost complete (18/24) sample of Galactic double mode Cepheids (also called beat Cepheids). Double mode Cepheids are Cepheids that pulsate in two modes simultaneously. We calibrate a new relation between their metallicity and their period ratio P1/P0. This linear relation allows to determine the metallicity of bimodal Cepheids with an accuracy of 0.03 dex in the range of [Fe/H] from +0.2 to -0.5 dex. By extrapolating the relation to Magellanic Clouds beat Cepheids, we provide their metallicity distribution function. Moreover, by using this relation, we also provide the first metallicity estimate for two double-mode F/1O Cepheids located in and beyond the Galactic bulge. Finally, we report the discovery of a super-Lithium rich double mode Cepheid V371 Per which has a Lithium abundance of logA(Li) = 3.54 ± 0.09 dex. Along with V1033 Cyg (which is an ordinary classical Cepheid), it is the second known Cepheid of such type in the Galaxy.

  18. Increased Short-Term Beat-To-Beat Variability of QT Interval in Patients with Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Andrea; Csajbók, Éva; Czékus, Csilla; Gavallér, Henriette; Magony, Sándor; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Várkonyi, Tamás T; Nemes, Attila; Baczkó, István; Forster, Tamás; Wittmann, Tibor; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Lengyel, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, including ventricular arrhythmias are responsible for increased mortality in patients with acromegaly. Acromegaly may cause repolarization abnormalities such as QT prolongation and impairment of repolarization reserve enhancing liability to arrhythmia. The aim of this study was to determine the short-term beat-to-beat QT variability in patients with acromegaly. Thirty acromegalic patients (23 women and 7 men, mean age±SD: 55.7±10.4 years) were compared with age- and sex-matched volunteers (mean age 51.3±7.6 years). Cardiac repolarization parameters including frequency corrected QT interval, PQ and QRS intervals, duration of terminal part of T waves (Tpeak-Tend) and short-term variability of QT interval were evaluated. All acromegalic patients and controls underwent transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Autonomic function was assessed by means of five standard cardiovascular reflex tests. Comparison of the two groups revealed no significant differences in the conventional ECG parameters of repolarization (QT: 401.1±30.6 ms vs 389.3±16.5 ms, corrected QT interval: 430.1±18.6 ms vs 425.6±17.3 ms, QT dispersion: 38.2±13.2 ms vs 36.6±10.2 ms; acromegaly vs control, respectively). However, short-term beat-to-beat QT variability was significantly increased in acromegalic patients (4.23±1.03 ms vs 3.02±0.80, P<0.0001). There were significant differences between the two groups in the echocardiographic dimensions (left ventricular end diastolic diameter: 52.6±5.4 mm vs 48.0±3.9 mm, left ventricular end systolic diameter: 32.3±5.2 mm vs 29.1±4.4 mm, interventricular septum: 11.1±2.2 mm vs 8.8±0.7 mm, posterior wall of left ventricle: 10.8±1.4 mm vs 8.9±0.7 mm, P<0.05, respectively). Short-term beat-to-beat QT variability was elevated in patients with acromegaly in spite of unchanged conventional parameters of ventricular repolarization. This enhanced temporal QT variability may be an early indicator of increased liability to

  19. Increased Short-Term Beat-To-Beat Variability of QT Interval in Patients with Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Orosz, Andrea; Csajbók, Éva; Czékus, Csilla; Gavallér, Henriette; Magony, Sándor; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Várkonyi, Tamás T.; Nemes, Attila; Baczkó, István; Forster, Tamás; Wittmann, Tibor; Papp, Julius Gy.; Varró, András; Lengyel, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, including ventricular arrhythmias are responsible for increased mortality in patients with acromegaly. Acromegaly may cause repolarization abnormalities such as QT prolongation and impairment of repolarization reserve enhancing liability to arrhythmia. The aim of this study was to determine the short-term beat-to-beat QT variability in patients with acromegaly. Thirty acromegalic patients (23 women and 7 men, mean age±SD: 55.7±10.4 years) were compared with age- and sex-matched volunteers (mean age 51.3±7.6 years). Cardiac repolarization parameters including frequency corrected QT interval, PQ and QRS intervals, duration of terminal part of T waves (Tpeak-Tend) and short-term variability of QT interval were evaluated. All acromegalic patients and controls underwent transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Autonomic function was assessed by means of five standard cardiovascular reflex tests. Comparison of the two groups revealed no significant differences in the conventional ECG parameters of repolarization (QT: 401.1±30.6 ms vs 389.3±16.5 ms, corrected QT interval: 430.1±18.6 ms vs 425.6±17.3 ms, QT dispersion: 38.2±13.2 ms vs 36.6±10.2 ms; acromegaly vs control, respectively). However, short-term beat-to-beat QT variability was significantly increased in acromegalic patients (4.23±1.03 ms vs 3.02±0.80, P<0.0001). There were significant differences between the two groups in the echocardiographic dimensions (left ventricular end diastolic diameter: 52.6±5.4 mm vs 48.0±3.9 mm, left ventricular end systolic diameter: 32.3±5.2 mm vs 29.1±4.4 mm, interventricular septum: 11.1±2.2 mm vs 8.8±0.7 mm, posterior wall of left ventricle: 10.8±1.4 mm vs 8.9±0.7 mm, P<0.05, respectively). Short-term beat-to-beat QT variability was elevated in patients with acromegaly in spite of unchanged conventional parameters of ventricular repolarization. This enhanced temporal QT variability may be an early indicator of increased liability to

  20. Movement Instruction to Facilitate Beat Competency in Instrumental Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Colleen; Marshall, Herbert; Hartz, Barry

    2014-01-01

    This article offers instrumental directors at all levels some suggestions for the use of movement to facilitate "beat competency". We use the term beat competency to refer to a musician's ability to play with a consistent sense of pulse and balanced subdivision, as well as the eventual ability to bring that sense of pulse to reading…

  1. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lense, Miriam D; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  2. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  3. Computer Simulation of the Beating Human Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskin, Charles S.; McQueen, David M.

    2001-06-01

    The mechanical function of the human heart couples together the fluid mechanics of blood and the soft tissue mechanics of the muscular heart walls and flexible heart valve leaflets. We discuss a unified mathematical formulation of this problem in which the soft tissue looks like a specialized part of the fluid in which additional forces are applied. This leads to a computational scheme known as the Immersed Boundary (IB) method for solving the coupled equations of motion of the whole system. The IB method is used to construct a three-dimensional Virtual Heart, including representations of all four chambers of the heart and all four valves, in addition to the large arteries and veins that connect the heart to the rest of the circulation. The chambers, valves, and vessels are all modeled as collections of elastic (and where appropriate, actively contractile) fibers immersed in viscous incompressible fluid. Results are shown as a computer-generated video animation of the beating heart.

  4. Wearable seismocardiography: towards a beat-by-beat assessment of cardiac mechanics in ambulant subjects.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, M; Vaini, E; Castiglioni, P; Merati, G; Meriggi, P; Parati, G; Faini, A; Rizzo, F

    2013-11-01

    Seismocardiogram (SCG) is the measure of the micro-vibrations produced by the heart contraction and blood ejection into the vascular tree. Over time, a large body of evidence has been collected on the ability of SCG to reflect cardiac mechanical events such as opening and closure of mitral and aortic valves, atrial filling and point of maximal aortic blood ejection. We recently developed a smart garment, named MagIC-SCG, that allows the monitoring of SCG, electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration out of the laboratory setting in ambulant subjects. The present pilot study illustrates the results of two different experiments performed to obtain a first evaluation on whether a dynamical assessment of indexes of cardiac mechanics can be obtained from SCG recordings obtained by MagIC-SCG. In the first experiment, we evaluated the consistency of the estimates of two indexes of cardiac contractility, the pre-ejection period, PEP, and the left ventricular ejection time, LVET. This was done in the lab, by reproducing an experimental protocol well known in literature, so that our measures derived from SCG could have been compared with PEP and LVET reference values obtained by traditional techniques. Six healthy subjects worn MagIC-SCG while assuming two different postures (supine and standing); PEP was estimated as the time interval between the Q wave in ECG and the SCG wave corresponding to the opening of aortic valve; LVET was the time interval between the SCG waves corresponding to the opening and closure of the aortic valve. The shift from supine to standing posture produced a significant increase in PEP and PEP/LVET ratio, a reduction in LVET and a concomitant rise in the LF/HF ratio in the RR interval (RRI) power spectrum. These results are in line with data available in literature thus providing a first support to the validity of our estimates. In the second experiment, we evaluated in one subject the feasibility of the beat-by-beat assessment of LVET during spontaneous

  5. Capacitive ECG recording and beat-to-beat interval estimation after major cardiac event.

    PubMed

    Leicht, Lennart; Skobel, Erik; Mathissen, Marcel; Leonhardt, Steffen; Weyer, Soren; Wartzek, Tobias; Reith, Sebastian; Mohler, Werner; Teichmann, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Today, heart diseases are the most common cause of death in the U.S.. Due to improved healthcare, more and more patients survive a major cardiac event, e.g. a heart attack. However, participation in everyday activity (e.g. driving a car) can be impaired afterwards. Patients might benefit from heart activity monitoring while driving using a capacitive ECG (cECG). However, it is unknown whether cECG is an appropriate monitoring tool for such patients. In this work, first results from a study including 10 patients having survived at least one major cardiac event are presented. It is shown that cECG can be used to diagnose heart rhythm deviations and estimate beat-to-beat intervals similar to conventional ECG. PMID:26738055

  6. Cardiac autonomic function and vascular profile in subclinical hypothyroidism: Increased beat-to-beat QT variability

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Pramila; Yeragani, Vikram K.; Prasanna Kumar, K. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) may have higher incidence of coronary heart disease and autonomic dysfunction. Design of the Study: Prospective case control study. Aim and Objectives: To evaluate beat-to-beat QT variability and vascular stiffness in patients with SH compared to normal controls. Materials and Methods: We compared linear and nonlinear measures of cardiac repolarization liability using beat-to-beat QT intervals derived from the surface electrocardiogram during supine posture and vascular indices including pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial index (ABI) during supine posture between female patients with SH and age- and sex-matched normal controls. Spectral analysis was done at very low frequency (LF) (0.003–0.04 Hz), Low frequency (LF) (0.04–0.15 Hz), and high frequency (HF) (0.15–0.4 Hz). The HF represents vagal regulation (parasympathetic) and LF represents both parasympathetic and sympathetic regulation. Results: We recruited 58 women with a mean age of 31.83 ± 8.9 years and 49 controls with mean age of 32.4 ± 9.9 years (P = NS). QT variability index (QTvi) was higher in cases compared to controls (P = 0.01). The ratio of LF/HF of R-R interval which is an index of sympathovagal tone was significantly more in cases compared to controls (P = 0.02). The difference in the left minus the right ABI was significant between cases and controls (P = 0.03). Conclusions: The cases had lower parasympathetic activity as compared to controls, and there was a predominance of sympathetic activity in cases. QTvi may be an important noninvasive tool in this group of patients to study the risk of cardiovascular mortality. PMID:27730068

  7. Evaluation of the beat-to-beat detection accuracy of PulseOn wearable optical heart rate monitor.

    PubMed

    Parak, Jakub; Tarniceriu, Adrian; Renevey, Philippe; Bertschi, Mattia; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) provides significant information about the health status of an individual. Optical heart rate monitoring is a comfortable alternative to ECG based heart rate monitoring. However, most available optical heart rate monitoring devices do not supply beat-to-beat detection accuracy required by proper HRV analysis. We evaluate the beat-to-beat detection accuracy of a recent wrist-worn optical heart rate monitoring device, PulseOn (PO). Ten subjects (8 male and 2 female; 35.9±10.3 years old) participated in the study. HRV was recorded with PO and Firstbeat Bodyguard 2 (BG2) device, which was used as an ECG based reference. HRV was recorded during sleep. As compared to BG2, PO detected on average 99.57% of the heartbeats (0.43% of beats missed) and had 0.72% extra beat detection rate, with 5.94 ms mean absolute error (MAE) in beat-to-beat intervals (RRI) as compared to the ECG based RRI BG2. Mean RMSSD difference between PO and BG2 derived HRV was 3.1 ms. Therefore, PO provides an accurate method for long term HRV monitoring during sleep.

  8. A dual collimator design for beat-to-beat measurement of cardiac performance with an Anger camera

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, S.L.; Goodwin, P.N.; Scharf, S.C.; Hardoff, R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-09-01

    A dual collimator was designed for an Anger camera to permit measurement of cardiac performance on a beat-to-beat basis. Special all-purpose (SAP) and special high-sensitivity (SHS) collimator sections can be interchanged without movement of the patient. Thus, left-ventricular regions of interest delineated on SAP multigated images can be transferred to SHS dynamic images to generate beat-to-beat volume curves. Preliminary balloon studies demonstrated an excellent correlation between ejection fractions calculated with the two collimators: r greater than 0.99, n . 17, p less than 0.001. Varying the volume of an adjacent right ventricle balloon failed to alter significantly the count rate from the left ventricle balloon's region of interest. Preliminary results on 12 patients, comparing standard-camera ejection fractions with average beat-to-beat ejection fractions, showed that is is possible to measure cardiac function on a beat-to-beat basis with a single-crystal gamma camera. There was minimal difference between the ejection fractions calculated by the dual-collimator method and a standard gated technique (r . 0.98, n . 12, p less than 0.001).

  9. The Cutaneous Rabbit Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Rudiger; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In the cutaneous rabbit effect (CRE), a tactile event (so-called attractee tap) is mislocalized toward an adjacent attractor tap. The effect depends on the time interval between the taps. The authors delivered sequences of taps to the forearm and asked participants to report the location of one of the taps. The authors replicated the original CRE…

  10. Effects of spironolactone towards rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid pacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Fa; Gu, Lei; Huang, Meng-Xun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Li, Hua; Zhang, Bang-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the effects of spironolactone towards the rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid atrial pacing (RAP). 30 rabbits were randomly divided into control group, RAP group and spironolactone group, with 10 rabbits in each group. RAP was performed at the speed of 800 beats/min for 8 h, atrial effective refractory period (AERP) was determined before and at the 1(st), 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th) and 8(th) of the pacing, the expressions of atrial muscular calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA were performed the RT-PCR detection, and ultrastructural changes of atrial myocytes were observed. AERP of RAP group shortened, with poor frequency adaptability; the expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA decreased 22% and 26%, respectively, when compared with the control group; ultrastructure of atrial myocytes changed significantly. AERP of spironotlactone group shortened less that RAP group, and the frequency adaptability was maintained, the decreased expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA significantly reduced. RAP could cause atrial remodeling, while spironolactone could inhibit RAP-induced atrial remodeling. PMID:26826809

  11. Robust inter-beat interval estimation in cardiac vibration signals.

    PubMed

    Brüser, C; Winter, S; Leonhardt, S

    2013-02-01

    Reliable and accurate estimation of instantaneous frequencies of physiological rhythms, such as heart rate, is critical for many healthcare applications. Robust estimation is especially challenging when novel unobtrusive sensors are used for continuous health monitoring in uncontrolled environments, because these sensors can create significant amounts of potentially unreliable data. We propose a new flexible algorithm for the robust estimation of local (beat-to-beat) intervals from cardiac vibration signals, specifically ballistocardiograms (BCGs), recorded by an unobtrusive bed-mounted sensor. This sensor allows the measurement of motions of the body which are caused by cardiac activity. Our method requires neither a training phase nor any prior knowledge about the morphology of the heart beats in the analyzed waveforms. Instead, three short-time estimators are combined using a Bayesian approach to continuously estimate the inter-beat intervals. We have validated our method on over-night BCG recordings from 33 subjects (8 normal, 25 insomniacs). On this dataset, containing approximately one million heart beats, our method achieved a mean beat-to-beat interval error of 0.78% with a coverage of 72.69%.

  12. Understanding women's attitudes towards wife beating in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed Central

    Hindin, Michelle J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with attitudes towards wife beating among women in partnerships in Zimbabwe in order to assist public health practitioners in preventing intimate partner violence (IPV). METHODS: A nationally representative survey of 5907 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) was conducted in Zimbabwe. Women were asked about their attitudes towards wife beating in five situations. The survey included sociodemographic characteristics, partnership characteristics, and household decision-making. FINDINGS: Over half of all women in Zimbabwe (53%) believed that wife beating was justified in at least one of the five situations. Respondents were most likely to find wife beating justified if a wife argued with her spouse (36%), neglected her children (33%), or went out without telling her spouse (30%). Among women in partnerships (n=3077), younger age, living in rural areas, lower household wealth, schooling at a lower level than secondary, and lower occupational status were associated with women reporting that wife beating is justified. Women who reported that they make household decisions jointly with their partners were less likely to say that wife beating is justified. CONCLUSIONS: Zimbabwe has a long way to go in preventing IPV, particularly because the younger generation of women is significantly more likely to believe that wife beating is justified compared with older women. Given the current social and political climate in Zimbabwe, finding means to negotiate rather than settle conflict through violence is essential from the household level to the national level. PMID:12973642

  13. Energetics of synchronized states in three-dimensional beating flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettot, Clément; Lauga, Eric

    2011-12-01

    During collective locomotion, beating flagella of spermatozoa interact hydrodynamically and are observed experimentally to synchronize. G. I. Taylor used a small-amplitude two-dimensional sheet model to show that the rate at which swimmers do work against the fluid is minimal for in-phase beating. We use a semianalytical approach based on hydrodynamic reflections to extend these results to the small-amplitude three-dimensional beating of infinite flagellar filaments. We first consider a configuration of two parallel filaments. In the case where the beating of both flagella occurs in the same plane as that defined by their axis, in-phase beating is found to lead to an overall minimum of energy dissipation, while opposite-phase leads to a maximum. If we allow the orientation of the beating planes to vary, we find that the minimum of energy dissipation is obtained for either the in-phase or opposite-phase conformation, in a manner that depends on the flagella orientation and their relative distance. We further characterize numerically the set of optimal relative orientations. Quantitatively analogous results are obtained using a simple model based on the beating of two spheres interacting hydrodynamically in the far field. Exploiting the linearity of Stokes equation, we then extend our results to the case of three beating flagella in an aligned and triangular conformation. Consistent with Taylor’s two-dimensional work, our results suggest that, from a hydrodynamic standpoint, it is more energetically favorable for spermatozoa with three-dimensional flagella to swim close to each other and with synchronized, parallel, in-phase beating.

  14. Temperature-controlled cooled-tip radiofrequency linear ablation of the atria guided by a realtime position management system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ichiro; Min, Nuo; Okumura, Yasuo; Ohkubo, Kimie; Kofune, Masayoshi; Ashino, Sonoko; Nagashima, Koichi; Nakai, Toshiko; Kasamaki, Yuji; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Due to the difficulty in producing a transmural linear lesion and the possibility of complications such as thrombus formation leading to thromboembolism, the catheter-based maze procedure remains problematic. We tested, in pigs, the possibility of using a temperature-controlled cooled-tip radiofrequency (RF) ablation system together with a realtime position management (RPM) system to create a transmural linear lesion uncomplicated by thrombus formation.Nine pigs underwent insertion of two electrode catheters (each with two ultrasound electrodes), one into the coronary sinus (CS) and one into the right ventricular apex (references for ultrasound-based non-fluoroscopic three-dimensional mapping). A cooled-tip catheter (with two ultrasound electrodes) was introduced into the right atrium. Linear right atrial ablation was performed with a custom radiofrequency (RF) generator. The catheter was perfused with 0.66 mL/second of saline. RF was delivered for 60 seconds at a target temperature of 40°C. A linear ablation line was created between the superior vena cava and inferior vena cava. Three-dimensional isochronal maps were created during CS pacing before and after ablation. In 4 of the 9 pigs, a transmural linear ablation line was confirmed by three-dimensional mapping and postmortem macroscopic examination. No endocardial thrombus formation was noted. Temperature-controlled cooled-tip RF linear ablation guided by an RPM system appears to have potential for creating linear lesions in the atria. Further studies are needed to determine whether such an ablation technique and the parameters used will facilitate successful completion of the catheter-based maze procedure.

  15. VLDL from Metabolic Syndrome Individuals Enhanced Lipid Accumulation in Atria with Association of Susceptibility to Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Ke, Liang-Yin; Wei, Chi; Hsiao, Yi-Lin; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lai, Wen-Ter; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Chen, Chu-Huang; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Wu, Bin-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of metabolic derangements. Dyslipidemia is an important factor in MetS and is related to atrial fibrillation (AF). We hypothesized that very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in MetS (MetS-VLDL) may induce atrial dilatation and vulnerability to AF. VLDL was therefore separated from normal (normal-VLDL) and MetS individuals. Wild type C57BL/6 male mice were divided into control, normal-VLDL (nVLDL), and MetS-VLDL (msVLDL) groups. VLDL (15 µg/g) and equivalent volumes of saline were injected via tail vein three times a week for six consecutive weeks. Cardiac chamber size and function were measured by echocardiography. MetS-VLDL significantly caused left atrial dilation (control, n = 10, 1.64 ± 0.23 mm; nVLDL, n = 7, 1.84 ± 0.13 mm; msVLDL, n = 10, 2.18 ± 0.24 mm; p < 0.0001) at week 6, associated with decreased ejection fraction (control, n = 10, 62.5% ± 7.7%, vs. msVLDL, n = 10, 52.9% ± 9.6%; p < 0.05). Isoproterenol-challenge experiment resulted in AF in young msVLDL mice. Unprovoked AF occurred only in elderly msVLDL mice. Immunohistochemistry showed excess lipid accumulation and apoptosis in msVLDL mice atria. These findings suggest a pivotal role of VLDL in AF pathogenesis for MetS individuals. PMID:26805814

  16. Investigation of beat-waves generation with high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Song, W.; Shi, Y. C.; Deng, Y. Q.; Zhu, X. X.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Hu, X. G.

    2013-10-21

    A method for generating high power beating radio-frequency wave with high conversion efficiency is proposed. Based on Cherenkov radiation, two longitudinal resonant modes are excited simultaneously and interacted with intense electron beam synchronously. An experiment was carried out and beat-waves with an average power of about 2.3 GW, frequencies of 9.29 GHz and 10.31 GHz, and efficiency of about 40% were obtained. Through controlling the electron energy, the amplitude proportions of the two resonant modes are altered, and different beat-wave patterns are formed.

  17. Investigation of beat-waves generation with high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Shi, Y. C.; Deng, Y. Q.; Zhu, X. X.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Hu, X. G.

    2013-10-01

    A method for generating high power beating radio-frequency wave with high conversion efficiency is proposed. Based on Cherenkov radiation, two longitudinal resonant modes are excited simultaneously and interacted with intense electron beam synchronously. An experiment was carried out and beat-waves with an average power of about 2.3 GW, frequencies of 9.29 GHz and 10.31 GHz, and efficiency of about 40% were obtained. Through controlling the electron energy, the amplitude proportions of the two resonant modes are altered, and different beat-wave patterns are formed.

  18. Beliefs about wife beating: an exploratory study with Lebanese students.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Nadine; Chang, Doris F; Ginges, Jeremy

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in understanding the sociocultural contexts and risk factors for domestic violence in the Arab world. This study provides an analysis of the religious, legal, and familial contexts of domestic violence in Lebanon and assesses contemporary attitudes toward women and wife beating in a sample of 206 Lebanese university students. Gender, patriarchal attitudes, religion, childhood experiences with family violence, and mother's employment status were investigated as predictors of attitudes toward wife beating. Consistent with feminist theories of wife abuse, gender and attitudes toward women's roles emerged as the strongest predictors of beliefs about wife beating. PMID:20445079

  19. Beat-to-beat estimation of LVET and QS2 indices of cardiac mechanics from wearable seismocardiography in ambulant subjects.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Vaini, Emanuele; Castiglioni, Paolo; Meriggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Seismocardiogram (SCG) is the measure of the minute vibrations produced by the beating heart. We previously demonstrated that SCG, ECG and respiration could be recorded over the 24 h during spontaneous behavior by a smart garment, the MagIC-SCG system. In the present case study we explored the feasibility of a beat-to-beat estimation of two indices of heart contractility, the Left Ventricular Ejection Time (LVET) and the electromechanical systole (QS2) from SCG and ECG recordings obtained by the MagIC-SCG device in one subject. We considered data collected during outdoor spontaneous behavior (while sitting in the metro and in the office) and in a laboratory setting (in supine and sitting posture, and during recovery after 100 W and 140 W cycling). LVET was estimated from SCG as the time interval between the opening and closure of the aortic valve, QS2 as the time interval between the Q wave of the ECG and the closure of the aortic valve. In every condition, LVET and QS2 could be estimated on a beat-to-beat basis from the SCG collected by the smart garment. LVET and QS2 are characterized by important beat-to-beat fluctuations, with standard deviations in the same order of magnitude of RR Interval. In all settings, spectral profiles are different for LVET, QS2 and RR Interval. This suggests that the biological mechanisms impinging on the heart exert a differentiated influence on the variability of each of these three indices.

  20. Effects of chronic treatment with losartan and enalaprilat on [3H]-norepinephrine release from isolated atria of Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Foucart, S; Patrick, S K; Oster, L; de Champlain, J

    1996-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chronic treatment with losartan, an AT1 angiotensin II receptor antagonist, and enalaprilat, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, on the presynaptic modulation of [3H]-norepinephrine release from isolated atria of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their respective control, the Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). The rats received either losartan (5 mg/kg/day) or enalaprilat (1 mg/kg/day) for 12 days by means of osmotic minipumps. The atria were isolated and incubated with [3H]-norepinephrine and the release of radioactivity was used as an index of norepinephrine release. The experimental protocol consisted of two electrical stimulations and the drugs were administered 20 min before the second stimulation. The modulatory action of angiotensin II (0.01 and 1 mumol/L), the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, oxymetazoline (1 mumol/L), the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, idazoxan (1 mumol/L) and the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist fenoterol (1 mumol/L) were tested. The results show that losartan or enalaprilat both similarly reduced the blood pressure in SHR. However, only the chronic losartan treatment, and not enalaprilat, abolished the facilitatory effect of exogenously administered angiotensin II on the release of radioactivity. The prejunctional alpha 2- and beta 2-adrenoceptor modulatory mechanisms were not altered by either chronic treatments. Similarly, the facilitatory effect of angiotensin II was blocked by acute administration of losartan but not by enalaprilat. Finally, the facilitatory action of bradykinin on the release of radioactivity was unchanged by chronic enalaprilat treatment. These results confirm the presence of facilitatory AT1 angiotensin II receptors on sympathetic nerve terminals of rat atria. These results also confirm that sympathetic nerve terminal blockade by losartan or the blockade of endogenous angiotensin II formation by enalaprilat are likely to participate in the antihypertensive

  1. Feathering collisions in beating reed simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Tamara; Abel, Jonathan S.; Smith, Julius O.

    2003-10-01

    Pressure controlled valves are the primary sound production mechanisms for woodwind and brass musical instruments, as well as for many bioacoustic vocal systems such as the larynx and syrinx (the vocal organ in birds). During sound production, air flow sets a reed or membrane into motion creating a variable height in the valve channel and, potentially, periodically closing the channel completely. Depending on how this event is handled, an abrupt termination of air flow between open and closed states can cause undesirable discontinuities and inaccuracies in a discrete-time simulation-particularly at relatively low audio sampling rates. A solution was developed by re-examining the behavior of the differential equation governing volume flow through a pressure-controlled valve, paying particular attention to this rather troublesome transition. A closed-form solution for the time evolution of volume flow is given and used to derive an update for volume flow. The result is a smoother, more accurate, and nearly alias-free transition from open to closed. ``Feathered collisions'' of this nature can refine the sound quality produced by the numerical simulation of beating reeds, such as in clarinets, at typical audio sampling rates.

  2. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  3. Intertrial auditory neural stability supports beat synchronization in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Carr, Kali Woodruff; Tierney, Adam; White-Schwoch, Travis; Kraus, Nina

    2016-02-01

    The ability to synchronize motor movements along with an auditory beat places stringent demands on the temporal processing and sensorimotor integration capabilities of the nervous system. Links between millisecond-level precision of auditory processing and the consistency of sensorimotor beat synchronization implicate fine auditory neural timing as a mechanism for forming stable internal representations of, and behavioral reactions to, sound. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate a systematic relationship between consistency of beat synchronization and trial-by-trial stability of subcortical speech processing in preschoolers (ages 3 and 4 years old). We conclude that beat synchronization might provide a useful window into millisecond-level neural precision for encoding sound in early childhood, when speech processing is especially important for language acquisition and development. PMID:26760457

  4. Beat the Winter Blues: Shedding Light on Seasonal Sadness

    MedlinePlus

    ... exit disclaimer . Subscribe Beat the Winter Blues Shedding Light on Seasonal Sadness As the days get shorter, ... clock” responds to cues in your surroundings, especially light and darkness. During the day, your brain sends ...

  5. Cilia-Like Beating of Active Microtubule Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Timothy; Welch, David; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism that drives the regular beating of individual cilia and flagella, as well as dense ciliary fields, remains unclear. We describe a minimal model system, composed of microtubules and molecular motors, which self-assemble into active bundles exhibiting beating patterns reminiscent of those found in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. These observations suggest that hundreds of molecular motors, acting within an elastic microtubule bundle, spontaneously synchronize their activity to generate large-scale oscillations. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that densely packed, actively bending bundles spontaneously synchronize their beating patterns to produce collective behavior similar to metachronal waves observed in ciliary fields. The simple in vitro system described here could provide insights into beating of isolated eukaryotic cilia and flagella, as well as their synchronization in dense ciliary fields. PMID:21778400

  6. Mercury Beating Heart: Modifications to the Classical Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najdoski, Metodija; Mirceski, Valentin; Petrusevski, Vladimir M.; Demiri, Sani

    2007-01-01

    The mercury beating heart (MBH) is a commonly performed experiment, which is based on varying oxidizing agents and substituting other metals for iron. Various modified versions of the classical demonstration of the experiment are presented.

  7. Intertrial auditory neural stability supports beat synchronization in preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Kali Woodruff; Tierney, Adam; White-Schwoch, Travis; Kraus, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The ability to synchronize motor movements along with an auditory beat places stringent demands on the temporal processing and sensorimotor integration capabilities of the nervous system. Links between millisecond-level precision of auditory processing and the consistency of sensorimotor beat synchronization implicate fine auditory neural timing as a mechanism for forming stable internal representations of, and behavioral reactions to, sound. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate a systematic relationship between consistency of beat synchronization and trial-by-trial stability of subcortical speech processing in preschoolers (ages 3 and 4 years old). We conclude that beat synchronization might provide a useful window into millisecond-level neural precision for encoding sound in early childhood, when speech processing is especially important for language acquisition and development. PMID:26760457

  8. Beat frequency ultrasonic microsphere contrast agent detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A system for and method of detecting and measuring concentrations of an ultrasonically-reflective microsphere contrast agent involving detecting non-linear sum and difference beat frequencies produced by the microspheres when two impinging signals with non-identical frequencies are combined by mixing. These beat frequencies can be used for a variety of applications such as detecting the presence of and measuring the flow rates of biological fluids and industrial liquids, including determining the concentration level of microspheres in the myocardium.

  9. Towards T 1-limited magnetic resonance imaging using Rabi beats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedder, H.; Dolde, F.; Rempp, F.; Wolf, T.; Hemmer, P.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2011-03-01

    Two proof-of-principle experiments toward T 1-limited magnetic resonance imaging with NV centers in diamond are demonstrated. First, a large number of Rabi oscillations is measured and it is demonstrated that the hyperfine interaction due to the NV's 14N can be extracted from the beating oscillations. Second, the Rabi beats under V-type microwave excitation of the three hyperfine manifolds is studied experimentally and described theoretically.

  10. Investigating the beat by beat phase synchronization between maternal and fetal heart rates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Khandoker, Ahsan H; Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Funamoto, Kiyoe; Sugibayashi, Rika; Endo, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2013-01-01

    The development of the fetal cardiovascular system plays a crucial role in fetal health. The evolution of the relationship between fetal and maternal cardiac systems during fetal maturation is a characterizing feature for fetal cardiac development. This paper aims to evaluate this relationship by investigating the beat-to-beat synchronization between fetal and maternal heart rates and its variation at different stages of pregnancy. Synchronization epochs and phase locking patterns are analyzed at certain synchronization ratios (SRs) for three gestational age groups (16-26 weeks, 27-33 weeks, 34-40 weeks). Results show that the normalized synchronization epoch is significantly different for three age groups with the p-value of 6.72*10(-6) and 2.89*10(-4) at SR of 1:2 and 4:5 respectively. The variance of phase locking also shows significant difference for three groups with the p-value less than 10(-7) at four SRs. Results also suggest that synchronization may be the force behind the increase in the maternal heart rate to maintain the fetal development and provide supplies for the fetus. Overall, the findings propose new clinical markers for evaluating the antenatal development.

  11. The relationship between the strength of the human heart beat and the interval between beats.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, J; Miller, G A; Noble, M I; Papadoyannis, D; Seed, W A

    1982-06-01

    In 15 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and pacing tests, the left ventricular (LV) pressure and its maximum rate of rise (LV dP/dt max) were measured with catheter-tip manometers. Atrial or ventricular pacing at a single steady frequency (the priming frequency) was followed by a test pulse at a varying interval (test pulse interval). In 14 subjects in whom it was examined, the contractile response after the test pulse increased with test pulse interval to reach a maximum plateau value--the optimum contractile response (OCR). In five cases, further prolongation of the test pulse interval decreased the contractile response. The optimum test pulse interval occurred at 800-900 msec. An increase in the priming frequency before the introduction of the test pulse caused a progressive increase in OCR, in contrast to the minor effects on LV dP/dt max of the control beats. Similar results were recorded in four other patients in whom contractile response was assessed from the rate of rise of right ventricular pressure. These results indicate that with tachycardia, the interval between beats is insufficient to allow maximum contractile performance (presumed to be activated by calcium ions) to develop. The true effect of increasing heart rate is only revealed by the relationship between OCR and the preceding frequency of contraction.

  12. [Non-heart-beating donors are ineligible].

    PubMed

    Heide, W

    2016-02-01

    The death of the donor is a mandatory prerequisite for organ transplantation (dead donor rule) worldwide. It is a medical, legal and ethical consensus to accept the concept of brain death, as first proposed in 1968 by the ad hoc committee of the Harvard Medical School, as a certain criterion of death. In isolated cases where the diagnosis of brain death was claimed to be wrong, it could be demonstrated that the diagnostic procedure for brain death had not been correctly performed. In March 2014 a joint statement by the German neuromedical societies emphasized that 1) the diagnosis of brain death is one of the safest diagnoses in medicine if performed according to accepted medical standards and criteria and 2) the concept of non-heart-beating donors (NHBD, i. e. organ donation after an arbitrarily defined duration of circulatory and cardiac arrest) practiced in some European countries must be absolutely rejected because it implicates a high risk of diagnostic error. According to the current literature it is unclear at what time cardiac and circulatory arrest is irreversible and leads to irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain including the brainstem, even though clinical signs of cessation of brain functions are always found after 10 min. Furthermore, is it often an arbitrary decision to exactly define the duration of cardiac arrest if continuous echocardiographic monitoring has not been carried out from the very beginning. Last but not least there are ethical concerns against the concept of NHBD because it might influence therapeutic efforts to resuscitate a patient with cardiac arrest. Therefore, the German Medical Council (BÄK) has repeatedly rejected the concept of NHBD for organ transplantation since 1995. PMID:26830897

  13. No inotropic action of enkephalins or enkephalin derivatives on electrically-stimulated atria isolated from lean and obese rats.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, W. S.; Thornhill, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Inotropic actions of the endogenous enkephalins, leucine enkephalin [( Leu] enkephalin) and methionine enkephalin [( Met] enkephalin), and derivatives, [D-Ala2-methionine] enkephalinamide (DAMEA) and [D Ala2-leucine]enkephalinamide (DALEA) were tested, alone or in combination with noradrenaline (NA), (+/-)-isoprenaline or carbachol, on electrically-stimulated atria excised from Sprague-Dawley, fatty, Zucker (fa/fa) and lean, hooded heterozygous (Fa/fa) rats. [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin, DAMEA and DALEA (4 X 10(-7)M to 4 X 10(-4)M) caused no significant changes in atrial tension in any group compared to pre-injection control values or those following the infusion of Krebs-Henseleit control solution. NA and isoprenaline (10(-7) to 10(-6)M) caused significant, dose-related increases in atrial tension in each of the three strains of rats tested with the Fa/fa group showing the greatest change and fastest rate of tension development. [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin, DAMEA or DALEA (4 X 10(-6)M) infused concurrently with NA or isoprenaline (10(-6)M) evoked atrial tension changes within each group that were not different from those observed when NA or isoprenaline was administered alone. Carbachol (10(-9) and 10(-8)M) caused a dose-related decrease (10% and 30-40%, respectively, from pre-injection control values) in atrial tension in auricles excised from all three groups. Again, infusion of [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin, DAMEA or DALEA (4 X 10(-6)M) together with carbachol (10(-8)M) did not affect atrial tension changes of auricles isolated from any group compared to when carbachol was given alone. The results indicate that the endogenous pentapeptides, [( Met] or [Leu] enkephalin), or derivatives (DAMEA and DALEA) do not affect atrial tension of electrically-stimulated auricles isolated from Sprague-Dawley, fa/fa or Fa/fa rats. In addition, these pentapeptides do not modify the positive inotropic actions of NA or isoprenaline or the negative inotropic

  14. Positive airway pressure improves nocturnal beat-to-beat blood pressure surges in obesity hypoventilation syndrome with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jason R; Fonkoue, Ida T; Grimaldi, Daniela; Emami, Leila; Gozal, David; Sullivan, Colin E; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment has been shown to have a modest effect on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, there is a paucity of data on the effect of PAP therapy on rapid, yet significant, BP swings during sleep, particularly in obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). The present study hypothesizes that PAP therapy will improve nocturnal BP on the first treatment night (titration PAP) in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and that these improvements will become more significant with 6 wk of PAP therapy. Seventeen adults (7 men, 10 women; age 50.4 ± 10.7 years, BMI 49.3 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)) with OHS and clinically diagnosed OSA participated in three overnight laboratory visits that included polysomnography and beat-to-beat BP monitoring via finger plethysmography. Six weeks of PAP therapy, but not titration PAP, lowered mean nocturnal BP. In contrast, when nocturnal beat-to-beat BPs were aggregated into bins consisting of at least three consecutive cardiac cycles with a >10 mmHg BP surge (i.e., Δ10-20, Δ20-30, Δ30-40, and Δ>40 mmHg), titration, and 6-wk PAP reduced the number of BP surges per hour (time × bin, P < 0.05). PAP adherence over the 6-wk period was significantly correlated to reductions in nocturnal systolic (r = 0.713, P = 0.001) and diastolic (r = 0.497, P = 0.043) BP surges. Despite these PAP-induced improvements in nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges, 6 wk of PAP therapy did not alter daytime BP. In conclusion, PAP treatment reduces nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and this improvement in nocturnal BP regulation was greater in patients with higher PAP adherence.

  15. Early repolarization as a predictor of premature ventricular beats.

    PubMed

    Matoshvili, Z T; Petriashvili, Sh G; Archadze, A T; Azaladze, I G

    2015-02-01

    Early repolarization pattern (ERP) is a common ECG variant, characterized by J point elevation manifested either as terminal QRS slurring (the transition from the QRS segment to the ST segment) or notching (a positive deflection inscribed on terminal QRS complex) associated with concave upward ST-segment elevation and prominent T waves in at least two contiguous leads. Aim of this observational study was to compare number of premature ventricular beats in the different groups of patients with early repolarization. The result of this observational study shows that there are: 1,74 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in 41-74 year subgroup VS 19-40 year subgroup; 1,31 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in male subgroup VS female subgroup (But this difference is not statistically significant, because t=1,49, p=0,141); 2,85 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in CAD+ERP subgroup VS ERP without CAD subgroup; 1,74 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in HF+ERP subgroup VS ERP without HF subgroup; 1,81 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in CAD+ERP subgroup VS CAD without ERP subgroup; 1,58 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in HF+ERP subgroup VS HF without ERP subgroup; So, CAD+ERP is very arrhythmogenic condition, after this is HF+ERP, Then Age. This study shows that ERP independently increase number of PVB in different groups (CAD, HF). This is principally new and very important result. Also the number of patients is enough to make this conclusion.

  16. Beating of wives: a cross-cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J C

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports a more in-depth analysis of wife beating from a cross-cultural perspective. As background for the analysis, the methodological, operationalization, and measurement in previous cross-cultural research on wife beating is examined. Subsequently, a review of findings from these studies and the theoretical explanations from selected disciplines are presented as the basis of selection of variables expected to affect the presence and severity of wife abuse in a given culture. These variables are then examined with evidence from female perspective ethnographies on eleven different societies. This cross-cultural analysis of wife beating has illuminated more issues of methodology and variations of patterns than it has answered any questions about what may increase the frequency and severity of wife-beating in a given culture. It is possible that the beating of wives is a personal expression of hostility against women that may be expressed in addition to, or instead of, institutionalized aggression toward women in that culture. As such, wife beating can take many forms. It can be an indication of manhood, a means of personal control, a reflection of personal animosity, and an expression of sexual jealousy. These personal forms would be paralleled by societal expression such as gang rape, control of women by exclusion from the public sphere, general hostility between sexes, and the virtue of women becoming an issue of extended family and community honor. In conclusion, the importance of the variables is summarized and directions for future cross-cultural research on wife beating are suggested.

  17. Analysis of ciliary beat pattern and beat frequency using digital high speed imaging: comparison with the photomultiplier and photodiode methods

    PubMed Central

    Chilvers, M.; O'Callaghan, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of the power and recovery stroke of respiratory cilia using digital high speed video imaging. Beat frequency measurements made using digital high speed video were also compared with those obtained using the photomultiplier and modified photodiode techniques.
METHOD—Ciliated epithelium was obtained by brushing the inferior nasal turbinate of 20 healthy subjects. Ciliated edges were observed by microscopy and the deviation of cilia during their recovery stroke relative to the path travelled during their power stroke was measured. Beat frequency measurements made by digital high speed video analysis were compared with those obtained using the photomultiplier and modified photodiode.
RESULTS—Cilia were found to beat with a forward power stroke and a backward recovery stroke within the same plane. The mean angular deviation of the cilia during the recovery stroke from the plane of the forward power stroke was only 3.6°(95% CI 3.1 to 4.1). There was a significant difference in beat frequency measurement between the digital high speed video (13.2 Hz (95% CI 11.8 to 14.6)) and both photomultiplier (12.0 Hz (95% CI 10.8 to 13.1), p = 0.01) and photodiode (11.2 Hz (95% CI 9.9 to 12.5), p<0.001) techniques. The Bland-Altman limits of agreement for the digital high speed video were -2.75 to 5.15 Hz with the photomultiplier and -2.30 to 6.06 Hz with the photodiode.
CONCLUSION—Respiratory cilia beat forwards and backwards within the same plane without a classical sideways recovery sweep. Digital high speed video imaging allows both ciliary beat frequency and beat pattern to be evaluated.

 PMID:10722772

  18. Robotic Force Stabilization for Beating Heart Intracardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Shelten G; Yip, Michael C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Perrin, Douglas P; Del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2009-10-01

    The manipulation of fast moving, delicate tissues in beating heart procedures presents a considerable challenge to surgeons. We present a new robotic force stabilization system that assists surgeons by maintaining a constant contact force with the beating heart. The system incorporates a novel, miniature uniaxial force sensor that is mounted to surgical instrumentation to measure contact forces during surgical manipulation. Using this sensor in conjunction with real-time tissue motion information derived from 3D ultrasound, we show that a force controller with feed-forward motion terms can provide safe and accurate force stabilization in an in vivo contact task against the beating mitral valve annulus. This confers a 50% reduction in force fluctuations when compared to a standard force controller and a 75% reduction in fluctuations when compared to manual attempts to maintain the same force. PMID:20431713

  19. Robotic force stabilization for beating heart intracardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Shelten G; Yip, Michael C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Perrin, Douglas P; del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    The manipulation of fast moving, delicate tissues in beating heart procedures presents a considerable challenge to surgeons. We present a new robotic force stabilization system that assists surgeons by maintaining a constant contact force with the beating heart. The system incorporates a novel, miniature uniaxial force sensor that is mounted to surgical instrumentation to measure contact forces during surgical manipulation. Using this sensor in conjunction with real-time tissue motion information derived from 3D ultrasound, we show that a force controller with feed-forward motion terms can provide safe and accurate force stabilization in an in vivo contact task against the beating mitral valve annulus. This confers a 50% reduction in force fluctuations when compared to a standard force controller and a 75% reduction in fluctuations when compared to manual attempts to maintain the same force. PMID:20425967

  20. Superresolution measurement of nanofiber diameter by modes beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, E. F.; Solano, P.; Hoffman, J. E.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Fatemi, F. K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanofibers are becoming an important tool in quantum information technologies for coupling photonics systems to atomic systems. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing these nanofibers prior to integration into an apparatus are desirable. In this work, we probe the light propagating in a fused silica optical nanofiber (750-nm-diameter) by coupling it evanescently to a 6- μm-diameter microfiber that is scanned along the nanofiber length. This technique is capable of observing all possible beat lengths among different propagating modes. The beat lengths are strongly dependent on the nanofiber diameter and refractive index of the fiber. The steep dependence has enabled measurements of the fiber diameter with sub-Angstrom sensitivity. The diameter extracted from the beat length measurements agrees with a measurement made using scanning electron microscopy. Work supported by NSF.

  1. A Structural Basis for How Motile Cilia Beat

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Peter; Heuser, Thomas; Sale, Winfield S.

    2014-01-01

    The motile cilium is a mechanical wonder, a cellular nanomachine that produces a high-speed beat based on a cycle of bends that move along an axoneme made of 9+2 microtubules. The molecular motors, dyneins, power the ciliary beat. The dyneins are compacted into inner and outer dynein arms, whose activity is highly regulated to produce microtubule sliding and axonemal bending. The switch point hypothesis was developed long ago to account for how sliding in the presence of axonemal radial spoke–central pair interactions causes the ciliary beat. Since then, a new genetic, biochemical, and structural complexity has been discovered, in part, with Chlamydomonas mutants, with high-speed, high-resolution analysis of movement and with cryoelectron tomography. We stand poised on the brink of new discoveries relating to the molecular control of motility that extend and refine our understanding of the basic events underlying the switching of arm activity and of bend formation and propagation. PMID:26955066

  2. On readout of vibrational qubits using quantum beats

    SciTech Connect

    Shyshlov, Dmytro; Babikov, Dmitri; Berrios, Eduardo; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-12-14

    Readout of the final states of qubits is a crucial step towards implementing quantum computation in experiment. Although not scalable to large numbers of qubits per molecule, computational studies show that molecular vibrations could provide a significant (factor 2–5 in the literature) increase in the number of qubits compared to two-level systems. In this theoretical work, we explore the process of readout from vibrational qubits in thiophosgene molecule, SCCl{sub 2}, using quantum beat oscillations. The quantum beats are measured by first exciting the superposition of the qubit-encoding vibrational states to the electronically excited readout state with variable time-delay pulses. The resulting oscillation of population of the readout state is then detected as a function of time delay. In principle, fitting the quantum beat signal by an analytical expression should allow extracting the values of probability amplitudes and the relative phases of the vibrational qubit states. However, we found that if this procedure is implemented using the standard analytic expression for quantum beats, a non-negligible phase error is obtained. We discuss the origin and properties of this phase error, and propose a new analytical expression to correct the phase error. The corrected expression fits the quantum beat signal very accurately, which may permit reading out the final state of vibrational qubits in experiments by combining the analytic fitting expression with numerical modelling of the readout process. The new expression is also useful as a simple model for fitting any quantum beat experiments where more accurate phase information is desired.

  3. Constant magnetic field influence on a heart beat in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lazetic, B.; Pekaric-Nadj, N.; Kasas-Lazetic, K.

    1991-03-11

    The authors used uretan narcose to implant constant magnets of 50 mT under the skin of rats in head region. The ECG was registrated in the next 6 hours. From it they found much slower heart beat which culminated in the first 105 minutes. After 6 weeks of continual exposure the heart beat of the exposed rats was still slower then in the controls. It is concluded that a chronical exposition to the constant magnetic field affected rats organisms and no regulatory mechanism could prevent it.

  4. Characterization of fluid transport due to multiciliary beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukens, Sarah; Yang, Xingzhou; Fauci, Lisa

    2008-11-01

    Understanding fluid transport caused by beating cilia can give insight on biological systems such as transport of respiratory mucus, ovum transport in the oviduct, and feeding currents around unicellular organisms. Here we investigate fluid transport due to coordinated beating of motile cilia based upon a computational model that couples their internal force generating mechanisms with external fluid dynamics. Velocity field data is used to identify Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) within the domain. These coherent structures give spatial information on fluid mixing and nutrient transport within this dynamic environment.

  5. THE RABBIT ZYGOTE

    PubMed Central

    Gulyas, Bela J.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of the blastomere nucleus was examined in the rabbit zygote with the electron microscope. In late anaphase the chromosomes are bare and vesicles of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum are numerous in the vicinity of the chromosomes. In early telophase individual chromosomes attain their own nuclear envelope and they are called karyomeres. The envelope of the karyomeres contains small gaps within it at several places where the chromatin is exposed to the cytoplasm. Nuclear pores are also observed. In the cytoplasm short annulate lamellae appear adjacent to the karyomeres, and clusters of punctate substance are also present. From early telophase onward the karyomeres extend pseudopod-like structures, called karyopods, which extend toward other karyomeres or karyopods, and consequently fuse together and serve as chromosomal bridges. Eventually all of the karyomeres fuse into a dense nucleus and decondensation of the chromosomes occurs. PMID:4676367

  6. The brain responses to different frequencies of binaural beat sounds on QEEG at cortical level.

    PubMed

    Jirakittayakorn, Nantawachara; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2015-01-01

    Beat phenomenon is occurred when two slightly different frequency waves interfere each other. The beat can also occur in the brain by providing two slightly different frequency waves separately each ear. This is called binaural beat. The brain responses to binaural beat are in discussion process whether the brain side and the brain area. Therefore, this study aims to figure out the brain responses to binaural beat by providing different binaural beat frequencies on 250 carrier tone continuously for 30 minutes to participants and using quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) to interpret the data. The result shows that different responses appear in different beat frequency. Left hemisphere dominance occur in 3 Hz beat within 15 minutes and 15 Hz beat within 5 minutes. Right hemisphere dominance occurs in 10 Hz beat within 25 minute. 6 Hz beat enhances all area of the brain within 10 minutes. 8 Hz and 25 Hz beats have no clearly responses while 40 Hz beat enhances the responses in frontal lobe. These brain responses can be used for brain modulation application to induce the brain activity in further studies.

  7. Hybrid access to atria via the Guiraudon Universal Cardiac Introducer for arrhythmia ablation after total cavopulmonary derivation.

    PubMed

    Guiraudon, Gérard M; Jones, Douglas L; Bainbridge, Daniel; Cohen, Laurence; Lecompte, Yves; Hidden-Lucet, Françoise; Frank, Robert; Pavie, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We report the first use of a new platform, the Guiraudon Universal Cardiac Introducer (GUCI), in humans for accessing the left atrium for catheter-based ablations in patients with resistant atrial arrhythmias after total cavopulmonary derivation. The GUCI was originally designed for intracardiac access for closed, beating instrumental intracardiac surgery.The patient was a 29-year-old man with problematic atrial arrhythmias resistant to antiarrhythmic drugs because of severe uncontrolled bradycardia and because his pacemaker was explanted for infection.The GUCI was attached to the left atrial appendage via an anterior left thoracotomy. The GUCI was modified to accommodate introduction and manipulation of multiple catheters. This allowed electrophysiologists to perform catheter-based exploration and ablation. A DDD pacemaker was implanted, with an atrial endocardial lead introduced via the GUCI cuff and a ventricular epicardial lead.Postoperative atrial arrhythmias were controlled using amiodarone and atrial pacing. At the 12-month follow-up, the patient was arrhythmia- and drug-free and returned to full employment.This new access offers an additional new alternative atrial access to treat resistant arrhythmia after total cavopulmonary derivation. The current state-of-the-art makes patient selection difficult and uncomfortable for the surgeons because of incomplete preoperative electrophysiological data, such as a return to the beginning of surgery for arrhythmia; however, more cumulative experience with intraoperative electrophysiological data and new mapping technologies should address these limitations.

  8. Influence of frequency of stimulation on the toxicity of digoxin on isolated guinea-pig atria in different extracellular Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J; Bremhorst, T; Schümann, H J

    1978-12-01

    In isolated guinea-pig left atria driven by rates of 0.5, 1,2, 3 and 4 Hz digoxin was infused continuously until cardiac arrest occurred. The experiments were performed in Tyrode solution with normal and twice the calcium content. Calculated was the toxic concentration of digoxin as that concentration which caused arrest of the preparation. In normal Ca2+-content (1.8 mM) an increase of the driving frequency decreased significantly the toxic concentration of digoxin, i.e. elevated the toxicity of this cardiac glycoside. The elevation of the Ca2+-content of the Tyrode caused a further diminution of the toxic concentrations of digoxin in dependence of the driving rate, thus demonstrating a synergism of Ca2+ and digoxin with regard to its toxicity.

  9. Relationship between beat to beat coronary artery motion and image quality in prospectively ECG-gated two heart beat 320-detector row coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Komatsu, Shuhei; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Kiryu, Shigeru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the influence of the beat-to-beat movement of the coronary arteries on image quality of multi-segment reconstruction (MSR) images. Although MSR improves temporal resolution, image quality would be degraded by beat-to-beat movement of the coronary arteries. In a retrospectively review, 18 patients (mean age, 67.0 years) who underwent coronary CT angiography using a 320-detector row CT were included. The displacement and diameter of coronary artery segments for each of the identified nine landmarks was recorded. The motion ratio was calculated as the division of displacement by diameter. Image quality (IQ) was graded by a four-point scale. The correlation between MSR IQ score and the motion ratio showed stronger negative correlation than that between MSR IQ score and the displacement (r = -0.54 vs. r = -0.36). The average motion ratio for segments in which half-scan reconstruction (HSR) IQ was better than MSR IQ (29.1%, group A) was higher than that for segments in which MSR IQ was better than HSR IQ (16.0%, group C). The motion ratio in group C was lower than 25%. Difference in IQ scores of the HSR images was more frequent in group A than in the remaining segments in which the motion ratio was lower than 25% (16.7% vs. 66.0%; P < 0.0002). The motion ratio could be a better index than the displacement to evaluate the influence of the motion of coronary arteries on image quality. MSR images would be impaired by a motion ratio larger than 25%. Image impairment of one of the HSR images might also impair MSR images.

  10. Analysis of ependymal ciliary beat pattern and beat frequency using high speed imaging: comparison with the photomultiplier and photodiode methods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare beat frequency measurements of ependymal cilia made by digital high speed imaging to those obtained using the photomultiplier and modified photodiode techniques. Using high speed video analysis the relationship of the power and recover strokes was also determined. Methods Ciliated strips of ependyma attached to slices from the brain of Wistar rats were incubated at 30°C and observed using a ×50 water immersion lens. Ciliary beat frequency was measured using each of the three techniques: the high speed video, photodiode and photomultiplier. Readings were repeated after 30 minutes incubation at 37°C. Ependymal cilia were observed in slow motion and the precise movement of cilia during the recovery stroke relative to the path travelled during the power stroke was measured. Results The mean (95% confidence intervals) beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 30°C were 27.7 (26.6 to 28.8), 25.5 (24.4 to 26.6) and 20.8 (20.4 to 21.3) Hz, respectively. The mean (95% confidence intervals) beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 37°C were 36.4 (34 to 39.5), 38.4 (36.8 to 39.9) and 18.8 (16.9 to 20.5) Hz. The inter and intra observer reliability for measurement of ciliary beat frequency was 3.8% and 1%, respectively. Ependymal cilia were observed to move in a planar fashion during the power and recovery strokes with a maximum deviation to the right of the midline of 12.1(11.8 to 13.0)° during the power stroke and 12.6(11.6 to 13.6)° to the left of the midline during the recovery stroke. Conclusion The photodiode technique greatly underestimates ciliary beat frequency and should not be used to measure ependymal ciliary beat frequency at the temperatures studied. Ciliary beat frequency from the high speed video and photomultiplier techniques cannot be used interchangeably. Ependymal cilia had minimal deviation to the right side

  11. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia during anaesthesia: assessment of respiration related beat-to-beat heart rate variability analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Loula, P; Jäntti, V; Yli-Hankala, A

    1997-11-01

    Beat-to-beat heart rate variability analysis is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of neuropathy. Respiration-related heart rate variability (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) reflects the function of parasympathetic nervous system during spontaneous ventilation while awake. RSA is also claimed to monitor the depth of anaesthesia. Power spectrum analysis or various averaging techniques of the heart rate variability are usually applied. The current literature, however, does not usually interpret the ground rules and limitations of the method used, and this may sometimes lead to erroneous conclusions on the data. The aim of our study was to compare and analyse critically the performance of different methods of evaluating RSA during anaesthesia and positive pressure ventilation. Power spectrum analysis, the root mean square of the successive RR-interval difference (RMSSD), and two respiration related methods, RSA index and average phase RSA, were included in the comparison. To test these methods, 11 patients were anaesthetised with isoflurane and their lungs were ventilated mechanically with a frequency of 6 cycles min-1. Each patient received a bolus dose of atropine (20 micrograms kg-1) during the trial. Electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram and tracheal pressure signal from respirator were recorded and analyses were performed off-line. We demonstrated that general indices, such as RMSSD, may be strongly affected by heart rate level and other non-respiration related variations in heart rate. We also showed that the effect of unwanted fluctuations on RSA can be reduced with respiration dependent beat-to-beat methods. Furthermore we confirmed that in addition to the amplitude, also the pattern of respiratory sinus arrhythmia is of interest: the pattern is reversed in phase compared to spontaneous breathing while awake, as we have shown earlier. To analyse RSA during anaesthesia, we recommend the use of an average phase RSA method based on beat-to-beat variability

  12. The cottontail rabbits of Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Llewellyn, L.M.; Handley, C.O.

    1945-01-01

    Five races of cottontail rabbits belonging to three species occur in Virginia. One of them, the Mearns cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus mearnsi), is reported here for the first time. It occurs in six southwestern counties of the state, while the eastern cottontail (S. f. mallurus) occurs in the remainder of the state with the exception of Smith and Fishermans islands off the eastern coast of Cape Charles, where it is replaced by Hitchens cottontail (S. f. hitchensi). The New England cottontail (S. transitionalis) is found on the higher mountain peaks, above 3000 feet, and the swamp rabbit (S. palustris) occurs in the Dismal Swamp region of southeastern Virginia.....The height of the breeding season for the eastern cottontail in Virginia is March and April, but breeding continues through the entire year except in December and January. The average litter size based on embryo counts was 4.7. The sex ratio of 234 specimens from all parts of the state, taken mostly in the December to February period, was 53 males to 47 females. That of a group of 145 rabbits live-trapped at Blacksburg during February and Marchwas 58 males to 42 females. The figures show that males are more active than females during the winter months, and therefore are more easily taken then....In transplanting cottontails from one section of the state to another, it is recommended that only cottontails of the same race as those originally present in the region being restocked be released there....Tularemia is not a common disease among rabbits in Virginia, but the rabbit ticks are often carriers of the disease and may transmit it to rabbits. Rabbit ticks are also found to be carriers of Rocky Mountain fever and American Q. fever. After the ticks drop off the rabbits to hibernate in the ground, which is likely to occur during mid-winter in Virginia, there is relatively little danger of humans contracting tularemia by contact with rabbits. Present laws in Virginia which prohibit rabbit hunting until the

  13. Binding of two specific bradycardic agents, alinidine and AQ-A 39, to muscarinic receptors of guinea pig atria and ventricle.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F; Kukovetz, W R

    1988-02-01

    The mechanism of action of the two "specific bradycardic agents" alinidine and AQ-A 39 (falipamil) is still a matter of controversy. Their binding properties to atrial and ventricular myocardium of the guinea pig and rat were, therefore, investigated by the radioligand binding technique. In competition studies against the nonselective antagonists [125I]3-quinuclidinyl 4-iodobenzilate [( 125I]QNB) and 1-N-methyl-[3H]scopolamine methylchloride [( 3H]NMS), both alinidine and AQ-A 39 competitively displaced the radioligands with I50 values (corrected for radioligand concentration) of 1-2 microM (alinidine/[125I]QNB) and 4 microM (alinidine/[3H]NMS), respectively. The I50 values for AQ-A 39 were lower by a factor of two. Slope factors (pseudo Hill coefficients) were 0.7-0.8 (AQ-A 39) and 0.8-0.9 (alinidine), and significantly lower than unity in both atria and ventricle. The guanosine triphosphate (GTP) (100 microM) and 5'-guanylimido-di-phosphate [Gpp(NH)p] (100 microM) slightly creased [3H]QNB binding and produced no or only a small (factor 2-3) rightward shift of alinidine and AQ-A 39 competition curves. At high concentration (1 mM), AQ-A 39 drastically decreased [125I]QNB dissociation rate from both atrial and ventricular receptors (t1/2 control, 19 min; plus AQ-A 39, 75 min) while alinidine (1 mM) decreased dissociation half-life in ventricle with no change in atria. It is concluded that both bradycardic agents possess some but not all characteristics of weak agonists in binding studies, and that they also bind to an allosteric site of the muscarinic receptors. Association with this site could possibly activate a mixed Na+/K+ inward pacemaker current (if) resulting in bradycardia.

  14. Binding of two specific bradycardic agents, alinidine and AQ-A 39, to muscarinic receptors of guinea pig atria and ventricle.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F; Kukovetz, W R

    1988-02-01

    The mechanism of action of the two "specific bradycardic agents" alinidine and AQ-A 39 (falipamil) is still a matter of controversy. Their binding properties to atrial and ventricular myocardium of the guinea pig and rat were, therefore, investigated by the radioligand binding technique. In competition studies against the nonselective antagonists [125I]3-quinuclidinyl 4-iodobenzilate [( 125I]QNB) and 1-N-methyl-[3H]scopolamine methylchloride [( 3H]NMS), both alinidine and AQ-A 39 competitively displaced the radioligands with I50 values (corrected for radioligand concentration) of 1-2 microM (alinidine/[125I]QNB) and 4 microM (alinidine/[3H]NMS), respectively. The I50 values for AQ-A 39 were lower by a factor of two. Slope factors (pseudo Hill coefficients) were 0.7-0.8 (AQ-A 39) and 0.8-0.9 (alinidine), and significantly lower than unity in both atria and ventricle. The guanosine triphosphate (GTP) (100 microM) and 5'-guanylimido-di-phosphate [Gpp(NH)p] (100 microM) slightly creased [3H]QNB binding and produced no or only a small (factor 2-3) rightward shift of alinidine and AQ-A 39 competition curves. At high concentration (1 mM), AQ-A 39 drastically decreased [125I]QNB dissociation rate from both atrial and ventricular receptors (t1/2 control, 19 min; plus AQ-A 39, 75 min) while alinidine (1 mM) decreased dissociation half-life in ventricle with no change in atria. It is concluded that both bradycardic agents possess some but not all characteristics of weak agonists in binding studies, and that they also bind to an allosteric site of the muscarinic receptors. Association with this site could possibly activate a mixed Na+/K+ inward pacemaker current (if) resulting in bradycardia. PMID:2452318

  15. The effect of adenosine deaminase inhibition on the A1 adenosinergic and M2 muscarinergic control of contractility in eu- and hyperthyroid guinea pig atria.

    PubMed

    Pak, Krisztian; Zsuga, Judit; Kepes, Zita; Erdei, Tamas; Varga, Balazs; Juhasz, Bela; Szentmiklosi, Andras Jozsef; Gesztelyi, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    The A1 adenosine and M2 muscarinic receptors exert protective (including energy consumption limiting) effects in the heart. We investigated the influence of adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibition on a representative energy consumption limiting function, the direct negative inotropic effect elicited by the A1 adenosinergic and M2 muscarinergic systems, in eu- and hyperthyroid atria. Furthermore, we compared the change in the interstitial adenosine level caused by ADA inhibition and nucleoside transport blockade, two well-established processes to stimulate the cell surface A1 adenosine receptors, in both thyroid states. A classical isolated organ technique was applied supplemented with the receptorial responsiveness method (RRM), a concentration estimating procedure. Via measuring the contractile force, the direct negative inotropic capacity of N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine, a selective A1 receptor agonist, and methacholine, a muscarinic receptor agonist, was determined on the left atria isolated from 8-day solvent- and thyroxine-treated guinea pigs in the presence and absence of 2'-deoxycoformycin, a selective ADA inhibitor, and NBTI, a selective nucleoside transporter inhibitor. We found that ADA inhibition (but not nucleoside transport blockade) increased the signal amplification of the A1 adenosinergic (but not M2 muscarinergic) system. This action of ADA inhibition developed in both thyroid states, but it was greater in hyperthyroidism. Nevertheless, ADA inhibition produced a smaller rise in the interstitial adenosine concentration than nucleoside transport blockade did in both thyroid states. Our results indicate that ADA inhibition, besides increasing the interstitial adenosine level, intensifies the atrial A1 adenosinergic function in another (thyroid hormone-sensitive) way, suggesting a new mechanism of action of ADA inhibition. PMID:25877465

  16. Exogenous midkine administration prevents cardiac remodeling in pacing-induced congestive heart failure of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Harada, Masahide; Hojo, Mayumi; Kamiya, Kaichiro; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Murohara, Toyoaki; Kodama, Itsuo; Horiba, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Midkine (MK), a heparin-binding growth factor, has been shown to prevent cardiac remodeling after ischemic injury through its anti-apoptotic effect. Cell apoptosis is central to the pathophysiology of cardiac remodeling in congestive heart failure (CHF) of ischemic as well as non-ischemic origin. We hypothesized that MK exerts the anti-apoptotic cardioprotective effect in CHF of non-ischemic etiology. MK protein or vehicle (normal saline) was subcutaneously administered in tachycardia-induced CHF rabbits (right ventricular pacing, 350 beats/min, 4 weeks). The vehicle-treated rabbits (n = 19, control) demonstrated severe CHF and high mortality rate, whereas MK (n = 16) demonstrated a well-compensated state and a lower mortality rate. In echocardiography, left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic dimension decreased in MK versus control, whereas LV systolic function increased. In histological analysis (picrosirius red staining), MK decreased collagen deposition area compared with control. TUNEL staining showed that MK prevented cell apoptosis and minimized myocyte loss in the CHF rabbit ventricle, associated with activation of PI3-K/Akt signaling, producing a parallel decrease of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. MK prevented progression of cardiac remodeling in the CHF rabbit, likely by activation of anti-apoptotic signaling. Exogenous MK application might be a novel therapeutic strategy for CHF due to non-ischemic origin.

  17. Are African American Fraternities Beating Themselves to Death?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Beating of pledges, frequently leading to lawsuits and sometimes to death, has become a serious problem in black fraternities. Although black fraternities officially cracked down on hazing in 1990 in response to a student's death, many fear underground hazing has become even more dangerous. Incidents occur both on black and on white campuses.…

  18. Using Science and Much More to Beat the Flood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The Beat the Flood challenge involves designing and building a model flood-proof home, which is then tested in "flood" conditions. It is set on the fictitious Watu Island. The children form teams, with each team member being assigned a responsibility for the duration of the task--team leader, chief recorder, and resource manager. This…

  19. Editorial: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Behar, Joachim; Johnson, Alistair; Oster, Julien; Clifford, Gari D.; Moody, George B.

    2015-01-01

    This editorial reviews the background issues, the design, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology (CinC) 2014 Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Our major focus was to accelerate the development and facilitate the comparison of robust methods for locating heart beats in long-term multi-channel recordings. A public (training) database consisting of 151,032 annotated beats was compiled from records that contained ECGs as well as pulsatile signals that directly reflect cardiac activity, and other signals that may have few or no observable markers of heart beats. A separate hidden test data set (consisting of 152,478 beats) is permanently stored at PhysioNet, and a public framework has been developed to provide researchers the ability to continue to automatically score and compare the performance of their algorithms. A scoring criteria based on the averaging of gross sensitivity, gross positive predictivity, average sensitivity, and average positive predictivity is proposed. The top three scores (as of March 2015) on the hidden test data set were 93.64%, 91.50%, and 90.70%. PMID:26217894

  20. Phase Shifting and the Beating of Complex Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2011-01-01

    At the introductory level, the demonstration and analysis of sound beating is usually limited to the superposition of two purely sinusoidal waves with equal amplitudes and very similar frequencies. Under such conditions, an observer hears the periodic variation of the loudness of a sound with an unchanging timbre. On the other hand, when complex…

  1. System-Beating: Structural Impediments to the Public Good.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner, Lydia S.

    1993-01-01

    Suggests that within bureaucratic systems norms of behavior develop that can be classified as system-beating. Examines elements necessary for such behavior to occur: individual with role within system; system comprised of many specific roles; observation of practical actions and practical circumstances; interpretation of these circumstances;…

  2. Heart beat detection using a multimodal data coupling method.

    PubMed

    Mollakazemi, M Javad; Atyabi, S Abbas; Ghaffari, Ali

    2015-08-01

    The most straightforward method for heart beat estimation is R-peak detection based on an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. Current R-peak detection methods do not work properly when the ECG signal is contaminated or missing, which leads to the incorrect estimation of the heart rate. This raises the need for reliable algorithms which can locate heart beats in continuous long-term multimodal data, allowing robust analysis.In this paper, three peak detectors are evaluated for heart beat detection using various cardiovascular signals. One of the peak detectors is a new general peak detector (GPD) algorithm which is applicable on ECG and other pulsatile signals to compensate for the limitation of QRS detection. This peak detector algorithm is adaptive and independently finds amplitude characteristics for every recording, while not tuned for ECG or other pulsatile signals. Three strategies, which are different disciplines of detectors, are then proposed while the fusion method remains the same in all strategies. In the first strategy, the ECG and the lowest-indexed signal of general blood pressure (BP), arterial blood pressure (ART) and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) are processed through gqrs and wabp (from the PhysioNet library), respectively. In the second strategy, all beats in different signals are detected by GPD. In the third strategy, ECG and other signals are processed by gqrs and GPD, respectively. In all three strategies two criteria are used in order to fuse the detections. The first criterion is based on the number of candidate detections in a specific time period, based on which signals of interest are selected. The second fusion criterion is based on the regularity of the derived intervals between subsequent candidate detections. If the number of detections in ECG and one of BP, ART and PAP signals have reasonable physiological range, a new signal is generated in which they are coupled with each other. Heart beats can more easily be detected in noisy

  3. The segmented-beat modulation method for ECG estimation.

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, A; Giuliani, C; Fioretti, S; Di Nardo, F; Burattini, L

    2015-08-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) tracings corrupted by noise with frequency components in the ECG frequency band, may result useless unless appropriately processed. The estimation of the clean ECG from such recordings, however, is quite challenging; being linear filtering inappropriate. In the common situations in which the R peaks are detectable, template-based techniques have been proposed to estimate the ECG by a template-beat concatenation. However, such techniques have the major limit of not being able to reproduce physiological heart-rate and morphological variability. Thus, the aim of the present study was to propose the segmented-beat modulation method (SBMM) as the technique that overcomes such limit. The SBMM is an improved template-based technique that provides good-quality estimations of ECG tracings characterized by some heart-rate and morphological variability. It segments the template ECG beat into QRS and TUP segments and then, before concatenation, it applies a modulation/demodulation process to the TUP-segment so that the estimated-beat duration and morphology adjust to those of the corresponding original-beat. To test its performance, the SBMM was applied to 19 ECG tracings from normal subjects. There were no errors in estimating the R peak location, and the errors in the QRS and TUP segments were low (≤65 μV and ≤30 μV, respectively), with the former ones being significantly higher than the latter ones. Eventually, TUP errors tended to increase with increasing heart-rate variability (correlation coefficient: 0.59, P<;10(-2)). In conclusion, the new SBMM proved to be a useful tool for providing good-quality ECG estimations of tracings characterized by heart-rate and morphological variability.

  4. J point elevation as a predictor of premature ventricular beats.

    PubMed

    Matoshvili, Z; Petriashvili, Sh; Archvadze, A; Azaladze, I

    2014-01-01

    Early repolarization pattern (ERP) is a common ECG variant, characterized by J point elevation manifested either as terminal QRS slurring (the transition from the QRS segment to the ST segment) or notching (a positive deflection inscribed on terminal QRS complex) associated with concave upward ST-segment elevation and prominent T waves in at least two contiguous leads. 36 patients were included in this observation. There are 36 patients (19-68 years old) with early repolarization ECG patterns. All this 36 patients were divided into two groups according to their level of J point elevation. First group consisted of 12 patients with J point elevation ≥0,15 mV; second group - of 24 patients with J point elevation <0,15 mV. We make 24 h ECG holter monitoring all this patients to evaluate absolute number of premature ventricular beat during 24 h. Before and during this monitoring patients don't take any antyarrhythmic drugs. In the first group (J point elevation ≥0,15 mV) sum of premature ventricular beats were 27432, in the second group (J point elevation <0,15 mV) sum of premature ventricular beats were 31 896. The results of this observational study shows that there is 1,72 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in first group. So, J point elevation equal or more then 0,15 mV, is more arrhythmogenic and induces premature ventricular beats. This is principally new and very important result.

  5. Correlations in heart beat data as quantitative characterization of heart pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbikas, J.; Cenys, A.; Zemaityte, D.; Varoneckas, G.

    1996-06-01

    Correlation between heart pathology and statistical properties of heart beat data has been studied. It is shown that heart beat data has different scaling behavior for healthy and disease cases. Possibilities to develop new monitoring technique based on the permanent control of the correlations in heart beat data are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Bead-beating artefacts in the Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes ratio of the human stool metagenome.

    PubMed

    Vebø, Heidi C; Karlsson, Magdalena Kauczynska; Avershina, Ekaterina; Finnby, Lene; Rudi, Knut

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated bead-beating cell-lysis in analysing the human stool metagenome, since this is a key step. We observed that two different bead-beating instruments from the same producer gave a three-fold difference in the Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes ratio. This illustrates that bead-beating can have a major impact on downstream metagenome analyses. PMID:27498349

  7. Role of gap junction channel in the development of beat-to-beat action potential repolarization variability and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Janos; Banyasz, Tamas; Szentandrassy, Norbert; Kistamas, Kornel; Nanasi, Peter P; Satin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The short-term beat-to-beat variability of cardiac action potential duration (SBVR) occurs as a random alteration of the ventricular repolarization duration. SBVR has been suggested to be more predictive of the development of lethal arrhythmias than the action potential prolongation or QT prolongation of ECG alone. The mechanism underlying SBVR is not completely understood but it is known that SBVR depends on stochastic ion channel gating, intracellular calcium handling and intercellular coupling. Coupling of single cardiomyocytes significantly decreases the beat-to-beat changes in action potential duration (APD) due to the electrotonic current flow between neighboring cells. The magnitude of this electrotonic current depends on the intercellular gap junction resistance. Reduced gap junction resistance causes greater electrotonic current flow between cells, and reduces SBVR. Myocardial ischaemia (MI) is known to affect gap junction channel protein expression and function. MI increases gap junction resistance that leads to slow conduction, APD and refractory period dispersion, and an increase in SBVR. Ultimately, development of reentry arrhythmias and fibrillation are associated post-MI. Antiarrhythmic drugs have proarrhythmic side effects requiring alternative approaches. A novel idea is to target gap junction channels. Specifically, the use of gap junction channel enhancers and inhibitors may help to reveal the precise role of gap junctions in the development of arrhythmias. Since cell-to-cell coupling is represented in SBVR, this parameter can be used to monitor the degree of coupling of myocardium.

  8. Image-based coronary tracking and beat-to-beat motion compensation: feasibility for improving coronary MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Maneesh; Hager, Gregory D; Lorenz, Christine H

    2008-09-01

    A method to reduce the effect of motion variability in MRI of the coronary arteries is proposed. It involves acquiring real-time low-resolution images in specific orthogonal orientations, extracting coronary motion from these images, and then using this motion information to guide high-resolution MR image acquisition on a beat-to-beat basis. The present study establishes the feasibility and efficacy of the proposed approach using human motion data in an offline implementation, prior to future online implementation on an MRI scanner. To track the coronary arteries in low-resolution real-time MR images in an accurate manner, a tracking approach is presented and validated. The tracking algorithm was run on real-time images acquired at 15-20 frames per second in four-chamber, short-axis, and coronal views in five volunteers. The systolic and diastolic periods in the cardiac cycles, computed from the extracted motion information, had significant variability during the short time periods typical of cardiac MRI. It is also demonstrated through simulation analysis using human tracked coronary motion data that accounting for this cardiac variability by adaptively changing the trigger delay for acquisition on a beat-to-beat basis improves overall motion compensation and hence MR image quality evaluated in terms of SNR and CNR values. PMID:18727098

  9. Ambulatory instrument for monitoring indirect beat-to-beat blood pressure in superficial temporal artery using volume-compensation method.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Yamakoshi, K

    1996-11-01

    A portable instrument, based on a volume-compensation technique, is designed for ambulatory monitoring of indirect beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) in the superficial temporal artery. The instrument consists of a small disc-type cuff and a portable unit carried by the subject. Several components are integrated in the cuff for applying counter-pressure to the artery, i.e. a reflectance-type photo-plethysmographic sensor for arterial volume detection, a pressure sensor for cuff pressure Pc measurement and a nozzle flapper-type- electro-pneumatic convertor for controlling Pc. The portable unit includes volume servo control circuitry and a microprocessor-based signal-processing and recording unit. This automatically performs all the necessary measurement procedures and stores into a memory IC element the processed systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressure data, together with pulse intervals on a beat-to-beat basis from the servo-controlled Pc (indirectly measured BP waveform). With this instrument, momentary changes in BP during ambulatory situations such as bicycle ergometer exercise and daily activities including motorway driving are successfully recorded. From the results of simultaneous measurement of the subject's posture changes, the effect of posture change on blood pressure, e.g. baroreceptor-cardiac reflex, is also clearly demonstrated.

  10. Left ventricular diastolic filling with an implantable ventricular assist device: beat to beat variability with overall improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Zhou, J.; Greenberg, N. L.; Savage, R. M.; McCarthy, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied the effects of left ventricular (LV) unloading by an implantable ventricular assist device on LV diastolic filling. BACKGROUND: Although many investigators have reported reliable systemic and peripheral circulatory support with implantable LV assist devices, little is known about their effect on cardiac performance. METHODS: Peak velocities of early diastolic filling, late diastolic filling, late to early filling ratio, deceleration time of early filling, diastolic filling period and atrial filling fraction were measured by intraoperative transesophageal Doppler echocardiography before and after insertion of an LV assist device in eight patients. A numerical model was developed to simulate this situation. RESULTS: Before device insertion, all patients showed either a restrictive or a monophasic transmitral flow pattern. After device insertion, transmitral flow showed rapid beat to beat variation in each patient, from abnormal relaxation to restrictive patterns. However, when the average values obtained from 10 consecutive beats were considered, overall filling was significantly normalized from baseline, with early filling velocity falling from 87 +/- 31 to 64 +/- 26 cm/s (p < 0.01) and late filling velocity rising from 8 +/- 11 to 32 +/- 23 cm/s (p < 0.05), resulting in an increase in the late to early filling ratio from 0.13 +/- 0.18 to 0.59 +/- 0.38 (p < 0.01) and a rise in the atrial filling fraction from 8 +/- 10% to 26 +/- 17% (p < 0.01). The deceleration time (from 112 +/- 40 to 160 +/- 44 ms, p < 0.05) and the filling period corrected by the RR interval (from 39 +/- 8% to 54 +/- 10%, p < 0.005) were also significantly prolonged. In the computer model, asynchronous LV assistance produced significant beat to beat variation in filling indexes, but overall a normalization of deceleration time as well as other variables. CONCLUSIONS: With LV assistance, transmitral flow showed rapidly varying patterns beat by beat in each patient, but

  11. The impact of beat-to-beat variability in optimising the acute hemodynamic response in cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Steven; Walker, Cameron; Crozier, Andrew; Hyde, Eoin R.; Blazevic, Bojan; Behar, Jonathan M.; Claridge, Simon; Sohal, Manav; Shetty, Anoop; Jackson, Tom; Rinaldi, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute indicators of response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) are critical for developing lead optimisation algorithms and evaluating novel multi-polar, multi-lead and endocardial pacing protocols. Accounting for beat-to-beat variability in measures of acute haemodynamic response (AHR) may help clinicians understand the link between acute measurements of cardiac function and long term clinical outcome. Methods and results A retrospective study of invasive pressure tracings from 38 patients receiving an acute pacing and electrophysiological study was performed. 602 pacing protocols for left ventricle (LV) (n = 38), atria–ventricle (AV) (n = 9), ventricle–ventricle (VV) (n = 12) and endocardial (ENDO) (n = 8) optimisation were performed. AHR was measured as the maximal rate of LV pressure development (dP/dtMx) for each beat. The range of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of mean AHR was ~ 7% across all optimisation protocols compared with the reported CRT response cut off value of 10%. A single clear optimal protocol was identifiable in 61%, 22%, 25% and 50% for LV, AV, VV and ENDO optimisation cases, respectively. A level of service (LOS) optimisation that aimed to maximise the expected AHR 5th percentile, minimising variability and maximising AHR, led to distinct optimal protocols from conventional mean AHR optimisation in 34%, 78%, 67% and 12.5% of LV, AV, VV and ENDO optimisation cases, respectively. Conclusion The beat-to-beat variation in AHR is significant in the context of CRT cut off values. A LOS optimisation offers a novel index to identify the optimal pacing site that accounts for both the mean and variation of the baseline measurement and pacing protocol. PMID:26844303

  12. Beat-to-beat systolic time-interval measurement from heart sounds and ECG.

    PubMed

    Paiva, R P; Carvalho, P; Couceiro, R; Henriques, J; Antunes, M; Quintal, I; Muehlsteff, J

    2012-02-01

    Systolic time intervals are highly correlated to fundamental cardiac functions. Several studies have shown that these measurements have significant diagnostic and prognostic value in heart failure condition and are adequate for long-term patient follow-up and disease management. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using heart sound (HS) to accurately measure the opening and closing moments of the aortic heart valve. These moments are crucial to define the main systolic timings of the heart cycle, i.e. pre-ejection period (PEP) and left ventricular ejection time (LVET). We introduce an algorithm for automatic extraction of PEP and LVET using HS and electrocardiogram. PEP is estimated with a Bayesian approach using the signal's instantaneous amplitude and patient-specific time intervals between atrio-ventricular valve closure and aortic valve opening. As for LVET, since the aortic valve closure corresponds to the start of the S2 HS component, we base LVET estimation on the detection of the S2 onset. A comparative assessment of the main systolic time intervals is performed using synchronous signal acquisitions of the current gold standard in cardiac time-interval measurement, i.e. echocardiography, and HS. The algorithms were evaluated on a healthy population, as well as on a group of subjects with different cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In the healthy group, from a set of 942 heartbeats, the proposed algorithm achieved 7.66 ± 5.92 ms absolute PEP estimation error. For LVET, the absolute estimation error was 11.39 ± 8.98 ms. For the CVD population, 404 beats were used, leading to 11.86 ± 8.30 and 17.51 ± 17.21 ms absolute PEP and LVET errors, respectively. The results achieved in this study suggest that HS can be used to accurately estimate LVET and PEP.

  13. Influences of rapid pacing-induced electrical remodeling on pharmacological manipulation of the atrial refractoriness in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Toshiki; Kondo, Naoto; Takahara, Akira

    2016-03-01

    Electrical remodeling plays a pivotal role in maintaining the reentry during atrial fibrillation. In this study, we assessed influence of electrical remodeling on pharmacological manipulation of the atrial refractoriness in rabbits. We used an atrial electrical remodeling model of the rabbit, subjected to rapid atrial pacing (RAP; 600 beats/min) for 2-4 weeks, leading to shortening of atrial effective refractory period (AERP). Intravenous administration of dl-sotalol (6 mg/kg), bepridil (1 mg/kg), amiodarone (10 mg/kg) or vernakalant (3 mg/kg) significantly prolonged the AERP both in the control and RAP rabbits. The extents in the RAP rabbits were similar to those in the control animals. On the other hand, prolonging effects of intravenously administered ranolazine (10 mg/kg) or tertiapin-Q (0.03 mg/kg) on the AERP in the RAP rabbits were more potent than those in the control animals. These results suggest that rapid pacing-induced electrical remodeling effectively modified the prolonging effects of ranolazine and tertiapin-Q on the AERP in contrast to those of clinically available antiarrhythmic drugs, dl-sotalol, bepridil amiodarone and vernakalant. PMID:27032905

  14. An efficient method for ectopic beats cancellation based on radial basis function.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Jorge; Torres, Ana; Rieta, José J

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the surface Electrocardiogram (ECG) is the most extended noninvasive technique in cardiological diagnosis. In order to properly use the ECG, we need to cancel out ectopic beats. These beats may occur in both normal subjects and patients with heart disease, and their presence represents an important source of error which must be handled before any other analysis. This paper presents a method for electrocardiogram ectopic beat cancellation based on Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN). A train-able neural network ensemble approach to develop customized electrocardiogram beat classifier in an effort to further improve the performance of ECG processing and to offer individualized health care is presented. Six types of beats including: Normal Beats (NB); Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVC); Left Bundle Branch Blocks (LBBB); Right Bundle Branch Blocks (RBBB); Paced Beats (PB) and Ectopic Beats (EB) are obtained from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Four morphological features are extracted from each beat after the preprocessing of the selected records. Average Results for the RBFNN based method provided an ectopic beat reduction (EBR) of (mean ± std) EBR = 7, 23 ± 2.18 in contrast to traditional compared methods that, for the best case, yielded EBR = 4.05 ± 2.13. The results prove that RBFNN based methods are able to obtain a very accurate reduction of ectopic beats together with low distortion of the QRST complex.

  15. Effects of calcium, sodium and potassium ions on contractility of isolated atria and their responses to noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Toda, N

    1969-06-01

    1. Rabbit left atrial preparations driven electrically at different rates were used for studies on inotropic effects of cations, drugs and coupled pacing. Sino-atrial node-atrial preparations were used for investigating the chronotropic effect of noradrenaline.2. The contractile tension-driving rate relationship was moved upwards by an elevation of [Ca(++)]o, coupled pacing and noradrenaline. In preparations exposed to Na(+)-poor and K(+)-free solutions the contractile strength at low driving rates (6 to 30 c/min) was markedly enhanced, but at high rates (120 to 240 c/min) it was not influenced. The contractile strength was reduced at low [Ca(++)]o and at high [K(+)]o.3. The positive inotropic effect of noradrenaline was markedly inhibited by a reduction of [Ca(++)]o and to some extent by a reduction of [K(+)]o. The noradrenaline-inotropy was not appreciably affected by an elevation of [Ca(++)]o and a reduction of [Na(+)]o.4. Cardiac excitability studied in preparations driven at high rates was enhanced by noradrenaline, a reduction of [K(+)]o and an elevation of [Ca(++)]o, but was reduced at low [Ca(++)]o, low [Na(+)]o and high [K(+)]o.5. The positive chronotropic response to noradrenaline was enhanced at high [Ca(++)]o, low [Na(+)]o and low [K(+)]o, but was reduced in solutions deficient in Ca(++) or rich in K(+).6. Inotropic effects of the ions and of coupled pacing were compared with those of ouabain. It is suggested that characteristic changes in the tension-rate curve seen in Na(+)-poor, K(+)-free and ouabain-containing solutions are correlated with an inhibition of active processes in the cardiac cell membrane, which affect ionic movements across it. It seems likely that mechanisms mediating adrenergic responses of the contractile tissue and the S-A node are associated with [Ca(++)]o.

  16. Emergence of Synchronized Beating during the Regrowth of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2011-09-01

    A fundamental issue in the biology of eukaryotic flagella is the origin of synchronized beating observed in tissues and organisms containing multiple flagella. Recent studies of the biflagellate unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provided the first evidence that the interflagellar coupling responsible for synchronization is of hydrodynamic origin. To investigate this mechanism in detail, we study here synchronization in Chlamydomonas as its flagella slowly regrow after mechanically induced self-scission. The duration of synchronized intervals is found to be strongly dependent on flagellar length. Analysis within a stochastic model of coupled phase oscillators is used to extract the length dependence of the interflagellar coupling and the intrinsic beat frequencies of the two flagella. Physical and biological considerations that may explain these results are proposed.

  17. Finding the ciliary beating pattern with optimal efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Natan; Vilfan, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of biological cilia acting individually or collectively and numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. Maximizing the efficiency of a single cilium leads to curly, often symmetric, and somewhat counterintuitive patterns. However, when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal coordination is essential for efficient pumping and the highest efficiency is achieved with antiplectic waves. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible optimum. PMID:21896741

  18. Nuclear quantum beats observed from photosynthetic charge separation

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.; Werst, M.; Thurnauer, M.

    1995-12-31

    In natural photosynthesis, efficient photoinduced charge-separation is achieved because of the unique structural and energetic relationships between the co-factors involved in this process. In turn, these unique properties give rise to unusual magnetic resonance responses when monitoring the charge-separation process with time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (epr). We have observed (at low temperatures) photo-induced low frequency oscillations in the transient epr responses from cyanobacterial Photosystem I (PSI) and pure photosynthetic bacteria. By comparing the signals from fully deuterated photosynthetic material having {sup 14}N or {sup 15}N we have identified these oscillations as nuclear quantum beats associated with the non-adiabatic change of the spin Hamiltonian at the instant of the laser pulse. The nuclear quantum beats can provide details of the electronic structures of the photo-oxidized primary electron donors in PSI and purple photosynthetic bacteria.

  19. Active Phase and Amplitude Fluctuations of Flagellar Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Klindt, Gary S.; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.; Jülicher, Frank; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2014-07-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats periodically, driven by the oscillatory dynamics of molecular motors, to propel cells and pump fluids. Small but perceivable fluctuations in the beat of individual flagella have physiological implications for synchronization in collections of flagella as well as for hydrodynamic interactions between flagellated swimmers. Here, we characterize phase and amplitude fluctuations of flagellar bending waves using shape mode analysis and limit-cycle reconstruction. We report a quality factor of flagellar oscillations Q =38.0±16.7 (mean±s.e.). Our analysis shows that flagellar fluctuations are dominantly of active origin. Using a minimal model of collective motor oscillations, we demonstrate how the stochastic dynamics of individual motors can give rise to active small-number fluctuations in motor-cytoskeleton systems.

  20. Active phase and amplitude fluctuations of flagellar beating.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Klindt, Gary S; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H; Jülicher, Frank; Friedrich, Benjamin M

    2014-07-25

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats periodically, driven by the oscillatory dynamics of molecular motors, to propel cells and pump fluids. Small but perceivable fluctuations in the beat of individual flagella have physiological implications for synchronization in collections of flagella as well as for hydrodynamic interactions between flagellated swimmers. Here, we characterize phase and amplitude fluctuations of flagellar bending waves using shape mode analysis and limit-cycle reconstruction. We report a quality factor of flagellar oscillations Q = 38.0 ± 16.7 (mean ± s.e.). Our analysis shows that flagellar fluctuations are dominantly of active origin. Using a minimal model of collective motor oscillations, we demonstrate how the stochastic dynamics of individual motors can give rise to active small-number fluctuations in motor-cytoskeleton systems.

  1. Emergence of synchronized beating during the regrowth of eukaryotic flagella.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Raymond E; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2011-09-30

    A fundamental issue in the biology of eukaryotic flagella is the origin of synchronized beating observed in tissues and organisms containing multiple flagella. Recent studies of the biflagellate unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provided the first evidence that the interflagellar coupling responsible for synchronization is of hydrodynamic origin. To investigate this mechanism in detail, we study here synchronization in Chlamydomonas as its flagella slowly regrow after mechanically induced self-scission. The duration of synchronized intervals is found to be strongly dependent on flagellar length. Analysis within a stochastic model of coupled phase oscillators is used to extract the length dependence of the interflagellar coupling and the intrinsic beat frequencies of the two flagella. Physical and biological considerations that may explain these results are proposed.

  2. Noise and synchronization in pairs of beating eukaryotic flagella.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Raymond E; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2009-10-16

    It has long been conjectured that hydrodynamic interactions between beating eukaryotic flagella underlie their ubiquitous forms of synchronization; yet there has been no experimental test of this connection. The biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas is a simple model for such studies, as its two flagella are representative of those most commonly found in eukaryotes. Using micromanipulation and high-speed imaging, we show that the flagella of a C. reinhardtii cell present periods of synchronization interrupted by phase slips. The dynamics of slips and the statistics of phase-locked intervals are consistent with a low-dimensional stochastic model of hydrodynamically coupled oscillators, with a noise amplitude set by the intrinsic fluctuations of single flagellar beats.

  3. Noise and Synchronization in Pairs of Beating Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2009-10-01

    It has long been conjectured that hydrodynamic interactions between beating eukaryotic flagella underlie their ubiquitous forms of synchronization; yet there has been no experimental test of this connection. The biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas is a simple model for such studies, as its two flagella are representative of those most commonly found in eukaryotes. Using micromanipulation and high-speed imaging, we show that the flagella of a C. reinhardtii cell present periods of synchronization interrupted by phase slips. The dynamics of slips and the statistics of phase-locked intervals are consistent with a low-dimensional stochastic model of hydrodynamically coupled oscillators, with a noise amplitude set by the intrinsic fluctuations of single flagellar beats.

  4. Recovery of spray paint traces from clothing by beating.

    PubMed

    Olderiks, Maurice; Baiker, Martin; van Velzen, Jill; van der Weerd, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    Manual recovery of spray paints from textiles using a microscope, the routine method in many laboratories, is often laborious. Beating the clothing with a plastic rod, the routine method used for recovery of glass traces within the authors' laboratory, is proposed as an alternative. The efficiency of the method was evaluated by spray tests with fluorescent paint. In these tests, paint particles in the acquired debris samples, as well as those remaining on the textiles, were investigated. The results show that beating is an efficient way to recover and concentrate paint particles. A good efficiency for jeans fabric and rough knitwear is reported. The results appeared to be less satisfactory for smooth woven fabric. Application of the method in casework was effective for graffiti paints as well as for flaked car paint.

  5. Beat Cepheids as Probes of Stellar and Galactic Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchler, J. Robert; Szabó, Róbert

    2007-05-01

    The mere location of a beat Cepheid model in a period ratio versus period diagram (Petersen diagram) puts very tight constraints on its metallicity Z. The beat Cepheid Petersen diagrams are revisited with linear nonadiabatic turbulent convective models, and their accuracy as a probe for stellar metallicity is evaluated. They are shown to be largely independent of the helium content Y, and they are also only weakly dependent on the mass-luminosity relation that is used in their construction. However, they are found to show sensitivity to the relative abundances of the elements that are lumped into the metallicity parameter Z. Rotation is estimated to have but a small effect on the ``pulsation metallicities.'' A composite Petersen diagram is presented that allows one to read off upper and lower limits on the metallicity Z from the measured period P0 and period ratio P10.

  6. Multiple beats of weakly confined excitons with inverted selection rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Hideki; Ishihara, Hajime

    2009-05-01

    The phenomenon of multiple beats (MBs) arising from nondipole-type excitons weakly confined in a thin film is theoretically elucidated using a nonlocal transient-response theory. Kojima previously demonstrated for a GaAs thin film that the degenerate four-wave mixing signals from the quantized levels of the center-of-mass motion of excitons exhibit complex interference between beats under femtosecond-order pulse incidence [Kojima , J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 77, 044701 (2008)]. This leads to an ultrafast optical response on the order of femtoseconds. This effect occurs in a size region beyond the long-wavelength approximation regime due to the resonant enhancement of the internal field, wherein the usual dipole selection rule is violated. Our analysis of MBs employs a model of the nonlocal multilevel system that considers the spatial interplay between excitonic waves and the radiation field to elucidate the mechanism behind the observed ultrafast response.

  7. Teratology studies in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Allais, Linda; Reynaud, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    The rabbit is generally the non-rodent species or second species after the rat recommended by the regulatory authorities and is part of the package of regulatory reproductive studies for the detection of potential embryotoxic and/or teratogenic effects of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, food additives, and other compounds, including vaccines (see Chapters 1-7).Its availability, practicality in housing and in mating as well as its large size makes the rabbit the preferred choice as a non-rodent species. The study protocols are essentially similar to those established for the rat (Chapter 9), with some particularities. The study designs are well defined in guidelines and are relatively standardized between testing laboratories across the world.As for the rat, large litter sizes and extensive background data in the rabbit are valuable criteria for an optimal assessment of in utero development of the embryo or fetus and for the detection of potential external or internal fetal malformations.

  8. Differential Fault Analysis of Rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kircanski, Aleksandar; Youssef, Amr M.

    Rabbit is a high speed scalable stream cipher with 128-bit key and a 64-bit initialization vector. It has passed all three stages of the ECRYPT stream cipher project and is a member of eSTREAM software portfolio. In this paper, we present a practical fault analysis attack on Rabbit. The fault model in which we analyze the cipher is the one in which the attacker is assumed to be able to fault a random bit of the internal state of the cipher but cannot control the exact location of injected faults. Our attack requires around 128 - 256 faults, precomputed table of size 241.6 bytes and recovers the complete internal state of Rabbit in about 238 steps.

  9. Comparison of Ca2+ release and uptake characteristics of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in isolated horse and rabbit cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Loughrey, C M; Smith, G L; MacEachern, K E

    2004-09-01

    Both the cardiac action potential duration (APD) (0.6-1 s) and resting heart rate (30-40 beats/min) in the horse are significantly different from humans and smaller mammals, including the rabbit. This would be anticipated to have consequences for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and require adaptation of the individual processes involved. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is one of the main components involved in EC coupling. This study examines and compares the activity of this organelle in the horse with that of the rabbit. In particular, the study focuses on SR Ca2+ release via the Ca2+ release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and Ca2+ uptake via the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) pump. Isolated cardiomyocytes from both horse and rabbit hearts were permeabilized, bathed in a mock intracellular solution, and exposed to a specified [Ca2+]. Rabbit cardiomyocytes exposed to 260 nM [Ca2+] produced spontaneous Ca2+ release and propagated Ca2+ waves. Horse cells failed to produce Ca2+ waves; instead, only local release in the form of Ca2+ sparks was evident. However, at 550 nM [Ca2+], Ca2+ waves were produced in both species. Ca2+ waves were four times less frequent yet approximately 1.5 times greater in amplitude in the horse compared with the rabbit. Ca2+ wave velocity was comparable between the species. The reason for this disparity in Ca2+ wave characteristics is unknown. Separate measurements of oxalate-supported Ca2+ uptake into the SR suggest that both horse and rabbit cardiomyocytes have comparable levels SERCA activity. The possible reasons for the observed differences in SR Ca2+ release between the horse and rabbit are discussed.

  10. European Rabbits as Reservoir for Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    González-Barrio, David; Maio, Elisa; Vieira-Pinto, Madalena; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    We studied the role of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as a reservoir for Coxiella burnetii in the Iberian region. High individual and population seroprevalences observed in wild and farmed rabbits, evidence of systemic infections, and vaginal shedding support the reservoir role of the European rabbit for C. burnetii.

  11. European Rabbits as Reservoir for Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    González-Barrio, David; Maio, Elisa; Vieira-Pinto, Madalena; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    We studied the role of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as a reservoir for Coxiella burnetii in the Iberian region. High individual and population seroprevalences observed in wild and farmed rabbits, evidence of systemic infections, and vaginal shedding support the reservoir role of the European rabbit for C. burnetii. PMID:25988670

  12. Visualization of calcium transients controlling orientation of ciliary beat

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    To image changes in intraciliary Ca controlling ciliary motility, we microinjected Ca Green dextran, a visible wavelength fluorescent Ca indicator, into eggs or two cell stages of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi. The embryos developed normally into free-swimming, approximately 0.5 mm cydippid larvae with cells and ciliary comb plates (approximately 100 microns long) loaded with the dye. Comb plates of larvae, like those of adult ctenophores, undergo spontaneous or electrically stimulated reversal of beat direction, triggered by Ca influx through voltage-sensitive Ca channels. Comb plates of larvae loaded with Ca Green dextran emit spontaneous or electrically stimulated fluorescent flashes along the entire length of their cilia, correlated with ciliary reversal. Fluorescence intensity peaks rapidly (34-50 ms), then slowly falls to resting level in approximately 1 s. Electrically stimulated Ca Green emissions often increase in steps to a maximum value near the end of the stimulus pulse train, and slowly decline in 1-2 s. In both spontaneous and electrically stimulated flashes, measurements at multiple sites along a single comb plate show that Ca Green fluorescence rises within 17 ms (1 video field) and to a similar relative extent above resting level from base to tip of the cilia. The decline of fluorescence intensity also begins simultaneously and proceeds at similar rates along the ciliary length. Ca-free sea water reversibly abolishes spontaneous and electrically stimulated Ca Green ciliary emissions as well as reversed beating. Calculations of Ca diffusion from the ciliary base show that Ca must enter the comb plate along the entire length of the ciliary membranes. The voltage-dependent Ca channels mediating changes in beat direction are therefore distributed over the length of the comb plate cilia. The observed rapid and virtually instantaneous Ca signal throughout the intraciliary space may be necessary for reprogramming the pattern of dynein activity

  13. Wave and particle dynamics of the beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, P. )

    1989-10-15

    We present two-dimensional wave-envelope studies of the interaction between a plasma beat-wave and the laser pumps which drive it. A new method of focusing is demonstrated which requires the plasma wave to be driven slightly below its resonant frequency. Test particles are employed to investigate possible means of extending the accelerator stage length. {copyright} 1989 American Institute of Physics

  14. Elastic Beating Pump Using Induced-Charge Electro-osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-10-01

    Pumping a viscous liquid in a confined space is essential in microfluidic systems because the pressure-driven flow rate through small channels decreases with the third or fourth power of the channel size. Hence, inspired by a cilium's pumping ability in a confined space, we propose an elastic beating pump using a hydrodynamic force due to induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) and numerically examine the pumping performance. By the multiphysics coupled simulation technique based on the boundary element method along with the thin double-layer approximation, we find that by selecting the optimum rigidity of the elastic beam, the ICEO elastic beating pump functions effectively at high frequencies with low applied voltages and shows a large average flow velocity with a remarkably large peak velocity that may be useful to flow a liquid with unexpectedly high viscosity. Furthermore, we propose a simple model that explains the characteristics of the time response behavior of the ICEO elastic beating pump tosome extent. By this analysis, we can considerably contribute to developments in studies on the artificial cilia having versatile functions.

  15. Moving to the Beat and Singing are Linked in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Bella, Simone; Berkowska, Magdalena; Sowiński, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    The abilities to sing and to move to the beat of a rhythmic auditory stimulus emerge early during development, and both engage perceptual, motor, and sensorimotor processes. These similarities between singing and synchronization to a beat may be rooted in biology. Patel (2008) has suggested that motor synchronization to auditory rhythms may have emerged during evolution as a byproduct of selection for vocal learning (“vocal learning and synchronization hypothesis”). This view predicts a strong link between vocal performance and synchronization skills in humans. Here, we tested this prediction by asking occasional singers to tap along with auditory pulse trains and to imitate familiar melodies. Both vocal imitation and synchronization skills were measured in terms of accuracy and precision or consistency. Accurate and precise singers tapped more in the vicinity of the pacing stimuli (i.e., they were more accurate) than less accurate and less precise singers. Moreover, accurate singers were more consistent when tapping to the beat. These differences cannot be ascribed to basic motor skills or to motivational factors. Individual differences in terms of singing proficiency and synchronization skills may reflect the variability of a shared sensorimotor translation mechanism. PMID:26733370

  16. Laser precision ranger based on beat-wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wu, Yanhua; Weia, Huang

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a laser precision ranger based on beat wave interferometry. A frequency-stabilized double longitudinal modes He-Ne laser with thermoregulation is used as the light source. The two beams of double longitudinal modes generated in the same resonator of the laser are naturally coaxial. They have a frequency difference of about 790MHz and a beat wavelength of 380mm. Their stability is the same as the laser, which is better than 10-7 in open air. The node of the beat wave is used as the sampling flag. An adaptive filter and a wavelet transform program are used to eliminate the noise and to improve the accuracy of node detection. The distance between the node and the measur ed point is measured with a double frequency interferometer, which is incorporated in the same optical system and has a resolution of 0.08μm. Experimental results indicate that the measuring range is 20m and the uncertainty 30μm /10m.

  17. Arsanilic acid toxicity in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Confer, A W; Ward, B C; Hines, F A

    1980-04-01

    Rations from several rabbitries experiencing increased mortality, weight loss and diminished reproduction were analyzed for arsanilic acid. Levels of less than 56 ppm of arsanilic acid were found. A 30 day trial was conducted where arsanilic acid was given in doses of 1.6-16.2 mg/day in water to weanling and adult rabbits. The higher doses induced diarrhea, terminal convulsions and death. Weight loss or reduced weight gains occurred in six of seven treated groups. No significant gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Chemical analysis demonstrated the presence of increased total hepatic arsenic levels in treated compared to control rabbits.

  18. The mechanism of self-organized beating of cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyadharan, Jyothish Sulochana

    The internal structure and physical properties of cilia are well known. The relevant hydrodynamics is also well known. But the mechanism behind the coordinated activity of the dynein molecular motors is not known. Based on experimental observations, it has been concluded that this mechanism cannot be due to control from the cell body. The possible mechanism has to be self-organized and the trigger for motor activation/deactivation has to be something related to the geometry of the ciliary axoneme. This thesis critically evaluates the most widely currently cited models and suggests an alternative model for how cilia beat. From the literature we obtained wave forms of ciliary beating at different instants in the beat cycle. These instants were digitized and interpolated. From this data, we were able to calculate the hydrodynamic force distribution (external force distribution) on the cilia and the translational and rotational velocities of the cell body. Once the hydrodynamic force distribution was obtained, we calculated the internal force distribution in the cilium using an equation we derived. Once this was known, we were able to calculate parameters of the ciliary axoneme such as the dynamic stiffness. The stiffness is the ratio of the first Fourier modes of the internal force distribution and the relative sliding between the doublet microtubules that form the axoneme. We found that the first mode was the dominant one and is the one we used for calculations. We were also able to calculate the energy involved in formation and propagation of the wave that produces the ciliary beating. We discovered that the dynamic stiffness varies along the length of a cilium. We determined that in the central region of the cilium, the stiffness is almost purely imaginary which means that the sliding velocity follows the internal force generation in that region rather than sliding. We also found that in Fourier space, the flexural rigidity (kappa=EI where E is Young's modulus and

  19. Sarcoplasmic reticulum and L-type Ca²⁺ channel activity regulate the beat-to-beat stability of calcium handling in human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Llach, Anna; Molina, Cristina E; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Padró, Josep; Cinca, Juan; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2011-07-01

    Irregularities in intracellular calcium on a beat-to-beat basis can precede cardiac arrhythmia, but the mechanisms inducing such irregularities remain elusive. This study tested the hypothesis that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and L-type calcium channel activity determine the beat-to-beat response and its rate dependency. For this purpose, patch-clamp technique and confocal calcium imaging was used to record L-type calcium current (ICa) and visualize calcium in human atrial myocytes subjected to increasing stimulation frequencies (from 0.2 to 2 Hz). The beat-to-beat response was heterogeneous among a population of 133 myocytes, with 30 myocytes responding uniformly at all frequencies, while alternating and irregular responses were induced in 78 and 25 myocytes, respectively. Myocytes with uniform responses had the lowest frequency of calcium wave-induced transient inward currents (ITI; 0.4 ± 0.2 min⁻¹), ICa density (1.8 ± 0.3 pA pF⁻¹) and caffeine-releasable calcium load (6.2 ± 0.5 amol pF⁻¹), while those with alternating responses had the highest ITI frequency (1.8 ± 0.3 min⁻¹,P =0.003) and ICa density (2.4 ± 0.2 pA pF⁻¹, P =0.04). In contrast, the calcium load was highest in myocytes with irregular responses (8.5 ± 0.7 amol pF⁻¹, P =0.01). Accordingly, partial ICa inhibition reduced the incidence (from 78 to 44%, P <0.05) and increased the threshold frequency for beat-to-beat alternation (from 1.3 ± 0.2 to 1.9 ± 0.2 Hz, P <0.05). Partial inhibition of SR calcium release reduced the ITI frequency, increased calcium loading and favoured induction of irregular responses, while complete inhibition abolished beat-to-beat alternation at all frequencies. In conclusion, the beat-to-beat response was heterogeneous among human atrial myocytes subjected to increasing stimulation frequencies, and the nature and stability of the response were determined by the SR and L-type calcium channel activities, suggesting that these mechanisms are key to

  20. Beating rate of isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes is regulated by the stable microtubule subset.

    PubMed

    Webster, D R; Patrick, D L

    2000-05-01

    We investigated the roles of microtubule (MT) dynamics (growth and shrinkage), the stable, nongrowing MT subset, the posttranslationally detyrosinated MT subset, and artificially elevated tubulin levels in the negative regulation of heart cell beating rate. We manipulated the MT populations in isolated, neonatal cardiomyocytes obtained from normal animals in several ways and then measured heart cell beating rate directly. We found that the stabilized population of MTs was sufficient to maintain a normal beating rate, whereas MT dynamics and detyrosination made no observable contribution. Furthermore, by directly and acutely increasing the level of tubulin within otherwise normally beating cells, we found that the increased tubulin (and MT) levels further depressed the beating rate. In conclusion, the stabilized MT subset is sufficient to maintain the normal beating rate in these cells, whereas increasing the MT density depresses it.

  1. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures; Ante-Mortem Inspections § 354.124 Quarantine of diseased rabbits. If live rabbits, which are... further handling of the rabbits will not create a health hazard, the lot shall be subject to ante-mortem... circumstances are such that release for treatment is impracticable, a careful rabbit-by-rabbit...

  2. Individual Differences in Beat Perception Affect Gait Responses to Low- and High-Groove Music

    PubMed Central

    Leow, Li-Ann; Parrott, Taylor; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    Slowed gait in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the “beat,” which might be difficult for patients with PD who tend to show weak beat perception. One solution may be to use high-groove music, which has high beat salience that may facilitate synchronization, and affective properties, which may improve motivation to move. As a first step to understanding how beat perception affects gait in complex neurological disorders, we examined how beat perception ability affected gait in neurotypical adults. Synchronization performance and gait parameters were assessed as healthy young adults with strong or weak beat perception synchronized to low-groove music, high-groove music, and metronome cues. High-groove music was predicted to elicit better synchronization than low-groove music, due to its higher beat salience. Two musical tempi, or rates, were used: (1) preferred tempo: beat rate matched to preferred step rate and (2) faster tempo: beat rate adjusted to 22.5% faster than preferred step rate. For both strong and weak beat-perceivers, synchronization performance was best with metronome cues, followed by high-groove music, and worst with low-groove music. In addition, high-groove music elicited longer and faster steps than low-groove music, both at preferred tempo and at faster tempo. Low-groove music was particularly detrimental to gait in weak beat-perceivers, who showed slower and shorter steps compared to uncued walking. The findings show that individual differences in beat perception affect gait when synchronizing footsteps to music, and have implications for using music in gait rehabilitation. PMID:25374521

  3. Gain enhancement plasma-loaded FEL in the presence of beat waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shamamian, A.H.; Gevorgian, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    An expression for the dielectric permittivity of underdense plasma interacting with laser beat waves is derived. It is shown that the presence of beat waves in plasma results in an effective growth of the plasma frequency. The FEL Gain is investigated in the case when the frequency of soft photons weakly depending on the electron beam energy and the synchronism condition is maintained. It is shown that the plasma beat waves lead to the essential increase in FEL gain.

  4. Factors associated with wife beating in Egypt: Analysis of two surveys (1995 and 2005)

    PubMed Central

    Akmatov, Manas K; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T; Labeeb, Shokria; Dhaher, Enas; Khan, Md Mobarak

    2008-01-01

    Background Wife beating is an important public health problem in many developing countries. We assessed the rates of wife beating and examined factors associated with wife beating in 1995 and 2005 in Egypt. Methods We used data from two Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in Egypt in 1995 and 2005 using multistage household sampling. Data related to wife beating included information from 7122 women in 1995 and 5612 women in 2005. Logistic regression was used to analyze factors independently associated with wife beating. Special weights were used to obtain nationally representative estimates. Results In 1995 17.5% of married women in Egypt experienced wife beating in the last 12 months, in 2005 – 18.9% or 16.0%, using different measures. The association between socio-demographic differentials and wife beating was weaker in the newer survey. The 12-month prevalence of wife beating was lower only when both partners were educated, but the differences across education levels were less pronounced in 2005. Based on the information available in the 2005 survey, more educated women experienced less severe forms of wife beating than less educated women. Conclusion Different measures used in both surveys make a direct comparison difficult. The observed patterns indicate that the changes in prevalence may be masked by two opposite processes occurring in the society: a decrease in (severe forms of) wife beating and an increase in reporting of wife beating. Improving the access to education for women and raising education levels in the whole society may help reducing wife beating. PMID:18801155

  5. PROCEDURES AND ACCURACY ESTIMATES FOR BETA-BEAT CORRECTION IN THE LHC.

    SciTech Connect

    TOMAS, R.; BRUNING, O.; CALAGA, R.; PEGGS, S.

    2006-06-26

    The LHC aperture imposes a tight tolerance of 20% on the maximum acceptable beta-beat in the machine. An accurate knowledge of the transfer functions for the individually powered insertion quadrupoles and techniques to compensate beta-beat are key prerequisites for successful operation with high intensity beams. They perform realistic simulations to identify quadrupole errors in LHC and explore possible ways of correction to minimize beta-beat below the 20% level.

  6. Photoacoustic tomography: Ultrasonically beating optical diffusion and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong

    2014-03-01

    A decade of research has pushed photoacoustic computed tomography to the forefront of molecular-level imaging, notes SPIE Fellow Lihong Wang (Washington University, St. Louis) in his plenary talk, "Photoacoustic Tomography: Ultrasonically Beating Optical Diffusion and Diffraction." Modern optical microscopy has resolution and diffraction limitations. But noninvasive functional photoacoustic computed tomography has overcome this limit, offering deep penetration with optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution of 1 cm depth or more -- up to 7 cm of penetration in some cases, such as evaluating sentinel lymph nodes for breast cancer staging. This opens up applications in whole body imaging, brain function, oxygen saturation, label-free cell analysis, and noninvasive cancer biopsies.

  7. Light-generated nuclear quantum beats: A signature of photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.; Ohmes, E.; Thurnauer, M.C.

    1995-08-15

    Light-induced radical pairs in deuterated and deuterated plus {sup 15}N-substituted Synechococcus lividus cyanobacteria have been studied by transient EPR following pulsed laser excitation. Nuclear quantum beats are observed in the transverse electron magnetization at lower temperatures. Model calculations for the time profiles, evaluated at the high-field emissive maximum of the spectrum, indicate assignment of these coherences to nitrogen nuclei in the primary donor. Thorough investigation of the nuclear modulation patterns can provide detailed information on the electronic structure of the primary donor, providing insight into the mechanism of the primary events of plant photosynthesis. 50 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Cascade focusing in the beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, P.; Bell, A.R.

    1988-10-03

    The 2D wave-envelope equationf for the beat-wave--cascade system are studied analytically and numerically. An expression for the mean square width of the cascade envelope is obtained, and is used to predict the long-term behavior of the waves. The amplitude or a resonantly driven plasma wave falls significantly over a stage length due to enhanced diffraction of the cascade envelope. Conversely, detuning the pumps from the plasma frequency can lead to focusing of the envelope and a corresponding increase in plasmon amplitude of up to 200% over the same distance.

  9. Regulatory pathways for the stimulation of canine tracheal ciliary beat frequency by bradykinin.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L B; Miller, I F; Yeates, D B

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of bradykinin, a potent inflammatory nanopeptide, on tracheal ciliary beat frequency in vivo were investigated using barbiturate-anaesthetized beagles. Tracheal ciliary beat frequency was measured using heterodyne mode correlation analysis laser light scattering, a technique that does not require surgical intervention. 2. Aerosolized 10(-5) M-bradykinin in 0.9% saline administered for 3 min to eight barbiturate-anaesthetized beagles stimulated tracheal ciliary beat frequency from the baseline of 5.3 +/- 0.1 Hz to a maximum of 16.6 +/- 2.0 Hz, 8 min after aerosol delivery, and ciliary beat frequency remained above baseline for the following 35 min. 3. Intravenously injected hexamethonium bromide, ipratropium bromide or indomethacin did not change baseline tracheal ciliary beat frequency. That down-regulation of ciliary beat frequency below baseline values was not observed with either the neural or the cyclooxygenase blocking agents suggests that neither of these pathways is involved in the maintenance of the observed basal ciliary beat frequency. 4. Bradykinin-induced stimulation of tracheal ciliary beat frequency is blocked by hexamethonium bromide, ipratropium bromide or indomethacin. These data suggest that the stimulation of ciliary beat frequency by bradykinin acts through both cellular cyclooxygenase and parasympathetic pathways in series. PMID:1972192

  10. Enhanced timing abilities in percussionists generalize to rhythms without a musical beat.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Daniel J; Grahn, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to entrain movements to music is arguably universal, but it is unclear how specialized training may influence this. Previous research suggests that percussionists have superior temporal precision in perception and production tasks. Such superiority may be limited to temporal sequences that resemble real music or, alternatively, may generalize to musically implausible sequences. To test this, percussionists and nonpercussionists completed two tasks that used rhythmic sequences varying in musical plausibility. In the beat tapping task, participants tapped with the beat of a rhythmic sequence over 3 stages: finding the beat (as an initial sequence played), continuation of the beat (as a second sequence was introduced and played simultaneously), and switching to a second beat (the initial sequence finished, leaving only the second). The meters of the two sequences were either congruent or incongruent, as were their tempi (minimum inter-onset intervals). In the rhythm reproduction task, participants reproduced rhythms of four types, ranging from high to low musical plausibility: Metric simple rhythms induced a strong sense of the beat, metric complex rhythms induced a weaker sense of the beat, nonmetric rhythms had no beat, and jittered nonmetric rhythms also had no beat as well as low temporal predictability. For both tasks, percussionists performed more accurately than nonpercussionists. In addition, both groups were better with musically plausible than implausible conditions. Overall, the percussionists' superior abilities to entrain to, and reproduce, rhythms generalized to musically implausible sequences. PMID:25540617

  11. Beat frequency is bimodally distributed in spermatozoa from T/t12 mice.

    PubMed

    Katz, D F; Erickson, R P; Nathanson, M

    1979-12-01

    Flagellar beat frequencies of spermatozoa from mice of varying genotype were studied using highspeed cinemicrography. Beat frequency was variable but unimodal in two inbred lines, their F1, and an outbred line. In contrast, beat frequency in spermatozoa from T-complex, balanced lethal stocks (T/t6 and T/t12) tended not to vary between individual males of each genotype up to four hours after collection. The two-hour distribution of beat frequency for T/t12 was, moreover, bimodal, suggesting the possible existence of two subpopulations of spermatozoa.

  12. Simultaneous beat-by-beat investigation of the effects of the Valsalva maneuver on left and right ventricular filling and the possible mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Yuan, Li-jun; Cao, Tie-sheng; Yang, Yong; Duan, Yun-you; Xing, Chang-yang

    2013-01-01

    Although the influence of the Valsalva maneuver on the heart and circulatory system has been investigated, the mechanism of intrathoracic pressure influencing cardiovascular function is unclear. To test our hypothesis that the interaction between the anatomy-determined partially-intrathoracic system and the fully-intrathoracic system might explain those issues and help to disclose the mechanism, we used the Hitachi dual pulse wave Doppler echocardiographic apparatus to investigate simultaneously the beat-by-beat influence of 40-mmHg Valsalva maneuver on left and right cardiac ventricular filling in 30 male adult volunteers. The mitral and tricuspid blood inflow velocity spectra during the Valsalva maneuver were recorded simultaneously. The peak velocity (PV), velocity-time integral (VTI) and inflow volume (IV) of each cycle were measured or calculated. The PV, VTI and IV of the left heart remained unchanged at the first beat after the Valsalva maneuver onset (compared with those at rest, p>0.1) and then decreased gradually to the lowest at the 11±1.2th beat (range, 9th to 12th beat). Simultaneously, the PV, VTI and IV of the right heart decreased significantly (p<0.05) at the first cycle, decreased rapidly to the lowest at the 6±0.8th beat (range, 4th to 7th beat) and then increased gradually to the 9±1.3th beat (range, 8th to 10th beat). These results suggest that the left heart and right heart have different physiological responses to the Valsalva maneuver. These could be explained by our hypothesis, the interaction between the partially-intrathoracic system and the fully-intrathoracic system, which might help to disclose the mechanism of how intrathoracic pressure influences the heart and circulatory system.

  13. Immunosuppression abrogates resistance of young rabbits to Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) is caused by a calicivirus (RHDV) that kills 90% of infected adult European rabbits within 3 days. Remarkably, young rabbits are resistant to RHD. We induced immunosuppression in young rabbits by treatment with methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and challenged the animals with RHDV by intramuscular injection. All of these young rabbits died within 3 days of infection due to fulminant hepatitis, presenting a large number of RHDV-positive dead or apoptotic hepatocytes, and a significant seric increase in cytokines, features that are similar to those of naïve adult rabbits infected by RHDV. We conclude that MPA-induced immunosuppression abrogates the resistance of young rabbits to RHD, indicating that there are differences in the innate immune system between young and adult rabbits that contribute to their distinct resistance/susceptibility to RHDV infection. PMID:24490832

  14. Immunosuppression abrogates resistance of young rabbits to Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD).

    PubMed

    Marques, Raquel M; Teixeira, Luzia; Aguas, Artur P; Ribeiro, Joana C; Costa-e-Silva, António; Ferreira, Paula G

    2014-02-04

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) is caused by a calicivirus (RHDV) that kills 90% of infected adult European rabbits within 3 days. Remarkably, young rabbits are resistant to RHD. We induced immunosuppression in young rabbits by treatment with methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and challenged the animals with RHDV by intramuscular injection. All of these young rabbits died within 3 days of infection due to fulminant hepatitis, presenting a large number of RHDV-positive dead or apoptotic hepatocytes, and a significant seric increase in cytokines, features that are similar to those of naïve adult rabbits infected by RHDV. We conclude that MPA-induced immunosuppression abrogates the resistance of young rabbits to RHD, indicating that there are differences in the innate immune system between young and adult rabbits that contribute to their distinct resistance/susceptibility to RHDV infection.

  15. Unraveling the nature of coherent beatings in chlorosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dostál, Jakub; Mančal, Tomáš; Pšenčík, Jakub; Vácha, František; Zigmantas, Donatas

    2014-03-21

    Coherent two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy at 80 K was used to study chlorosomes isolated from green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. Two distinct processes in the evolution of the 2D spectrum are observed. The first being exciton diffusion, seen in the change of the spectral shape occurring on a 100-fs timescale, and the second being vibrational coherences, realized through coherent beatings with frequencies of 91 and 145 cm{sup −1} that are dephased during the first 1.2 ps. The distribution of the oscillation amplitude in the 2D spectra is independent of the evolution of the 2D spectral shape. This implies that the diffusion energy transfer process does not transfer coherences within the chlorosome. Remarkably, the oscillatory pattern observed in the negative regions of the 2D spectrum (dominated by the excited state absorption) is a mirror image of the oscillations found in the positive part (originating from the stimulated emission and ground state bleach). This observation is surprising since it is expected that coherences in the electronic ground and excited states are generated with the same probability and the latter dephase faster in the presence of fast diffusion. Moreover, the relative amplitude of coherent beatings is rather high compared to non-oscillatory signal despite the reported low values of the Huang-Rhys factors. The origin of these effects is discussed in terms of the vibronic and Herzberg-Teller couplings.

  16. Efficient heart beat detection using embedded system electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Oh, Sechang; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    The present day bio-technical field concentrates on developing various types of innovative ambulatory and wearable devices to monitor several bio-physical, physio-pathological, bio-electrical and bio-potential factors to assess a human body's health condition without intruding quotidian activities. One of the most important aspects of this evolving technology is monitoring heart beat rate and electrocardiogram (ECG) from which many other subsidiary results can be derived. Conventionally, the devices and systems consumes a lot of power since the acquired signals are always processed on the receiver end. Because of this back end processing, the unprocessed raw data is transmitted resulting in usage of more power, memory and processing time. This paper proposes an innovative technique where the acquired signals are processed by a microcontroller in the front end of the module and just the processed signal is then transmitted wirelessly to the display unit. Therefore, power consumption is considerably reduced and clearer data analysis is performed within the module. This also avoids the need for the user to be educated about usage of the device and signal/system analysis, since only the number of heart beats will displayed at the user end. Additionally, the proposed concept also eradicates the other disadvantages like obtrusiveness, high power consumption and size. To demonstrate the above said factors, a commercial controller board was used to extend the monitoring method by using the saved ECG data from a computer.

  17. Nitroxide stable radicals protect beating cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Samuni, A.; Winkelsberg, D.; Pinson, A.; Hahn, S.M.; Mitchell, J.B.; Russo, A. )

    1991-05-01

    The protective effect of stable nitroxide radicals against oxidative damage was studied using cardiomyocyte cultures obtained from newborn rats. Monolayered cardiomyocytes were exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the effect on spontaneous beating and leakage of LDH was determined. Hydrogen peroxide irreversibly blocked rhythmic beating and resulted in a significant membrane injury as shown by release of LDH. The injury was prevented by catalase which removes H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and by cell-permeable, metal-chelating agents such as desferrioxamine or bipyridine. In contrast, reagents which are excluded from the cell such as superoxide dismutase or DTPA did not protect the cells against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Five- and six-membered ring, stable nitroxide radicals which have previously been shown to chemically act as low-molecular weight, membrane-permeable, SOD-mimetic compounds provided full protection. The nitroxides prevented leakage of LDH and preserved normal cardiomyocyte contractility, presumably by intercepting intracellular O{sub 2}-radicals. Alternatively, protection may result through nitroxides reacting with reduced transition metal ions or by detoxifying secondary organic radicals.

  18. Revisiting the Mode-Beating Model of AC Helicity Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-11-01

    Oscillating field current drive (OFCD), or AC helicity injection, is an important candidate for current sustainment in reversed-field pinch devices. Bellan examined AC helicity injection in a slab geometry and described it as a beating between two plasma modes that produces a mean current parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field [P. M. Bellan. Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 1381 (1985)]. This mean current is confined to within a classical resistive skin depth of the plasma surface, and plasma relaxation is responsible for transporting this current to the core. We revisit this analytical work and examine how this wave-beating effect is represented in zero-beta MHD simulations, including consideration of the choice of boundary conditions. In addition to the expected parallel current, numerical simulations show a pinch effect from a cycle-averaged current that is perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, which is not described in Bellan's original work. Our results are discussed with respect to Boozer's general anti-dynamo theorem [A. H. Boozer. Phys. Fluids B Vol. 5, 2271 (1993)].

  19. Analysis of the forces acting on beating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, Ashok S.; Vidyadharan, Jyothish; Foster, Kenneth W.

    2016-06-01

    Detailed analysis of the forces acting on a uniform-diameter beating cilium is carried out to determine the moment generated by the inter-doublet forces acting along the length of a cilium and the results are compared with the sliding-control theory according to which the moment is a function of the interdoublet sliding. In the central part of the cilium the inter-doublet forces are found to be proportional to the inter-doublet sliding. However, in spite of the uniformity of the diameter of the cilium, the proportionality constant, known as the dynamic stiffness, is not constant along its entire length. Significant variations are observed in the regions both near the tip of the cilium and proximal to the cell body. In the tip region the magnitude of the dynamic stiffness is found to decrease. This decrease is probably due to decrease in the number density of the molecular motors in that region and in the number of doublet microtubules. The behavior in the proximal region, on the other hand, does not appear to be well described by the sliding control theory. Our analysis therefore suggests that the dynamics of ciliary beating cannot be adequately described by a simple sliding-control theory with constant dynamic stiffness. Our analysis suggests that the cilium is differentiated into a basal region optimized for the creation of a wave and a central region optimized to support a traveling wave that provides the thrust for the cell.

  20. Beyond the beat: modeling metric structure in music and performance.

    PubMed

    Tomic, Stefan T; Janata, Petr

    2008-12-01

    Current models for capturing metric structure of recordings of music are concerned primarily with the task of tempo and beat estimation. Even though these models have the potential for extracting other metric and rhythmic information, this potential has not been realized. In this paper, a model for describing the general metric structure of audio signals and behavioral data is presented. This model employs reson filters, rather than the comb filters used in earlier models. The oscillatory nature of reson filters is investigated, as they may be better suited for extracting multiple metric levels in the onset patterns of acoustic signals. The model is tested with several types of sequences of Dirac impulses as inputs, in order to investigate the model's sensitivity to timing variations and accent structure. The model's responses to natural stimuli are illustrated, both for excerpts of recorded music from a large database utilized by tempo-estimation models, and sequences of taps from a bimanual tapping task. Finally, the relationship of the model to several other beat-finding and rhythm models is discussed, and several applications and extensions for the model are suggested.

  1. Time-dependent changes in nasal ciliary beat frequency.

    PubMed

    Sommer, J Ulrich; Gross, Shalini; Hörmann, Karl; Stuck, Boris A

    2010-09-01

    As the ex vivo lifetime of nasal ciliary cells is limited, these cells have to be transferred to a culture medium for analysis with vital cytology immediately. Although the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) is likely to change over time, sufficient data regarding changes in the ex vivo CBF has not been published to date. In the present study, nasal epithelial cells were harvested from the mucosa of the inferior turbinate of 19 healthy volunteers with a cytology brush. Beating cilia were visualized with phase-contrast microscopy. Over a 12-h timeframe, 2 s epochs of video were captured every 5 min from the identical group of cells using a high-speed digital camera with a sampling rate of 100 fps. Temperature was maintained at about 22 degrees C and controlled by an infrared pyrometer. The CBF rapidly increased by 47 +/- 53% during the first 3 h of measurement. A relative plateau followed this increase from 3 to 9 h. After 9 h, CBF reduced linearly. After 12 h, the mean frequency reduced to 20 +/- 69% of baseline. However, there was considerable variance between the samples. The initial increase in CBF has not been reported previously. This interval seems to be unsuitable for meaningful measurements. Measurements of CBF are most reliable during the plateau phase between 3 and 9 h. After 9 h, there is clearly a significant decrease in CBF, together with a considerable interindividual variance. PMID:20169353

  2. Cardiovascular physiology and diseases of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Pariaut, Romain

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews what is known about the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular diseases in the pet rabbit. Current knowledge is based on anecdotal reports, derived from research data using the rabbit as an animal model of human cardiovascular diseases, but most importantly canine and feline cardiology. It is likely that, as cardiovascular diseases are more often recognized, more specific information will soon become available for the treatment of the pet rabbit with cardiac disease.

  3. TRPM7 is down‐regulated in both left atria and left ventricle of ischaemic cardiomyopathy patients and highly related to changes in ventricular function

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Ana; Roselló‐Lletí, Esther; Tarazón, Estefanía; Gil‐Cayuela, Carolina; Lago, Francisca; González‐Juanatey, Jose‐Ramón; Martinez‐Dolz, Luis; Portolés, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims The kinase ion channel transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is considered a modulator of cardiac fibrosis progression; nevertheless, we lack of studies analysing its role in human ischaemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). Our objective was to analyse the expression of genes encoding cardiac ion channels in human ICM, focusing on the alterations in mRNA levels of TRPM7 and its relationship with changes in the ventricular function. Methods and results RNA‐sequencing was carried out in 13 left ventricular (LV) samples of patients with ICM compared with a control group (n = 10). The analysis revealed a total of 25 ion channel genes differentially expressed. We performed an RTqPCR analysis of the TRPM7 mRNA in LV and left atrial samples and found that it was down‐regulated in both cavities (−1.43‐fold and −1.52‐fold, respectively). Atrial TRPM7 mRNA levels showed an excellent and inverse relationships with the depressed ejection fraction (r = −0.724, P = 0.042) and with the mitral A wave (r = −0.938, P = 0.006). Conclusions We report the down‐regulation of TRPM7 in tissue samples from both left atria and left ventricle in patients with ICM. We found an inverse relationship between both cardiac chambers mRNA levels with LV dysfunction, suggesting an important role of TRPM7 in the left atrial and LV functional depression found in this cardiomyopathy.

  4. A new algorithm to diagnose atrial ectopic origin from multi lead ECG systems--insights from 3D virtual human atria and torso.

    PubMed

    Alday, Erick A Perez; Colman, Michael A; Langley, Philip; Butters, Timothy D; Higham, Jonathan; Workman, Antony J; Hancox, Jules C; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Rapid atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) predispose to ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Identifying the origin of atrial ectopic activity from the electrocardiogram (ECG) can help to diagnose the early onset of AF in a cost-effective manner. The complex and rapid atrial electrical activity during AF makes it difficult to obtain detailed information on atrial activation using the standard 12-lead ECG alone. Compared to conventional 12-lead ECG, more detailed ECG lead configurations may provide further information about spatio-temporal dynamics of the body surface potential (BSP) during atrial excitation. We apply a recently developed 3D human atrial model to simulate electrical activity during normal sinus rhythm and ectopic pacing. The atrial model is placed into a newly developed torso model which considers the presence of the lungs, liver and spinal cord. A boundary element method is used to compute the BSP resulting from atrial excitation. Elements of the torso mesh corresponding to the locations of the placement of the electrodes in the standard 12-lead and a more detailed 64-lead ECG configuration were selected. The ectopic focal activity was simulated at various origins across all the different regions of the atria. Simulated BSP maps during normal atrial excitation (i.e. sinoatrial node excitation) were compared to those observed experimentally (obtained from the 64-lead ECG system), showing a strong agreement between the evolution in time of the simulated and experimental data in the P-wave morphology of the ECG and dipole evolution. An algorithm to obtain the location of the stimulus from a 64-lead ECG system was developed. The algorithm presented had a success rate of 93%, meaning that it correctly identified the origin of atrial focus in 75/80 simulations, and involved a general approach relevant to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant improvement over previously developed algorithms. PMID

  5. A new algorithm to diagnose atrial ectopic origin from multi lead ECG systems--insights from 3D virtual human atria and torso.

    PubMed

    Alday, Erick A Perez; Colman, Michael A; Langley, Philip; Butters, Timothy D; Higham, Jonathan; Workman, Antony J; Hancox, Jules C; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Rapid atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) predispose to ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Identifying the origin of atrial ectopic activity from the electrocardiogram (ECG) can help to diagnose the early onset of AF in a cost-effective manner. The complex and rapid atrial electrical activity during AF makes it difficult to obtain detailed information on atrial activation using the standard 12-lead ECG alone. Compared to conventional 12-lead ECG, more detailed ECG lead configurations may provide further information about spatio-temporal dynamics of the body surface potential (BSP) during atrial excitation. We apply a recently developed 3D human atrial model to simulate electrical activity during normal sinus rhythm and ectopic pacing. The atrial model is placed into a newly developed torso model which considers the presence of the lungs, liver and spinal cord. A boundary element method is used to compute the BSP resulting from atrial excitation. Elements of the torso mesh corresponding to the locations of the placement of the electrodes in the standard 12-lead and a more detailed 64-lead ECG configuration were selected. The ectopic focal activity was simulated at various origins across all the different regions of the atria. Simulated BSP maps during normal atrial excitation (i.e. sinoatrial node excitation) were compared to those observed experimentally (obtained from the 64-lead ECG system), showing a strong agreement between the evolution in time of the simulated and experimental data in the P-wave morphology of the ECG and dipole evolution. An algorithm to obtain the location of the stimulus from a 64-lead ECG system was developed. The algorithm presented had a success rate of 93%, meaning that it correctly identified the origin of atrial focus in 75/80 simulations, and involved a general approach relevant to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant improvement over previously developed algorithms.

  6. Effects of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation-Induced Electrical Remodeling on Atrial Electro-Mechanics – Insights from a 3D Model of the Human Atria

    PubMed Central

    Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, David H.; Garratt, Clifford J.; Ye, Jianqiao; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Aims Atrial stunning, a loss of atrial mechanical contraction, can occur following a successful cardioversion. It is hypothesized that persistent atrial fibrillation-induced electrical remodeling (AFER) on atrial electrophysiology may be responsible for such impaired atrial mechanics. This simulation study aimed to investigate the effects of AFER on atrial electro-mechanics. Methods and Results A 3D electromechanical model of the human atria was developed to investigate the effects of AFER on atrial electro-mechanics. Simulations were carried out in 3 conditions for 4 states: (i) the control condition, representing the normal tissue (state 1) and the tissue 2–3 months after cardioversion (state 2) when the atrial tissue recovers its electrophysiological properties after completion of reverse electrophysiological remodelling; (ii) AFER-SR condition for AF-remodeled tissue with normal sinus rhythm (SR) (state 3); and (iii) AFER-AF condition for AF-remodeled tissue with re-entrant excitation waves (state 4). Our results indicate that at the cellular level, AFER (states 3 & 4) abbreviated action potentials and reduced the Ca2+ content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, resulting in a reduced amplitude of the intracellular Ca2+ transient leading to decreased cell active force and cell shortening as compared to the control condition (states 1 & 2). Consequently at the whole organ level, atrial contraction in AFER-SR condition (state 3) was dramatically reduced. In the AFER-AF condition (state 4) atrial contraction was almost abolished. Conclusions This study provides novel insights into understanding atrial electro-mechanics illustrating that AFER impairs atrial contraction due to reduced intracellular Ca2+ transients. PMID:26606047

  7. A New Algorithm to Diagnose Atrial Ectopic Origin from Multi Lead ECG Systems - Insights from 3D Virtual Human Atria and Torso

    PubMed Central

    Alday, Erick A. Perez; Colman, Michael A.; Langley, Philip; Butters, Timothy D.; Higham, Jonathan; Workman, Antony J.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Rapid atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) predispose to ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Identifying the origin of atrial ectopic activity from the electrocardiogram (ECG) can help to diagnose the early onset of AF in a cost-effective manner. The complex and rapid atrial electrical activity during AF makes it difficult to obtain detailed information on atrial activation using the standard 12-lead ECG alone. Compared to conventional 12-lead ECG, more detailed ECG lead configurations may provide further information about spatio-temporal dynamics of the body surface potential (BSP) during atrial excitation. We apply a recently developed 3D human atrial model to simulate electrical activity during normal sinus rhythm and ectopic pacing. The atrial model is placed into a newly developed torso model which considers the presence of the lungs, liver and spinal cord. A boundary element method is used to compute the BSP resulting from atrial excitation. Elements of the torso mesh corresponding to the locations of the placement of the electrodes in the standard 12-lead and a more detailed 64-lead ECG configuration were selected. The ectopic focal activity was simulated at various origins across all the different regions of the atria. Simulated BSP maps during normal atrial excitation (i.e. sinoatrial node excitation) were compared to those observed experimentally (obtained from the 64-lead ECG system), showing a strong agreement between the evolution in time of the simulated and experimental data in the P-wave morphology of the ECG and dipole evolution. An algorithm to obtain the location of the stimulus from a 64-lead ECG system was developed. The algorithm presented had a success rate of 93%, meaning that it correctly identified the origin of atrial focus in 75/80 simulations, and involved a general approach relevant to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant improvement over previously developed algorithms. PMID

  8. Interacting cortical and basal ganglia networks underlying finding and tapping to the musical beat.

    PubMed

    Kung, Shu-Jen; Chen, Joyce L; Zatorre, Robert J; Penhune, Virginia B

    2013-03-01

    Humans are able to find and tap to the beat of musical rhythms varying in complexity from children's songs to modern jazz. Musical beat has no one-to-one relationship with auditory features-it is an abstract perceptual representation that emerges from the interaction between sensory cues and higher-level cognitive organization. Previous investigations have examined the neural basis of beat processing but have not tested the core phenomenon of finding and tapping to the musical beat. To test this, we used fMRI and had musicians find and tap to the beat of rhythms that varied from metrically simple to metrically complex-thus from a strong to a weak beat. Unlike most previous studies, we measured beat tapping performance during scanning and controlled for possible effects of scanner noise on beat perception. Results showed that beat finding and tapping recruited largely overlapping brain regions, including the superior temporal gyrus (STG), premotor cortex, and ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC). Beat tapping activity in STG and VLPFC was correlated with both perception and performance, suggesting that they are important for retrieving, selecting, and maintaining the musical beat. In contrast BG activity was similar in all conditions and was not correlated with either perception or production, suggesting that it may be involved in detecting auditory temporal regularity or in associating auditory stimuli with a motor response. Importantly, functional connectivity analyses showed that these systems interact, indicating that more basic sensorimotor mechanisms instantiated in the BG work in tandem with higher-order cognitive mechanisms in PFC.

  9. Use of beat-to-beat cardiovascular variability data to determine the validity of sham therapy as the placebo control in osteopathic manipulative medicine research.

    PubMed

    Henley, Charles E; Wilson, Thad E

    2014-11-01

    Osteopathic manipulative medicine researchers often use sham therapy as the placebo control during clinical trials. Optimally, the sham therapy should be a hands-on procedure that is perceptually indistinguishable from osteopathic manipulative treatment, does not create an effect on its own, and is not a treatment intervention. However, the sham therapy itself may often influence the outcome. The use of cardiovascular variability (eg, beat-to-beat heart rate variability) as a surrogate for the autonomic nervous system is one objective method by which to identify such an effect. By monitoring cardiovascular variability, investigators can assess autonomic nervous system activity as a response to the sham therapy and quickly determine whether or not the selected sham therapy is a true placebo control. The authors provide evidence for assessment of beat-to-beat heart rate variability as one method for assuring objectivity of sham therapy as a placebo control in osteopathic manipulative medicine research.

  10. Application of stochastic phenomenological modelling to cell-to-cell and beat-to-beat electrophysiological variability in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, John; Mirams, Gary R; Pitt-Francis, Joe; Rodriguez, Blanca; Burrage, Kevin

    2015-01-21

    Variability in the action potential of isolated myocytes and tissue samples is observed in experimental studies. Variability is manifested as both differences in the action potential (AP) morphology between cells (extrinsic variability), and also 'intrinsic' or beat-to-beat variability of repolarization (BVR) in the AP duration of each cell. We studied the relative contributions of experimentally recorded intrinsic and extrinsic variability to dispersion of repolarization in tissue. We developed four cell-specific parameterizations of a phenomenological stochastic differential equation AP model exhibiting intrinsic variability using APs recorded from isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes exhibiting BVR. We performed simulations in tissue using the four different model parameterizations in the presence and the absence of both intrinsic and extrinsic variability. We altered the coupling of the tissue to determine how inter-cellular coupling affected the dispersion of the AP duration in tissue. Both intrinsic and extrinsic variability were gradually revealed by reduction of tissue coupling. However, the recorded extrinsic variability between individual myocytes produced a greater degree of dispersion in repolarization in tissue than the intrinsic variability of each myocyte.

  11. The impact of varying autonomic states on the dynamic beat-to-beat QT-RR and QT-TQ interval relationships.

    PubMed

    Fossa, A A

    2008-08-01

    The beat-to-beat dynamicity of the QT-RR interval relationship is difficult to assess with the use of traditional correction factors (QTc) and changes in QTc do not accurately reflect or quantify arrhythmogenic risk. Further, the interpretation of arrhythmogenic risk is influenced by autonomic state. To visualize the QT-RR interval dynamics under varying conditions of autonomic state from impaired repolarization, we have developed a system to sequentially plot the beat-to-beat confluence of ECG data or 'clouds' obtained from conscious dogs and humans. To represent the non-uniformity of the clouds, a bootstrap sampling method that computes the mathematical centre of the uncorrected beat-to-beat QT value (QTbtb) and defines the upper and lower 95% confidence bounds is used. The same method can also be used to examine heterogeneity, hysteresis (both acceleration and deceleration) and restitution (beat-to-beat QT-TQ interval relationship). Impaired repolarization with the combination of E-4031 and L-768,673 (inhibitor of IKs current) increased heterogeneity of restitution at rest 55-91%; increased hysteresis during heart rate acceleration after isoproterenol challenge by approximately 40-60%; and dramatically diminished the minimum TQ boundary by 72% to only 28 ms. Impaired repolarization alters restitution during normal sinus rhythm and increases hysteresis/heterogeneity during heart rate acceleration following sympathetic stimulation. These findings are supported by similar clinical observations in LQT1 and LQT2 syndromes. Therefore, the assessment of the dynamic QT-RR and QT-TQ interval relationships through quantification of heterogeneity, hysteresis and restitution may allow a more accurate non-invasive evaluation of the conditions leading to cardiac arrhythmia.

  12. Comparison of real beat-to-beat signals with commercially available 4 Hz sampling on the evaluation of foetal heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Hernâni; Costa, Antónia; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Costa-Santos, Cristina; Rocha, Ana Paula; Bernardes, João

    2013-06-01

    Evaluation of foetal heart rate (FHR) variability is an essential part of foetal monitoring, but a precise quantification of this parameter depends on the quality of the signal. In this study, we compared real FHR beat-to-beat signals with 4 Hz sampling provided by commercial foetal monitors on linear and nonlinear indices and analysed their clinical implications. Simultaneous acquisition of beat-to-beat signals and their 4 Hz sampling rate counterparts was performed using a scalp electrode, during the last hour of labour in 21 fetuses born with an umbilical artery blood (UAB) pH ≥ 7.20 and 6 born with an UAB pH < 7.20. For each case, the first and last 10 min segments were analysed, using time and frequency domain linear, and nonlinear FHR indices, namely mean FHR, low frequency, high frequency, approximate, sample and multiscale entropy. Significant differences in variability indices were found between beat-to-beat and 4 Hz sampled signals, with a lesser effect seen with 2 Hz sampling. These differences did not affect physiological changes observed during labour progression, such as decreased entropy and linear time domain indices, and increased frequency domain indices. However, significant differences were found in the discrimination between fetuses born with different UAB pHs, with beat-to-beat sampling providing better results in linear indices and 4 Hz sampling better results in entropy indices. In conclusion, different FHR sampling frequencies can significantly affect the quantification of variability indices. This needs to be taken into account in the interpretation of FHR variability and in the development of new equipment.

  13. 77 FR 17060 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge... years, announces the launch of the Beat Down Blood Pressure Video Challenge. This challenge is an open... consumer e-health tools to manage high blood pressure. Health care providers are also encouraged to...

  14. 77 FR 19015 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Health and Human Services (HHS) published a notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 17060) announcing requirements and registration for a Beat Down Blood Pressure Video Challenge. This challenge will not be open... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure...

  15. Beat sampling accuracy in estimating spruce spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae) populations and injury on juniper.

    PubMed

    Shrewsbury, Paula M; Hardin, Mark R

    2004-08-01

    The use of a standardized beat sampling method for estimating spruce spider mite, Oligonychus ununguis (Jacobi) (Acari: Tetranychidae), densities on a widely used evergreen ornamental plant species, Juniperus chinensis variety 'Sargentii' A. Henry (Cupressaceae), was examined. There was a significant positive relationship between total spruce spider mite densities and spider mite densities from beat sampling on juniper. The slope and intercept of the relationship may be used by pest managers to predict total spider mite densities on plants from beat sample counts. Beat sampling dramatically underestimates the total number of spider mites on a foliage sample. The relationships between spruce spider mite feeding injury and spider mite density estimates from beat sampling juniper foliage and total spider mite counts on foliage were also examined. There was a significant positive relationship between spruce spider mite density as estimated from beat sampling and injury to the plants. There was a similar positive relationship between the total number of spruce spider mites and injury to the plants, suggesting that a pest manager could use beat sampling counts to estimate plant injury and related thresholds. These findings have important implications to decision-making for spruce spider mite control, especially as it relates to threshold levels and determining rates of predator releases. Further assessment of the effectiveness of beat and other sampling methods across multiple spider mite- host plant associations needs to be examined to enable pest managers to select sampling plans that are feasible and reliable.

  16. Keeping the Beat: A Large Sample Study of Bouncing and Clapping to Music.

    PubMed

    Tranchant, Pauline; Vuvan, Dominique T; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of humans move in time with a musical beat. This behaviour has been mostly studied through finger-tapping synchronization. Here, we evaluate naturalistic synchronization responses to music-bouncing and clapping-in 100 university students. Their ability to match the period of their bounces and claps to those of a metronome and musical clips varying in beat saliency was assessed. In general, clapping was better synchronized with the beat than bouncing, suggesting that the choice of a specific movement type is an important factor to consider in the study of sensorimotor synchronization processes. Performance improved as a function of beat saliency, indicating that beat abstraction plays a significant role in synchronization. Fourteen percent of the population exhibited marked difficulties with matching the beat. Yet, at a group level, poor synchronizers showed similar sensitivity to movement type and beat saliency as normal synchronizers. These results suggest the presence of quantitative rather than qualitative variations when losing the beat. PMID:27471854

  17. Beat-wave Photoinjector for Generating Periodic Electron Bunches at THz Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-H.; Lau, W.-K.

    2009-01-22

    A laser beat wave is proposed to induce density modulated electron emission from a photocathode and is thereby used to generate a periodically bunched electron beam from a photocathode electron accelerator. This technique does not introduce additional energy spread or emittance to the electron beam. We also present a laser system for this purpose with a tunable beat frequency up to 40 THz.

  18. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  19. Beat processing is pre-attentive for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Fleur L; Van Zuijen, Titia L; Honing, Henkjan

    2014-01-01

    The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN), an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespective of whether subjects are attending to the stimuli. Both musicians and non-musicians were presented with a varying rhythm with a clear accent structure in which occasionally a sound was omitted. We compared the MMN response to the omission of identical sounds in different metrical positions. Most importantly, we found that omissions in strong metrical positions, on the beat, elicited higher amplitude MMN responses than omissions in weak metrical positions, not on the beat. This suggests that the detection of a beat is pre-attentive when highly beat inducing stimuli are used. No effects of musical expertise were found. Our results suggest that for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents beat processing does not require attention or musical expertise. In addition, we discuss how the use of acoustically varying stimuli may influence ERP results when studying beat processing.

  20. Measurement of the Frequencies of One Octave in a Harmonium by Counting Beats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datta, Somnath

    1991-01-01

    An experiment intended to familiarize a student with the musical scale and the technique of tuning an instrument by listening for beats is described. From the dial reading of the oscillator frequency and the counted beats frequency, the student then computes the frequency of each musical note over one full octave. (Author)

  1. Tubulin polyglutamylation is essential for airway ciliary function through the regulation of beating asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Koji; Sato, Showbu; Nakamura, Kenji; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    Airway epithelial cilia protect the mammalian respiratory system from harmful inhaled materials by providing the force necessary for effective mucociliary clearance. Ciliary beating is asymmetric, composed of clearly distinguished effective and recovery strokes. Neither the importance of nor the essential components responsible for the beating asymmetry has been directly elucidated. We report here that the beating asymmetry is crucial for ciliary function and requires tubulin glutamylation, a unique posttranslational modification that is highly abundant in cilia. WT murine tracheal cilia have an axoneme-intrinsic structural curvature that points in the direction of effective strokes. The axonemal curvature was lost in tracheal cilia from mice with knockout of a tubulin glutamylation-performing enzyme, tubulin tyrosine ligase-like protein 1. Along with the loss of axonemal curvature, the axonemes and tracheal epithelial cilia from these knockout (KO) mice lost beating asymmetry. The loss of beating asymmetry resulted in a reduction of cilia-generated fluid flow in trachea from the KO mice. The KO mice displayed a significant accumulation of mucus in the nasal cavity, and also emitted frequent coughing- or sneezing-like noises. Thus, the beating asymmetry is important for airway ciliary function. Our find-ings provide evidence that tubulin glutamylation is essential for ciliary function through the regulation of beating asymmetry, and provides insight into the molecular basis underlying the beating asymmetry. PMID:20498047

  2. Keeping the Beat: A Large Sample Study of Bouncing and Clapping to Music

    PubMed Central

    Tranchant, Pauline; Vuvan, Dominique T.; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of humans move in time with a musical beat. This behaviour has been mostly studied through finger-tapping synchronization. Here, we evaluate naturalistic synchronization responses to music–bouncing and clapping–in 100 university students. Their ability to match the period of their bounces and claps to those of a metronome and musical clips varying in beat saliency was assessed. In general, clapping was better synchronized with the beat than bouncing, suggesting that the choice of a specific movement type is an important factor to consider in the study of sensorimotor synchronization processes. Performance improved as a function of beat saliency, indicating that beat abstraction plays a significant role in synchronization. Fourteen percent of the population exhibited marked difficulties with matching the beat. Yet, at a group level, poor synchronizers showed similar sensitivity to movement type and beat saliency as normal synchronizers. These results suggest the presence of quantitative rather than qualitative variations when losing the beat. PMID:27471854

  3. Beat Processing Is Pre-Attentive for Metrically Simple Rhythms with Clear Accents: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    Bouwer, Fleur L.; Van Zuijen, Titia L.; Honing, Henkjan

    2014-01-01

    The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN), an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespective of whether subjects are attending to the stimuli. Both musicians and non-musicians were presented with a varying rhythm with a clear accent structure in which occasionally a sound was omitted. We compared the MMN response to the omission of identical sounds in different metrical positions. Most importantly, we found that omissions in strong metrical positions, on the beat, elicited higher amplitude MMN responses than omissions in weak metrical positions, not on the beat. This suggests that the detection of a beat is pre-attentive when highly beat inducing stimuli are used. No effects of musical expertise were found. Our results suggest that for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents beat processing does not require attention or musical expertise. In addition, we discuss how the use of acoustically varying stimuli may influence ERP results when studying beat processing. PMID:24870123

  4. Attitudes toward Wife Beating among Palestinian Women of Reproductive Age from Three Cities in West Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhaher, Enas A.; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T.; Maxwell, Annette E.; Kramer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    A total of 450 women were interviewed in Mother and Child Health Care Centers in three cities in West Bank, Palestine, to assess attitudes toward wife beating. Overall, women perceived wife beating to be justified if a wife insults her husband (59%), if she disobeys her husband (49%), if she neglects her children (37%), if she goes out without…

  5. Beat-to-beat variability of repolarization differentiates the extent of torsadogenic potential of multi ion channel-blockers bepridil and amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Akira; Nakamura, Yuji; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2008-10-31

    Bepridil and amiodarone are known to have a multiple ion channel-blocking property in the heart. In this study, we compared the effects of bepridil on beat-to-beat variability of repolarization, a new predictive marker of torsades de pointes arrhythmia, with those of amiodarone. Bepridil (30 mg/kg, n=4) or amiodarone (200 mg/day for initial 7 days and 100 mg/day for following 21 days, n=4) was orally administered to chronic atrioventricular block dogs under the Holter ECG monitoring. The QT interval was prolonged after the administration of bepridil and amiodarone, and torsades de pointes arrhythmia was induced in 3 out of 4 dogs after the bepridil administration, which was not observed during the chronic administration of amiodarone. Beat-to-beat variability of repolarization, quantified as the short-term variability of the QT interval, increased after the administration of bepridil by +3.0 ms, whereas no significant change was detected in this parameter after the administration of amiodarone. These results suggest that the beat-to-beat variability of repolarization is a useful marker for differentiating the extent of torsadogenic potential of multi ion channel-blockers bepridil and amiodarone.

  6. Parasympathetic influence on electrical vulnerability in the atrial myocardium of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Nilius, B; Schüttler, K; Boldt, W

    1981-01-01

    Repetitive activity of the isolated rabbit atrium was induced by trains of premature stimuli. Analyzing the interval-histograms of the recorded atrial action potentials a quantitative description of this arrhythmia is demonstrated. An atrial flutter or fibrillation is evoked 110 to 140 ms after a regular driving pulse. Vagal stimulation increases the electrical vulnerability. The degree of arrhythmia was found to be dependent on the frequency of stimulation. During increased vagal activity premature stimuli applied 40 to 190 ms after a regular driving pulse generate arrhythmias. By vagal stimulation a preexisting arrhythmia is converted into an atrial fibrillation. In spite of a constant pacing, the atrial arrhythmia disappears at atrial masses of below 55 mg if initiated by early coupled beats. During an application of acetylcholine this critical mass is reduced.

  7. Auditory Beat Stimulation and its Effects on Cognition and Mood States

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Wilpert, Elke Caroline; Reber, Thomas P.; Fell, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Auditory beat stimulation may be a promising new tool for the manipulation of cognitive processes and the modulation of mood states. Here, we aim to review the literature examining the most current applications of auditory beat stimulation and its targets. We give a brief overview of research on auditory steady-state responses and its relationship to auditory beat stimulation (ABS). We have summarized relevant studies investigating the neurophysiological changes related to ABS and how they impact upon the design of appropriate stimulation protocols. Focusing on binaural-beat stimulation, we then discuss the role of monaural- and binaural-beat frequencies in cognition and mood states, in addition to their efficacy in targeting disease symptoms. We aim to highlight important points concerning stimulation parameters and try to address why there are often contradictory findings with regard to the outcomes of ABS. PMID:26029120

  8. Attitudes toward wife beating among Palestinian women of reproductive age from three cities in West Bank.

    PubMed

    Dhaher, Enas A; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T; Maxwell, Annette E; Krämer, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    A total of 450 women were interviewed in Mother and Child Health Care Centers in three cities in West Bank, Palestine, to assess attitudes toward wife beating. Overall, women perceived wife beating to be justified if a wife insults her husband (59%), if she disobeys her husband (49%), if she neglects her children (37%), if she goes out without telling her husband (25%), if she argues with her husband (11%), and if she burns the food (5%). Sixty-five percent of women agreed with at least one reason for wife beating, but there were statistically significant regional differences: Wife beating was most accepted in Jenin (73% acceptance of at least one reason) and least accepted in Hebron (55%). Lower level of education, not being employed, having more than one child, being married for fewer than 10 years, and making few household decisions were all associated with women's acceptance of wife beating. The implications of these results are discussed.

  9. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  10. Amusic does not mean unmusical: beat perception and synchronization ability despite pitch deafness.

    PubMed

    Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Toiviainen, Petri; Gosselin, Nathalie; Peretz, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Pitch deafness, the most commonly known form of congenital amusia, refers to a severe deficit in musical pitch processing (i.e., melody discrimination and recognition) that can leave time processing--including rhythm, metre, and "feeling the beat"--preserved. In Experiment 1, we show that by presenting musical excerpts in nonpitched drum timbres, rather than pitched piano tones, amusics show normal metre recognition. Experiment 2 reveals that body movement influences amusics' interpretation of the beat of an ambiguous drum rhythm. Experiment 3 and a subsequent exploratory study show an ability to synchronize movement to the beat of popular dance music and potential for improvement when given a modest amount of practice. Together the present results are consistent with the idea that rhythm and beat processing are spared in pitch deafness--that is, being pitch-deaf does not mean one is beat-deaf. In the context of drum music especially, amusics can be musical. PMID:24344816

  11. Born to dance but beat deaf: a new form of congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Toiviainen, Petri; Gosselin, Nathalie; Piché, Olivier; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Palmer, Caroline; Peretz, Isabelle

    2011-04-01

    Humans move to the beat of music. Despite the ubiquity and early emergence of this response, some individuals report being unable to feel the beat in music. We report a sample of people without special training, all of whom were proficient at perceiving and producing the musical beat with the exception of one case ("Mathieu"). Motion capture and psychophysical tests revealed that people synchronized full-body motion to music and detected when a model dancer was not in time with the music. In contrast, Mathieu failed to period- and phase-lock his movement to the beat of most music pieces, and failed to detect most asynchronies of the model dancer. Mathieu's near-normal synchronization with a metronome suggests that the deficit concerns beat finding in the context of music. These results point to time as having a distinct neurobiological origin from pitch in music processing. PMID:21316375

  12. Robotic Tissue Tracking for Beating Heart Mitral Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Shelten G.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid motion of the heart presents a significant challenge to the surgeon during intracardiac beating heart procedures. We present a 3D ultrasound-guided motion compensation system that assists the surgeon by synchronizing instrument motion with the heart. The system utilizes the fact that certain intracardiac structures, like the mitral valve annulus, have trajectories that are largely constrained to translation along one axis. This allows the development of a real-time 3D ultrasound tissue tracker that we integrate with a 1 degree-of-freedom (DOF) actuated surgical instrument and predictive filter to devise a motion tracking system adapted to mitral valve annuloplasty. In vivo experiments demonstrate that the system provides highly accurate tracking (1.0 mm error) with 70% less error than manual tracking attempts. PMID:23973122

  13. Kuramoto transition in an ensemble of mercury beating heart systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P.; Contractor, A. Q.; Rivera, M.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied, experimentally, the collective behavior of the electrically coupled autonomous Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) systems exhibiting the breathing mode, by varying both the coupling strength and the population size (from N = 3 to N = 16). For a fixed N, the electrical and the mechanical activities of the MBH systems achieve complete synchronization at different coupling strengths. The electrical activity of each MBH system is measured by the corresponding electrode potential (Ei = Vi). Additionally, the mechanical activity of each MBH oscillator is visually observed (snapshots and video clips). Subsequently, this activity is quantified by calculating the temporal variation in the area (Ai) of the Hg drop. As a result, the synchronization of the electrical (Ei = Vi) and the mechanical (Ai) activities can be measured. The extent of synchronization was quantified by employing the order parameter (r). Our experimental results are found to be in agreement with the Kuramoto theory.

  14. Beating heart mitral valve repair with integrated ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John T.; Peters, Terry M.

    2015-03-01

    Beating heart valve therapies rely extensively on image guidance to treat patients who would be considered inoperable with conventional surgery. Mitral valve repair techniques including the MitrClip, NeoChord, and emerging transcatheter mitral valve replacement techniques rely on transesophageal echocardiography for guidance. These images are often difficult to interpret as the tool will cause shadowing artifacts that occlude tissue near the target site. Here, we integrate ultrasound imaging directly into the NeoChord device. This provides an unobstructed imaging plane that can visualize the valve lea ets as they are engaged by the device and can aid in achieving both a proper bite and spacing between the neochordae implants. A proof of concept user study in a phantom environment is performed to provide a proof of concept for this device.

  15. Synchronization using environmental coupling in mercury beating heart oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Tanu; Montoya, Fernando; Rivera, M.; Tajima, Shunsuke; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Parmananda, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report synchronization of Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) oscillators using the environmental coupling mechanism. This mechanism involves interaction of the oscillators with a common medium/environment such that the oscillators do not interact among themselves. In the present work, we chose a modified MBH system as the common environment. In the absence of coupling, this modified system does not exhibit self sustained oscillations. It was observed that, as a result of the coupling of the MBH oscillators with this common environment, the electrical and the mechanical activities of both the oscillators synchronized simultaneously. Experimental results indicate the emergence of both lag and the complete synchronization in the MBH oscillators. Simulations of the phase oscillators were carried out in order to better understand the experimental observations.

  16. Kuramoto transition in an ensemble of mercury beating heart systems.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P; Contractor, A Q; Rivera, M

    2015-06-01

    We have studied, experimentally, the collective behavior of the electrically coupled autonomous Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) systems exhibiting the breathing mode, by varying both the coupling strength and the population size (from N = 3 to N = 16). For a fixed N, the electrical and the mechanical activities of the MBH systems achieve complete synchronization at different coupling strengths. The electrical activity of each MBH system is measured by the corresponding electrode potential (Ei = Vi). Additionally, the mechanical activity of each MBH oscillator is visually observed (snapshots and video clips). Subsequently, this activity is quantified by calculating the temporal variation in the area (Ai) of the Hg drop. As a result, the synchronization of the electrical (Ei = Vi) and the mechanical (Ai) activities can be measured. The extent of synchronization was quantified by employing the order parameter (r). Our experimental results are found to be in agreement with the Kuramoto theory. PMID:26117134

  17. Nonlinear pattern analysis of ventricular premature beats by mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yokoshima, T.; Kishida, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of ventricular premature beats (VPBs) has been related to the risk of mortality. However, little is known about the temporal pattern of occurrence of VPBs and its relationship to autonomic activity. Hence, we applied a general correlation measure, mutual information, to quantify how VPBs are generated over time. We also used mutual information to determine the correlation between VPB production and heart rate in order to evaluate effects of autonomic activity on VPB production. We examined twenty subjects with more than 3000 VPBs/day and simulated random time series of VPB occurrence. We found that mutual information values could be used to characterize quantitatively the temporal patterns of VPB generation. Our data suggest that VPB production is not random and VPBs generated with a higher value of mutual information may be more greatly affected by autonomic activity.

  18. Metal MEMS Tools for Beating-heart Tissue Removal

    PubMed Central

    Gosline, Andrew H.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Veeramani, Arun; Wu, MingTing; Schmitz, Greg; Chen, Rich; Arabagi, Veaceslav; del Nido, Pedro J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel robotic tool is proposed to enable the surgical removal of tissue from inside the beating heart. The tool is manufactured using a unique metal MEMS process that provides the means to fabricate fully assembled devices that incorporate micron-scale features in a millimeter scale tool. The tool is integrated with a steerable curved concentric tube robot that can enter the heart through the vasculature. Incorporating both irrigation and aspiration, the tissue removal system is capable of extracting substantial amounts of tissue under teleoperated control by first morselizing it and then transporting the debris out of the heart through the lumen of the robot. Tool design and robotic integration are described and ex vivo experimental results are presented. PMID:24232076

  19. Oxidized Cellulose with Different Carboxyl Content: Structure and Properties before and after Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendula, Hejlová; Miloslav, Milichovský

    Our recent studies concentrated in investigating influence of beating oxidized cellulose, with different carboxyl content, on changing their basic properties (degree of polymerization, WRV - water resistant value and X-ray diffraction). Cellulose samples of oxidized cellulose were beated by toroidal beating machine. Cellulose consists of both amorphous and crystalline regions. Cellulose consists of linear chains of poly[ß-1,4-D- anhydroglucopyranose] (C6nH10n + 2O5n + 1 (n = degree of polymerization of glucose)), which crystallize through hydrogen bonding between the chains and has cellobiose as repeat unit. Oxidized cellulose is preparing by oxidation of cellulose in the C6 position of the glucopyranose units to carboxylic group (-COOH) and polyanhydroglukuronic acid (PAGA) is arised. An other option is oxidation with sodium hypochlorite with catalytic amounts of sodium bromide and 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) under various conditions. Beating and refining or mechanical treatment of fibers in water is an important step in using pulps for papermaking. It is an energy intensive process. The purpose of the treatment is to modify fiber properties to obtain the most desirable paper machine runnability and product properties. End of beating pulps was characterized by position, when all beated pulps under mixture passed through of riddle (about sizes mesh of 50). During beating of samples about different ratio of oxidation it was found, that samples with higher contents of COOH groups in starting pulp are characterized by a significantly lower specific beating energy consumption needed to achieving the same sizes of particles. X-ray analyse shows that for non-beated oxidized cellulose was perceptible high share amorphous contents compared with beated oxidized cellulose.

  20. Mapping superficial lymphatic territories in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Soto-Miranda, Miguel A; Suami, Hiroo; Chang, David W

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the anatomy of the lymphatic system in the rabbit with regard to relationships between the lymphatic vessel and lymph node. According to our previous studies in human cadavers and canines, the superficial lymphatic system could be divided into lymphatic territories. The aim of this study was to completely map the superficial lymphatic system in the rabbit. We used our microinjection technique and histological analysis for dissecting studies and recently developed indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent lymphography for demonstrating dynamic lymph flow in living rabbits. Real-time ICG fluorescent lymphography was performed in two living New Zealand White rabbits, and direct dye microinjection of the lymphatic vessels was performed in eight dead rabbits. To assess the relationships between the vascular and lymphatic systems in rabbits, we performed radiocontrast injection into arteries in two dead rabbits prior to the lymphatic injection. The ICG fluorescent lymphography revealed eight lymphatic territories in the preauricular, submandibular, root of the lateral neck, axillary, lumbar, inguinal, root of the tail, and popliteal regions. We injected blue acrylic dye into every lymphatic vessel 0.1 mm in diameter or larger. We then dissected and chased the stained lymphatic vessels proximally until the vessels connected to the first tier lymph node. This procedure was repeated throughout the body until all the relationships between the lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes were defined. The lymphatic system of the rabbit could be defined as eight lymphatic territories, each with its own lymphatic vessels and lymph node.

  1. Uterine disorders in 50 pet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Frank; Grinninger, Petra; Shibly, Sarina; Hassan, Jasmin; Tichy, Alexander; Berghold, Petra; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of uterine disorders in pet rabbits is high there are only a few retrospective studies and case reports on genital tract disease in female rabbits. Uterine disorders were assessed in 50 pet rabbits. In 31 pet rabbits with suspected clinical uterine disease, medical records were further reviewed regarding clinical signs, diagnostic workup, treatment as well as the outcome itself. Uterine adenocarcinoma (54%) was most frequently diagnosed, followed by endometrial hyperplasia (26%). Serosanguineous vaginal discharge was the predominant clinical sign observed by the rabbit owners. In approximately 50% of the rabbits with suspected uterine disorders, abdominal palpation revealed enlarged and/or irregular masses in the caudoventral abdomen indicating uterine lesions. Out of 23 rabbits undergoing ovariohysterectomy, four were either euthanized or died shortly after surgery because they were clinically unstable. Overall, 80% of the ovariohysterectomized animals were still alive 6 mo after surgery. In female pet rabbits that are not breeding, either ovariohysterectomy should be performed at an early age or routine checks including ultrasonography of the abdomen are recommended on a regular basis.

  2. Thermal cataract formation in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, P.; Harris, C.; Guy, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    Intraocularly circulating hot water was used to produce cataracts in nine eyes of seven rabbits by maintaining their retrolental temperatures between 43 degrees C and 45 degrees C. A rapid rate of heating (1.3 degrees C/min) plus a sharp temperature gradient across the eye may have been contributing factors in the consistent production of cataracts at these temperatures. Biomicroscopy and light microscopy showed lens changes similar to those associated with acute exposure to microwave radiation. These findings support the assumption that microwave cataractogenesis is due to the local production of elevated temperatures.

  3. Synchronization of sinoatrial node pacemaker cell clocks and its autonomic modulation impart complexity to heart beating intervals Short title: Beating-rate variability of sinoatrial node cells

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Ahmet, Ismayil; Liu, Jie; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Guiriba, Toni-Rose; Okamoto, Yosuke; Ziman, Bruce D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Background A reduction of complexity of heart-beat interval variability (BIV) that is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease states is thought to derive from the balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic neural impulses to the heart. But rhythmic clock-like behavior intrinsic to pacemaker cells within the sinoatrial node (SAN) drives their beating, even in the absence of autonomic neural input. Objective To test how this rhythmic clock-like behavior intrinsic to pacemaker cells interacts with autonomic impulses to the heart-beat interval variability in vivo. Methods We analyzed BIV in the time and frequency domains and by fractal and entropy analyses: i) in vivo, when the brain input to the SAN is intact; ii) during autonomic denervation in vivo; iii) in isolated SAN tissue (i.e., in which the autonomic-neural input is completely absent); iv) in single pacemaker cells isolated from the SAN; and v) following autonomic receptor stimulation of these cells. Results Spontaneous-beating intervals of pacemaker cells residing within the isolated SAN tissue exhibit fractal-like behavior and have lower approximate entropy than in the intact heart. Isolation of pacemaker cells from SAN tissue, however, leads to a loss in the beating-interval order and fractal-like behavior. β adrenergic receptor stimulation of isolated pacemaker cells increases intrinsic clock synchronization, decreases their action potential period and increases system complexity. Conclusions Both the average-beating interval in vivo and beating interval complexity are conferred by the combined effects of clock periodicity intrinsic to pacemaker cells and their response to autonomic-neural input. PMID:24713624

  4. Behavioral fever in newborn rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satinoff, E.; Mcewen, G. N., Jr.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New Zealand white rabbit pups aged 12 to 72 hr were divided into three groups and given an intraperitoneal injection of Pseudomonas polysaccharide, a saline vehicle alone, and no treatment, respectively. The animals injected with pyrogen and maintained at an ambient temperature of 32 C for 2 hr did not develop fever. When placed in a thermally graded alleyway, the animals injected with pyrogen selected gradient positions that represented significantly higher temperatures than controls injected with saline. Further stay at selected positions for 5 min caused a considerable increase in the rectal temperature of the pyrogen-injected pups but not that of controls. The results support the hypothesis that newborn rabbits will develop a fever by behavioral means after a single injection of an exogenous pyrogen if the opportunity for thermoregulatory behavior is present. No fever develops if the pups must rely solely on internal thermoregulatory mechanisms. The behavioral system for producing a fever is mature at birth, but an adequate system of internal reflexes does not appear to develop for some days.

  5. Ectopic beats in approximate entropy and sample entropy-based HRV assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Butta; Singh, Dilbag; Jaryal, A. K.; Deepak, K. K.

    2012-05-01

    Approximate entropy (ApEn) and sample entropy (SampEn) are the promising techniques for extracting complex characteristics of cardiovascular variability. Ectopic beats, originating from other than the normal site, are the artefacts contributing a serious limitation to heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. The approaches like deletion and interpolation are currently in use to eliminate the bias produced by ectopic beats. In this study, normal R-R interval time series of 10 healthy and 10 acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients were analysed by inserting artificial ectopic beats. Then the effects of ectopic beats editing by deletion, degree-zero and degree-one interpolation on ApEn and SampEn have been assessed. Ectopic beats addition (even 2%) led to reduced complexity, resulting in decreased ApEn and SampEn of both healthy and AMI patient data. This reduction has been found to be dependent on level of ectopic beats. Editing of ectopic beats by interpolation degree-one method is found to be superior to other methods.

  6. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Quarantine of diseased rabbits. 354... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Inspection Procedures; Ante-Mortem Inspections § 354.124 Quarantine of diseased rabbits. If live rabbits, which...

  7. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Quarantine of diseased rabbits. 354... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Inspection Procedures; Ante-Mortem Inspections § 354.124 Quarantine of diseased rabbits. If live rabbits, which...

  8. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Quarantine of diseased rabbits. 354... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Inspection Procedures; Ante-Mortem Inspections § 354.124 Quarantine of diseased rabbits. If live rabbits, which...

  9. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Quarantine of diseased rabbits. 354... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Inspection Procedures; Ante-Mortem Inspections § 354.124 Quarantine of diseased rabbits. If live rabbits, which...

  10. Clinical aspects of lagomorph dental anatomy: the rabbit (oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Crossley, D A

    1995-12-01

    The lagomorphs most commonly encountered as pets are rabbits. There are many breeds of domestic rabbit, varying from dwarf varieties with an adult weight of under one kilogram to giants weighing 10 kg. This article provides a working knowledge of the dental anatomy and physiology of rabbits so that veterinarians can interpret clinical and radiographic findings when investigating rabbits with suspected dental disease.

  11. The evolutionary neuroscience of musical beat perception: the Action Simulation for Auditory Prediction (ASAP) hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Aniruddh D.; Iversen, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Every human culture has some form of music with a beat: a perceived periodic pulse that structures the perception of musical rhythm and which serves as a framework for synchronized movement to music. What are the neural mechanisms of musical beat perception, and how did they evolve? One view, which dates back to Darwin and implicitly informs some current models of beat perception, is that the relevant neural mechanisms are relatively general and are widespread among animal species. On the basis of recent neural and cross-species data on musical beat processing, this paper argues for a different view. Here we argue that beat perception is a complex brain function involving temporally-precise communication between auditory regions and motor planning regions of the cortex (even in the absence of overt movement). More specifically, we propose that simulation of periodic movement in motor planning regions provides a neural signal that helps the auditory system predict the timing of upcoming beats. This “action simulation for auditory prediction” (ASAP) hypothesis leads to testable predictions. We further suggest that ASAP relies on dorsal auditory pathway connections between auditory regions and motor planning regions via the parietal cortex, and suggest that these connections may be stronger in humans than in non-human primates due to the evolution of vocal learning in our lineage. This suggestion motivates cross-species research to determine which species are capable of human-like beat perception, i.e., beat perception that involves accurate temporal prediction of beat times across a fairly broad range of tempi. PMID:24860439

  12. Disentangling beat perception from sequential learning and examining the influence of attention and musical abilities on ERP responses to rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Fleur L; Werner, Carola M; Knetemann, Myrthe; Honing, Henkjan

    2016-05-01

    Beat perception is the ability to perceive temporal regularity in musical rhythm. When a beat is perceived, predictions about upcoming events can be generated. These predictions can influence processing of subsequent rhythmic events. However, statistical learning of the order of sounds in a sequence can also affect processing of rhythmic events and must be differentiated from beat perception. In the current study, using EEG, we examined the effects of attention and musical abilities on beat perception. To ensure we measured beat perception and not absolute perception of temporal intervals, we used alternating loud and soft tones to create a rhythm with two hierarchical metrical levels. To control for sequential learning of the order of the different sounds, we used temporally regular (isochronous) and jittered rhythmic sequences. The order of sounds was identical in both conditions, but only the regular condition allowed for the perception of a beat. Unexpected intensity decrements were introduced on the beat and offbeat. In the regular condition, both beat perception and sequential learning were expected to enhance detection of these deviants on the beat. In the jittered condition, only sequential learning was expected to affect processing of the deviants. ERP responses to deviants were larger on the beat than offbeat in both conditions. Importantly, this difference was larger in the regular condition than in the jittered condition, suggesting that beat perception influenced responses to rhythmic events in addition to sequential learning. The influence of beat perception was present both with and without attention directed at the rhythm. Moreover, beat perception as measured with ERPs correlated with musical abilities, but only when attention was directed at the stimuli. Our study shows that beat perception is possible when attention is not directed at a rhythm. In addition, our results suggest that attention may mediate the influence of musical abilities on beat

  13. Disentangling beat perception from sequential learning and examining the influence of attention and musical abilities on ERP responses to rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Fleur L; Werner, Carola M; Knetemann, Myrthe; Honing, Henkjan

    2016-05-01

    Beat perception is the ability to perceive temporal regularity in musical rhythm. When a beat is perceived, predictions about upcoming events can be generated. These predictions can influence processing of subsequent rhythmic events. However, statistical learning of the order of sounds in a sequence can also affect processing of rhythmic events and must be differentiated from beat perception. In the current study, using EEG, we examined the effects of attention and musical abilities on beat perception. To ensure we measured beat perception and not absolute perception of temporal intervals, we used alternating loud and soft tones to create a rhythm with two hierarchical metrical levels. To control for sequential learning of the order of the different sounds, we used temporally regular (isochronous) and jittered rhythmic sequences. The order of sounds was identical in both conditions, but only the regular condition allowed for the perception of a beat. Unexpected intensity decrements were introduced on the beat and offbeat. In the regular condition, both beat perception and sequential learning were expected to enhance detection of these deviants on the beat. In the jittered condition, only sequential learning was expected to affect processing of the deviants. ERP responses to deviants were larger on the beat than offbeat in both conditions. Importantly, this difference was larger in the regular condition than in the jittered condition, suggesting that beat perception influenced responses to rhythmic events in addition to sequential learning. The influence of beat perception was present both with and without attention directed at the rhythm. Moreover, beat perception as measured with ERPs correlated with musical abilities, but only when attention was directed at the stimuli. Our study shows that beat perception is possible when attention is not directed at a rhythm. In addition, our results suggest that attention may mediate the influence of musical abilities on beat

  14. Multimode fiber laser for simultaneous measurement of strain and temperature based on beat frequency demodulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Chen, Lin; Huang, Long; Chen, Xiangfei

    2012-09-24

    A multimode fiber laser sensor system for simultaneous measurement of strain and temperature is proposed and demonstrated. Because of the long cavity and birefringence, longitudinal mode beat frequency and polarization mode beat frequency are achieved in the beat frequency signals of the multimode fiber laser. The strain and temperature can be obtained by monitoring both of them for their different strain and temperature responses. The experimental measurement errors are within ± 16.2 με and ± 1.9 °C. The usage of only one fiber laser and one demodulation system makes the system simple, cost-effective and portable.

  15. An improved isolated working rabbit heart preparation using red cell enhanced perfusate.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, V.; Chen, Y. H.; Downing, S. E.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of isolated working rabbit hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit (KH) buffer was compared with those in which the buffer was supplemented with washed human red blood cells (KH + RBC) at a hematocrit of 15 percent. When perfused with KH alone at 70 cm H2O afterload and paced at 240 beats/minute, coronary flow was more than double, whereas aortic flow was 40-60 percent of that in hearts perfused with KH + RBC, regardless of left atrial filling pressures (LAFP). Peak systolic pressure reached a plateau at 120 mm Hg in KH + RBC, but at 95 mm Hg in the KH group. Stroke work, however, was similar in the two groups. Despite the high coronary flow, oxygen uptake by hearts perfused with KH was substantially less and did not respond to increases in LAFP as in those perfused with KH + RBC. There was a 20 percent drop in ATP and glycogen content after 90 minutes' perfusion. In contrast, isolated hearts perfused with RBC-enriched buffer remained stable for at least 150 minutes. Irrespective of the perfusate, triacylglycerol content of the muscle remained at similar levels throughout the course of study. Increasing RBC in the perfusate from 15 percent to 25 percent had no additional effect on cardiac performance or oxygen consumption. Our findings demonstrate that in the isolated working rabbit heart inclusion of RBC in the perfusate improves mechanical and metabolic stability by providing an adequate oxygen supply. PMID:3604287

  16. Bobcat attack on a cottontail rabbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biggins, D.E.; Biggins, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    We observed an attack by a bobcat (Lynx rufus) on a cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus) that involved stealthy approach by the cat for >1 h, followed by a 12.3-s chase covering 116.0 m for the cat and 128.4 m for the rabbit. During the chase, the route of the cat from starting point to kill site was more direct than the semi-circular route of the rabbit. Stride lengths for the cat and total distance covered by the chase were longer than those previously reported for bobcats.

  17. Diet-induced hypercholesterolaemia in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A S; Torkhovskaya, T I; Khalilov, E M; Archakov, A I

    1991-01-01

    Intraspecies variation in diet-induced hypercholesterolaemia in rabbits, simulating atherosclerosis, was studied. The chinchilla rabbit population examined contained several subpopulations, as indicated by polymodal forms of histograms of plasma cholesterol levels. This finding indicates that the inclusion of subpopulations in an investigation can lead to erroneous conclusions, and that subpopulations should be identified before such work is undertaken. The relationship between the molar cholesterol/phospholipid ratio in rabbit erythrocyte membranes and the plasma cholesterol level in experimental atherosclerosis was also studied. A correlation was evident only over the range of 1-5 g cholesterol per litre of plasma. PMID:1751762

  18. EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS IN THE RABBIT

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Wade H.; Pearce, Louise

    1920-01-01

    From a study of the phenomena of the primary infection on the one hand, and the phenomena of local spread, or dissemination, on the other, it is seen that a multiplicity of lesions develops in the testicle and scrotum of the rabbit which have much the same characteristics irrespective of their origin. Some of these lesions are clearly recognizable as primary lesions or parts of a primary reaction to infection, while others are just as clearly the results of dissemination of the virus from a primary focus of infection or correspond with lesions which are commonly spoken of as secondary lesions. The effort to draw a sharp line of distinction between these two groups of lesions or between a primary and a secondary stage of infection in the rabbit, however, would be largely an arbitrary procedure. The fact is that the tissues of the scrotum and testicle of the rabbit constitute favorable surroundings for the localization and development of pallidum infections. Under ordinary circumstances, a large part of the reaction to infection which expresses itself in the formation of lesions recognizable by ordinary methods of examination takes place in these tissues. These lesions present certain broad and general characteristics without regard to whether they are primary or secondary in origin; the reaction is merely a reaction to a syphilitic infection which in either case may assume the most diverse character. Further, it would appear that in rabbits infected with such strains of Treponema pallidum as we have used, the virus is never confined to the area occupied by the so called primary lesion, or chancre, but always spreads and always gives rise to a regional adenopathy. There may be no lesions to indicate the progress of this dissemination, but an examination of the inguinal nodes shows that dissemination occurs very soon after inoculation, and a pallidum reaction may be detected in these glands even before infection can be recognized in the scrotum. Subsequently lesions

  19. Automatic analysis of ciliary beat frequency using optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, Michael; Lechner, Manuel; Werther, Tobias; Horak, Fritz; Hummel, Johann; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) can be a useful parameter for diagnosis of several diseases, as e.g. primary ciliary dyskinesia. (PCD). CBF computation is usually done using manual evaluation of high speed video sequences, a tedious, observer dependent, and not very accurate procedure. We used the OpenCV's pyramidal implementation of the Lukas-Kanade algorithm for optical flow computation and applied this to certain objects to follow the movements. The objects were chosen by their contrast applying the corner detection by Shi and Tomasi. Discrimination between background/noise and cilia by a frequency histogram allowed to compute the CBF. Frequency analysis was done using the Fourier transform in matlab. The correct number of Fourier summands was found by the slope in an approximation curve. The method showed to be usable to distinguish between healthy and diseased samples. However there remain difficulties in automatically identifying the cilia, and also in finding enough high contrast cilia in the image. Furthermore the some of the higher contrast cilia are lost (and sometimes found) by the method, an easy way to distinguish the correct sub-path of a point's path have yet to be found in the case where the slope methods doesn't work.

  20. Coordinated Beating of Algal Flagella is Mediated by Basal Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    Cilia or flagella often exhibit synchronized behavior. This includes phase-locking, as seen in Chlamydomonas, and metachronal wave formation in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating filaments. Recent work on the dynamics of physically separated pairs of flagella isolated from the multicellular alga Volvox has shown that hydrodynamic coupling alone is sufficient for synchrony. However, the situation is more complex when considering multiple flagella on a single cell. We suggest that a mechanism, internal to the cell, provides an additional flagellar coupling. For instance, flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants deficient in filamentary connections between basal bodies are found to display markedly different synchronization from the wildtype. Diverse flagellar coordination strategies found in quadri-, octo- and hexadecaflagellates reveal further evidence that intracellular couplings between flagellar basal bodies compete with hydrodynamic interactions to determine the precise form of flagellar synchronization in unicellular algae.

  1. Coordinated beating of algal flagella is mediated by basal coupling.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kirsty Y; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2016-05-17

    Cilia and flagella often exhibit synchronized behavior; this includes phase locking, as seen in Chlamydomonas, and metachronal wave formation in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating filaments. Recent work on the dynamics of physically separated pairs of flagella isolated from the multicellular alga Volvox has shown that hydrodynamic coupling alone is sufficient to produce synchrony. However, the situation is more complex in unicellular organisms bearing few flagella. We show that flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants deficient in filamentary connections between basal bodies display markedly different synchronization from the wild type. We perform micromanipulation on configurations of flagella and conclude that a mechanism, internal to the cell, must provide an additional flagellar coupling. In naturally occurring species with 4, 8, or even 16 flagella, we find diverse symmetries of basal body positioning and of the flagellar apparatus that are coincident with specific gaits of flagellar actuation, suggesting that it is a competition between intracellular coupling and hydrodynamic interactions that ultimately determines the precise form of flagellar coordination in unicellular algae.

  2. Non-heart-beating organ donation in Italy.

    PubMed

    Geraci, P M; Sepe, V

    2011-06-01

    In 2007 the non-heart-beating organ donation (NHBD) "Programma Alba" (Sunrise Programme) started in Pavia, Italy. The initial plan was to cut down waiting list for kidney transplantation, while its final aim is to shorten organ transplantation waiting lists. When compared to European countries and the USA, the Italian NHBD program has taken longer to get established. Initially Italian physicians were not entirely aware of the NHBD organ viability for transplantation, furthermore ethical issues and the need to regulate medical requirements to Italian law slowed down the NHBD program. In particular, Italian legislation provides for death ascertainment after irreversible cardiac arrest, 20-minute flat electrocardiogram. This no-touch period is longer when compared to worldwide legislation, and organ viability has been a main concern for Italian transplant doctors over the years. However, recent data let up to 40-minute warm ischemia time to preserve organ viability; this has encouraged Pavia's group to establish the NHBD "Programma Alba". It was designed according to Italian legislation from death diagnosis to graft placement, from this perspective must the significant role of the Transplant coordinator be recognized. Since 2007 seven kidneys have been gathered from seven NHBD. Of these, six NHBD kidneys have been transplanted. Currently, four patients are out of dialysis. This report is a detailed description of NHBD "Programma Alba" and its preliminary results. PMID:21617625

  3. Coordinated beating of algal flagella is mediated by basal coupling.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kirsty Y; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2016-05-17

    Cilia and flagella often exhibit synchronized behavior; this includes phase locking, as seen in Chlamydomonas, and metachronal wave formation in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating filaments. Recent work on the dynamics of physically separated pairs of flagella isolated from the multicellular alga Volvox has shown that hydrodynamic coupling alone is sufficient to produce synchrony. However, the situation is more complex in unicellular organisms bearing few flagella. We show that flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants deficient in filamentary connections between basal bodies display markedly different synchronization from the wild type. We perform micromanipulation on configurations of flagella and conclude that a mechanism, internal to the cell, must provide an additional flagellar coupling. In naturally occurring species with 4, 8, or even 16 flagella, we find diverse symmetries of basal body positioning and of the flagellar apparatus that are coincident with specific gaits of flagellar actuation, suggesting that it is a competition between intracellular coupling and hydrodynamic interactions that ultimately determines the precise form of flagellar coordination in unicellular algae. PMID:27140605

  4. Transport by Collective Flagellar Beating Facilitates Evolutionary Transitions to Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Martin; Powers, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    A central problem underlying the evolution from single cells to multicellular organisms is the relationship between metabolic requirements and environmental metabolite exchange with increasing size. For organisms that form spherical colonies such as the volvocalean green algae, there is a bottleneck if diffusion alone governs nutrient uptake as they increase in size, for the diffusive flux is linear in the radius while the requirements of surface somatic cells grow quadratically. Using Volvox as a model organism, we examine experimentally and theoretically the role that advection of fluid by surface flagella plays in enhancing nutrient uptake. We show that the fluid flow driven by the coordinated beating of those flagella produces a boundary layer in the concentration of a diffusing solute which renders the metabolite exchange rate quadratic in the colony radius. This bypasses the diffusive bottleneck, facilitating evolutionary transitions to multicellularity which may be driven by other environmental factors. These results suggest that flagella may have evolved not only for motility, but also to enhance metabolite exchange.

  5. Taming microwave plasma to beat thermodynamics in CO2 dissociation.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, G J; van den Bekerom, D C M; den Harder, N; Minea, T; Berden, G; Bongers, W A; Engeln, R; Graswinckel, M F; Zoethout, E; van de Sanden, M C M

    2015-01-01

    The strong non-equilibrium conditions provided by the plasma phase offer the opportunity to beat traditional thermal process energy efficiencies via preferential excitation of molecular vibrations. Simple molecular physics considerations are presented to explain potential dissociation pathways in plasma and their effect on energy efficiency. A common microwave reactor approach is evaluated experimentally with Rayleigh scattering and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to assess gas temperatures (exceeding 10(4) K) and conversion degrees (up to 30%), respectively. The results are interpreted on a basis of estimates of the plasma dynamics obtained with electron energy distribution functions calculated with a Boltzmann solver. It indicates that the intrinsic electron energies are higher than is favorable for preferential vibrational excitation due to dissociative excitation, which causes thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry to dominate. The highest observed energy efficiencies of 45% indicate that non-equilibrium dynamics had been at play. A novel approach involving additives of low ionization potential to tailor the electron energies to the vibrational excitation regime is proposed.

  6. Robotic Motion Compensation for Beating Heart Intracardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Shelten G.; Kettler, Daniel T.; Novotny, Paul M.; Plowes, Richard D.; Howe, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    3D ultrasound imaging has enabled minimally invasive, beating heart intracardiac procedures. However, rapid heart motion poses a serious challenge to the surgeon that is compounded by significant time delays and noise in 3D ultrasound. This paper investigates the concept of using a one-degree-of-freedom motion compensation system to synchronize with tissue motions that may be approximated by 1D motion models. We characterize the motion of the mitral valve annulus and show that it is well approximated by a 1D model. The subsequent development of a motion compensation instrument (MCI) is described, as well as an extended Kalman filter (EKF) that compensates for system delays. The benefits and robustness of motion compensation are tested in user trials under a series of non-ideal tracking conditions. Results indicate that the MCI provides an approximately 50% increase in dexterity and 50% decrease in force when compared with a solid tool, but is sensitive to time delays. We demonstrate that the use of the EKF for delay compensation restores performance, even in situations of high heart rate variability. The resulting system is tested in an in vitro 3D ultrasound-guided servoing task, yielding accurate tracking (1.15 mm root mean square) in the presence of noisy, time-delayed 3D ultrasound measurements. PMID:20436927

  7. Computerized image processing in the Reginald Denny beating trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Lawrence C.

    1997-02-01

    New image processing techniques may have significant benefits to law enforcement officials but need to be legally admissible in court. Courts have different tests for determining the admissibility of new scientific procedures, requiring their reliability to be established by expert testimony. The first test developed was whether there has been general acceptance of the new procedure within the scientific community. In 1993 the U.S. Supreme Court loosened the requirements for admissibility of new scientific techniques, although the California Supreme Court later retained the general acceptance test. What the proper standard is for admission of such evidence is important to both the technical community and to the legal community because of the conflict between benefits of rapidly developing technology, and the dangers of 'junk science.' The Reginald Denny beating case from the 1992 Los Angeles riots proved the value of computerized image processing in identifying persons committing crimes on videotape. The segmentation process was used to establish the presence of a tattoo on one defendant, which was key in his identification. Following the defendant's conviction, the California Court of Appeal approved the use of the evidence involving the segmentation process. This published opinion may be cited as legal precedent.

  8. Coordinated beating of algal flagella is mediated by basal coupling

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Kirsty Y.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella often exhibit synchronized behavior; this includes phase locking, as seen in Chlamydomonas, and metachronal wave formation in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating filaments. Recent work on the dynamics of physically separated pairs of flagella isolated from the multicellular alga Volvox has shown that hydrodynamic coupling alone is sufficient to produce synchrony. However, the situation is more complex in unicellular organisms bearing few flagella. We show that flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants deficient in filamentary connections between basal bodies display markedly different synchronization from the wild type. We perform micromanipulation on configurations of flagella and conclude that a mechanism, internal to the cell, must provide an additional flagellar coupling. In naturally occurring species with 4, 8, or even 16 flagella, we find diverse symmetries of basal body positioning and of the flagellar apparatus that are coincident with specific gaits of flagellar actuation, suggesting that it is a competition between intracellular coupling and hydrodynamic interactions that ultimately determines the precise form of flagellar coordination in unicellular algae. PMID:27140605

  9. Beat-to-beat, reading-to-reading, and day-to-day blood pressure variability in relation to organ damage in untreated Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang-Fei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Ting-Yan; Ding, Feng-Hua; Wang, Ji-Guang; Staessen, Jan A

    2014-04-01

    Whether target organ damage is associated with blood pressure (BP) variability independent of level remains debated. We assessed these associations from 10-minute beat-to-beat, 24-hour ambulatory, and 7-day home BP recordings in 256 untreated subjects referred to a hypertension clinic. BP variability indices were variability independent of the mean, maximum-minimum difference, and average real variability. Effect sizes (standardized β) were computed using multivariable regression models. In beat-to-beat recordings, left ventricular mass index (n=128) was not (P≥0.18) associated with systolic BP but increased with all 3 systolic variability indices (+2.97-3.53 g/m(2); P<0.04); the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio increased (P≤0.03) with systolic BP (+1.14-1.17 mg/mmol) and maximum-minimum difference (+1.18 mg/mmol); and pulse wave velocity increased with systolic BP (+0.69 m/s; P<0.001). In 24-hour recordings, all 3 indices of organ damage increased (P<0.03) with systolic BP, whereas the associations with BP variability were nonsignificant (P≥0.15) except for increases in pulse wave velocity (P<0.05) with variability independent of the mean (+0.16 m/s) and maximum-minimum difference (+0.17 m/s). In home recordings, the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (+1.27-1.30 mg/mmol) and pulse wave velocity (+0.36-0.40 m/s) increased (P<0.05) with systolic BP, whereas all associations of target organ damage with the variability indices were nonsignificant (P≥0.07). In conclusion, while accounting for BP level, associations of target organ damage with BP variability were readily detectable in beat-to-beat recordings, least noticeable in home recordings, with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring being informative only for pulse wave velocity.

  10. Keynote Presentation: Genome Beat (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Carl

    2012-03-20

    Carl Zimmer, a reporter for the New York Times, speaks on "The Genome Beat," the opening keynote presentation at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  11. [Analysis of scalp potential activity and heart rate variability during volitional control of heart beat].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Jian-Bao; Wang, Jue

    2009-07-01

    In the study the changes of scalp potential and cardiac autonomic nervous system during volitional control of heart beat are explored with the wavelet packet parameters and approximate entropy (ApEn) of Electroencephalogram (EEG) and heart rate variability. The results show that volition can control heart beat and the changes of brain activity are earlier than that of autonomic activity. But its control of heart beat is very different from the motor nervous system because different cortical positions are respectively concerned during the quick and slow control of heart beat. The pre-central areas of brain are correlated with parasympathetic activity by which HR is controlled to slow down. The post-central areas of brain are correlated with sympathetic activity by which HR is controlled to accelerate.

  12. Quantum beats in conductance oscillations in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity wells and electrostatic wells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Ying-Tao; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-14

    The transport properties in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity well (Fermi velocity inside the well less than that outside the well) and electrostatic well structures are investigated using the transfer matrix method. The results show that quantum beats occur in the oscillations of the conductance for asymmetric double velocity wells. The beating effect can also be found in asymmetric double electrostatic wells, but only if the widths of the two wells are different. The beat frequency for the asymmetric double well is exactly equal to the frequency difference between the oscillation rates in two isolated single wells with the same structures as the individual wells in the double well structure. A qualitative interpretation is proposed based on the fact that the resonant levels depend upon the sizes of the quantum wells. The beating behavior can provide a new way to identify the symmetry of double well structures.

  13. Free-electron laser from wave-mechanical beats of 2 electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is possible, though technically difficult, to produce beams of free electrons that exhibit beats of a quantum mechanical nature. (1) the generation of electromagnetic radiation, e.g., light, based on the fact that the beats give rise to alternating charge and current densities; and a frequency shifter, based on the fact that a beam with beats constitutes a moving grating. When such a grating is exposed to external radiation of suitable frequency and direction, the reflected rediation will be shifted in frequency, since the grating is moving. A twofold increase of the frequency is readily attainable. It is shown that it is impossible to generate radiation, because the alternating electromagnetic fields that accompany the beats cannot reform themselves into freely propagating waves. The frequency shifter is useless as a practical device, because its reflectance is extremely low for realizable beams.

  14. Keynote Presentation: Genome Beat (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Zimmer, Carl [New York Times

    2016-07-12

    Carl Zimmer, a reporter for the New York Times, speaks on "The Genome Beat," the opening keynote presentation at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  15. 3D force control for robotic-assisted beating heart surgery based on viscoelastic tissue model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Moreira, Pedro; Zemiti, Nabil; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Current cardiac surgery faces the challenging problem of heart beating motion even with the help of mechanical stabilizer which makes delicate operation on the heart surface difficult. Motion compensation methods for robotic-assisted beating heart surgery have been proposed recently in literature, but research on force control for such kind of surgery has hardly been reported. Moreover, the viscoelasticity property of the interaction between organ tissue and robotic instrument further complicates the force control design which is much easier in other applications by assuming the interaction model to be elastic (industry, stiff object manipulation, etc.). In this work, we present a three-dimensional force control method for robotic-assisted beating heart surgery taking into consideration of the viscoelastic interaction property. Performance studies based on our D2M2 robot and 3D heart beating motion information obtained through Da Vinci™ system are provided.

  16. Beat synchronization predicts neural speech encoding and reading readiness in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Woodruff Carr, Kali; White-Schwoch, Travis; Tierney, Adam T; Strait, Dana L; Kraus, Nina

    2014-10-01

    Temporal cues are important for discerning word boundaries and syllable segments in speech; their perception facilitates language acquisition and development. Beat synchronization and neural encoding of speech reflect precision in processing temporal cues and have been linked to reading skills. In poor readers, diminished neural precision may contribute to rhythmic and phonological deficits. Here we establish links between beat synchronization and speech processing in children who have not yet begun to read: preschoolers who can entrain to an external beat have more faithful neural encoding of temporal modulations in speech and score higher on tests of early language skills. In summary, we propose precise neural encoding of temporal modulations as a key mechanism underlying reading acquisition. Because beat synchronization abilities emerge at an early age, these findings may inform strategies for early detection of and intervention for language-based learning disabilities.

  17. The ability to tap to a beat relates to cognitive, linguistic, and perceptual skills.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Adam T; Kraus, Nina

    2013-03-01

    Reading-impaired children have difficulty tapping to a beat. Here we tested whether this relationship between reading ability and synchronized tapping holds in typically-developing adolescents. We also hypothesized that tapping relates to two other abilities. First, since auditory-motor synchronization requires monitoring of the relationship between motor output and auditory input, we predicted that subjects better able to tap to the beat would perform better on attention tests. Second, since auditory-motor synchronization requires fine temporal precision within the auditory system for the extraction of a sound's onset time, we predicted that subjects better able to tap to the beat would be less affected by backward masking, a measure of temporal precision within the auditory system. As predicted, tapping performance related to reading, attention, and backward masking. These results motivate future research investigating whether beat synchronization training can improve not only reading ability, but potentially executive function and auditory processing as well.

  18. "Keep the Beat" Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease ... Contents Your blood pressure rises and falls during the day. But when it stays elevated over time, ...

  19. Beat to beat variability of embryonic chick heart cells under septic conditions: application and evaluation of entropy as well as fractal measures.

    PubMed

    Ahammer, Helmut; Scherubel, Susanne; Arnold, Robert; Zorn-Pauly, Klaus; Pelzmann, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Extracardiac factors of heart rate variability have commonly been investigated using linear and nonlinear methods for a long time. Recently, intracardiac mechanisms on an electrophysiological basis have been found to be also important. This work is focused on the evaluation of complex measures of temporal signals gained with microelectrode measurements of embryonic chick heart aggregates. Septic conditions were mimicked in vitro by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in order to investigate the influence on beat to beat variability. Surrogate data analysis revealed high statistical significances for normalized complexity measures.

  20. The Effect of Dopaminergic Medication on Beat-Based Auditory Timing in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Daniel J; Pickett, Kristen A; Earhart, Gammon M; Grahn, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) adversely affects timing abilities. Beat-based timing is a mechanism that times events relative to a regular interval, such as the "beat" in musical rhythm, and is impaired in PD. It is unknown if dopaminergic medication influences beat-based timing in PD. Here, we tested beat-based timing over two sessions in participants with PD (OFF then ON dopaminergic medication) and in unmedicated control participants. People with PD and control participants completed two tasks. The first was a discrimination task in which participants compared two rhythms and determined whether they were the same or different. Rhythms either had a beat structure (metric simple rhythms) or did not (metric complex rhythms), as in previous studies. Discrimination accuracy was analyzed to test for the effects of beat structure, as well as differences between participants with PD and controls, and effects of medication (PD group only). The second task was the Beat Alignment Test (BAT), in which participants listened to music with regular tones superimposed, and responded as to whether the tones were "ON" or "OFF" the beat of the music. Accuracy was analyzed to test for differences between participants with PD and controls, and for an effect of medication in patients. Both patients and controls discriminated metric simple rhythms better than metric complex rhythms. Controls also improved at the discrimination task in the second vs. first session, whereas people with PD did not. For participants with PD, the difference in performance between metric simple and metric complex rhythms was greater (sensitivity to changes in simple rhythms increased and sensitivity to changes in complex rhythms decreased) when ON vs. OFF medication. Performance also worsened with disease severity. For the BAT, no group differences or effects of medication were found. Overall, these findings suggest that timing is impaired in PD, and that dopaminergic medication influences beat-based and non-beat

  1. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-01-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  2. Eyeblink conditioning in the developing rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kevin L.; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.

    2011-01-01

    Eyeblink classical conditioning in pre-weanling rabbits was examined in the present study. Using a custom lightweight headpiece and restrainer, New Zealand white littermates were trained once daily in 400 ms delay eyeblink classical conditioning from postnatal days (PD) 17–21 or PD 24–28. These ages were chosen because eyeblink conditioning emerges gradually over PD 17–24 in rats (Stanton, Freeman, & Skelton, 1992), another altricial species with neurodevelopmental features similar to those of rabbits. Consistent with well-established findings in rats, rabbits trained from PD 24–28 showed greater conditioning relative to littermates trained from PD 17–21. Both age groups displayed poor retention of eyeblink conditioning at retraining one month after acquisition. These findings are the first to demonstrate eyeblink conditioning in the developing rabbit. With further characterization of optimal conditioning parameters, this preparation may have applications to neurodevelopmental disease models as well as research exploring the ontogeny of memory. PMID:21953433

  3. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-12-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  4. Real-time optical gating for three-dimensional beating heart imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Jonathan M.; Saunter, Christopher D.; Love, Gordon D.; Girkin, John M.; Henderson, Deborah J.; Chaudhry, Bill

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate real-time microscope image gating to an arbitrary position in the cycle of the beating heart of a zebrafish embryo. We show how this can be used for high-precision prospective gating of fluorescence image slices of the moving heart. We also present initial results demonstrating the application of this technique to 3-D structural imaging of the beating embryonic heart.

  5. Finding the beat: a neural perspective across humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Hugo; Grahn, Jessica; Trainor, Laurel; Rohrmeier, Martin; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2015-03-19

    Humans possess an ability to perceive and synchronize movements to the beat in music ('beat perception and synchronization'), and recent neuroscientific data have offered new insights into this beat-finding capacity at multiple neural levels. Here, we review and compare behavioural and neural data on temporal and sequential processing during beat perception and entrainment tasks in macaques (including direct neural recording and local field potential (LFP)) and humans (including fMRI, EEG and MEG). These abilities rest upon a distributed set of circuits that include the motor cortico-basal-ganglia-thalamo-cortical (mCBGT) circuit, where the supplementary motor cortex (SMA) and the putamen are critical cortical and subcortical nodes, respectively. In addition, a cortical loop between motor and auditory areas, connected through delta and beta oscillatory activity, is deeply involved in these behaviours, with motor regions providing the predictive timing needed for the perception of, and entrainment to, musical rhythms. The neural discharge rate and the LFP oscillatory activity in the gamma- and beta-bands in the putamen and SMA of monkeys are tuned to the duration of intervals produced during a beat synchronization-continuation task (SCT). Hence, the tempo during beat synchronization is represented by different interval-tuned cells that are activated depending on the produced interval. In addition, cells in these areas are tuned to the serial-order elements of the SCT. Thus, the underpinnings of beat synchronization are intrinsically linked to the dynamics of cell populations tuned for duration and serial order throughout the mCBGT. We suggest that a cross-species comparison of behaviours and the neural circuits supporting them sets the stage for a new generation of neurally grounded computational models for beat perception and synchronization. PMID:25646516

  6. Energetic considerations of ciliary beating and the advantage of metachronal coordination

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Shay; Levit-Gurevich, Konstantin

    1999-01-01

    The internal mechanism of cilia is among the most ancient biological motors on an evolutionary scale. It produces beat patterns that consist of two phases: during the effective stroke, the cilium moves approximately as a straight rod, and during the recovery stroke, it rolls close to the surface in a tangential motion. It is commonly agreed that these two phases are designed for efficient functioning: the effective stroke encounters strong viscous resistance and generates thrust, whereas the recovery stroke returns the cilium to starting position while avoiding viscous resistance. Metachronal coordination between cilia, which occurs when many of them beat close to each other, is believed to be an autonomous result of the hydrodynamical interactions in the system. Qualitatively, metachronism is perceived as a way for reducing the energy expenditure required for beating. This paper presents a quantitative study of the energy expenditure of beating cilia, and of the energetic significance of metachronism. We develop a method for computing the work done by model cilia that beat in a viscous fluid. We demonstrate that for a single cilium, beating in water, the mechanical work done during the effective stroke is approximately five times the amount of work done during the recovery stroke. Investigation of multicilia configurations shows that having neighboring cilia beat metachronally is energetically advantageous and perhaps even crucial for multiciliary functioning. Finally, the model is used to approximate the number of dynein arm attachments that are likely to occur during the effective and recovery strokes of a beat cycle, predicting that almost all of the available dynein arms should participate in generating the motion. PMID:10535905

  7. Quantum beats in hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in an external electric field.

    PubMed

    Labzowsky, L; Sharipov, V

    2004-04-01

    An effect of quantum beats that arises due to the coherent excitation of 2s and 2p states of hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in an external electric field is described. It is shown that the quantum beat signal contains terms linear in electric field, i.e., is of opposite sign for the hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms. The conditions for the observation of this effect are discussed.

  8. Spin-Dependent Beats Created by Irradiation of Microwave Field Through a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagani, M. Bagheri; Soleimani, H. Rahimpour

    We study spin-dependent transport through a quantum dot with Zeeman split levels coupled to ferromagnetic leads and under influence of microwave irradiation. Current polarization, spin current, spin accumulation and tunneling magnetoresistance are analyzed using nonequilibrium Green's function formalism and rate equations. Spin-dependent beats in spin resolved currents are observed. The effects of magnetic field, temperature and Coulomb interaction on these beats are studied.

  9. Effects of exciton line widths on the amplitude of quantum beat oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Osamu; Kita, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the effects of the exciton line widths on the amplitude of quantum beat oscillations using a model with the Voigt function. Using the Voigt function, we find that the maximum amplitude appears at the central energy between two excitons. This result agrees with many previous experimental results. Our analysis helps in identifying the condition for strong quantum beat oscillation, which is important for device applications such as terahertz electromagnetic wave emitters and ultrafast switches.

  10. Finding the beat: a neural perspective across humans and non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Hugo; Grahn, Jessica; Trainor, Laurel; Rohrmeier, Martin; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2015-01-01

    Humans possess an ability to perceive and synchronize movements to the beat in music (‘beat perception and synchronization’), and recent neuroscientific data have offered new insights into this beat-finding capacity at multiple neural levels. Here, we review and compare behavioural and neural data on temporal and sequential processing during beat perception and entrainment tasks in macaques (including direct neural recording and local field potential (LFP)) and humans (including fMRI, EEG and MEG). These abilities rest upon a distributed set of circuits that include the motor cortico-basal-ganglia–thalamo-cortical (mCBGT) circuit, where the supplementary motor cortex (SMA) and the putamen are critical cortical and subcortical nodes, respectively. In addition, a cortical loop between motor and auditory areas, connected through delta and beta oscillatory activity, is deeply involved in these behaviours, with motor regions providing the predictive timing needed for the perception of, and entrainment to, musical rhythms. The neural discharge rate and the LFP oscillatory activity in the gamma- and beta-bands in the putamen and SMA of monkeys are tuned to the duration of intervals produced during a beat synchronization–continuation task (SCT). Hence, the tempo during beat synchronization is represented by different interval-tuned cells that are activated depending on the produced interval. In addition, cells in these areas are tuned to the serial-order elements of the SCT. Thus, the underpinnings of beat synchronization are intrinsically linked to the dynamics of cell populations tuned for duration and serial order throughout the mCBGT. We suggest that a cross-species comparison of behaviours and the neural circuits supporting them sets the stage for a new generation of neurally grounded computational models for beat perception and synchronization. PMID:25646516

  11. Oritavancin Pharmacokinetics and Bone Penetration in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ostiguy, Valerie; Cadieux, Cordelia; Malouin, Mireille; Belanger, Odette; Far, Adel Rafai; Parr, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bone concentrations of oritavancin were investigated after a single intravenous dose was administered to rabbits. The pharmacokinetic profile of oritavancin in rabbits showed that it is rapidly distributed to bone tissues, with concentrations remaining stable for up to 168 h, the last measured time point. Based on these findings, further evaluation of oritavancin for the treatment of infections in bone tissues is warranted. PMID:26239977

  12. Effect of depth beating on the fiber properties and enzymatic saccharification efficiency of softwood kraft pulp.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenhua; Xiang, Zhouyang; Chen, Kefu; Yang, Rendang; Yang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Commercial bleached softwood kraft pulp was mechanically fibrillated by a PFI-mill with beating revolution from 5000 to 30,000 r. The extent of fibrillating on the pulp was evaluated by beating degree, fiber morphological properties (fiber length, width, coarseness and curls index), water retention value (WRV) and physical properties of paper made from the pulp. Depth beating process significantly affected the pulp fibrillations as showed by the decreased fiber length and width as well as the SEM analysis, but the effects were limited after beating revolution of 15,000. Depth beating process also improved the total internal pore and inter-fibril surface areas as shown by the increased WRV values. Substrate enzymatic digestibility (SED) of beaten pulp at 5000 revolutions could reach 95% at cellulase loading of 15 FPU/g of glucan. After the enzymatic hydrolysis, the size of the pulp residues was reduced to micro-scale, and a relative uniform size distribution of the residues appeared at 10,000 r beating revolution. PMID:25965499

  13. Emergence of flagellar beating from the collective behavior of individual ATP-powered dyneins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdeo, S.; Onck, P. R.

    2016-10-01

    Flagella are hair-like projections from the surface of eukaryotic cells, and they play an important role in many cellular functions, such as cell-motility. The beating of flagella is enabled by their internal architecture, the axoneme, and is powered by a dense distribution of motor proteins, dyneins. The dyneins deliver the required mechanical work through the hydrolysis of ATP. Although the dynein-ATP cycle, the axoneme microstructure, and the flagellar-beating kinematics are well studied, their integration into a coherent picture of ATP-powered flagellar beating is still lacking. Here we show that a time-delayed negative-work-based switching mechanism is able to convert the individual sliding action of hundreds of dyneins into a regular overall beating pattern leading to propulsion. We developed a computational model based on a minimal representation of the axoneme consisting of two representative doublet microtubules connected by nexin links. The relative sliding of the microtubules is incorporated by modeling two groups of ATP-powered dyneins, each responsible for sliding in opposite directions. A time-delayed switching mechanism is postulated, which is key in converting the local individual sliding action of multiple dyneins into global beating. Our results demonstrate that an overall nonreciprocal beating pattern can emerge with time due to the spatial and temporal coordination of the individual dyneins. These findings provide insights in the fundamental working mechanism of axonemal dyneins and could possibly open new research directions in the field of flagellar motility.

  14. Correlation between ciliary beat frequency and metachronal wave disorder using image analysis method.

    PubMed

    Yi, W J; Park, K S; Lee, C H; Rhee, C S

    2003-07-01

    Ciliary beating and metachronal waves are fundamental to effective mucociliary transport. The ciliary beat frequencies (CBFs) and metachronal wave directions of multiple cilia beating in culture media were measured simultaneously using digital microscopic images. The degree of synchronisation between ciliary beats was determined by the correlation between ciliary signals at two different locations. The wave propagation directions of cilia were determined from a two-dimensional correlation map by a principal axis method. The standard deviation of measured wave directions in a region of interest was defined as a measure of metachronal wave disorder (MWD). Considerable variation was found in the beat frequencies and metachronal wave directions of cilia beating on epithelium. The pooled mean of MWDs was 23.4 +/- 8.8 degrees, and the pooled mean of CBFs was 10.1 +/- 1.9 Hz on 120 cells from five healthy subjects. The means of the MWD and the CBF from subjects were highly correlated (correlation = -0.83). The higher the CBF, the lower the level of the MWD.

  15. Detection and removal of ventricular ectopic beats in atrial fibrillation recordings via principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Arturo; Alcaraz, Raúl; Rieta, José J

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic beats are early heart beats with remarkable large amplitude that provoke serious disturbances in the analysis of electrocardiograms (ECG). These beats are very common in atrial fibrillation (AF) and are the source of important residua when the QRST is intended to be removed. Given that QRST cancellation is a binding step in the appropriate analysis of atrial activity (AA) in AF, a method for ventricular ectopic beats cancellation is proposed as a previous step to the application of any QRST removal technique. First, the method discriminates between normal and ectopic beats with an accuracy higher than 99% through QRS morphological characterization. Next, the most similar ectopic beats to the one under cancellation are clustered and serve to get their eigenvector matrix by principal component analysis. Finally, the highest variance eigenvector is used as cancellation template. The reduction ectopic rate (RER) has been defined to evaluate the method's performance by using templates generated with 5, 10, 20, 40 or 80 ectopics. Optimal results were reached with the 5 most similar complexes, yielding a RER higher than 5.5. In addition, a decreasing RER trend was noticed as the number of considered ectopics for cancellation increased. As conclusion, given that ectopics presented a remarkable variability in their morphology, the proposed cancellation approach is a robust ectopic remover and can notably facilitate the later application of any QRST cancellation technique to extract the AA in the best conditions. PMID:22255385

  16. Neural responses to sounds presented on and off the beat of ecologically valid music.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    The tracking of rhythmic structure is a vital component of speech and music perception. It is known that sequences of identical sounds can give rise to the percept of alternating strong and weak sounds, and that this percept is linked to enhanced cortical and oscillatory responses. The neural correlates of the perception of rhythm elicited by ecologically valid, complex stimuli, however, remain unexplored. Here we report the effects of a stimulus' alignment with the beat on the brain's processing of sound. Human subjects listened to short popular music pieces while simultaneously hearing a target sound. Cortical and brainstem electrophysiological onset responses to the sound were enhanced when it was presented on the beat of the music, as opposed to shifted away from it. Moreover, the size of the effect of alignment with the beat on the cortical response correlated strongly with the ability to tap to a beat, suggesting that the ability to synchronize to the beat of simple isochronous stimuli and the ability to track the beat of complex, ecologically valid stimuli may rely on overlapping neural resources. These results suggest that the perception of musical rhythm may have robust effects on processing throughout the auditory system. PMID:23717268

  17. Genomic Analysis of Companion Rabbit Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Mark A.; Harrison, Ewan M.; Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Parkhill, Julian; Foster, Geoffrey; Paterson, Gavin K.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being an important human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus is able to cause a variety of infections in numerous other host species. While the S. aureus strains causing infection in several of these hosts have been well characterised, this is not the case for companion rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), where little data are available on S. aureus strains from this host. To address this deficiency we have performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genome sequencing on a collection of S. aureus isolates from companion rabbits. The findings show a diverse S. aureus population is able to cause infection in this host, and while antimicrobial resistance was uncommon, the isolates possess a range of known and putative virulence factors consistent with a diverse clinical presentation in companion rabbits including severe abscesses. We additionally show that companion rabbit isolates carry polymorphisms within dltB as described as underlying host-adaption of S. aureus to farmed rabbits. The availability of S. aureus genome sequences from companion rabbits provides an important aid to understanding the pathogenesis of disease in this host and in the clinical management and surveillance of these infections. PMID:26963381

  18. Genomic Analysis of Companion Rabbit Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Mark A; Harrison, Ewan M; Fisher, Elizabeth A; Graham, Elizabeth M; Parkhill, Julian; Foster, Geoffrey; Paterson, Gavin K

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being an important human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus is able to cause a variety of infections in numerous other host species. While the S. aureus strains causing infection in several of these hosts have been well characterised, this is not the case for companion rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), where little data are available on S. aureus strains from this host. To address this deficiency we have performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genome sequencing on a collection of S. aureus isolates from companion rabbits. The findings show a diverse S. aureus population is able to cause infection in this host, and while antimicrobial resistance was uncommon, the isolates possess a range of known and putative virulence factors consistent with a diverse clinical presentation in companion rabbits including severe abscesses. We additionally show that companion rabbit isolates carry polymorphisms within dltB as described as underlying host-adaption of S. aureus to farmed rabbits. The availability of S. aureus genome sequences from companion rabbits provides an important aid to understanding the pathogenesis of disease in this host and in the clinical management and surveillance of these infections. PMID:26963381

  19. Genomic Analysis of Companion Rabbit Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Mark A; Harrison, Ewan M; Fisher, Elizabeth A; Graham, Elizabeth M; Parkhill, Julian; Foster, Geoffrey; Paterson, Gavin K

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being an important human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus is able to cause a variety of infections in numerous other host species. While the S. aureus strains causing infection in several of these hosts have been well characterised, this is not the case for companion rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), where little data are available on S. aureus strains from this host. To address this deficiency we have performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genome sequencing on a collection of S. aureus isolates from companion rabbits. The findings show a diverse S. aureus population is able to cause infection in this host, and while antimicrobial resistance was uncommon, the isolates possess a range of known and putative virulence factors consistent with a diverse clinical presentation in companion rabbits including severe abscesses. We additionally show that companion rabbit isolates carry polymorphisms within dltB as described as underlying host-adaption of S. aureus to farmed rabbits. The availability of S. aureus genome sequences from companion rabbits provides an important aid to understanding the pathogenesis of disease in this host and in the clinical management and surveillance of these infections.

  20. Probabilistic model-based approach for heart beat detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hugh; Erol, Yusuf; Shen, Eric; Russell, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, hospitals are ubiquitous and integral to modern society. Patients flow in and out of a veritable whirlwind of paperwork, consultations, and potential inpatient admissions, through an abstracted system that is not without flaws. One of the biggest flaws in the medical system is perhaps an unexpected one: the patient alarm system. One longitudinal study reported an 88.8% rate of false alarms, with other studies reporting numbers of similar magnitudes. These false alarm rates lead to deleterious effects that manifest in a lower standard of care across clinics. This paper discusses a model-based probabilistic inference approach to estimate physiological variables at a detection level. We design a generative model that complies with a layman's understanding of human physiology and perform approximate Bayesian inference. One primary goal of this paper is to justify a Bayesian modeling approach to increasing robustness in a physiological domain. In order to evaluate our algorithm we look at the application of heart beat detection using four datasets provided by PhysioNet, a research resource for complex physiological signals, in the form of the PhysioNet 2014 Challenge set-p1 and set-p2, the MIT-BIH Polysomnographic Database, and the MGH/MF Waveform Database. On these data sets our algorithm performs on par with the other top six submissions to the PhysioNet 2014 challenge. The overall evaluation scores in terms of sensitivity and positive predictivity values obtained were as follows: set-p1 (99.72%), set-p2 (93.51%), MIT-BIH (99.66%), and MGH/MF (95.53%). These scores are based on the averaging of gross sensitivity, gross positive predictivity, average sensitivity, and average positive predictivity.

  1. Ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels is facilitated by ciliary beating.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J; Himmerkus, N; Holland, N; Sartoris, F J; Bleich, M; Tresguerres, M

    2016-08-01

    The excretion of nitrogenous waste products in the form of ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4 (+)) is a fundamental process in aquatic organisms. For mytilid bivalves, little is known about the mechanisms and sites of excretion. This study investigated the localization and the mechanisms of ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels. An Rh protein was found to be abundantly expressed in the apical cell membrane of the plicate organ, which was previously described as a solely respiratory organ. The Rh protein was also expressed in the gill, although at significantly lower concentrations, but was not detectable in mussel kidney. Furthermore, NH3/NH4 (+) was not enriched in the urine, suggesting that kidneys are not involved in active NH3/NH4 (+) excretion. Exposure to elevated seawater pH of 8.5 transiently reduced NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates, but they returned to control values following 24 h acclimation. These mussels had increased abundance of V-type H(+)-ATPase in the apical membranes of plicate organ cells; however, NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates were not affected by the V-type H(+)-ATPase specific inhibitor concanamycin A (100 nmol l(-1)). In contrast, inhibition of ciliary beating with dopamine and increased seawater viscosity significantly reduced NH3 excretion rates under control pH (8.0). These results suggest that NH3/NH4 (+) excretion in mytilid mussels takes place by passive NH3 diffusion across respiratory epithelia via the Rh protein, facilitated by the water current produced for filter feeding, which prevents accumulation of NH3 in the boundary layer. This mechanism would be energy efficient for sessile organisms, as they already generate water currents for filter feeding. PMID:27489216

  2. ORAL PAPILLOMATOSIS OF RABBITS: A VIRUS DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Robert J.; Kidd, John G.

    1943-01-01

    Papillomas occur frequently on the oral mucosa of domestic rabbits procured in the metropolitan area of New York. They are small and benign, and are situated mostly on the under side of the tongue. A filtrable virus can be extracted from them with which growths can be reproduced in the oral mucosa of several species of rabbits and hares but which fails to cause lesions when inoculated into other rabbit tissues and into the oral mucosa of other species. The virus differs notably from the Shope virus, which causes cutaneous papillomas in rabbits but proves innocuous to oral mucosa: rabbits solidly immune to the oral papilloma virus are fully susceptible to the Shope virus and vice versa. The oral papillomas are not highly contagious, for susceptible animals kept in individual cages in the same rooms with others carrying the growths, fed the same kind of food, and cared for by the same attendants, do not "catch" them. They are found much more frequently in the offspring of dams that carry the growths than in those of mothers free from them, and the causative virus can be recovered from the mouth washings of rabbits having no growths. The observations indicate that the virus may be spread by transfer from the mother to the young during the period of suckling, and that it may lie latent in the mouth, doing no harm unless the mucous membrane is injured. The slight trauma occurring now and then when coarse foods are chewed may furnish the required tissue nidus under natural conditions, for papillomas occasionally appear after virus has been dropped into the mouths of uninoculated rabbits; but the more extensive injury and healing resulting from experimental tattoo inoculations proves regularly effective in this respect. Tar can also act as an efficient adjuvant to the virus, the incidence of "spontaneous" oral papillomas being much higher in domestic rabbits that had had the opportunity to lick tar from their ears and paws during long periods than in normal control

  3. Quantitative analysis of ciliary beating in primary ciliary dyskinesia: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare congenital respiratory disorder characterized by abnormal ciliary motility leading to chronic airway infections. Qualitative evaluation of ciliary beat pattern based on digital high-speed videomicroscopy analysis has been proposed in the diagnosis process of PCD. Although this evaluation is easy in typical cases, it becomes difficult when ciliary beating is partially maintained. We postulated that a quantitative analysis of beat pattern would improve PCD diagnosis. We compared quantitative parameters with the qualitative evaluation of ciliary beat pattern in patients in whom the diagnosis of PCD was confirmed or excluded. Methods Nasal nitric oxide measurement, nasal brushings and biopsies were performed prospectively in 34 patients with suspected PCD. In combination with qualitative analysis, 12 quantitative parameters of ciliary beat pattern were determined on high-speed videomicroscopy recordings of beating ciliated edges. The combination of ciliary ultrastructural abnormalities on transmission electron microscopy analysis with low nasal nitric oxide levels was the “gold standard” used to establish the diagnosis of PCD. Results This “gold standard” excluded PCD in 15 patients (non-PCD patients), confirmed PCD in 10 patients (PCD patients) and was inconclusive in 9 patients. Among the 12 parameters, the distance traveled by the cilium tip weighted by the percentage of beating ciliated edges presented 96% sensitivity and 95% specificity. Qualitative evaluation and quantitative analysis were concordant in non-PCD patients. In 9/10 PCD patients, quantitative analysis was concordant with the “gold standard”, while the qualitative evaluation was discordant with the “gold standard” in 3/10 cases. Among the patients with an inconclusive “gold standard”, the use of quantitative parameters supported PCD diagnosis in 4/9 patients (confirmed by the identification of disease-causing mutations in one

  4. The Effect of Dopaminergic Medication on Beat-Based Auditory Timing in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Daniel J.; Pickett, Kristen A.; Earhart, Gammon M.; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) adversely affects timing abilities. Beat-based timing is a mechanism that times events relative to a regular interval, such as the “beat” in musical rhythm, and is impaired in PD. It is unknown if dopaminergic medication influences beat-based timing in PD. Here, we tested beat-based timing over two sessions in participants with PD (OFF then ON dopaminergic medication) and in unmedicated control participants. People with PD and control participants completed two tasks. The first was a discrimination task in which participants compared two rhythms and determined whether they were the same or different. Rhythms either had a beat structure (metric simple rhythms) or did not (metric complex rhythms), as in previous studies. Discrimination accuracy was analyzed to test for the effects of beat structure, as well as differences between participants with PD and controls, and effects of medication (PD group only). The second task was the Beat Alignment Test (BAT), in which participants listened to music with regular tones superimposed, and responded as to whether the tones were “ON” or “OFF” the beat of the music. Accuracy was analyzed to test for differences between participants with PD and controls, and for an effect of medication in patients. Both patients and controls discriminated metric simple rhythms better than metric complex rhythms. Controls also improved at the discrimination task in the second vs. first session, whereas people with PD did not. For participants with PD, the difference in performance between metric simple and metric complex rhythms was greater (sensitivity to changes in simple rhythms increased and sensitivity to changes in complex rhythms decreased) when ON vs. OFF medication. Performance also worsened with disease severity. For the BAT, no group differences or effects of medication were found. Overall, these findings suggest that timing is impaired in PD, and that dopaminergic medication influences beat

  5. STUDIES ON RABBIT LYMPHOCYTES IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Stewart; Gell, P. G. H.

    1965-01-01

    Rabbit lymphocytes may be stimulated in vitro with specific antiallotype sera to transform into "blast" cells and to synthesize DNA. This transformation only occurs when the donor cells are obtained from a rabbit having a given γ-globulin allotype (As4) and these cells are cultured in the presence of an antiserum prepared against the given allotype (As4). Heterologous (sheep, goat, and guinea pig) anti-rabbit γ-globulin sera also induce significant blast transformation and DNA synthesis in rabbit lymphocytes. Allotypic transformation and DNA synthesis are due to 7S antiallotype antibodies and do not require complement. The degree of transformation and rate of DNA synthesis is related to the concentration of antibody. Incubation of the appropriate cells with the antiallotype antibody for as short a time as 15 minutes results in a significant degree of "blast" transformation, indicating that the recognition of the antiallotype specificity in the cells and stimulation of the cellular changes leading to eventual transformation is rapid. The activity of the antiallotype sera as measured by transforming or haemagglutinating capacity, may be absorbed by lymphocytes of the appropriate allotype, but is not absorbed by lymphocytes from a donor rabbit not having the allotype to which the antiserum is directed. Transformation does not occur with mixtures of lymphocytes from different rabbits even if 1 donor is immunized against an allotype present in the other donor. Peripheral rabbit lymphocytes can also be induced to undergo "blast transformation" in vitro by phytohaemagglutinin and staphylococcal filtrate. The lack of demonstrable leucoagglutinins in staphylococcal filtrate and antiallotype serum indicates that agglutination is not a necessary prerequisite to the induction of blast transformation. PMID:14316952

  6. To beat or not to beat a tick: comparison of DNA extraction methods for ticks (Ixodes scapularis)

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are important disease vectors in the United States, known to transmit a variety of pathogens to humans, including bacteria, protozoa, and viruses. Their importance as a disease vector necessitates reliable and comparable methods for extracting microbial DNA from ticks. Furthermore, to explore the population genetics or genomics of this tick, appropriate DNA extraction techniques are needed for both the vector and its microbes. Although a few studies have investigated different methods of DNA isolation from ticks, they are limited in the number and types of DNA extraction and lack species-specific quantification of DNA yield. Methods. Here we determined the most efficient and consistent method of DNA extraction from two different developmental stages of I. scapularis—nymph and adult—that are the most important for disease transmission. We used various methods of physical disruption of the hard, chitinous exoskeleton, as well as commercial and non-commercial DNA isolation kits. To gauge the effectiveness of these methods, we quantified the DNA yield and confirmed the DNA quality via PCR of both tick and microbial genetic material. Results. DNA extraction using the Thermo GeneJET Genomic DNA Purification Kit resulted in the highest DNA yields and the most consistent PCR amplification when combined with either cutting or bead beating with select matrices across life stages. DNA isolation methods using ammonium hydroxide as well as the MoBio PowerSoil kit also produced strong and successful PCR amplification, but only for females. Discussion. We contrasted a variety of readily available methods of DNA extraction from single individual blacklegged ticks and presented the results through a quantitative and qualitative assessment. PMID:26290800

  7. Phosphatidylinositol kinase from rabbit reticulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, P.T.; Heng, A.B.W.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase was isolated from the postribosomal supernatant of rabbit reticulocytes. This activity was identified by the formation of a product that comigrated with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) when purified PI was phosphorylated in the presence of (/sup 32/P)ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. Three major peaks of PI kinase activity were resolved by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The first peak eluted at 50-100 mM NaCl together with several serine protein kinases, casein kinase (CK) I and protease activated kinase (PAK) I and II. The PI kinase was subsequently separated from the protein kinases by chromatography on phosphocellulose. The second peak eluted at 125-160 mM NaCl and contained another lipid kinase activity that produced a product which comigrated with phosphatidic acid on thin layer chromatography. The third peak, which eluted at 165-200 mM NaCl, partly comigrated with casein kinase (CK) II and an active protein kinase(s) which phosphorylated mixed histone and histone I. CK II and the histone kinase activities were also separated by chromatography on phosphocelluslose. The different forms of PI kinase were characterized and compared with respect to substrate and salt requirements.

  8. Cross-cultural influences on rhythm processing: reproduction, discrimination, and beat tapping.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Daniel J; Bentley, Jocelyn; Grahn, Jessica A

    2015-01-01

    The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to entrain movement to musical rhythm occurs in virtually all individuals across cultures. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on perception, production, and beat tapping for rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were the same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced by the culture of the participant and the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant's ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than for unfamiliar rhythms. Moreover, there were differences between the two participant groups, and between the two types of rhythms, in the metrical level selected for beat tapping. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion

  9. Extraction of cilium beat parameters by the combined application of photoelectric measurements and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Priel, Z

    1997-01-01

    Photoelectric signals were created and used to investigate the features of the signals as a function of the ciliary beat parameters. Moreover, correlation between the simulated and the measured signals permitted measurement of the cilium beat parameters. The simulations of the signals were based on generation of a series of time-frozen top-view frames of an active ciliary area and determination of the amount of light passing through an observation area in each of these frames. All the factors that might contribute to the shape of the signals, namely, partial ciliary transmittance of light, three-dimensional ciliary beat (composed of recovery, effective, and pause parts), phase distribution on the ciliary surface, and the large number of cilia that contribute to the photoelectric signal, were taken into account in generation of the signals. Changes in the ciliary parameters influenced the shape of the photoelectric signals, and the different phases of the beat could not be directly and unequivocally identified in the signals. The degree of temporal asymmetry of the beat and the portion of the cycle occupied by the pause significantly influenced the shapes of both the lower and the upper parts of the signal and the slopes of the signal. Increases in the angle of the arc swept by the cilium during the effective stroke smoothed the signals and increased the duration of the upper part of the signal. The angle of the arc projected by the cilium onto the cell surface during the recovery stroke had minor effects on the signal's shape. Characteristics of the metachronal wave also influenced the signal's shape markedly. Decreases in ciliary spacing smoothed the signals, whereas ciliary length had a minor influence on the simulated photoelectric signals. Comparison of the simulated and the measured signals showed that the beat parameters of the best-fitting simulated signals converged to values that agree well with the accepted range of beat parameters in mucociliary systems.

  10. Extraction of cilium beat parameters by the combined application of photoelectric measurements and computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Gheber, L; Priel, Z

    1997-01-01

    Photoelectric signals were created and used to investigate the features of the signals as a function of the ciliary beat parameters. Moreover, correlation between the simulated and the measured signals permitted measurement of the cilium beat parameters. The simulations of the signals were based on generation of a series of time-frozen top-view frames of an active ciliary area and determination of the amount of light passing through an observation area in each of these frames. All the factors that might contribute to the shape of the signals, namely, partial ciliary transmittance of light, three-dimensional ciliary beat (composed of recovery, effective, and pause parts), phase distribution on the ciliary surface, and the large number of cilia that contribute to the photoelectric signal, were taken into account in generation of the signals. Changes in the ciliary parameters influenced the shape of the photoelectric signals, and the different phases of the beat could not be directly and unequivocally identified in the signals. The degree of temporal asymmetry of the beat and the portion of the cycle occupied by the pause significantly influenced the shapes of both the lower and the upper parts of the signal and the slopes of the signal. Increases in the angle of the arc swept by the cilium during the effective stroke smoothed the signals and increased the duration of the upper part of the signal. The angle of the arc projected by the cilium onto the cell surface during the recovery stroke had minor effects on the signal's shape. Characteristics of the metachronal wave also influenced the signal's shape markedly. Decreases in ciliary spacing smoothed the signals, whereas ciliary length had a minor influence on the simulated photoelectric signals. Comparison of the simulated and the measured signals showed that the beat parameters of the best-fitting simulated signals converged to values that agree well with the accepted range of beat parameters in mucociliary systems

  11. [Spontaneous Cryptosporidium infection in weaned rabbits].

    PubMed

    Pavlásek, I; Lávicka, M; Tůmová, E; Skrivan, M

    1996-12-01

    The first occurrence of Cryptosporidium parvum Tyzzer, 1912 in broiler rabbits in the Czech Republic is reported. The protozoon was determined on the basis of morphometrical parameters of oocysts and of localization of endogenous developmental stages. The dynamics of natural Cryptosporidium infection was studied in a group of 72 young rabbits after weaning (their age ranging from 23-33 to 82-92 days) obtained from six large flocks and used in a feeding experiment. C. parvum was found in rabbits from four farms (Tab. I). Animals under observation were divided into 9 subgroups according to the genotype (Hyla 2000, California White, crosses of New Zealand x California, New Zealand White, Cunistar and Zika) as well as according to the farm of origin. The animals were housed in 28 cages under the conditions of two-floor cage technology. The upper floor consisted of cages housing three head, the lower floor two head each. The animals were fed ad libitum with commercial feed mixture (till the average age of 64.days supplemented with Robenidin as coccidiostat). During the first 10 days of observation pooled samples of droppings from each cage were examinated by flotation-centrifugation method according to Breza (1957) and Pavlásek (1991) in the intervals of three to four days, later one-week intervals. Post mortem scrapings from mucous epithelium taken from young rabbits were examinated (to reveal endogenous developmental stages of C. parvum) together with digesta (to detect oocysts of the protozoon) taken from the full length of the small intestine using method of native preparations and Giemsa stain. In one 37-day dead animal the small and large intestines were examined histologically. The maximum number of young rabbits infected with C. parvum were 30-40 and 33-43 days old (Fig. 1). In animals of this age category the oocysts of the protozoon were found in pooled samples in 11 and 12 cages (39.3 and 42.9%) from totally 28 cages under study. In rabbits of more than 50

  12. Intracellular pathways regulating ciliary beating of rat brain ependymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien; Chin, Wei-Chun; O’Brien, Jennifer A; Verdugo, Pedro; Berger, Albert J

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian brain ventricles are lined with ciliated ependymal cells. As yet little is known about the mechanisms by which neurotransmitters regulate cilia beat frequency (CBF). Application of 5-HT to ependymal cells in cultured rat brainstem slices caused CBF to increase. 5-HT had an EC50 of 30 μM and at 100 μM attained a near-maximal CBF increase of 52.7 ± 4.1 % (mean ± s.d.) (n= 8). Bathing slices in Ca2+-free solution markedly reduced the 5-HT-mediated increase in CBF. Fluorescence measurements revealed that 5-HT caused a marked transient elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) that then slowly decreased to a plateau level. Analysis showed that the [Ca2+]c transient was due to release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores; the plateau was probably due to extracellular Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Application of ATP caused a sustained decrease in CBF. ATP had an EC50 of about 50 μM and 100 μM ATP resulted in a maximal 57.5 ± 6.5 % (n= 12) decrease in CBF. The ATP-induced decrease in CBF was unaffected by lowering extracellular [Ca2+], and no changes in [Ca2+]c were observed. Exposure of ependymal cells to forskolin caused a decrease in CBF. Ciliated ependymal cells loaded with caged cAMP exhibited a 54.3 ± 7.5 % (n= 9) decrease in CBF following uncaging. These results suggest that ATP reduces CBF by a Ca2+-independent cAMP-mediated pathway. Application of 5-HT and adenosine-5′-O-3-thiotriphosphate (ATP-γ-S) to acutely isolated ciliated ependymal cells resulted in CBF responses similar to those of ependymal cells in cultured slices suggesting that these neurotransmitters act directly on these cells. The opposite response of ciliated ependymal cells to 5-HT and ATP provides a novel mechanism for their active involvement in central nervous system signalling. PMID:11179397

  13. Characterization of the respiratory and heart beat signal from an air pressure-based ballistocardiographic setup.

    PubMed

    Willemen, Tim; Van Deun, Dorien; Verhaert, Vincent; Van Huffel, Sabine; Haex, Bart; Vander Sloten, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Off-body detection of respiratory and cardiac activity presents an enormous opportunity for general health, stress and sleep quality monitoring. The presented setup detects the mechanical activity of both heart and lungs by measuring pressure difference fluctuations between two air volumes underneath the chest area of the subject. The registered signals were characterized over four different sleep postures, three different base air pressures within the air volumes and three different mattress top layer materials. Highest signal strength was detected in prone posture for both the respiratory and heart beat signal. Respiratory signal strength was the lowest in supine posture, while heart beat signal strength was lowest for right lateral. Heart beat cycle variability was highest in prone and lowest in supine posture. Increasing the base air pressure caused a reduction in signal amplitude for both the respiratory and the heart beat signal. A visco-elastic poly-urethane foam top layer had significantly higher respiration amplitude compared to high resilient poly-urethane foam and latex foam. For the heart beat signal, differences between the top layers were small. The authors conclude that, while the influence of the mattress top layer material is small, the base air pressure can be tuned for optimal mechanical transmission from heart and lungs towards the registration setup.

  14. Beat Synchronization across the Lifespan: Intersection of Development and Musical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Elaine C.; White-Schwoch, Travis; Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Rhythmic entrainment, or beat synchronization, provides an opportunity to understand how multiple systems operate together to integrate sensory-motor information. Also, synchronization is an essential component of musical performance that may be enhanced through musical training. Investigations of rhythmic entrainment have revealed a developmental trajectory across the lifespan, showing synchronization improves with age and musical experience. Here, we explore the development and maintenance of synchronization in childhood through older adulthood in a large cohort of participants (N = 145), and also ask how it may be altered by musical experience. We employed a uniform assessment of beat synchronization for all participants and compared performance developmentally and between individuals with and without musical experience. We show that the ability to consistently tap along to a beat improves with age into adulthood, yet in older adulthood tapping performance becomes more variable. Also, from childhood into young adulthood, individuals are able to tap increasingly close to the beat (i.e., asynchronies decline with age), however, this trend reverses from younger into older adulthood. There is a positive association between proportion of life spent playing music and tapping performance, which suggests a link between musical experience and auditory-motor integration. These results are broadly consistent with previous investigations into the development of beat synchronization across the lifespan, and thus complement existing studies and present new insights offered by a different, large cross-sectional sample. PMID:26107927

  15. Beating of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a closed-loop interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sanghyun; Chang, Dong-In; Lee, Hu-Jong; Khym, Gyong Luck; Kang, Kicheon; Chung, Yunchul; Mahalu, Diana; Umansky, Vladimir

    2007-07-15

    One of the points at issue with closed-loop-type interferometers is beating in the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations. Recent observations suggest the possibility that the beating results from the Berry-phase pickup by the conducting electrons in materials with the strong spin-orbit interaction (SOI). In this study, we also observed beats in the AB oscillations in a gate-defined closed-loop interferometer fabricated on a GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As two-dimensional electron-gas heterostructure. Since this heterostructure has very small SOI, the picture of the Berry-phase pickup is ruled out. The observation of beats in this study, with the controllability of forming a single transverse subband mode in both arms of our gate-defined interferometer, also rules out the often-claimed multiple transverse subband effect. It is observed that nodes of the beats with an h/2e period exhibit a parabolic distribution for varying the side gate. These results are shown to be well interpreted, without resorting to the SOI effect, by the existence of two-dimensional multiple longitudinal modes in a single transverse subband. The Fourier spectrum of measured conductance, despite showing multiple h/e peaks with the magnetic-field dependence that are very similar to that from strong-SOI materials, can also be interpreted as the two-dimensional multiple-longitudinal-modes effect.

  16. Functional domains of rabbit thrombomodulin.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M C; Boffa, M C; Björk, I; Lindahl, U

    1986-08-01

    Thrombomodulin isolated from rabbit lung was separated by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose into a retarded (acidic) and a nonretarded (nonacidic) fraction. Both fractions contained the cofactor required for the activation of protein C. In addition, the acidic fraction (but not the nonacidic fraction) prevented the clotting of fibrinogen by thrombin ("direct" anticoagulant activity) and accelerated the inhibition of thrombin by antithrombin (effect corresponding to 2-10 international units of heparin per mg of protein). Both of these activities were readily neutralized by the synthetic polycation Polybrene, which did not appreciably affect protein C activation. They were also eliminated by digestion of thrombomodulin with bacterial heparinase, which, in addition, converted the acidic form of the protein C activation cofactor to a nonacidic form. Similar conversion observed during storage of thrombomodulin was attributed to endogenous proteinase activity. Density-gradient centrifugation of the acidic form of thrombomodulin in CsCl/4M guanidinium chloride failed to separate either of the direct or antithrombin-dependent anticoagulant activities from the protein C activation cofactor, which showed a buoyant density of 1.31-1.34 g/ml. The nonacidic cofactor had a lower density, 1.26-1.28 g/ml. Unreduced thrombomodulin yielded two major fractions of protein C activation cofactor on NaDodSO4/PAGE, with apparent Mr of approximately 68,000 and 57,000, respectively. The larger component contained essentially all of the direct and antithrombin-dependent anticoagulant activities. We propose that these activities as well as the negative charge and the higher buoyant density of the acidic, Mr 68,000 form of thrombomodulin are due to a heparin-like polysaccharide and, further, that this component can be separated from the major portion of the molecule, which contains the protein C activation site, through the action of a proteinase.

  17. Light stimulation of iris tyrosinase in vivo. [Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Dryja, T.P.; Kimball, G.P.; Albert, D.M.

    1980-05-01

    This paper presents evidence that light stimulates tyrosinase activity in iris melanocytes in rabbits. Levels of iris tyrosinase were found to be greater in eyes of rabbits exposed to light for 6 weeks than in eyes of rabbits maintained in darkness. Despite increasing tyrosinase levels, exposure to light produced no clinically observable change in iris color.

  18. Rabbits and hominin survival in Iberia.

    PubMed

    Fa, John E; Stewart, John R; Lloveras, Lluís; Vargas, J Mario

    2013-04-01

    High dependence on the hunting and consumption of large mammals by some hominins may have limited their survival once their preferred quarry became scarce or disappeared. Adaptation to smaller residual prey would have been essential after the many large-bodied species decreased in numbers. We focus on the use of a superabundant species, the rabbit, to demonstrate the importance of this taxon in Iberia as fundamental to predators. We show that the use of the rabbit over time has increased, and that there could have been differential consumption by Neanderthals and Anatomically Modern Humans (AMH). Analysis of bone remains from excavations throughout Iberia show that this lagomorph was a crucial part of the diet of AMH but was relatively unutilised during the Mousterian, when Neanderthals were present. We first present changes in mammalian biomass and mean body mass of mammals over 50,000 years, to illustrate the dramatic loss of large mammalian fauna and to show how the rabbit may have contributed a consistently high proportion of the available game biomass throughout that period. Unlike the Italian Peninsula and other parts of Europe, in Iberia the rabbit has provided a food resource of great importance for predators including hominins. We suggest that hunters that could shift focus to rabbits and other smaller residual fauna, once larger-bodied species decreased in numbers, would have been able to persist. From the evidence presented here, we postulate that Neanderthals may have been less capable of prey-shifting and hence use the high-biomass prey resource provided by the rabbit, to the extent AMH did.

  19. Dissociation of Calcium Transients and Force Development following a Change in Stimulation Frequency in Isolated Rabbit Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Haizlip, Kaylan M.; Milani-Nejad, Nima; Varian, Kenneth D.; Slabaugh, Jessica L.; Walton, Shane D.; Gyorke, Sandor; Davis, Jonathan P.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Janssen, Paul M. L.

    2015-01-01

    As the heart transitions from one exercise intensity to another, changes in cardiac output occur, which are modulated by alterations in force development and calcium handling. Although the steady-state force-calcium relationship at various heart rates is well investigated, regulation of these processes during transitions in heart rate is poorly understood. In isolated right ventricular muscle preparations from the rabbit, we investigated the beat-to-beat alterations in force and calcium during the transition from one stimulation frequency to another, using contractile assessments and confocal microscopy. We show that a change in steady-state conditions occurs in multiple phases: a rapid phase, which is characterized by a fast change in force production mirrored by a change in calcium transient amplitude, and a slow phase, which follows the rapid phase and occurs as the muscle proceeds to stabilize at the new frequency. This second/late phase is characterized by a quantitative dissociation between the calcium transient amplitude and developed force. Twitch timing kinetics, such as time to peak tension and 50% relaxation rate, reached steady-state well before force development and calcium transient amplitude. The dynamic relationship between force and calcium upon a switch in stimulation frequency unveils the dynamic involvement of myofilament-based properties in frequency-dependent activation. PMID:25961020

  20. [Acute toxoplasmosis outbreak in rabbit flocks].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, V; Heidrich, R; Kiupel, H

    1980-02-01

    Acute toxoplasmosis occurred in 2-18 month old domestic rabbits of 15 flocks entailing losses of 3-66%. Pathomorphological examinations of 49 rabbits revealed lesions of a generalized granulomatous-necrotizing toxoplasmosis with spleen, liver, lungs and lymphonodes mainly affected. Similarities existed to pseudotuberculosis. The spleen was massively packed with pseudocysts and cysts of Toxoplasma. Electronmicroscopic examinations of organ specimens fixed in formalin assured the identity of Toxoplasma and serological tests (CFT, SFT, IFAT) as well as the mouse test confirmed it.

  1. Plasma PIVKA proteins in rabbits given warfarin.

    PubMed

    Zivelin, A; Rao, L V; Rapaport, S I

    1996-06-01

    The presence of partially carboxylated forms of the vitamin K dependent coagulation factors (PIVKA) was evaluated in the plasma of rabbits treated with warfarin. Excess antigen over activity as measured in rabbit specific assays was taken as evidence for PIVKA. Our data confirm a previous report of the absence of plasma PIVKA prothrombin. In contrast, plasma PIVKA factors VII, IX, and X were demonstrable. A striking excess of plasma factor IX antigen over activity was measured and a large fraction of the factor IX antigen persisted in the plasma after its adsorption with barium citrate.

  2. Substrate stiffness-modulated registry phase correlations in cardiomyocytes map structural order to coherent beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Majkut, S.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments show that both striation, an indication of the structural registry in muscle fibres, as well as the contractile strains produced by beating cardiac muscle cells can be optimized by substrate stiffness. Here we show theoretically how the substrate rigidity dependence of the registry data can be mapped onto that of the strain measurements. We express the elasticity-mediated structural registry as a phase-order parameter using a statistical physics approach that takes the noise and disorder inherent in biological systems into account. By assuming that structurally registered myofibrils also tend to beat in phase, we explain the observed dependence of both striation and strain measurements of cardiomyocytes on substrate stiffness in a unified manner. The agreement of our ideas with experiment suggests that the correlated beating of heart cells may be limited by the structural order of the myofibrils, which in turn is regulated by their elastic environment.

  3. Intra-beat Scaling Properties of Cardiac Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Eduardo; Lerma, Claudia; Echeverría, Juan C.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2008-02-01

    We applied detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to characterize the intra-beat scaling dynamics of electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings from the PhysioNet Sudden Cardiac Death Holter Database. The main finding of this contribution is that, in such recordings involving different types of arrhythmias; the ECG waveform, besides showing a less-random intra-beat dynamics, becomes more regular during bigeminy, ventricular tachycardia (VT) or even atrial fibrillation (AFIB) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) despite the appearance of erratic traces. Thus, notwithstanding that these cardiac rhythm abnormalities are generally considered as irregular and some of them generated by random impulses or wavefronts, the intra-beat scaling properties suggest that regularity dominates the underlying mechanisms of arrhythmias. Among other explanations, this may result from shorted or restricted -less complex- pathways of conduction of the electrical activity within the ventricles.

  4. Characterization of metachronal wave of beating cilia on frog's palate epithelium in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, D; Priel, Z

    1987-01-01

    1. A method is suggested to measure phase versus distance between beating cilia by means of a photoelectric device. A statistical method interpreting the results thus obtained is discussed. 2. It was found that: (a) an average phase exists between beating cilia, (b) despite strong fluctuations in phase on a short time scale, the average phase was kept constant over periods of 8 h, (c) the ciliary frequency and the length of the metachronal wave can be measured simultaneously. 3. The average phase differences are linearly dependent on distance. 4. The effective range of synchronization between cilia is of the order of 10 micron indicating that it occurs within one cell. 5. During the cycle of ciliary beating there are periods where coupling is stronger. PMID:3656188

  5. Characterization of metachronal wave of beating cilia on frog's palate epithelium in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Eshel, D; Priel, Z

    1987-07-01

    1. A method is suggested to measure phase versus distance between beating cilia by means of a photoelectric device. A statistical method interpreting the results thus obtained is discussed. 2. It was found that: (a) an average phase exists between beating cilia, (b) despite strong fluctuations in phase on a short time scale, the average phase was kept constant over periods of 8 h, (c) the ciliary frequency and the length of the metachronal wave can be measured simultaneously. 3. The average phase differences are linearly dependent on distance. 4. The effective range of synchronization between cilia is of the order of 10 micron indicating that it occurs within one cell. 5. During the cycle of ciliary beating there are periods where coupling is stronger.

  6. Substrate stiffness-modulated registry phase correlations in cardiomyocytes map structural order to coherent beating.

    PubMed

    Dasbiswas, K; Majkut, S; Discher, D E; Safran, Samuel A

    2015-01-19

    Recent experiments show that both striation, an indication of the structural registry in muscle fibres, as well as the contractile strains produced by beating cardiac muscle cells can be optimized by substrate stiffness. Here we show theoretically how the substrate rigidity dependence of the registry data can be mapped onto that of the strain measurements. We express the elasticity-mediated structural registry as a phase-order parameter using a statistical physics approach that takes the noise and disorder inherent in biological systems into account. By assuming that structurally registered myofibrils also tend to beat in phase, we explain the observed dependence of both striation and strain measurements of cardiomyocytes on substrate stiffness in a unified manner. The agreement of our ideas with experiment suggests that the correlated beating of heart cells may be limited by the structural order of the myofibrils, which in turn is regulated by their elastic environment.

  7. Eliminating the Attentional Blink through Binaural Beats: A Case for Tailored Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Reedijk, Susan A.; Bolders, Anne; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing human cognitive performance is a topic that continues to spark scientific interest. Studies into cognitive-enhancement techniques often fail to take inter-individual differences into account, however, which leads to underestimation of the effectiveness of these techniques. The current study investigated the effect of binaural beats, a cognitive-enhancement technique, on attentional control in an attentional blink (AB) task. As predicted from a neurocognitive approach to cognitive control, high-frequency binaural beats eliminated the AB, but only in individuals with low spontaneous eye-blink rates (indicating low striatal dopamine levels). This suggests that the way in which cognitive-enhancement techniques, such as binaural beats, affect cognitive performance depends on inter-individual differences. PMID:26089802

  8. Effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a species of choice in neurobiological and behavioral studies of alcohol-related disorders. In these efforts, the activity of adult zebrafish is typically quantified using indirect activity measures that are either scored manually or identified automatically from the fish trajectory. The analysis of such activity measures has produced important insight into the effect of acute ethanol exposure on individual and social behavior of this vertebrate species. Here, we leverage a recently developed tracking algorithm that reconstructs fish body shape to investigate the effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion in terms of amplitude and frequency. Our results demonstrate a significant effect of ethanol on the tail-beat amplitude as well as the tail-beat frequency, both of which were found to robustly decrease for high ethanol concentrations. Such a direct measurement of zebrafish motor functions is in agreement with evidence based on indirect activity measures, offering a complementary perspective in behavioral screening.

  9. A novel type of self-beating cardiomyocytes in adult mouse ventricles

    SciTech Connect

    Omatsu-Kanbe, Mariko; Matsuura, Hiroshi

    2009-04-10

    This study was designed to investigate the presence of resident heart cells that are distinct from terminally-differentiated cardiomyocytes. Adult mouse heart was coronary perfused with collagenase, and ventricles were excised and further digested. After spinning cardiomyocyte-containing fractions down, the supernatant fraction was collected and cultured without adding any chemicals. Two to five days after plating, some of rounded cells adhered to the culture dish, gradually changed their shape and then started self-beating. These self-beating cells did not appreciably proliferate but underwent a further morphological maturation process to form highly branched shapes with many projections. These cells were mostly multinucleated, well sarcomeric-organized and expressed cardiac marker proteins, defined as atypically-shaped cardiomyocytes (ACMs). Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ACMs exhibited spontaneous action potentials arising from the preceding slow diastolic depolarization. We thus found a novel type of resident heart cells in adult cardiac ventricles that spontaneously develop into self-beating cardiomyocytes.

  10. Terahertz beat oscillation of plasmonic electrons interacting with femtosecond light pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinping; He, Jianfang; Wang, Yimeng; Liu, Feifei

    2016-01-01

    Plasmon resonance in nanostructured metals is in essence collective oscillation of free electrons, which is driven by optical electric fields and oscillates at nearly the same frequency as the excitation photons. This is the basic physics for the currently extensively interested topics in optical metamaterials, optical switching, and logic optical “circuits” with potential applications in optical communication and optical computation. We present here an interference effect between photons and plasmon electrons, which is observed as multi-cycle beat-oscillation. The beat frequency is in the range of 3~4 THz, which is equal to the difference between optical frequency of the photons and oscillation frequency of the plasmon electrons. Such beat oscillation evolves in a time scale of more than 1 ps, which is much longer than the optical pulse length, implying interaction between photons and pure damping plasmon-electrons. The discovered mechanisms might be important for exploring new approaches for THz generation.

  11. On the Interaction of Two Beating Electrostatic Waves with Plasma Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malá, Z.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the interaction of particles with two beating plasma waves. We follow the instructional article by Ott and Dum. According to them, the sum of wave actions during the interaction is constant, supposing the effect of trapped particles on the beat can be neglected. In the present paper, this problem is solved more generally, just for the case of trapped and also untrapped particles in the wave. Our study shows that the sum of wave actions is constant also in the case when the influence of the trapped particles on the amplitudes of two waves was considered. On the contrary this conclusion is not valid if it is supposed that two original waves are amplitude modulated e.g. by the influence of the interaction of the beat with particles.

  12. Transient outward currents and action potential alterations in rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kawano, S; Hiraoka, M

    1991-06-01

    To clarify ionic mechanisms underlying successive changes in action potential repolarization upon sudden increase in driving rate or initiation of rapid drive after a rest, membrane potentials and currents were recorded from isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes using the suction-pipette whole-cell clamp method. When 20 action potentials were elicited with a stimulus frequency of 2.0 Hz after a rest period of 20 s, the plateau and action potential duration showed complex changes in successive beats, whereas they were nearly constant with stimulation at 0.1 Hz. There were only weak correlations between changes in action potential parameters and preceding diastolic intervals. The changes were prominent in the first 10 beats but subsided gradually thereafter, attaining nearly steady configurations of action potentials. When depolarizing pulses were applied at a fast rate, under the voltage clamp, the amplitudes of the initial inward current in the presence of tetrodotoxin changed greatly depending on the pulse numbers and diastolic intervals, whereas the delayed outward K+ current changed little. Variations of the initial inward current in successive pulses were caused by different degrees of activation and recovery from inactivation in the Ca2+ current, the Ca(2+)-sensitive and -insensitive transient outward current. While inhibition of either one or two current components decreased the action potential alterations, blocking the three components completely abolished them. These results indicate that alterations of the Ca(2+)-sensitive and -insensitive transient outward current together with the Ca2+ current contribute to the action potential alterations after initiation of rapid drive or an increase in driving rates.

  13. Activating and Relaxing Music Entrains the Speed of Beat Synchronized Walking

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is ‘activating’ in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is ‘relaxing’ in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation. PMID:23874469

  14. Paramecium swimming and ciliary beating patterns: a study on four RNA interference mutations.

    PubMed

    Funfak, Anette; Fisch, Cathy; Abdel Motaal, Hatem T; Diener, Julien; Combettes, Laurent; Baroud, Charles N; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium cells swim and feed by beating their thousands of cilia in coordinated patterns. The organization of these patterns and its relationship with cell motility has been the subject of a large body of work, particularly as a model for ciliary beating in human organs where similar organization is seen. However the rapid motion of the cells makes quantitative measurements very challenging. Here we provide detailed measurements of the swimming of Paramecium cells from high-speed video at high magnification, as they move in microfluidic channels. An image analysis protocol allows us to decouple the cell movement from the motion of the cilia, thus allowing us to measure the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and the spatio-temporal organization into metachronal waves along the cell periphery. Two distinct values of the CBF appear at different regions of the cell: most of the cilia beat in the range of 15 to 45 Hz, while the cilia in the peristomal region beat at almost double the frequency. The body and peristomal CBF display a nearly linear relation with the swimming velocity. Moreover the measurements do not display a measurable correlation between the swimming velocity and the metachronal wave velocity on the cell periphery. These measurements are repeated for four RNAi silenced mutants, where proteins specific to the cilia or to their connection to the cell base are depleted. We find that the mutants whose ciliary structure is affected display similar swimming to the control cells albeit with a reduced efficiency, while the mutations that affect the cilia's anchoring to the cell lead to strongly reduced ability to swim. This reduction in motility can be related to a loss of coordination between the ciliary beating in different parts of the cell. PMID:25383612

  15. aBEAT: a toolbox for consistent analysis of longitudinal adult brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yakang; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Li; Wu, Guorong; Shi, Feng; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal brain image analysis is critical for revealing subtle but complex structural and functional changes of brain during aging or in neurodevelopmental disease. However, even with the rapid increase of clinical research and trials, a software toolbox dedicated for longitudinal image analysis is still lacking publicly. To cater for this increasing need, we have developed a dedicated 4D Adult Brain Extraction and Analysis Toolbox (aBEAT) to provide robust and accurate analysis of the longitudinal adult brain MR images. Specially, a group of image processing tools were integrated into aBEAT, including 4D brain extraction, 4D tissue segmentation, and 4D brain labeling. First, a 4D deformable-surface-based brain extraction algorithm, which can deform serial brain surfaces simultaneously under temporal smoothness constraint, was developed for consistent brain extraction. Second, a level-sets-based 4D tissue segmentation algorithm that incorporates local intensity distribution, spatial cortical-thickness constraint, and temporal cortical-thickness consistency was also included in aBEAT for consistent brain tissue segmentation. Third, a longitudinal groupwise image registration framework was further integrated into aBEAT for consistent ROI labeling by simultaneously warping a pre-labeled brain atlas to the longitudinal brain images. The performance of aBEAT has been extensively evaluated on a large number of longitudinal MR T1 images which include normal and dementia subjects, achieving very promising results. A Linux-based standalone package of aBEAT is now freely available at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/abeat.

  16. Paramecium swimming and ciliary beating patterns: a study on four RNA interference mutations.

    PubMed

    Funfak, Anette; Fisch, Cathy; Abdel Motaal, Hatem T; Diener, Julien; Combettes, Laurent; Baroud, Charles N; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium cells swim and feed by beating their thousands of cilia in coordinated patterns. The organization of these patterns and its relationship with cell motility has been the subject of a large body of work, particularly as a model for ciliary beating in human organs where similar organization is seen. However the rapid motion of the cells makes quantitative measurements very challenging. Here we provide detailed measurements of the swimming of Paramecium cells from high-speed video at high magnification, as they move in microfluidic channels. An image analysis protocol allows us to decouple the cell movement from the motion of the cilia, thus allowing us to measure the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and the spatio-temporal organization into metachronal waves along the cell periphery. Two distinct values of the CBF appear at different regions of the cell: most of the cilia beat in the range of 15 to 45 Hz, while the cilia in the peristomal region beat at almost double the frequency. The body and peristomal CBF display a nearly linear relation with the swimming velocity. Moreover the measurements do not display a measurable correlation between the swimming velocity and the metachronal wave velocity on the cell periphery. These measurements are repeated for four RNAi silenced mutants, where proteins specific to the cilia or to their connection to the cell base are depleted. We find that the mutants whose ciliary structure is affected display similar swimming to the control cells albeit with a reduced efficiency, while the mutations that affect the cilia's anchoring to the cell lead to strongly reduced ability to swim. This reduction in motility can be related to a loss of coordination between the ciliary beating in different parts of the cell.

  17. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    PubMed

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation.

  18. Beating and insulting children as a risk for adult cancer, cardiac disease and asthma.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Michael E; Alkhalaf, Ahmed M; Whalley, Ben

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical punishment for children is associated with poor psychological and behavioral outcomes, but the causal pathway is controversial, and the effects on later physical health unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of asthma, cancer, and cardiac patients (150 in each category, 75 male) recruited from outpatient clinics and 250 healthy controls (125 male). All participants were 40-60 years old and citizens of Saudi Arabia, where the use of beating and insults is an acceptable parenting style. Demographic data and recalled frequency of beatings and insults as a child were assessed on an 8-point scale. Beating and insults were highly correlated (ρ = 0.846). Propensity score matching was used to control for demographic differences between the disease and healthy groups. After controlling for differences, more frequent beating (once or more per month) and insults were associated with a significantly increased risk for cancer (RR = 1.7), cardiac disease (RR = 1.3) and asthma (RR = 1.6), with evidence of increased risk for cancer and asthma with beating frequency of once every 6 months or more. Our results show that a threatening parenting style of beating and insults is associated with increased risk for somatic disease, possibly because this form of parenting induces stress. Our findings are consistent with previous research showing that child abuse and other early life stressors adversely affect adult somatic health, but provide evidence that the pathogenic effects occur also with chronic minor stress. A stress-inducing parenting style, even when normative, has long term adverse health consequences. PMID:23054177

  19. Cloning, Characteristics, and Functional Analysis of Rabbit NADPH Oxidase 5

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Yin, Caiyong; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Fulton, David J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nox5 was the last member of the Nox enzyme family to be identified. Functionally distinct from the other Nox isoforms, our understanding of its physiological significance has been hampered by the absence of Nox5 in mouse and rat genomes. Nox5 is present in the genomes of other species such as the rabbit that have broad utility as models of cardiovascular disease. However, the mRNA sequence, characteristics, and functional analysis of rabbit Nox5 has not been fully defined and were the goals of the current study. Methods: Rabbit Nox5 was amplified from rabbit tissue, cloned, and sequenced. COS-7 cells were employed for expression and functional analysis via Western blotting and measurements of superoxide. We designed and synthesized miRNAs selectively targeting rabbit Nox5. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of rabbit Nox5 were aligned with those of putative rabbit isoforms (X1, X2, X3, and X4). A phylogenetic tree was generated based on the mRNA sequence for Nox5 from rabbit and other species. Results: Sequence alignment revealed that the identified rabbit Nox5 was highly conserved with the predicted sequence of rabbit Nox5. Cell based experiments reveal that rabbit Nox5 was robustly expressed and produced superoxide at rest and in a calcium and PMA-dependent manner that was susceptible to superoxide dismutase and the flavoprotein inhibitor, DPI. miRNA-1 was shown to be most effective in down-regulating the expression of rabbit Nox5. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship between rabbit and armadillo Nox5. Rabbit Nox5 was relatively closely related to human Nox5, but lies in a distinct cluster. Conclusion: Our study establishes the suitability of the rabbit as a model organism to further our understanding of the role of Nox5 in cardiovascular and other diseases and provides new information on the genetic relationship of Nox5 genes in different species. PMID:27486403

  20. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qiao, Xin; Cheng, Li-Hong; Tang, Rong-An; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-09-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length.

  1. Polarization-dependent loss characterization method based on optical frequency beat.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, T; Nobre, C S; Temporão, G P

    2016-03-10

    Characterization of the polarization-dependent loss (PDL) of optical components is fundamental for the reliable operation of fiber-optic communication systems. Here we present a method for determining the PDL of optical devices based on optical frequency beating and spectral analysis. Depending on the beat note between components of two orthogonally polarized probe signals modulated at different frequencies, the PDL value and its axis can be determined from a single sweep of an optical spectrum analyzer. Our proposal represents an alternative high-speed option for PDL characterization. PMID:26974770

  2. Effect of pulse slippage on beat wave THz generation in a rippled density magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Rajouria, Satish Kumar; K, Magesh Kumar K.

    2013-10-01

    Beat wave excitation of terahertz radiation by nonlinear mixing of two laser pulses in a ripple density magnetized plasma is investigated allowing for the effect of pulse slippage. The lasers' ponderomotive-force-induced electron drift couples with the density ripple to produce a nonlinear current that resonantly drives the terahertz at the beat frequency. Density ripple provides the phase matching while the magnetic field, transverse to the direction of laser propagation, provides a transverse component to current density. However, the group velocity mismatch between the lasers and the terahertz radiation leads to slippage of the latter behind the laser pulses leading to saturation of the terahertz amplitude.

  3. Beat wave current drive experiment on the Davis Diverted Tokamak (DDT). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.Q.; Horton, R.D.; Rogers, J.H. |

    1993-12-31

    The beatwave current drive experiment is summarized. The first phase of the experiment was the construction of the microwave sources and the diagnostics needed to demonstrate the beat wave effects, i.e. the measurement of the electrostatic plasma wave produced by the beating of two high intensity electromagnetic waves. In order to keep the cost of the experiments to a minimum, a low density filament plasma source (10{sup 8}) to (10{sup 10} particles cm{sup {minus}3}) was employed and the magnetic field in the toroidal plasma was produced by a dc power supply.

  4. Tunable short-pulse beat-wave laser source operating at 1 microm.

    PubMed

    Hankla, A K; Bullock, A B; White, W E; Squier, J A; Barty, C P

    1997-11-15

    We have demonstrated a chirped-pulse-amplification system utilizing an air-spaced etalon inside a regenerative amplifier to produce two simultaneous 2.0-ps pulses, one centered at the gain peak of Nd:phosphate glass (1052 nm) and the other centered at the gain peak of Nd:silicate (1061 nm). Autocorrelations of the resulting beat wave demonstrate a beat frequency of 2.3 THz. We achieved wavelength tunability over a 10-nm range by electronically adjusting the etalon spacing and variable pulse width by changing the etalon rotation. PMID:18188344

  5. Off-momentum beta-beat correction in the RHIC proton run

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; White, S.

    2012-05-20

    In this article, we will review the techniques to measure the off-momentum {beta}-beat and the correction algorithms with the chromatic arc sextupoles in RHIC. We will focus on the measurement and correction of the off-momentum {beta}*-beat at the interaction points. The off-momentum {beta}* is measured with the quadrupole strength change and a high resolution phase lock loop tune meter. The results of off-momentum {beta}* correction performed in a dedicated beam experiment in the 2012 RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run are presented.

  6. Tunable short-pulse beat-wave laser source operating at 1 microm.

    PubMed

    Hankla, A K; Bullock, A B; White, W E; Squier, J A; Barty, C P

    1997-11-15

    We have demonstrated a chirped-pulse-amplification system utilizing an air-spaced etalon inside a regenerative amplifier to produce two simultaneous 2.0-ps pulses, one centered at the gain peak of Nd:phosphate glass (1052 nm) and the other centered at the gain peak of Nd:silicate (1061 nm). Autocorrelations of the resulting beat wave demonstrate a beat frequency of 2.3 THz. We achieved wavelength tunability over a 10-nm range by electronically adjusting the etalon spacing and variable pulse width by changing the etalon rotation.

  7. Effect of salt intake on beat-to-beat blood pressure nonlinear dynamics and entropy in salt-sensitive versus salt-protected rats.

    PubMed

    Fares, Souha A; Habib, Joseph R; Engoren, Milo C; Badr, Kamal F; Habib, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Blood pressure exhibits substantial short- and long-term variability (BPV). We assessed the hypothesis that the complexity of beat-to-beat BPV will be differentially altered in salt-sensitive hypertensive Dahl rats (SS) versus rats protected from salt-induced hypertension (SSBN13) maintained on high-salt versus low-salt diet. Beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic BP series from nine SS and six SSBN13 rats (http://www.physionet.org) were analyzed following 9 weeks on low salt and repeated after 2 weeks on high salt. BP complexity was quantified by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), short- and long-range scaling exponents (αS and αL), sample entropy (SampEn), and traditional standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV(%)). Mean systolic and diastolic BP increased on high-salt diet (P < 0.01) particularly for SS rats. SD and CV(%) were similar across groups irrespective of diet. Salt-sensitive and -protected rats exhibited similar complexity indices on low-salt diet. On high salt, (1) SS rats showed increased scaling exponents or smoother, systolic (P = 0.007 [αL]) and diastolic (P = 0.008 [αL]) BP series; (2) salt-protected rats showed lower SampEn (less complex) systolic and diastolic BP (P = 0.046); and (3) compared to protected SSBN13 rats, SS showed higher αL for systolic (P = 0.01) and diastolic (P = 0.005) BP Hypertensive SS rats are more susceptible to high salt with a greater rise in mean BP and reduced complexity. Comparable mean pressures in sensitive and protective rats when on low-salt diet coupled with similar BPV dynamics suggest a protective role of low-salt intake in hypertensive rats. This effect likely reflects better coupling of biologic oscillators.

  8. The role of α-adrenergic receptors in mediating beat-by-beat sympathetic vascular transduction in the forearm of resting man.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Seth T; Holwerda, Seth W; Credeur, Daniel P; Zuidema, Mozow Y; Medley, John H; Dyke, Peter C; Wray, D Walter; Davis, Michael J; Fadel, Paul J

    2013-07-15

    Sympathetic vascular transduction is commonly understood to act as a basic relay mechanism, but under basal conditions, competing dilatory signals may interact with and alter the ability of sympathetic activity to decrease vascular conductance. Thus, we determined the extent to which spontaneous bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) mediate decreases in forearm vascular conductance (FVC) and the contribution of local α-adrenergic receptor-mediated pathways to the observed FVC responses. In 19 young men, MSNA (microneurography), arterial blood pressure and brachial artery blood flow (duplex Doppler ultrasound) were continuously measured during supine rest. These measures were also recorded in seven men during intra-arterial infusions of normal saline, phentolamine (PHEN) and PHEN with angiotensin II (PHEN+ANG). The latter was used to control for increases in resting blood flow with α-adrenergic blockade. Spike-triggered averaging was used to characterize beat-by-beat changes in FVC for 15 cardiac cycles following each MSNA burst and a peak response was calculated. Following MSNA bursts, FVC initially increased by +3.3 ± 0.3% (P = 0.016) and then robustly decreased to a nadir of -5.8 ± 1.6% (P < 0.001). The magnitude of vasoconstriction appeared graded with the number of consecutive MSNA bursts; while individual burst size only had a mild influence. Neither PHEN nor PHEN+ANG infusions affected the initial rise in FVC, but both infusions significantly attenuated the subsequent decrease in FVC (-2.1 ± 0.7% and -0.7 ± 0.8%, respectively; P < 0.001 vs. normal saline). These findings indicate that spontaneous MSNA bursts evoke robust beat-by-beat decreases in FVC that are exclusively mediated via α-adrenergic receptors.

  9. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease: advantages of cELISA in assessing immunity in wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tao; Parkes, John P

    2011-12-15

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) is an acute fatal disease of domestic and wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) caused by RHD virus (RHDV). Accurate assessment of immunity is of great importance for the conservation and control of wild rabbits. We evaluated a competitive ELISA (cELISA) against isotype ELISAs for assessing the protective immunity against the disease by challenging 50 wild-caught rabbits with a lethal dose of RHDV. Death or survival to the challenge was used as a criterion to determine the performance characteristics of the assay for the assessment of immunity in rabbits. At 1:10 dilution, a serum exhibiting ≥ 25% inhibition (1:10(25)) was regarded as the presence of RHDV-specific antibodies. Eleven of 16 (68.8%) rabbits with antibodies at 1:10(25) (<1:40) died of RHD. When the cut-off was moved from 25% to 50% inhibition (1:10(50)) at 1:10 serum dilution, the assay sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the protective immunity were improved from 84%, 54.2% and 69.4% to 84%, 100% and 91.8%, respectively. We also demonstrated at the epitope amino acid sequence level why the presence of the RHDV-cross reactive benign rabbit calicivirus, which interfered with isotype ELISAs, had little impact on the specificity of the cELISA for the diagnosis of RHDV infection. The presence of RHDV-specific antibody at 1:10(50) by the cELISA is a reliable indicator for the protective immunity. In contrast to isotype ELISAs, the cELISA is a valuable specific tool for monitoring the herd immunity to RHD for the conservation and management of wild rabbits in the field.

  10. An individual-based model of rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease on European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fa, John E.; Sharples, Colin M.; Bell, Diana J.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    We developed an individual-based model of Rabbit Viral Hemorrhagic Disease (RVHD) for European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.), representing up to 1000 rabbits in four hectares. Model output for productivity and recruitment matched published values. The disease was density-dependent and virulence affected outcome. Strains that caused death after several days produced greater overall mortality than strains in which rabbits either died or recovered very quickly. Disease effect also depended on time of year. We also elaborated a larger scale model representing 25 km2 and 100,000+ rabbits, split into a number of grid-squares. This was a more traditional model that did not represent individual rabbits, but employed a system of dynamic equations for each grid-square. Disease spread depended on probability of transmission between neighboring grid-squares. Potential recovery from a major population crash caused by the disease relied on disease virulence and frequency of recurrence. The model's dependence on probability of disease transmission between grid-squares suggests the way that the model represents the spatial distribution of the population affects simulation. Although data on RVHD in Europe are lacking, our models provide a basis for describing the disease in realistic detail and for assessing influence of various social and spatial factors on spread.

  11. The rod circuit in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Vaney, D I; Young, H M; Gynther, I C

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian retinae have a well-defined neuronal pathway that serves rod vision. In rabbit retina, the different populations of interneurons in the rod pathway can be selectively labeled, either separately or in combination. The rod bipolar cells show protein kinase C immunoreactivity; the rod (AII) amacrine cells can be distinguished in nuclear-yellow labeled retina; the rod reciprocal (S1 & S2) amacrine cells accumulate serotonin; and the dopaminergic amacrine cells show tyrosine-hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Furthermore, intracellular dye injection of the microscopically identified interneurons enables whole-population and single-cell studies to be combined in the same tissue. Using this approach, we have been able to analyze systematically the neuronal architecture of the rod circuit across the rabbit retina and compare its organization with that of the rod circuit in central cat retina. In rabbit retina, the rod interneurons are not organized in a uniform neuronal module that is simply scaled up from central to peripheral retina. Moreover, peripheral fields in superior and inferior retina that have equivalent densities of each neuronal type show markedly different rod bipolar to AII amacrine convergence ratios, with the result that many more rod photoreceptors converge on an AII amacrine cell in superior retina. In rabbit retina, much of the convergence in the rod circuit occurs in the outer retina whereas, in central cat retina, it is more evenly distributed between the inner and outer retina.

  12. Urolithiasis and cystotomy in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cyndi

    2011-03-01

    Cystotomy is a surgical incision into the urinary bladder, which may be required for removal of calculi, diagnosis of tumors or refractory urinary tract infections, or repair of ectopic ureters and ruptured bladders. This column describes the indications and techniques for cystotomy in the rabbit. PMID:21326187

  13. Dystocia in a rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Dickie, Erica

    2011-01-01

    A 4-year-old female dwarf lop rabbit was presented with dystocia after mis-mating. Abdominal palpation, vaginal examination, and radiography confirmed that the doe was carrying 3 kits. Treatment for the dystocia consisted of gentle manual extraction of the fetuses and fetal membranes, and administration of oxytocin and calcium borogluconate.

  14. Dystocia in a rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Dickie, Erica

    2011-01-01

    A 4-year-old female dwarf lop rabbit was presented with dystocia after mis-mating. Abdominal palpation, vaginal examination, and radiography confirmed that the doe was carrying 3 kits. Treatment for the dystocia consisted of gentle manual extraction of the fetuses and fetal membranes, and administration of oxytocin and calcium borogluconate. PMID:21461214

  15. STUDIES ON RABBIT LYMPHOCYTES IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Stewart; Rowe, David S.; Gell, P. G. H.

    1965-01-01

    In vitro cultures of the peripheral blood lymphocytes of rabbits may be stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin, staphylococcal filtrate, antiallotype serum, or sheep anti-rabbit whole serum to synthesize protein, RNA and DNA as indicated by the incorporation of radiolabelled precursor substances into these products. A sequence of events found in all stimulated cultures characteristically shows protein synthesis followed by RNA synthesis, histologic blast transformation, DNA synthesis, and mitosis, with the complete sequence requiring 48 hours. All four stimulants induce essentially identical metabolic changes. Characterization of the proteins synthesized by lymphocytes in vitro has failed to demonstrate immunoglobulin synthesis by stimulated or non-stimulated cultures. It is concluded that the majority of proteins produced by peripheral lymphocytes stimulated in vitro are most likely cellular proteins related to the metabolic alterations necessary for mitosis. Absorption of sheep antisera to whole rabbit serum with rabbit IgG does not always remove the transforming capacity of the sheep antisera. Thus, it is likely that antibodies to proteins other than IgG present in the small lymphocyte may also be able to stimulate transformation. A possible common mechanism for the induction of lymphoblast transformation may be the ability of both specific and non-specific stimulants to react with protein constituents of the lymphocyte which may also be present in serum. PMID:4954762

  16. Walking to the beat of different drums: practical implications for the use of acoustic rhythms in gait rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Bank, Paulina J M; Peper, C Lieke E; Beek, Peter J

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic rhythms are frequently used in gait rehabilitation, with positive instantaneous and prolonged transfer effects on various gait characteristics. The gait modifying ability of acoustic rhythms depends on how well gait is tied to the beat, which can be assessed with measures of relative timing of auditory-motor coordination. We examined auditory-motor coordination in 20 healthy elderly individuals walking to metronome beats with pacing frequencies slower than, equal to, and faster than their preferred cadence. We found that more steps were required to adjust gait to the beat, the more the metronome rate deviated from the preferred cadence. Furthermore, participants anticipated the beat with their footfalls to various degrees, depending on the metronome rate; the faster the tempo, the smaller the phase advance or phase lead. Finally, the variability in the relative timing between footfalls and the beat was smaller for metronome rates closer to the preferred cadence, reflecting superior auditory-motor coordination. These observations have three practical implications. First, instantaneous effects of acoustic stimuli on gait characteristics may typically be underestimated given the considerable number of steps required to attune gait to the beat in combination with the usual short walkways. Second, a systematic phase lead of footfalls to the beat does not necessarily reflect a reduced ability to couple gait to the metronome. Third, the efficacy of acoustic rhythms to modify gait depends on metronome rate. Gait is coupled best to the beat for metronome rates near the preferred cadence.

  17. Mnemonic Effect of Iconic Gesture and Beat Gesture in Adults and Children: Is Meaning in Gesture Important for Memory Recall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Wing Chee; Chen-Hui, Colin Sim; Wei-Shan, Julie Low

    2012-01-01

    Abundant research has shown that encoding meaningful gesture, such as an iconic gesture, enhances memory. This paper asked whether gesture needs to carry meaning to improve memory recall by comparing the mnemonic effect of meaningful (i.e., iconic gestures) and nonmeaningful gestures (i.e., beat gestures). Beat gestures involve simple motoric…

  18. The European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a source of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, G; Chalmers, R M

    2010-12-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. have been found in the faeces of over 150 mammalian host species, but the risks to public health from wildlife are poorly understood. In summer 2008, the Cryptosporidium sp. rabbit genotype was identified as the aetiological agent in an outbreak of waterborne human cryptosporidiosis. The source was a wild rabbit that had entered a treated water tank. To establish current knowledge about Cryptosporidium spp. infecting lagomorphs, especially the host range and biological characteristics of the rabbit genotype, and the potential risks to public health that rabbits may pose in the transmission of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis, we undertook a literature and data review. The literature returned demonstrates that although the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) has been the most widely studied lagomorph, few large scale studies were found. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in wild rabbit populations in the two large scale studies was 0.9% (95%CI 0.2-5.0) and 0.0% (95%CI 0.0-1.6). Neither study provided age nor sex profiles nor typing of Cryptosporidium isolates. The infecting Cryptosporidium species was confirmed in just four other studies of rabbits, all of which showed the rabbit genotype. Human-infectious Cryptosporidium species including Cryptosporidium parvum have caused experimental infections in rabbits and it is likely that this may also occur naturally. No published studies of the host range and biological features of the Cryptosporidium rabbit genotype were identified, but information was generated on the identification and differentiation of the rabbit genotype at various genetic loci. Both pet and wild rabbits are a potential source of human cryptosporidiosis and as such, good hygiene practices are recommended during and after handling rabbits or exposure to their faeces, or potentially contaminated surfaces. Water supplies should be protected against access by wildlife, including rabbits.

  19. Risk of zoonotic transmission of HEV from rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Dubois, Martine; Abravanel, Florence; Top, Sokunthea; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Guerin, Jean-Luc; Izopet, Jacques

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus strains from rabbits indicate that these mammals may be a reservoir for HEVs that cause infection in humans. Further issues remain to be clarified, including whether the genotype of rabbit HEV differs from human and swine HEV genotype 3 and whether rabbit HEV can infect human and other animals. HEV was found in farmed rabbits in several geographic areas of China, in USA and more recently in France. The prevalence of antibodies against HEV was 36%, 57% and 55% in rabbits from Virginia (USA), Gansu Province and Beijing (China), respectively. HEV RNA was detected in 16.5% of serum samples from farmed rabbits in Virginia, 7.5% in Gansu Province and 7.0% in Beijing. HEV RNA was detected in 7% of bile samples from farmed rabbits and in 23% of liver samples from wild rabbits in France. The full-length genomic sequences analysis indicates that all the rabbit strains belong to the same clade. Nucleotide sequences were 72.2-78.2% identical to HEV genotypes 1-4. Comparison with HEV sequences of human strains circulating in France and reference sequences identified a human strain closely related to rabbit HEV. A 93-nucleotide insertion in the X domain of the ORF1 of the human strain and in all the rabbit HEV strains was found. Moreover, the ability of rabbit HEV to cause cross-species infection in a pig model has recently been demonstrated. Rabbit HEV can replicate efficiently in human cell lines. Collectively, these data support the possibility of zoonotic transmission of HEV from rabbits. PMID:23474012

  20. Trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ movements associated with contraction of the rabbit right ventricular wall

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.N.; Rich, T.L.; Langer, G.A.

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the movements of Ca2+ into the myocardium from the extracellular space during the course of muscle contraction. Equilibration of the rabbit right ventricular wall with perfusate containing /sup 45/Ca was measured by collecting effluent droplets over time. This protocol was carried out in a quiescent muscle and then repeated 15-20 minutes later in an identical fashion except that halfway through the collection period the muscle was stimulated to contract. We were thus able to quantitate the contraction-dependent changes in /sup 45/Ca movements. In control experiments using (/sup 58/Co)EDTA as an extracellular space marker, we observed that contraction altered the volume of this space. This alteration in extracellular space was relatively small, and the quantitation of /sup 45/Ca movements was corrected for this change. The addition of 1 microM Bay K 8644 to the perfusate stimulated tension and augmented Ca2+ depletion from the extracellular space. The addition of 15 microM nifedipine to the perfusate significantly reduced both tension development and Ca2+ depletion from the extracellular space of the muscle. Net contraction-dependent movement of Ca2+ from the extracellular space into the myocardium under control conditions at 1 mM (Ca2+) was 10-14 mumol Ca2+/kg tissue wet wt/beat. This value indicates either a large contribution of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and/or significant contribution of sarcolemmal bound Ca2+ to excitation-contraction coupling in the rabbit ventricle.

  1. Cytoarchitecture and neurocytology of rabbit cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Brent A

    2016-09-01

    The rabbit cingulate cortex is highly differentiated in contrast to rodents and numerous recent advances suggest the rabbit area map needs revision. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess cytoarchitecture with neuron-specific nuclear binding protein (NeuN) and neurocytology with intermediate neurofilament proteins, parvalbumin and glutamic acid decarboxylase. Key findings include: (1) Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) area 32 has dorsal and ventral divisions. (2) Area 33 is part of ACC. (3) Midcingulate cortex (MCC) has anterior and posterior divisions and this was verified with extensive quantitative analysis and a horizontal series of sections. (4) NeuN, also known as Fox-3, is not limited to somata and formed nodules, granular clusters and striations in the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. (5) Area 30 forms a complex of anterior and posterior parts with further medial and lateral divisions. (6) Area 29b has two divisions and occupies substantially more volume than in rat. (7) Area 29a begins with a subsplenial component and extends relatively further caudal than in rat. As similar areal designations are often used among species, direct comparisons were made of rabbit areas with those in rat and monkey. The dichotomy of MCC is of particular interest to studies of pain as anterior MCC is most frequently activated in human acute pain studies and the rabbit can be used to study this subregion. Finally, the area 30 complex is not primarily dysgranular as in rat and is more differentiated than in any other mammal including human. The large and highly differentiated rabbit cingulate cortex provides a unique model for assessing cingulate cortex, pain processing and RNA splicing functions. PMID:26462665

  2. Prostaglandin synthesis and catabolism in the gastric mucosa: studies in normal rabbits and rabbits immunized with prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Redfern, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    Antral and fundic mucosal homogenates obtained from prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits converted 14C-arachidonic acid to prostaglandin E2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and prostaglandin D2. Percentage conversion of 14C-arachidonic acid to these prostaglandin products was not significantly different in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits compared with control rabbits (thyroglobulin-immunized and unimmunized rabbits combined). Synthesis of 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, prostaglandin E2 and 13,14-dihydro 15-keto prostaglandin E2 from endogenous arachidonic acid after vortex mixing fundic mucosal homogenates was similar in prostaglandin E2 immunized rabbits and control rabbits. Both in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits and controls, 3H-prostaglandin E2 was catabolized extensively by the fundic mucosa, whereas 3H-6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, 3H-prostaglandin F2 alpha, and 3H-prostaglandin D2 were not catabolized to any appreciable extent. The rate of catabolism of PGs was not significantly different in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits and control rabbits, with the exception of prostaglandin F2 alpha which was catabolized slightly more rapidly in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits. These results indicate that development of gastric ulcers in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits is not associated with an alteration in the capacity of the gastric mucosa to synthesize or catabolize prostaglandins.

  3. Recombinant Rabbit Leukemia Inhibitory Factor and Rabbit Embryonic Fibroblasts Support the Derivation and Maintenance of Rabbit Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Fei; Ma, Yinghong; Chen, Y. Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng; Lin, Tzu-An; Chen, Chien-Hong; Lin, Wei-Wen; Roach, Marsha; Ju, Jyh-Cherng; Yang, Lan; Du, Fuliang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The rabbit is a classical experimental animal species. A major limitation in using rabbits for biomedical research is the lack of germ-line-competent rabbit embryonic stem cells (rbESCs). We hypothesized that the use of homologous feeder cells and recombinant rabbit leukemia inhibitory factor (rbLIF) might improve the chance in deriving germ-line-competent rbES cells. In the present study, we established rabbit embryonic fibroblast (REF) feeder layers and synthesized recombinant rbLIF. We derived a total of seven putative rbESC lines, of which two lines (M5 and M23) were from culture Condition I using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as feeders supplemented with human LIF (hLIF) (MEF+hLIF). Another five lines (R4, R9, R15, R21, and R31) were derived from Condition II using REFs as feeder cells supplemented with rbLIF (REF+rbLIF). Similar derivation efficiency was observed between these two conditions (8.7% vs. 10.2%). In a separate experiment with 2×3 factorial design, we examined the effects of feeder cells (MEF vs. REF) and LIFs (mLIF, hLIF vs. rbLIF) on rbESC culture. Both Conditions I and II supported satisfactory rbESC culture, with similar or better population doubling time and colony-forming efficiency than other combinations of feeder cells with LIFs. Rabbit ESCs derived and maintained on both conditions displayed typical ESC characteristics, including ESC pluripotency marker expression (AP, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA4) and gene expression (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, c-Myc, Klf4, and Dppa5), and the capacity to differentiate into three primary germ layers in vitro. The present work is the first attempt to establish rbESC lines using homologous feeder cells and recombinant rbLIF, by which the rbESCs were derived and maintained normally. These cell lines are unique resources and may facilitate the derivation of germ-line-competent rbESCs. PMID:22775411

  4. Recombinant rabbit leukemia inhibitory factor and rabbit embryonic fibroblasts support the derivation and maintenance of rabbit embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fei; Ma, Yinghong; Chen, Y Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng; Lin, Tzu-An; Chen, Chien-Hong; Lin, Wei-Wen; Roach, Marsha; Ju, Jyh-Cherng; Yang, Lan; Du, Fuliang; Xu, Jie

    2012-08-01

    The rabbit is a classical experimental animal species. A major limitation in using rabbits for biomedical research is the lack of germ-line-competent rabbit embryonic stem cells (rbESCs). We hypothesized that the use of homologous feeder cells and recombinant rabbit leukemia inhibitory factor (rbLIF) might improve the chance in deriving germ-line-competent rbES cells. In the present study, we established rabbit embryonic fibroblast (REF) feeder layers and synthesized recombinant rbLIF. We derived a total of seven putative rbESC lines, of which two lines (M5 and M23) were from culture Condition I using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as feeders supplemented with human LIF (hLIF) (MEF+hLIF). Another five lines (R4, R9, R15, R21, and R31) were derived from Condition II using REFs as feeder cells supplemented with rbLIF (REF+rbLIF). Similar derivation efficiency was observed between these two conditions (8.7% vs. 10.2%). In a separate experiment with 2×3 factorial design, we examined the effects of feeder cells (MEF vs. REF) and LIFs (mLIF, hLIF vs. rbLIF) on rbESC culture. Both Conditions I and II supported satisfactory rbESC culture, with similar or better population doubling time and colony-forming efficiency than other combinations of feeder cells with LIFs. Rabbit ESCs derived and maintained on both conditions displayed typical ESC characteristics, including ESC pluripotency marker expression (AP, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA4) and gene expression (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, c-Myc, Klf4, and Dppa5), and the capacity to differentiate into three primary germ layers in vitro. The present work is the first attempt to establish rbESC lines using homologous feeder cells and recombinant rbLIF, by which the rbESCs were derived and maintained normally. These cell lines are unique resources and may facilitate the derivation of germ-line-competent rbESCs.

  5. Swimming Speed of Larval Snail Does Not Correlate with Size and Ciliary Beat Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kit Yu Karen; Jiang, Houshuo; Padilla, Dianna K.

    2013-01-01

    Many marine invertebrates have planktonic larvae with cilia used for both propulsion and capturing of food particles. Hence, changes in ciliary activity have implications for larval nutrition and ability to navigate the water column, which in turn affect survival and dispersal. Using high-speed high-resolution microvideography, we examined the relationship between swimming speed, velar arrangements, and ciliary beat frequency of freely swimming veliger larvae of the gastropod Crepidula fornicata over the course of larval development. Average swimming speed was greatest 6 days post hatching, suggesting a reduction in swimming speed towards settlement. At a given age, veliger larvae have highly variable speeds (0.8–4 body lengths s−1) that are independent of shell size. Contrary to the hypothesis that an increase in ciliary beat frequency increases work done, and therefore speed, there was no significant correlation between swimming speed and ciliary beat frequency. Instead, there are significant correlations between swimming speed and visible area of the velar lobe, and distance between centroids of velum and larval shell. These observations suggest an alternative hypothesis that, instead of modifying ciliary beat frequency, larval C. fornicata modify swimming through adjustment of velum extension or orientation. The ability to adjust velum position could influence particle capture efficiency and fluid disturbance and help promote survival in the plankton. PMID:24367554

  6. EXPOSURE OF CULTURED MYOCYTES TO ZINC RESULTS IN ALTERED BEAT RATE AND INTERCELLULAR COMMUNICATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cultured myocytes to zinc results in altered beat rate and intercellular communication

    Graff, Donald W, Devlin, Robert B, Brackhan, Joseph A, Muller-Borer, Barbara J, Bowman, Jill S, Cascio, Wayne E.

    Exposure to ambient air pollution particulate matter (...

  7. Peak misdetection in heart-beat-based security: Characterization and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Seepers, Robert M; Strydis, Christos; Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Sourdis, Ioannis; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-01

    The Inter-Pulse-Interval (IPI) of heart beats has previously been suggested for security in mobile health (mHealth) applications. In IPI-based security, secure communication is facilitated through a security key derived from the time difference between heart beats. However, there currently exists no work which considers the effect on security of imperfect heart-beat (peak) detection. This is a crucial aspect of IPI-based security and likely to happen in a real system. In this paper, we evaluate the effects of peak misdetection on the security performance of IPI-based security. It is shown that even with a high peak detection rate between 99.9% and 99.0%, a significant drop in security performance may be observed (between -70% and -303%) compared to having perfect peak detection. We show that authenticating using smaller keys yields both stronger keys as well as potentially faster authentication in case of imperfect heart beat detection. Finally, we present an algorithm which tolerates the effect of a single misdetected peak and increases the security performance by up to 155%.

  8. The Patterns of Music: Young Children Learning Mathematics through Beat, Rhythm, and Melody

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, Kamile; Geist, Eugene A.; Kuznik, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Research on music and music therapy suggests that math and music are related in the brain from very early in life. Musical elements such as steady beat, rhythm, melody, and tempo possess inherent mathematical principles such as spatial properties, sequencing, counting, patterning, and one-to-one correspondence. With new understanding about the…

  9. Ratings of speed in real music as a function of both original and manipulated beat tempo.

    PubMed

    Madison, Guy; Paulin, Johan

    2010-11-01

    There is an apparent contradiction between the narrow range of tempi optimal for perceptual judgment and motor synchronization and the wide range of beat tempi found in real music. The relation between listeners' perception of speed and beat tempo was therefore investigated, both for real music excerpts (ME) and metronome sequences. Tempi ranged from 42 to 200 beats per minute (BPM), and some excerpts were further tempo manipulated in four levels from ±5 to ±20%. Regression analyses showed that speed was a shallower function of original tempo for fast (>150 BPM) and slow (<95 BPM) MEs than for MEs with intermediate tempi, describing a non-linear, sigmoid function. Manipulated tempo had twice as large an effect on speed as had original tempo. In contrast, speed was an almost linear function of tempo for metronome sequences. Taken together, these results show that the non-linearity stems from properties of the musical signal, rather than being a subjective perceptual effect. They indicate an inverse relation between tempo and relative event density in real music, and demonstrate that the perception of periodic signals is affected not only by the beat level, but also by faster and slower levels.

  10. High-Frequency Binaural Beats Increase Cognitive Flexibility: Evidence from Dual-Task Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Bernhard; Sellaro, Roberta; Fischer, Rico; Borg, Saskia; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cognitive-control processes can be configured to optimize either persistence of information processing (by amplifying competition between decision-making alternatives and top-down biasing of this competition) or flexibility (by dampening competition and biasing). We investigated whether high-frequency binaural beats, an auditory illusion suspected to act as a cognitive enhancer, have an impact on cognitive-control configuration. We hypothesized that binaural beats in the gamma range bias the cognitive-control style toward flexibility, which in turn should increase the crosstalk between tasks in a dual-task paradigm. We replicated earlier findings that the reaction time in the first-performed task is sensitive to the compatibility between the responses in the first and the second task—an indication of crosstalk. As predicted, exposing participants to binaural beats in the gamma range increased this effect as compared to a control condition in which participants were exposed to a continuous tone of 340 Hz. These findings provide converging evidence that the cognitive-control style can be systematically biased by inducing particular internal states; that high-frequency binaural beats bias the control style toward more flexibility; and that different styles are implemented by changing the strength of local competition and top-down bias.

  11. Why Some Schools with Latino Children Beat the Odds...and Others Don't

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waits, Mary Jo; Campbell, Heather E.; Gau, Rebecca; Jacobs, Ellen; Rex, Tom; Hess, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    Throughout Arizona and the Southwest, the odds are against high achievement in schools with a mostly Latino, mostly poor student enrollment. Some schools, however, "beat the odds" and achieve consistently high results or show steady gains. Why do these schools succeed where others fail? Using the methodology of business guru Jim Collins…

  12. Outcry against Violence: Beating Death of Student in Chicago Spurs Attention to a Nationwide Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarons, Dakarai I.

    2009-01-01

    In the wake of the videotaped beating death of a Chicago high school student, law-enforcement officials and educators called this week for renewed efforts to stem youth violence. But they also acknowledged that money and programs alone will not solve the problem. Cabinet members traveled to Chicago to offer money and to call for adults to play a…

  13. Outcry against Violence: Beating Death of Student in Chicago Spurs Attention to a Nationwide Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarons, Dakarai I.

    2010-01-01

    In the wake of the beating death of a Chicago high school student in September, law-enforcement officials and educators have called for renewed efforts to stem youth violence. But they also acknowledged that money and programs alone won't solve the problem. U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan traveled to…

  14. Beat-frequency adjustable Er3+-doped DBR fiber laser for ultrasound detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tuan; Wong, Allan C L; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Guan, Bai-Ou; Lu, Chao; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2011-01-31

    A compact low beat-frequency dual-polarization distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser whose beat frequency can be varied, for high-frequency ultrasound detection has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The laser was fabricated in small birefringent commercial erbium-doped fiber. It operated in a robust single-longitude mode with output power of more than 1 mW and high signal-to-noise ratio better than 60 dB. Induced birefringence to the fiber during the UV inscription process is small (~10(-7)) and consequently the laser beats at a low frequency of ~20 MHz which is at least one order of magnitude smaller than previously reported results, making frequency down-conversion unnecessary. The beat frequency can be adjusted by controlling the side-exposure time of the UV light irradiating the gain cavity, providing a simple approach to multiplex a large number of DBR fiber lasers of different frequencies in series using frequency division multiplexing (FDM) technique. The proposed DBR fiber laser is also temperature insensitive, making it a good candidate for hydrophone applications.

  15. Reversal of ventricular premature beat induced cardiomyopathy by radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Y; Pison, L; van Opstal, J M; Dennert, R M; Heesen, W F; Crijns, H J G M

    2010-10-01

    Frequent monomorphic ventricular premature beats (VPBs) may lead to left ventricular dysfunction. We describe two patients with frequent monomorphic VPBs and dilated cardiomyopathy in whom left ventricular function normalised after elimination of the VPBs by radiofrequency catheter ablation. The recent literature on this topic is summarised and potential candidates for catheter ablation are discussed. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:493-8.).

  16. The conserved ciliary protein Bug22 controls planar beating of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dan; Cao, Muqing; Oda, Toshiyuki; Pan, Junmin

    2014-01-15

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia can exhibit planar and non-planar beating, and the mechanism controlling these beating patterns is not well understood. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagella beat in approximately the same plane with either an asymmetric ciliary-type or symmetric flagellar-type waveform. Each B-tubule of the number 1, 5 and 6 doublets of the flagellar axoneme possesses a beak-like structure. The number 5 and 6 beak structures are implicated in conversion of ciliary motion into flagellar motion. Here, we show that in a null mutant of Bug22, the asymmetric ciliary waveform is converted into a three-dimensional (non-planar) symmetric flagellar waveform. Bug22 is localized to approximately the proximal half to two-thirds of the flagellum, similar to localization of beak-like structures. However, as shown by immunogold labeling, Bug22 associates with axonemal microtubules without apparent preference for any particular doublets. Interestingly, bug22 mutants lack all beak-like structures. We propose that one function of Bug22 is to regulate the anchoring of the beak-like structures to the doublet microtubules and confine flagellar beating to a plane. PMID:24259666

  17. Beat the Blues: A CBT Based Program for the Treatment of Depressive Symptomatology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habicht, Manuela H.

    The present Beat the Blues Program is based in a cognitive-behavioral model. It has been developed as an 8-module group treatment program for 8-10 participants and is usually run over 8 weeks. Each module focuses on aspects of the model and provides exercises, strategies, and techniques for understanding and dealing with depression and anxiety.…

  18. Rhythm and Books: Feel the Beat! 1996 Florida Library Youth Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupert, Libby, Comp.; And Others

    The Florida Library Youth Program is an extension of the Florida Summer Library Program and has emerged in response to a need to provide programs for school-age children at times other than the traditional summer vacation. The theme, "Rhythm and Books--Feel the Beat!," focuses on music and rhythms that abound around children in the world. The…

  19. High-Frequency Binaural Beats Increase Cognitive Flexibility: Evidence from Dual-Task Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Bernhard; Sellaro, Roberta; Fischer, Rico; Borg, Saskia; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cognitive-control processes can be configured to optimize either persistence of information processing (by amplifying competition between decision-making alternatives and top-down biasing of this competition) or flexibility (by dampening competition and biasing). We investigated whether high-frequency binaural beats, an auditory illusion suspected to act as a cognitive enhancer, have an impact on cognitive-control configuration. We hypothesized that binaural beats in the gamma range bias the cognitive-control style toward flexibility, which in turn should increase the crosstalk between tasks in a dual-task paradigm. We replicated earlier findings that the reaction time in the first-performed task is sensitive to the compatibility between the responses in the first and the second task—an indication of crosstalk. As predicted, exposing participants to binaural beats in the gamma range increased this effect as compared to a control condition in which participants were exposed to a continuous tone of 340 Hz. These findings provide converging evidence that the cognitive-control style can be systematically biased by inducing particular internal states; that high-frequency binaural beats bias the control style toward more flexibility; and that different styles are implemented by changing the strength of local competition and top-down bias. PMID:27605922

  20. Beat Keeping in a Sea Lion As Coupled Oscillation: Implications for Comparative Understanding of Human Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Andrew A.; Cook, Peter F.; Large, Edward W.; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Human capacity for entraining movement to external rhythms—i.e., beat keeping—is ubiquitous, but its evolutionary history and neural underpinnings remain a mystery. Recent findings of entrainment to simple and complex rhythms in non-human animals pave the way for a novel comparative approach to assess the origins and mechanisms of rhythmic behavior. The most reliable non-human beat keeper to date is a California sea lion, Ronan, who was trained to match head movements to isochronous repeating stimuli and showed spontaneous generalization of this ability to novel tempos and to the complex rhythms of music. Does Ronan's performance rely on the same neural mechanisms as human rhythmic behavior? In the current study, we presented Ronan with simple rhythmic stimuli at novel tempos. On some trials, we introduced “perturbations,” altering either tempo or phase in the middle of a presentation. Ronan quickly adjusted her behavior following all perturbations, recovering her consistent phase and tempo relationships to the stimulus within a few beats. Ronan's performance was consistent with predictions of mathematical models describing coupled oscillation: a model relying solely on phase coupling strongly matched her behavior, and the model was further improved with the addition of period coupling. These findings are the clearest evidence yet for parity in human and non-human beat keeping and support the view that the human ability to perceive and move in time to rhythm may be rooted in broadly conserved neural mechanisms. PMID:27375418

  1. Effects of Movement, Tempo, and Gender on Steady Beat Performance of Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Paige

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to discover the effects of manual (hand) and pedal (foot) movements, tempo, and gender on steady beat accuracy. Participants (N = 119) consisted of male (n = 63) and female (n = 56) kindergarten students randomly divided into two groups, counterbalanced with regard to school, homeroom, and gender. Participants…

  2. Movement in Steady Beat: Learning on the Move, Ages 3-7. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.

    The ability to feel and maintain steady, rhythmic beat is important for children to develop in early childhood and will assist them in mastering concepts in language and literacy, mathematics, and other content areas as well as increase body coordination and related physical abilities. Designed as an activity supplement to High Scope movement and…

  3. Beat Keeping in a Sea Lion As Coupled Oscillation: Implications for Comparative Understanding of Human Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Andrew A; Cook, Peter F; Large, Edward W; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Human capacity for entraining movement to external rhythms-i.e., beat keeping-is ubiquitous, but its evolutionary history and neural underpinnings remain a mystery. Recent findings of entrainment to simple and complex rhythms in non-human animals pave the way for a novel comparative approach to assess the origins and mechanisms of rhythmic behavior. The most reliable non-human beat keeper to date is a California sea lion, Ronan, who was trained to match head movements to isochronous repeating stimuli and showed spontaneous generalization of this ability to novel tempos and to the complex rhythms of music. Does Ronan's performance rely on the same neural mechanisms as human rhythmic behavior? In the current study, we presented Ronan with simple rhythmic stimuli at novel tempos. On some trials, we introduced "perturbations," altering either tempo or phase in the middle of a presentation. Ronan quickly adjusted her behavior following all perturbations, recovering her consistent phase and tempo relationships to the stimulus within a few beats. Ronan's performance was consistent with predictions of mathematical models describing coupled oscillation: a model relying solely on phase coupling strongly matched her behavior, and the model was further improved with the addition of period coupling. These findings are the clearest evidence yet for parity in human and non-human beat keeping and support the view that the human ability to perceive and move in time to rhythm may be rooted in broadly conserved neural mechanisms. PMID:27375418

  4. Behind Beats and Rhymes: Working Class from a Hampton Roads Hip Hop Homeplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Aisha S.

    2009-01-01

    The film documentary titled "Hip Hop: beyond beats and rhymes" captures ongoing conversations among scholars, cultural critics, and hip hop insiders about the state of African Americans by interrogating distinct expressive forms associated with hip hop culture. Durham draws from two scenes to describe her memories as the researched underclass and…

  5. Quantum beats in forward scattering - Subnanosecond studies with a mode-locked dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, H.; Burggraf, H.; Mlynek, J.; Lange, W.

    1981-06-01

    Time-resolved polarization spectroscopy of transient coherent superpositions of atomic substates is extended to the picosecond time scale by using a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser. As a first demonstration, hyperfine beats in the sodium D1 and D2 lines were resolved. The ground-state splitting could be determined with an accuracy of better than 0.001.

  6. Quantum beats in forward scattering: subnanosecond studies with a mode-locked dye laser.

    PubMed

    Harde, H; Burggraf, H; Mlynek, J; Lange, W

    1981-06-01

    Time-resolved polarization spectroscopy of transient coherent superpositions of atomic substates is extended to the picosecond time scale by using a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser. As a first demonstration, hyperfine beats in the sodium D(1) and D(2), lines were resolved. The ground-state splitting could be determined with an accuracy of better than 10(-3).

  7. Swimming speed of larval snail does not correlate with size and ciliary beat frequency.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kit Yu Karen; Jiang, Houshuo; Padilla, Dianna K

    2013-01-01

    Many marine invertebrates have planktonic larvae with cilia used for both propulsion and capturing of food particles. Hence, changes in ciliary activity have implications for larval nutrition and ability to navigate the water column, which in turn affect survival and dispersal. Using high-speed high-resolution microvideography, we examined the relationship between swimming speed, velar arrangements, and ciliary beat frequency of freely swimming veliger larvae of the gastropod Crepidula fornicata over the course of larval development. Average swimming speed was greatest 6 days post hatching, suggesting a reduction in swimming speed towards settlement. At a given age, veliger larvae have highly variable speeds (0.8-4 body lengths s(-1)) that are independent of shell size. Contrary to the hypothesis that an increase in ciliary beat frequency increases work done, and therefore speed, there was no significant correlation between swimming speed and ciliary beat frequency. Instead, there are significant correlations between swimming speed and visible area of the velar lobe, and distance between centroids of velum and larval shell. These observations suggest an alternative hypothesis that, instead of modifying ciliary beat frequency, larval C. fornicata modify swimming through adjustment of velum extension or orientation. The ability to adjust velum position could influence particle capture efficiency and fluid disturbance and help promote survival in the plankton.

  8. The conserved ciliary protein Bug22 controls planar beating of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dan; Cao, Muqing; Oda, Toshiyuki; Pan, Junmin

    2014-01-15

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia can exhibit planar and non-planar beating, and the mechanism controlling these beating patterns is not well understood. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagella beat in approximately the same plane with either an asymmetric ciliary-type or symmetric flagellar-type waveform. Each B-tubule of the number 1, 5 and 6 doublets of the flagellar axoneme possesses a beak-like structure. The number 5 and 6 beak structures are implicated in conversion of ciliary motion into flagellar motion. Here, we show that in a null mutant of Bug22, the asymmetric ciliary waveform is converted into a three-dimensional (non-planar) symmetric flagellar waveform. Bug22 is localized to approximately the proximal half to two-thirds of the flagellum, similar to localization of beak-like structures. However, as shown by immunogold labeling, Bug22 associates with axonemal microtubules without apparent preference for any particular doublets. Interestingly, bug22 mutants lack all beak-like structures. We propose that one function of Bug22 is to regulate the anchoring of the beak-like structures to the doublet microtubules and confine flagellar beating to a plane.

  9. Beating the Odds Summer School: A Dropout Prevention Program for At-Risk Students (1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opuni, Kwame A.; And Others

    The 1990 Beating the Odds (BTO) Summer School was an intensive instructional, counseling, and guidance program sponsored by the Houston (Texas) Independent School District for a group of at-risk students in grades 5-9. The program was designed to provide a supportive and nurturing learning environment in which the academic and sociopsychological…

  10. The Ability to Tap to a Beat Relates to Cognitive, Linguistic, and Perceptual Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Adam T.; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Reading-impaired children have difficulty tapping to a beat. Here we tested whether this relationship between reading ability and synchronized tapping holds in typically-developing adolescents. We also hypothesized that tapping relates to two other abilities. First, since auditory-motor synchronization requires monitoring of the relationship…

  11. Laser-driven Beat-Wave Current Drive in Dense Plasmas with Demo on CTIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Horton, Robert; Hwang, David; Zhu, Ben; Evans, Russell; Hong, Sean; Hsu, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas hanging freely in vacuum in voluminous amount without obstruction to diagnostics will greatly enhance our ability to study the physics of high energy density plasmas in strong magnetic fields. Plasma current can be generated through nonlinear beat-wave process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves into unmagnetized plasma. Beat-wave acceleration of electrons has been demonstrated in a low-density plasma using microwaves [1]. The proposed PLX experimental facility presently under construction at Los Alamos offers the opportunity to test the method at a density level scalable to the study of HED plasmas. For PLX beat-wave experiments, CO2 lasers will be used as pump waves due to their high power and tunability. For a typical PLX density ne=10^17cm-3, two CO2 lasers can be separately tuned to 9P(28) and 10P(20) to match the 2.84THz plasma frequency. The beat-wave demo experiment will be conducted on CTIX. The laser arrangement is being converted to two independent single lasers. Frequency-tuning methods, optics focusing system and diagnostics system will be discussed. The laser measurements and results of synchronization of two lasers will be presented, and scaling to PLX experiments will be given. [1] Rogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., PRL. v68 p3877 (1992).

  12. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Yee, K C; Chou, C K; Guy, A W

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  13. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, K.C.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  14. Beat Keeping in a Sea Lion As Coupled Oscillation: Implications for Comparative Understanding of Human Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Andrew A; Cook, Peter F; Large, Edward W; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Human capacity for entraining movement to external rhythms-i.e., beat keeping-is ubiquitous, but its evolutionary history and neural underpinnings remain a mystery. Recent findings of entrainment to simple and complex rhythms in non-human animals pave the way for a novel comparative approach to assess the origins and mechanisms of rhythmic behavior. The most reliable non-human beat keeper to date is a California sea lion, Ronan, who was trained to match head movements to isochronous repeating stimuli and showed spontaneous generalization of this ability to novel tempos and to the complex rhythms of music. Does Ronan's performance rely on the same neural mechanisms as human rhythmic behavior? In the current study, we presented Ronan with simple rhythmic stimuli at novel tempos. On some trials, we introduced "perturbations," altering either tempo or phase in the middle of a presentation. Ronan quickly adjusted her behavior following all perturbations, recovering her consistent phase and tempo relationships to the stimulus within a few beats. Ronan's performance was consistent with predictions of mathematical models describing coupled oscillation: a model relying solely on phase coupling strongly matched her behavior, and the model was further improved with the addition of period coupling. These findings are the clearest evidence yet for parity in human and non-human beat keeping and support the view that the human ability to perceive and move in time to rhythm may be rooted in broadly conserved neural mechanisms.

  15. Attitudes toward Wife Beating: A Cross-Country Study in Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rani, Manju; Bonu, Sekhar

    2009-01-01

    Using demographic and health surveys conducted between 1998 and 2001 from seven countries (Armenia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Kazakhstan, Nepal, and Turkey), the study found that acceptance of wife beating ranged from 29% in Nepal, to 57% in India (women only), and from 26% in Kazakhstan, to 56% in Turkey (men only). Increasing wealth predicted…

  16. Charge and current beats in T-shaped qubit-detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranko, R.; Kwapiński, T.

    2015-06-01

    The time evolution of a charge qubit coupled electrostatically with different detectors in the forms of single, double and triple quantum dot linear systems in the T-shaped configuration between two reservoirs is theoretically considered. The correspondence between the qubit quantum dot oscillations and the detector current is studied for different values of the inter-dot tunneling amplitudes and the qubit-detector interaction strength. We have found that even for a qubit coupled with a single QD detector, the coherent beat patterns appear in the oscillations of the qubit charge. This effect is more evident for a qubit coupled with double or triple-QD detectors. The beats can be also observed in both the detector current and the detector quantum dot occupations. Moreover, in the presence of beats the qubit oscillations hold longer in time in comparison with the beats-free systems with monotonously decaying oscillations. The dependence of the qubit dynamics on different initial occupations of the detector sites (memory effect) is also analyzed.

  17. BEAT: A Web-Based Boolean Expression Fault-Based Test Case Generation Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, T. Y.; Grant, D. D.; Lau, M. F.; Ng, S. P.; Vasa, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    BEAT is a Web-based system that generates fault-based test cases from Boolean expressions. It is based on the integration of our several fault-based test case selection strategies. The generated test cases are considered to be fault-based, because they are aiming at the detection of particular faults. For example, when the Boolean expression is in…

  18. High-Frequency Binaural Beats Increase Cognitive Flexibility: Evidence from Dual-Task Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Bernhard; Sellaro, Roberta; Fischer, Rico; Borg, Saskia; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cognitive-control processes can be configured to optimize either persistence of information processing (by amplifying competition between decision-making alternatives and top-down biasing of this competition) or flexibility (by dampening competition and biasing). We investigated whether high-frequency binaural beats, an auditory illusion suspected to act as a cognitive enhancer, have an impact on cognitive-control configuration. We hypothesized that binaural beats in the gamma range bias the cognitive-control style toward flexibility, which in turn should increase the crosstalk between tasks in a dual-task paradigm. We replicated earlier findings that the reaction time in the first-performed task is sensitive to the compatibility between the responses in the first and the second task-an indication of crosstalk. As predicted, exposing participants to binaural beats in the gamma range increased this effect as compared to a control condition in which participants were exposed to a continuous tone of 340 Hz. These findings provide converging evidence that the cognitive-control style can be systematically biased by inducing particular internal states; that high-frequency binaural beats bias the control style toward more flexibility; and that different styles are implemented by changing the strength of local competition and top-down bias. PMID:27605922

  19. Measuring Neural Entrainment to Beat and Meter in Infants: Effects of Music Background.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Laura K; Spinelli, Christina; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Trainor, Laurel J

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often engage in musical interactions with their infants. For example, parents across cultures sing lullabies and playsongs to their infants from birth. Behavioral studies indicate that infants not only extract beat information, but also group these beats into metrical hierarchies by as early as 6 months of age. However, it is not known how this is accomplished in the infant brain. An EEG frequency-tagging approach has been used successfully with adults to measure neural entrainment to auditory rhythms. The current study is the first to use this technique with infants in order to investigate how infants' brains encode rhythms. Furthermore, we examine how infant and parent music background is associated with individual differences in rhythm encoding. In Experiment 1, EEG was recorded while 7-month-old infants listened to an ambiguous rhythmic pattern that could be perceived to be in two different meters. In Experiment 2, EEG was recorded while 15-month-old infants listened to a rhythmic pattern with an unambiguous meter. In both age groups, information about music background (parent music training, infant music classes, hours of music listening) was collected. Both age groups showed clear EEG responses frequency-locked to the rhythms, at frequencies corresponding to both beat and meter. For the younger infants (Experiment 1), the amplitudes at duple meter frequencies were selectively enhanced for infants enrolled in music classes compared to those who had not engaged in such classes. For the older infants (Experiment 2), amplitudes at beat and meter frequencies were larger for infants with musically-trained compared to musically-untrained parents. These results suggest that the frequency-tagging method is sensitive to individual differences in beat and meter processing in infancy and could be used to track developmental changes. PMID:27252619

  20. Measuring Neural Entrainment to Beat and Meter in Infants: Effects of Music Background.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Laura K; Spinelli, Christina; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Trainor, Laurel J

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often engage in musical interactions with their infants. For example, parents across cultures sing lullabies and playsongs to their infants from birth. Behavioral studies indicate that infants not only extract beat information, but also group these beats into metrical hierarchies by as early as 6 months of age. However, it is not known how this is accomplished in the infant brain. An EEG frequency-tagging approach has been used successfully with adults to measure neural entrainment to auditory rhythms. The current study is the first to use this technique with infants in order to investigate how infants' brains encode rhythms. Furthermore, we examine how infant and parent music background is associated with individual differences in rhythm encoding. In Experiment 1, EEG was recorded while 7-month-old infants listened to an ambiguous rhythmic pattern that could be perceived to be in two different meters. In Experiment 2, EEG was recorded while 15-month-old infants listened to a rhythmic pattern with an unambiguous meter. In both age groups, information about music background (parent music training, infant music classes, hours of music listening) was collected. Both age groups showed clear EEG responses frequency-locked to the rhythms, at frequencies corresponding to both beat and meter. For the younger infants (Experiment 1), the amplitudes at duple meter frequencies were selectively enhanced for infants enrolled in music classes compared to those who had not engaged in such classes. For the older infants (Experiment 2), amplitudes at beat and meter frequencies were larger for infants with musically-trained compared to musically-untrained parents. These results suggest that the frequency-tagging method is sensitive to individual differences in beat and meter processing in infancy and could be used to track developmental changes.

  1. Measuring Neural Entrainment to Beat and Meter in Infants: Effects of Music Background

    PubMed Central

    Cirelli, Laura K.; Spinelli, Christina; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often engage in musical interactions with their infants. For example, parents across cultures sing lullabies and playsongs to their infants from birth. Behavioral studies indicate that infants not only extract beat information, but also group these beats into metrical hierarchies by as early as 6 months of age. However, it is not known how this is accomplished in the infant brain. An EEG frequency-tagging approach has been used successfully with adults to measure neural entrainment to auditory rhythms. The current study is the first to use this technique with infants in order to investigate how infants' brains encode rhythms. Furthermore, we examine how infant and parent music background is associated with individual differences in rhythm encoding. In Experiment 1, EEG was recorded while 7-month-old infants listened to an ambiguous rhythmic pattern that could be perceived to be in two different meters. In Experiment 2, EEG was recorded while 15-month-old infants listened to a rhythmic pattern with an unambiguous meter. In both age groups, information about music background (parent music training, infant music classes, hours of music listening) was collected. Both age groups showed clear EEG responses frequency-locked to the rhythms, at frequencies corresponding to both beat and meter. For the younger infants (Experiment 1), the amplitudes at duple meter frequencies were selectively enhanced for infants enrolled in music classes compared to those who had not engaged in such classes. For the older infants (Experiment 2), amplitudes at beat and meter frequencies were larger for infants with musically-trained compared to musically-untrained parents. These results suggest that the frequency-tagging method is sensitive to individual differences in beat and meter processing in infancy and could be used to track developmental changes. PMID:27252619

  2. Atorvastatin delays the glucose clearance rate in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Daxin; Wang, Yanli; Gao, Shoucui; Wang, Xiaojing; Sun, Wentao; Bai, Liang; Cheng, Gong; Chu, Yonglie; Zhao, Sihai; Liu, Enqi

    2015-05-01

    The administration of statin might increase the risk of new-onset diabetes in hypercholesterolemic patients based on the recent clinical evidence. However, the causal relationship must be clarified and confirmed in animal experiments. Therefore, we mimicked hypercholesterolemia by feeding rabbits a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) and performed 16 weeks of atorvastatin administration to investigate the effect of statin on glucose metabolism. The intravenous glucose tolerance test showed that plasma glucose levels in the statin-treated rabbits were consistently higher and that there was a slower rate of glucose clearance from the blood than in HCD rabbits. The incremental area under the curve for glucose in the statin-treated rabbits was also significantly larger than in the HCD rabbits. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the intravenous insulin tolerance test. The glucose-lowering ability of exogenous insulin was not impaired by statin treatment in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. The administration of a single dose of statin did not affect glucose metabolism in normal rabbits. The statin also significantly increased the levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase and decreased plasma levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the hypercholesterolemic rabbits, whereas it did not affect plasma levels of glucose and insulin. The current results showed that atorvastatin treatment resulted in a significant delay of glucose clearance in hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and this rabbit model could be suitable for studying the effects of statin on glucose metabolism.

  3. The detection of chronic cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits with magnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Jin, Gui; Qin, Mingxin; Wan, Zibing; Wang, Jinbao; ChaoWang; Guo, Wanyou; Xu, Lin; Ning, Xu; Xu, Jia; Pu, Xianjie; Chen, Mingsheng; Zhao, Hongmei

    2012-12-01

    Chronic cerebral hemorrhage (CCH) in the brain is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as MRI and PET, which are not readily available in low economical resource parts of the world. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of CCH in the brain. The system measures the phase shift between the electromagnetic signals on the two coils. CCH was induced in the brain of rabbits by stereotactic method. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and Electrocardiograph (ECG) of subjects were monitored for 1.5h. Signals were continuously monitored up to t=1.5h at exciting frequency 10.7MHz. From 0.8 to 2.4 ml of autologous blood was injected (each injection quantity of 0.8 ml, the interval time for 30 minutes). The results show significant phase shifts increase as a function of injection volume. ICP and phase shift were directly proportional to the related, while HRV were stable around 200beats*min-1. Our system has high sensitivity that even 0.8 ml can also be detected. In this study, the curves of inductive phase shift are significantly related to ICP. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable, in addition to continuous monitoring, also for early warning in emergency medicine and critical care units.

  4. Stochasticity intrinsic to coupled-clock mechanisms underlies beat-to-beat variability of spontaneous action potential firing in sinoatrial node pacemaker cells.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Sirenko, Syevda; Okamoto, Yosuke; Guiriba, Toni-Rose; Ziman, Bruce D; Morrell, Christopher H; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the spontaneous action potential (AP) of isolated sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) is regulated by a system of stochastic mechanisms embodied within two clocks: ryanodine receptors of the "Ca(2+) clock" within the sarcoplasmic reticulum, spontaneously activate during diastole and discharge local Ca(2+) releases (LCRs) beneath the cell surface membrane; clock crosstalk occurs as LCRs activate an inward Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger current (INCX), which together with If and decay of K(+) channels prompts the "M clock," the ensemble of sarcolemmal-electrogenic molecules, to generate APs. Prolongation of the average LCR period accompanies prolongation of the average AP beating interval (BI). Moreover, the prolongation of the average AP BI accompanies increased AP BI variability. We hypothesized that both the average AP BI and AP BI variability are dependent upon stochasticity of clock mechanisms reported by the variability of LCR period. We perturbed the coupled-clock system by directly inhibiting the M clock by ivabradine (IVA) or the Ca(2+) clock by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). When either clock is perturbed by IVA (3, 10 and 30 μM), which has no direct effect on Ca(2+) cycling, or CPA (0.5 and 5 μM), which has no direct effect on the M clock ion channels, the clock system failed to achieve the basal AP BI and both AP BI and AP BI variability increased. The changes in average LCR period and its variability in response to perturbations of the coupled-clock system were correlated with changes in AP beating interval and AP beating interval variability. We conclude that the stochasticity within the coupled-clock system affects and is affected by the AP BI firing rate and rhythm via modulation of the effectiveness of clock coupling. PMID:25257916

  5. Stochasticity intrinsic to coupled-clock mechanisms underlies beat-to-beat variability of spontaneous action potential firing in sinoatrial node pacemaker cells

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Sirenko, Syevda; Okamoto, Yosuke; Guiriba, Toni-Rose; Ziman, Bruce D.; Morrell, Christopher H.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the spontaneous action potential (AP) of isolated sinoatrial node cells (SANC) is regulated by a system of stochastic mechanisms embodied within two clocks: ryanodine receptors of the “Ca2+ clock” within the sarcoplasmic reticulum, spontaneously activate during diastole and discharge local Ca2+ releases (LCRs) beneath the cell surface membrane; clock crosstalk occurs as LCRs activate an inward Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current (INCX), which together with If and decay of K+ channels prompts the “M clock,” the ensemble of sarcolemmal-electrogenic molecules, to generate APs. Prolongation of the average LCR period accompanies prolongation of the average AP beating interval (BI). Moreover, prolongation of the average AP BI accompanies increased AP BI variability. We hypothesized that both the average AP BI and AP BI variability are dependent upon stochasticity of clock mechanisms reported by the variability of LCR period. We perturbed the coupled-clock system by directly inhibiting the M clock by ivabradine (IVA) or the Ca2+ clock by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). When either clock is perturbed by IVA (3, 10 and 30μM), which has no direct effect on Ca2+ cycling, or CPA ( 0.5 and 5μM), which has no direct effect on the M clock ion channels, the clock system failed to achieve the basal AP BI and both AP BI and AP BI variability increased. The changes in average LCR period and its variability in response to perturbations of the coupled-clock system were correlated with changes in AP beating interval and AP beating interval variability. We conclude that the stochasticity within the coupled-clock system affects and is affected by the AP BI firing rate and rhythm via modulation of the effectiveness of clock coupling. PMID:25257916

  6. A filled duration illusion in music: Effects of metrical subdivision on the perception and production of beat tempo.

    PubMed Central

    Repp, Bruno H.; Bruttomesso, Meijin

    2010-01-01

    This study replicates and extends previous findings suggesting that metrical subdivision slows the perceived beat tempo (Repp, 2008). Here, musically trained participants produced the subdivisions themselves and were found to speed up, thus compensating for the perceived slowing. This was shown in a synchronization-continuation paradigm (Experiment 1) and in a reproduction task (Experiment 2a). Participants also judged the tempo of a subdivided sequence as being slower than that of a preceding simple beat sequence (Experiment 2b). Experiment 2 also included nonmusician participants, with similar results. Tempo measurements of famous pianists’ recordings of two variation movements from Beethoven sonatas revealed a strong tendency to play the first variation (subdivided beats) faster than the theme (mostly simple beats). A similar tendency was found in musicians’ laboratory performances of a simple theme and variations, despite instruc-tions to keep the tempo constant (Experiment 3a). When playing melodic sequences in which only one of three beats per measure was subdivided, musicians tended to play these beats faster and to perceive them as longer than adjacent beats, and they played the whole sequence faster than a sequence without any subdivisions (Experiments 3b and 3c). The results amply demonstrate a filled duration illusion in rhythm perception and music performance: Intervals containing events seem longer than empty intervals and thus must be shortened to be perceived as equal in duration. PMID:20689669

  7. The establishment of regular beating in populations of pacemaker heart cells. A study with tissue-cultured rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, H J; Tsjernina, L; de Bruijne, J

    1983-02-01

    Single isolated neonatal rat heart cells beat slowly (mean beating interval duration in the range of seconds) and irregularly (coefficient of variation greater than 40%). It is shown that slowness and irregularity of beating are intrinsic properties of the cells and are not caused by dissociation damage or lack of conditioning factors in the culture medium. When cell contacts are established either by letting the cultures grow for given amounts of time or by plating cells at increasing densities both interval duration and irregularity decrease. The beating regularity of small groups of interconnected cells (3 to 35 cells) and larger groups (200 to 15000 cells) is comparable. There is no clear cut proportionality between number of interconnected cells and beating regularity. Confluent monolayers beat fast (mean interval duration ranging between 200 and 400 ms and regular (coefficient of variation less than 5%). The hypothesis is discussed that this clock-like behavior of monolayers of heart cells is caused by the interaction of several pacemaker centers which are by themselves less regular and beat more slowly. PMID:6854658

  8. Fourier analysis of wing beat signals: assessing the effects of genetic alterations of flight muscle structure in Diptera.

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, C J; Maughan, D W

    1994-01-01

    A method for determining and analyzing the wing beat frequency in Diptera is presented. This method uses an optical tachometer to measure Diptera wing movement during flight. The resulting signal from the optical measurement is analyzed using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique, and the dominant frequency peak in the Fourier spectrum is selected as the wing beat frequency. Also described is a method for determining quantitatively the degree of variability of the wing beat frequency about the dominant frequency. This method is based on determination of a quantity called the Hindex, which is derived using data from the FFT analysis. Calculation of the H index allows computer-based selection of the most suitable segment of recorded data for determination of the representative wing beat frequency. Experimental data suggest that the H index can also prove useful in examining wing beat frequency variability in Diptera whose flight muscle structure has been genetically altered. Examples from Drosophila indirect flight muscle studies as well as examples of artificial data are presented to illustrate the method. This method fulfills a need for a standardized method for determining wing beat frequencies and examining wing beat frequency variability in insects whose flight muscles have been altered by protein engineering methods. PMID:7811927

  9. Gastric Perforation by Ingested Rabbit Bone Fragment.

    PubMed

    Gambaracci, Giulio; Mecarini, Eleonora; Franceschini, Maria Silvia; Scialpi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The majority of accidentally ingested foreign bodies is excreted from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract without any complications. Sometimes sharp foreign bodies - like chicken and fish bones - can lead to intestinal perforation and may present insidiously with a wide range of symptoms and, consequently, different diagnoses. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman presenting with fever and a 1-month history of vague abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) showed the presence of a hyperdense linear image close to the gastric antrum surrounded by a fluid collection and free peritoneal air. At laparotomy, a 4-cm rabbit bone fragment covered in inflamed tissue was detected next to a gastric wall perforation. Rabbit bone fragment ingestion, even if rarely reported, should not be underestimated as a possible cause of GI tract perforation.

  10. Subcutaneous rhabdomyosarcoma in an old rabbit

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Chun-Ho; NAKAJIMA, Chikage; KIMITSUKI, Kazunori; SHIWA, Nozomi; TSUCHIDA, Yasuhiko; BOONSRIROJ, Hassadin

    2016-01-01

    An 11-year-old castrated male rabbit presented with a subcutaneous mass in the right hind limb. The mass comprised solid and myxoid areas. Solid areas were characterized by a storiform or interlacing pattern of spindle cells, strap cells, multinucleated giant cells and round cells with eccentrically located nuclei, whereas the myxoid areas were composed predominantly of elongated fusiform cells with hyperchromatic nuclei embedded in Alcian Blue-positive myxoid stroma. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells in both areas were positive for desmin and vimentin. Ultrastructurally, the tumor cells in the solid areas had abundant myofilaments with electron dense Z-band structures. Based on these pathological findings, this case was diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma in a rabbit. PMID:27264737

  11. STUDIES ON RABBIT LYMPHOCYTES IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Stewart; Gell, P. G. H.

    1965-01-01

    Lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of newborn rabbits heterozygous for IgG allotypes As4 and As5, or As5 and As6, obtained at an age when only the maternal allotypic determinants are detectable in the serum, may be stimulated in vitro to transform into "blast" cells with antiallotype sera directed against the determinants contolled both by the maternal and by the paternal chromosomes. This result rules out the possibility that allotypic specificity is conferred upon lymphocytes by environmental IgG and suggests that the lymphocytes of newborn rabbits have the potential to synthesize IgG determinants either in the form of intact IgG molecules or constituent polypeptide chains. PMID:4159058

  12. Single Agent Antihypertensive Therapy and Orthostatic Blood Pressure Behaviour in Older Adults Using Beat-to-Beat Measurements: The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Mark; O’Connell, Matthew D. L.; Murphy, Catriona M.; O’Leary, Neil; Little, Mark A.; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired blood pressure (BP) stabilisation after standing, defined using beat-to-beat measurements, has been shown to predict important health outcomes. We aimed to define the relationship between individual classes of antihypertensive agent and BP stabilisation among hypertensive older adults. Methods Cross-sectional analysis from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing, a cohort study of Irish adults aged 50 years and over. Beat-to-beat BP was recorded in participants undergoing an active stand test. We defined grade 1 hypertension according to European Society of Cardiology criteria (systolic BP [SBP] 140-159mmHg ± diastolic BP [DBP] 90-99mmHg). Outcomes were: (i) initial orthostatic hypotension (IOH) (SBP drop ≥40mmHg ± DBP drop ≥20mmHg within 15 seconds [s] of standing accompanied by symptoms); (ii) sustained OH (SBP drop ≥20mmHg ± DBP drop ≥10mmHg from 60 to 110s inclusive); (iii) impaired BP stabilisation (SBP drop ≥20mmHg ± DBP drop ≥10mmHg at any 10s interval during the test). Outcomes were assessed using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Results A total of 536 hypertensive participants were receiving monotherapy with a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system inhibitor (n = 317, 59.1%), beta-blocker (n = 89, 16.6%), calcium channel blocker (n = 89, 16.6%) or diuretic (n = 41, 7.6%). A further 783 untreated participants met criteria for grade 1 hypertension. Beta-blockers were associated with increased odds of initial OH (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.31–3.21) and sustained OH (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.87–6.03) versus untreated grade 1 hypertension. Multivariable adjustment did not attenuate the results. Impaired BP stabilisation was evident at 20s (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.58–4.25) and persisted at 110s (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.64–5.11). No association was found between the other agents and any study outcome. Conclusion Beta-blocker monotherapy was associated with a >2-fold increased odds of initial OH and a >3-fold increased odds of sustained OH

  13. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Swamp rabbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1985-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the swamp rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  14. Lactate metabolism in the fetal rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, M.J.; Brown, D.J.; Dooley, M.

    1986-05-01

    Lactate is frequently overlooked as a potential substrate for the fetal lung, even though it is present in the fetal circulation in concentrations as high as 8 mM. These high concentrations, coupled with the relatively low levels of glucose in the fetal blood, may indicate that lactate can substitute for glucose in pulmonary energy generation and phospholipid synthesis. A series of experiments was therefore undertaken in order to investigate the role of lactate in perinatal pulmonary development. Explants from 30 day gestation fetal rabbit lungs were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer supplemented with 3 mM (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose and varying levels of lactate. In the absence of medium lactate, fetal rabbit lung explants were capable of producing lactate at a rate of approximately 200 etamoles/mg protein/hour. The addition of lactate to the bathing medium immediately reduced net lactate production and above 4 mM, fetal rabbit lung explants became net utilizers of lactate. Media lactate concentrations of 2.5 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM also decreased glucose incorporation into total tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine by approximately 20%, 35%, and 45%, respectively. Glucose incorporation into surfactant phosphatidylcholine was also reduced by approximately 50%, when lactate was present in the incubation medium at a concentration of 5 mM. Additional experiments also revealed that fetal lung lactate dehydrogenase activity was almost twice that found in the adult rabbit lung. These data indicate that lactate may be an important carbon source for the developing lung and could be a significant component in the manufacture of surfactant phosphatidylcholine during late gestation.

  15. TOXEMIA OF PREGNANCY IN THE RABBIT

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Harry S. N.

    1937-01-01

    The clinical manifestations and pathology of a disorder associated with pregnancy in the rabbit have been described. The disorder bears a close analogy to toxemia of pregnancy in man and offers an experimental approach to the problems associated with that condition. The evidence at hand indicates that the disorder is of endogenous origin and arises from a disturbance of functions concerned in reproductive processes. PMID:19870636

  16. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Swamp Rabbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1985-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the swamp rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  17. Novel, single-beat approach for determining both end-systolic pressure–dimension relationship and preload recruitable stroke work

    PubMed Central

    Inuzuka, Ryo; Kass, David A; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective The end-systolic pressure–dimension relationship (ESPDR) and the preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) relationship are load-insensitive measures of contractility, but their clinical application has been limited by the need to record multiple beats over a wide volume range. In this study, we therefore sought to validate a new method to concomitantly determine the ESPDR and the PRSW relationship from a single beat. Methods Pressure–dimension loops were recorded in 14 conscious dogs under various haemodynamic and pathological conditions. Multiple-beat PRSW relationship was determined for its slope (Mw) and for a dimension-axis intercept (Dw). The ESPDR represented by the formula , was estimated from a steady-state, single-beat late-systolic pressure–dimension relationship. The single-beat Mw was determined as an end-systolic pressure when the end-systolic dimension was equal to Dw. Results A strong correlation was observed between multiple-beat and single-beat ESPDRs (zero-stress dimension; r=0.98, p<0.0001). The single-beat estimation of Mw calculated using the wall thickness was strongly correlated with the actual Mw (r=0.93, p<0.0001) and was sensitive enough to detect the change in contractility by dobutamine infusion (p<0.001) and by tachycardia-induced heart failure (p<0.001). Similar results were obtained for Mw estimated without information on wall thickness. Conclusions Mw can be interpreted as an end-systolic pressure when the end-systolic dimension is equal to Dw. By using the non-linear ESPDR, accurate single-beat estimation of the ESPDR and Mw is possible even without information on wall thickness. These results should enhance the applicability of pressure–volume framework to clinical medicine. PMID:27347424

  18. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  19. BIORESORBABLE POLYMERIC MENISCAL PROSTHESIS: STUDY IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Tulio Pereira; de Rezende Duek, Eliana Aparecida; Amatuzzi, Marco Martins; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To induce growth of a neomeniscus into the pores of a prosthesis in order to protect the knee joint cartilage. Methods: 70 knees of 35 New Zealand rabbits were operated. The rabbits were five to seven months old, weighed 2 to 3.8 kilograms, and 22 were male and 13 were female. Each animal underwent medial meniscectomy in both knees during a single operation. A bioabsorbable polymeric meniscal prosthesis composed of 70% polydioxanone and 30% L-lactic acid polymer was implanted in one side. The animals were sacrificed after different postoperative time intervals. The femoral condyles and neomeniscus were subjected to histological analysis. Histograms were used to measure the degradation and absorption of the prosthesis, the growth of meniscal tissue in the prosthesis and the degree of degradation of the femoral condyle joint cartilage. Results: The data obtained showed that tissue growth histologically resembling a normal meniscus occurred, with gradual absorption of the prosthesis, and the percentages of chondrocytes on the control side and prosthesis side. Conclusion: Tissue growth into the prosthesis pores that histologically resembled the normal rabbit meniscus was observed. The joint cartilage of the femoral condyles on the prosthesis side presented greater numbers of chondrocytes in all its layers. PMID:27022549

  20. Nonpathogenicity of antiintestinal antibody in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, B. S.; Rogers, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with intestinal extract prepared from rabbits, guinea pigs, and germ-free rats. The resultant serum antibody response to intestinal antigen was determined by gel precipitation and direct tissue immunofluorescence. Forty-eight hours prior to sacrifice of each immunized animal, a portion of the duodenum, ileum, and colon were traumatized to bring circulating antibody into contact with the tissue. Sections for histology and direct immunofluorescence were taken from the area of trauma, just adjacent to the area, and 10 cm from it. The humoral immune response, the presence of tissue bound immunoglobulin, and tissue histology were compared. The area of trauma in normal and immunized animals showed the same histologic changes. In each animal, tissue just adjacent to the area of trauma and 10 cm from it were histologically identical. The pathologic alterations in the immunized animals were similar to those associated with malabsorption in man. Direct immunofluorescence of the intestinal tissue revealed bound immunoglobulin in histologically normal and abnormal tissue. Precipitating antibody to intestine was present in the serum of rabbits with normal and abnormal histology. Thus, antiintestinal antibody as dected by precipitation in gel and direct tissue immunofluorescence does not appear to be a factor in the pathogenesis of this model of immunologically induced histologic changes in the intestine. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1266943